Science.gov

Sample records for air velocity vector

  1. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  2. VECTUM. Irregular 2D Velocity Vector Field Plotting Package

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, F.R.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1992-05-04

    VECTUM is a NCAR Graphics based package, for generating a plot of an irregular 2D velocity vector field. The program reads an ASCII database of x, y, u, v, data pairs and produces a plot in Computer Graphics Metafile (CGM) format. The program also uses an ASCII parameter file for controlling annotation details such as the plot title, arrowhead style, scale of vectors, windowing, etc. Simple geometry (i.e. lines, arcs, splines) can be defined to be included with the velocity vectors. NCAR Graphics drivers can be used to display the CGM file into PostScript, HPGL, HDF, etc, output.

  3. Estimating 2-D vector velocities using multidimensional spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-08-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wideband estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity. Later, it was shown that this approach could also be used for finding the lateral velocity component by also including a lateral sampling. A single velocity component would then be concentrated along a plane in the 3-D Fourier space, tilted according to the 2 velocity components. This paper presents 2 new velocity estimators for finding both the axial and lateral velocity components. The estimators essentially search for the plane in the 3- D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. Several phantom measurements, for flow-to-depth angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed. Multiple parallel lines were beamformed simultaneously, and 2 different receive apodization schemes were tried. The 2 estimators were then applied to the data. The axial velocity component was estimated with an average standard deviation below 2.8% of the peak velocity, while the average standard deviation of the lateral velocity estimates was between 2.0% and 16.4%. The 2 estimators were also tested on in vivo data from a transverse scan of the common carotid artery, showing the potential of the vector velocity estimation method under in vivo conditions. PMID:18986918

  4. Kinematics and aerodynamics of the velocity vector roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.; Lutze, Frederick H.; Mason, W.

    1993-01-01

    The velocity vector roll is an angular rotation of an aircraft about its instantaneous velocity vector, constrained to be performed at constant angle-of-attack (AOA), no sideslip, and constant velocity. Consideration of the aerodynamic force equations leads to requirements for body-axis yawing and pitching rotations that satisfy these constraints. Here, the body axis rotations, and the constraints, are used in the moment equations to determine the aerodynamic moments required to perform the velocity vector roll. For representative tactical aircraft, the conditions for maximum pitching moment are a function of orientation, occurring at about 90 deg of bank in a level trajectory. Maximum required pitching moment occurs at peak roll rate, and is achieved at AOA above 45 deg. The conditions for maximum rolling moment depend on the value of the roll mode time constant. For a small time constant (fast response) the maximum rolling moment occurs at maximum roll acceleration and zero AOA, largely independent of aircraft orientation; for a large time constant, maximum required rolling moment occurs at maximum roll rate, at maximum AOA, and at 180 deg of bank in level flight. Maximum yawing moment occurs at maximum roll acceleration, maximum AOA, and is largely independent of airplane orientation.

  5. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  6. Two high resolution velocity vector analyzers for cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S.

    1975-01-01

    Two new methods are described to measure velocities and angles of incidence of charged cosmic dust particles with precisions of about 1% and 1 deg, respectively. Both methods employ four one-dimensional position-sensitive detectors in series. The first method utilizes a charge-dividing technique while the second utilizes a time-of-flight technique for determining the position of a particle inside the instrument. The velocity vectors are measured although mechanical interaction between the particle and the instrument is completely avoided. Applications to cosmic dust composition and collection experiments are discussed. The range of radii of measurable particles is from about 0.01 to 100 microns at velocities from 1 to 80 km/sec.

  7. Optimum instantaneous impulsive orbital injection to attain a specified asymptotic velocity vector.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    A nalysis of the necessary conditions of Battin for instantaneous orbital injection, with consideration of the uniqueness of his solution, and of the further problem which arises in the degenerate case when radius vector and asymptotic vector are separated by 180 deg. It is shown that when the angular separation between radius vector and asymptotic velocity vector satisfies theta not equal to 180 deg, there are precisely two insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of the target asymptotic velocity vector, one yielding posigrade, the other retrograde motion. When theta equals to 180 deg, there is a family of insertion-velocity vectors which permit attainment of a specified asymptotic velocity vector with a unique insertion-velocity vector for every arbitrary orientation of a target unit angular momentum vector.

  8. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (VX,VY,VZ)=(10.5,18.5,7.3)+/-0.1 km s-1 not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (VX,VY,VZ)=(9.9,15.6,6.9)+/-0.2 km s-1. The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0+/-1.4, B=-13.1+/-1.2, K=1.1+/-1.8, and C=-2.9+/-1.4 km s-1 kpc-1. The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at ~-20 km s-1 kpc-1. A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z>1 kpc), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z<200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within

  9. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  10. Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas using vector velocity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lange, Theis; Heerwagen, Søren; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Rix, Marianne; Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-11-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow was estimated to be 242 mL/min and 404 mL/min lower than the ultrasound dilution technique estimate, depending on the approach. The standard deviations of the two Vector Flow Imaging approaches were 175.9 mL/min and 164.8 mL/min compared with a standard deviation of 136.9 mL/min using the ultrasound dilution technique. The study supports that Vector Flow Imaging is applicable for volume flow measurements. PMID:25282482

  11. Geometric relations of eye position and velocity vectors during saccades.

    PubMed

    Tweed, D; Vilis, T

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of angular position and velocity vectors of the eye in three human and three monkey subjects showed that: (1) position vectors lie roughly in a single plane, in accordance with Listing's law, between and during saccades; (2) primary position of the eye is often far from the centre of the oculomotor range. (3) saccades have nearly-fixed rotation axes, which tilt out of Listing's plane in a systematic way depending on current eye position. Findings 1 and 3 show that saccadic control signals accurately reflect the properties of three-dimensional rotations, as predicted by a new quaternion model of the saccadic system; models that approximate rotational kinematics using vectorial addition and integration do not predict these findings. PMID:2321357

  12. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  13. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  14. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  15. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  16. Mathematical Relationships Between Two Sets of Laser Anemometer Measurements for Resolving the Total Velocity Vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Albert K.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical relations between the measured velocity fields for the same compressor rotor flow field resolved by two fringe type laser anemometers at different observational locations are developed in this report. The relations allow the two sets of velocity measurements to be combined to produce a total velocity vector field for the compressor rotor. This report presents the derivation of the mathematical relations, beginning with the specification of the coordinate systems and the velocity projections in those coordinate systems. The vector projections are then transformed into a common coordinate system. The transformed vector coordinates are then combined to determine the total velocity vector. A numerical example showing the solution procedure is included.

  17. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  18. Air travel and vector-borne disease movement.

    PubMed

    Tatem, A J; Huang, Z; Das, A; Qi, Q; Roth, J; Qiu, Y

    2012-12-01

    Recent decades have seen substantial expansions in the global air travel network and rapid increases in traffic volumes. The effects of this are well studied in terms of the spread of directly transmitted infections, but the role of air travel in the movement of vector-borne diseases is less well understood. Increasingly however, wider reaching surveillance for vector-borne diseases and our improving abilities to map the distributions of vectors and the diseases they carry, are providing opportunities to better our understanding of the impact of increasing air travel. Here we examine global trends in the continued expansion of air transport and its impact upon epidemiology. Novel malaria and chikungunya examples are presented, detailing how geospatial data in combination with information on air traffic can be used to predict the risks of vector-borne disease importation and establishment. Finally, we describe the development of an online tool, the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk (VBD-Air) tool, which brings together spatial data on air traffic and vector-borne disease distributions to quantify the seasonally changing risks for importation to non-endemic regions. Such a framework provides the first steps towards an ultimate goal of adaptive management based on near real time flight data and vector-borne disease surveillance. PMID:22444826

  19. Simulation of air velocity in a vertical perforated air distributor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngu, T. N. W.; Chu, C. M.; Janaun, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Perforated pipes are utilized to divide a fluid flow into several smaller streams. Uniform flow distribution requirement is of great concern in engineering applications because it has significant influence on the performance of fluidic devices. For industrial applications, it is crucial to provide a uniform velocity distribution through orifices. In this research, flow distribution patterns of a closed-end multiple outlet pipe standing vertically for air delivery in the horizontal direction was simulated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a tool of research for enhancing and understanding design was used as the simulator and the drawing software SolidWorks was used for geometry setup. The main purpose of this work is to establish the influence of size of orifices, intervals between outlets, and the length of tube in order to attain uniformity of exit flows through a multi outlet perforated tube. However, due to the gravitational effect, the compactness of paddy increases gradually from top to bottom of dryer, uniform flow pattern was aimed for top orifices and larger flow for bottom orifices.

  20. Flame Velocities over a Wide Composition Range for Pentane-air, Ethylene-air, and Propyne-air Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Dorothy M; Wong, Edgar, L

    1951-01-01

    Fundamental flame velocities are reported for pentane air, ethylene-air, and propylene-air mixtures for the concentration range 60 to 130 percent of stoichiometric. A form of the Tanford and Pease equation, which includes a small constant velocity term independent of diffusion, will predict the observed changes in flame velocity.

  1. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  2. Navigation Doppler lidar sensor for precision altitude and vector velocity measurements: flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockard, George; Hines, Glenn

    2011-06-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high-resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over various terrains. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  3. Significance of air humidity and air velocity for fungal spore release into the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Pasanen, P.; Jantunen, M. J.; Kalliokoski, P.

    Our previous field studies have shown that the presence of molds in buildings does not necessarily mean elevated airborne spore counts. Therefore, we investigated the release of fungal spores from cultures of Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium sp. and Cladosporium sp. at different air velocities and air humidities. Spores of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were released from conidiophores already at air velocity of 0.5 ms -1, whereas Cladosporium spores required at least a velocity of 1.0 ms -1. Airborne spore counts of A. fumigatus and Penicillium sp. were usually higher in dry than moist air, being minimal at relative humidities (r.h.) above 70%, while the effect of r.h. on the release of Cladosporium sp. was ambivalent. The geometric mean diameter of released spores increased when the r.h. exceeded a certain level which depends on fungal genus. Thus, spores of all three fungi were hygroscopic but the hygroscopicity of various spores appeared at different r.h.-ranges. This study indicates that spore release is controlled by external factors and depends on fungal genus which can be one reason for considerable variation of airborne spore counts in buildings with mold problems.

  4. Modeling the exit velocity of a compressed air cannon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Z. J.; Buresh, T. R.; Madsen, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of compressed air cannons in an undergraduate laboratory provides a way to illustrate the connection between diverse physics concepts, such as conservation of momentum, the work-kinetic energy theorem, gas expansion, air drag, and elementary Newtonian mechanics. However, it is not clear whether the expansion of the gas in the cannon is an adiabatic or an isothermal process. We built an air cannon that utilizes a diaphragm valve to release the pressurized gas and found that neither process accurately predicts the exit velocity of our projectile. We discuss a model based on the flow of air through the valve, which is in much better agreement with our data.

  5. Group velocity locked vector dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yiyang; Li, Lei; Liu, Deming; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Tang, Dingyuan; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-08-01

    Vectorial nature of dissipative solitons (DSs) with high repetition rate is studied for the first time in a normal-dispersion fiber laser. Despite the fact that the formed DSs are strongly chirped and the repetition rate is greater than 100 MHz, polarization locked and polarization rotating group velocity locked vector DSs can be formed under 129.3 MHz fundamental mode-locking and 258.6 MHz harmonic mode-locking of the fiber laser, respectively. The two orthogonally polarized components of these vector DSs possess distinctly different central wavelengths and travel together at the same group velocity in the laser cavity, resulting in a gradual spectral edge and small steps on the optical spectrum, which can be considered as an auxiliary indicator of the group velocity locked vector DSs. Moreover, numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and further reveal the impact of the net cavity birefringence on the properties of the formed vector DSs. PMID:27505834

  6. Analysis of the three-dimensional stellar velocity field using vector spherical functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vityazev, V. V.; Tsvetkov, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    We apply vector spherical functions to problems of stellar kinematics. Using these functions allows all of the systematic components in the stellar velocity field to be revealed without being attached to a specific physical model. Comparison of the theoretical decomposition coefficients of the equations for a particular kinematical model with observational data can provide precise information about whether the model is compatible with the observations and can reveal systematic components that are not described by this model. The formalism of vector spherical functions is particularly well suited for analyzing the present and future (e.g., GAIA) catalogs containing all three velocity vector components: the propermotions in both coordinates and the radial velocity. We show that there are systematic components in the proper motions of Hipparcos stars that cannot be interpreted in terms of the linear Ogorodnikov-Milne model. The same result is also confirmed by an analysis of the radial velocities for these stars.

  7. Angular velocity estimation from measurement vectors of star tracker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-bo; Yang, Jun-cai; Yi, Wen-jun; Wang, Jiong-qi; Yang, Jian-kun; Li, Xiu-jian; Tan, Ji-chun

    2012-06-01

    In most spacecraft, there is a need to know the craft's angular rate. Approaches with least squares and an adaptive Kalman filter are proposed for estimating the angular rate directly from the star tracker measurements. In these approaches, only knowledge of the vector measurements and sampling interval is required. The designed adaptive Kalman filter can filter out noise without information of the dynamic model and inertia dyadic. To verify the proposed estimation approaches, simulations based on the orbit data of the challenging minisatellite payload (CHAMP) satellite and experimental tests with night-sky observation are performed. Both the simulations and experimental testing results have demonstrated that the proposed approach performs well in terms of accuracy, robustness, and performance. PMID:22695598

  8. Unimpeded air velocity profiles of air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that relies on tree structure information to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Unimpeded air jet velocities from an air assisted, five-port sprayer in an open field were measured at four height...

  9. Air velocity distributions from air-assisted five-port sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capability to control both liquid and air flow rates based on tree structures would be one of the advantages of future variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rate functions...

  10. Air velocity distributions from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer for tree applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that implements tree structure to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rat...

  11. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  12. Measurement of vertical velocity using clear-air Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Green, J. L.; Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.; Clark, W. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A new clear air Doppler radar was constructed, called the Flatland radar, in very flat terrain near Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The radar wavelength is 6.02 m. The radar has been measuring vertical velocity every 153 s with a range resolution of 750 m almost continuously since March 2, 1987. The variance of vertical velocity at Flatland is usually quite small, comparable to the variance at radars located near rough terrain during periods of small background wind. The absence of orographic effects over very flat terrain suggests that clear air Doppler radars can be used to study vertical velocities due to other processes, including synoptic scale motions and propagating gravity waves. For example, near rough terrain the shape of frequency spectra changes drastically as the background wind increases. But at Flatland the shape at periods shorter than a few hours changes only slowly, consistent with the changes predicted by Doppler shifting of gravity wave spectra. Thus it appears that the short period fluctuations of vertical velocity at Flatland are alsmost entirely due to the propagating gravity waves.

  13. Fume hood performance: Face velocity variability inconsistent air volume systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volin, C.E.; Joao, R.V.; Gershey, E.L.; Reiman, J.S.; Party, E.

    1998-09-01

    A 3-year survey of 366 bench-type fume hoods in working laboratories in conventional, constant air volume settings showed that face velocities varied greatly from unit to unit and over time. Fume hoods with bypasses performed better than those without; however, even newly fabricated bypass hoods exhibited large variations. These variations were due to several factors; however, face velocities at 100 {+-} 10 ft/min at working sash heights in the range of 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) were attainable. The use of smoke showed poor containment, especially at face velocities below 85 ft/min (0.425 m/s) or above 130 ft/min (0.65 m/s) and when the hoods were obstructed by large items placed on the work surface. Auxiliary/supplemental air created unstable face velocities and poor smoke patterns. The analysis of 3 years of fume hood monitoring showed clearly the need for and importance of a maintenance program where the fume hood lower slots are cleaned and fans, ducts, dampers, and hoods are checked periodically.

  14. Relationship among shock-wave velocity, particle velocity, and adiabatic exponent for dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In H.; Hong, Sang H.; Jhung, Kyu S.; Oh, Ki-Hwan; Yoon, Yo K.

    1991-07-01

    Using the results of the detailed numerical calculations, it is shown that the relationship between the shock-wave velocity U sub s and the particle velocity U sub p for shock-compressed dry air can be represented accurately by the linear relation U sub s = a(P0) + b(P0)U sub p in a wide range of U sub p (U sub p = 2 to 9 ) km/s and initial pressure P0 = 10 to the -6th to 1 atm, where a and b are given by the cubic polynomials of log10P0. Based on the linear U sub s - U sub p relation, an analytic expression has been obtained for the adiabatic exponent gamma as a function of particle velocity.

  15. Comparison of umbo velocity in air- and bone-conduction.

    PubMed

    Röösli, Christof; Chhan, David; Halpin, Christopher; Rosowski, John J

    2012-08-01

    This study investigates the ossicular motion produced by bone-conducted (BC) sound in live human ears. Laser Doppler vibrometry was used to measure air conduction (AC)- and BC-induced umbo velocity (V(U)) in both ears of 10 subjects, 20 ears total. Sound pressure in the ear canal (P(EC)) was measured simultaneously. For air conduction, V(U) at standard hearing threshold level was calculated. For BC, ΔV was defined as the difference between V(U) and the tympanic ring velocity (an estimate of the skull velocity measured in the ear canal). ΔV and P(EC) at BC standard hearing threshold were calculated. ΔV at standard BC threshold was significantly smaller than V(U) at standard AC threshold between 500 Hz and 2000 Hz. Ear canal pressure at BC threshold tended to be smaller than for AC below 3000 Hz (with significant differences at 1000 Hz and 2000 Hz). Our results are most consistent with inertia of the ossicles and cochlear fluid driving BC hearing below 500 Hz, but with other mechanisms playing a significant role at higher frequencies. Sound radiated into the external ear canal might contribute to BC hearing at 3000 Hz and above. PMID:22609771

  16. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  17. Interferometric Estimation of theThree-Dimensional Ice-Flow Velocity Vector Using Ascending and Descending Passes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughin, I.; Kwok, R.; Fahnestock, M.

    1996-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry provides an importatn new tool for determining ice-flow velocity. Interferometric measurements made from a single track direction are sensitive only to a single component of the three-dimensional velocity vector. Observations from along thre different track directions would allow the full velocity vector to be determined. A north/south-looking SAR could provide these observations over large portions of the globe but not over large areas of the polar ice sheets. We develop and demonstrate a technique that allows the full three-component velocity vector to be determined from data acquired along two track directions (ascending and descending) under a surface-parallel flow assumption.

  18. Methane flux across the air-water interface - Air velocity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Bartlett, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Methane loss to the atmosphere from flooded wetlands is influenced by the degree of supersaturation and wind stress at the water surface. Measurements in freshwater ponds in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Florida, demonstrated that for the combined variability of CH4 concentrations in surface water and air velocity over the water surface, CH4 flux varied from 0.01 to 1.22 g/sq m/day. The liquid exchange coefficient for a two-layer model of the gas-liquid interface was calculated as 1.7 cm/h for CH4 at air velocity of zero and as 1.1 + 1.2 v to the 1.96th power cm/h for air velocities from 1.4 to 3.5 m/s and water temperatures of 20 C.

  19. Velocity vector analysis of a juncture flow using a three component laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. F.; Hepner, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    A specialized single-axis, five-beam three-component laser velocimeter was constructed and used to study the flow field in a juncture. The juncture was defined by a blunt leading edged vertical splitter plate and a sharp leading edged horizontal plate. The investigations were conducted in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.1 and a Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10 to the 6th per meter over the model. The three-component velocity flow field in the juncture was measured, Reynolds stresses calculated, and the velocity vector analysis performed.

  20. Velocity Vector Analysis of a Juncture Flow Using a Three-Component Laser Velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Hepner, Timothy E.

    1984-01-01

    A specialized single-axis, five-beam three-component laser velocimeter was constructed and used to study the flow field in a juncture. The juncture was defined by a blunt leading, edged vertical splitter plate and a sharp leading edged horizontal plate. The investigations were conducted in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.1 and a Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10(exp 6) per meter over the model. The three-component velocity flow field in the juncture was measured, Reynolds stresses calculated and the velocity vector analysis performed.

  1. Recovering Photospheric Velocities from Vector Magnetograms by using a Three-Dimensional, Fully Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.; Wu, S. T.; Liu, Yang; Hathaway, D.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a numerical simulation method for recovering the photospheric velocity field from the vector magnetograms. The traditional method is local correlation tracking (LCT) which is based on measuring the relative displacements of features in blocks of pixels between successive white-light images or magnetograms. Within this method, there are a variety of implementations. One of recently developed implementations is induction local correlation tracking (ILCT) as described by Welsch et al. (2004). They employ the normal component of magnetic induction equation as a constraint to assure consistent solutions. Our numerical method uses the fully three-dimensional MHD equations to recover the photospheric velocity field with individual vector magnetograms. We compare our method to the ILCT method using NOAA AR8210 as an example. The differences and similarities are discussed in detail.

  2. Hadoop-Based Distributed System for Online Prediction of Air Pollution Based on Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaemi, Z.; Farnaghi, M.; Alimohammadi, A.

    2015-12-01

    The critical impact of air pollution on human health and environment in one hand and the complexity of pollutant concentration behavior in the other hand lead the scientists to look for advance techniques for monitoring and predicting the urban air quality. Additionally, recent developments in data measurement techniques have led to collection of various types of data about air quality. Such data is extremely voluminous and to be useful it must be processed at high velocity. Due to the complexity of big data analysis especially for dynamic applications, online forecasting of pollutant concentration trends within a reasonable processing time is still an open problem. The purpose of this paper is to present an online forecasting approach based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the air quality one day in advance. In order to overcome the computational requirements for large-scale data analysis, distributed computing based on the Hadoop platform has been employed to leverage the processing power of multiple processing units. The MapReduce programming model is adopted for massive parallel processing in this study. Based on the online algorithm and Hadoop framework, an online forecasting system is designed to predict the air pollution of Tehran for the next 24 hours. The results have been assessed on the basis of Processing Time and Efficiency. Quite accurate predictions of air pollutant indicator levels within an acceptable processing time prove that the presented approach is very suitable to tackle large scale air pollution prediction problems.

  3. Real-time GPU implementation of transverse oscillation vector velocity flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Kjær, Carsten Straso; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-03-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work, Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner's built-in processing, it enables new opportunities for prototyping novel algorithms, optimizing processing parameters, and accelerating the path from development lab to clinic.

  4. Pointing-Vector and Velocity Based Frequency Predicts for Deep-Space Uplink Array Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, P.; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Jamnejad, V.

    2008-01-01

    Uplink array technology is currently being developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to provide greater range and data throughput for future NASA missions, including manned missions to Mars and exploratory missions to the outer planets, the Kuiper belt, and beyond. Here we describe a novel technique for generating the frequency predicts that are used to compensate for relative Doppler, derived from interpolated earth position and spacecraft ephemerides. The method described here guarantees velocity and range estimates that are consistent with each other, hence one can always be recovered from the other. Experimental results have recently proven that these frequency predicts are accurate enough to maintain the phase of a three element array at the EPOXI spacecraft for three hours. Previous methods derive frequency predicts directly from interpolated relative velocities. However, these velocities were found to be inconsistent with the corresponding spacecraft range, meaning that range could not always be recovered accurately from the velocity predicts, and vice versa. Nevertheless, velocity-based predicts are also capable of maintaining uplink array phase calibration for extended periods, as demonstrated with the EPOXI spacecraft, however with these predicts important range and phase information may be lost. A comparison of the steering-vector method with velocity-based techniques for generating precise frequency predicts specifically for uplink array applications is provided in the following sections.

  5. ‘Snap-shot’ velocity vector mapping using echo-planar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Alexander B.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Newling, Benedict; Mantle, Mick D.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2010-06-01

    A 'snap-shot' ultra-fast MRI velocimetry technique based upon the echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence is presented. The new technique is an extension of the GERVAIS pulse sequence previously developed by Sederman et al. (2004) and is capable of acquiring both reference and velocity encoded phase maps following a single excitation for generation of three-component velocity vectors in under 125 ms. This approach allows velocity images of systems with a dynamic, non-periodic geometry to be obtained by MRI. The technique proved to be accurate within 5% error by comparison with Poiseuille flow in a pipe and for the transverse plane flow field in a Couette cell. It was further applied to obtain the velocity field around an impeller in a stirred vessel; an unsteady yet periodic system which otherwise could only be studied by triggered acquisitions. Good agreement was evident between the present technique and triggered conventional velocity encoded pulse sequences. Finally, new experimental data attainable only by the new sequence is demonstrated as the flow field within a mobile droplet of oil is captured as it rises through a column of water. The technique promises to be highly useful in velocimetric measurements of dynamic, non-periodic systems, and in particular for the characterisation of multiphase flow systems.

  6. Underwater patch near-field acoustical holography based on particle velocity and vector hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, DeSen; Li, SiChun; Sun, Yu; Mo, ShiQi; Shi, ShengGuo

    2012-11-01

    One-step patch near-field acoustical holography (PNAH) is a powerful tool for identifying noise sources from the partially known sound pressure field. The acoustical property to be reconstructed on the surface of interest is related to the partially measured pressure on the hologram surface in terms of sampling and bandlimiting matrices, which cost more in computation. A one-step procedure based on measuring of the normal component of the particle velocity is described, including the mathematical formulation. The numerical simulation shows that one-step PNAH based on particle velocity can obtain more accurately reconstructed results and it is also less sensitive to noise than the method based on pressure. These findings are confirmed by an underwater near-field acoustical holography experiment conducted with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results have illustrated the high performance of one-step PNAH based on particle velocity in the reconstruction of sound field and the advantages of a vector hydrophone array in an underwater near-field measurement.

  7. The epoch state navigation filter. [for maximum likelihood estimates of position and velocity vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battin, R. H.; Croopnick, S. R.; Edwards, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The formulation of a recursive maximum likelihood navigation system employing reference position and velocity vectors as state variables is presented. Convenient forms of the required variational equations of motion are developed together with an explicit form of the associated state transition matrix needed to refer measurement data from the measurement time to the epoch time. Computational advantages accrue from this design in that the usual forward extrapolation of the covariance matrix of estimation errors can be avoided without incurring unacceptable system errors. Simulation data for earth orbiting satellites are provided to substantiate this assertion.

  8. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  9. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    PubMed Central

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  10. Force, Velocity, and Work: The Effects of Different Contexts on Students' Understanding of Vector Concepts Using Isomorphic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test…

  11. Cosmological nonlinear density and velocity power spectra including nonlinear vector and tensor modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Jeong, Donghui; Noh, Hyerim

    2016-04-01

    We present the leading order nonlinear density and velocity power spectra in the complete form; previous studies have omitted the vector- and tensor-type perturbations simultaneously excited by the scalar-type perturbation in nonlinear order. These additional contributions are comparable to the scalar-type purely relativistic perturbations, and thus negligible in the current paradigm of concordance cosmology: concerning density and velocity perturbations of the pressureless matter in perturbation regime well inside of matter-dominated epoch, we show that pure Einstein's gravity contributions appearing from the third order are entirely negligible (five orders of magnitude smaller than the Newtonian contributions) in all scales. We thus prove that Newtonian perturbation theory is quite reliable in calculating the amplitude of matter fluctuations even in the precision era of cosmology. Therefore, the only relativistic effect relevant for interpreting observational data must be the projection effects that occurs when mapping galaxies onto the observed coordinate.

  12. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  13. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  14. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  15. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  16. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  17. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-03-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  18. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  19. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  20. Surface Vector Velocity Estimates and Gulf Stream Observations From the UMass Dual Beam Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkovic, D.; Toporkov, J. V.; Sletten, M. A.; Farquharson, G.; Frasier, S. J.; Marmorino, G. O.; Judd, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Dual Beam Interferometer (DBI) developed by University of Massachusetts (UMass) consists of two C-band along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radars (ATI-SAR). The beams of this airborne system are squinted 20 degrees forward and aft of broadside allowing surface vector velocity estimation in a single aircraft pass. The instrument has been deployed several times over the period of last two years off coastal areas of Florida on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) WP-3D plane in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During 2002-2003 the instrument has undergone a series of tests and engineering flights with the August 2003 data producing the first interferogram. March 2004 flights were mainly focused on the western boundary of the Gulf Stream off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Simultaneous imagery of the sea-surface temperature field were obtained using NRL's Infrared (IR) camera, which was mounted in belly of the aircraft. Multiple passes over the Gulf Stream were made under a range of environmental conditions and viewing geometries relative to the Gulf Stream current and the wind. Additional flights were made over the barrier islands west of Ft. Meyers, Florida at times of near maximum ebb tidal flow. This paper will present initial estimates of the surface vector velocities for each area. The Gulf Stream velocity estimates show a current maximum of 1.5 m/s across the edge of the Stream which is consistent with estimates of the current from IR imagery using feature tracking. Estimates of the flow between the barrier islands are of the order of 1.5 to 2 m/s, which agrees well with the predicted tidal flow.

  1. Multifractal Analysis of Velocity Vector Fields and a Continuous In-Scale Cascade Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitton, G.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-04-01

    the order of 1.5 for all three components. Given we have only the horizontal wind components over a grid for the Germany dataset the comparable probability distributions of horizontal and vertical velocity increments shows the field is isotropic. The Germany dataset allows us to compare the spatial velocity increments with that of the temporal. We briefly mentioned above that the winds in Corsica were subject to vertical forcing effects over large scales. This means the velocity field scaled as 11/5 i.e. Bolgiano-Obukhov instead of Kolmogorov's. To test this we were required to invoke Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis since the data was a one point measurement. Having vertical and horizontal velocity increments means we can further justify the claims of an 11/5 scaling law for vertical shears of the velocity and test the validity of the Taylor's hypothesis. We used the results to first simulate the velocity components using continuous in-scale cascades and then discuss the reconstruction of the full vector fields.

  2. Web-based GIS: the vector-borne disease airline importation risk (VBD-AIR) tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past century, the size and complexity of the air travel network has increased dramatically. Nowadays, there are 29.6 million scheduled flights per year and around 2.7 billion passengers are transported annually. The rapid expansion of the network increasingly connects regions of endemic vector-borne disease with the rest of the world, resulting in challenges to health systems worldwide in terms of vector-borne pathogen importation and disease vector invasion events. Here we describe the development of a user-friendly Web-based GIS tool: the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk Tool (VBD-AIR), to help better define the roles of airports and airlines in the transmission and spread of vector-borne diseases. Methods Spatial datasets on modeled global disease and vector distributions, as well as climatic and air network traffic data were assembled. These were combined to derive relative risk metrics via air travel for imported infections, imported vectors and onward transmission, and incorporated into a three-tier server architecture in a Model-View-Controller framework with distributed GIS components. A user-friendly web-portal was built that enables dynamic querying of the spatial databases to provide relevant information. Results The VBD-AIR tool constructed enables the user to explore the interrelationships among modeled global distributions of vector-borne infectious diseases (malaria. dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya) and international air service routes to quantify seasonally changing risks of vector and vector-borne disease importation and spread by air travel, forming an evidence base to help plan mitigation strategies. The VBD-AIR tool is available at http://www.vbd-air.com. Conclusions VBD-AIR supports a data flow that generates analytical results from disparate but complementary datasets into an organized cartographical presentation on a web map for the assessment of vector-borne disease movements on the air travel network

  3. Rear wheel torque vectoring model predictive control with velocity regulation for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siampis, Efstathios; Velenis, Efstathios; Longo, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose a constrained optimal control architecture for combined velocity, yaw and sideslip regulation for stabilisation of the vehicle near the limit of lateral acceleration using the rear axle electric torque vectoring configuration of an electric vehicle. A nonlinear vehicle and tyre model are used to find reference steady-state cornering conditions and design two model predictive control (MPC) strategies of different levels of fidelity: one that uses a linearised version of the full vehicle model with the rear wheels' torques as the input, and another one that neglects the wheel dynamics and uses the rear wheels' slips as the input instead. After analysing the relative trade-offs between performance and computational effort, we compare the two MPC strategies against each other and against an unconstrained optimal control strategy in Simulink and Carsim environment.

  4. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  6. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  7. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  10. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  12. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  13. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s‑1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  14. On the Divergence of the Velocity Vector in Real-Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical study was performed addressing the degree of applicability or inapplicability, to a real gas, of the occasionally stated belief that for an ideal gas, incompressibility is synonymous with a zero or very low Mach number. The measure of compressibility used in this study is the magnitude of the divergence of the flow velocity vector [V(bar) (raised dot) u (where u is the flow velocity)]. The study involves a mathematical derivation that begins with the governing equations of flow and involves consideration of equations of state, thermodynamics, and fluxes of heat, mass, and the affected molecular species. The derivation leads to an equation for the volume integral of (V(bar) (raised dot) u)(sup 2) that indicates contributions of several thermodynamic, hydrodynamic, and species-flux effects to compressibility and reveals differences between real and ideal gases. An analysis of the equation leads to the conclusion that for a real gas, incompressibility is not synonymous with zero or very small Mach number. Therefore, it is further concluded, the contributions to compressibility revealed by the derived equation should be taken into account in simulations of real-gas flows.

  15. The kinematical analysis of proper motions and radial velocities of stars by means of the vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, A.; Vityazev, . V.; , Kumkova I. I.

    2009-09-01

    The paper describes the application of the 3-D vector spherical harmonics (henceforth VSH) to the investigation of stellar kinematics. The VSH technique is suitable for present and future catalogues which contain all three components of velocity vector: proper motions and radial velocities. In general, the VSH allows to detect all the systematic components in the stellar velocity field and does not depend on any model. If some physical model is used, the VSH not only determines the parameters of the model, but detects the systematic components which are beyond the model. The application of the VSH to the Hipparcos data complimented with radial velocities discovers the systematic components which are beyond the linear Ogorodnikov-milne model.

  16. Assessment of longitudinal systolic ventricular dysfunction and asynchrony using velocity vector imaging in children with a single right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Rong; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Chen, Li-Jun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhong, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of ventricular dysfunction and asynchrony is very important in predicting the outcome for children with a single right ventricle. However, the assessment is inaccurate and subjective because of the unusual ventricular shape. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of velocity vector imaging for assessing longitudinal systolic ventricular dysfunction and intraventricular asynchrony in children with a single right ventricle. The study enrolled 36 children with a single right ventricle and 36 age-matched children with a normal heart. Peak systolic velocity, peak displacement, strain, strain rate, time to peak systolic velocity, and time to peak systolic strain were measured via velocity vector imaging using the Siemens Sequoia C512 echocardiography instrument. The maximum positive rate of ventricular pressure change (Max [dp/dt]) was obtained by cardiac catheterization for all the children with a single right ventricle. In the children with a single right ventricle, the maximal temporal differences and the standard deviations of the times to peak systolic velocity and peak systolic strain were higher (P < 0.01) than in the children with a normal heart. Moreover, the strain and strain rate values were significantly lower in all six segments (P < 0.05). The strain rate of the basal segment adjacent to the rudimentary chamber correlated best with Max (dp/dt) (r = 0.86; P < 0.01). Longitudinal systolic dysfunction and intraventricular asynchrony could be assessed accurately using velocity vector imaging in children with a single right ventricle. PMID:24771060

  17. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  18. Velocity and pressure distribution behind bodies in an air current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1924-01-01

    The following experiments on the air flow behind bodies were made for the purpose of assisting in the explanation of the phenomena connected with air resistance. The first two series of experiments dealt with the phenomena behind a cylinder. The third series of experiments was carried out behind a streamlined strut.

  19. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hansen, Peter Møller; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-08-01

    A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo. This paper investigates errors from estimating volumetric flow using a commercial ultrasound scanner and the common assumptions made in the literature. The theoretical model shows, e.g. that volume flow is underestimated by 15%, when the scan plane is off-axis with the vessel center by 28% of the vessel radius. The error sources were also studied in vivo under realistic clinical conditions, and the theoretical results were applied for correcting the volume flow errors. Twenty dialysis patients with arteriovenous fistulas were scanned to obtain vector flow maps of fistulas. When fitting an ellipsis to cross-sectional scans of the fistulas, the major axis was on average 10.2mm, which is 8.6% larger than the minor axis. The ultrasound beam was on average 1.5mm from the vessel center, corresponding to 28% of the semi-major axis in an average fistula. Estimating volume flow with an elliptical, rather than circular, vessel area and correcting the ultrasound beam for being off-axis, gave a significant (p=0.008) reduction in error from 31.2% to 24.3%. The error is relative to the Ultrasound Dilution Technique, which is considered the gold standard for volume flow estimation for dialysis patients. The study shows the importance of correcting for volume flow errors, which are often made in clinical practice. PMID:27164045

  20. Changes in left atrial deformation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Evaluation by vector velocity imaging

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Hassan, Hesham; Nazmy, Ahmed; Faheem, Naglaa; Saadan, Haythem; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Objectives: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) represents a generalized myopathic process affecting both ventricular and atrial myocardium. We assessed the global and regional left atrial (LA) function and its relation to left ventricular (LV) mechanics and clinical status in patients with HCM using Vector Velocity Imaging (VVI). Methods: VVI of the LA and LV was acquired from apical four- and two-chamber views of 108 HCM patients (age 40 ± 19years, 56.5% men) and 33 healthy subjects, all had normal LV systolic function. The LA subendocardium was traced to obtain atrial volumes, ejection fraction, velocities, and strain (ϵ)/strain rate (SR) measurements. Results: Left atrial reservoir (ϵsys,SRsys) and conduit (early diastolic SRe) function were significantly reduced in HCM compared to controls (P < .0001). Left atrial deformation directly correlated to LVϵsys, SRsys and negatively correlated to age, NYHA class, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), LA volume index and severity of mitral regurge (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characterist was constructed to explore the cutoff value of LA deformation in differentiation of LA dysfunction; ϵsys < 40% was 75% sensitive, 50% specific, SRsys < 1.7s− 1 was 70% sensitive, 61% specific, SRe> − 1.8s− 1 was 81% sensitive and 30% specific, SRa> − 1.5s− 1 was 73% sensitive and 40% specific. By multivariate analysis global LVϵsys and LV septal thickness are independent predictors for LAϵsys, while end systolic diameter is the only independent predictor for SRsys, P < .001. Conclusion: Left atrial reservoir and conduit function as measured by VVI were significantly impaired while contractile function was preserved among HCM patients. Left atrial deformation was greatly influenced by LV mechanics and correlated to severity of phenotype. PMID:24688992

  1. Assessment of air velocity sensors for use in animal produciton facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ventilation is an integral part of thermal environment control in animal production facilities. Accurately measuring the air velocity distribution within these facilities is cumbersome using the traverse method and a distributed velocity measurement system would reduce the time necessary to perform ...

  2. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  3. Dynamical equations for the vector potential and the velocity potential in incompressible irrotational Euler flows: a refined Bernoulli theorem.

    PubMed

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We consider incompressible Euler flows in terms of the stream function in two dimensions and the vector potential in three dimensions. We pay special attention to the case with singular distributions of the vorticity, e.g., point vortices in two dimensions. An explicit equation governing the velocity potentials is derived in two steps. (i) Starting from the equation for the stream function [Ohkitani, Nonlinearity 21, T255 (2009)NONLE50951-771510.1088/0951-7715/21/12/T02], which is valid for smooth flows as well, we derive an equation for the complex velocity potential. (ii) Taking a real part of this equation, we find a dynamical equation for the velocity potential, which may be regarded as a refinement of Bernoulli theorem. In three-dimensional incompressible flows, we first derive dynamical equations for the vector potentials which are valid for smooth fields and then recast them in hypercomplex form. The equation for the velocity potential is identified as its real part and is valid, for example, flows with vortex layers. As an application, the Kelvin-Helmholtz problem has been worked out on the basis the current formalism. A connection to the Navier-Stokes regularity problem is addressed as a physical application of the equations for the vector potentials for smooth fields. PMID:26465559

  4. Rise velocity of an air bubble in porous media: Theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz; Cihan, Abdullah; Drazenovic, Mirna

    2004-04-01

    The rise velocity of injected air phase from the injection point toward the vadose zone is a critical factor in in-situ air sparging operations. It has been reported in the literature that air injected into saturated gravel rises as discrete air bubbles in bubbly flow of air phase. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative technique to estimate the rise velocity of an air bubble in coarse porous media. The model is based on the macroscopic balance equation for forces acting on a bubble rising in a porous medium. The governing equation incorporates inertial force, added mass force, buoyant force, surface tension and drag force that results from the momentum transfer between the phases. The momentum transfer terms take into account the viscous as well as the kinetic energy losses at high velocities. Analytical solutions are obtained for steady, quasi-steady, and accelerated bubble rise velocities. Results show that air bubbles moving up through a porous medium equilibrate after a short travel time and very short distances of rise. It is determined that the terminal rise velocity of a single air bubble in an otherwise water saturated porous medium cannot exceed 18.5 cm/s. The theoretical model results compared favorably with the experimental data reported in the literature. A dimensional analysis conducted to study the effect of individual forces indicates that the buoyant force is largely balanced by the drag force for bubbles with an equivalent radius of 0.2-0.5 cm. With increasing bubble radius, the dimensionless number representing the effect of the surface tension force decreases rapidly. Since the total inertial force is quite small, the accelerated bubble rise velocity can be approximated by the terminal velocity.

  5. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.140 Section 84.140 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air...

  6. Performance of a combined three-hole conductivity probe for void fraction and velocity measurement in air-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, João Eduardo; Pereira, Nuno H. C.; Matos, Jorge; Frizell, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a three-hole pressure probe with back-flushing combined with a conductivity probe, used for measuring simultaneously the magnitude and direction of the velocity vector in complex air-water flows, is described in this paper. The air-water flows envisaged in the current work are typically those occurring around the rotors of impulse hydraulic turbines (like the Pelton and Cross-Flow turbines), where the flow direction is not known prior to the data acquisition. The calibration of both the conductivity and three-hole pressure components of the combined probe in a rig built for the purpose, where the probe was placed in a position similar to that adopted for the flow measurements, will be reported. After concluding the calibration procedure, the probe was utilized in the outside region of a Cross-Flow turbine rotor. The experimental results obtained in the present study illustrate the satisfactory performance of the combined probe, and are encouraging toward its use for characterizing the velocity field of other complex air-water flows.

  7. Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Intraventricular Flow Velocity Vector Visualization Based on the Continuity Equation and Measurements of Vorticity and Wall Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itatani, Keiichi; Okada, Takashi; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Tanaka, Tomohiko; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami; Takenaka, Katsu

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to estimate velocity vector fields inside the cardiac ventricle by echocardiography and to evaluate several flow dynamical parameters to assess the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. A two-dimensional continuity equation was applied to color Doppler data using speckle tracking data as boundary conditions, and the velocity component perpendicular to the echo beam line was obtained. We determined the optimal smoothing method of the color Doppler data, and the 8-pixel standard deviation of the Gaussian filter provided vorticity without nonphysiological stripe shape noise. We also determined the weight function at the bilateral boundaries given by the speckle tracking data of the ventricle or vascular wall motion, and the weight function linear to the distance from the boundary provided accurate flow velocities not only inside the vortex flow but also around near-wall regions on the basis of the results of the validation of a digital phantom of a pipe flow model.

  9. Effect of compressibility on the rise velocity of an air bubble in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a theoretical model to analyze the effect of air compressibility on air bubble migration in porous media. The model is obtained by combining the Newton's second law of motion and the ideal gas law assuming that the air phase in the bubble behaves as an ideal gas. Numerical and analytical solutions are presented for various cases of interest. The model results compare favorably with both experimental data and analytical solutions reported in the literature obtained for an incompressible air bubble migration. The results show that travel velocity of a compressible air bubble in porous media strongly depends on the depth of air phase injection. A bubble released from greater depths travels with a slower velocity than a bubble with an equal volume injected at shallower depths. As an air bubble rises up, it expands with decreasing bubble pressure with depth. The volume of a bubble injected at a 1-m depth increases 10% as the bubble reaches the water table. However, bubble volume increases almost twofold when it reaches to the surface from a depth of 10 m. The vertical rise velocity of a compressible bubble approaches that of an incompressible one regardless of the injection depth and volume as it reaches the water table. The compressible bubble velocity does not exceed 18.8 cm/s regardless of the injection depth and bubble volume. The results demonstrate that the effect of air compressibility on the motion of a bubble cannot be neglected except when the air is injected at very shallow depths.

  10. Definition of water droplets "strain cycles" in air times dependences on their sizes and movement velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Roman; Zhdanova, Alena; Zabelin, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Strizhak, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Experimental investigation of water droplets deformation regularities during their motion in the air by the action of gravitational forces was executed. Characteristic sizes of droplets were varied in the range from 3 mm to 6 mm. Velocities of droplets movement attained to 5 m/s. The cross-correlation system of video registration was used. More than ten characteristic "strain cycles" of droplets during the 1 m distance motion by them thought the air were established. Characteristic of droplets forms, periods, dimensions and ranges were determined for all "strain cycles". "Strain cycle" times dependences on velocity and sizes of droplets were established.

  11. Analysis of vector wind change with respect to time for Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    1978-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the temporal variability of wind vectors at 1 km altitude intervals from 0 to 27 km altitude taken from a 10-year data sample of twice-daily rawinsode wind measurements over Vandenberg Air Force Base, California is presented.

  12. Force, velocity, and work: The effects of different contexts on students' understanding of vector concepts using isomorphic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-12-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test with no physical context, and a test with mechanics contexts. For this study, we administered the items twice to students who were finishing an introductory mechanics course at a large private university in Mexico. The first time, we administered the two 12-item tests to 608 students. In the second, we only tested the items for which we had found differences in students' performances that were difficult to explain, and in this case, we asked them to show their reasoning in written form. In the first administration, we detected no significant difference between the medians obtained in the tests; however, we did identify significant differences in some of the items. For each item we analyze the type of difference found between the tests in the selection of the correct answer, the most common error on each of the tests, and the differences in the selection of incorrect answers. We also investigate the causes of the different context effects. Based on these analyses, we establish specific recommendations for the instruction of vector concepts in an introductory mechanics course. In the Supplemental Material we include both tests for other researchers studying vector learning, and for physics teachers who teach this material.

  13. Fiber-Based Doppler Lidar for Vector Velocity and Altitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar capable of providing accurate velocity and altitude data has been developed and demonstrated for future NASA missions to the solar system bodies requiring precision navigation and controlled soft landing.

  14. Proposal for the measuring molecular velocity vector with single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for simultaneous measurements of more than one flow velocity component using coherent Raman spectroscopy are proposed. It is demonstrated that using a kilowatt broad-band probe pulse (3-30 GHz) along with a megawatt narrow-band pump pulse (approximately 100 MHz), coherent Raman signal resulting from a single laser pulse is sufficient to produce a high-resolution Raman spectrum for a velocity measurement.

  15. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.1139 Section 84.1139 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. 84.202 Section 84.202 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical...

  17. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  18. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  19. The M31 Velocity Vector. II. Radial Orbit toward the Milky Way and Implied Local Group Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, Roeland P.; Fardal, Mark; Besla, Gurtina; Beaton, Rachael L.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Brown, Tom; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We determine the velocity vector of M31 with respect to the Milky Way and use this to constrain the mass of the Local Group, based on Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements of three fields presented in Paper I. We construct N-body models for M31 to correct the measurements for the contributions from stellar motions internal to M31. This yields an unbiased estimate for the M31 center-of-mass motion. We also estimate the center-of-mass motion independently, using the kinematics of satellite galaxies of M31 and the Local Group, following previous work but with an expanded satellite sample. All estimates are mutually consistent, and imply a weighted average M31 heliocentric transverse velocity of (vW , vN ) = (- 125.2 ± 30.8, -73.8 ± 28.4) km s-1. We correct for the reflex motion of the Sun using the most recent insights into the solar motion within the Milky Way, which imply a larger azimuthal velocity than previously believed. This implies a radial velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way of V rad, M31 = -109.3 ± 4.4 km s-1, and a tangential velocity of V tan, M31 = 17.0 km s-1, with a 1σ confidence region of V tan, M31 <= 34.3 km s-1. Hence, the velocity vector of M31 is statistically consistent with a radial (head-on collision) orbit toward the Milky Way. We revise prior estimates for the Local Group timing mass, including corrections for cosmic bias and scatter, and obtain M LG ≡ M MW, vir + M M31, vir = (4.93 ± 1.63) × 1012 M ⊙. Summing known estimates for the individual masses of M31 and the Milky Way obtained from other dynamical methods yields smaller uncertainties. Bayesian combination of the different estimates demonstrates that the timing argument has too much (cosmic) scatter to help much in reducing uncertainties on the Local Group mass, but its inclusion does tend to increase other estimates by ~10%. We derive a final estimate for the Local Group mass from literature and new considerations of M LG = (3.17 ± 0.57) × 1012 M

  20. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. II. RADIAL ORBIT TOWARD THE MILKY WAY AND IMPLIED LOCAL GROUP MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Brown, Tom; Fardal, Mark; Besla, Gurtina; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We determine the velocity vector of M31 with respect to the Milky Way and use this to constrain the mass of the Local Group, based on Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements of three fields presented in Paper I. We construct N-body models for M31 to correct the measurements for the contributions from stellar motions internal to M31. This yields an unbiased estimate for the M31 center-of-mass motion. We also estimate the center-of-mass motion independently, using the kinematics of satellite galaxies of M31 and the Local Group, following previous work but with an expanded satellite sample. All estimates are mutually consistent, and imply a weighted average M31 heliocentric transverse velocity of (v{sub W} , v{sub N} ) = (- 125.2 {+-} 30.8, -73.8 {+-} 28.4) km s{sup -1}. We correct for the reflex motion of the Sun using the most recent insights into the solar motion within the Milky Way, which imply a larger azimuthal velocity than previously believed. This implies a radial velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way of V{sub rad,M31} = -109.3 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}, and a tangential velocity of V{sub tan,M31} = 17.0 km s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} confidence region of V{sub tan,M31} {<=} 34.3 km s{sup -1}. Hence, the velocity vector of M31 is statistically consistent with a radial (head-on collision) orbit toward the Milky Way. We revise prior estimates for the Local Group timing mass, including corrections for cosmic bias and scatter, and obtain M{sub LG} {identical_to} M{sub MW,vir} + M{sub M31,vir} = (4.93 {+-} 1.63) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. Summing known estimates for the individual masses of M31 and the Milky Way obtained from other dynamical methods yields smaller uncertainties. Bayesian combination of the different estimates demonstrates that the timing argument has too much (cosmic) scatter to help much in reducing uncertainties on the Local Group mass, but its inclusion does tend to increase other estimates by {approx}10%. We

  1. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect

  2. Optimization and investigation of the effect of velocity distribution of air curtains on the performance of food refrigerated display cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XueHong; Chang, ZhiJuan; Ma, QiuYang; Lu, YanLi; Yin, XueMei

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on improving the performance of the vertical open refrigerated display cabinets (VORDC) by optimizing the structure of deflector, which is affected by inlet velocity and velocity distribution of air curtains. The results show that the temperature of products located at the front and at the rear reduces as the increases of inlet velocity of air curtains. The increase of the inlet velocity of air curtains can strengthen the disturbance inside the VORDC, and also decrease the temperature of products inside the VORDC; the increase of the outer velocity of air curtain will exacerbate the disturbance outside the VORDC and decrease air curtain's performance. The present study can provide a theoretical foundation for the design of VORDC.

  3. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  4. Measurements of Flat-Flame Velocities of Diethyl Ether in Air

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Fiona; Metcalfe, Wayne K.; Dirrenberger, Patricia; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Curran, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents new adiabatic laminar burning velocities of diethyl ether in air, measured on a flat-flame burner using the heat flux method. The experimental pressure was 1 atm and temperatures of the fresh gas mixture ranged from 298 to 398 K. Flame velocities were recorded at equivalence ratios from 0.55 to 1.60, for which stabilization of the flame was possible. The maximum laminar burning velocity was found at an equivalence ratio of 1.10 or 1.15 at different temperatures. These results are compared with experimental and computational data reported in the literature. The data reported in this study deviate significantly from previous experimental results and are well-predicted by a previously reported chemical kinetic mechanism. PMID:23710107

  5. Effects of shape, size, and air velocity on entry loss factors of suction hoods.

    PubMed

    McLoone, H E; Guffey, S E; Curran, J P

    1993-03-01

    This study further elucidated the effects of air velocity, aspect ratio (face length to face width), and area ratio (face area to duct area) on entry loss factors of suction hoods. A full scale ventilation system was utilized to determine the entry loss factor attributable to each of 20 square and rectangular hoods with a 90 degrees included angle. Static and velocity pressures were measured using Pitot tubes connected by tubing to piezo-resistive pressure transducers and inclined tube manometers. The entry loss factor, Fh, is the ratio of hood total pressure loss to mean velocity pressure. Values of Fh determined in this study ranged from 0.17-1.85. The values of Fh were a hyperbolic function of area ratio with a region rapidly increasing change for area ratios less than 5. For area ratios greater than 5, the values of Fh approached an asymptote of 0.17. Among hoods with a given area ratio (e.g., 2.5, 5.1, or 10.2), values of Fh were independent of aspect ratio. To a limited extent, Fh values decreased as mean air velocities increased from 319-1770 m/min (1046-5807 feet/min). PMID:8447256

  6. An Empirical Model of Human Aspiration in Low-Velocity Air Using CFD Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée; Anderson, Kimberly R.

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed to investigate the aspiration efficiency of the human head in low velocities to examine whether the current inhaled particulate mass (IPM) sampling criterion matches the aspiration efficiency of an inhaling human in airflows common to worker exposures. Data from both mouth and nose inhalation, averaged to assess omnidirectional aspiration efficiencies, were compiled and used to generate a unifying model to relate particle size to aspiration efficiency of the human head. Multiple linear regression was used to generate an empirical model to estimate human aspiration efficiency and included particle size as well as breathing and freestream velocities as dependent variables. A new set of simulated mouth and nose breathing aspiration efficiencies was generated and used to test the fit of empirical models. Further, empirical relationships between test conditions and CFD estimates of aspiration were compared to experimental data from mannequin studies, including both calm-air and ultra-low velocity experiments. While a linear relationship between particle size and aspiration is reported in calm air studies, the CFD simulations identified a more reasonable fit using the square of particle aerodynamic diameter, which better addressed the shape of the efficiency curve’s decline toward zero for large particles. The ultimate goal of this work was to develop an empirical model that incorporates real-world variations in critical factors associated with particle aspiration to inform low-velocity modifications to the inhalable particle sampling criterion. PMID:25438035

  7. Impact of air velocity on the development and detection of small coal fires

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, M.R.

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted experiments in the intermediate-scale fire tunnel to assess the influence of air velocity on the gas production and smoke characteristics during smoldering and flaming combustion of Pittsburgh seam coal and its impact on the detection of the combustion products. On-line determinations of mass and number smoke particles, light transmission, and various gas concentrations were made. From these experimental values, generation rates, heat-release rates, production constants, particle sizes, obscuration rates, and optical densities were calculated. Ventilation has a direct effect on fire detection and development. The results indicate, that in general, increased air velocity lengthened the onset of smoke and flaming ignition, increased the fire intensity, but decreased the gas and smoke concentrations. Increased air velocity also lengthened the response times of all the fire sensors tested. Rapid and reliable detector response at this most crucial stage of fire development can increase the possibility that appropriate miner response (fire suppression tactics or evacuation) can be completed before toxic smoke spreads throughout the mine. 9 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  9. Particle velocity gradient based acoustic mode beamforming for short linear vector sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Gur, Berke

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a subtractive beamforming algorithm for short linear arrays of two-dimensional particle velocity sensors is described. The proposed method extracts the highly directional acoustic modes from the spatial gradients of the particle velocity field measured at closely spaced sensors along the array. The number of sensors in the array limits the highest order of modes that can be extracted. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations indicate that the acoustic mode beamformer achieves directivity comparable to the maximum directivity that can be obtained with differential microphone arrays of equivalent aperture. When compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamformers for pressure sensor arrays, the proposed method achieves comparable directivity with 70%-85% shorter apertures. Moreover, the proposed method has additional capabilities such as high front-back (port-starboard) discrimination, frequency and steer direction independent response, and robustness to correlated ambient noise. Small inter-sensor spacing that results in very compact apertures makes the proposed beamformer suitable for space constrained applications such as hearing aids and short towed arrays for autonomous underwater platforms. PMID:24907810

  10. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  11. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  12. A support vector regression-firefly algorithm-based model for limiting velocity prediction in sewer pipes.

    PubMed

    Ebtehaj, Isa; Bonakdari, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Sediment transport without deposition is an essential consideration in the optimum design of sewer pipes. In this study, a novel method based on a combination of support vector regression (SVR) and the firefly algorithm (FFA) is proposed to predict the minimum velocity required to avoid sediment settling in pipe channels, which is expressed as the densimetric Froude number (Fr). The efficiency of support vector machine (SVM) models depends on the suitable selection of SVM parameters. In this particular study, FFA is used by determining these SVM parameters. The actual effective parameters on Fr calculation are generally identified by employing dimensional analysis. The different dimensionless variables along with the models are introduced. The best performance is attributed to the model that employs the sediment volumetric concentration (C(V)), ratio of relative median diameter of particles to hydraulic radius (d/R), dimensionless particle number (D(gr)) and overall sediment friction factor (λ(s)) parameters to estimate Fr. The performance of the SVR-FFA model is compared with genetic programming, artificial neural network and existing regression-based equations. The results indicate the superior performance of SVR-FFA (mean absolute percentage error = 2.123%; root mean square error =0.116) compared with other methods. PMID:27148727

  13. Effects of light intensity light quality and air velocity on temperature in plant reproductive organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Excess temperature increase in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmata could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions in closed plant growth facilities There is a possibility that the aberration was caused by an excess increase in temperatures of reproductive organs in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space The fundamental study was conducted to know the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by light intensity light quality and air velocity on the earth and to estimate the excess temperature increase in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities in space Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 10 r C The temperatures in flowers at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under the lights from red LEDs white LEDs blue LEDs fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps increased by 1 4 1 7 1 9 6 0 and 25 3 r C respectively for rice and by 2 8 3 4 4 1 7 8 and 43 4 r C respectively for strawberry The flower temperatures increased with increasing PPFD levels The temperatures in petals anthers and stigmas of strawberry at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under incandescent lamps increased by 32 7 29 0 and 26 6 r C respectively at 0 1 m s -1 air velocity and by 20 6 18 5 and 15 9 r C respectively at 0 8 m s -1 air velocity The temperatures of reproductive organs decreased with increasing

  14. Correlation between myocardial dysfunction and perfusion impairment in diabetic rats with velocity vector imaging and myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhangrui; Zhang, Haibin; Su, Haili; Zhu, Ting; Zhu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether myocardial systolic dysfunction and perfusion impairment occur in diabetic rats, and to assess their relationship using velocity vector imaging (VVI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Forty-six rats were randomly divided into either control or the diabetes mellitus (DM) groups. DM was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Twelve weeks later, 39 survival rats underwent VVI and MCE in short-axis view at the middle level of the left ventricle, both at rest and after dipyridamole stress. VVI-derived contractile parameters included peak systolic velocity (Vs ), circumferential strain (εc ), strain rate (SRc ), and their reserves. MCE-derived perfusion parameters consisted of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). At rest, SRc in the DM group was significantly lower than in the control group, Vs , εc , and MBF did not differ significantly between groups. After dipyridamole stress, all VVI parameters and their reserves in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, MBF and MFR were substantially lower than those in the control group, too. Meanwhile, significant correlations between VVI parameter reserves and MFR were observed in the DM group. Both myocardial systolic function and perfusion were impaired in DM rats. Decreased MFR could be an important contributor to the reduction in myocardial contractile reserve. PMID:22931118

  15. DIRDOP: a directivity approach to determining the seismic rupture velocity vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Borges, José F.

    2010-07-01

    Directivity effects are a characteristic of seismic source finiteness and are a consequence of the rupture spread in preferential directions. These effects are manifested through seismic spectral deviations as a function of the observation location. The directivity by Doppler effect method permits estimation of the directions and rupture velocities, beginning from the duration of common pulses, which are identified in waveforms or relative source time functions. The general model of directivity that supports the method presented here is a Doppler analysis based on a kinematic source model of rupture (Haskell, Bull Seismol Soc Am 54:1811-1841, 1964) and a structural medium with spherical symmetry. To evaluate its performance, we subjected the method to a series of tests with synthetic data obtained from ten typical seismic ruptures. The experimental conditions studied correspond with scenarios of simple and complex, unilaterally and bilaterally extended ruptures with different mechanisms and datasets with different levels of azimuthal coverage. The obtained results generally agree with the expected values. We also present four real case studies, applying the method to the following earthquakes: Arequipa, Peru ( M w = 8.4, June 23, 2001); Denali, AK, USA ( M w = 7.8; November 3, 2002); Zemmouri-Boumerdes, Algeria ( M w = 6.8, May 21, 2003); and Sumatra, Indonesia ( M w = 9.3, December 26, 2004). The results obtained from the dataset of the four earthquakes agreed, in general, with the values presented by other authors using different methods and data.

  16. Burning Velocity Measurements in Aluminum-Air Suspensions using Bunsen Type Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John; Goroshin, Samuel; Kolbe, Massimiliano

    2001-01-01

    Laminar burning velocity (sometimes also referred in literature as fundamental or normal flame propagation speed) is probably the most important combustion characteristic of the premixed combustible mixture. The majority of experimental data on burning velocities in gaseous mixtures was obtained with the help of the Bunsen conical flame. The Bunsen cone method was found to be sufficiently accurate for gaseous mixtures with burning velocities higher than 10-15 cm/s at normal pressure. Hans Cassel was the first to demonstrate that suspensions of micron-size solid fuel particles in a gaseous oxidizer can also form self-sustained Bunsen flames. He was able to stabilize Bunsen flames in a number of suspensions of different nonvolatile solid fuels (aluminum, carbon, and boron). Using the Bunsen cone method he estimated burning velocities in the premixed aluminum-air mixtures (particle size less than 10 microns) to be in the range of 30-40 cm/s. Cassel also found, that the burning velocity in dust clouds is a function of the burner diameter. In our recent work, we have used the Bunsen cone method to investigate dependence of burning velocity on dust concentration in fuel-rich aluminum dust clouds. Burning velocities in stoichiometric and fuel-rich aluminum dust suspensions with average particle sizes of about 5 microns were found to be in the range of 20-25 cm/s and largely independent on dust concentration. These results raise the question to what degree burning velocities derived from Bunsen flame specifically and other dust flame configurations in general, are indeed fundamental characteristics of the mixture and to what degree are they apparatus dependent. Dust flames in comparison to gas combustion, are thicker, may be influenced by radiation heat transfer in the flame front, respond differently to heat losses, and are fundamentally influenced by the particular flow configuration due to the particles inertia. Since characteristic spatial scales of dust flames are

  17. The influence of bubble plumes on air-seawater gas transfer velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, W. E.; Karle, L. M.; Higgins, B. J.; Farley, P. J.; Monahan, E. C.; Leifer, I. S.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory results have demonstrated that bubble plumes are a very efficient air-water gas transfer mechanism. Because breaking waves generate bubble plumes, it could be possible to correlate the air-sea gas transport velocity kL with whitecap coverage. This correlation would then allow kL to be predicted from measurements of apparent microwave brightness temperature through the increase in sea surface microwave emissivity associated with breaking waves. In order to develop this remote-sensing-based method for predicting air-sea gas fluxes, a whitecap simulation tank was used to measure evasive and invasive kL values for air-seawater transfer of carbon dioxide, oxygen, helium, sulfur hexafluoride, and dimethyl sulfide at cleaned and surfactant-influenced water surfaces. An empirical model has been developed that can predict kL from bubble plume coverage, diffusivity, and solubility. The observed dependence of kL on molecular diffusivity and aqueous-phase solubility agrees with the predictions of modeling studies of bubble-driven air-water gas transfer. It has also been shown that soluble surfactants can decrease kL even in the presence of breaking waves.

  18. Velocity and temperature field characteristics of water and air during natural convection heating in cans.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Ferruh; Tutar, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Presence of headspace during canning is required since an adequate amount allows forming vacuum during the process. Sealing technology may not totally eliminate all entrapped gases, and headspace might affect heat transfer. Not much attention has been given to solve this problem in computational studies, and cans, for example, were mostly assumed to be fully filled with product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine velocity and temperature evolution of water and air in cans during heating to evaluate the relevance of headspace in the transport mechanism. For this purpose, canned water samples with a certain headspace were used, and required governing continuity, energy, and momentum equations were solved using a finite volume approach coupled with a volume of fluid element model. Simulation results correlated well with experimental results validating faster heating effects of headspace rather than insulation effects as reported in the literature. The organized velocity motions along the air-water interface were also shown. Practical Application: Canning is a universal and economic method for processing of food products, and presence of adequate headspace is required to form vacuum during sealing of the cans. Since sealing technology may not totally eliminate the entrapped gases, mainly air, headspace might affect heating rates in cans. This study demonstrated the increased heating rates in the presence of headspace in contrast with some studies in the literature. By applying the effect of headspace, required processing time for thermally processed foods can be reduced leading to more rapid processes and lower energy consumptions. PMID:21535663

  19. Compact High-Velocity Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Plasma Jet in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annette, Meiners; Michael, Leck; Bernd, Abel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet at high streaming velocity operating with ambient air is highlighted. In the present technological approach, the employment of air poses a significant challenge. The high oxygen concentration in air results in a reduced concentration of reactive species in combination with a short species lifetime. The plasma jet assembly presented here contains a special dielectric barrier with a high secondary emission coefficient. In this way, the electron density and in turn the density of reactive species is increased. In addition, the plasma jet assembly is equipped with a short electrode. This leads to a higher voltage across the discharge gap and in turn to an increased density of reactive plasma species. The plasma jet is formed within and emitted by a small conical nozzle. A high-speed gas flow with gas velocity of 340 m/s was achieved at the end of the nozzle. In the jet the concentration of toxic and unwanted neutral plasma species like O3 or NOx is significantly reduced because of the shorter residence time within the plasma. The range of short-lived active plasma species is in turn considerably enhanced. The jet efficiency and action range measured through the oxidation of a test surface were determined by measuring the increase of surface tension of a polypropylene substrate via contact angle measurements after plasma treatment. Numerical modeling of the plasma plume indicates that oxygen atoms are in fact the main active species in the plasma plume.

  20. A reconciliation of empirical and mechanistic models of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Woolf, David K.; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Shutler, Jamie D.

    2016-01-01

    Models of the air-sea transfer velocity of gases may be either empirical or mechanistic. Extrapolations of empirical models to an unmeasured gas or to another water temperature can be erroneous if the basis of that extrapolation is flawed. This issue is readily demonstrated for the most well-known empirical gas transfer velocity models where the influence of bubble-mediated transfer, which can vary between gases, is not explicitly accounted for. Mechanistic models are hindered by an incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms of air-sea gas transfer. We describe a hybrid model that incorporates a simple mechanistic view—strictly enforcing a distinction between direct and bubble-mediated transfer—but also uses parameterizations based on data from eddy flux measurements of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) to calibrate the model together with dual tracer results to evaluate the model. This model underpins simple algorithms that can be easily applied within schemes to calculate local, regional, or global air-sea fluxes of gases.

  1. Thermal stability effects on the structure of the velocity field above an air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are described for turbulent flows above laboratory water waves, under various wind and thermal stratification conditions. Experimental results, when presented in the framework of Monin-Obukhov (1954) similarity theory, support local scaling based on evaluation of stratification effects at the same nondimensional distance from the mean water surface. Such scaling allows an extension of application of the above theory to the outer region of the boundary layer. Throughout the fully turbulent region, ratios of mean velocity gradients, eddy viscosities, and turbulence intensities under nonneutral and neutral conditions correlate well with the parameter z/Lambda (Lambda being a local Obukhov length and z the vertical coordinate of the mean air flow) and show good agreement with established field correlations. The influence of stratification on the wind-stress coefficient can be estimated from an empirical relationship in terms of its value under neutral conditions and a bulk Richardson number.

  2. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  3. Dynamics of air temperature, velocity and ammonia emissions in enclosed and conventional pig housing systems.

    PubMed

    Song, J I; Park, K-H; Jeon, J H; Choi, H L; Barroga, A J

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the dynamics of air temperature and velocity under two different ventilation and housing systems during summer and winter in Korea. The NH3 concentration of both housing systems was also investigated in relation to the pig's growth. The ventilation systems used were; negative pressure type for the enclosed pig house (EPH) and natural airflow for the conventional pig house (CPH). Against a highly fluctuating outdoor temperature, the EPH was able to maintain a stable temperature at 24.8 to 29.1°C during summer and 17.9 to 23.1°C during winter whilst the CPH had a wider temperature variance during summer at 24.7 to 32.3°C. However, the temperature fluctuation of the CPH during winter was almost the same with that of EPH at 14.5 to 18.2°C. The NH3 levels in the CPH ranged from 9.31 to 16.9 mg/L during summer and 5.1 to 19.7 mg/L during winter whilst that of the EPH pig house was 7.9 to 16.1 mg/L and 3.7 to 9.6 mg/L during summer and winter, respectively. These values were less than the critical ammonia level for pigs with the EPH maintaining a lower level than the CPH in both winter and summer. The air velocity at pig nose level in the EPH during summer was 0.23 m/s, enough to provide comfort because of the unique design of the inlet feature. However, no air movement was observed in almost all the lower portions of the CPH during winter because of the absence of an inlet feature. There was a significant improvement in weight gain and feed intake of pigs reared in the EPH compared to the CPH (p<0.05). These findings proved that despite the difference in the housing systems, a stable indoor temperature was necessary to minimize the impact of an avoidable and highly fluctuating outdoor temperature. The EPH consistently maintained an effective indoor airspeed irrespective of season; however the CPH had defective and stagnant air at pig nose level during winter. Characteristics of airflow direction and pattern were consistent relative to

  4. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  5. Atmospheric corrosion effects of HNO 3—Influence of concentration and air velocity on laboratory-exposed copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samie, Farid; Tidblad, Johan; Kucera, Vladimir; Leygraf, Christofer

    A recently developed experimental set-up has been used to explore the atmospheric corrosion effects of nitric acid (HNO 3) on copper, in particular the influence of concentration and air velocity. Characterization and quantification of the corrosion products on exposed samples were performed with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrocscopy, ion chromatography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-balance and microscopy. At low air velocity (0.03 cm s -1) HNO 3 deposition and weight gain of copper increased linearly with concentration up to 400 μg m -3 or 156 ppb. The influence of air velocity on corrosion of copper was tested within the range of 0.03-35.4 cm s -1. Although the air velocity in this study was significantly lower than typical outdoor wind values, a high HNO 3 concentration of the air velocity of 35.4 cm s -1 resulted in a relatively high deposition velocity ( Vd) of 0.9 cm s -1 on the metal surface and 1.2 cm s -1 on an ideal absorbent, which would imply a limiting deposition velocity on the copper surface ( Vd,surf) of 3.6 cm s -1. Results obtained in this study emphasize the importance for future research on the corrosion effects of HNO 3 on materials as very little has so far been done in this field.

  6. Air-Induced Drag Reduction at High Reynolds Numbers: Velocity and Void Fraction Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbing, Brian; Mäkiharju, Simo; Wiggins, Andrew; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven

    2010-11-01

    The injection of air into a turbulent boundary layer forming over a flat plate can reduce the skin friction. With sufficient volumetric fluxes an air layer can separate the solid surface from the flowing liquid, which can produce drag reduction in excess of 80%. Several large scale experiments have been conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9 m long flat plate model investigating bubble drag reduction (BDR), air layer drag reduction (ALDR) and the transition between BDR and ALDR. The most recent experiment acquired phase velocities and void fraction profiles at three downstream locations (3.6, 5.9 and 10.6 m downstream from the model leading edge) for a single flow speed (˜6.4 m/s). The profiles were acquired with a combination of electrode point probes, time-of-flight sensors, Pitot tubes and an LDV system. Additional diagnostics included skin-friction sensors and flow-field image visualization. During this experiment the inlet flow was perturbed with vortex generators immediately upstream of the injection location to assess the robustness of the air layer. From these, and prior measurements, computational models can be refined to help assess the viability of ALDR for full-scale ship applications.

  7. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  8. Validation of a CFD Model by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611

  9. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  10. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  11. A gyro-gauge independent minimal guiding-center reduction by Lie-transforming the velocity vector field

    SciTech Connect

    Guillebon, L. de; Vittot, M.

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a gyro-gauge independent formulation of a simplified guiding-center reduction, which removes the fast time-scale from particle dynamics by Lie-transforming the velocity vector field. This is close to Krylov-Bogoliubov method of averaging the equations of motion, although more geometric. At leading order, the Lie-transform consists in the generator of Larmor gyration, which can be explicitly inverted, while working with gauge-independent coordinates and operators, by using the physical gyro-angle as a (constrained) coordinate. This brings both the change of coordinates and the reduced dynamics of the minimal guiding-center reduction order by order in a Larmor radius expansion. The procedure is algorithmic and the reduction is systematically derived up to full second order, in a more straightforward way than when Lie-transforming the phase-space Lagrangian or averaging the equations of motion. The results write up some structures in the guiding-center expansion. Extensions and limitations of the method are considered.

  12. In vitro and in vivo three-dimensional velocity vector measurement by three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Trasischker, Wolfgang; Werkmeister, René M; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Torzicky, Teresa; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2013-11-01

    We developed a three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) system that enables measurement of the velocity vector of moving particles in three-dimensions (3-D). The spatial orientation as well as the magnitude of motion can be determined without prior knowledge of the geometry of motion. The system combines three spectral-domain OCT interferometers whose sample beams are focused at the sample by a common focusing lens at three different angles. This provides three spatially independent velocity components simultaneously from which the velocity vector can be reconstructed. We demonstrate the system in a simple test object (rotating disc), a flow phantom, and for blood flow measurements in the retina of a healthy human subject. Measurements of blood flow at a venous bifurcation achieve a good agreement between in- and outflow and demonstrate the reliability of the method. PMID:24247747

  13. Effect of air velocity on kinetics of thin layer carrot pomace drying.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Sarkar, B C; Sharma, H K

    2011-10-01

    Carrot pomace is a by-product obtained during carrot juice processing. Thin layer carrot pomace drying was performed in a laboratory scale hot air forced convective dryer. The drying experiments were carried out at the air velocity of 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 m/s at air temperatures from 60 to 75 °C. It was observed that whole drying process of carrot pomace took place in a falling rate period except a very short accelerating period at the beginning. Mathematical models were tested to fit drying data of carrot pomace. The best fit model was observed on the basis of R², Chi-square and RMSE values. R² values for all the selected models were above 0.9783. The average values of effective diffusivity ranged from 2.61 × 10(-9) to 3.64 × 10(-9) m²/s. PMID:21954311

  14. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  15. Entrapped air bubbles in piezo-driven inkjet printing: Their effect on the droplet velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Jos; Jeurissen, Roger; Borel, Huub; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Reinten, Hans; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-12-01

    Air bubbles entrapped in the ink channel are a major problem in piezo-driven inkjet printing. They grow by rectified diffusion and eventually counteract the pressure buildup at the nozzle, leading to a breakdown of the jetting process. Experimental results on the droplet velocity udrop as a function of the equilibrium radius R0 of the entrained bubble are presented. Surprisingly, udrop(R0) shows a pronounced maximum around R0=17μm before it sharply drops to zero around R0=19μm. A simple one-dimensional model is introduced to describe this counterintuitive behavior which turns out to be a resonance effect of the entrained bubble.

  16. Calculation of nonequilibrium hydrogen-air reactions with implicit flux vector splitting method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Ho; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods, fully- and loosely-coupled, are developed to incorporate nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry into the fluid dynamic implicit flux vector splitting code (F3D). The new code (F3D/Chem) is validated against other existing codes for two cases: nozzle expansion, and shock-induced combustion around a blunt body. The shock-induced combustion case is compared also with an experimental data. The reaction rate constants are varied in an effort to reproduce the experimental data. The fully- and loosely-coupled methods are found to yield comparable results, but the computation time is shorter using the loosely-coupled method. The present method is found to reproduce results obtained using different existing codes. The experimental data was not reproduced with any selected rate coefficients set.

  17. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  18. Experimental investigation of the influence of the liquid drop size and velocity on the parameters of drop deformation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, R. S.; Vysokomornaya, O. V.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2015-08-01

    The deformation of water, kerosene, and ethyl alcohol drops traveling a distance of up to 1 m in air with different velocities (1-5 m/s) is recorded by high-speed photography (the frame of the cross-correlation camera is less than 1 µs). It is shown that the shape of the drops varies cyclically. Several tens of "deformation cycles" are found, which have characteristic times, drop size variation amplitudes, and number of shapes. It is found that the velocity and size of the drops influence the parameters of their deformation cycles. Experiments with the drops are conducted in air at moderate Weber numbers (We < 10).

  19. Temperature and air velocity effects on ethanol emission from corn silage with the characteristics of an exposed silo face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Felipe; Hafner, Sasha D.; Rotz, C. Alan; Mitloehner, Frank M.

    2010-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from agricultural sources are believed to be an important contributor to tropospheric ozone in some locations. Recent research suggests that silage is a major source of VOCs emitted from agriculture, but only limited data exist on silage emissions. Ethanol is the most abundant VOC emitted from corn silage; therefore, ethanol was used as a representative compound to characterize the pattern of emission over time and to quantify the effect of air velocity and temperature on emission rate. Ethanol emission was measured from corn silage samples removed intact from a bunker silo. Emission rate was monitored over 12 h for a range in air velocity (0.05, 0.5, and 5 m s -1) and temperature (5, 20, and 35 °C) using a wind tunnel system. Ethanol flux ranged from 0.47 to 210 g m -2 h -1 and 12 h cumulative emission ranged from 8.5 to 260 g m -2. Ethanol flux was highly dependent on exposure time, declining rapidly over the first hour and then continuing to decline more slowly over the duration of the 12 h trials. The 12 h cumulative emission increased by a factor of three with a 30 °C increase in temperature and by a factor of nine with a 100-fold increase in air velocity. Effects of air velocity, temperature, and air-filled porosity were generally consistent with a conceptual model of VOC emission from silage. Exposure duration, temperature, and air velocity should be taken into consideration when measuring emission rates of VOCs from silage, so emission rate data obtained from studies that utilize low air flow methods are not likely representative of field conditions.

  20. Determination of the Wind-Velocity Vector Above the Ocean Surface Using the Image Spectrum of a Polarimetric Radar with Synthesized Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, M. A.; Kanevsky, M. B.; Balandina, G. N.; Karaev, V. Yu.; Stoffelen, A.; Verkhoev, A.

    2015-09-01

    We propose a new method for determining the wind-velocity vector above the ocean surface using the data of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar. The preliminary calculations show that for wind waves, the location of the maximum in the radar image is unambiguously related to the wind velocity, whereas the wind direction is retrieved with an uncertainty of 180°, which is related to the central symmetry of the image spectrum. To eliminate the ambiguity when determining the wind direction, a criterion based on the information on the sign of the coefficient of correlation among the complex signals on the co- and cross polarizations is used. It is shown that using the polarimetric radar, it is theoretically possible to obtain information on both the wind velocity and direction without exact radar calibration.

  1. INVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF RELATIVE HUMIDITY, AIR VELOCITY, AND AMPLIFICATION ON THE EMISSION RATES OF FUNGAL SPORES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the impact of relative humidity (RH), air velocity, and surface growth on the emission rates of fungal spores from the surface of contaminated material. Although the results show a complex interaction of factors, we have determined, for this limited data set,...

  2. Space-based retrievals of air-sea gas transfer velocities using altimeters: Calibration for dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddijn-Murphy, Lonneke; Woolf, David K.; Marandino, Christa

    2012-08-01

    This study is the first to directly correlate gas transfer velocity, measured at sea using the eddy-correlation (EC) technique, and satellite altimeter backscattering. During eight research cruises in different parts of the world, gas transfer velocity of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was measured. The sample times and locations were compared with overpass times and locations of remote sensing satellites carrying Ku-band altimeters: ERS-1, ERS-2, TOPEX, POSEIDON, GEOSAT Follow-On, JASON-1, JASON-2 and ENVISAT. The result was 179 pairs of gas transfer velocity measurements and backscattering coefficients. An inter-calibration of the different altimeters significantly reduced data scatter. The inter-calibrated data was best fitted to a quadratic relation between the inverse of the backscattering coefficients and the gas transfer velocity measurements. A gas transfer parameterization based on backscattering, corresponding with sea surface roughness, might be expected to perform better than wind speed-based parameterizations. Our results, however, did not show improvement compared to direct correlation of shipboard wind speeds. The relationship of gas transfer velocity to satellite-derived backscatter, or wind speed, is useful to provide retrieval algorithms. Gas transfer velocity (cm/hr), corrected to a Schmidt number of 660, is proportional to wind speed (m/s). The measured gas transfer velocity is controlled by both the individual water-side and air-side gas transfer velocities. We calculated the latter using a numerical scheme, to derive water-side gas transfer velocity. DMS is sufficiently soluble to neglect bubble-mediated gas transfer, thus, the DMS transfer velocities could be applied to estimate water-side gas transfer velocities through the unbroken surface of any other gas.

  3. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malík, M. Primas, J.; Kopecký, V.; Svoboda, M.

    2014-01-15

    This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect). A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  4. Spatial Characteristics of Water Spray Formed by Two Impinging Jets at Several Jet Velocities in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Hampton H.; Heidmann, Marcus F.

    1960-01-01

    The spatial characteristics of a spray formed by two impinging water jets in quiescent air were studied over a range of nominal jet velocities of 30 to 74 feet per second. The total included angle between the 0.089-inch jets was 90 deg. The jet velocity, spray velocity, disappearance of the ligaments just before drop formation, mass distribution, and size and position of the largest drops were measured in a circumferential survey around the point of jet impingement. Photographic techniques were used in the evaluations. The distance from the point of jet impingement to ligament breakup into drops was about 4 inches on the spray axis and about 1.3 inches in the radial position +/-90 deg from the axis. The distance tended to increase slightly with increase in jet velocity. The spray velocity varied from about 99 to about 72 percent of the jet velocity for a change in circumferential position from the spray axis to the +/-80 deg positions. The percentages tended to increase slightly with an increase in jet velocity. Fifty percent of the mass was distributed about the spray axis in an included angle of slightly less than 40 deg. The effect of jet velocity was small. The largest observed drops (2260-micron or 0.090-in. diam.) were found on and about the spray axis. The size of the largest drops decreased for an increase in radial angular position, being about 1860 microns (0.074 in.) at the +/-90 deg positions. The largest drop sizes tended to decrease for an increase in jet velocity, although the velocity effect was small. A drop-size distribution analysis indicated a mass mean drop size equal to 54 percent of an extrapolated maximum drop size.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low-Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Mouth-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, T. Renée

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to investigate particle aspiration efficiency in low-moving air typical of occupational settings (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Fluid flow surrounding an inhaling humanoid form and particle trajectories traveling into the mouth were simulated for seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 135° and 180°). Three continuous inhalation velocities (1.81, 4.33, and 12.11 m s−1), representing the mean inhalation velocity associated with sinusoidal at-rest, moderate, and heavy breathing (7.5, 20.8, and 50.3 l min−1, respectively) were simulated. These simulations identified a decrease in aspiration efficiency below the inhalable particulate mass (IPM) criterion of 0.5 for large particles, with no aspiration of particles 100 µm and larger for at-rest breathing and no aspiration of particles 116 µm for moderate breathing, over all freestream velocities and orientations relative to the wind. For particles smaller than 100 µm, orientation-averaged aspiration efficiency exceeded the IPM criterion, with increased aspiration efficiency as freestream velocity decreased. Variability in aspiration efficiencies between velocities was low for small (<22 µm) particles, but increased with increasing particle size over the range of conditions studied. Orientation-averaged simulation estimates of aspiration efficiency agree with the linear form of the proposed linear low-velocity inhalable convention through 100 µm, based on laboratory studies using human mannequins. PMID:23316076

  6. Simulation comparison of a decoupled longitudinal control system and a velocity vector control wheel steering system during landings in wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A simulator comparison of the velocity vector control wheel steering (VCWS) system and a decoupled longitudinal control system is presented. The piloting task was to use the electronic attitude direction indicator (EADI) to capture and maintain a 3 degree glide slope in the presence of wind shear and to complete the landing using the perspective runway included on the EADI. The decoupled control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The decoupled control system improved the pilots' ability to control airspeed and flight path angle during the final stages of an approach made in severe wind shear. The system also improved their ability to complete safe landings. The pilots preferred the decoupled control system in severe winds and, on a pilot rating scale, rated the approach and landing task with the decoupled control system as much as 3 to 4 increments better than use of the VCWS system.

  7. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  8. The US Air Force Aerial Spray Unit: a history of large area disease vector control operations, WWII through Katrina.

    PubMed

    Breidenbaugh, Mark; Haagsma, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The US Air Force has had a long history of aerial applications of pesticides to fulfill a variety of missions, the most important being the protection of troops through the minimization of arthropod vectors capable of disease transmission. Beginning in World War II, aerial application of pesticides by the military has effectively controlled vector and nuisance pest populations in a variety of environments. Currently, the military aerial spray capability resides in the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), which operates and maintains C-130 airplanes capable of a variety of missions, including ultra low volume applications for vector and nuisance pests, as well as higher volume aerial applications of herbicides and oil-spill dispersants. The USAFR aerial spray assets are the only such fixed-wing aerial spray assets within the Department of Defense. In addition to troop protection, the USAFR Aerial Spray Unit has participated in a number of humanitarian/relief missions, most recently in the response to the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which heavily damaged the Gulf Coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. This article provides historical background on the Air Force Aerial Spray Unit and describes the operations in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:20088030

  9. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  10. Influence of current velocity and wind speed on air-water gas exchange in a mangrove estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Coffineau, Nathalie; Hickman, Benjamin; Chow, Nicholas; Koffman, Tobias; Schlosser, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of air-water gas transfer velocities and water residence times is necessary to study the fate of mangrove derived carbon exported into surrounding estuaries and ultimately to determine carbon balances in mangrove ecosystems. For the first time, the 3He/SF6 dual tracer technique, which has been proven to be a powerful tool to determine gas transfer velocities in the ocean, is applied to Shark River, an estuary situated in the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The mean gas transfer velocity was 3.3 ± 0.2 cm h-1 during the experiment, with a water residence time of 16.5 ± 2.0 days. We propose a gas exchange parameterization that takes into account the major sources of turbulence in the estuary (i.e., bottom generated shear and wind stress).

  11. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  12. Impact of air velocity on the development and detection of small coal fires. Report of investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted experiments in the intermediate-scale fire tunnel to assess the influence of air velocity on the gas production and smoke characteristics during smoldering and flaming combustion of Pittsburgh seam coal and its impact on the detection of the combustion products. On-line determinations of mass and number of smoke particles, light transmission, and various gas concentrations were made. From these experimental values, generation rates, heat-release rates, production constants, particle sizes, obscuration rates, and optical densities were calculated. Ventilation has a direct effect on fire detection and development. The results indicate that, in general, increased air velocity lengthened the onset of smoke and flaming ignition, increased the fire intensity, but decreased the gas and smoke concentrations. Increased air velocity also lengthened the response times of all the fire sensors tested. Rapid and reliable detector response at this most crucial state of fire development can increase the possibility that appropriate miner response (fire suppression tactics or evacuation) can be completed before toxic smoke spreads throughout the mine.

  13. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  14. Effect of the borax mass and pre-spray medium temperature on droplet size and velocity vector distributions of intermittently sprayed starchy solutions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-02-01

    Spray coating technology has demonstrated great potential in the slow release fertilizers industry. The better understanding of the key spray parameters benefits both the environment and low cost coating processes. The use of starch based materials to coat the slow release fertilizers is a new development. However, the hydraulic spray jet breakup of the non-Newtonian starchy solutions is a complex phenomenon and very little known. The aim of this research was to study the axial and radial distributions of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and velocity vectors in pulsing spray patterns of native and modified tapioca starch solutions. To meet the objective, high speed imaging and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques were employed to characterize the four compositions of the starch-urea-borax complex namely S0, S1, S2 and S3. The unheated solutions exhibited very high viscosities ranging from 2035 to 3030 cP. No jet breakup was seen at any stage of the nozzle operation at an injection pressure of 1-5 bar. However, at 80 °C temperature and 5 bar pressure, the viscosity was reduced to 455 to 638 cP and dense spray patterns emerged from the nozzle obscuring the PDA signals. The axial size distribution revealed a significant decrease in SMD along the spray centreline. The smallest axial SMD (51 to 79 μm) was noticed in S0 spray followed by S1, S2 and S3. Unlikely, the radial SMD in S0 spray did not vary significantly at any stage of the spray injection. This trend was attributed to the continuous growth of the surface wave instabilities on the native starch sheet. However, SMD obtained with S1, S2 and S3 varied appreciably along the radial direction. The mean velocity vector profiles followed the non-Gaussian distribution. The constant vector distributions were seen in the near nozzle regions, where the spray was in the phase of development. In far regions, the velocity vectors were poly-dispersed and a series of ups and downs were seen in the respective radial

  15. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Measurements of the Air-flow Velocity in the Cylinder of an Airplane Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, Hermann

    1939-01-01

    The object of the present investigation is to determine the velocity in the BMW-VI cylinder of an externally driven single-cylinder test engine at high engine speeds using the hot-wire method of Ulsamer.

  17. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  18. Probability distribution functions for the initial liftoff velocities of saltating sand grains in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hong; Zou, Xue-Yong; Zhang, Chun-Lai

    2006-11-01

    Saltating sand grains are the primary component of airborne sand and account for 75% of all transport flux of sand grains. Although they have been widely studied, the microscopic and macroscopic aspects of blown sand physics have not been united, and this has slowed development of this field. The main reason for this is that the bridge (probability distribution functions for initial liftoff velocities of saltating sand grains) between the macroscopic and microscopic research has not been satisfactorily solved because it is difficult to measure the initial liftoff parameters of saltating sand grains and because the underlying theory is lacking. In this paper, we combined theoretical analyses with wind tunnel experiment data to describe the liftoff parameters of saltating sand grains (the horizontal, vertical, and resultant liftoff velocities and angles). On the basis of these data, the liftoff angles follow a LogNorm4 distribution function, whereas the horizontal, vertical, and resultant liftoff velocities follow a Gamma distribution function. We also demonstrated that it is feasible to colligate initial liftoff velocities of saltating sand grains obtained under different frictional wind velocities by different scholars in wind tunnel experiments and comprehensively analyze their distributions. Therefore the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocities of saltating sand grains presented in this paper do a good job of reflecting the underlying physics.

  19. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  20. Effect of temperature and air velocity on drying kinetics, antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content, colour, texture and microstructure of apple (var. Granny Smith) slices.

    PubMed

    Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Ah-Hen, Kong; Chacana, Marcelo; Vergara, Judith; Martínez-Monzó, Javier; García-Segovia, Purificación; Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto; Di Scala, Karina

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of temperature and air velocity on the drying kinetics and quality attributes of apple (var. Granny Smith) slices during drying. Experiments were conducted at 40, 60 and 80°C, as well as at air velocities of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5ms(-1). Effective moisture diffusivity increased with temperature and air velocity, reaching a value of 15.30×10(-9)m(2)s(-1) at maximum temperature and air velocity under study. The rehydration ratio changed with varying both air velocity and temperature indicating tissue damage due to processing. The colour difference, ΔE, showed the best results at 80°C. The DPPH-radical scavenging activity at 40°C and 0.5ms(-1) showed the highest antioxidant activity, closest to that of the fresh sample. Although ΔE decreased with temperature, antioxidant activity barely varied and even increased at high air velocities, revealing an antioxidant capacity of the browning products. The total phenolics decreased with temperature, but at high air velocity retardation of thermal degradation was observed. Firmness was also determined and explained using glass transition concept and microstructure analysis. PMID:26434262

  1. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  2. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  3. Applications of the Zero-Group-Velocity Lamb Mode for Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen D.; Song, Jun-Ho; Evan, Victoria L.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2005-04-01

    Airborne ultrasound couples particularly well into plates at the zero-group-velocity point of the first order symmetric (S1) Lamb mode. Applications of this mode to ultrasonic imaging of plate-like structures are discussed. The sensitivity and high Q of this mode makes it ideal for imaging. Images from a wide variety of materials and samples, including composites and honeycomb structures are presented. Transmission at the zero-group-velocity frequency is shown to be particularly sensitive to nearby flaws and discontinuities, and is therefore suitable for wide-area scanning for cracks or manufacturing flaws.

  4. Airborne nanoparticle exposures while using constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain-isolated fume hoods.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Jung Candace; Huang, Rong Fung; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Tsai et al. (Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods. J Nanopart Res 2009; 11: 147-61) found that the handling of dry nanoalumina and nanosilver inside laboratory fume hoods can cause a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the hood. Hood design affects the magnitude of release. With traditionally designed fume hoods, the airflow moves horizontally toward the hood cupboard; the turbulent airflow formed in the worker wake region interacts with the vortex in the constant-flow fume hood and this can cause nanoparticles to be carried out with the circulating airflow. Airborne particle concentrations were measured for three hood designs (constant-flow, constant-velocity, and air-curtain hoods) using manual handling of nanoalumina particles. The hood operator's airborne nanoparticle breathing zone exposure was measured over the size range from 5 nm to 20 mum. Experiments showed that the exposure magnitude for a constant-flow hood had high variability. The results for the constant-velocity hood varied by operating conditions, but were usually very low. The performance of the air-curtain hood, a new design with significantly different airflow pattern from traditional hoods, was consistent under all operating conditions and release was barely detected. Fog tests showed more intense turbulent airflow in traditional hoods and that the downward airflow from the double-layered sash to the suction slot of the air-curtain hood did not cause turbulence seen in other hoods. PMID:19933309

  5. Noncoplanar minimum delta V two-impulse and three-impulse orbital transfer from a regressing oblate earth assembly parking ellipse onto a flyby trans-Mars asymptotic velocity vector.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Comparison of two-impulse and three-impulse orbital transfer, using data from a 63-case numerical study. For each case investigated for which coplanarity of the regressing assembly parking ellipse was attained with the target asymptotic velocity vector, a two-impulse maneuver (or a one-impulse equivalent) was found for which the velocity expenditure was within 1% of a reference absolute minimum lower bound. Therefore, for the coplanar cases, use of a minimum delta-V three-impulse maneuver afforded scant improvement in velocity penalty. However, as the noncoplanarity of the parking ellipse and the target asymptotic velocity vector increased, there was a significant increase in the superiority of minimum delta-V three-impulse maneuvers for slowing the growth of velocity expenditure. It is concluded that a multiple-impulse maneuver should be contemplated if nonnominal launch conditions could occur.

  6. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. III. Mach Number of the Flow, Velocity Vector, and Temperature from the First Six Years of Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Leonard, T. W.; McComas, D. J.; Möbius, E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wurz, P.

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed observations of interstellar neutral helium (ISN He) obtained from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) satellite during its first six years of operation. We used a refined version of the ISN He simulation model, presented in the companion paper by Sokół et al. (2015b), along with a sophisticated data correlation and uncertainty system and parameter fitting method, described in the companion paper by Swaczyna et al. We analyzed the entire data set together and the yearly subsets, and found the temperature and velocity vector of ISN He in front of the heliosphere. As seen in the previous studies, the allowable parameters are highly correlated and form a four-dimensional tube in the parameter space. The inflow longitudes obtained from the yearly data subsets show a spread of ˜6°, with the other parameters varying accordingly along the parameter tube, and the minimum χ2 value is larger than expected. We found, however, that the Mach number of the ISN He flow shows very little scatter and is thus very tightly constrained. It is in excellent agreement with the original analysis of ISN He observations from IBEX and recent reanalyses of observations from Ulysses. We identify a possible inaccuracy in the Warm Breeze parameters as the likely cause of the scatter in the ISN He parameters obtained from the yearly subsets, and we suppose that another component may exist in the signal or a process that is not accounted for in the current physical model of ISN He in front of the heliosphere. From our analysis, the inflow velocity vector, temperature, and Mach number of the flow are equal to λISNHe = 255.°8 ± 0.°5, βISNHe = 5.°16 ± 0.°10, TISNHe = 7440 ± 260 K, vISNHe = 25.8 ± 0.4 km s-1, and MISNHe = 5.079 ± 0.028, with uncertainties strongly correlated along the parameter tube.

  7. Measuring air-sea gas exchange velocities in a large scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2014-06-01

    In this study we present gas exchange measurements conducted in a large scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.8 to 15 m s-1 conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of three) was observed for N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant affected CH3OH, the high solubility tracer only weakly.

  8. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  9. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of human aspiration in low velocity air: orientation effects on nose-breathing simulations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kimberly R; Anthony, T Renée

    2014-06-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1-0.4 m s(-1)). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of Human Aspiration in Low Velocity Air: Orientation Effects on Nose-Breathing Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kimberly R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1–0.4 m s−1). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm. PMID:24665111

  11. 3D Tomographic Imaging of the Crustal Velocity Structure beneath the Marmara Sea using Air-gun and Earthquake Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarancioglu, Adil; Kocaoglu, Argun H.; Ozalaybey, Serdar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the local seismicity and obtain a detailed three-dimensional crustal velocity structure beneath the Marmara Sea in an area surrounding the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) by tomographic inversion using both controlled-source (air-gun) and earthquake data. The tomographic inversion is carried out by using the local earthquake tomography code SIMUL2000. Two sets of seismological data, collected in 2006 (EOSMARMARA experiment) and 2001 (SEISMARMARA experiment), are re-processed and used in this study. A total of 441 high quality earthquakes and 452 air-gun shots recorded by a total of 53 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) are selected for the simultaneous inversion for velocity and hypocentral parameters. The OBS location and time-drift errors are identified from air-gun shot records by a grid search method and required corrections are made on the travel time data. The initial (reference) velocity model and earthquake locations required for the three dimensional tomographic inversion are derived from the one-dimensional velocity model obtained by using the VELEST algorithm in which a subset of earthquakes are selected such that phase readings were made by at least five stations and maximum azimuthal gap was 180o. The inversion results are checked for initial model dependence and the effect of damping factor. The reliability of the results is also evaluated in terms of derivative-weighted-sum, resolution-diagonal-elements values and checkerboard tests. The hypocenter locations of the local earthquakes have been remarkably improved by the three-dimensional velocity model obtained from the tomographic inversion. The three-dimensional velocity model shows that the Tekirdag, Central and Cinarcik Basins are characterized generally by lower Vp (3.0 - 3.5 km/s) values and most of the earthquakes across these regions are located at the depths of 10 to 17 km, about 5 km deeper than those obtained from the one-dimensional reference

  12. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles. [for combustion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  13. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  14. Performance and human factors results from thrust vectoring investigations in simulated air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, J. E.; Meintel, A. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In support of research related to advanced fighter technology, the Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS) has been used to investigate the effects of advanced aerodynamic concepts, parametric changes in performance parameters, and advanced flight control systems on the combat capability of fighter airplanes. At least five studies were related to thrust vectoring and/or inflight thrust reversing. The aircraft simulated ranged from F-4 class to F-15 class, and included the AV-8 Harrier. This paper presents an overview of these studies including the assumptions involved, trends of results, and human factors considerations that were found.

  15. On the coefficients of small eddy and surface divergence models for the air-water gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian; Fillingham, Joseph H.; Bootsma, Harvey A.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggested that under low to moderate wind conditions without bubble entraining wave breaking, the air-water gas transfer velocity k+ can be mechanistically parameterized by the near-surface turbulence, following the small eddy model (SEM). Field measurements have supported this model in a variety of environmental forcing systems. Alternatively, surface divergence model (SDM) has also been shown to predict the gas transfer velocity across the air-water interface in laboratory settings. However, the empirically determined model coefficients (α in SEM and c1 in SDM) scattered over a wide range. Here we present the first field measurement of the near-surface turbulence with a novel floating PIV system on Lake Michigan, which allows us to evaluate the SEM and SDM in situ in the natural environment. k+ was derived from the CO2 flux that was measured simultaneously with a floating gas chamber. Measured results indicate that α and c1 are not universal constants. Regression analysis showed that α˜log>(ɛ>) while the near-surface turbulence dissipation rate ɛ is approximately greater than 10-6 m2 s-3 according to data measured for this study as well as from other published results measured in similar environments or in laboratory settings. It also showed that α scales linearly with the turbulent Reynolds number. Similarly, coefficient c1 in the SDM was found to linearly scale with the Reynolds number. These findings suggest that larger eddies are also important parameters, and the dissipation rate in the SEM or the surface divergence β' in the SDM alone may not be adequate to determine k+ completely.

  16. Effects of metabolic rate on thermal responses at different air velocities in -10 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, T T; Gavhed, D; Holmér, I; Rintamäki, H

    2001-04-01

    The effects of exercise intensity on thermoregulatory responses in cold (-10 degrees C) in a 0.2 (still air, NoWi), 1.0 (Wi1), and 5.0 (Wi5) m x s(-1) wind were studied. Eight young and healthy men, preconditioned in thermoneutral (+20 degrees C) environment for 60 min, walked for 60 min on the treadmill at 2.8 km/h with different combinations of wind and exercise intensity. Exercise level was adjusted by changing the inclination of the treadmill between 0 degrees (lower exercise intensity, metabolic rate 124 W x m(-2), LE) and 6 degrees (higher exercise intensity, metabolic rate 195 W x m(-2), HE). Due to exercise increased heat production and circulatory adjustments, the rectal temperature (T(re)), mean skin temperature (Tsk) and mean body temperature (Tb) were significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1, and T(re) and Tb also in Wi5. Tsk and Tb were significantly decreased by 5.0 m x s(-1) wind in comparison to NoWi and Wi1. The higher exercise intensity was intense enough to diminish peripheral vasoconstriction and consequently the finger skin temperature was significantly higher at the end of HE in comparison to LE in NoWi and Wi1. Mean heat flux from the skin was unaffected by the exercise intensity. At LE oxygen consumption (VO2) was significantly higher in Wi5 than NoWi and Wi1. Heart rate was unaffected by the wind speed. The results suggest that, with studied exercise intensities, produced without changes in walking speed, the metabolic rate is not so important that it should be taken into consideration in the calculation of wind chill index. PMID:11282319

  17. Air-sea Exchange of Dimethylsulfide (DMS) - Separation of the Transfer Velocity to Buoyancy, Turbulence, and Wave Driven Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B.; Huebert, B. J.; Fairall, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    In the past several years, we have measured the sea-to-air flux of DMS directly with eddy covariance on five cruises in distinct oceanic environments, including the equatorial Pacific (TAO 2003), Sargasso Sea (Biocomplexity 2004), Northern Atlantic (DOGEE 2007), Southern Ocean (SO-GasEX 2008), and Peruvian/Chilean upwelling region (VOCALS-REx 2008). Normalizing DMS flux by its concurrent air-sea concentration difference gave us the transfer velocity of DMS (kDMS). Our wealth of kDMS measurements (~2000 hourly values) in very different oceans and across a wide range of wind speeds (0.5~20.5 m/s) provides an opportunity to evaluate existing parameterizations of k and quantify the importance of various controlling factors on gas exchange. Gas exchange in different wind speed regimes is driven by distinct physical mechanisms. In low winds (<4 m/s), buoyancy-driven convection results in a finite and positive kDMS. In moderate winds (4~10 m/s), turbulence from wind-stress prevails, as we found a near linear dependence of kDMS on wind speed and on friction velocity (u*). In high winds (>10 m/s), there is additional bubble-mediated exchange from wave-breaking, which depends on gas solubility (a function of temperature and to a lesser degree, salinity). When normalizing kDMS to a reference temperature of 20°C, we found the oft-used Schmidt number correction (for diffusivity) to be inadequate because it does not account for the temperature dependence in solubility. To quantify the solubility effect, we subtract the small buoyancy-driven term computed by the NOAA-COARE model 3.0a from k660 (kDMS corrected to a Schmidt number of 660). A linear fit to the residual k660 in the moderate wind regime allows us to further separate the turbulence-driven and wave-breaking components. A solubility correction is applied to the latter, which is then added back to the buoyancy and turbulence-driven terms to give k660,C. Compared to k660, k660,C shows a significant reduction in scatter

  18. Correlation of turbulent burning velocities of ethanol-air, measured in a fan-stirred bomb up to 1.2 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Mansour, M.S.

    2011-01-15

    The turbulent burning velocity is defined by the mass rate of burning and this also requires that the associated flame surface area should be defined. Previous measurements of the radial distribution of the mean reaction progress variable in turbulent explosion flames provide a basis for definitions of such surface areas for turbulent burning velocities. These inter-relationships. in general, are different from those for burner flames. Burning velocities are presented for a spherical flame surface, at which the mass of unburned gas inside it is equal to the mass of burned gas outside it. These can readily be transformed to burning velocities based on other surfaces. The measurements of the turbulent burning velocities presented are the mean from five different explosions, all under the same conditions. These cover a wide range of equivalence ratios, pressures and rms turbulent velocities for ethanol-air mixtures. Two techniques are employed, one based on measurements of high speed schlieren images, the other on pressure transducer measurements. There is good agreement between turbulent burning velocities measured by the two techniques. All the measurement are generalised in plots of burning velocity normalised by the effective unburned gas rms velocity as a function of the Karlovitz stretch factor for different strain rate Markstein numbers. For a given value of this stretch factor a decrease in Markstein number increases the normalised burning velocity. Comparisons are made with the findings of other workers. (author)

  19. Design and analysis of air acoustic vector-sensor configurations for two-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Mohd; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic vector-sensors (AVS) have been designed using the P-P method for different microphone configurations. These configurations have been used to project the acoustic intensity on the orthogonal axes through which the direction of arrival (DoA) of a sound source has been estimated. The analytical expressions for the DoA for different microphone configurations have been derived for two-dimensional geometry. Finite element method simulation using COMSOL-Multiphysics has been performed, where the microphone signals for AVS configurations have been recorded in free field conditions. The performance of all the configurations has been evaluated with respect to angular error and root-mean-square angular error. The simulation results obtained with ideal geometry for different configurations have been corroborated experimentally with prototype AVS realizations and also compared with microphone-array method, viz., Multiple Signal Classification and Generalized Cross Correlation. Experiments have been performed in an anechoic room using different prototype AVS configurations made from small size microphones. The DoA performance using analytical expressions, simulation studies, and experiments with prototype AVS in anechoic chamber are presented in the paper. The square and delta configurations are found to perform better in the absence and presence of noise, respectively. PMID:27250174

  20. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  1. Computational simulation of temperature and velocity distribution in human upper respiratory airway during inhalation of hot air.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi-Ardakani, V; Taeibi-Rahni, M; Salimi, M R; Ahmadi, G

    2016-03-01

    The present study provides an accurate simulation of velocity and temperature distributions of inhalation thermal injury in a human upper airway, including vestibule, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx, and upper part of main bronchus. To this end, a series of CT scan images, taken from an adult woman, was used to construct a three dimensional model. The airway walls temperature was adjusted according to existing in vivo temperature measurements. Also, in order to cover all breathing activities, five different breathing flow rates (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 l/min) and different ambient air temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C) were studied. Different flow regimes, including laminar, transitional, and turbulence were considered and the simulations were validated using reliable experimental data. The results show that nostrils, vestibule, and nasal cavity are damaged more than other part of airway. Finally, In order to obtain the heat flux through the walls, correlations for Nusselt number for each individual parts of airway (vestibule, main upper airway, nasopharynx etc.,) are proposed. PMID:26777422

  2. Laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-air mixtures at pressures up to 1.0 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Liu, Kexin; Woolley, R.; Verhelst, S.

    2007-04-15

    Values of laminar burning velocity, u{sub l}, and the associated strain rate Markstein number, Ma{sub sr}, of H{sub 2}-air mixtures have been obtained from measurements of flame speeds in a spherical explosion bomb with central ignition. Pressures ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, with values of equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 1.0. Many of the flames soon became unstable, with an accelerating flame speed, due to Darrieus-Landau and thermodiffusive instabilities. This effect increased with pressure. The flame wrinkling arising from the instabilities enhanced the flame speed. A method is described for allowing for this effect, based on measurements of the flame radii at which the instabilities increased the flame speed. This enabled u{sub l} and Ma{sub sr} to be obtained, devoid of the effects of instabilities. With increasing pressure, the time interval between the end of the ignition spark and the onset of flame instability, during which stable stretched flame propagation occurred, became increasingly small and very high camera speeds were necessary for accurate measurement. Eventually this time interval became so short that first Ma{sub sr} and then u{sub l} could not be measured. Such flame instabilities throw into question the utility of u{sub l} for high pressure, very unstable, flames. The measured values of u{sub l} are compared with those predicted by detailed chemical kinetic models of one-dimensional flames. (author)

  3. Study on measurement of the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes of a boiler with relationship between air velocity and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Shen, F.; Lin, W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Q.; Ke, J.; Quan, W.

    1999-07-01

    According to the theoretical relationship between air velocity and pressure drop in different solid-air mass flow in vertical pipes with the condition of upward air-solid flowing, the experimental research on measuring the coal powder concentration is directed against the pneumatic pipes of a boiler's combustion system in the energy industry. Through analyzing the experimental results, a mathematical model for measuring the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes is obtained. Then, the error analysis is done, and the method of on-line measurement and its function are provided.

  4. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  5. The influence of topography on vertical velocity of air in relation to severe storms near the Southern Andes Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Pessano, H.; Hierro, R.; Santos, J. R.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.

    2015-04-01

    On the basis of 180 storms which took place between 2004 and 2011 over the province of Mendoza (Argentina) near to the Andes Range at southern mid-latitudes, we consider those registered in the northern and central crop areas (oases). The regions affected by these storms are currently protected by an operational hail mitigation project. Differences with previously reported storms detected in the southern oasis are highlighted. Mendoza is a semiarid region situated roughly between 32S and 37S at the east of the highest Andes top. It forms a natural laboratory where different sources of gravity waves, mainly mountain waves, occur. In this work, we analyze the effects of flow over topography generating mountain waves and favoring deep convection. The joint occurrence of storms with hail production and mountain waves is determined from mesoscale numerical simulations, radar and radiosounding data. In particular, two case studies that properly represent diverse structures observed in the region are considered in detail. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to each variable and profile to detect the main oscillation modes present. Simulated temperature profiles are validated and compared with radiosounding data. Each first radar echo, time and location are determined. The necessary energy to lift a parcel to its level of free convection is tested from the Convective Available Potential Energy and Convection Inhibition. This last parameter is compared against the mountain waves' vertical kinetic energy. The time evolution and vertical structure of vertical velocity and equivalent potential temperature suggest in both cases that the detected mountain wave amplitudes are able to provide the necessary energy to lift the air parcel and trigger convection. A simple conceptual scheme linking the dynamical factors taking place before and during storm development is proposed.

  6. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-moa; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we have reviewed the basics of tensor analysis in an attempt to clarify some misconceptions regarding contravariant and covariant vector components as used in fluid dynamics. We have indicated that contravariant components are components of a given vector expressed as a unique combination of the covariant base vector system and, vice versa, that the covariant components are components of a vector expressed with the contravariant base vector system. Mathematically, expressing a vector with a combination of base vector is a decomposition process for a specific base vector system. Hence, the contravariant velocity components are decomposed components of velocity vector along the directions of coordinate lines, with respect to the covariant base vector system. However, the contravariant (and covariant) components are not physical quantities. Their magnitudes and dimensions are controlled by their corresponding covariant (and contravariant) base vectors.

  7. Investigation of the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot using simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Suntz, R.; Bockhorn, H.

    2015-05-01

    The response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (0-350 Hz) and the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot are investigated. The results obtained from these flames are of special interest for "rich-quenched-lean" (RQL) combustion concepts applied in modern gas turbines. In RQL combustion, the fuel is initially oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in a first stage followed by a fuel-lean combustion step in a second stage. To mimic soot formation and oxidation in RQL combustion, soot particle measurements in highly turbulent, non-premixed swirling natural gas/ethylene-confined flames at imposed air inlet velocity oscillations are performed using simultaneous 2-Colour-Time-Resolved-Laser-Induced Incandescence (simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII). The latter technique is combined with line-of-sight averaged OH*-chemiluminescence imaging, measurements of the velocity field by high-speed particle imaging velocimetry under reactive combustion conditions and measurements of the mean temperature field obtained by a thermocouple. A natural gas/ethylene mixture (Φ = 1.56, 42 % C2H4, 58 % natural gas, P th = 17.6 kW at atmospheric pressure) is used as a fuel, which is oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in the first combustion chamber.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of media velocity on filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filters.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Steven L; Parsons, Michael S; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Waggoner, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are widely used to control particulate matter emissions from processes that involve management or treatment of radioactive materials. Section FC of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers AG-1 Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment currently restricts media velocity to a maximum of 2.5 cm/sec in any application where this standard is invoked. There is some desire to eliminate or increase this media velocity limit. A concern is that increasing media velocity will result in higher emissions of ultrafine particles; thus, it is unlikely that higher media velocities will be allowed without data to demonstrate the effect of media velocity on removal of ultrafine particles. In this study, the performance of nuclear grade HEPA filters, with respect to filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size, was evaluated as a function of media velocity. Deep-pleat nuclear grade HEPA filters (31 cm x 31 cm x 29 cm) were evaluated at media velocities ranging from 2.0 to 4.5 cm/sec using a potassium chloride aerosol challenge having a particle size distribution centered near the HEPA filter most penetrating particle size. Filters were challenged under two distinct mass loading rate regimes through the use of or exclusion of a 3 microm aerodynamic diameter cut point cyclone. Filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size measurements were made throughout the duration of filter testing. Filter efficiency measured at the onset of aerosol challenge was noted to decrease with increasing media velocity, with values ranging from 99.999 to 99.977%. The filter most penetrating particle size recorded at the onset of testing was noted to decrease slightly as media velocity was increased and was typically in the range of 110-130 nm. Although additional testing is needed, these findings indicate that filters operating at media velocities up to 4.5 cm/sec will meet or exceed current filter efficiency requirements. Additionally

  9. Rectilinear-motion space inversion-based detection approach for infrared dim air targets with variable velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tianlei; Shi, Zelin; Yin, Jian; Liu, Yunpeng; Xu, Baoshu; Zhang, Chengshuo

    2016-03-01

    Dim targets are extremely difficult to detect using methods based on single-frame detection. Radiation accumulation is one of the effective methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A detection approach based on radiation accumulation is proposed. First, a location space and a motion space are established. Radiation accumulation operation, controlled by vectors from the motion space, is applied to the original image space. Then, a new image space is acquired where some images have an improved SNR. Second, quasitargets in the new image space are obtained by constant false-alarm ratio judging, and location vectors and motion vectors of quasitargets are also acquired simultaneously. Third, the location vectors and motion vectors are mapped into the two spaces, respectively. Volume density function is defined in the motion space. Location extremum of the location space and volume density extremum of motion space will confirm the true target. Finally, actual location of the true target in the original image space is obtained by space inversion. The approach is also applicable to detect multiple dim targets. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach and demonstrate the approach is superior to compared approaches on detection probability and false alarm probability.

  10. Investigations of the air flow velocity field structure above the wavy surface under severe wind conditions by particle image velosimetry technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary experiments devoted to measuring characteristics of the air flow above the waved water surface for the wide range of wind speeds were performed with the application of modified Particle Image Velosimetry (PIV) technique. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 °, cross section of air channel 0.4×0.4 m) for four different axial wind speeds: 8.7, 13.5, 19 and 24 m/s, corresponding to the equivalent 10-m wind speeds 15, 20, 30 40 m/s correspondingly. Intensive wave breaking with forming foam crest and droplets generations was occurred for two last wind conditions. The modified PIV-method based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by tiny particles and with highspeed video. Spherical 20 μm polyamide particles with density 1.02 g/sm3 and inertial time 7•10-3 s were used for seeding airflow with special injecting device. Green (532 nm) CW laser with 4 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz s and exposure time 10 ms Combination including iteration Canny method [1] for obtaining curvilinear surface from the images in the laser sheet view and contact measurements of surface elevation by wire wave gauge installed near the border of working area for the surface wave profile was used. Then velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved by averaging over obtained ensembles of wind velocity field realizations and over a wave period even for the cases of intensive wave breaking and droplets generation. To verify the PIV method additional measurements of mean velocity profiles over were carried out by the contact method using the Pitot tube. In the area of overlap, wind velocity profiles measured by

  11. Influence of velocity effects on the shape of N2 (and air) broadened H2O lines revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, N. H.; Tran, H.; Gamache, R. R.; Bermejo, D.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    The modeling of the shape of H2O lines perturbed by N2 (and air) using the Keilson-Storer (KS) kernel for collision-induced velocity changes is revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). The latter have been performed for a large number of molecules starting from intermolecular-potential surfaces. Contrary to the assumption made in a previous study [H. Tran, D. Bermejo, J.-L. Domenech, P. Joubert, R. R. Gamache, and J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 108, 126 (2007)], 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.03.009, the results of these CMDS show that the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes statistically occur at the same time scale. This validates the use of a single memory parameter in the Keilson-Storer kernel to describe both the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes. The CMDS results also show that velocity- and rotational state-changing collisions are statistically partially correlated. A partially correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer model has thus been used to describe the line-shape. For this, the velocity changes KS kernel parameters have been directly determined from CMDS, while the speed-dependent broadening and shifting coefficients have been calculated with a semi-classical approach. Comparisons between calculated spectra and measurements of several lines of H2O broadened by N2 (and air) in the ν3 and 2ν1 + ν2 + ν3 bands for a wide range of pressure show very satisfactory agreement. The evolution of non-Voigt effects from Doppler to collisional regimes is also presented and discussed.

  12. Long-term carbide development in high-velocity oxygen fuel/high-velocity air fuel Cr3C2-NiCr coatings heat treated at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; Hyland, M.; James, B.

    2004-12-01

    During the deposition of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings, compositional degradation occurs, primarily through the dissolution of the carbide phase into the matrix. Exposure at an elevated temperature leads to transformations in the compositional distribution and microstructure. While these have been investigated in short-term trials, no systematic investigations of the long-term microstructural development have been presented for high-velocity sprayed coatings. In this work, high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) coatings were treated at 900 °C for up to 60 days. Rapid refinement of the supersaturated matrix phase occurred, with the degree of matrix phase alloying continuing to decrease over the following 20 to 40 days. Carbide nucleation in the HVAF coatings occurred preferentially on the retained carbide grains, while that in the HVOF coatings developed in the regions of greatest carbide dissolution. This difference resulted in a variation in carbide morphologies. Preferential horizontal growth was evident in both coatings over the first 20 to 30 days of exposure, beyond which spheroidization of the microstructure occurred. After 30 days, the carbide morphology of both coatings was comparable, tending toward an expansive structure of coalesced carbide grains. The development of the carbide phase played a significant role in the microhardness variation of these coatings with time.

  13. Definition of Contravariant Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is an old issue in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). What is the so-called contravariant velocity or contravariant velocity component? In the article, we review the basics of tensor analysis and give the contravariant velocity component a rigorous explanation. For a given coordinate system, there exist two uniquely determined sets of base vector systems - one is the covariant and another is the contravariant base vector system. The two base vector systems are reciprocal. The so-called contravariant velocity component is really the contravariant component of a velocity vector for a time-independent coordinate system, or the contravariant component of a relative velocity between fluid and coordinates, for a time-dependent coordinate system. The contravariant velocity components are not physical quantities of the velocity vector. Their magnitudes, dimensions, and associated directions are controlled by their corresponding covariant base vectors. Several 2-D (two-dimensional) linear examples and 2-D mass-conservation equation are used to illustrate the details of expressing a vector with respect to the covariant and contravariant base vector systems, respectively.

  14. a Study of Liquid - of Atomization Droplet Size Velocity and Temperature Distribution via Information Theory Spray Interaction with Ambient Air Motion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianguo

    Linear temporal instability analysis of a moving thin viscous liquid sheet of uniform thickness in an inviscid gas medium shows that surface tension always opposes, while surrounding gas and relative velocity between the sheet and gas favour the onset and development of instability. For gas Weber number smaller than the density ratio of gas to liquid, liquid viscosity enhances instability; If gas Weber number is slightly larger, aerodynamic and viscosity -induced instabilities interact with each other, displaying complicated effects of viscosity via Ohnesorge number; For much larger values of gas Weber numbers, aerodynamic instability dominates, liquid viscosity reduces disturbance growth rate and increases the dominant wavelength. Droplet probability distribution function (PDF) in sprays is formulated through information theory without resorting to the details of atomization processes. The derived analytical droplet size PDF is Nukiyama-Tanasawa type if conservation of mass is considered alone. If conservation of mass, momentum and energy is all taken into account, the joint droplet size and velocity PDF depends on Weber number, and compares favourably with measurements. Droplet velocity PDF is truncated Gaussian for any specific droplet size. Mean velocity approaches a constant value and velocity variance decreases as droplet size increases. Mean droplet diameters calculated agree well with observations. The computation indicates that atomization efficiency is very low, usually less than 1%. Droplet size, velocity and temperature PDF in sprays under combusting environment has also been derived. Effects of combustion on PDF occur mainly through the heat transferred into liquid sheet prior to its breakup. Experimental studies identify three modes of spray behaviours due to its interaction with various annular air flows, and show that bluff-body type of combustor has ability and easement to control aerodynamically spray angle, shape and droplet trajectories. It is

  15. Ballistic Range Measurements of Stagnation-Point Heat Transfer in Air and in Carbon Dioxide at Velocities up to 18,000 Feet Per Second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Layton; Bailey, Harry E.; Woodward, Henry T.

    1961-01-01

    A new technique for measuring heat-transfer rates on free-flight models in a ballistic range is described in this report. The accuracy of the heat-transfer rates measured in this way is shown to be comparable with the accuracy obtained in shock-tube measurements. The specific results of the present experiments consist of measurements of the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates experienced by a spherical-nosed model during flight through air and through carbon dioxide at velocities up to 18,000 feet per second. For flight through air these measured heat-transfer rates agree well with both the theoretically predicted rates and the rates measured in shock tubes. the heat-transfer rates agree well with the rates measured in a shock tube. Two methods of estimating the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates in carbon dioxide are compared with the experimental measurements. At each velocity the measured stagnation-point heat-transfer rate in carbon dioxide is about the same as the measured heat-transfer rate in air.

  16. Measuring air-sea gas-exchange velocities in a large-scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present gas-exchange measurements conducted in a large-scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.73 to 13.2 m s-1) conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas-exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of 3) was observed for the relatively insoluble N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant effect for CH3OH, the high solubility tracer, was significantly weaker.

  17. Air sea gas transfer velocity estimates from the Jason-1 and TOPEX altimeters: Prospects for a long-term global time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, David M.; Frew, Nelson M.; McCue, Scott J.

    2007-06-01

    Estimation of global and regional air-sea fluxes of climatically important gases is a key goal of current climate research programs. Gas transfer velocities needed to compute these fluxes can be estimated by combining altimeter-derived mean square slope with an empirical relation between transfer velocity and mean square slope derived from field measurements of gas fluxes and small-scale wave spectra [Frew, N.M., Bock, E.J., Schimpf, U., Hara, T., Hauβecker, H., Edson, J.B., McGillis, W.R., Nelson, R.K., McKenna, S.P., Uz, B.M., Jähne, B., 2004. Air-sea gas transfer: Its dependence on wind stress, small-scale roughness and surface films, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C08S17, doi: 10.1029/2003JC002131.]. We previously reported initial results from a dual-frequency (Ku- and C-band) altimeter algorithm [Glover, D.M., Frew, N.M., McCue, S.J., Bock, E.J., 2002. A Multi-year Time Series of Global Gas Transfer Velocity from the TOPEX Dual Frequency, Normalized Radar Backscatter Algorithm, In: Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces, editors: Donelan, M., Drennan, W., Saltzman, E., and Wanninkhof, R., Geophysical Monograph 127, American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC, 325-331.] for estimating the air-sea gas transfer velocity ( k) from the mean square slope of short wind waves (40-100 rad/m) and derived a 6-year time series of global transfer velocities based on TOPEX observations. Since the launch of the follow-on altimeter Jason-1 in December 2001 and commencement of the TOPEX/Jason-1 Tandem Mission, we have extended this time series to 12 years, with improvements to the model parameters used in our algorithm and using the latest corrected data releases. The prospect of deriving multi-year and interdecadal time series of gas transfer velocity from TOPEX, Jason-1 and follow-on altimeter missions depends on precise intercalibration of the normalized backscatter. During the Tandem Mission collinear phase, both satellites followed identical orbits with a mere 73-s time separation. The

  18. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production from 24 to 27 weeks under simulated evaporatively cooled conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  19. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  20. Measurement of Off-Body Velocity, Pressure, and Temperature in an Unseeded Supersonic Air Vortex by Stimulated Raman Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical method is used to make time-averaged (30 sec) off-body measurements in a supersonic airflow. Seeding of tracer particles is not required. One spatial component of velocity, static pressure, and static temperature are measured with stimulated Raman scattering. The three flow parameters are determined simultaneously from a common sample volume (0.3 by 0.3 by 15 mm) using concurrent measurements of the forward and backward scattered line shapes of a N2 vibrational Raman transition. The capability of this technique is illustrated with laboratory and large-scale wind tunnel testing that demonstrate 5-10% measurement uncertainties. Because the spatial resolution of the present work was improved to 1.5 cm (compared to 20 cm in previous work), it was possible to demonstrate a modest one-dimensional profiling of cross-flow velocity, pressure, and translational temperature through the low-density core of a stream-wise vortex (delta-wing model at Mach 2.8 in NASA Langley's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel).

  1. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  2. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  3. Firn air-content of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, from seismic velocities, borehole surveys and firn modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulessa, Bernd; Brisbourne, Alex; Booth, Adam; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Bevan, Suzanne; Luckman, Adrian; Hubbard, Bryn; Gourmelen, Noel; Palmer, Steve; Holland, Paul; Ashmore, David; Shepherd, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The rising surface temperature of Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves is strongly implicated in ice shelf disintegration, by exacerbating the compaction of firn layers. Firn compaction is expected to warm the ice column and, given sufficiently wet and compacted layers, to allow meltwater to penetrate into surface crevasses and thus enhance hydrofracture potential. Integrating seismic refraction surveys with borehole neutron and firn core density logging, we reveal vertical and horizontal changes in firn properties across Larsen C Ice Shelf. Patterns of firn air-content derived from seismic surveys are broadly similar to those estimated previously from airborne radar and satellite data. Specifically, these estimates show greater firn compaction in the north and landward inlets compared to the south, although spatial gradients in seismic-derived air-contents are less pronounced than those previously inferred. Firn thickness is less than 10 m in the extreme northwest of Larsen C, in Cabinet Inlet, yet exceeds 40 m in the southeast, suggesting that the inlet is a focus of firn compaction; indeed, buried layers of massive refrozen ice were observed in 200 MHz GPR data in Cabinet and Whirlwind Inlets during a field campaign in the 2014-15 austral summer. Depth profiles of firn density provide a reasonable fit with those derived from closely-located firn cores and neutron probe data. Our model of firn structure is driven by RACMO and includes a 'bucket'-type hydrological implementation, and simulates the depth-density profiles in the inlets well. Discrepancies between measured and modelled depth-density profiles become progressively greater towards the ice-shelf front. RACMO incorrectly simulates the particular leeward (sea-ice-influenced) microclimate of the shallow boundary layer, leading to excess melt and/or lack of snowfall. The spatial sampling density of our seismic observations will be augmented following a further field campaign in the 2016-17 austral summer

  4. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  5. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind

  6. Walk-through survey report: HVLV (high velocity low volume) control technology for aircraft bonded wing and radome maintenance at Air Force Logistics Command, McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, B.A.

    1983-08-01

    A walk through survey was conducted at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center, McClellan Air Force Base, California, on June 13, 1983, to evaluate the use of High Velocity Low Volume (HVLV) technology in the aircraft-maintenance industry. The HVLV system consisted of 65 ceiling drops in the bonded honeycomb shop where grinding and sanding operations created glass fiber and resin dusts. Preemployment and periodic physical examinations were required. Workers were required to wear disposable coveralls, and disposable dust masks were available. Workers walked through decontamination air jet showers before leaving the area to change clothes. Environmental monitoring revealed no significant dust exposures when the HVLV system was in use. Performance of the exhaust system on the eight-inch-diameter nose cone sanding operation was good, but the three-inch-diameter tools were too large and the shrouds too cumbersome for use on many hand-finishing tasks. The author concludes that the HVLV system is partially successful but requires additional shroud design. Further development of small tool shrouds is recommended.

  7. Velocity Field Measurements of Human Coughing Using Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Marr, D. R.; Higuchi, H.; Glauser, M. N.

    2003-11-01

    Quantitative fluid mechanics analysis of human coughing has been carried out using new Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TRPIV). The study involves measurement of velocity vector time-histories and velocity profiles. It is focused on the average normal human coughing. Some work in the past on cough mechanics has involved measurement of flow rates, tidal volumes and sub-glottis pressure. However, data of unsteady velocity vector field of the exiting highly time-dependent jets is not available. In this study, human cough waveform data are first acquired in vivo using conventional respiratory instrumentation for various volunteers of different gender/age groups. The representative waveform is then reproduced with a coughing/breathing simulator (with or without a manikin) for TRPIV measurements and analysis. The results of this study would be useful not only for designing of indoor air quality and heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, but also for devising means of protection against infectious diseases.

  8. Measurement of Gas and Liquid Velocities in an Air-Water Two-Phase Flow using Cross-Correlation of Signals from a Double Senor Hot-Film Probe

    SciTech Connect

    B. Gurau; P. Vassalo; K. Keller

    2002-02-19

    Local gas and liquid velocities are measured by cross-correlating signals from a double sensor hot-film anemometer probe in pure water flow and air water two-phase flow. The gas phase velocity measured in two-phase flow agrees with velocity data obtained using high-speed video to within +/-5%. A turbulent structure, present in the liquid phase, allows a correlation to be taken, which is consistent with the expected velocity profiles in pure liquid flow. This turbulent structure is also present in the liquid phase of a two-phase flow system. Therefore, a similar technique can be applied to measure the local liquid velocity in a two-phase system, when conditions permit.

  9. Effect of gas-transfer-velocity parameterization choice on CO2 air-sea fluxes in the North Atlantic and European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, I.; Piskozub, J.

    2015-11-01

    The ocean sink is an important part of the anthropogenic CO2 budget. Because the terrestrial biosphere is usually treated as a residual, understanding the uncertainties the net flux into the ocean sink is crucial for understanding the global carbon cycle. One of the sources of uncertainty is the parameterization of CO2 gas transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software tool, FluxEngine, to calculate monthly net carbon air-sea flux for the extratropical North Atlantic, European Arctic as well as global values (or comparison) using several available parameterizations of gas transfer velocity of different dependence of wind speed, both quadratic and cubic. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic, a large sink of CO2 and a region with good measurement coverage, characterized by strong winds. We show that this uncertainty is smaller in the North Atlantic and in the Arctic than globally, within 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, comparing to 9 % for the World Ocean when restricted to functions with quadratic wind dependence and respectively 42, 40 and 67 % for all studied parameterizations. We propose an explanation of this smaller uncertainty due to the combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic and lack of seasonal changes in the flux direction in most of the region. We also compare the available pCO2 climatologies (Takahashi and SOCAT) pCO2 discrepancy in annual flux values of 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal flux changes in the Arctic have inverse seasonal change in both climatologies, caused most probably by insufficient data coverage, especially in winter.

  10. QSPR study on the octanol/air partition coefficient of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by using molecular distance-edge vector index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) for octanol/air partition coefficient (KOA) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was investigated. Molecular distance-edge vector (MDEV) index was used as the structural descriptor of PBDEs. The quantitative relationship between the MDEV index and the lgKOA of PBDEs was modeled by multivariate linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) respectively. Leave one out cross validation and external validation was carried out to assess the predictive ability of the developed models. The investigated 22 PBDEs were randomly split into two groups: Group I, which comprises 16 PBDEs, and Group II, which comprises 6 PBDEs. Results The MLR model and the ANN model for predicting the KOA of PBDEs were established. For the MLR model, the prediction root mean square relative error (RMSRE) of leave one out cross validation and external validation is 2.82 and 2.95, respectively. For the L-ANN model, the prediction RMSRE of leave one out cross validation and external validation is 2.55 and 2.69, respectively. Conclusion The developed MLR and ANN model are practicable and easy-to-use for predicting the KOA of PBDEs. The MDEV index of PBDEs is shown to be quantitatively related to the KOA of PBDEs. MLR and ANN are both practicable for modeling the quantitative relationship between the MDEV index and the KOA of PBDEs. The prediction accuracy of the ANN model is slightly higher than that of the MLR model. The obtained ANN model shoud be a more promising model for studying the octanol/air partition behavior of PBDEs. PMID:24959199

  11. Concerning the flow about ring-shaped cowlings Part IX : the influence of oblique oncoming flow on the incremental velocities and air forces at the front part of circular cowls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchemann, Dietrich; Weber, Johanna

    1952-01-01

    The dependence of the maximum incremental velocities and air forces on a circular cowling on the mass flow and the angle of attack of the oblique flow is determined with the aid of pressure-distribution measurements. The particular cowling tested had been partially investigated in NACA TM 1327.

  12. On helical vortex motions of moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2013-09-01

    Two results that are fundamentally different from what takes place in a dry atmosphere have been obtained for adiabatic motions of unsaturated moist air: (1) the steady helical motion of moist air with collinear velocity and vorticity vectors everywhere is dynamically impossible; (2) the spontaneous amplification (generation) of helicity in a moist air due to baroclinicity is dynamically and thermodynamically feasible. In the absence of helicity flux through the boundary of the domain occupied by air flows, the difference between the values of integral helicity H at time instant t delaying at a small time interval from the initial instant t 0 (at which the instantaneous state of air motion is isomorphic either to a steady Beltrami flow or to an irrotational flow) and the initial value of H increases proportionally to ( t - t 0)4. The nonzero value of the proportionality factor is ensured by the difference in values of the Poisson ratio for dry air and water vapor, respectively.

  13. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  14. Small Break Air Ingress Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim

    2011-09-01

    The small break air-ingress experiment, described in this report, is designed to investigate air-ingress phenomena postulated to occur in pipes in a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTRs). During this experiment, air-ingress rates were measured for various flow and break conditions through small holes drilled into a pipe of the experimental apparatus. The holes were drilled at right angles to the pipe wall such that a direction vector drawn from the pipe centerline to the center of each hole was at right angles with respect to the pipe centerline. Thus the orientation of each hole was obtained by measuring the included angle between the direction vector of each hole with respect to a reference line anchored on the pipe centerline and pointing in the direction of the gravitational force. Using this reference system, the influence of several important parameters on the air ingress flow rate were measured including break orientation, break size, and flow velocity . The approach used to study the influence of these parameters on air ingress is based on measuring the changes in oxygen concentrations at various locations in the helium flow circulation system as a function of time using oxygen sensors (or detectors) to estimate the air-ingress rates through the holes. The test-section is constructed of a stainless steel pipe which had small holes drilled at the desired locations.

  15. Analysis of the Air Flow Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans Using a 3D Sonic Anemometer

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans. PMID:22969363

  16. Investigation of Slipstream Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J W , Jr

    1925-01-01

    These experiments were made at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, to investigate the velocity of the air in the slipstream in horizontal and climbing flight to determine the form of expression giving the slipstream velocity in terms of the airspeed of the airplane. The method used consisted in flying the airplane both on a level course and in climb at full throttle and measuring the slipstream velocity at seven points in the slipstream for the whole speed range of the airplane in both conditions. In general the results show that for both condition, horizontal and climbing flights, the slipstream velocity v subscript 3 and airspeed v can be represented by straight lines and consequently the equations are of the form: v subscript s = mv+b where m and b are constant. (author)

  17. Measurement of surface velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for measuring surface velocity fields is briefly described. It determines the surface velocity vector as a function of location and time by the analysis of thermal fluctuations of the surface profile in a small domain around the point of interest. The apparatus now being constructed will be used in a series of experiments involving flow fields established by temperature gradients imposed along a surface.

  18. Vector Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Vector addition is an important skill for introductory physics students to master. For years, I have used a fun example to introduce vector addition in my introductory physics classes based on one with which my high school physics teacher piqued my interest many years ago.

  19. Velocity and mass flux distribution measurements of spherical glass beads in air flow in a 90-deg vertical-to-horizontal bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliafas, Yannis

    The fluid mechanics of a mixture of gas and glass beads in a 90-deg bend was studied, and the resulting mean streamwise and radial velocities and the associated Reynolds stresses are reported. Higher negative slip velocities were observed for 100-micron beads than for 50-micron beads. At angular displacements of 0 deg the radial velocity was directed toward the inner wall for both sizes of beads. Most of the bead-wall collisions occurred between the 30- and 60-deg stations. Bead-wall interaction was the controlling factor influencing the behavior of the beads. The inner wall was generally erosion-free, and no erosion was observed on the side walls, which were made of glass. A 2.5-m-long deposition-free area was observed for both bead sizes used. The results are significant for coal gasification technology.

  20. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  1. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  2. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  3. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  4. Relativistic Gamow vectors: State vectors for unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldas, Hany Kamel Halim

    The relativistic Gamow vectors are derived from the analytic continuation of the angular momentum velocity kets to the resonance pole of the S- matrix. This construction is justifiable within a Rigged Hilbert Space of Hardy class functions. The kets obtained | p j3[ sRjR ]-> are characterized by a spin jR and a complex mass square sR = (MR - iΓ R/2)2. Our use of the velocity kets renders the Gamow vectors | p j3[ sRjR ]-> ``minimally complex'', as the 4-velocities p̂μ = p μ/ s are taken real and they remain real under Lorentz transformations. When the symmetry transformations of the Gamow vectors are considered, it is found that they obey a semigroup time evolution in the forward light cone for the subgroup of P with causal space- time translations, i.e., for space-time translations with 4-vectors x such that x2 >= 0. This semigroup evolution, which is a consequence of the characterization obtained for the Gamow vectors as functionals in a Rigged Hilbert Space, is in conformity with the time directedness associated with decay phenomena. The Gamow vectors, with a Breit-Wigner distribution and exponential decay law, provide a description of decaying particles with a wide range of Γ/ M. Moreover, the Gamow vectors, being members of a complex basis vector expansion, allow the Wigner-Weisskopf's based effective theories, such as the Lee-Oehme-Yang theory for the neutral K-mesons, to be obtained as an approximation in an exact formalism.

  5. Superior Performance of High-Velocity Oxyfuel-Sprayed Nanostructured TiO2 in Comparison to Air Plasma-Sprayed Conventional Al2O3-13TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2005-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania (Al2O3-13wt.%TiO2) coatings have been used for many years in the thermal spray industry for antiwear applications, mainly in the paper, printing, and textile industries. This work proposes an alternative to the traditional air plasma spraying of conventional aluminatitania by high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) spraying of nanostructured titania (TiO2). The microstructure, porosity, hardness (HV 300 g), crack propagation resistance, abrasion behavior (ASTM G65), and wear scar characteristics of these two types of coatings were analyzed and compared. The HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania coating is nearly pore-free and exhibits higher wear resistance when compared with the air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania coating. The nanozones in the nanostructured coating act as crack arresters, enhancing its toughness. By comparing the wear scar of both coatings (via SEM, stereoscope microscopy, and roughness measurements), it is observed that the wear scar of the HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania is very smooth, indicating plastic deformation characteristics, whereas the wear scar of the air plasma-sprayed alumina-titania coating is very rough and fractured. This is considered to be an indication of a superior machinability of the nanostructured coating.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN AQUITARD AND DIRECT DETECTION OF LNAPL AT HILL AIR FORCE BASE USING GPR AVO AND MIGRATION VELOCITY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large quantities of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) contaminate the near surface sediments at Operable Unit 1 (OU1), Hill Air Force Base (HAFB), Utah. In October 2000, a 3D, multi-offset GPR survey was acquired at OU1 with two objectives: 1) to i...

  7. Numerical and Physical Simulation of the Low-Velocity Air Flow in a Diffuser with a Circular Cavity in the Case of Suction of the Air from the Central Cylindrical Body Positioned in the Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Guvernyuk, S. V.; Zubin, M. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Ermakov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the results of solution of the steady-state Reynolds equations closed with the use of the shear-stress transfer model for the air fl ow in a divergent channel with suction of the air from the surface of the cylindrical central body positioned in the circular vortex cavity built in the lower wall of the channel with the corresponding experimental data has been performed.

  8. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  9. Questions Students Ask: About Terminal Velocity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Earl R.; Nelson, Jim

    1984-01-01

    If a ball were given an initial velocity in excess of its terminal velocity, would the upward force of air resistance (a function of velocity) be greater than the downward force of gravity and thus push the ball back upwards? An answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  10. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  11. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  12. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-09-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics classrooms, the direction of an angular velocity vector is taught by the right-hand rule, a mnemonic tool intended to aid memory. A setup constructed for instructional purposes may provide students with a more easily understood and concrete method to observe the direction of the angular velocity. This article attempts to demonstrate the angular velocity vector using the observable motion of a screw mounted to a remotely operated toy car.

  13. [Growth and polysaccharide formation in Sinorhizobium meliloti strains in an air-lift-type fermentor. Effect on nodulation velocity in alfalfa plants].

    PubMed

    Lorda, G S; Castaño, R C; Pordomingo, A B; Pastor, M D; Balatti, A P

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the exopolysaccharides produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti strains on the nodulation rates in alfalfa plants has been considered. The experiments were performed in a rotary shaker and in an air-lift type fermentor. Different Sinorhizobium meliloti strains were used. Bacterial growth rates were determined by viable cell counts. Exopolysaccharide concentration was determined by precipitation with ethanol. It was observed that maximum cell concentration was in the order of 1 x 10(10) cell/ml and exopolysaccharide content was approximately 11 g/l. The experiments performed with alfalfa plants in a controlled environment chamber showed that, when inoculation was carried out with diluted suspensions (1/10), nodulation time was reduced from 10 to 4 days, while the strains retained their symbiotic properties. PMID:12920984

  14. Application of support vector machine method for the analysis of absorption spectra of exhaled air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yury V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgeny L.

    2014-11-01

    The results of the joint use of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemometrics methods in gas analysis of exhaled air of patients with respiratory diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia and lung cancer) are presented. The absorption spectra of exhaled breath of all volunteers were measured, the classification methods of the scans of the absorption spectra were applied, the sensitivity/specificity of the classification results were determined. It were obtained a result of nosological in pairs classification for all investigated volunteers, indices of sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Stationary Plasma Thruster Ion Velocity Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.

    1994-01-01

    A nonintrusive velocity diagnostic based on laser induced fluorescence of the 5d4F(5/2)-6p4D(5/2) singly ionized xenon transition was used to interrogate the exhaust of a 1.5 kW Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT). A detailed map of plume velocity vectors was obtained using a simplified, cost-effective, nonintrusive, semiconductor laser based scheme. Circumferential velocities on the order of 250 m/s were measured which implied induced momentum torques of approximately 5 x 10(exp -2) N-cm. Axial and radial velocities were evaluated one mm downstream of the cathode at several locations across the width of the annular acceleration channel. Radial velocities varied linearly with radial distance. A maximum radial velocity of 7500 m/s was measured 8 mm from the center of the channel. Axial velocities as large as 16,500 m/s were measured.

  16. An experimental and numerical investigation of velocity in an enclosed residential complex parking area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Khosro; Motlagh, Majid Shafie Pour; Mousavi, Monireh Sadat; Niksokhan, Mohhamad hosein; Vosoughifar, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present research is analysis of velocity vector and magnitude in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran. Velocity parameters are key factor and can be helpful in proposing solutions to improve indoor air quality. Since The flow pattern determines that how and where the pollutants propagate. In this research at first, the proportion of vehicular exhaust emissions is estimated and then experimental and numerical analyses are performed. In experimental analysis, a full-scale experiment of parking area has been used; velocity is measured by calibrated measuring devices. Samples were performed in several times. In order to perform numerical calculation, a 3-dimensional model was created by Fluent software that solves flow equations with finite volume method. In this research, the flow condition is assumed to be incompressible and turbulent. Standard k-ɛ scheme was selected as turbulence modeling. In the Computational Fluid Dynamics technique the geometry of parking area is generated in ICEM-CFD software and hexahedral mesh type is used. Velocity vectors and magnitudes in an enclosed residential complex parking in Tehran are estimated. The findings obtained from numerical simulation are in complete accord with experimental results.

  17. Influence of the inlet velocity profiles on the prediction of velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Shah M.E.; Deev, A.V.; Subaschandar, N.; Rasul, M.G.; Khan, M.M.K.

    2009-01-15

    The influence of the velocity profile at the inlet boundary on the simulation of air velocity distribution inside an electrostatic precipitator is presented in this study. Measurements and simulations were performed in a duct and an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). A four-hole cobra probe was used for the measurement of velocity distribution. The flow simulation was performed by using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Numerical calculations for the air flow were carried out by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the realizable k-{epsilon} turbulence model equations. Simulations were performed with two different velocity profiles at the inlet boundary - one with a uniform (ideal) velocity profile and the other with a non-uniform (real) velocity profile to demonstrate the effect of velocity inlet boundary condition on the flow simulation results inside an ESP. The real velocity profile was obtained from the velocity measured at different points of the inlet boundary whereas the ideal velocity profile was obtained by calculating the mean value of the measured data. Simulation with the real velocity profile at the inlet boundary was found to predict better the velocity distribution inside the ESP suggesting that an experimentally measured velocity profile could be used as velocity inlet boundary condition for an accurate numerical simulation of the ESP. (author)

  18. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.; Utt, Carroll E.

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  19. Air-Velocity Sensor For Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. Douglas; Hellbaum, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    New airspeed sensor conceived for accurate measurement of both airspeed and direction of flight of helicopter. Direction of motion of helicopter displayed by lighting of one of series of lamps encircling digital display of airspeed. Pressure transducer measures difference between impact and static pressures at tip of rotor blade by use of conventional pitot-static-tube assembly.

  20. Effects of air velocity on broiler production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent improvements in poultry genetics have resulted in increased growth rates (Havenstein et al., 2003) and total heat production (Chepete and Xin, 2001; Xin et al., 2001). In addition, market weights have also increased with white the meat demand of the U.S. resulting in birds being marketed at ...

  1. Signal conditioning electronics for a laser vector velocimeter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.; Hornkohl, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    A type of laser velocimeter termed a laser vector velocimeter (LVV) resolves the 180 deg directional ambiguity problem of the conventional laser velocimeter by exploiting optical frequency translation techniques and frequency division demultiplexing techniques. This paper defines some fundamental LVV system signal characteristics and signal conditioning and data acquisition problems. The signal conditioning electronics for a three velocity component LVV system are described. Data obtained from atmospheric wind velocity measurements using a two velocity component LVV system are presented to illustrate the vector velocity measurement capabilities of the system. The operational status LVV systems presently in use are two orthogonal velocity component units. However, a laboratory status LVV system has been used to make three-dimensional vector velocity measurements.

  2. Blending Velocities In Task Space In Computing Robot Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Blending of linear and angular velocities between sequential specified points in task space constitutes theoretical basis of improved method of computing trajectories followed by robotic manipulators. In method, generalized velocity-vector-blending technique provides relatively simple, common conceptual framework for blending linear, angular, and other parametric velocities. Velocity vectors originate from straight-line segments connecting specified task-space points, called "via frames" and represent specified robot poses. Linear-velocity-blending functions chosen from among first-order, third-order-polynomial, and cycloidal options. Angular velocities blended by use of first-order approximation of previous orientation-matrix-blending formulation. Angular-velocity approximation yields small residual error, quantified and corrected. Method offers both relative simplicity and speed needed for generation of robot-manipulator trajectories in real time.

  3. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  4. Development of a standing wave apparatus for calibrating acoustic vector sensors and hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Richard D; Sagers, Jason D; Wilson, Preston S

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to calibrate acoustic hydrophones and vector sensors between 25 and 2000 Hz. A standing wave field is established inside a vertically oriented, water-filled, elastic-walled waveguide by a piston velocity source at the bottom and a pressure-release boundary condition at the air/water interface. A computer-controlled linear positioning system allows a device under test to be precisely located in the water column while the acoustic response is measured. Some of the challenges of calibrating hydrophones and vector sensors in such an apparatus are discussed, including designing the waveguide to mitigate dispersion, understanding the impact of waveguide structural resonances on the acoustic field, and developing algorithms to post-process calibration measurement data performed in a standing wave field. Data from waveguide characterization experiments and calibration measurements are presented and calibration uncertainty is reported. PMID:26827015

  5. HMI Measured Doppler Velocity Contamination from the SDO Orbit Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Philip H.; SDO HMI Team

    2016-05-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) measures sets of filtergrams which are converted into velocity and magnetic field maps each 45-seconds with its front camera and each 12 minutes with its side camera. In addition to solar phototspheric motions the velocity measurements include a direct component from the line-of-sight component of the SDO orbit. Since the magnetic field is computed as the difference between the velocity measured in left and right circular polarization the orbit velocity is canceled only if the celocity is properly calibrated. When the orbit component of the velocity is subtracted for each pixel the remaining "solar" velocity shows a residual signal which is equal to about 2% of the c. +- 3000 m/s orbit velocity in a nearly linear relationship. This implies an error in our knowledge of some of the details of as-built filter components. The model instrument transmission profile is required for calibration of all HMI level 1.5 “observable” quantities. This systematic error is very likely the source of 12- and 24-hour variations in most HMI data products. Over the years since launch a substantial effort has been dedicated to understanding the origin of this problem. While the instrument as presently calibrated (Couvidat et al. 2012 and 2016) meets all of the “Level-1” mission requirements it fails to meet the stated goal of 10 m/s accuracy for velocity data products and some not stated but generally assumed goals for other products. For the velocity measurements this has not been a significant problem since the prime HMI goals of obtaining data for helioseismology are not affected by this systematic error. However the orbit signal leaking into the magnetograms and vector magnetograms degrades the ability to accomplish some of the mission science goals at the expected levels of accuracy. This poster presents the current state of understanding of the source of this systematic error and

  6. Polar versus Cartesian velocity models for maneuvering target tracking with IMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laneuville, Dann

    This paper compares various model sets in different IMM filters for the maneuvering target tracking problem. The aim is to see whether we can improve the tracking performance of what is certainly the most widely used model set in the literature for the maneuvering target tracking problem: a Nearly Constant Velocity model and a Nearly Coordinated Turn model. Our new challenger set consists of a mixed Cartesian position and polar velocity state vector to describe the uniform motion segments and is augmented with the turn rate to obtain the second model for the maneuvering segments. This paper also gives a general procedure to discretize up to second order any non-linear continuous time model with linear diffusion. Comparative simulations on an air defence scenario with a 2D radar, show that this new approach improves significantly the tracking performance in this case.

  7. Velocity fluctuation analysis via dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.

    2006-10-15

    A new method of calculating one-dimensional velocity fluctuations from spatially resolved density fluctuation measurements is presented. The algorithm uses vector-matching methods of dynamic programming that match structures, such as turbulent fluctuations, in two data sets. The associated time delay between data sets is estimated by determining an optimal path to transform one vector to another. This time-delay-estimation (TDE) method establishes a new benchmark for velocity analysis by achieving higher sensitivity and frequency response than previously developed methods, such as time-resolved cross correlations and wavelets. TDE has been successfully applied to beam emission spectroscopy measurements of density fluctuations to obtain poloidal flow fluctuations associated with such phenomena as the geodesic acoustic mode. The dynamic programming algorithm should allow extension to high frequency velocity fluctuations associated with underlying electrostatic potential and resulting ExB fluctuations.

  8. Foamy virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D W; Miller, A D

    1996-01-01

    Human foamy virus (HFV) is a retrovirus of the spumavirus family. We have constructed vectors based on HFV that encode neomycin phosphotransferase and alkaline phosphatase. These vectors are able to transduce a wide variety of vertebrate cells by integration of the vector genome. Unlike vectors based on murine leukemia virus, HFV vectors are not inactivated by human serum, and they transduce stationary-phase cultures more efficiently than murine leukemia virus vectors. These properties, as well as their large packaging capacity, make HFV vectors promising gene transfer vehicles. PMID:8523528

  9. Teaching Universal Gravitation with Vector Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Like many high school and college physics teachers, I have found playing vector games to be a useful way of illustrating the concepts of inertia, velocity, and acceleration. Like many, I have also had difficulty in trying to get students to understand Newton's law of universal gravitation, specifically the inverse-square law and its application to…

  10. Electromagnetic energy flux vector for a dispersive linear medium.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Michael E; Akozbek, Neset

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic energy flux vector in a dispersive linear medium is derived from energy conservation and microscopic quantum electrodynamics and is found to be of the Umov form as the product of an electromagnetic energy density and a velocity vector. PMID:16803063

  11. Issues in acoustic vector-sensor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Malcolm Alistair

    This dissertation examines the ability of acoustic vector sensors to solve the passive direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and 3-D localization problems. These sensors measure the three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity vector, as well as the acoustic pressure, at one location. By preserving directional information that is present in the structure of the velocity field, they gain a number of advantages over traditional arrays of scalar sensors, such as hydrophones and microphones. We compute and examine, through the Cramér-Rao bound and beam-forming based methods, the ability of arrays of acoustic vector sensors to estimate direction. We first consider the case of an array in free space then extend these results to account for the presence of a reflecting boundary, such as the seabed or a vessel's hull, located near the array. Next, we derive expressions for the noise correlation structure induced by various ambient noise fields, isotropic and anisotropic, at an acoustic vector sensor array, and use them to examine its localization performance. We then propose a decentralized processing scheme to rapidly locate a wideband target in three dimensions. Finally, we present a general framework for the analysis of errors associated with the estimation of a vector, or system of vectors, that has geometrical interpretations in terms of length, angle, etc. The framework is employed throughout the thesis.

  12. Pore Velocity Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devary, J. L.; Doctor, P. G.

    1982-08-01

    Geostatistical data analysis techniques were used to stochastically model the spatial variability of groundwater pore velocity in a potential waste repository site. Kriging algorithms were applied to Hanford Reservation data to estimate hydraulic conductivities, hydraulic head gradients, and pore velocities. A first-order Taylor series expansion for pore velocity was used to statistically combine hydraulic conductivity, hydraulic head gradient, and effective porosity surfaces and uncertainties to characterize the pore velocity uncertainty. Use of these techniques permits the estimation of pore velocity uncertainties when pore velocity measurements do not exist. Large pore velocity estimation uncertainties were found to be located in the region where the hydraulic head gradient relative uncertainty was maximal.

  13. Velocity vector LDA measurement inside a pitched blade impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacnik, Michal; Lamka, Jaromir; Fort, Ivan

    1993-02-01

    The integral quantities of flow in a mixing system with a pitched blade impeller are generally known, but the flow pattern inside and in the close neighborhood of the impeller is not well documented. This paper describes results of pitched blade impeller synchronous measurements obtained by Laser Doppler Anemometry.

  14. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  15. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  16. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren.

    PubMed

    Iffa, Emishaw D; Aziz, A Rashid A; Malik, Aamir S

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed. PMID:21343981

  17. Method for determining individual deposition velocities of radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Angell, C T; Pedretti, M; Norman, E B

    2015-04-01

    The deposition velocity of radon progeny is used to model the removal of progeny from the air by surfaces in assessing indoor air quality. It can also be used to assess radon-induced background in sensitive, low-background experiments. A single value of the deposition velocity is typically used for all radon progeny for modeling purposes. This paper presents a method for uniquely determining the individual deposition velocities of radon progeny. Measurements demonstrating the method were carried out. PMID:25618737

  18. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  19. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  20. Restart 68000 vector remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, J.

    1984-05-03

    The circuit described allows power-on-reset (POR) vector fetch from ROM for a 68000 microprocessor. It offers programmability of exception vectors, including the restart vector. This method eliminates the need for high-resolution, address-decoder peripheral circuitry.

  1. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  2. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  3. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  4. Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, David R.

    This thesis focuses on the description and measurement of the underwater acoustic field, based on vector properties of acoustic particle velocity. The specific goal is to interpret vector sensor measurements in underwater waveguides, in particular those measurements made in littoral (shallow) waters. To that end, theoretical models, which include the effects of reflections from the waveguide boundaries, are developed for the acoustic intensity, i.e. the product of acoustic pressure and acoustic particle velocity. Vector properties of acoustic intensity are shown to correspond to a non-dimensional vector property of acoustic particle velocity, its degree of circularity, which describes the trajectory of particle motion. Both experimental measurements and simulations of this non-dimensional vector property are used to analyze characteristics of sound propagation in underwater waveguides. Two measurement techniques are utilized in the experiments described in this thesis. In the first, particle velocity is obtained indirectly by time integration of the measured pressure gradient between two closely spaced (with respect to an acoustic wavelength) conventional pressure sensitive hydrophones. This method was used in ocean experiments conducted with vertical line arrays of hydrophones. In the second technique, particle velocity is measured directly by time integration of the signal generated by an accelerometer. An additional pressure measurement from a co-located hydrophone forms what is known as a "combined sensor" in the Russian literature, which allows for estimation of the vector acoustic intensity. This method was utilized mainly in laboratory experiments.

  5. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  6. Flow in Smooth Straight Pipes at Velocities Above and Below Sound Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frossel, W

    1938-01-01

    To investigate the laws of flow of compressible fluids in pipes, tests were carried out with air flowing at velocities below and above that of sound in straight smooth pipes. Air was chosen as the flow medium. In order that the effect of compressibility may be brought out most effectively, the velocity should lie between 100 and 500 m/s (200 and 1,000 mph); that is, be of the order of magnitude of the velocity of sound in air. The behavior of the compression shock in a smooth cylindrical pipe was also investigated. The compression shock can occur at any position in the pipe, depending on the throttling downstream, and travels upstream with increasing throttling up to the pipe entrance, so that only subsonic velocities occur in the pipe.

  7. Measuring flying object velocity with CCD sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricny, Vaclav; Mikulec, Jiri

    1994-06-01

    An autonomous optoelectronic method of measuring the flying objects track velocity vector (TVV) using digital signal two-line CCD sensors has been developed and simulated at the Department of Radioelectronics at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic. The principle of the method, the computer simulation of measuring device operations, the application of statistic estimates for the precision of values measured, and the presentation of the results achieved are described.

  8. Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 Contingency Drogue Deploy Velocity Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, Robert S.; Stochowiak, Susan; Smith, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    As a backup to the GPS-aided Kalman filter and the Barometric altimeter, an "adjusted" velocity trigger is used during entry to trigger the chain of events that leads to drogue chute deploy for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1). Even though this scenario is multiple failures deep, the Orion Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) software makes use of a clever technique that was taken from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) program, which recently successfully landing the Curiosity rover on Mars. MSL used this technique to jettison the heat shield at the proper time during descent. Originally, Orion use the un-adjusted navigated velocity, but the removal of the Star Tracker to save costs for EFT-1, increased attitude errors which increased inertial propagation errors to the point where the un-adjusted velocity caused altitude dispersions at drogue deploy to be too large. Thus, to reduce dispersions, the velocity vector is projected onto a "reference" vector that represents the nominal "truth" vector at the desired point in the trajectory. Because the navigation errors are largely perpendicular to the truth vector, this projection significantly reduces dispersions in the velocity magnitude. This paper will detail the evolution of this trigger method for the Orion project and cover the various methods tested to determine the reference "truth" vector; and at what point in the trajectory it should be computed.

  9. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  10. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  11. Teaching Universal Gravitation with Vector Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Matthew

    2008-12-01

    Like many high school and college physics teachers, I have found playing vector games to be a useful way of illustrating the concepts of inertia, velocity, and acceleration. Like many, I have also had difficulty in trying to get students to understand Newton's law of universal gravitation, specifically the inverse-square law and its application to motion. In this paper, I'll outline a way to address this problem through use of a vector game. The inspiration for this idea came from a January 1998 article in The Physics Teacher by Michael Vinson entitled "Space Race: A Game of Physics Adventure."

  12. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  13. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  14. Three-dimensional flow vectors from rf ultrasound signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Theresa A.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Fowlkes, J. B.

    2002-04-01

    A new ultrasound technique for determining three-dimensional velocity vectors has been devised using radio frequency (RF) data from commercially available scanners. Applied to blood flow, this technique could prove useful for evaluating hemodynamics and detecting stenoses. Three orthogonal velocity vectors are computed from the RF signals of two steered beams from a single array. The in-plane velocities are determined using standard Doppler analysis, while the out-of-plane component is derived from the total velocity as computed from temporal decorrelation and the in-plane components. The technique was tested using contrast agent pumped through a flow tube. A GE Vingmed SystemV scanner with a 10 MHz linear array provided scans at beam steering angles of +/- 20 degree(s). Both Doppler velocities and temporal complex decorrelation were computed for each digitized voxel. Additional studies were done on a blood mimicking fluid and in vivo with a canine femoral artery. Vector plots were constructed to show flow for various transducer angles. Angle estimates were within 20 degree(s), and the mean error for the velocity amplitude was less than 15%. The in vivo results provided velocity estimates consistent with the literature. The proposed method, unlike current Doppler velocity measurement techniques, provides quantitative velocity information independent of transducer orientation.

  15. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  16. 30 CFR 75.327 - Air courses and trolley haulage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... enough entries or rooms as intake air courses to limit the velocity of air currents in the haulageways to... approves a higher velocity, the velocity of the air current in the trolley haulage entries shall be limited to not more than 250 feet per minute. A higher air velocity may be required to limit the...

  17. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  18. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  19. The role of the harmonic vector average in motion integration

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Alan; Scarfe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The local speeds of object contours vary systematically with the cosine of the angle between the normal component of the local velocity and the global object motion direction. An array of Gabor elements whose speed changes with local spatial orientation in accordance with this pattern can appear to move as a single surface. The apparent direction of motion of plaids and Gabor arrays has variously been proposed to result from feature tracking, vector addition and vector averaging in addition to the geometrically correct global velocity as indicated by the intersection of constraints (IOC) solution. Here a new combination rule, the harmonic vector average (HVA), is introduced, as well as a new algorithm for computing the IOC solution. The vector sum can be discounted as an integration strategy as it increases with the number of elements. The vector average over local vectors that vary in direction always provides an underestimate of the true global speed. The HVA, however, provides the correct global speed and direction for an unbiased sample of local velocities with respect to the global motion direction, as is the case for a simple closed contour. The HVA over biased samples provides an aggregate velocity estimate that can still be combined through an IOC computation to give an accurate estimate of the global velocity, which is not true of the vector average. Psychophysical results for type II Gabor arrays show perceived direction and speed falls close to the IOC direction for Gabor arrays having a wide range of orientations but the IOC prediction fails as the mean orientation shifts away from the global motion direction and the orientation range narrows. In this case perceived velocity generally defaults to the HVA. PMID:24155716

  20. The role of the harmonic vector average in motion integration.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alan; Scarfe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The local speeds of object contours vary systematically with the cosine of the angle between the normal component of the local velocity and the global object motion direction. An array of Gabor elements whose speed changes with local spatial orientation in accordance with this pattern can appear to move as a single surface. The apparent direction of motion of plaids and Gabor arrays has variously been proposed to result from feature tracking, vector addition and vector averaging in addition to the geometrically correct global velocity as indicated by the intersection of constraints (IOC) solution. Here a new combination rule, the harmonic vector average (HVA), is introduced, as well as a new algorithm for computing the IOC solution. The vector sum can be discounted as an integration strategy as it increases with the number of elements. The vector average over local vectors that vary in direction always provides an underestimate of the true global speed. The HVA, however, provides the correct global speed and direction for an unbiased sample of local velocities with respect to the global motion direction, as is the case for a simple closed contour. The HVA over biased samples provides an aggregate velocity estimate that can still be combined through an IOC computation to give an accurate estimate of the global velocity, which is not true of the vector average. Psychophysical results for type II Gabor arrays show perceived direction and speed falls close to the IOC direction for Gabor arrays having a wide range of orientations but the IOC prediction fails as the mean orientation shifts away from the global motion direction and the orientation range narrows. In this case perceived velocity generally defaults to the HVA. PMID:24155716

  1. Symbolic computer vector analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A MACSYMA program is described which performs symbolic vector algebra and vector calculus. The program can combine and simplify symbolic expressions including dot products and cross products, together with the gradient, divergence, curl, and Laplacian operators. The distribution of these operators over sums or products is under user control, as are various other expansions, including expansion into components in any specific orthogonal coordinate system. There is also a capability for deriving the scalar or vector potential of a vector field. Examples include derivation of the partial differential equations describing fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics, for 12 different classic orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.

  2. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  3. Steel Spheres and Skydiver--Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa Leme, J.; Moura, C.; Costa, Cintia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of open source video analysis software in the study of the relationship between the velocity of falling objects and time. We discuss an experiment in which a steel sphere falls in a container filled with two immiscible liquids. The motion is similar to that of a skydiver falling through air.

  4. Vector Sensor Arrays in Underwater Acoustic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Paulo; Felisberto, Paulo; Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Traditionally, ocean acoustic signals have been acquired using hydrophones, which measure the pressure field and are typically omnidirectional. A vector sensor measures both the acoustic pressure and the three components of particle velocity. Assembled into an array, a vector sensor array (VSA) improves spatial filtering capabilities when compared with arrays of same length and same number of hydrophones. The objective of this work is to show the advantage of the use of vector sensors in underwater acoustic applications such as direction of arrival (DOA) estimation and geoacoustic inversion. Beyond the improvements in DOA estimation, it will be shown the advantages of using the VSA in bottom parameters estimation. Additionally, is tested the possibility of using high frequency signals (say 8-14 kHz band), acquired during the MakaiEx 2005, to allow a small aperture array, reducing the cost of actual sub-bottom profilers and providing a compact and easy-to-deploy system.

  5. HF Doppler observations of vector plasma drifts in the evening F-region at the magnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Jayachandran, B.; Balachandran Nair, R.; Namboothiri, S. P.; Bailey, G. J.; Rao, P. B.

    1992-12-01

    Observations are presented of the vector plasma drifts in the equatorial F-region at Trivandrum (India), made during the afternoon-midnight period of March-April 1988 with an HF Doppler radar. The vertical component of the plasma drift is characterized by a prereversal upward enhancement, which fits the interpretation based on the F-region dynamo operating at sunset. The East-West component of the plasma drift is westward during the afternoon and eastward during the night, with mean peak velocities of 30 and 110/sec, respectively. The North-South component, representing the meridional neutral air wind, is found to be northward during the afternoon and southward during the night, with respective mean peak velocities of about 50 and 70/sec. The observations are found to be consistent with those of earlier observers using other techniques.

  6. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  7. Analysis on Sound Field Recorded with Vector Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenghua; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Renhe

    2010-09-01

    From data collected with vector sensors at several sites, the transmission losses of particle velocities and pressures are examined. In particular, the components of the particle velocity fields both normal and tangential to the horizontal plane are studied. Theoretical and experimental results show that both vertical and horizontal particle velocities can be regarded as the summation of normal modes. The lower modes dominate for the horizontal particle velocity, while higher modes are relatively important for the vertical particle velocity. The intensity of the vertical velocity decreases faster than that of the horizontal particle velocity. The experimental results also show that the same modes of the horizontal and vertical particle velocity have similar losses, but different amplitudes and phases. Theoretical analyses indicate that the difference of the mode amplitudes between horizontal particle velocity and vertical particle velocity depends on the eigenvalue and receiver depths, which can provide information on the estimation of bottom parameters. A geo-inversion scheme by the matched-field processing with a vector array is developed. The theoretical and experimental results indicate that the proposed inversion method can decrease the uncertainty of inversion in comparison with that by hydrophone arrays.

  8. Easy-to-use blood velocity measurement instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David H. R.; Chilipka, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes a new kind of clinical instrument designed to allow non-specialists to quantitatively measure blood velocity. The instrument's design utilizes vector continuous-wave (CW) Doppler. Vector CW Doppler insonates a volume with simultaneous multiple-angle beams that define a measurement region; within that region, the velocity vector of the blood can be measured independently of the probe orientation. By eliminating the need for simultaneous imaging and the specially trained technician required for the complicated instrument needed for such imaging, easy and inexpensive blood velocity measurements becomes possible. A prototype for a CW vector Doppler instrument has been used to measure blood velocity in several clinically important arteries: the radial and ulnar in the arm, the femoral in the leg, and the carotid in the neck. We report here on its first clinical use -- monitoring the flow in dialysis access grafts to prevent graft thrombosis. These early clinical results show accuracy and rapid learning of proper instrument use. The design approach presented shows much promise in creating instruments that will provide simple and low-cost-of-use procedures for measurement of blood velocity.

  9. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  10. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  11. Vertical Velocity Measurements in Warm Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of vertical air motion in warm boundary layer clouds are key for quantitatively describing cloud-scale turbulence and for improving our understanding of cloud and drizzle microphysical processes. Recently, a new technique that produces seamless measurements of vertical air velocity in the cloud and sub-cloud layers for both drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus clouds has been developed. The technique combines radar Doppler spectra-based retrievals of vertical air motion in cloud and light drizzle conditions with a novel neural network analysis during heavily drizzling periods. Observations from Doppler lidars are used to characterize sub-cloud velocities and to evaluate the performance of the technique near the cloud base. The technique is applied to several cases of stratiform clouds observed by the ARM Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod. The observations clearly illustrate coupling of the sub-cloud and cloud layer turbulent structures.

  12. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  13. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  14. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  15. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  16. Generation of vorticity and velocity dispersion by orbit crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2009-08-15

    We study the generation of vorticity and velocity dispersion by orbit crossing using cosmological numerical simulations, and calculate the backreaction of these effects on the evolution of large-scale density and velocity divergence power spectra. We use Delaunay tessellations to define the velocity field, showing that the power spectra of velocity divergence and vorticity measured in this way are unbiased and have better noise properties than for standard interpolation methods that deal with mass-weighted velocities. We show that high resolution simulations are required to recover the correct large-scale vorticity power spectrum, while poor resolution can spuriously amplify its amplitude by more than 1 order of magnitude. We measure the scalar and vector modes of the stress tensor induced by orbit crossing using an adaptive technique, showing that its vector modes lead, when input into the vorticity evolution equation, to the same vorticity power spectrum obtained from the Delaunay method. We incorporate orbit-crossing corrections to the evolution of large-scale density and velocity fields in perturbation theory by using the measured stress tensor modes. We find that at large scales (k{approx_equal}0.1h Mpc{sup -1}) vector modes have very little effect in the density power spectrum, while scalar modes (velocity dispersion) can induce percent-level corrections at z=0, particularly in the velocity divergence power spectrum. In addition, we show that the velocity power spectrum is smaller than predicted by linear theory until well into the nonlinear regime, with little contribution from virial velocities.

  17. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  18. Climate change velocity underestimates climate change exposure in mountainous regions

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Parks, Sean A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change velocity is a vector depiction of the rate of climate displacement used for assessing climate change impacts. Interpreting velocity requires an assumption that climate trajectory length is proportional to climate change exposure; longer paths suggest greater exposure. However, distance is an imperfect measure of exposure because it does not quantify the extent to which trajectories traverse areas of dissimilar climate. Here we calculate velocity and minimum cumulative exposure (MCE) in degrees Celsius along climate trajectories for North America. We find that velocity is weakly related to MCE; each metric identifies contrasting areas of vulnerability to climate change. Notably, velocity underestimates exposure in mountainous regions where climate trajectories traverse dissimilar climates, resulting in high MCE. In contrast, in flat regions velocity is high where MCE is low, as these areas have negligible climatic resistance to movement. Our results suggest that mountainous regions are more climatically isolated than previously reported. PMID:27476545

  19. Climate change velocity underestimates climate change exposure in mountainous regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Parks, Sean A.

    2016-08-01

    Climate change velocity is a vector depiction of the rate of climate displacement used for assessing climate change impacts. Interpreting velocity requires an assumption that climate trajectory length is proportional to climate change exposure; longer paths suggest greater exposure. However, distance is an imperfect measure of exposure because it does not quantify the extent to which trajectories traverse areas of dissimilar climate. Here we calculate velocity and minimum cumulative exposure (MCE) in degrees Celsius along climate trajectories for North America. We find that velocity is weakly related to MCE; each metric identifies contrasting areas of vulnerability to climate change. Notably, velocity underestimates exposure in mountainous regions where climate trajectories traverse dissimilar climates, resulting in high MCE. In contrast, in flat regions velocity is high where MCE is low, as these areas have negligible climatic resistance to movement. Our results suggest that mountainous regions are more climatically isolated than previously reported.

  20. Climate change velocity underestimates climate change exposure in mountainous regions.

    PubMed

    Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Parks, Sean A

    2016-01-01

    Climate change velocity is a vector depiction of the rate of climate displacement used for assessing climate change impacts. Interpreting velocity requires an assumption that climate trajectory length is proportional to climate change exposure; longer paths suggest greater exposure. However, distance is an imperfect measure of exposure because it does not quantify the extent to which trajectories traverse areas of dissimilar climate. Here we calculate velocity and minimum cumulative exposure (MCE) in degrees Celsius along climate trajectories for North America. We find that velocity is weakly related to MCE; each metric identifies contrasting areas of vulnerability to climate change. Notably, velocity underestimates exposure in mountainous regions where climate trajectories traverse dissimilar climates, resulting in high MCE. In contrast, in flat regions velocity is high where MCE is low, as these areas have negligible climatic resistance to movement. Our results suggest that mountainous regions are more climatically isolated than previously reported. PMID:27476545

  1. FAME Radial Velocity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.

    2000-12-01

    Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) belongs to a new generation of astrometry satellites and will probe the surrounding space some 20 times deeper than its predecessor Hipparcos. As a result we will acquire precise knowledge of 5 out of 6 components of phase-space for millions of stars. The remaining coordinate, radial velocity, will remain unknown. In this study, we look at how the knowledge of radial velocity affects the determination of the structure of the Galaxy, and its gravitational potential. We therefore propose a radial velocity survey of FAME stars, and discuss its feasibility and technical requirements.

  2. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.; Sun, Xudong

    2013-03-10

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently

  3. Performance characteristics of a variable-area vane nozzle for vectoring an ASTOVL exhaust jet up to 45 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.; Esker, Barbara S.

    1993-01-01

    Many conceptual designs for advanced short-takeoff, vertical landing (ASTOVL) aircraft need exhaust nozzles that can vector the jet to provide forces and moments for controlling the aircraft's movement or attitude in flight near the ground. A type of nozzle that can both vector the jet and vary the jet flow area is called a vane nozzle. Basically, the nozzle consists of parallel, spaced-apart flow passages formed by pairs of vanes (vanesets) that can be rotated on axes perpendicular to the flow. Two important features of this type of nozzle are the abilities to vector the jet rearward up to 45 degrees and to produce less harsh pressure and velocity footprints during vertical landing than does an equivalent single jet. A one-third-scale model of a generic vane nozzle was tested with unheated air at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility. The model had three parallel flow passages. Each passage was formed by a vaneset consisting of a long and a short vane. The longer vanes controlled the jet vector angle, and the shorter controlled the flow area. Nozzle performance for three nominal flow areas (basic and plus or minus 21 percent of basic area), each at nominal jet vector angles from -20 deg (forward of vertical) to +45 deg (rearward of vertical) are presented. The tests were made with the nozzle mounted on a model tailpipe with a blind flange on the end to simulate a closed cruise nozzle, at tailpipe-to-ambient pressure ratios from 1.8 to 4.0. Also included are jet wake data, single-vaneset vector performance for long/short and equal-length vane designs, and pumping capability. The pumping capability arises from the subambient pressure developed in the cavities between the vanesets, which could be used to aspirate flow from a source such as the engine compartment. Some of the performance characteristics are compared with characteristics of a single-jet nozzle previously reported.

  4. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  5. The acoustic vector sensor: a versatile battlefield acoustics sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bree, Hans-Elias; Wind, Jelmer W.

    2011-06-01

    The invention of the Microflown sensor has made it possible to measure acoustic particle velocity directly. An acoustic vector sensor (AVS) measures the particle velocity in three directions (the source direction) and the pressure. The sensor is a uniquely versatile battlefield sensor because its size is a few millimeters and it is sensitive to sound from 10Hz to 10kHz. This article shows field tests results of acoustic vector sensors, measuring rifles, heavy artillery, fixed wing aircraft and helicopters. Experimental data shows that the sensor is suitable as a ground sensor, mounted on a vehicle and on a UAV.

  6. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  7. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  8. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  9. Velocity profile development for a poultry facility acid scrubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of the air velocity profile for 12 experimental configurations (ECs) of an acid scrubber was carried out using an equal area traverse method with a vane axial anemometer. Four velocity profile plots were created for each configuration to determine the four optimal ECs. ECs were selecte...

  10. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  11. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  12. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  13. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  14. Advanced Ice Velocity Mapping Using Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, M. J.; Scambos, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Haran, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Improved image-to-image cross correlation software is applied to pairs of sequential Landsat 8 satellite imagery to accurately measure ice surface velocity over ice sheets and glaciers (±0.1 pixel displacement, 15 meter pixels). The high radiometric fidelity of Landsat 8's panchromatic band (12-bit), and exceptional geolocation accuracy (typically ±5 m) supports the generation of ice velocity fields over very short time intervals (e.g., 16-, 32-, or 48-day repeat images of the same scene location). The high radiometry supports velocity mapping in areas with very subtle topographic detail, including un-crevassed sastrugi regions on ice dome flanks or the ice sheet interior. New Python-based software presently under development (named PyCorr), takes two sequential Landsat 8 OLI scenes (or suitably processed ETM+ or TM scenes) and matches small sub-scenes ('chips') between the images based on similarity in their gray-scale value patterns, using an image correlation algorithm. Peak fitting in the region of maximum correlation for a chip pair yields sub-pixel fits to the feature offset vector. Vector editing after the image correlation runs seeks to eliminate spurious and cloud-impacted vectors, and correct residual geo-location error. This processing is based on plausible values of ice strain rates and known areas of near-zero ice flow (rock outcrops, ice dome areas, etc.). In preliminary processing, we have examined ~800 Landsat 8 image pairs having <20% cloud cover spanning the near-coastal Antarctic ice sheet during the 2013-14 summer season.

  15. On the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P.; Tavares, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Students of mechanics usually have difficulties when they learn about the rotation of a rigid body. These difficulties are rooted in the relation between angular momentum and angular velocity, because these vectors are not parallel, and we need in general to utilize a rotating frame of reference or a time dependent inertia tensor. We discuss a series of problems that introduce both difficulties.

  16. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  17. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  19. Shape functions for velocity interpolation in general hexahedral cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical methods for grids with irregular cells require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element (CVMFE) methods, vector shape functions approximate velocities and vector test functions enforce a discrete form of Darcy's law. In this paper, a new vector shape function is developed for use with irregular, hexahedral cells (trilinear images of cubes). It interpolates velocities and fluxes quadratically, because as shown here, the usual Piola-transformed shape functions, which interpolate linearly, cannot match uniform flow on general hexahedral cells. Truncation-error estimates for the shape function are demonstrated. CVMFE simulations of uniform and non-uniform flow with irregular meshes show first- and second-order convergence of fluxes in the L2 norm in the presence and absence of singularities, respectively.

  20. A new instrumentation for particle velocity and velocity related measurements under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weijia

    This dissertation investigates the capability of a new instrument for small particle velocity measurement and velocity related signal analysis in an underwater environment. This research started from the laser beam quality test, which was performed in air. It was conducted mainly by means of an optical fiber sensor combined with a computer controlled stepping motor as well as two other methods, edge detection and needle-tip scattering. The stepping motor offers a constant velocity to the fiber sensor, so that the beam separation can be accurately measured by using the constant velocity value and the transit time determined by the cross correlation function of two digital signals. Meanwhile, information of the beam intensity profile, the parallelism of the two beams and the in-air beam widths can also be obtained in the test. By using the calibrated beam separation of the ribbon pair in the beam quality test, particle velocity measurements are carried out based on the relation between velocity, displacement and time in a 500-liter open water tank. The time delay for a particle crossing over the two ribbons in sequence is obtained by computing the cross correlation of the two signals. In fact, the time delay is actually a statistical mean value of many particles that cross over the ribbons in a short time. So is the measured velocity. The third part of this research is the practical study on pulse shape analysis based on the data sets of the velocity measurement. Several computer programs are developed to explore the pulse height distribution in a data set, to study the pulse degeneration, the relationship between the pulse width and the velocity, and the in-water beam width information. Some important reference materials are displayed in the appendices such as the fundamentals of the cross correlation and auto correlation, three main MATLAB programs developed for this research, the theoretical analysis of particle diffraction.

  1. Gunshot residue particle velocity and deceleration.

    PubMed

    De Forest, Peter R; Martir, Kirby; Pizzola, Peter A

    2004-11-01

    The velocity of over 800 gunshot residue particles from eight different sources was determined using high speed stroboscopic photography (spark gap light source). These particles were found to have an average velocity of 500 to 600 ft per second. Many particles acquired considerably higher velocities. Thus, the particles have sufficient energy to embed themselves within certain nearby targets like skin or fabric. The relatively high velocity that the particles acquire explain the formation of stippling on skin in close proximity to a muzzle discharge. These findings also indicate little influence of air currents on particle behavior near the muzzle. The deceleration of less than 100 particles during a 100-microsecond interval was also calculated. The particles experienced rapid rates of deceleration which would explain why few particles are found in test firings beyond 3 ft from the muzzle of a discharged firearm. Because of their relatively high velocity, normal wind velocity would not be expected to significantly influence their motion near the muzzle. PMID:15568695

  2. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  3. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  4. Scalar and vector spherical harmonic spectral equations of rotating magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivers, D. J.; Phillips, C. G.

    2008-12-01

    Vector spherical harmonic analyses have been used effectively to solve laminar and mean-field magnetohydrodynamic dynamo problems with product interactions, such as magnetic induction, anisotropic alpha-effect and anisotropic magnetic diffusion, that are difficult to analyse spectrally in spherical geometries. Spectral forms of the non-linear rotating, Boussinesq and anelastic, momentum, magnetic induction and heat equations are derived for spherical geometries from vector spherical harmonic expansions of the velocity, magnetic induction, vorticity, electrical current and gravitational acceleration and from scalar spherical harmonic expansions of the pressure and temperature. By combining the vector spherical harmonic spectral forms of the momentum equation and the magnetic induction equation with poloidal-toroidal representations of the velocity and the magnetic field, non-linear spherical harmonic spectral equations are also derived for the poloidal-toroidal potentials of the velocity or the momentum density in the anelastic approximation and the magnetic field. Both compact and spectral interaction expansion forms are given. Vector spherical harmonic spectral forms of the linearized rotating magnetic induction, momentum and heat equations for a general basic state can be obtained by linearizing the corresponding non-linear spectral equations. Similarly, the spherical harmonic spectral equations for the poloidal-toroidal potentials of the velocity and the magnetic field may be linearized. However, for computational applications, new alternative hybrid linearized spectral equations are derived. The algorithmically simpler hybrid equations depend on vector spherical harmonic expansions of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity, electrical current and gravitational acceleration of the basic state and scalar spherical harmonic expansions of the poloidal-toroidal potentials of the perturbation velocity, magnetic field and temperature. The spectral equations derived

  5. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2016-05-14

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined. PMID:27179476

  6. Fluidic angular velocity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluidic sensor providing a differential pressure signal proportional to the angular velocity of a rotary input is described. In one embodiment the sensor includes a fluid pump having an impeller coupled to a rotary input. A housing forming a constricting fluid flow chamber is connected to the fluid input of the pump. The housing is provided with a fluid flow restrictive input to the flow chamber and a port communicating with the interior of the flow chamber. The differential pressure signal measured across the flow restrictive input is relatively noise free and proportional to the square of the angular velocity of the impeller. In an alternative embodiment, the flow chamber has a generally cylindrical configuration and plates having flow restrictive apertures are disposed within the chamber downstream from the housing port. In this embodiment, the differential pressure signal is found to be approximately linear with the angular velocity of the impeller.

  7. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  8. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  9. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  10. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behavior of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the big flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  11. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results aremore » used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.« less

  12. MSE velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimd, C.; Courtois, H.; Koda, J.

    2015-12-01

    A huge velocity survey based on the Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer facility (MSE) is proposed, aiming at investigating the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web over 3π steradians up to ˜1 Gpc and at unprecedented spatial resolution, its relationship with the galaxy formation process, and the bias between galaxies and dark matter during the last three billions years. The cross-correlation of velocity and density fields will further allow the probe any deviation from General Relativity by measuring the the linear-growth rate of cosmic structures at precision competitive with high-redshift spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  13. DVL Angular Velocity Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Wolfgang

    1944-01-01

    In many studies, especially of nonstationary flight motion, it is necessary to determine the angular velocities at which the airplane rotates about its various axes. The three-component recorder is designed to serve this purpose. If the angular velocity for one flight attitude is known, other important quantities can be derived from its time rate of change, such as the angular acceleration by differentiations, or - by integration - the angles of position of the airplane - that is, the angles formed by the airplane axes with the axis direction presented at the instant of the beginning of the motion that is to be investigated.

  14. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  15. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  16. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  17. Acoustic vector fields in underwater waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapids, Brian

    2005-09-01

    The ability to compute the sound pressure level as well as the vectors associated with the acoustic particle motion has existed for some time. However, propagation studies and ambient noise investigations have typically focused only upon the sound pressure levels that would be observed by an omnidirectional hydrophone or array of hydrophones. Recent interest in geophones and accelerometers for use as vector and dyadic sensors should encourage the investigation and analysis of the underlying vector fields contributing to the acoustic intensity and energy density fields. The frequency domain properties of the acoustic vector field generated by monopole sources having frequencies <1kHz in a simple iso-velocity waveguide are presented in order to build a fundamental understanding of the related quantities. Subsequently, similar field quantities computed for more realistic environments such as downward refracting profiles and deep-water profiles supporting convergence zone propagation will be discussed. Regions and phenomena associated with perturbations in the energy flux density will be highlighted.

  18. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  19. Vector WIMP miracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Seto, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin-one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the Higgs mass is often predicted to be 120-125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of Higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this Letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  20. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  1. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  2. Performance of vector sensors in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Henry; Baggeroer, Arthur

    2003-10-01

    Vector sensors are super gain devices that can provide ``array gain'' against ocean noise with a point sensor. As supergain devices they have increased sensitivity to nonacoustic noise components. This paper reviews and summarizes the processing gain that is achievable in various noise fields. Comparisons are made with an omni-directional sensor and with the correlation of a pair of closely spaced omni-directional sensors. Total processing gain that consists of both spatial and temporal gain is considered so that a proper analysis and interpretation of multiplicative processing can be made. The performance of ``intensity sensors'' (pressure times velocity) that are obtained by multiplying the omnidirectional component with a co-located dipole is also considered. A misinterpretation, that is common in the literature, concerning the performance of intensity sensors is discussed. The adaptive cardioid processing of vector sensors is also reviewed.

  3. Satellite Angular Rate Estimation From Vector Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Harman, Richard R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the angular rate vector of a satellite which is based on the time derivatives of vector measurements expressed in a reference and body coordinate. The computed derivatives are fed into a spacial Kalman filter which yields an estimate of the spacecraft angular velocity. The filter, named Extended Interlaced Kalman Filter (EIKF), is an extension of the Kalman filter which, although being linear, estimates the state of a nonlinear dynamic system. It consists of two or three parallel Kalman filters whose individual estimates are fed to one another and are considered as known inputs by the other parallel filter(s). The nonlinear dynamics stem from the nonlinear differential equation that describes the rotation of a three dimensional body. Initial results, using simulated data, and real Rossi X ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data indicate that the algorithm is efficient and robust.

  4. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  5. Ellipsoid flowed around by a harmonic vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, A. O.; Savchenko, O. Ya.

    2012-03-01

    We consider the screening of an external magnetic field in which a superconducting ellipsoid is inserted and a change in the velocity distribution in an ideal liquid flowing around an ellipsoid inserted in it. In both cases, the solution is given by a harmonic vector field parallel to the surface near the ellipsoid.

  6. Extraction of the local phase velocity and the group velocity from surface noise source in microseismic monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Malgorzata; Roux, Philippe; Bardainne, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the extraction of the local phase velocity and the group velocity from surface noise source in microseismic monitoring. One of the biggest challenges in microseismic monitoring is surface seismic noise. Microseismic surface studies are often contaminated with instrumental and ambient seismic noise, originating from both natural (wind, rain) and anthropogenic sources (injection, pumps, infrastructure, traffic). The two primary ways to attenuate the undesired surface noise sources are via processing and acquisition strategies. At the acquisition stage, one solution is through the use of patch array. One patch is a group of 48 vertical sensors densely distributed on the area of~150m*150m, and one trace is the array of 12 vertical geophones. In the present work, 44 patches were sparsely distributed on a 41 square kilometer area. Benefitting from continuous recording, we used Matched Field Processing (MFP) methods to extract local phase and group velocities over the whole area. The aim of this technique is to detect and locate uncoherent noise sources while using array-processing methods. The method is based on the comparison between a recorded wave field per patch (the data vector) and a theoretical (or modeled) wave-field (the replica vector) in the frequency domain. The replica vector is a Green's function at a given frequency, which depends on the following parameters: position (x,y) in 2D-grid and a phase velocity. The noise source location is obtained by matching the data vector with the replica vector using a linear "low-resolution" algorithm or a nonlinear "high-resolution" adaptive processor. These algorithms are defined for each point in the 2D - grid and for each phase velocity. The phase velocity per patch is optimal if it maximizes the processor output. As a result, an ambiguity surface is produced which shows the probability of presence of primary noise sources per patch. The combination of all the maps per patch

  7. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  8. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  9. Applications Using AIRS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Olsen, E. T.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. For vector-borne disease, research is underway using AIRS near surface retrievals to assess outbreak risk, mosquito incubation periods and epidemic potential for dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. For drought applications, AIRS temperature and humidity data are being used in the development of new drought indicators and improvement in the understanding of drought development. For volcanic hazards, new algorithms using AIRS data are in development to improve the reporting of sulfur dioxide concentration, the burden and height of volcanic ash and dust, all of which pose a safety threat to aircraft. In addition, anomaly maps of many of AIRS standard products are being produced to help highlight "hot spots" and illustrate trends. To distribute it's applications imagery, AIRS is leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving, distribution and participation in the BEDI. This poster will communicate the status of the applications effort for the AIRS Project and provide examples of new maps designed to best communicate the AIRS data.

  10. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  11. Transverse vorticity measurements. [to evaluate mean velocity distribution of shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A technique, involving programmed digital calculations, is proposed for evaluating transverse vorticity in typical laboratory shear flows from an array of four hot-wire probes. The computing scheme successfully recovers the velocity vector information from a wide range of velocity magnitudes and a wide range of pitch angles. It is readily implemented in a batch process mode on a digital computer.

  12. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  13. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  14. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  15. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  16. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years. PMID:20128467

  17. Research in vector control

    PubMed Central

    Quarterman, K. D.

    1963-01-01

    Current research on vector control is directed mainly at finding answers to the problem of resistance. Despite considerable advances in knowledge of the genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and ecology of resistant vectors, the only practical answer found so far has been the development of new, substitute insecticides. At present the operational needs of existing large-scale control or eradication programmes swallow up much of the funds, personnel and facilities that might otherwise be devoted to basic research. Moreover, to back up these programmes, there is a continuing need for applied research on such questions as the packaging of pesticides, improvements in equipment and the development of new formulations. The author gives examples of applied research already carried out or in progress and indicates some areas of both basic and applied research demanding urgent attention. Like other participants in the seminar, he stresses the fundamental importance of ecological studies. He also examines the concept of integrated vector control and points out that the realization of this concept presupposes close co-ordination between basic and applied research, laboratory and field studies, and investigations on chemical and non-chemical vector control measures. PMID:20604177

  18. Fall velocity of multi-shaped clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate settling velocity predictions of differently shaped micro- or macroclasts are required in many branches of science and engineering. Here, a single, dimensionally correct equation is presented that yields a significant improvement on previous settling formulas for a wide range of clast shapes. For smooth or irregular clasts with known axial dimensions, a partially polynomial equation based on the logarithmic values of dimensionless sizes and settling velocities is presented, in which the values of only one coefficient and one exponent need to be adapted for different shapes, irrespective of the Reynolds number. For irregular, natural clasts with unknown axial dimensions, a polynomial equation of the same form is applied, but with different coefficients. Comparison of the predicted and measured settling velocities of 8 different shape classes as well as natural grains with unknown axial dimensions in liquids, representing a total of 390 experimental data points, shows a mean percentage error of - 0.83% and a combined R2 value of 0.998. The settling data of 169 differently shaped particles of pumice, glass and feldspar falling in air were also analyzed, which demonstrates that the proposed equation is also valid for these conditions. Two additional shape classes were identified in the latter data set, although the resultant equations are less accurate than for liquids. An Excel spreadsheet is provided to facilitate the calculation of fall velocities for grains settling individually and in groups, or alternatively to determine the equivalent sieve size from the settling velocity, which can be used to calibrate settling tubes.

  19. Complex Vector Formalism of Harmonic Oscillator in Geometric Algebra: Particle Mass, Spin and Dynamics in Complex Vector Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, K.

    2014-03-01

    Elementary particles are considered as local oscillators under the influence of zeropoint fields. Such oscillatory behavior of the particles leads to the deviations in their path of motion. The oscillations of the particle in general may be considered as complex rotations in complex vector space. The local particle harmonic oscillator is analyzed in the complex vector formalism considering the algebra of complex vectors. The particle spin is viewed as zeropoint angular momentum represented by a bivector. It has been shown that the particle spin plays an important role in the kinematical intrinsic or local motion of the particle. From the complex vector formalism of harmonic oscillator, for the first time, a relation between mass and bivector spin has been derived in the form . Where, is the angular velocity bivector of complex rotations, is the velocity of light. The unit vector acts as an operator on the idempotents and to give the eigen values The constant represents two fold nature of the equation corresponding to particle and antiparticle states. Further the above relation shows that the mass of the particle may be interpreted as a local spatial complex rotation in the rest frame. This gives an insight into the nature of fundamental particles. When a particle is observed from an arbitrary frame of reference, it has been shown that the spatial complex rotation dictates the relativistic particle motion. The mathematical structure of complex vectors in space and spacetime is developed.

  20. Application of Bred Vectors To Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corazza, M.; Kalnay, E.; Patil, Dj

    We introduced a statistic, the BV-dimension, to measure the effective local finite-time dimensionality of the atmosphere. We show that this dimension is often quite low, and suggest that this finding has important implications for data assimilation and the accuracy of weather forecasting (Patil et al, 2001). The original database for this study was the forecasts of the NCEP global ensemble forecasting system. The initial differences between the control forecast and the per- turbed forecasts are called bred vectors. The control and perturbed initial conditions valid at time t=n(t are evolved using the forecast model until time t=(n+1) (t. The differences between the perturbed and the control forecasts are scaled down to their initial amplitude, and constitute the bred vectors valid at (n+1) (t. Their growth rate is typically about 1.5/day. The bred vectors are similar by construction to leading Lya- punov vectors except that they have small but finite amplitude, and they are valid at finite times. The original NCEP ensemble data set has 5 independent bred vectors. We define a local bred vector at each grid point by choosing the 5 by 5 grid points centered at the grid point (a region of about 1100km by 1100km), and using the north-south and east- west velocity components at 500mb pressure level to form a 50 dimensional column vector. Since we have k=5 global bred vectors, we also have k local bred vectors at each grid point. We estimate the effective dimensionality of the subspace spanned by the local bred vectors by performing a singular value decomposition (EOF analysis). The k local bred vector columns form a 50xk matrix M. The singular values s(i) of M measure the extent to which the k column unit vectors making up the matrix M point in the direction of v(i). We define the bred vector dimension as BVDIM={Sum[s(i)]}^2/{Sum[s(i)]^2} For example, if 4 out of the 5 vectors lie along v, and one lies along v, the BV- dimension would be BVDIM[sqrt(4), 1, 0

  1. Computation of the Streamfunction and Velocity Potential for Limited and Irregular Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhijin; Chao, Yi; McWilliams, James C.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for the computation of streamfunction and velocity potential from given horizontal velocity vectors based on solving a minimization problem. To guarantee the uniqueness of the solution and computational reliability of the algorithm, a Tikhonov regularization is applied. The solution implies that the obtained streamfunction and velocity potential have minimal magnitude, while the given velocity vectors can be accurately reconstructed from the computed streamfunction and velocity potential. Because the formulation of the minimization problem allows for circumventing the explicit specification of separate boundary conditions on the streamfunction and velocity potential, the algorithm is easily applicable to irregular domains. By using an advanced minimization algorithm with the use of adjoint techniques, the method is computationally efficient and suitable for problems with large dimensions. An example is presented for coastal oceans to illustrate the practical application of the algorithm.

  2. Kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity climatologies from a chemistry climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinke Hoppe, Charlotte; Ploeger, Felix; Konopka, Paul; Müller, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    The representation of vertical velocity in chemistry climate models is a key element for the representation of the large-scale Brewer-Dobson circulation in the stratosphere. Here, we diagnose and compare the kinematic and diabatic vertical velocities in the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The calculation of kinematic vertical velocity is based on the continuity equation, whereas diabatic vertical velocity is computed using diabatic heating rates. Annual and monthly zonal mean climatologies of vertical velocity from a 10-year simulation are provided for both kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity representations. In general, both vertical velocity patterns show the main features of the stratospheric circulation, namely, upwelling at low latitudes and downwelling at high latitudes. The main difference in the vertical velocity pattern is a more uniform structure for diabatic and a noisier structure for kinematic vertical velocity. Diabatic vertical velocities show higher absolute values both in the upwelling branch in the inner tropics and in the downwelling regions in the polar vortices. Further, there is a latitudinal shift of the tropical upwelling branch in boreal summer between the two vertical velocity representations with the tropical upwelling region in the diabatic representation shifted southward compared to the kinematic case. Furthermore, we present mean age of air climatologies from two transport schemes in EMAC using these different vertical velocities and analyze the impact of residual circulation and mixing processes on the age of air. The age of air distributions show a hemispheric difference pattern in the stratosphere with younger air in the Southern Hemisphere and older air in the Northern Hemisphere using the transport scheme with diabatic vertical velocities. Further, the age of air climatology from the transport scheme using diabatic vertical velocities shows a younger mean age of air in the

  3. Velocity Dependence of the Kinetic Friction of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, Dirk; Feldmann, Michael; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2010-03-01

    The velocity dependence of interfacial friction is of high interest to unveil the fundamental processes in nanoscopic friction. So far, different forms of velocity dependence have been observed for contacts between friction force microscope (FFM) tips and a substrate surface. In this work we present velocity-dependent friction measurements performed by nanoparticle manipulation of antimony nanoparticles on atomically flat HOPG substrates under UHV conditions. This allows to analyze interfacial friction for very well defined and clean surface contacts. A novel approach to nanoparticle manipulation, the so called 'tip-on-top' technique [1], made it possible to manipulate the same particle many times while varying the velocity. The antimony particles exhibit a qualitatively different velocity dependence on friction in comparison to direct tip-HOPG contacts. A characteristic change in velocity dependence was observed when comparing freshly prepared particles to contaminated specimen, which were exposed to air before the manipulation experiments. [1] Dietzel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 53104 (2009)

  4. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena. PMID:27581602

  5. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  6. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  7. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  8. The SAMEX Vector Magnetograph: A Design Study for a Space-Based Solar Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gary, G. A.; West, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a pre-phase A study performed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL) to develop a design concept for a space-based solar vector magnetograph and hydrogen-alpha telescope. These are two of the core instruments for a proposed Air Force mission, the Solar Activities Measurement Experiments (SAMEX). This mission is designed to study the processes which give rise to activity in the solar atmosphere and to develop techniques for predicting solar activity and its effects on the terrestrial environment.

  9. Accurate measurement of the position and velocity of a falling object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Madhur; Kalimullah, Arun, P.; Lima, F. M. S.

    2007-03-01

    An object accelerates while it falls under the influence of the gravitational force. By using two sensors a precise and automated measurement of the velocity can be obtained. The analysis of these measurements may be insufficient if air resistance is important. We discuss how by increasing the number of sensors we can determine the velocity, terminal velocity, and acceleration due to gravity.

  10. River velocities from sequential multispectral remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Mied, Richard P.

    2013-06-01

    We address the problem of extracting surface velocities from a pair of multispectral remote sensing images over rivers using a new nonlinear multiple-tracer form of the global optimal solution (GOS). The derived velocity field is a valid solution across the image domain to the nonlinear system of equations obtained by minimizing a cost function inferred from the conservation constraint equations for multiple tracers. This is done by deriving an iteration equation for the velocity, based on the multiple-tracer displaced frame difference equations, and a local approximation to the velocity field. The number of velocity equations is greater than the number of velocity components, and thus overly constrain the solution. The iterative technique uses Gauss-Newton and Levenberg-Marquardt methods and our own algorithm of the progressive relaxation of the over-constraint. We demonstrate the nonlinear multiple-tracer GOS technique with sequential multispectral Landsat and ASTER images over a portion of the Potomac River in MD/VA, and derive a dense field of accurate velocity vectors. We compare the GOS river velocities with those from over 12 years of data at four NOAA reference stations, and find good agreement. We discuss how to find the appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions to allow optimization of the technique for specific rivers.

  11. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast.

    PubMed

    Locke, Shannon M; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static "snapshot" model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  12. Sensitivity to Auditory Velocity Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Shannon M.; Leung, Johahn; Carlile, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A natural auditory scene often contains sound moving at varying velocities. Using a velocity contrast paradigm, we compared sensitivity to velocity changes between continuous and discontinuous trajectories. Subjects compared the velocities of two stimulus intervals that moved along a single trajectory, with and without a 1 second inter stimulus interval (ISI). We found thresholds were threefold larger for velocity increases in the instantaneous velocity change condition, as compared to instantaneous velocity decreases or thresholds for the delayed velocity transition condition. This result cannot be explained by the current static “snapshot” model of auditory motion perception and suggest a continuous process where the percept of velocity is influenced by previous history of stimulation. PMID:27291488

  13. Preloadable vector sensitive latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, William R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A preloadable vector-sensitive latch which automatically releases when the force vector from a latch memebr reaches a specified release angle is presented. In addition, it contains means to remove clearance between the latched members and to preload the latch to prevent separation at angles less than the specified release angle. The latch comprises a triangular main link, a free link connected between a first corner of the main link and a yoke member, a housing, and an actuator connected between the yoke member and the housing. A return spring bias means connects the main link to a portion of the housing. A second corner of the main link is slidably and pivotally connected to the housing via a slot in a web portion of the housing. The latch housing has a rigid docking ring alignable with a mating locking ring which is engageable by a locking roller journalled on the third corner of the triangular main link.

  14. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  15. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  16. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  17. Some experiences with Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng; Kim, Hyoung M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors for reduced-order modeling in structural dynamics and for control of flexible structures. Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors are defined and illustrated, and several applications that have been under study at The University of Texas at Austin are reviewed: model reduction for undamped structural dynamics systems, component mode synthesis using Krylov vectors, model reduction of damped structural dynamics systems, and one-sided and two-sided unsymmetric block-Lanczos model-reduction algorithms.

  18. Auditory Risk of Air Rifles

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, James E.; Meinke, Deanna K.; Flamme, Gregory A.; Finan, Donald S.; Stewart, Michael; Tasko, Stephen; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize the impulse noise exposure and auditory risk for air rifle users for both youth and adults. Design Acoustic characteristics were examined and the auditory risk estimates were evaluated using contemporary damage-risk criteria for unprotected adult listeners and the 120-dB peak limit and LAeq75 exposure limit suggested by the World Health Organization (1999) for children. Study sample Impulses were generated by 9 pellet air rifles and 1 BB air rifle. Results None of the air rifles generated peak levels that exceeded the 140 dB peak limit for adults and 8 (80%) exceeded the 120 dB peak SPL limit for youth. In general, for both adults and youth there is minimal auditory risk when shooting less than 100 unprotected shots with pellet air rifles. Air rifles with suppressors were less hazardous than those without suppressors and the pellet air rifles with higher velocities were generally more hazardous than those with lower velocities. Conclusion To minimize auditory risk, youth should utilize air rifles with an integrated suppressor and lower velocity ratings. Air rifle shooters are advised to wear hearing protection whenever engaging in shooting activities in order to gain self-efficacy and model appropriate hearing health behaviors necessary for recreational firearm use. PMID:26840923

  19. Flight management concepts compatible with air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of airline deregulation and increased competition, the need for cost efficient airline operations is critical. This paper summarizes past research efforts and planned research thrusts toward the development of compatible flight management and air traffic control systems that promise increased operational effectiveness and efficiency. Potential capacity improvements resulting from a time-based ATC simulation (fast-time) are presented. Advanced display concepts with time guidance and velocity vector information to allow the flight crew to play an important role in the future ATC environment are discussed. Results of parametric sensitivity analyses are also presented that quantify the fuel/cost penalties for idle-thrust mismodeling and wind-modeling errors.

  20. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Speckhard, Eric G; Ng, Kenny C Y; Beacom, John F; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-22

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications. PMID:26849582

  1. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckhard, Eric G.; Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Beacom, John F.; Laha, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce linelike spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy—the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer—can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will have the precision needed. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  2. Isomap based supporting vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    This research presents a new isomap based supporting vector machine method. Isomap is a dimension reduction method which is able to analyze nonlinear relationship of data on manifolds. Accordingly, support vector machine is established on the isomap manifold to classify given and predict unknown data. A case study of the isomap based supporting vector machine for environmental planning problems is conducted.

  3. Kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity climatologies from a chemistry climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, C. M.; Ploeger, F.; Konopka, P.; Müller, R.

    2015-11-01

    The representation of vertical velocity in chemistry climate models is a key element for the representation of the large scale Brewer-Dobson-Circulation in the stratosphere. Here, we diagnose and compare the kinematic and diabatic vertical velocities in the ECHAM/Messy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The calculation of kinematic vertical velocity is based on the continuity equation, whereas diabatic vertical velocity is computed using diabatic heating rates. Annual and monthly zonal mean climatologies of vertical velocity from a 10 year simulation are provided for both, kinematic and diabatic vertical velocity representations. In general, both vertical velocity patterns show the main features of the stratospheric circulation, namely upwelling at low latitudes and downwelling at high latitudes. The main difference in the vertical velocity pattern is a more uniform structure for diabatic and a noisier structure for kinematic vertical velocity. Diabatic vertical velocities show higher absolute values both in the upwelling branch in the inner tropics and in the downwelling regions in the polar vortices. Further, there is a latitudinal shift of the tropical upwelling branch in boreal summer between the two vertical velocity representations with the tropical upwelling region in the diabatic representation shifted southward compared to the kinematic case. Furthermore, we present mean age of air climatologies from two transport schemes in EMAC using these different vertical velocities. The age of air distributions show a hemispheric difference pattern in the stratosphere with younger air in the Southern Hemisphere and older air in the Northern Hemisphere using the transport scheme with diabatic vertical velocities. Further, the age of air climatology from the transport scheme using diabatic vertical velocities shows younger mean age of air in the inner tropical upwelling branch and older mean age in the extratopical tropopause region.

  4. Geoacoustic Inversion Based on a Vector Hydrophone Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Han-Shu; Li, Feng-Hua

    2007-07-01

    We propose a geoacoustic inversion scheme employing a vector hydrophone array based on the fact that vector hydrophone can provide more acoustic field information than traditional pressure hydrophones. Firstly, the transmission loss of particle velocities is discussed. Secondly, the sediment sound speed is acquired by a matched-field processing (MFP) procedure, which is the optimization in combination of the pressure field and vertical particle velocity field. Finally, the bottom attenuation is estimated from the transmission loss difference between the vertical particle velocity and the pressure. The inversion method based on the vector hydrophone array mainly has two advantages: One is that the MFP method based on vector field can decrease the uncertain estimation of the sediment sound speed. The other is that the objective function based on the transmission loss difference has good sensitivity to the sediment attenuation and the inverted sediment attenuation is independent of source level. The validity of the inverted parameters is examined by comparison of the numerical results with the experimental data.

  5. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  6. The Relativistic Wave Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz transformation applies directly to the kinematics of moving particles viewed as geometric points. Wave propagation, on the other hand, involves moving planes which are extended objects defined by simultaneity. By treating a plane wave as a geometric object moving at the phase velocity, novel results are obtained that illustrate the…

  7. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  8. Vector Theory of Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    So far, works on ultrasonic diffraction imaging are based on scalar theory of sound wave. This is not correct as sound has vector nature. But when sound propagates in solids, its vector nature has to be considered as polarization occurs and transverse wave as well as longitudinal wave will appear. Vector theory is especially needed when the obstacle size is smaller than the wavelength. We use the Smythe-Kirchhoff approach for the vector theory of diffraction. We derive the image formation theory based on the vector diffraction theory. The effect of polarization on acoustical imaging is discussed.

  9. Synthetic RR Lyrae velocity curves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianxing Boston Univ., MA )

    1991-02-01

    An amplitude correlation between the pulsation velocity curves and visual light curves of ab-type RR Lyrae stars is derived from a large number of RR Lyrae that have high-precision radial-velocity and photometric data. Based on the determined AVp, AV ralation, a synthetic radial-velocity curve for a typical ab-type RR Lyrae star is constructed. This would be of particular use in determining the systemic velocities of RR Lyrae. 17 refs.

  10. Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging.

    PubMed

    Straus, Daniel B; Butler, Lynne M; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J

    2013-08-15

    Increasingly, velocity map imaging is becoming the method of choice to study photoinduced molecular dissociation processes. This paper introduces an algorithm to analyze the measured net speed, P(vnet), and angular, β(vnet), distributions of the products from a two-step dissociation mechanism, where the first step but not the second is induced by absorption of linearly polarized laser light. Typically, this might be the photodissociation of a C-X bond (X = halogen or other atom) to produce an atom and a momentum-matched radical that has enough internal energy to subsequently dissociate (without the absorption of an additional photon). It is this second step, the dissociation of the unstable radicals, that one wishes to study, but the measured net velocity of the final products is the vector sum of the velocity imparted to the radical in the primary photodissociation (which is determined by taking data on the momentum-matched atomic cophotofragment) and the additional velocity vector imparted in the subsequent dissociation of the unstable radical. The algorithm allows one to determine, from the forward-convolution fitting of the net velocity distribution, the distribution of velocity vectors imparted in the second step of the mechanism. One can thus deduce the secondary velocity distribution, characterized by a speed distribution P(v1,2°) and an angular distribution I(θ2°), where θ2° is the angle between the dissociating radical's velocity vector and the additional velocity vector imparted to the product detected from the subsequent dissociation of the radical. PMID:23464815

  11. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread. PMID:25564746

  12. The velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen - Evidence for high velocities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1993-01-01

    The Hamilton Echelle spectrograph on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory was used to obtain high-velocity and spatial resolution 2D spectra of H-alpha 6563-A emission in Comets Austin and Levy. The presence of the components expected from water dissociation and collisional thermalization in the inner coma is confirmed by the hydrogen velocity distribution. In Comet Austin, the potential high-velocity hydrogen includes velocities of up to about 40 km/s and is spatially symmetric with respect to the nucleus. In Comet Levy, the high-velocity hydrogen reaches velocities of up to 50 km/s and is situated exclusively on the sunward side of the nucleus. The two distinct signatures of high-velocity hydrogen imply two distinct sources.

  13. The construction and use of divergence free vector expansions for incompressible fluid flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mhuiris, N. M. G.

    1986-01-01

    For incompressible fluids the law of mass conservation reduces to a constraint on the velocity vector, namely that it be divergence free. This constraint has long been a source of great difficulty to the numericist seeking to discretize the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. A spectral method is discussed which overcomes this difficulty. Its efficacy is demonstrated on some simple problems. The velocity is approximated by a finite sum of divergence free vectors, each of which satisfies the same boundary conditions as the velocity. Projecting the governing equation onto the space of inviscid vector fields eliminates the pressure term and produces a set of ordinary differential equations that must be solved for the coefficents in the velocity. The pressure can then be recovered if it is needed.

  14. Laser sheet light flow visualization for evaluating room air flowsfrom Registers

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Claret, Valerie; Smith, Brian

    2006-04-01

    Forced air heating and cooling systems and whole house ventilation systems deliver air to individual rooms in a house via supply registers located on walls ceilings or floors; and occasionally less straightforward locations like toe-kicks below cabinets. Ideally, the air velocity out of the registers combined with the turbulence of the flow, vectoring of air by register vanes and geometry of register placement combine to mix the supply air within the room. A particular issue that has been raised recently is the performance of multiple capacity and air flow HVAC systems. These systems vary the air flow rate through the distribution system depending on the system load, or if operating in a ventilation rather than a space conditioning mode. These systems have been developed to maximize equipment efficiency, however, the high efficiency ratings do not include any room mixing effects. At lower air flow rates, there is the possibility that room air will be poorly mixed, leading to thermal stratification and reduced comfort for occupants. This can lead to increased energy use as the occupants adjust the thermostat settings to compensate and parts of the conditioned space have higher envelope temperature differences than for the well mixed case. In addition, lack of comfort can be a barrier to market acceptance of these higher efficiency systems To investigate the effect on room mixing of reduced air flow rates requires the measurement of mixing of supply air with room air throughout the space to be conditioned. This is a particularly difficult exercise if we want to determine the transient performance of the space conditioning system. Full scale experiments can be done in special test chambers, but the spatial resolution required to fully examine the mixing problem is usually limited by the sheer number of thermal sensors required. Current full-scale laboratory testing is therefore severely limited in its resolution. As an alternative, we used a water-filled scale model

  15. Two-Phase PIV: Fuel-Spray Interaction with Surrounding Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankers, Stefan; Gotthardt, Mark; Stengler, Thomas; Ohmstede, Gerhard; Hentschel, Werner

    The demand for improvement of combustion-engine processes leads to a great need for detailed experimental information about the complicated processes of injection, breakup and propagation of the fuel jet and the vaporization of the fuel. Thus, in the presented work it was the aim to visualize the air flow that is induced by the injected fuel jet and also to explore the air entrainment into the fuel spray. This was done using two-phase PIV (particle image velocimetry). The fuel jet was illuminated with a Nd:YAG PIV-laser and PIV analysis was done by simply measuring the elastically scattered light of the fuel droplets. For the investigation of the surrounding air propylene-carbonate doped with DCM-dye was dispersed and the droplets were added to the continuous gas flow upstream of the chamber. Scattered and fluorescence signals, respectively, were detected perpendicular to the laser sheet with a CCD camera. To detect the gas flow, the scattered light from the liquid fuel was suppressed by an OG 590 longpass filter glass that transmits the fluorescence signal of the DCM-dye. It was possible to measure both the fuel jet and the gas flow in the presence of the fuel spray and a clear separation of the two phases could be achieved. In both (fuel and air) vector pictures corresponding vortices could be identified near the air/fuel boundary layer. Maximum velocities in the jet are depending on the operation conditions up to 150ms-1 and the gas flow has typically a velocity of 1 to 10ms-1. In the region next to the injector the air was pressed away during the injection. After the end of the injection a strong fast air entrainment flow into this region can be observed that compensates the pressure difference.

  16. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  17. HF Doppler observations of vector plasma drifts in the evening F-region at the magnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Jayachandran, B.; Balachandran Nair, R.; Namboothiri, S. P.; Bailey, G. J.; Rao, P. B.

    Using HF Doppler radar in a spaced-receiver configuration, observations conducted on the vector plasma drifts in the equatorial F-region at Trivandrum during the afternoon-midnight period of March-April 1988, are presented. The three components of the F-region plasma drift at the magnetic equator are such that the North-South component corresponds to the meridional neutral air wind while the other two components represent the electrodynamic drift. The vertical component of the plasma drift is characterized by a prereversal upward enhancement which fits the interpretation based on the F-region dynamo operating at sunset. Equatorial spread-F, which is linked to the prereversal enhancement, appears to be inhibited during the main phase of magnetic storms. The East-West component of the plasma drift is westward during the afternoon and eastward during the night with mean peak velocities of 30 and 110 ms -1, respectively. The large night-time drift is believed to be due to a large reduction in the degree of electromagnetic coupling between the E- and F-regions during the night. The North-South component, representing the meridional neutral air wind, is found to be northward during the afternoon and southward during the night with respective mean peak velocities of about 50 and 70 m s -1. The neutral air wind shows a tendency to reverse from southward to northward at around midnight and is thought to be caused by the midnight bulge in the neutral air temperature. The observations which correspond to the lower F-region are found to be consistent with those reported earlier using other experimental techniques.

  18. Phobos: Low Velocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather; Lee, Pascal; Hamilton, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    Mars’s inner moon, Phobos, is located deep in the planet’s gravity well and orbits far below the planet’s synchronous orbit. Images of the surface of Phobos, in particular from Viking Orbiter 1, MGS, MRO, and MEX, reveal a rich collisional history, including fresh-looking impact craters and subdued older ones, very large impact structures (compared to the size of Phobos), such as Stickney, and much smaller ones.Sources of impactors colliding with Phobos include a priori: A) Impactors from outside the martian system (asteroids, comets, and fragments thereof); B) Impactors from Mars itself (ejecta from large impacts on Mars); and C) Impactors from Mars orbit, including impact ejecta launched from Deimos and ejecta launched from, and reintercepted by, Phobos. In addition to individual craters on Phobos, the networks of grooves on this moon have also been attributed in part or in whole to impactors from some of these sources, particularly B. We report the preliminary results of a systematic survey of the distribution, morphology, albedo, and color characteristics of fresh impact craters and associated ejecta deposits on Phobos. Considering that the different potential impactor sources listed above are expected to display distinct dominant compositions and different characteristic impact velocity regimes, we identify specific craters on Phobos that are more likely the result of low velocity impacts by impactors derived from Mars orbit than from any alternative sources. Our finding supports the hypothesis that the spectrally “Redder Unit” on Phobos may be a superficial veneer of accreted ejecta from Deimos, and that Phobos’s bulk might be distinct in composition from Deimos.

  19. Group-Velocity-Matched Three Wave Mixing in Birefringent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,ARLEE V.

    2000-12-12

    We show that the combination of pulse-front slant, k-vector tilt, and crystal birefringence often permits exact matching of both phase and group velocities in three wave mixing in birefringent crystals. This makes possible more efficient mixing of short light pulses, and it permits efficient mixing of chirped or broad bandwidth light. We analyze this process and present examples. Differences in the group velocities of the three interacting waves in a nonlinear crystal often limits the effective interaction length. For example, in mixing very short pulses, temporal walk off can stretch the pulses in time unless the crystal is very short. Efficient mixing with such short crystals requires high irradiances, but the irradiances are limited by higher order nonlinear effects such as intensity-dependent refractive index and two-photon absorption. Improved matching of the group velocities can alleviate this problem, allowing longer crystal and lower irradiances. Similarly, for high energy pulses, practical limits on crystal apertures mandate temporally stretching the pulses to reduce irradiances. For the resulting chirped pulses, temporal walk off restricts the chirp range unless the group velocities are well matched. In addition to perfectly matching the group velocities of all three waves, it is sometimes useful to match two velocities, such as the signal and idler in parametric amplification, permitting broadband parametric amplification, or to arrange the velocities of two inputs to bracket the generated sum frequency pulse, giving pulse compression under suitable circumstances.

  20. Quantifying Riverine Surface Velocities Using Thermal Infrared PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutkowski, C. M.; Puleo, J. A.; McKenna, T. E.

    2010-12-01

    With the exception of river width, remotely obtaining riverine properties such as velocity, discharge and depth is difficult. The use of remote sensing techniques to estimate river velocity requires observation of surface texture. Unfortunately, many river environments do not exhibit texture that can be seen by the naked eye nor recorded with standard RGB imagery. Long wave infrared (thermal) imagers are capable of quantifying small true or apparent (usually based on variations in emissivity) temperature variations on the river surface that are advected with the current. A field study was conducted from May 24-28, 2010 in the Wolf River in Harrison County, Mississippi in order to investigate the application of thermal imagery to infer riverine surface currents. Over 20 hours of thermal imagery were captured during daylight and nighttime hours in addition to standard RGB imagery. Imagery is geo-rectified to the riverine surface and velocities are quantified using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV technique identifies similar patterns of intensity between images and quantifies the spatial distance between the patterns. Horizontal velocity vectors are derived using these distances and the image sampling interval (7.5 Hz). Mean, in situ surface velocities were obtained using 6 electro-magnetic current meters deployed from a floating platform that was repositioned numerous times during the study. Image-derived velocities and validation by comparison with surface velocities obtained from the current meters will be presented.

  1. The standardised freight container: vector of vectors and vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Reiter, P

    2010-04-01

    The standardised freight container was one of the most important innovations of the 20th Century. Containerised cargoes travel from their point of origin to their destination by ship, road and rail as part of a single journey, without unpacking. This simple concept is the key element in cheap, rapid transport by land and sea, and has led to a phenomenal growth in global trade. Likewise, containerised air cargo has led to a remarkable increase in the inter-continental transportation of goods, particularly perishable items such as flowers, fresh vegetables and live animals. In both cases, containerisation offers great advantages in speed and security, but reduces the opportunity to inspect cargoes in transit. An inevitable consequence is the globalisation of undesirable species of animals, plants and pathogens. Moreover, cheap passenger flights offer worldwide travel for viral and parasitic pathogens in infected humans. The continued emergence of exotic pests, vectors and pathogens throughout the world is an unavoidable consequence of these advances in transportation technology. PMID:20617647

  2. Tracking Vector Magnetograms with the Magnetic Induction Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, P.

    2009-01-01

    The differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE) that we developed in 2006 for estimating velocities from line-of-sight magnetograms is modified to directly incorporate horizontal magnetic fields to produce a differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms (DAVE4VM). The DAVE4VM's performance is demonstrated on the synthetic data from the anelastic pseudospectral ANMHD simulations that were used in the recent comparison of velocity inversion techniques by Welsch and coworkers. The DAVE4VM predicts roughly 95% of the helicity rate and 75% of the power transmitted through the simulation slice. Intercomparison between DAVE4VM and DAVE and further analysis of the DAVE method demonstrates that line-of-sight tracking methods capture the shearing motion of magnetic footpoints but are insensitive to flux emergence - the velocities determined from line-of-sight methods are more consistent with horizontal plasma velocities than with flux transport velocities. These results suggest that previous studies that rely on velocities determined from line-of-sight methods such as the DAVE or local correlation tracking may substantially misrepresent the total helicity rates and power through the photosphere.

  3. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  4. Visualization of 3 Dimensional Seismic Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, E.; Chourasia, A.; Minster, J. H.; Schulze, J.

    2009-12-01

    Earthquake simulations produce vast amounts of surface and volumetric temporal data. We have implemented methods to visualize scalar and vector data that allows comprehension of the large amount of information. We leverage advances in graphics processors to draw oriented and textured geometry interactively. We have developed four glyphs to depict the underlying vector data: spheres, ellipsoids, lines, and voxels. The glyphs can be switched interactively and offer multiple visual representations where each glyph enhances different underlying property. Additionally, we have developed highlighting mechanisms to enhance comprehension of direction of vector data. For instance, a sphere would ordinarily not provide directional cues but with our method of highlight the sphere can indicate the direction. We have also developed interactively tunable methods to resolve occlusion of volumetric data. We present multimodal visual representations that provide an array of interactive and flexible visualization techniques to the scientists for scientific investigation through visualization. The visualization tool can be run on a laptop, desktop or virtual reality (VR) environment. We are leveraging one such state-of-the-art system called “StarCAVE”. The StarCAVE surrounds the user with seamless, immersive and stereoscopic virtual environment. This VR environment provides the capability to view the volumetric data from inside the volume in an immersive manner, which is similar to witnessing the earthquake event from inside earth from any vantage point. Interactive visualization of the Terashake simulation allows scientists to flexibly explore existing data intuitively. This is a crop of the Terashake simulation containing the San Andreas near San Bernadino. Color represents velocity magnitude, while direction is that of the displacement vector.

  5. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  6. Velocity and velocity bounds in static spherically symmetric metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arraut, Ivan; Batic, Davide; Nowakowski, Marek

    2011-08-01

    We find simple expressions for velocity of massless particles with dependence on the distance, r, in Schwarzschild coordinates. For massive particles these expressions give an upper bound for the velocity. Our results apply to static spherically symmetric metrics. We use these results to calculate the velocity for different cases: Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström with and without the cosmological constant. We emphasize the differences between the behavior of the velocity in the different metrics and find that in cases with naked singularity there always exists a region where the massless particle moves with a velocity greater than the velocity of light in vacuum. In the case of Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter we completely characterize the velocity and the metric in an algebraic way. We contrast the case of classical naked singularities with naked singularities emerging from metric inspired by noncommutative geometry where the radial velocity never exceeds one. Furthermore, we solve the Einstein equations for a constant and polytropic density profile and calculate the radial velocity of a photon moving in spaces with interior metric. The polytropic case of radial velocity displays an unexpected variation bounded by a local minimum and maximum.

  7. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters. PMID:27369140

  8. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan, Micheal T.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged ρ0ρ0,ρφ,K*K¯*, and ρω production and tagged ρ0ρ0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  9. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  10. Velocity and drop size measurements in a swirl-stabilized, combusting spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Velocity and drop size measurements are reported for a swirl-stabilized, combusting spray. For the gas phase, three components of mean and fluctuating velocity are reported. For the droplets, three components of mean and fluctuating velocity, diameter, and number flux are reported. The liquid fuel utilized for all the tests was heptane. The fuel was injected using an air-assist atomizer. The combustor configuration consisted of a center-mounted, air-assist atomizer surrounded by a coflowing air stream. Both the coflow and the atomizing air streams were passed through 45 degree swirlers. The swirl was imparted to both streams in the same direction. The combustion occurred unconfined in stagnant surroundings. The nonintrusive measurements were obtained using a two-component phase/Doppler particle analyzer. The laser-based instrument measured two components of velocity as well as droplet size at a particular point. Gas phase measurements were obtained by seeding the air streams with nominal 1 micron size aluminum-oxide particles and using the measured velocity from that size to represent the gas phase velocity. The atomizing air, coflow air, and ambient surroundings were all seeded with the aluminum-oxide particles to prevent biasing. Measurements are reported at an axial distance of 5 mm from the nozzle. Isothermal single-phase gas velocities are also reported for comparison with the combusting case.

  11. Factors influencing perceived angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Calderone, Jack B.

    1991-01-01

    Angular velocity perception is examined for rotations both in depth and in the image plane and the influence of several object properties on this motion parameter is explored. Two major object properties are considered, namely, texture density which determines the rate of edge transitions for rotations in depth, i.e., the number of texture elements that pass an object's boundary per unit of time, and object size which determines the tangential linear velocities and 2D image velocities of texture elements for a given angular velocity. Results of experiments show that edge-transition rate biased angular velocity estimates only when edges were highly salient. Element velocities had an impact on perceived angular velocity; this bias was associated with 2D image velocity rather than 3D tangential velocity. Despite these biases judgements were most strongly determined by the true angular velocity. Sensitivity to this higher order motion parameter appeared to be good for rotations both in depth (y-axis) and parallel to the line of sight (z-axis).

  12. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  13. Velocity dependant splash behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlett, C. A. E.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; McHale, G.; Ahn, S.; Doerr, S. H.; Bryant, R.; Newton, M. I.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme soil water repellency can occur in nature via condensation of volatile organic compounds released during wildfires and can lead to increased erosion rate. Such extreme water repellent soil can be classified as superhydrophobic and shares similar chemical and topographical features to specifically designed superhydrophobic surfaces. Previous studies using high speed videography to investigate single droplet impact behaviour on artificial superhydrophobic have revealed three distinct modes of splash behaviour (rebound, pinned and fragmentation) which are dependent on the impact velocity of the droplet. In our studies, using high-speed videography, we show that such splash behaviour can be replicated on fixed 'model' water repellent soils (hydrophobic glass beads/particles). We show that the type of splash behaviour is dependent on both the size and chemical nature of the fixed particles. The particle shape also influences the splash behaviour as shown by drop impact experiments on fixed sand samples. We have also studied soil samples, as collected from the field, which shows that the type of droplet splash behaviour can lead to enhanced soil particle transport.

  14. Metallic glass velocity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.L.; Butler, S.C.; Massa, D.P.; Cavanagh, G.H.

    1996-04-01

    A metallic glass accelerometer has been developed for use as an underwater sound velocity sensor. The device uses the metallic glass material Metglas 2605SC which has been processed to achieve a virgin coupling coefficient of 0.96. The mechanical to electrical conversion is based on the detection of the change in the inductance of the device as a result of bending motion. The detection method uses a carrier frequency signal which is amplitude modulated by the received signal. This scheme was originally described by Wun-Fogle, Savage and Clark [{open_quote}{open_quote}Sensitive wide frequency range magnetostrictive strain gauge,{close_quote}{close_quote} Sensors and Actuators, 1{underscore}2{underscore}, 323{endash}331 (1987)]. The bender is in the form of a three layered laminate with a closed magnetic path window frame structure. The theory of operation along with measured and calculated results are presented for a prototype element with approximate dimensions 1.5{times}1.0{times}0.1 inches. Calculated and measured results agree for a reduced effective coupling coefficient of 0.72 and operation with a carrier field intensity of 0.87 Oe and carrier frequency of 20 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  16. Concentration and Velocity Gradients in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClymer, James P.

    2003-01-01

    In this work we focus on the height dependence of particle concentration, average velocity components, fluctuations in these velocities and, with the flow turned off, the sedimentation velocity. The latter quantities are measured using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The PIV technique uses a 1-megapixel camera to capture two time-displaced images of particles in the bed. The depth of field of the imaging system is approximately 0.5 cm. The camera images a region with characteristic length of 2.6 cm for the small particles and 4.7 cm. for the large particles. The local direction of particle flow is determined by calculating the correlation function for sub-regions of 32 x 32 pixels. The velocity vector map is created from this correlation function using the time between images (we use 15 to 30 ms). The software is sensitive variations of 1/64th of a pixel. We produce velocity maps at various heights, each consisting of 3844 velocities. We break this map into three vertical zones for increased height information. The concentration profile is measured using an expanded (1 cm diameter) linearly polarized HeNe Laser incident on the fluidized bed. A COHU camera (gamma=1, AGC off) with a lens and a polarizer images the transmitted linearly polarized light to minimize the effects of multiply scattered light. The intensity profile (640 X 480 pixels) is well described by a Gaussian fit and the height of the Gaussian is used to characterize the concentration. This value is compared to the heights found for known concentrations. The sedimentation velocity is estimated using by imaging a region near the bottom of the bed and using PIV to measure the velocity as a function of time. With a nearly uniform concentration profile, the time can be converted to height information. The stable fluidized beds are made from large pseudo-monodisperse particles (silica spheres with radii (250-300) microns and (425-500) microns) dispersed in a glycerin/water mix. The Peclet number is

  17. Multiscale hierarchical support vector clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Michael Saas; Holm, David Alberg; Sjöstrand, Karl; Ley, Carsten Dan; Rowland, Ian John; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-03-01

    Clustering is the preferred choice of method in many applications, and support vector clustering (SVC) has proven efficient for clustering noisy and high-dimensional data sets. A method for multiscale support vector clustering is demonstrated, using the recently emerged method for fast calculation of the entire regularization path of the support vector domain description. The method is illustrated on artificially generated examples, and applied for detecting blood vessels from high resolution time series of magnetic resonance imaging data. The obtained results are robust while the need for parameter estimation is reduced, compared to support vector clustering.

  18. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  19. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  20. How to measure propagation velocity in cardiac tissue: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Linnenbank, Andre C.; de Bakker, Jacques M. T.; Coronel, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    To estimate conduction velocities from activation times in myocardial tissue, the “average vector” method computes all the local activation directions and velocities from local activation times and estimates the fastest and slowest propagation speed from these local values. The “single vector” method uses areas of apparent uniform elliptical spread of activation and chooses a single vector for the estimated longitudinal velocity and one for the transversal. A simulation study was performed to estimate the influence of grid size, anisotropy, and vector angle bin size. The results indicate that the “average vector” method can best be used if the grid- or bin-size is large, although systematic errors occur. The “single vector” method performs better, but requires human intervention for the definition of fiber direction. The average vector method can be automated. PMID:25101004

  1. The MSFC Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system is described; this system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 × 5 or 2.0 × 2.0 arc min square field-of-view with an optimum time resolution of ˜ 100 s and an optimum signal-to-noise of ˜1600. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration. Scientific investigations which utilize the unique characteristics of the instrument are described and typical results are presented.

  2. The MSFC vector magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.

    1981-02-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 x 5 or 2.5 x 2.5 arc min square field of view with an optimum time resolution of approximately 100 sec and an optimum signal-to-noise of approximately 1000. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system, and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration.

  3. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  4. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  5. An efficient method for recovering Lyapunov vectors from singular vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher L.; Samelson, Roger M.

    2007-05-01

    Lyapunov vectors are natural generalizations of normal modes for linear disturbances to aperiodic deterministic flows and offer insights into the physical mechanisms of aperiodic flow and the maintenance of chaos. Most standard techniques for computing Lyapunov vectors produce results which are norm-dependent and lack invariance under the linearized flow (except for the leading Lyapunov vector) and these features can make computation and physical interpretation problematic. An efficient, norm-independent method for constructing the n most rapidly growing Lyapunov vectors from n - 1 leading forward and n leading backward asymptotic singular vectors is proposed. The Lyapunov vectors so constructed are invariant under the linearized flow in the sense that, once computed at one time, they are defined, in principle, for all time through the tangent linear propagator. An analogous method allows the construction of the n most rapidly decaying Lyapunov vectors from n decaying forward and n - 1 decaying backward singular vectors. This method is demonstrated using two low-order geophysical models.

  6. Geo-acoustic inversion with a vector sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenghua; Zhang, Renhe; Sun, Mei

    2012-11-01

    Geo-acoustic inversion has been paid much attention in the last several decades. Various geo-acoustic inversion methods based on hydrophone arrays have been developed. However, few studies on inverting the bottom parameters with a vector sensor array have been performed. In this paper, theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that in comparison with pressure, the vertical particle velocity has different spatial distribution, which can provide more information for geo-acoustic inversion. Two geo-acoustic inversion methods, based on coherent and incoherent matched field processing with a vector sensor array, have been developed. To establish the validity of the proposed methods, a shallow water experiment was performed in 2009. The experimental data indicates that the uncertainty of the inversion results is decreased by the coherent inversion method with a vector sensor array in comparison with the results obtained by a hydrophone array only.

  7. Velocity correlations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gramann, Mirt

    1994-01-01

    We determine the velocity correlation function, pairwise peculiar velocity difference, and rms pairwise peculiar velocity dispersion of rich clusters of galaxies, as a function of pair separation, for three cosmological models: Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 cold dark matter (CDM), and Omega = 0.3 primeval baryonic isocurvature (PBI) models (all flat and Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized). We find that close cluster pairs, with separation r is less than or equal to 10/h Mpc, exhibit strong attractive peculiar velocities in all models; the cluster pairwise velocities depend sensitively on the model. The mean pairwise attractive velocity of clusters on 5/h Mpc scale ranges from approximately 1700 km/s for Omega = 1 CDM to approximately 1000 km/s for PBI to approximately 700 km/s for Omega = 0.3 CDM. The small-scale pairwise velocities depend also on cluster mass: richer, more massive clusters exhibit stronger attractive velocities than less massive clusters. On large scales, from approximately 20 to 200/h Mpc, the cluster peculiar velocities are increasingly dominated by bulk and random motions; they are independent of cluster mass. The cluster velocity correlation function is negative on small scales for Omega = 1 and Omega = 0.3 CDM, indicating strong pairwise motion relative to bulk motion on small scales; PBI exhibits relatively larger bulk motions. The cluster velocity correlation function is positive on very large scales, from r approximately 10/h Mpc to r approximately 200/h Mpc, for all models. These positive correlations, which decrease monotonically with scale, indicate significant bulk motions of clusters up to approximately 200/h Mpc. The strong dependence of the cluster velocity functions on models, especially at small separations, makes them useful tools in constraining cosmological models when compared with observations.

  8. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Altitude, Ground Velocity, and Air Velocity of Aircraft and Spaceborne Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A Doppler lidar sensor system includes a laser generator that produces a highly pure single frequency laser beam, and a frequency modulator that modulates the laser beam with a highly linear frequency waveform. A first portion of the frequency modulated laser beam is amplified, and parts thereof are transmitted through at least three separate transmit/receive lenses. A second portion of the laser beam is used as a local oscillator beam for optical heterodyne detection. Radiation from the parts of the laser beam transmitted via the transmit/receive lenses is received by the respective transmit/receive lenses that transmitted the respective part of the laser beam. The received reflected radiation is compared with the local oscillator beam to calculate the frequency difference there between to determine various navigational data.

  9. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  10. Velocity profiles between two baffles in a horizontal circular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Hae-Soo; Oh, Keon-Je; Doh, Doeg Hee; Lee, Chang-Hoan

    2014-12-01

    The shell and tube heat exchanger is an essential part of a power plant for recovering heat transfer between the feed water of a boiler and the wasted heat. The baffles are also an important element inside the heat exchanger. Internal materials influence the flow pattern in the bed. The influence of baffles in the velocity profiles was observed using a three-dimensional particle image velocimetry around baffles in a horizontal circular tube. The velocity of the particles was measured before the baffle and between them in the test tube. Results show that the flows near the front baffle flow were parallel to the vertical wall, and then concentrate on the upper opening of the front baffle. The flows circulate in the front and rear baffles. These flow profiles are related to the Reynolds number (Re) or the flow intensity. The velocity profiles at lower Re number showed a complicated mixing, concentrating on the lower opening of the rear baffle as front wall. Swirling flow was employed in this study, which was produced using tangential velocities at the inlet. At the entrance of the front baffle, the velocity vector profiles with swirl were much different from that without swirl. However, velocities between two baffles are not much different from those without swirl.

  11. Estimation of Laminar Burning Velocities by Direct Digital Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uske, J.; Barat, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Bunsen burner flame, which is the most common flame in the laboratory, can be easily studied for its dynamics because of modern, economical digital technology available to student laboratories. Direct digital photography of Bunsen flames is used to obtain laminar burning velocities of selected gaseous hydrocarbon/air flames.

  12. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electricity is major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of the industry’s variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significant...

  13. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electricity is a major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significantly decrease e...

  14. Air-Water Gas Exchange in Wetland Water Columns Due To Wind and Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a parameterization of the air-water gas transfer rate in wetlands, and do so in terms of easily measured environmental variables. This parameterization is intended to support biogeochemical modeling in wetlands by providing an interfacial flux of key importance. Our approach uses laboratory experiments describe the oxygen transfer across an air-water interface in a model wetland. The oxygen transfer is sensitive to the externally imposed wind, vegetation characteristics, and vertical thermal convection. We vary these systematically, determining the gas transfer (or "piston") velocity that describes interfacial gas flux. We measure velocity vector fields near the air-water interface using particle image velocimetry, and use these measurements to help explain the mechanisms behind the measured trends in oxygen transfer. The explanatory power of these measurements includes the relationship between plant geometry and surface divergence. We explore the potential impact of our results on wetland modeling and management, for issues such as carbon sequestration and methane emission.

  15. A vectorized solution for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, N. R.; Thompson, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain solutions to the unsteady Reynolds-averaged incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates on a vector processor. The governing equations are in nonconservative form with the velocity and pressure as dependent variables. Two momentum equations and the Poisson equation for pressure form a set of three governing equations for three flow field unknowns: u, v, and p. The governing equations and boundary conditions are expressed in terms of boundary-conforming curvilinear coordinates, and a checkerboard SOR iteration is used to solve the governing equations. Several possible sequences for a checkerboard SOR iteration are investigated for finding the best overall convergence rate. The efficiency and capability of the present algorithm was assessed using the example of an 18 percent thick NACA 66(3)018 airfoil at zero degree angle of attack for chord Reynolds number range 1000-40,000.

  16. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  17. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  18. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  19. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  20. Analytical Ultracentrifugation as an Approach to Characterize Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Brenda; Nass, Shelley; Kong, Elton; Mattingly, MaryEllen; Woodcock, Denise; Song, Antonius; Wadsworth, Samuel; Cheng, Seng H; Scaria, Abraham; O'Riordan, Catherine R

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors represent a novel class of biopharmaceutical drugs. The production of clinical-grade rAAV vectors for gene therapy would benefit from analytical methods that are able to monitor drug product quality with regard to homogeneity, purity, and manufacturing consistency. Here, we demonstrate the novel application of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) to characterize the homogeneity of preparations of rAAV vectors. We show that a single sedimentation velocity run of rAAV vectors detected and quantified a number of different viral species, such as vectors harboring an intact genome, lacking a vector genome (empty particles), and containing fragmented or incomplete vector genomes. This information is obtained by direct boundary modeling of the AUC data generated from refractometric or UV detection systems using the computer program SEDFIT. Using AUC, we show that multiple parameters contributed to vector quality, including the AAV genome form (i.e., self-complementary vs. single-stranded), vector genome size, and the production and purification methods. Hence, AUC is a critical tool for identifying optimal production and purification processes and for monitoring the physical attributes of rAAV vectors to ensure their quality. PMID:26414997

  1. Divergence-based vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Villmann, Thomas; Haase, Sven

    2011-05-01

    Supervised and unsupervised vector quantization methods for classification and clustering traditionally use dissimilarities, frequently taken as Euclidean distances. In this article, we investigate the applicability of divergences instead, focusing on online learning. We deduce the mathematical fundamentals for its utilization in gradient-based online vector quantization algorithms. It bears on the generalized derivatives of the divergences known as Fréchet derivatives in functional analysis, which reduces in finite-dimensional problems to partial derivatives in a natural way. We demonstrate the application of this methodology for widely applied supervised and unsupervised online vector quantization schemes, including self-organizing maps, neural gas, and learning vector quantization. Additionally, principles for hyperparameter optimization and relevance learning for parameterized divergences in the case of supervised vector quantization are given to achieve improved classification accuracy. PMID:21299418

  2. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  3. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested. PMID:20092978

  4. Instantaneous Velocity Using Photogate Timers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolbeck, John

    2010-01-01

    Photogate timers are commonly used in physics laboratories to determine the velocity of a passing object. In this application a card attached to a moving object breaks the beam of the photogate timer providing the time for the card to pass. The length L of the passing card can then be divided by this time to yield the average velocity (or speed)…

  5. Multi-Velocity Component LDV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A laser doppler velocimeter uses frequency shifting of a laser beam to provide signal information for each velocity component. A composite electrical signal generated by a light detector is digitized and a processor produces a discrete Fourier transform based on the digitized electrical signal. The transform includes two peak frequencies corresponding to the two velocity components.

  6. Magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity filtering estimation for attitude changing spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents an improved real-time sequential filter (IRTSF) for magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation of spacecraft during its attitude changing (including fast and large angular attitude maneuver, rapidly spinning or uncontrolled tumble). In this new magnetometer-only attitude determination technique, both attitude dynamics equation and first time derivative of measured magnetic field vector are directly leaded into filtering equations based on the traditional single vector attitude determination method of gyroless and real-time sequential filter (RTSF) of magnetometer-only attitude estimation. The process noise model of IRTSF includes attitude kinematics and dynamics equations, and its measurement model consists of magnetic field vector and its first time derivative. The observability of IRTSF for small or large angular velocity changing spacecraft is evaluated by an improved Lie-Differentiation, and the degrees of observability of IRTSF for different initial estimation errors are analyzed by the condition number and a solved covariance matrix. Numerical simulation results indicate that: (1) the attitude and angular velocity of spacecraft can be estimated with sufficient accuracy using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data; (2) compared with that of RTSF, the estimation accuracies and observability degrees of attitude and angular velocity using IRTSF from magnetometer-only data are both improved; and (3) universality: the IRTSF of magnetometer-only attitude and angular velocity estimation is observable for any different initial state estimation error vector.

  7. Strategies for targeting lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Szécsi, Judit; Cosset, Francois-Loîc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2008-12-01

    Vectors derived from retroviruses such as lentiviruses and onco-retroviruses are probably among the most suitable tools to achieve a long-term gene transfer since they allow stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses (MLV) since in contrast to the latter they can transduce non-proliferating target cells. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer approaches in vivo. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to upgrade lentiviral vectors for tissue or cell targeting and which have potential for in vivo gene delivery. In this overview we distinguish between three types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies (Fig 1): 1) targeting of vectors at the level of vector-cell entry through lentiviral vector surface modifications; 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue specific promoters into lentiviral vectors; 3) a novel microRNA technology that rather than targeting the 'right' cells will 'detarget' transgene expression from non-target cells while achieving high expression in the target-cell. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value for several gene therapy approaches but combining these three layers of transgene expression control will offer tools to really overcome several drawbacks in the field such as side-effect of off-target expression, clearance of transgene modified cells by immune response to the transgene and lack of biosecurity and efficiency in in vivo approaches. PMID:19075628

  8. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  9. Horizontal Velocity Structure in Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1981-04-01

    We have measured the spatial variation of a single horizontal component of the velocity in a number of waterspouts using an airborne infrared Doppler lidar. In 21 data sets, maximum velocities range from 4.2 to 33.6 m s1 and visible funnel diameters from 6.6 to 90 m. Data were taken at altitudes between 675 m, near cloud base, and 95 m above the surface. The sequences show time development of the velocity as a function of radius at a fixed altitude and the velocity structure at different altitudes and sequential times with a horizontal resolution of 0.75 m between data points. The variation in velocity structure between waterspouts is large, with some showing marked azimuthal asymmetry and mixing with the ambient flow, and others showing multiple concentric vortex shells.

  10. Temperature and velocity measurements in premixed turbulent flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dandekar, K. V.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Turbulent flame speed data for premixed flames of methane-air, propane-air and ethylene-air mixtures stabilized in grid turbulence are reported and discussed. It is shown that turbulence effects on flame speed cannot be fully correlated by the turbulence length scale and r.m.s. velocity in the cold flow. Rather there appear to be significant flame-flow-turbulence interactions affecting both turbulence level in the reaction zone and measured flame speeds. Results of detailed velocity measurements, including autocorrelations, by laser velocimetry are used to elucidate the nature of these interactions. It is concluded that flame speed experiments must be designed and conducted to provide sufficient information (e.g., boundary conditions) to allow for reconstruction of the flow field and these interactions by modelers if the data are to be of value in turbulent combustion model development and evaluation.

  11. Vector Network Analysis

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore » to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  12. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1988-12-09

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/, /rho//phi/, K/sup *//bar K//sup */, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M. T.

    1989-04-25

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/,/rho//phi/,/ital K//sup *//ital K/bar /*/, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  14. Elastic wave velocities and thermal diffusivities of Apollo 14 rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Fujii, N.; Hamano, Y.; Osako, M.

    1972-01-01

    The compressional- and shear-wave velocities of Apollo 14 lunar rocks 14311,50 and 14313,27 as functions of pressure up to 10 kb and the thermal diffusivity of sample 14311,50 over the temperature range 100 to 550 K have been measured. Both samples 14311 and 14313 are polymict fragmental rocks. The overall elastic and anelastic behavior of the Apollo 14 samples are similar to those of Apollo 11 and 12 samples; low velocity and low Q at pressures below 1 kb and rapid increase of velocity and Q with pressure are also typical of the Apollo 14 rocks. The available data of P- and S-wave velocities of lunar rocks show that Birch's law holds for the lunar rocks. The thermal diffusivity of a lunar rock in vacuum is found to be significantly lower than that in air at one atmospheric pressure.

  15. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Large-Scale, Supersonic, Heated Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Bivolaru, D.; Tedder, S.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    Two laser-based measurement techniques have been used to characterize an axisymmetric, combustion-heated supersonic jet issuing into static room air. The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurement technique measured temperature and concentration while the interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) method simultaneously measured two components of velocity. This paper reports a preliminary analysis of CARS-IRS temperature and velocity measurements from selected measurement locations. The temperature measurements show that the temperature along the jet axis remains constant while dropping off radially. The velocity measurements show that the nozzle exit velocity fluctuations are about 3% of the maximum velocity in the flow.

  16. Ricci collineation vectors in fluid space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamparlis, M.; Mason, D. P.

    1990-07-01

    The properties of fluid space-times that admit a Ricci collineation vector (RCV) parallel to the fluid unit four-velocity vector ua are briefly reviewed. These properties are expressed in terms of the kinematic quantities of the timelike congruence generated by ua. The cubic equation derived by Oliver and Davis [Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré 30, 339 (1979)] for the equation of state p=p(μ) of a perfect fluid space-time that admits an RCV, which does not degenerate to a Killing vector, is solved for physically realistic fluids. Necessary and sufficient conditions for a fluid space-time to admit a spacelike RCV parallel to a unit vector na orthogonal to ua are derived in terms of the expansion, shear, and rotation of the spacelike congruence generated by na. Perfect fluid space-times are studied in detail and analogues of the results for timelike RCVs parallel to ua are obtained. Properties of imperfect fluid space-times for which the energy flux vector qa vanishes and na is a spacelike eigenvector of the anisotropic stress tensor πab are derived. Fluid space-times with anisotropic pressure are discussed as a special case of imperfect fluid space-times for which na is an eigenvector of πab.

  17. Bearing estimation with acoustic vector-sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, M.; Nehorai, A.

    1996-04-01

    We consider direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation using arrays of acoustic vector sensors in free space, and derive expressions for the Cram{acute e}r-Rao bound on the DOA parameters when there is a single source. The vector-sensor array is seen to have improved performance over the traditional scalar-sensor (pressure-sensor) array for two distinct reasons: its elements have an inherent directional sensitivity and the array makes a greater number of measurements. The improvement is greatest for small array apertures and low signal-to-noise ratios. Examination of the conventional beamforming and Capon DOA estimators shows that vector-sensor arrays can completely resolve the bearing, even with a linear array, and can remove the ambiguities associated with spatial undersampling. We also propose and analyze a diversely-oriented array of velocity sensors that possesses some of the advantages of the vector-sensor array without the increase in hardware and computation. In addition, in certain scenarios it can avoid problems with spatially correlated noise that the vector-sensor array may suffer. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Scaffolding vector representations for student learning inside a physics game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Cynthia

    Vectors and vector addition are difficult concepts for many introductory physics students and traditional instruction does not usually sufficiently address these difficulties. Vectors play a major role in most topics in introductory physics and without a complete understanding of them many students are unable to make sense of the physics topics covered in their classes. Video games present a unique opportunity to help students develop an intuitive understanding of motion, forces, and vectors while immersed in an enjoyable and interactive environment. This study examines two dimensions of design decisions to help students learn while playing a physics-based game. The representational complexity dimension looked at two ways of presenting dynamic information about the velocity of the game object on the screen. The scaffolding context dimension looked at two different contexts for presenting vector addition problems that were related to the game. While all students made significant learning games from the pre to the post test, there were virtually no differences between students along the representational complexity dimension and small differences between students along the scaffolding context dimension. A context that directly connects to students' game playing experience was in most cases more productive to learning than an abstract context.

  19. The Newcomb & Michelson Velocity of Light Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.

    2002-05-01

    Simon Newcomb (1835-1909) is remembered as the leading American mathematical astronomer of the 19th century; Albert Michelson (1852-1931) as the leading optical experimentalist of his era, and the first American to win the Nobel Prize in physics (1907). Newcomb first became interested in measuring the velocity of light to better determine the scale of the solar system. Ensign Michelson began his velocity of light experiments while preparing to teach physics at the U.S. Naval Academy, in Annapolis, Maryland. Using private funding and Naval Academy facilities, in January 1879, Michelson obtained a value of 299,910 km/sec. In March of that same year Newcomb received an appropriation of five thousand dollars and Michelson was detailed to the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) to assist with experiments in Washington D. C. The instrument designed by Newcomb used a four-sided solid steel rotating mirror to avoid a failure of the type Michelson had experienced when a thin glass mirror failed from centrifugal force. The mirror was driven by compressed air operating on fan wheels at each end of the assembly. Rotation rates of 250 rev/sec were possible, in both directions, and the rate could be varied minutely by adjusting conflicting air jets. Ft. Meyers was selected for the primary station, and fixed mirror stations were placed at USNO (Foggy Bottom) and the Washington Monument. The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) determined the distances from the rotating mirror to the fixed mirrors. They first established a few hundred meter long baseline on Analostan Island, in the Potomac River, using 4 meter long agate capped steel slide-rods. Triangulation was then used to extend the network to each of the reflector stations. Michelson participated in the Washington D.C. observations until September 1880, when he was granted a leave of absence by the Navy to study in Europe. Newcomb continued the experiments for two more years. In his final report, Newcomb gave two values for the

  20. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  1. Enhancing poxvirus vectors vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Esteban, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing heterologous antigens from pathogens are currently at various stages in clinical trials with the aim to establish their efficacy. This is because these vectors have shown excellent safety profiles, significant immunogenicity against foreign expressed antigens and are able to induce protective immune responses. In view of the limited efficacy triggered by some poxvirus strains used in clinical trials (i.e, ALVAC in the RV144 phase III clinical trial for HIV), and of the restrictive replication capacity of the highly attenuated vectors like MVA and NYVAC, there is a consensus that further improvements of these vectors should be pursuit. In this review we considered several strategies that are currently being implemented, as well as new approaches, to improve the immunogenicity of the poxvirus vectors. This includes heterologous prime/boost protocols, use of co-stimulatory molecules, deletion of viral immunomodulatory genes still present in the poxvirus genome, enhancing virus promoter strength, enhancing vector replication capacity, optimizing expression of foreign heterologous sequences, and the combined use of adjuvants. An optimized poxvirus vector triggering long-lasting immunity with a high protective efficacy against a selective disease should be sought. PMID:25424927

  2. Velocity and drop size measurements in a confined, swirl-stabilized, combusting spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulzan, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    Drop size and velocity measurements in a confined, swirl-stabilized, reacting spray are presented. The configuration consisted of a center-mounted research air-assist atomizer surrounded by a coflowing air stream. A quartz tube surrounded the burner and provided the confinement. Both the air-assist and coflow streams had swirl imparted to them in the same direction with 45-degree-angle swirlers. The fuel and air entered the combustor at ambient temperature. The gas-phase measurements reported were obtained from the velocity drops with a mean diameter of four microns. Heptane fuel was used for all the experiments. Measurements of drop size and velocity, gas-phase velocity and drop number flux are reported for axial distances of 23, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 50 mm downstream of the nozzle. The measurements were performed using a two-component phase/Doppler particle analyzer. Profiles across the entire flowfield are presented.

  3. Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Kondo, Shigeo; Sekiya, Akira

    2008-06-30

    Burning velocity measurements of nitrogen-containing compounds, i.e., ammonia (NH3), methylamine (CH3NH2), ethylamine (C2H5NH2), and propylamine (C3H7NH2), were carried out to assess the flammability of potential natural refrigerants. The spherical-vessel (SV) method was used to measure the burning velocity over a wide range of sample and air concentrations. In addition, flame propagation was directly observed by the schlieren photography method, which showed that the spherical flame model was applicable to flames with a burning velocity higher than approximately 5 cm s(-1). For CH3NH2, the nozzle burner method was also used to confirm the validity of the results obtained by closed vessel methods. We obtained maximum burning velocities (Su0,max) of 7.2, 24.7, 26.9, and 28.3 cm s(-1) for NH3, CH3NH2, C2H5NH2, and C3H7NH2, respectively. It was noted that the burning velocities of NH3 and CH3NH2 were as high as those of the typical hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants difluoromethane (HFC-32, Su0,max=6.7 cm s(-1)) and 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a, Su0,max=23.6 cm s(-1)), respectively. The burning velocities were compared with those of the parent alkanes, and it was found that introducing an NH2 group into hydrocarbon molecules decreases their burning velocity. PMID:18207640

  4. Three Component Velocity and Acceleration Measurement Using FLEET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Calvert, Nathan; Dogariu, Arthur; Miles, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) method has been used to measure three components of velocity and acceleration for the first time. A jet of pure N2 issuing into atmospheric pressure air was probed by the FLEET system. The femtosecond laser was focused down to a point to create a small measurement volume in the flow. The long-lived lifetime of this fluorescence was used to measure the location of the tagged particles at different times. Simultaneous images of the flow were taken from two orthogonal views using a mirror assembly and a single intensified CCD camera, allowing two components of velocity to be measured in each view. These different velocity components were combined to determine three orthogonal velocity components. The differences between subsequent velocity components could be used to measure the acceleration. Velocity accuracy and precision were roughly estimated to be +/-4 m/s and +/-10 m/s respectively. These errors were small compared to the approx. 100 m/s velocity of the subsonic jet studied.

  5. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  6. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    PubMed

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  7. Vector statistics of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Underwood, D.

    1977-01-01

    A digitized multispectral image, such as LANDSAT data, is composed of numerous four dimensional vectors, which quantitatively describe the ground scene from which the data are acquired. The statistics of unique vectors that occur in LANDSAT imagery are studied to determine if that information can provide some guidance on reducing image processing costs. A second purpose of this report is to investigate how the vector statistics are changed by various types of image processing techniques and determine if that information can be useful in choosing one processing approach over another.

  8. Baculovirus as a vaccine vector

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Baculovirus is extensively utilized as an excellent tool for production of recombinant protein in insect cells. Baculovirus infects insects in nature and is non-pathogenic to humans. In addition to insect cells, baculovirus is capable of transducing a broad range of animal cells. Due to its biosafety, large cloning capacity, low cytotoxicity, and non-replication nature in the transduced cells as well as the ease of manipulation and production, baculovirus has been utilized as RNA interference mediators, gene delivery vectors, and vaccine vectors for a wide variety of applications. This article focuses on the utilization of baculoviruses as vaccine vectors to prepare antigen or subunit vaccines. PMID:22705893

  9. Air resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This section describes the ambient (surrounding) air quality of the TVA region, discusses TVA emission contributions to ambient air quality, and identifies air quality impacts to human health and welfare. Volume 2 Technical Document 2, Environmental Consequences, describes how changes in TVA emissions could affect regional air quality, human health, environmental resources, and materials. The primary region of the affected environment is broadly defined as the state of Tennessee, as well as southern Kentucky, western Virginia, southern West Virginia, western North Carolina, and northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. This area represents the watershed of the Tennessee River and the 201 counties of the greater TVA service area. Emissions from outside the Tennessee Valley region contribute to air quality in the Valley. Also, TVA emissions are transported outside the Valley and have some impact on air quality beyond the primary study area. Although the study area experiences a number of air quality problems, overall air quality is good.

  10. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen's work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille's solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  11. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen`s work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille`s solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  12. Modeling and performance analysis of GPS vector tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Matthew

    This dissertation provides a detailed analysis of GPS vector tracking algorithms and the advantages they have over traditional receiver architectures. Standard GPS receivers use a decentralized architecture that separates the tasks of signal tracking and position/velocity estimation. Vector tracking algorithms combine the two tasks into a single algorithm. The signals from the various satellites are processed collectively through a Kalman filter. The advantages of vector tracking over traditional, scalar tracking methods are thoroughly investigated. A method for making a valid comparison between vector and scalar tracking loops is developed. This technique avoids the ambiguities encountered when attempting to make a valid comparison between tracking loops (which are characterized by noise bandwidths and loop order) and the Kalman filters (which are characterized by process and measurement noise covariance matrices) that are used by vector tracking algorithms. The improvement in performance offered by vector tracking is calculated in multiple different scenarios. Rule of thumb analysis techniques for scalar Frequency Lock Loops (FLL) are extended to the vector tracking case. The analysis tools provide a simple method for analyzing the performance of vector tracking loops. The analysis tools are verified using Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations are also used to study the effects of carrier to noise power density (C/N0) ratio estimation and the advantage offered by vector tracking over scalar tracking. The improvement from vector tracking ranges from 2.4 to 6.2 dB in various scenarios. The difference in the performance of the three vector tracking architectures is analyzed. The effects of using a federated architecture with and without information sharing between the receiver's channels are studied. A combination of covariance analysis and Monte Carlo simulation is used to analyze the performance of the three algorithms. The federated algorithm without

  13. Are Bred Vectors The Same As Lyapunov Vectors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Corazza, M.; Cai, M.

    Regional loss of predictability is an indication of the instability of the underlying flow, where small errors in the initial conditions (or imperfections in the model) grow to large amplitudes in finite times. The stability properties of evolving flows have been studied using Lyapunov vectors (e.g., Alligood et al, 1996, Ott, 1993, Kalnay, 2002), singular vectors (e.g., Lorenz, 1965, Farrell, 1988, Molteni and Palmer, 1993), and, more recently, with bred vectors (e.g., Szunyogh et al, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). Bred vectors (BVs) are, by construction, closely related to Lyapunov vectors (LVs). In fact, after an infinitely long breeding time, and with the use of infinitesimal ampli- tudes, bred vectors are identical to leading Lyapunov vectors. In practical applications, however, bred vectors are different from Lyapunov vectors in two important ways: a) bred vectors are never globally orthogonalized and are intrinsically local in space and time, and b) they are finite-amplitude, finite-time vectors. These two differences are very significant in a dynamical system whose size is very large. For example, the at- mosphere is large enough to have "room" for several synoptic scale instabilities (e.g., storms) to develop independently in different regions (say, North America and Aus- tralia), and it is complex enough to have several different possible types of instabilities (such as barotropic, baroclinic, convective, and even Brownian motion). Bred vectors share some of their properties with leading LVs (Corazza et al, 2001a, 2001b, Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). For example, 1) Bred vectors are independent of the norm used to define the size of the perturba- tion. Corazza et al. (2001) showed that bred vectors obtained using a potential enstro- phy norm were indistinguishable from bred vectors obtained using a streamfunction squared norm, in contrast with singular vectors. 2) Bred vectors are independent of the length of the rescaling period as long as the

  14. First-order torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Rudnick, I.

    1977-01-01

    The letter reports an observation of first-order nonzero time-averaged torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense acoustic fields. The experimental apparatus consisted of a vertical cylindrical rod supported on an air bearing and passing through a box with two loudspeakers centered on adjoining vertical sides. The rim velocity of the cylinder and the torque on the cylinder are measured as functions of air-particle velocity and the phase difference between the x and y components of the particle velocity. It is found that both rim velocity and torque are linear functions of particle velocity. Difficulties in constructing a proper theoretical description of the observed effects are discussed.

  15. Choice of velocity variables for complex flow computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of adopting the velocity components as dependent velocity variables for the Navier-Stokes flow computations is investigated. The viewpoint advocated is that a numerical algorithm should preferably honor both the physical conservation law in differential form and the geometric conservation law in discrete form. With the use of Cartesian velocity vector, the momentum equations in curvilinear coordinates can retain the full conservation-law form and satisfy the physical conservation laws. With the curvilinear velocity components, source terms appear in differential equations and hence the full conservation law form can not be retained. In discrete expressions, algorithms based on the Cartesian components can satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for convection terms but not for viscous terms; those based on the curvilinear components, on the other hand, cannot satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for either convection or viscous terms. Several flow solutions for domain with 90 and 360 degree turnings are presented to illustrate the issues of using the Cartesian velocity components and the staggered grid arrangement.

  16. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  17. Robust, automatic GPS station velocities and velocity time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.; Hammond, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Automation in GPS coordinate time series analysis makes results more objective and reproducible, but not necessarily as robust as the human eye to detect problems. Moreover, it is not a realistic option to manually scan our current load of >20,000 time series per day. This motivates us to find an automatic way to estimate station velocities that is robust to outliers, discontinuities, seasonality, and noise characteristics (e.g., heteroscedasticity). Here we present a non-parametric method based on the Theil-Sen estimator, defined as the median of velocities vij=(xj-xi)/(tj-ti) computed between all pairs (i, j). Theil-Sen estimators produce statistically identical solutions to ordinary least squares for normally distributed data, but they can tolerate up to 29% of data being problematic. To mitigate seasonality, our proposed estimator only uses pairs approximately separated by an integer number of years (N-δt)<(tj-ti )<(N+δt), where δt is chosen to be small enough to capture seasonality, yet large enough to reduce random error. We fix N=1 to maximally protect against discontinuities. In addition to estimating an overall velocity, we also use these pairs to estimate velocity time series. To test our methods, we process real data sets that have already been used with velocities published in the NA12 reference frame. Accuracy can be tested by the scatter of horizontal velocities in the North American plate interior, which is known to be stable to ~0.3 mm/yr. This presents new opportunities for time series interpretation. For example, the pattern of velocity variations at the interannual scale can help separate tectonic from hydrological processes. Without any step detection, velocity estimates prove to be robust for stations affected by the Mw7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, and velocity time series show a clear change after the earthquake, without any of the usual parametric constraints, such as relaxation of postseismic velocities to their preseismic values.

  18. Velocity of Sound in Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Michael T.; Kluk, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Presents experiments to measure the velocity of sound through metals and other amorphous materials. Describes the equipment used to make the measurements and the possibility of interfacing with a microcomputer. (MDH)

  19. Comparison study of time reversal OFDM acoustic communication with vector and scalar sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongkang; Zhang, Hongtao; Xie, Zhe

    2012-11-01

    To compare the performance of time reversal orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) acoustic communication on vector and scalar sensors, the vector and scalar acoustic fields were modeled. Time reversal OFDM acoustic communication was then simulated for each sensor type. These results are compared with data from the CAPEx'09 experiment. The abilityof particle velocity channels to achieve reliable acoustic communication, as predicted by the model, is confirmed with the experiment data. Experimental results show that vector receivers can reduce the required array size, in comparisonto hydrophone arrays, whileproviding comparable communication performance.

  20. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  1. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  2. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  3. Threshold friction velocity influenced by wetness of soils within the Columbia Plateau

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Windblown dust impacts air quality in the Columbia Plateau of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion of agricultural lands, which is the predominate source of windblown dust in the region, occurs when the friction velocity exceeds the threshold friction velocity (TFV) of the surface. Soil moisture...

  4. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  5. High geocentric velocity meteor ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Hawkes, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Interstellar origin meteoroids have now been detected using radar, image intensified video, large aperture radar and space dust impact techniques. Dynamical and radiation production mechanisms will eject some meteoroids from other planetary systems into orbits which will impact Earth with high geocentric velocities. In this paper we numerically model the ablation of high geocentric velocity (71 to 500~km s-1) meteors in order to predict the heights, light curves and trail lengths to be expected. We modeled three compositions and structures: asteroidal, cometary and porous cometary. Meteoroid masses ranging from 10-6 to 10-13~kg were used in the model. As expected, these high geocentric velocity meteors, when compared to other meteors, ablate higher in the atmosphere. For example a 300~km s-1 cometary structure meteor of mass 10-9~kg will have a peak luminosity at about 190 km. They will also have significantly longer trail lengths. The same 300~km s-1, 10-9~kg cometary meteor would be within 2 mag of its peak brightness for a vertical displacement of 60 km if incident at a zenith angle of 45°. The peak light intensity of these high geocentric velocity meteors changes only slowly with velocity. Although the incident kinetic energy per unit time increases dramatically, this is largely offset by a decrease in the optical luminous efficiency in this velocity regime according to our luminous efficiency model. The 300~km s-1, 10-9~kg cometary meteor would have an absolute meteor magnitude at peak luminosity of about +8.5 mag. Our results suggest that at least those high geocentric velocity meteors larger than about 10-8~kg should be observable with current meteor electro-optical technology although there may be observational biases against their detection. The results of this paper can be used to help optimize a search strategy for these very high geocentric velocity meteors.

  6. Josephson Circuits as Vector Quantum Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samach, Gabriel; Kerman, Andrew J.

    While superconducting circuits based on Josephson junction technology can be engineered to represent spins in the quantum transverse-field Ising model, no circuit architecture to date has succeeded in emulating the vector quantum spin models of interest for next-generation quantum annealers and quantum simulators. Here, we present novel Josephson circuits which may provide these capabilities. We discuss our rigorous quantum-mechanical simulations of these circuits, as well as the larger architectures they may enable. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  7. Interferometer for Low-Uncertainty Vector Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified schematic diagram of a tilt-sensing unequal-path interferometer set up to measure the orientation of the normal vector of one surface of a cube mounted on a structure under test is described herein. This interferometer has been named a "theoferometer" to express both its interferometric nature and the intention to use it instead of an autocollimating theodolite. The theoferometer optics are mounted on a plate, which is in turn mounted on orthogonal air bearings for near-360 rotation in azimuth and elevation. Rough alignment of the theoferometer to the test cube is done by hand, with fine position adjustment provided by a tangent arm drive using linear inchwormlike motors.

  8. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  9. Coulomb problem for vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2006-05-01

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{sup {+-}} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  10. Molecular dynamics on vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Mountain, R. D.; Oconnell, J.

    1985-10-01

    An algorithm called the method of lights (MOL) has been developed for the computerized simulation of molecular dynamics. The MOL, implemented on the CYBER 205 computer, is based on sorting and reformulating the manner in which neighbor lists are compiled, and it uses data structures compatible with specialized vector statements that perform parallel computations. The MOL is found to reduce running time over standard methods in scalar form, and vectorization is shown to produce an order-of-magnitude reduction in execution time.

  11. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  12. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  13. Simulations of the Local Universe constrained by observational peculiar velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Courtois, Hélène M.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-02-01

    Peculiar velocities, obtained from direct distance measurements, are data of choice to achieve constrained simulations of the Local Universe reliable down to a scale of a few megaparsec. Unlike redshift surveys, peculiar velocities are direct tracers of the underlying gravitational field as they trace both baryonic and dark matter. This paper presents the first attempt to use solely observational peculiar velocities to constrain cosmological simulations of the nearby Universe. In order to set up initial conditions, a Reverse Zel'dovich Approximation (RZA) is used to displace constraints from their positions at z = 0 to their precursors' locations at higher redshifts. An additional new feature replaces original observed radial peculiar velocity vectors by their full 3D reconstructions provided by the Wiener-Filter (WF) estimator. Subsequently, the constrained realization (CR) of Gaussian fields technique is applied to build various realizations of the initial conditions. The WF/RZA/CR method is first tested on realistic mock catalogues built from a reference simulation similar to the Local Universe. These mocks include errors on peculiar velocities, on data point positions and a large continuous zone devoid of data in order to mimic galactic extinction. Large-scale structures are recovered with a typical accuracy of 5 h-1 Mpc in position, the best realizations reaching a 2-3 h-1 Mpc precision, the limit imposed by the RZA linear theory. Then, the method is applied to the first observational radial peculiar velocity catalogue of the project Cosmicflows. This paper is a proof of concept that the WF/RZA/CR method can be applied to observational peculiar velocities to successfully build constrained initial conditions.

  14. Vertically Velocity Characteristics of Oceanic Convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, David P.; Lemone, Margaret A.

    1989-03-01

    rain to ice and graupel as the air ascends through the freezing level. The, lack of reports of hail and other forms of severe weather in these oceanic regions is consistent with the aircraft and radar observations.The data from the `best' organized weather system investigated by the P-3 during TAMEX are used to examine the relationship of cloud buoyancy and vertical motion. Water loading and entrainment has a significant role in reducing both the core virtual temperature excess over the environment and the updraft velocity from what would be expected from the convective available potential energy of the environmental air. The majority of the strongest downdrafts possess positive temperature perturbations (probably as a result of mixing with nearby updraft air) with the negative buoyancy being sustained by large amounts of rainwater.

  15. Two-component, self-aligning laser vector velocimeter. [ultrasonic Bragg cell for atmospheric application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, W. M.; Hornkohl, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    A newly developed laser Doppler velocimeter is described. The basic optical component of the instrument is a two-dimensional ultrasonic Bragg cell. It is shown that use of this Bragg cell simplifies the optics usually required for the more conventional velocimeters, allows measurement of two-vector components of velocity, requires no adjustment of alignment mirrors, and enables both velocity component signals to be detected with a single detector. Some results from experiments using this velocimeter in an atmospheric application are described.

  16. Terminal velocity and drag reduction measurements on superhydrophobic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, G.; Shirtcliffe, N. J.; Evans, C. R.; Newton, M. I.

    2009-02-01

    Super water-repellent surfaces occur naturally on plants and aquatic insects and are created in the laboratory by combining micro- or nanoscale surface topographic features with hydrophobic surface chemistry. When such types of water-repellent surfaces are submerged they can retain a film of air (a plastron). In this work, we report measurements of the terminal velocity of solid acrylic spheres with various surface treatments settling under the action of gravity in water. We observed increases in terminal velocity corresponding to drag reduction of between 5% and 15% for superhydrophobic surfaces that carry plastrons.

  17. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV) objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  18. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  19. Using a constraint on the parallel velocity when determining electric fields with EISCAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1988-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine the perpendicular components of the ion velocity vector (and hence the perpendicular electric field) from EISCAT tristatic measurements, in which one introduces an additional constraint on the parallel velocity, in order to take account of our knowledge that the parallel velocity of ions is small. This procedure removes some artificial features introduced when the tristatic geometry becomes too unfavorable. It is particularly well suited for the southernmost or northernmost positions of the tristatic measurements performed by meridian scan experiments (CP3 mode).

  20. Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Marakulin, A. O. Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V.

    2012-07-15

    The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of {Lambda}-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.