Science.gov

Sample records for air water interactions

  1. Interaction of L-Phenylalanine with a Phospholipid Monolayer at the Water-Air Interface.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Perkins, Russell J; Telesford, Dana-Marie; Adams, Ellen M; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Allen, Heather C; Roeselová, Martina; Vaida, Veronica

    2015-07-23

    The interaction of L-phenylalanine with a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayer at the air-water interface was explored using a combination of experimental techniques and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. By means of Langmuir trough methods and Brewster angle microscopy, L-phenylalanine was shown to significantly alter the interfacial tension and the surface domain morphology of the DPPC film. In addition, confocal microscopy was used to explore the aggregation state of L-phenylalanine in the bulk aqueous phase. Finally, MD simulations were performed to gain molecular-level information on the interactions of L-phenylalanine and DPPC at the interface. Taken together, these results show that L-phenylalanine intercalates into a DPPC film at the air-water interface, thereby affecting the surface tension, phase morphology, and ordering of the DPPC film. The results are discussed in the context of biological systems and the mechanism of diseases such as phenylketonuria.

  2. Interaction between graphene oxide and Pluronic F127 at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanghao; Guo, Jingru; Patel, Ravi A; Dadlani, Anup L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2013-05-14

    Triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) has previously been demonstrated to disperse graphene oxide (GO) in electrolyte solution and block the hydrophobic interaction between GO and l-tryptophan and l-tyrosine. However, the nature of this interaction between PF127 and GO remains to be characterized and elucidated. In the present study, we aimed to characterize and understand the interaction between GO and PF127 using a 2-dimensional Langmuir monolayer methodology at the air-water interface by surface pressure-area isotherm measurement, stability, adsorption, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. Based on the observation of surface pressure-area isotherms, adsorption, and stability of PF127 and PF127/GO mixture at the air-water interface, GO is suggested to change the conformation of PF127 at the air-water interface and also drag PF127 from the interface to the bulk subphase. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) image supports this assumption, as GO and PF127 can be observed by spreading the subphase solution outside the compressing barriers, as shown in the TOC graphic.

  3. Ligand interaction with the purified serotonin transporter in solution and at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faivre, V.; Manivet, P.; Callaway, J.C.; Morimoto, H.; Airaksinen, M.M.; Baszkin, A.; Launay, J.M.; Rosilio, V.

    2000-06-01

    The purified serotonin transporter (SERT) was spread at the air/water interface and the effects both of its surface density and of the temperature on its interfacial behavior were studied. The recorded isotherms evidenced the existence of a stable monolayer undergoing a lengthy rearrangement. SERT/ligand interactions appeared to be dependent on the nature of the studied molecules. Whereas an unrelated drug (chlorcyclizine) did not bind to the spread SERT, it interacted with its specific ligands. Compared to heterocyclic drugs, for which binding appeared to be concentration-dependent, a 'two-site' mechanism was evidenced for pinoline and imipramine.

  4. Duolayers at the Air/Water Interface: Improved Lifetime through Ionic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prime, Emma L; Solomon, David H; Dagley, Ian J; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-08-01

    Ionic interactions to stabilize Langmuir films at the air/water interface have been used to develop improved duolayer films. Two-component mixtures of octadecanoic (stearic) acid and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (polyDADMAC) with different ratios were prepared and applied to the water surface. Surface pressure isotherm cycles demonstrated a significant improvement in film stability with the inclusion of the polymer. Viscoelastic properties were measured using canal viscometry and oscillating barriers, with both methods showing that the optimum ratio for improved properties was four octadecanoic acid molecules to one DADMAC unit (1:0.25). At this ratio it is expected multiple strong ionic interactions are formed along each polymer chain. Brewster angle microscopy showed decreased domain size with increased ratios of polyDADMAC, indicating that the polymer is interspersed across the surface. This new method to stabilize and increase the viscoelastic properties of charged monolayer films, using a premixed composition, will have application in areas such as water evaporation mitigation, optical devices, and foaming. PMID:27420341

  5. Biogenic amine – surfactant interactions at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Li, P X

    2015-07-01

    The strong interaction between polyamines and anionic surfactants results in pronounced adsorption at the air-water interface and can lead to the formation of layered surface structures. The transition from monolayer adsorption to more complex surface structures depends upon solution pH, and the structure and molecular weight of the polyamine. The effects of manipulating the polyamine molecular weight and structure on the adsorption of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate at the air-water interface are investigated using neutron reflectivity and surface tension, for the biogenic amines putrescine, spermidine and spermine. The results show how changing the number of amine groups and the spacing between the amine groups impacts upon the surface adsorption. At lower pH, 3-7, and for the higher molecular weight polyamines, spermidine and spermine, ordered multilayer structures are observed. For putrescine at all pH and for spermidine and spermine at high pH, monolayer adsorption with enhanced surfactant adsorption compared to the pure surfactant is observed. The data for the biogenic amines, when compared with similar data for the polyamines ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine, indicate that the spacing between amines groups is more optimal for the formation of ordered surface multilayer structures.

  6. Physicochemical processes in the indirect interaction between surface air plasma and deionized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. C.; Liu, D. X.; Chen, C.; Li, D.; Yang, A. J.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most central scientific questions for plasma applications in healthcare and environmental remediation is the chemical identity and the dose profile of plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can act on an object inside a liquid. A logical focus is on aqueous physicochemical processes near a sample with a direct link to their upstream gaseous processes in the plasma region and a separation gap from the liquid bulk. Here, a system-level modeling framework is developed for indirect interactions of surface air plasma and a deionized water bulk and its predictions are found to be in good agreement with the measurement of gas-phase ozone and aqueous long-living ROS/RNS concentrations. The plasma region is described with a global model, whereas the air gap and the liquid region are simulated with a 1D fluid model. All three regions are treated as one integrated entity and computed simultaneously. With experimental validation, the system-level modeling shows that the dominant aqueous ROS/RNS are long-living species (e.g. H2O2 aq, O3 aq, nitrite/nitrate, H+ aq). While most short-living gaseous species could hardly survive their passage to the liquid, aqueous short-living ROS/RNS are generated in situ through reactions among long-living plasma species and with water molecules. This plasma-mediated remote production of aqueous ROS/RNS is important for the abundance of aqueous HO2 aq, HO3 aq, OHaq and \\text{O}2- aq as well as NO2 aq and NO3 aq. Aqueous plasma chemistry offers a novel and significant pathway to activate a given biological outcome, as exemplified here for bacterial deactivation in plasma-activated water. Additional factors that may synergistically broaden the usefulness of aqueous plasma chemistry include an electric field by aqueous ions and liquid acidification. The system-modeling framework will be useful in assisting designs and analyses of future investigations of plasma-liquid and plasma-cell interactions.

  7. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems. PMID:27139819

  8. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems.

  9. Characterization of air contaminants formed by the interaction of lava and sea water.

    PubMed

    Kullman, G J; Jones, W G; Cornwell, R J; Parker, J E

    1994-05-01

    We made environmental measurements to characterize contaminants generated when basaltic lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano enters sea water. This interaction of lava with sea water produces large clouds of mist (LAZE). Island winds occasionally directed the LAZE toward the adjacent village of Kalapana and the Hawaii Volcanos National Park, creating health concerns. Environmental samples were taken to measure airborne concentrations of respirable dust, crystalline silica and other mineral compounds, fibers, trace metals, inorganic acids, and organic and inorganic gases. The LAZE contained quantifiable concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF); HCl was predominant. HCl and HF concentrations were highest in dense plumes of LAZE near the sea. The HCl concentration at this sampling location averaged 7.1 ppm; this exceeds the current occupational exposure ceiling of 5 ppm. HF was detected in nearly half the samples, but all concentrations were <1 ppm Sulfur dioxide was detected in one of four short-term indicator tube samples at approximately 1.5 ppm. Airborne particulates were composed largely of chloride salts (predominantly sodium chloride). Crystalline silica concentrations were below detectable limits, less than approximately 0.03 mg/m3 of air. Settled dust samples showed a predominance of glass flakes and glass fibers. Airborne fibers were detected at quantifiable levels in 1 of 11 samples. These fibers were composed largely of hydrated calcium sulfate. These findings suggest that individuals should avoid concentrated plumes of LAZE near its origin to prevent over exposure to inorganic acids, specifically HCl.

  10. Characterization of air contaminants formed by the interaction of lava and sea water.

    PubMed

    Kullman, G J; Jones, W G; Cornwell, R J; Parker, J E

    1994-05-01

    We made environmental measurements to characterize contaminants generated when basaltic lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano enters sea water. This interaction of lava with sea water produces large clouds of mist (LAZE). Island winds occasionally directed the LAZE toward the adjacent village of Kalapana and the Hawaii Volcanos National Park, creating health concerns. Environmental samples were taken to measure airborne concentrations of respirable dust, crystalline silica and other mineral compounds, fibers, trace metals, inorganic acids, and organic and inorganic gases. The LAZE contained quantifiable concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF); HCl was predominant. HCl and HF concentrations were highest in dense plumes of LAZE near the sea. The HCl concentration at this sampling location averaged 7.1 ppm; this exceeds the current occupational exposure ceiling of 5 ppm. HF was detected in nearly half the samples, but all concentrations were <1 ppm Sulfur dioxide was detected in one of four short-term indicator tube samples at approximately 1.5 ppm. Airborne particulates were composed largely of chloride salts (predominantly sodium chloride). Crystalline silica concentrations were below detectable limits, less than approximately 0.03 mg/m3 of air. Settled dust samples showed a predominance of glass flakes and glass fibers. Airborne fibers were detected at quantifiable levels in 1 of 11 samples. These fibers were composed largely of hydrated calcium sulfate. These findings suggest that individuals should avoid concentrated plumes of LAZE near its origin to prevent over exposure to inorganic acids, specifically HCl. PMID:8593853

  11. Stream air temperature relations to classify stream ground water interactions in a karst setting, central Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, Michael A.; DeWalle, David R.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryStream-ground water interactions in karst vary from complete losses through swallow holes, to reemergences from springs. Our study objective was to compare stream-air temperature and energy exchange relationships across various stream-ground water relationships in a carbonate watershed. It was hypothesized that ground water-fed stream segments could be distinguished from perched/losing segments using stream-air temperature relationships. Two types of computations were conducted: (1) comparisons of stream-air temperature relationships for the period of October 1999-September 2002 at 12 sites in the Spring Creek drainage and (2) detailed energy budget computations for the same period for ground water-dominated Thompson Run and Lower Buffalo Run, a stream with negligible ground water inputs. Weekly average air temperatures and stream temperatures were highly correlated, but slopes and intercepts of the relationship varied for the 12 sites. Slopes ranged from 0.19 to 0.67 and intercepts ranged from 3.23 to 9.07 °C. A two-component mixing model with end members of ground water and actual stream temperatures indicated that the slope and intercept of the stream-air temperature relationship was controlled by ground water inputs. Streams with large ground water inputs had greater intercepts and lesser slopes than streams that were seasonally losing, perched, and/or distant from ground water inputs. Energy fluxes across the air-water interface were greatest for the ground water-fed stream due to increased longwave, latent, and sensible heat losses from the stream in winter when large temperature and vapor pressure differences existed between the stream and air. Advection of ground water was an important source and sink for heat in the ground water-fed stream, depending on season. In contrast, along the seasonally losing stream reach, advection was of minimal importance and stream temperatures were dominated by energy exchange across the air- water interface. Overall

  12. The interaction of water mists and premixed propane-air flames under low-gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; Riedel, Edward P.; McKinnon, J. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the effect of water mists on premixed flame propagation in a cylindrical tube under low-gravity conditions has been conducted to define the scientific and technical objectives of the experiments to be performed on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station microgravity environments. The inhibiting characteristics of water mists in propagating flames of propane-air mixtures at various equivalence ratios are studied. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the laminar flame speed are used as the measure of fire suppression efficacy. Flame speed and propagation behavior are monitored by a video camera. Reduced gravity is obtained with an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. Measurements and qualitative observations from the low-gravity experiments clearly show the effect of water mist on flame speed abatement, flame shape, and radiant emission. For lean propane-air mixtures, the flame speed increases at first with low water-mist concentrations and then decreases below its dry value when higher water-mist volumes are introduced in the tube. This phenomenon may be due in part to the heating of the unburned mixture ahead of the flame as a result of radiation absorption by the water droplets. For rich propane-air mixtures, similar behavior of flame speed vs. water concentration is encountered but in this case is mostly due to the formation of cellular flames. At high water loads both lean and rich flames exhibit extinction before reaching the end of the tube.

  13. Ultrasonic predator-prey interactions in water-convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey.

  14. Ultrasonic predator-prey interactions in water-convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey. PMID:23781206

  15. Characterization of air contaminants formed by the interaction of lava and sea water.

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, G J; Jones, W G; Cornwell, R J; Parker, J E

    1994-01-01

    We made environmental measurements to characterize contaminants generated when basaltic lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano enters sea water. This interaction of lava with sea water produces large clouds of mist (LAZE). Island winds occasionally directed the LAZE toward the adjacent village of Kalapana and the Hawaii Volcanos National Park, creating health concerns. Environmental samples were taken to measure airborne concentrations of respirable dust, crystalline silica and other mineral compounds, fibers, trace metals, inorganic acids, and organic and inorganic gases. The LAZE contained quantifiable concentrations of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF); HCl was predominant. HCl and HF concentrations were highest in dense plumes of LAZE near the sea. The HCl concentration at this sampling location averaged 7.1 ppm; this exceeds the current occupational exposure ceiling of 5 ppm. HF was detected in nearly half the samples, but all concentrations were <1 ppm Sulfur dioxide was detected in one of four short-term indicator tube samples at approximately 1.5 ppm. Airborne particulates were composed largely of chloride salts (predominantly sodium chloride). Crystalline silica concentrations were below detectable limits, less than approximately 0.03 mg/m3 of air. Settled dust samples showed a predominance of glass flakes and glass fibers. Airborne fibers were detected at quantifiable levels in 1 of 11 samples. These fibers were composed largely of hydrated calcium sulfate. These findings suggest that individuals should avoid concentrated plumes of LAZE near its origin to prevent over exposure to inorganic acids, specifically HCl. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 4. D PMID:8593853

  16. Verification and Validation of Numerical Models for Air/Water Flow on Coastal and Navigation Fluid-Structure Interaction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M.; Dimakopoulos, A.; DeLataillade, T.

    2015-12-01

    Performance analysis and optimization of coastal and navigation structures is becoming feasible due to recent improvements in numerical methods for multiphase flows and the steady increase in capacity and availability of high performance computing resources. Now that the concept of fully three-dimensional air/water flow modelling for real world engineering analysis is achieving acceptance by the wider engineering community, it is critical to expand careful comparative studies on verification,validation, benchmarking, and uncertainty quantification for the variety of competing numerical methods that are continuing to evolve. Furthermore, uncertainty still remains about the relevance of secondary processes such as surface tension, air compressibility, air entrainment, and solid phase (structure) modelling so that questions about continuum mechanical theory and mathematical analysis of multiphase flow are still required. Two of the most popular and practical numerical approaches for large-scale engineering analysis are the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) and Level Set (LS) approaches. In this work we will present a publically available verification and validation test set for air-water-structure interaction problems as well as computational and physical model results including a hybrid VOF-LS method, traditional VOF methods, and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) results. The test set repository and test problem formats will also be presented in order to facilitate future comparative studies and reproduction of scientific results.

  17. Variation of Local Surface Properties of an Air Bubble in Water Caused by Its Interaction with Another Surface.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    Surface and hydrodynamic forces acting between an air bubble and a flat mica surface in surfactant-free water and in 1 mM KCl solution have been investigated by observing film drainage using a modified surface force apparatus (SFA). The bubble shapes observed with the SFA are compared to theoretical profiles computed from a model that considers hydrodynamic interactions, surface curvature, and disjoining pressure arising from electrical double layer and van der Waals interactions. It is shown that the bubble experiences double-layer forces, and a final equilibrium wetting film between the bubble and mica surfaces is formed by van der Waals repulsion. However, comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the double-layer forces are not simply a function of surface separation. Rather, they appear to be changed by one of more of the following: the bubble's dynamic deformation, its proximity to another surface, and/or hydrodynamic flow in the aqueous film that separate them. The same comments apply to the hydrodynamic mobility or immobility of the air-water interface. Together the results show that the bubble's surface is "soft" in two senses: in addition to its well-known deformability, its local properties are affected by weak external forces, in this case the electrical double-layer interactions with a nearby surface and hydrodynamic flow in the neighboring aqueous phase. PMID:27391417

  18. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  19. Self-Assembly and Lipid Interactions of Diacylglycerol Lactone Derivatives Studied at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philosof-Mazor, Liron; Volinsky, Roman; Comin, Maria J.; Lewin, Nancy E.; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) have been shown to be effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways. The biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules depends in part upon their lipid interactions within the cellular plasma membrane. This study explores the thermodynamic and structural features of DAG-lactone derivatives and their lipid interactions at the air/water interface. Surface-pressure/area isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy revealed the significance of specific side-groups attached to the terminus of a very rigid 4-(2-phenylethynyl) benzoyl chain of the DAG-lactones, which affected both the self-assembly of the molecules and their interactions with phospholipids. The experimental data highlight the formation of different phases within mixed DAG-lactone/phospholipid monolayers and underscore the relationship between the two components in binary mixtures of different mole ratios. Importantly, the results suggest that DAG-lactones are predominantly incorporated within fluid phospholipid phases rather than in the condensed phases that form, for example, by cholesterol. Moreover, the size and charge of the phospholipid headgroups do not seem to affect DAG-lactone interactions with lipids. PMID:18788772

  20. Interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, socio-demographic and built environment) on preterm birth.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposures are often measured individually, though many occur in tandem. To address aggregate exposures, a county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) representing five environmental domains (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) was constructed. Recent st...

  1. System interactions of air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, W.E. )

    1992-06-01

    The impact of system interactions and simultaneous or sequential exposure to various air pollutants, both man-made and natural ones, requires greater concern in the interpretation of the total adverse impact of various air pollutants. It is clear that there are highly significant system interactions with exposure to various air pollutants, and these must be considered very carefully in the evaluation of their adverse health effects.

  2. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges. PMID:26257361

  3. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges.

  4. The interaction of eugenol with cell membrane models at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid monolayer composition.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giulia E G; de Souza, Fernanda S; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    Eugenol, a natural phenylpropanoid derivative with possible action in biological surfaces as microbicide, anesthetic and antioxidant, was incorporated in lipid monolayers of selected lipids at the air-water interface, representing cell membrane models. Interaction of eugenol with the lipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) could be inferred by means of surface pressure-area isotherms and Polarization-Modulation Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy. The interaction showed different effects on the different lipids. A higher monolayer expansion was observed for DPPS and DODAB, while more significant effects on the polar groups of the lipids were observed for DPPS and DPPC. These results pointed to the fact that the interaction of eugenol with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid composition, which may be important to comprehend at the molecular level the interaction of this drug with biological surfaces.

  5. Interaction of N-myristoylethanolamine with cholesterol investigated in a Langmuir film at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Chandra, M Sharath; Radhakrishnan, T P; Swamy, Musti J

    2009-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the content of N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) having different acyl chains in various tissues when subjected to stress has resulted in significant interest in investigations on these molecules. Previous studies suggested that N-myristoylethanolamine (NMEA) and cholesterol interact to form a 1:1 (mol/mol) complex. In studies reported here, pressure-area isotherms of Langmuir films at the air-water interface have shown that at low fractions of cholesterol, the average area per molecule is lower than that predicted for ideal mixing, whereas at high cholesterol content the observed molecular area is higher, with a cross-over point at the equimolar composition. A plausible model that can explain these observations is the following: addition of small amounts of cholesterol to NMEA results in a reorientation of the NMEA molecules from the tilted disposition in the crystalline state to the vertical and stabilization of the intermolecular interactions, leading to the formation of a compact monolayer film, whereas at the other end of the composition diagram, addition of small amounts of NMEA to cholesterol leads to a tilting of the cholesterol molecules resulting in an increase in the average area per molecule. In Brewster angle microscopy experiments, a stable and bright homogeneous condensed phase was observed at a relatively low applied pressure of 2 mN.m(-1) for the NMEA:Chol. (1:1, mol/mol) mixture, whereas all other samples required significantly higher pressures (>10 mN.m(-1)) to form a homogeneous condensed phase. These observations are consistent with the formation of a 1:1 stoichiometric complex between NMEA and cholesterol and suggest that increase in the content of NAEs under stress may modulate the composition and dynamics of lipid rafts in biological membranes, resulting in alterations in signaling events involving them, which may be relevant to the putative cytoprotective and stress-combating ability of NAEs.

  6. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  7. Strong interactions in air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.

    2015-03-02

    We study the role new gauge interactions in extensions of the standard model play in air showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Hadron-hadron events remain dominated by quantum chromodynamics, while projectiles and/or targets from beyond the standard model permit us to see qualitative differences arising due to the new interactions.

  8. Microwave interaction with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, W. M.; Pershing, D.

    1985-06-01

    Microwave breakdown studies of gaseous elements have been carried out extensively over a wide range of pressures and for several microwave frequencies using CW and pulsed radiation sources. The main emphasis in these studies was on the determination of the breakdown power threshold and its dependence on the gas pressure and the microwave frequency. The coupling of mircowave energy into the breakdown plasma and neutral gas has not been studied in detail. The reason for this is that, until recently, no high-power microwave sources have been available to perform such studies. Most of the early work performed on breakdown thresholds was performed using high Q-cavities to obtain the necessary electric field to break down the gas. Once breakdown of the gas occurred, the Q of the cavity dropped and the interaction changed. Using the NRL high-power gyrotron facility, we have been able to eliminate the need for cavities and have performed experiments using a focused geometry to examine the coupling of microwave energy to nitrogen gas during breakdown. We have also modeled the experiments using a 1-D computer simulation code. Simulations were performed in a spherical geometry using a self-consistent, nitrogen chemistry, wave optics, microwave breakdown simulation code, MINI. The main emphasis of past work was on the ionization front created during nitrogen breakdown and its motion and plasma properties, as observed experimentally.

  9. Determination and comparison of how the chain number and chain length of a lipid affects its interactions with a phospholipid at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Ngyugen, Hang; McNamee, Cathy E

    2014-06-01

    We determined how the number of chains in a lipid and its chain length affects its interactions with a phospholipid model membrane, and whether the number of chains or the chain length of lipids affects their interactions with the phospholipids more. This was achieved by using a Langmuir trough and a fluorescence microscope to study the interactions of mono-, di-, and triglycerides with a phospholipid monolayer at an air/water interface. The effect of the number of chains in a lipid on its interactions with phospholipids at air/water interfaces was shown by surface pressure-area per molecule isotherms and their thermodynamic analysis to worsen as the number of alkyl chains was increased to be greater than one. An increase in the packing density decreased the mixing ability of the lipids with the phospholipids, resulting in the formation of aggregates in the mixed monolayer. The aggregation was explained by the intermolecular hydrophobic and van der Waals attractions between the lipid molecules. Fluorescence microscopy revealed partial mixing without aggregation for monoglycerides, but the presence of lipid aggregation for diglycerides and triglycerides. The effect of decreasing the chain length of triglycerides from a long chain to a medium chain caused the interactions of the lipids with the phospholipid molecules at the air/water interface to significantly improve. Decreasing the chain length of monoglycerides from a long chain to a medium chain worsened their interaction with the phospholipid molecules. The effect of decreasing the triglyceride chain length on their interactions with phospholipids was much greater than the effect of decreasing the number of alkyl chains in the lipid.

  10. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  11. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  12. Experimental investigation of water droplet-air flow interaction in a non-reacting PEM fuel cell channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Montello, Aaron D.; Guezennec, Yann G.; Pianese, Cesare

    It has been well documented that water production in PEM fuel cells occurs in discrete locations, resulting in the formation and growth of discrete droplets on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface within the gas flow channels (GFCs). This research uses a simulated fuel cell GFC with three transparent walls in conjunction with a high speed fluorescence photometry system to capture videos of dynamically deforming droplets. Such videos clearly show that the droplets undergo oscillatory deformation patterns. Although many authors have previously investigated the air flow induced droplet detachment, none of them have studied these oscillatory modes. The novelty of this work is to process and analyze the recorded videos to gather information on the droplets induced oscillation. Plots are formulated to indicate the dominant horizontal and vertical deformation frequency components over the range of sizes of droplets from formation to detachment. The system is also used to characterize droplet detachment size at a variety of channel air velocities. A simplified model to explain the droplet oscillation mechanism is provided as well.

  13. Radon, CO2 and CH4 as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies - comparative theoretical evaluation of the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Paschke, A.

    2015-05-01

    The applicability of radon as environmental tracer in groundwater/surface water interaction studies has been documented in a considerable number of publications. In some of these reports it has also been suggested to validate the radon based results by using CO2 and CH4 as supplementary tracers. The on-site measurement of the three gaseous parameters relies on their extraction from the water followed by the measurement of their concentration by means of mobile gas-in-air detectors. Since most related practical applications require the recording of time series, a continuous extraction of the gases from (e.g.) a permanently pumped water stream is necessary. A precondition for the sound combined interpretation of the resulting time series is that the individual temporal responses of the extracted gas-in-air concentrations to instantaneously changing gas-in-water concentrations are either identical or in reproducible relation to each other. The aim of our theoretical study was the comparison of the extraction behavior of the three gaseous solutes with focus on the individual temporal responses to changing gas-in-water concentrations considering in particular the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics. We could show that the overall mass transfer coefficients of radon, CO2 and CH4 result in a virtually similar temporal response to aqueous concentration changes, thus confirming the straightforward combined measurement/utilization of the dissolved gases as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies.

  14. Effects of cholesterol component on molecular interactions between paclitaxel and phospholipid within the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingyun; Feng, Si-Shen

    2006-08-01

    Cholesterol is a main component of the cell membrane and could have significant effects on drug-cell membrane interactions and thus the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. It also plays an important role in liposomal formulation of drugs for controlled and targeted delivery. In this research, Langmuir film technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are employed for a systematic investigation on the effects of cholesterol component on the molecular interactions between a prototype antineoplastic drug (paclitaxel) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) within the cell membrane by using the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface as a model of the lipid bilayer membrane and the biological cell membrane. Analysis of the measured surface pressure (pi) versus molecular area (a) isotherms of the mixed DPPC/paclitaxel/cholesterol monolayers at various molar ratios shows that DPPC, paclitaxel and cholesterol can form a non-ideal miscible system at the air-water interface. Cholesterol enhances the intermolecular forces between paclitaxel and DPPC, produces an area-condensing effect and thus makes the mixed monolayer more stable. Investigation of paclitaxel penetration into the mixed DPPC/cholesterol monolayer shows that the existence of cholesterol in the DPPC monolayer can considerably restrict the drug penetration into the monolayer, which may have clinical significance for diseases of high cholesterol. FTIR and AFM investigation on the mixed monolayer deposited on solid surface confirmed the obtained results.

  15. Using continuous measurements of near-surface atmospheric water vapor isotopes to document snow-air interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Winkler, Renato; Satow, Kazuhide; Prie, Frederic; Bayou, Nicolas; Brun, Eric; Cuffey, Kurt; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Dumont, Marie; Guillevic, Myriam; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Landais, Amaelle; Popp, Trevor; Risi, Camille; Steffen, Konrad; Stenni, Barbara; Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny

    2014-05-01

    Water stable isotope data from Greenland ice cores provide key paleoclimatic information. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, a monitoring of the isotopic composition δ18O and δD at several height levels (up to 13 meter) of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and snow in the first 0.5 cm from the surface has been conducted during three summers (2010-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. We observe a clear diurnal cycle in both the value and gradient of the isotopic composition of the water vapor above the snow surface. The diurnal amplitude in δD is found to be ~15‰. The diurnal isotopic composition follows the absolute humidity cycle. This indicates a large flux of vapor from the snow surface to the atmosphere during the daily warming and reverse flux during the daily cooling. The isotopic measurements of the flux of water vapor above the snow give new insights into the post depositional processes of the isotopic composition of the snow. During nine 1-5 days periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in-between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near-surface vapor isotopic composition. This is consistent with an estimated 60% mass turnover of surface snow per day driven by snow

  16. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  17. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning.

  18. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning. PMID:26624532

  19. Coupled modeling of water transport and air-droplet interaction in the electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Pianese, Cesare; Guezennec, Yann G.

    In this work, an accurate and computationally fast model for liquid water transport within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode is developed by lumping the space-dependence of the relevant variables. Capillarity is considered as the main transport mechanism within the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The novelty of the model lies in the coupled simulation of the water transport at the interface between gas diffusion layer and gas flow channel (GFC). This is achieved with a phenomenological description of the process that allows its simulation with relative simplicity. Moreover, a detailed two-dimensional visualization of such interface is achieved via geometric simulation of water droplets formation, growth, coalescence and detachment on the surface of the GDL. The model is useful for optimization analysis oriented to both PEMFC design and balance of plant. Furthermore, the accomplishment of reduced computational time and good accuracy makes the model suitable for control strategy implementation to ensure PEM fuel cells operation within optimal electrode water content.

  20. Interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids spread as monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Issaurat, B; Teissié, J

    1988-10-20

    The interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids was studied on mixed monolayers models by means of surface fluorescence. When in a monolayer this hexapeptide which contains two tryptophan molecules was observed to fluoresce. Isothermal compression experiments showed that the complex was destroyed upon compression in the case of phosphatidylethanolamine. With phosphatidylglycerol it was observed to be stable but a dramatic reversible decrease in emission was observed at high surface pressure. This is indicative of a reversible change in the organization of the peptide-phospholipid complex. These observations indicate that, in the complex, hydrophobic interactions were weak but electrostatic ones, when present, were strong enough to maintain the GHRP attached to the monolayer and not to destabilize it. The integrity of the lipid monolayer appeared not to be affected by the peptide. PMID:3179304

  1. Numerical Simulation of Air Bubble Characteristics in Stationary Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. X.; Wang, Y. X.

    The motion of air bubble in water plays a key role in such diverse aspects as air bubble curtain breakwater, air curtain drag reduction, air cushion isolation, weakening the shock wave in water by air bubble screen, etc. At present, the research on air bubble behaviors can be subdivided into several processes: air bubble formation from submerged orifices; interaction and coalescence during the ascending. The work presented in this paper focuses on numerical simulation of air bubble characteristics in stationary water, for example, air bubble formation, the ascending speed, the departing period, and so on. A series of models to simulate the characteristics of air bubble are developed by the VOF method in the two phase flow module of FLUENT. The numerical simulation results are consistent with the theoretical characteristics of air bubble in many aspects. So it is concluded that numerical simulation of air bubble characteristics in stationary water based on FLUENT is feasible. Due to the fact that the characteristics of air bubble are complicated questions, it is important that study on the air bubble behaviors in stationary water should be conducted on deeply.

  2. Air stripping for treatment of produced water

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.S.; Lin, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    In a laboratory study, air stripping shows a promising potential for treatment of produced water to meet new government regulations on total organic carbon (TOC). Reservoir hydrocarbons dissolved in water, such as volatile paraffins and aromatics, can be removed by air stripping through interphase mass transfer. However, air stripping cannot remove many chemicals added to crude oil by the operator.

  3. Solitary water wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, W.; Guyenne, P.; Hammack, J.; Henderson, D.; Sulem, C.

    2006-05-01

    This article concerns the pairwise nonlinear interaction of solitary waves in the free surface of a body of water lying over a horizontal bottom. Unlike solitary waves in many completely integrable model systems, solitary waves for the full Euler equations do not collide elastically; after interactions, there is a nonzero residual wave that trails the post-collision solitary waves. In this report on new numerical and experimental studies of such solitary wave interactions, we verify that this is the case, both in head-on collisions (the counterpropagating case) and overtaking collisions (the copropagating case), quantifying the degree to which interactions are inelastic. In the situation in which two identical solitary waves undergo a head-on collision, we compare the asymptotic predictions of Su and Mirie [J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980)] and Byatt-Smith [J. Fluid Mech. 49, 625 (1971)], the wavetank experiments of Maxworthy [J. Fluid Mech. 76, 177 (1976)], and the numerical results of Cooker, Weidman, and Bale [J. Fluid Mech. 342, 141 (1997)] with independent numerical simulations, in which we quantify the phase change, the run-up, and the form of the residual wave and its Fourier signature in both small- and large-amplitude interactions. This updates the prior numerical observations of inelastic interactions in Fenton and Rienecker [J. Fluid Mech. 118, 411 (1982)]. In the case of two nonidentical solitary waves, our precision wavetank experiments are compared with numerical simulations, again observing the run-up, phase lag, and generation of a residual from the interaction. Considering overtaking solitary wave interactions, we compare our experimental observations, numerical simulations, and the asymptotic predictions of Zou and Su [Phys. Fluids 29, 2113 (1986)], and again we quantify the inelastic residual after collisions in the simulations. Geometrically, our numerical simulations of overtaking interactions fit into the three categories of Korteweg-deVries two

  4. Interaction between Air Bubbles and Superhydrophobic Surfaces in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Zhang, Xurui; Tchoukov, Plamen; Liu, Qingxia; Encinas, Noemi; Paven, Maxime; Geyer, Florian; Vollmer, Doris; Xu, Zhenghe; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are usually characterized by a high apparent contact angle of water drops in air. Here we analyze the inverse situation: Rather than focusing on water repellency in air, we measure the attractive interaction of air bubbles and superhydrophobic surfaces in water. Forces were measured between microbubbles with radii R of 40-90 μm attached to an atomic force microscope cantilever and submerged superhydrophobic surfaces. In addition, forces between macroscopic bubbles (R = 1.2 mm) at the end of capillaries and superhydrophobic surfaces were measured. As superhydrophobic surfaces we applied soot-templated surfaces, nanofilament surfaces, micropillar arrays with flat top faces, and decorated micropillars. Depending on the specific structure of the superhydrophobic surfaces and the presence and amount of entrapped air, different interactions were observed. Soot-templated surfaces in the Cassie state showed superaerophilic behavior: Once the electrostatic double-layer force and a hydrodynamic repulsion were overcome, bubbles jumped onto the surface and fully merged with the entrapped air. On nanofilaments and micropillar arrays we observed in addition the formation of sessile bubbles with finite contact angles below 90° or the attachment of bubbles, which retained their spherical shape.

  5. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  6. Water gun vs air gun: A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Detrick, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The water gun is a relatively new marine seismic sound source that produces an acoustic signal by an implosive rather than explosive mechanism. A comparison of the source characteristics of two different-sized water guns with those of conventional air guns shows the the water gun signature is cleaner and much shorter than that of a comparable-sized air gun: about 60-100 milliseconds (ms) for an 80-in3. (1.31-liter (I)) water gun compared with several hundred ms for an 80-in3. (1.31-1) air gun. The source spectra of water guns are richer in high frequencies (>200 Hz) than are those of air guns, but they also have less energy than those of air guns at low frequencies. A comparison between water gun and air gun reflection profiles in both shallow (Long Island Sound)-and deep (western Bermuda Rise)-water settings suggests that the water gun offers a good compromise between very high resolution, limited penetration systems (e.g. 3.5-kHz profilers and sparkers) and the large volume air guns and tuned air gun arrays generally used where significant penetration is required. ?? 1984 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  7. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  8. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  9. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  10. Air-Sea Interactions in CLIMODE: In-Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigorre, S.; Weller, R.

    2006-12-01

    The subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic or Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is an important component of the oceanic circulation. Its formation and evolution are linked to fundamental aspects of the oceanic climate. A central formation process involves the subduction of surface water through air-sea interactions. Conditions for this are ideal in the Gulf Stream region when warm water interacts with cold air above, sinks and is trapped in the late winter, thereby ventilating the interior. The study program CLIvar MOde Water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE), sponsored by NSF, is designed to quantify and understand which processes lead to the formation and dissipation of EDW. A key component to this goal is the knowledge of buoyancy fluxes in the region of EDW formation. The Upper Ocean Processes (UOP) group deployed a 3-m discus buoy anchored in the Gulf Stream (64W, 38N) in November 2005. Oceanographic instruments collect data along the mooring line while meteorological and surface sensors are placed on the buoy and collect data every minute. Since the deployment, hourly averages of the meteorological data were transmitted through the Argos satellite system. These data were plugged in the TOGA-COARE bulk algorithm to estimate air-sea fluxes. These preliminary results are presented, while the full dataset will be analyzed after recovery of the buoy in November 2006. Heat fluxes estimates indicate high heat loss events. In December 2005, regular losses larger than 1000W/m2 occurred. These heat loss events are associated with cold air outbreaks. When the air-sea temperature gradient increases, winds also tend to increase indicating a destabilization of the boundary layer and production of turbulence, enhancing further the heat transfer. As the air-sea temperature gradient decreases in the late winter, heat loss also decreases. The SST signal is seen to modulate the heat fluxes on lower frequencies than air temperature changes. This kind of signal tends therefore to be

  11. Water-power lifeline interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, B.; Eidinger, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of water and power lifelines is described in three modes of operation: normal, fire and earthquake. Case study applications will be taken from large water and electric lifelines serving the greater San Francisco Bay Area operated by East Bay Municipal Utility District (water) and Pacific Gas and Electric (electricity). Two emergency events are examined: the recent 1991 Oakland Hills firestorm and a future Hayward Magnitude 7 earthquake. Both the water and electric lifelines have limitations under these emergencies that will hamper provision of lifeline services to end users of water and electricity. A model is presented to deal with the interactions between these utilities. By using this model, the water utility can plan for a reasonable number of backup power/pumping units to deal with these types of emergency events.

  12. Interactive effects of soil water deficit and air vapour pressure deficit on mesophyll conductance to CO2 in Vitis vinifera and Olea europaea.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, A; Flexas, J; Ribas-Carbó, M; Bota, J; Tomás, M; Infante, J M; Diaz-Espejo, A

    2009-01-01

    The present work aims to study the interactive effect of drought stress and high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) on leaf gas exchange, and especially on mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)), in two woody species of great agronomical importance in the Mediterranean basin: Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo and Olea europaea L. cv. Manzanilla. Plants were grown in specially designed outdoor chambers with ambient and below ambient VPD, under both well-irrigated and drought conditions. g(m) was estimated by the variable J method from simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and fluorescence. In both species, the response to soil water deficit was larger in g(s) than in g(m), and more important than the response to VPD. Olea europaea was apparently more sensitive to VPD, so that plants growing in more humid chambers showed higher g(s) and g(m). In V. vinifera, in contrast, soil water deficit dominated the response of g(s) and g(m). Consequently, changes in g(m)/g(s) were more related to VPD in O. europaea and to soil water deficit in V. vinifera. Most of the limitations of photosynthesis were diffusional and especially due to stomatal closure. No biochemical limitation was detected. The results showed that structural parameters played an important role in determining g(m) during the acclimation process. Although the relationship between leaf mass per unit area (M(A)) with g(m) was scattered, it imposed a limitation to the maximum g(m) achievable, with higher values of M(A) in O. europaea at lower g(m) values. M(A) decreased under water stress in O. europaea but it increased in V. vinifera. This resulted in a negative relationship between M(A) and the CO(2) draw-down between substomatal cavities and chloroplasts in O. europaea, while being positive in V. vinifera. PMID:19457982

  13. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  14. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

    1995-09-05

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

  15. AIRS total precipitable water over high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, H.; Fetzer, E. J.; Bromwich, D. H.; Fishbein, E.; Olsen, E. T.; Granger, S.; Lee, S.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Chen, L.

    2006-12-01

    Given the importance of atmospheric conditions over the Arctic and Antarctica to the global climate system, hydrological cycles, and cryopspheric dynamics, and the poor coverage of traditional data over these region, AIRS data will play a significant role in filling the information gaps. In this study, we examine the quality of AIRS total atmospheric precipitable water (PWV) and explore its potential applications over the Antarctica and Arctic. For Antarctica, both Level II matching files and Level III gridded products of AIRS are compared with radiosonde records at Dome C and ECMWF's analysis products during December 10, 2003 to January 26, 2004. Results will testify to the quality of AIRS moisture data over glacial surfaces. For the Arctic region, AIRS level III data are used to compare with AMSR-E data and ECMWF analysis product during September of 2004. Results will reveal the quality of AIRS data over high-latitude water, sea ice, and land surfaces. The potential of AIRS data to improve model simulation will be discussed.

  16. Combined air and water pollution control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, Billy C. (Inventor); Jarrell, Lamont (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A bioaquatic air pollution control system for controlling both water and atmospheric pollution is disclosed. The pollution control system includes an exhaust for directing polluted gases out of a furnace and a fluid circulating system which circulates fluid, such as waste water, from a source, past the furnace where the fluid flow entrains the pollutants from the furnace. The combined fluid and pollutants are then directed through a rock/plant/microbial filtering system. A suction pump pumps the treated waste water from the filter system past the exhaust to again entrain more pollutants from the furnace where they are combined with the fluid (waste water) and directed to the filter system.

  17. Integration of air and water quality issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental sustainability of dairy farms is dependent upon a number of air and water quality issues. Atmospheric emissions include hazardous compounds such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide along with greenhouse gases and their implications with global climate change. Runoff of sediment, phosph...

  18. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-09-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 {mm} square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3. Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ }) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  19. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 mm square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3 . Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ } ) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  20. Air expansion in a water rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, Alejandro; Bove, Italo; González Madina, Federico

    2013-10-01

    We study the thermodynamics of a water rocket in the thrust phase, taking into account the expansion of the air with water vapor, vapor condensation, and the corresponding latent heat. We set up a simple experimental device with a stationary bottle and verify that the gas expansion in the bottle is well approximated by a polytropic process PVβ = constant, where the parameter β depends on the initial conditions. We find an analytical expression for β that depends only on the thermodynamic initial conditions and is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  2. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  3. 14 CFR § 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean air and water. § 1260.34 Section Â... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  4. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  5. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Soon after its inception, R/P FLIP was used to study the interaction of the atmosphere and ocean due to its unique stability and low flow distortion. A number of campaigns have been conducted to measure the surface fluxes of heat, water vapor and horizontal momentum of the wind with instrumentation as used over land, supported by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation. The size of FLIP allows for simultaneous ocean wave and mixed-layer measurements as well. Air-sea interaction was a prime component of BOMEX in 1968, where FLIP transited the Panama Canal. The methods used were similar to the over-land "Kansas" experiment of AFCRL in 1968. BOMEX was followed by many experiments in the north Pacific off San Diego, northern California, and Hawaii. Diverse results from FLIP include identification of the mechanism that causes erroneous fluctuating temperature measurements in the salt-aerosol-laden marine atmosphere, the role of humidity on optical refractive index fluctuations, and identification of Miles' critical layer in the air flow over waves.

  6. Groundwater air stripping: Effect on water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, R.B.; Simpson, C.W.; Elliott, D.J.

    1995-02-01

    An air stripping unit was designed to reduce groundwater hydrocarbon content and biotoxicity to acceptable levels. A pilot plant study was conducted to determine the water treatability and to optimize the commercial unit design conditions. A measurement of the pilot plant effluent toxicity was obtained from {open_quotes}Microtox{close_quotes} analysis and rigorous bio-assays. These results indicated that reduction of the water hydrocarbon content to permitted discharge limits was accompanied by the elimination of water toxicity. The Onda mass transfer model was used to prepare the commercial unit design. A post-installation evaluation indicated that the model gave a good representation of the commercial unit performance. Toxicity reductions observed in the pilot plant were also observed in the commercial unit. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. DAXX is a new AIRE-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Alessandra; Meloni, Allesandra; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Corda, Denise; Incani, Federica; Serra, Maria Luisa; Contini, Antonella; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2010-04-23

    The AIRE protein plays a remarkable role as a regulator of central tolerance by controlling the promiscuous expression of tissue-specific antigens in thymic medullary epithelial cells. Defects in the AIRE gene cause the autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy, a rare disease frequent in Iranian Jews, Finns, and Sardinian population. To this day, the precise function of the AIRE protein in regulating transcription and its interacting proteins has yet to be entirely clarified. The knowledge of novel AIRE interactors and their precise role will improve our knowledge of its biological activity and address some of the foremost autoimmunity-related questions. In this study, we have used a yeast two-hybrid system to identify AIRE-interacting proteins. This approach led us to the discovery of a new AIRE-interacting protein called DAXX. The protein is known to be a multifunctional adaptor with functions both in apoptosis and in transcription regulation pathways. The interaction between AIRE and DAXX has been validated by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation analysis and colocalization study in mammalian cells. The interaction has been further confirmed by showing in transactivation assays that DAXX exerts a strong repressive role on the transcriptional activity of AIRE.

  8. Thermaikos Gulf Coastal System, NW Aegean Sea: an overview of water/sediment fluxes in relation to air land ocean interactions and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, S. E.; Chronis, G. Th; Collins, M. B.; Lykousis, V.

    2000-04-01

    This study presents an overview of the Holocene formation and evolution of the coastal system of Thermaikos Gulf (NW Aegean Sea). The system is divided into the terrestrial sub-system and the oceanic sub-system; the former represents 90%, while the latter includes only 10% of the total area. This particular coastal zone includes the second most important socio-economic area of Greece and in the southern Balkans, the Thessaloniki region; this is in terms of population concentration (>1 million people), industry, agriculture, aquaculture, trade and services. The geomorphology of the coastal zone is controlled by sediment inputs, nearshore water circulation, and the level of wave activity. The large quantities of sediments (with yields >500 tonnes/km 2 per year), delivered annually by the main rivers (Axios, Aliakmon, Pinios, and Gallikos) and other seasonal streams are responsible for the general progradation of the coastline and the formation of the Holocene sedimentary cover over the seabed of the Gulf. Changes to the coastline can be identified on macro- and meso-time scales; the former include the evolution of the deltaic plains (at >1 km 2/year), while the latter incorporates seasonal changes along sections of the coastline (e.g. sandy spits), mostly due to the anthropogenic activities. The overall water circulation pattern in Thermaikos Gulf is characterised by northerly water movement, from the central and eastern part of the Gulf; this is compensated by southerly movement along its western part. The prevailing climate (winds and pressure systems) appears to control the surface water circulation, while near-bed current measurements reveal a general moderate (<15 cm/s) southerly flow, i.e. offshore, towards the deep water Sporades Basin. Waves approaching from southerly directions play also a role in controlling the shoreline configuration. Various human activities within the coastal system place considerable pressure on the natural evolution of the coastal

  9. Photodetoxification and purification of water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.; Blake, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The scope of interest in this section is basic research in photochemistry that can remove barriers to the development of photochemical technologies for the removal of hazardous chemicals from contaminated air or water (photodetoxification). Photochemistry is be broadly interpreted to include direct photochemistry, indirect photochemistry (sensitized and photocatalytic), photochemistry of species adsorbed on inert surfaces, and complementary effects of high energy radiation photons and particles. These may occur in either homogeneous or heterogeneous media. The photon source may span the range from ionizing radiation to the near infrared.

  10. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  11. NBC detection in air and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Smith, Steven J.; McMurtry, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in a Navy STTR project to develop a system capable of the 'real-time' detection and quanitification of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) warfare agents, and of related industrial chemicals including NBC agent synthesis by-products in water and in air immediately above the water's surface. This project uses JPL's Soft Ionization Membrane (SIM) technology which totally ionizes molecules without fragmentation (a process that can markedly improve the sensitivity and specificity of molecule compostition identification), and JPL's Rotating Field Mass Spectrometer (RFMS) technology which has large enough dynamic mass range to enable detection of nuclear materials as well as biological and chemical agents. This Navy project integrates these JPL Environmental Monitoring UnitS (REMUS) an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). It is anticipated that the REMUS AUV will be capable of 'real-time' detection and quantification of NBC warefare agents.

  12. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or water caloric stimulator is a device that delivers a stream of air...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  13. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34... Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award... (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1319(c)), and is...

  14. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry.

  15. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry. PMID:27509207

  16. Enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, B Edward; Calvo, David C

    2007-12-01

    Excitation of acoustic radiation into the air from a low-frequency point source under water is investigated using plane wave expansion of the source spectrum and Rayleigh reflection/transmission coefficients. Expressions are derived for the acoustic power radiated into air and water as a function of source depth and given to lowest order in the air/water density ratio. Near zero source depth, the radiation into the water is quenched by the source's acoustic image, while the power radiated into air reaches about 1% of the power that would be radiated into unbounded water.

  17. METHYL TERT-BUTYLETHER-WATER INTERACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a well-known environmental contaminant owing to its high solubility in water. Since the early 1990s, MTBE has been added to gasoline to improve air quality in some metropolitan areas of the United States. Improved air quality was, however, achiev...

  18. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  19. New research initiative on air sea interaction in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Leethorp, A.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.

    1994-12-31

    Recent statistical results have demonstrated that the oceanic environment of Southern Africa plays a important regulating role in the climate of the subcontinent. Statistical teleconnections between oceanic temperature anomalies and precipitation over South Africa`s summer rainfall region have been demonstrated, even to the extent of being partially implicated in catastrophic floods. A research program to investigate the interaction between ocean and atmosphere in those ocean areas that have been identified as crucial to Southern Africa climate and rainfall has just started. The first step of this program was to set up a state of the art air-sea interaction measurement system aboard the antarctic research vessel S.A. Agulhas. The second step of the program was to install low cost automatic air sea interaction measurement systems on three research vessels which will provide an extensive database for air-sea interaction studies.

  20. Alveolar macrophage interaction with air pollution particulates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, C A; Frevert, C; Imrich, A; Sioutas, C; Kobzik, L

    1997-09-01

    We applied flow cytometric analysis to characterize the in vitro response of alveolar macrophages (AM) to air pollution particulates. Normal hamster AM were incubated with varying concentrations of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or concentrated ambient air particulates (CAP). We found a dose-dependent increase in AM-associated right angle light scatter (RAS) after uptake of ROFA (e.g., mean channel number 149.4 +/- 6.5, 102.5 +/- 4.1, 75.8 +/- 3.5, and 61.0 +/- 4.6 at 200, 100, 50, and 25 mg/ml, respectively) or CAP. A role for scavenger-type receptors (SR) in AM uptake of components of ROFA and CAP was identified by marked inhibition of RAS increases in AM pretreated with the specific SR inhibitor polyinosinic acid. We combined measurement of particle uptake (RAS) with flow cytometric analysis of intracellular oxidation of dichlorofluorescin. Both ROFA and CAP caused a dose-related intracellular oxidant stress within AM, comparable to that seen with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (e.g., fold increase over control, 6.6 +/- 0.4, 3.6 +/- 0.4, 4.6 +/- 0.5, 200 mg/ml ROFA, 100 mg/ml ROFA, and 10(-7) M PMA, respectively). We conclude that flow cytometry of RAS increases provides a useful relative measurement of AM uptake of complex particulates within ROFA and CAP. Both ROFA and CAP cause substantial intracellular oxidant stress within AM, which may contribute to subsequent cell activation and production of proinflammatory mediators.

  1. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  2. Subsurface And Surface Water Flow Interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we present basic concepts and principles underlying the phenomena of groundwater and surface water interactions. Fundamental equations and analytical and numerical solutions describing stream-aquifer interactions are presented in hillslope and riparian aquifer en...

  3. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  4. Surface Wave Driven Air-Water Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, Elena; Henriques, Julio; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model has been developed in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest and to provide a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N +O -->NO+ + e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO2 and nitrous acid HNO2 have also been detected by mass and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, high densities of O2(a1Δg) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O2(a1Δg) density is about 0.1% of the total density. The plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  5. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  6. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L.

    2012-04-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial depth of the mixed layer and strength of the stratification level that set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer. For example in oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean (and sea surface temperatures) quickly which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture is available through the sea surface. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions (low vertical shear, anticyclonic circulation aloft), tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina and Rita in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. These effects and possible impact on TC deepening and weakening underscores the necessity of having complete 3-D ocean measurements juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements.

  7. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  8. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  9. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer; Marron, Lisa C.; Salton, Jonathan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  10. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  11. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  12. Low-head air stripper treats oil tanker ballast water

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. )

    1992-02-01

    Prototype tests conducted during the winter of 1989/90 have successfully demonstrated an economical design for air stripping volatile hydrocarbons from oily tanker ballast water. The prototype air stripper, developed for Alyeska's Ballast Water Treatment (BWT) facility in Valdez, Alaska, ran continuously for three months with an average removal of 88% of the incoming volatile organics. Initially designed to remove oil and grease compounds from tanker ballast water, the BWT system has been upgraded to a three-step process to comply with new, stringent regulations. The BWT biological oxidation process enhances the growth of bacteria present in the incoming ballast water through nutrient addition, aeration, and recirculation within a complete-mixed bioreactor. The average removal of BETX is over 95%, however, occassional upsets required the placement of a polishing air stripper downstream of the aeration tanks. Packed-tower air stripping was investigated but deemed economically unfeasible for a facility that would only occasionally be used. Twelve feet of excess gravity head in the existing BWT hydraulic gradeline were employed to drive the air stripper feed. This limited the stripper packing depth to 8 feet and imposed constraints on the design of the inlet water and air distributors. Water distribution, air flow, temperature effects, and fouling from constituents in the ballast water were investigated. The prototype was operated under water and air flow conditions similar to those specified for the full-scale unit, and at a range of test conditions above and below the normal design conditions.

  13. Linking Air, Land, and Water Pollution for Effective Environmental Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1970, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, other federal agencies, and the states have made substantial progress in improving the Nation’s air and water quality. Traditionally, the air, land, and water pollution ...

  14. Gene-air pollution interaction and cardiovascular disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Baccarelli, Andrea; Schwartz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is likely to play a role in response to air pollution. Hence, gene-environment interactions studies can be a tool for exploring the mechanisms and the importance of the pathway in the association between air pollution and a cardiovascular outcome. In this article we present a systematic review of the studies which have examined gene–environment interactions in relation to the cardiovascular health effects of air pollutants. We identified 16 papers meeting our search criteria. Of these studies, most have focused on individual functional polymorphisms or individual candidate genes. Moreover they were all based on three study populations that have been extensively investigated in relation to air pollution effects: the Normative Aging Study (NAS), AIRGENE and Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study. Conclusions the studies differed substantially in both the cardiovascular outcomes examined and the polymorphisms examined, so there is little confirmation of results across cohorts. Gene-environment interactions studies can help explore the mechanisms and the potential pathway in the association between air pollution and a cardiovascular outcome; replication of findings and studies involving multiple cohorts would be needed to draw stronger conclusions. PMID:21414469

  15. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  16. Blocking of the water-lunar fines reaction by air and water concentration effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammage, R. B.; Holmes, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, are able to impede severely the attack of lunar fines. Thus is explained the stability of lunar fines in moisture laden air, and their small solubility in liquid, aerated water. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains; the channels formed are wider and the expansion of area is greater.

  17. Air/Superfund national technical guidance study series: Estimation of air impacts for air stripping of contaminated water

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.; Smith, S.; Hunt, M.

    1991-05-01

    Analysis of the air impacts associated with the alternatives to cleaning up Superfund sites is frequently required for planning purposes prior to actual cleanup. Such analyses depend on estimates rather than on field measurements. The report provides procedures for estimating the emissions and ambient air concentrations associated with air stripping - a widely used technique for removing volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated water. Procedures are given to evaluate the effect of the concentration of contaminants in water, the stripping efficiency and the stripping rate on the emission rates and on the ambient air concentrations at selected distances from the air stripper. Henry's Law constants are provided for over 130 compounds to assist in determining stripping efficiencies. Health-based action levels are also provided for the 130 compounds for comparison to the estimated ambient air concentrations. Action levels are also expressed in terms of water concentrations using conservative estimates of emissions and dispersion.

  18. 9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view to the south. The water purification system is visible in the right foreground of the photograph and the instrument air receiver tank is visible in the right background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  19. Air-sea interactions and precipitation over the tropical oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, C.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture, the author principally discusses air-sea exchanges that are relevant to climate and global problems. The processes of interest are those acting over time scales of months to decades, which in some instances are influenced by smaller-time-scale processes, down to the diurnal time scale. The repsective influence of these processes varies with regions, seasons and scales over which they occur and, because these processes are mostly nonlinear, scale interactions can be quite complex. Owing to the breadth of the topic addressed, the discussion is mostly focused on the tropical regions where air-sea interactions and precipitation processes eventually affect the entire globe. This allows a look in more detail at some air-sea processes, such as those associated with the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO). This oscillation, which affects the climate of the entire globe, acts over periods of a year or longer and is caused, primarily, by sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the tropical Pacific. As a result, SST variability is often used as an indicator of coupled ocean-atmosphere low-frequency variability. Global or basin scale processes can uniquely be observed from space-born instruments with the coverage required. Space based techniques have been developed during the last decade which can now be used to illustrate the scientific issues presented and the presentation concludes with an overview of some Earth Observing System (EOS) capabilities for addressing air-sea interactions and hydrology issues.

  20. Observations of Air-Ice and Air-Ocean Interactions During Arctic Freeze-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, O. P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes are key to the annual summer melt and autumn freeze-up of Arctic sea ice, but are strongly modulated by interactions between atmospheric, ocean, and sea-ice processes. This presentation will examine direct observations of energy fluxes during autumn freeze-up from three recent field programs: the international Arctic Clouds in Summer Experiment (ACSE) on board the R/V Oden in 2014, the Japanese MR14-05 cruise of the R/V Mirai in 2014, and the ONR-funded Sea State cruise of the R/V Sikuliaq in 2015. The R/V Oden obtained measurements in open water and multi-year ice north of the New Siberian Islands, the R/V Mirai's measurements were at a fixed point near the ice edge in the western Canada Basin, and the measurements from the Sikuliaq were obtained at the advancing ice edge in the Canada Basin/Beaufort Sea. Though measurement types varied, all three cruises made atmospheric measurements with radiosondes and remote sensing at high temporal resolution, obtained measurements or estimates of all terms in the surface energy budget equation, obtained upper-ocean thermodynamic measurements with frequent CTDs, and were able to characterize the evolving air-ocean and air-ice interfaces. The 2014 cruises document processes producing autumnal heat loss in the upper ocean just before and at the very incipient stages of ice formation, while the third cruise documented processes responsible for ice formation during the main freeze-up period. Ocean freeze-up was observed when the near-surface ocean temperature had reached its freezing point and energy loss to the atmosphere continued (Fig. 1). This important loss of energy to the atmosphere from the ocean mixed layer was modulated by a number of local and regional atmospheric processes and some ocean processes, producing significant variability. The different energy budgets over the existing sea ice and adjacent open water also played a major role in the freeze-up processes. This presentation will attempt to

  1. Developments in Airborne Oceanography and Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. K.

    2014-12-01

    , just as aircraft carriers "project force". Now we can measure winds, waves, temperatures, currents, radiative transfer, images and air-sea fluxes from aircraft over the ocean.I will review some of the history of airborne oceanography and present examples of how it can extend our knowledge and understanding of air-sea interaction.

  2. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  3. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  4. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  5. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  6. Air stripping of contaminated water sources - air emissions and controls. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vancit, M.A.; Howle, R.H.; Herndon, D.J.; Shareef, S.A.

    1987-08-01

    Air-stripping towers are being used to remove low concentrations of organic contaminants from water. The report describes the technology and methods used to control air pollution resulting from this procedure. The cost of the controls is presented along with other positive and negative impacts of the technology.

  7. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  8. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Glazkova, Elena A.; Svarovskaya, Natalia V.; Bakina, Olga V.; Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  9. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  10. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  11. Human interactions with ground-water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    Ground-Water could be considered as an immense reservoir, from which only a certain amount of water can be withdrawn without affecting the quantity and quality of water. This amount is determined by the characteristics of the environment in which ground-water occurs and by the interactions of ground-water with precipitation, surface water, and people. It should be recognized that quantity and quality of ground-water are intimately related and should be considered accordingly. Quantity refers to usable water and water is usable for any specific purpose only so long as its quality has not deteriorated beyond acceptable limits. Thus an overall quantitative and qualitative management of ground water is inevitable, and its should also involve the uses of ground-water reservoirs for purposes other than water supply. The main objective of ground-water management is to ensure that ground-water resources will be available in appropriate time and in appropriate quantity and quality to meet the most important demands of our society. Traditional, and obvious uses of ground-water are the extraction of water for water supplies (domestic, municipal, agricultural, and industrial) and the natural discharge feeding lakes and maintaining base flow of streams. Not so obvious are the uses of ground-water reservoirs, the very framework within which ground-water occurs and moves, and in which other fluids or materials can be stored. In the last two decades, ground-water reservoirs have been intensively considered for many other purposes than water supplies. Diversified and very often conflicting uses need to be evaluated and dealt with in the most efficient way in order to determine the importance of each possible use, and to assign priorities of these uses. With rising competition for the use of ground-water reservoirs, we will also need to increase the potential for effective planning of ground-water development and protection. Man's development and use of ground-water necessarily

  12. Study of the interactions of molten sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate 50 mol % mixture with water vapor and carbon dioxide in air. Final report, June 2, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

    1981-09-01

    The interactions of aerial components such as water, carbon dioxide, and oxygen with the binary 50 mol % mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate have been studied in the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C using electrochemical methods. In addition, the behavior of nitrite ions in this melt was investigated electrochemically. By judicious choice of techniques, in situ electroanalysis was possible and the necessary relevant data to accomplish this is presented, as well as insight into the corresponding electrochemical mechanisms associated with the electroactive species. The influence of each atmospheric component was examined separately. At temperatures above 300/sup 0/C, nitrite ions are found to accumulate due to thermal decomposition of the nitrate. Water is highly soluble in the salt mixture, but no hydrolytic reactions were observed. Two methods of in situ analysis for water are described. Pure carbon dioxide is found to attack the melt at all temperatures above 250/sup 0/C producing carbonate. (LEW)

  13. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  14. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  15. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  16. Minimizing the water and air impacts of unconventional energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy generates income and, done well, can reduce air pollution compared to other fossil fuels and even water use compared to fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Alternatively, it could slow the adoption of renewables and, done poorly, release toxic chemicals into water and air. Based on research to date, some primary threats to water resources come from surface spills, wastewater disposal, and drinking-water contamination through poor well integrity. For air resources, an increase in volatile organic compounds and air toxics locally is a potential health threat, but the switch from coal to natural gas for electricity generation will reduce sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and particulate pollution regionally. Critical needs for future research include data for 1) estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) of unconventional hydrocarbons; 2) the potential for further reductions of water requirements and chemical toxicity; 3) whether unconventional resource development alters the frequency of well-integrity failures; 4) potential contamination of surface and ground waters from drilling and spills; and 5) the consequences of greenhouse gases and air pollution on ecosystems and human health.

  17. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  18. Waste Feed Delivery Raw Water and Potable Water and Compressed Air Capacity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    MAY, T.H.

    2000-02-08

    This study evaluated the ability of the Raw Water, Potable Water, and Compressed Air systems to support safe storage as well as the first phase of the Waste Feed Delivery. Several recommendations are made to improve the system.

  19. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  20. Air-sea interactions during strong winter extratropical storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Jill; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.; Bane, John

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution, regional coupled atmosphere–ocean model is used to investigate strong air–sea interactions during a rapidly developing extratropical cyclone (ETC) off the east coast of the USA. In this two-way coupled system, surface momentum and heat fluxes derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting model and sea surface temperature (SST) from the Regional Ocean Modeling System are exchanged via the Model Coupling Toolkit. Comparisons are made between the modeled and observed wind velocity, sea level pressure, 10 m air temperature, and sea surface temperature time series, as well as a comparison between the model and one glider transect. Vertical profiles of modeled air temperature and winds in the marine atmospheric boundary layer and temperature variations in the upper ocean during a 3-day storm period are examined at various cross-shelf transects along the eastern seaboard. It is found that the air–sea interactions near the Gulf Stream are important for generating and sustaining the ETC. In particular, locally enhanced winds over a warm sea (relative to the land temperature) induce large surface heat fluxes which cool the upper ocean by up to 2 °C, mainly during the cold air outbreak period after the storm passage. Detailed heat budget analyses show the ocean-to-atmosphere heat flux dominates the upper ocean heat content variations. Results clearly show that dynamic air–sea interactions affecting momentum and buoyancy flux exchanges in ETCs need to be resolved accurately in a coupled atmosphere–ocean modeling framework.

  1. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  2. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  3. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  4. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  5. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  6. Methane flux across the air-water interface - Air velocity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Bartlett, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Methane loss to the atmosphere from flooded wetlands is influenced by the degree of supersaturation and wind stress at the water surface. Measurements in freshwater ponds in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Florida, demonstrated that for the combined variability of CH4 concentrations in surface water and air velocity over the water surface, CH4 flux varied from 0.01 to 1.22 g/sq m/day. The liquid exchange coefficient for a two-layer model of the gas-liquid interface was calculated as 1.7 cm/h for CH4 at air velocity of zero and as 1.1 + 1.2 v to the 1.96th power cm/h for air velocities from 1.4 to 3.5 m/s and water temperatures of 20 C.

  7. Water treatment: Air stripping. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of air stripping techniques for wastewater, groundwater, and soil decontamination. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. The cleanup of organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 212 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Water treatment: Air stripping. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of air stripping techniques for wastewater, groundwater, and soil decontamination. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. The cleanup of organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 225 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Water treatment: Air stripping. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of air stripping techniques for wastewater, groundwater, and soil decontamination. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. The cleanup of organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 129 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  11. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  12. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  13. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  14. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  15. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  16. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  17. Quantum chemical tests of water-water potential for interaction site water models.

    PubMed

    Huš, Matej; Urbič, Tomaž

    2012-09-01

    Accuracy of different simple interaction site water models was tested. Instead of assessing their quality through the calculations of various water physical properties (dipole moment, dielectric constant, phase-equilibria diagrams, etc.) and comparison with experimental values, we calculated water-water potential and compared it with the potential from quantum chemical calculations. Using density functional theory (DFT) water-water potential was calculated for different positions of two water molecules, which was compared with the interaction used in water models. Different simple interaction site water models were then evaluated and assessed. Special emphasis is placed on angle and distance dependence of water-water potential around minima in the potential. Among three-, four-and five-site electrostatic water models, TIP3P, TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P were found to be the most accurate.

  18. Diagnosing Air-Sea Interactions on Intraseasonal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    What is the role of ocean coupling in the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)? Consensus thinking holds that the essential physics of the MJO involve interactions between convection, atmospheric wave dynamics, and boundary layer and free troposphere moisture. However, many modeling studies demonstrate improved MJO simulation when an atmosphere-only general circulation model (AGCM) is coupled to an ocean model, so feedbacks from the ocean are probably not negligible. Assessing the importance and processes of these feedbacks is challenging for at least two reasons. First, observations of the MJO only sample the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system; there is no "uncoupled" MJO in nature. Second, the practice of analyzing the MJO in uncoupled and coupled GCMs (CGCMs) involves using imperfect tools to study the problem. Although MJO simulation is improving in many models, shortcomings remain in both AGCMs and CGCMs, making it difficult to determine if changes brought about through coupling reflect critical air-sea interactions or are simply part of the collective idiosyncracies of a given model. For the atmosphere, ocean feedbacks from intraseasonal sea surface temperature (SST) variations are communicated through their effects on surface fluxes of heat and moisture. This presentation suggests a set of analysis tools for diagnosing the impact of an interactive ocean on surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, including their mean, variance, spectral characteristics, and phasing with respect to wind, SST, and MJO convection. The diagnostics are demonstrated with application to several CMIP5 models, and reveal a variety of responses to coupled ocean feedbacks.

  19. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements.

  20. Water, Air, Earth and Cosmic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc, which

  1. Water, air, Earth and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc

  2. Water, air, Earth and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc

  3. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  4. Water and Air Measures That Make 'PureSense'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Each day, we read about mounting global concerns regarding the ability to sustain supplies of clean water and to reduce air contamination. With water and air serving as life s most vital elements, it is important to know when these environmental necessities may be contaminated, in order to eliminate exposure immediately. The ability to respond requires an understanding of the conditions impacting safety and quality, from source to tap for water, and from outdoor to indoor environments for air. Unfortunately, the "time-to-know" is not immediate with many current technologies, which is a major problem, given the greater likelihood of risky situations in today s world. Accelerating alert and response times requires new tools, methods, and technologies. New solutions are needed to engage in more rapid detection, analysis, and response. This is the focus of a company called PureSense Environmental, Inc., which evolved out of a unique relationship with NASA. The need for real-time management and operations over the quality of water and air, and the urgency to provide new solutions, were reinforced by the events of September 11, 2001. This, and subsequent events, exposed many of the vulnerabilities facing the multiple agencies tasked with working in tandem to protect communities from harmful disaster. Much has been done since September 11 to accelerate responses to environmental contamination. Partnerships were forged across the public and private sectors to explore, test, and use new tools. Methods and technologies were adopted to move more astutely from proof-of-concept to working solutions.

  5. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  6. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... meaning set forth in 40 CFR 15.4. (b) TVA will not award a contract to any offeror whose performance would... is exempt at the time of contract award from the provisions of 40 CFR part 15 as set forth therein... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clean Air and...

  7. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  8. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meaning set forth in 40 CFR 15.4. (b) TVA will not award a contract to any offeror whose performance would... is exempt at the time of contract award from the provisions of 40 CFR part 15 as set forth therein... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clean Air and...

  9. Earth, Air, Fire and Water in Our Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievesley, Tara

    2007-01-01

    The idea that everything is made of the four "elements", earth, air, fire and water, goes back to the ancient Greeks. In this article, the author talks about the origins of ideas about the elements. The author provides an account that attempts to summarise thousands of years of theoretical development of the elements in a thousand words or so.

  10. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  12. MONITORING CYCLICAL AIR-WATER ELEMENTAL MERCURY EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experimental work has demonstrated that elemental mercury evasion from natural water displays a diel cycle; evasion rates during the day can be two to three times evasion rates observed at night. A study with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) found that diurnal PCB air/wa...

  13. Air and water quality monitor assessment of life support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Ken; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Holder, D.; Humphries, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preprotype air revitalization and water reclamation subsystems (Mole Sieve, Sabatier, Static Feed Electrolyzer, Trace Contaminant Control, and Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporative Subsystem) were operated and tested independently and in an integrated arrangement. During each test, water and/or gas samples were taken from each subsystem so that overall subsystem performance could be determined. The overall test design and objectives for both subsystem and integrated subsystem tests were limited, and no effort was made to meet water or gas specifications. The results of chemical analyses for each of the participating subsystems are presented along with other selected samples which were analyzed for physical properties and microbiologicals.

  14. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  15. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants.

  16. Harmonization of environmental quality objectives for air, water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Plassche, E.J. van de

    1994-12-31

    Environmental quality objectives (EQO) are often derived for single compartments only. However, concentrations at or below EQO level for one compartment may lead to exceeding of the EQO in another compartment due to intermedia transport of the chemical. Hence, achieving concentrations lower than the EQO in e.g. air does not necessarily mean that a ``safe`` concentration in soil can be maintained because of deposition from air to soil. This means that EQOs for air, water and soil must be harmonized in such a way that they meet a coherence criterion. This criterion implies that a EQO for one compartment has to be set at a level that full protection to organisms living in other compartments is ensured. In The Netherlands a project has been started to derive harmonized EQOs for a large number of chemicals. First, EQ0s are derived for all compartments based on ecotoxicological data for single species applying extrapolation methods. Secondly, these independently derived EQOs are harmonized. For harmonization of EQOs for water, sediment and soil the equilibrium partitioning method is used. For harmonization of EQOs for water and soil with the E00s for air a procedure is used applying computed steady state concentration ratios rather than equilibrium partitioning. The model SimpleBox is used for these computations. Some results of the project mentioned above will be presented. Attention will be paid to the derivation of independent EQ0s as well as the harmonization procedures applied.

  17. LASE Observations of Interactions Between African Easterly Waves and the Saharan Air Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Biswas, Mrinal; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Notari, Anthony; Heymsfield, Andrew; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Dunion, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) participated in the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) field experiment in 2006 that was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde to study the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and its influence on the African Easterly Waves (AEWs) and Tropical Cyclones (TCs). During NAMMA, LASE collected simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements from 14 flights onboard the NASA DC- 8. In this paper we present three examples of the interaction of the SAL and AEWs regarding: moistening of the SAL and transfer of latent heat; injection of dust in an updraft; and influence of dry air intrusion on an AEW. A brief discussion is also given on activities related to the refurbishment of LASE to enhance its operational performance and plans to participate in the next NASA hurricane field experiment in the summer of 2010.

  18. Soy milk oleosome behaviour at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Waschatko, Gustav; Junghans, Ann; Vilgis, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Soy milk is a highly stable emulsion mainly due to the presence of oleosomes, which are oil bodies and function as lipid storage organelles in plants, e.g., in seeds. Oleosomes are micelle-like structures with an outer phospholipid monolayer, an interior filled with triacylglycerides (TAGs), and oleosins anchored hairpin-like into the structure with their hydrophilic parts remaining outside the oleosomes, completely covering their surface (K. Hsieh and A. H. C. Huang, Plant Physiol., 2004, 136, 3427-3434). Oleosins are alkaline proteins of 15-26 kDa (K. Hsieh and A. H. C. Huang, Plant Physiol., 2004, 136, 3427-3434) which are expressed during seed development and maturation and play a major role in the stability of oil bodies. Additionally, the oil bodies of seeds seem to have the highest impact on coalescence, probably due to the required protection against environmental stress during dormancy and germination compared to, e.g., vertebrates' lipoproteins. Surface pressure investigations and Brewster angle microscopy of oleosomes purified from raw soy milk were executed to reveal their diffusion to the air-water interface, rupture, adsorption and structural modification over time at different subphase conditions. Destroying the surface portions of the oleosins by tryptic digestion induced coalescence of oleosomes (J. Tzen and A. Huang, J. Cell. Biol., 1992, 117, 327-335) and revealed severe changes in their adsorption kinetics. Such investigations will help to determine the effects behind oleosome stability and are necessary for a better understanding of the principal function of oleosins and their interactions with phospholipids.

  19. Connecting Water Quality With Air Quality Through Microbial Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. Elias

    Aerosol production from surface waters results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients and bacteria) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. In urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in emissions of pathogenic bacteria from contaminated waters. Despite the potential importance of this link, sources, near-shore deposition, identity and viability of microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. This dissertation focuses on the environmental and biological mechanisms that define this water-air connection, as a means to build our understanding of the biogeochemical, biogeographical, and public health implications of the transfer of surface water materials to the near-shore environment in both urban and non-urban environments. The effects of tidal height, wind speed and fog on coastal aerosols and microbial content were first quantified on a non-urban coast of Maine, USA. Culture-based, culture-independent, and molecular methods were used to simultaneously sample microbial aerosols while monitoring meteorological parameters. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and high concentrations of ecologically-relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height, onshore wind speed, and fog presence. Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations, but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. Molecular analyses of the microbes settling out of near-shore aerosols provided further evidence of local ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes. Aerosol and surface ocean bacterial communities shared species and in general were dominated by organisms previously sampled in marine environments. Fog presence strengthened the microbial connection between water and land through

  20. Charge dependent condensation of macro-ions at air-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mrinal; Antonio, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Ordering of ions at and near air-water interfaces is a century old problem for researchers and has implications on a host of physical, chemical and biological processes. The dynamic nature of water surface and the surface fluctuations created by thermally excited capillary waves have always limited measurement of near surface ionic-distributions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome by using macro-ions of sizes larger than the capillary wave roughness ~3Å. Our attempts to measure distributions of inorganic macro-ions in the form of Keggin heteropolyanions (HPAs) of sizes ~10Å have unraveled novel charge-dependent condensation of macro-ions beneath air-water interfaces. Our results demonstrate that HPAs with -3 charges condense readily beneath air-water interfaces. This is in contrast to the absence of surface preference for HPAs with -4 charges. The similarity of HPA-HPA separations near air-water interfaces and in bulk crystal structures suggests the presence of the planar Zundel ions (H5O2+), which interact with HPAs and the water surface to facilitate the charge dependent condensation beneath the air-water interfaces.This work and the use of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences, under contract No DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Gulf of Mexico Air/Sea Interaction: Measurements and Initial Data Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Huang, C. H.; Roberts, P. T.; Bariteau, L.; Fairall, C. W.; Gibson, W.; Ray, A.

    2011-12-01

    Corporate, government, and university researchers collaborated to develop an atmospheric boundary layer environmental observations program on an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The primary goals of this project were to provide data to (1) improve our understanding of boundary layer processes and air-sea interaction over the Gulf of Mexico; (2) improve regional-scale meteorological and air quality modeling; and (3) provide a framework for advanced offshore measurements to support future needs such as emergency response, exploration and lease decisions, wind energy research and development, and meteorological and air quality forecasting. In October 2010, meteorological and oceanographic sensors were deployed for an extended period (approximately 12 months) on a Chevron service platform (ST 52B, 90.5W, 29N) to collect boundary layer and sea surface data sufficient to support these objectives. This project has significant importance given the large industrial presence in the Gulf, sizeable regional population nearby, and the recognized need for precise and timely pollutant forecasts. Observations from this project include surface meteorology; sodar marine boundary layer winds; microwave radiometer profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and liquid water; ceilometer cloud base heights; water temperature and current profiles; sea surface temperature; wave height statistics; downwelling solar and infrared radiation; and air-sea turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. This project resulted in the collection of an unprecedented set of boundary layer measurements over the Gulf of Mexico that capture the range of meteorological and oceanographic interactions and processes that occur over an entire year. This presentation will provide insight into the logistical and scientific issues associated with the deployment and operations of unique measurements in offshore areas and provide results from an initial data analysis of boundary layer processes over the Gulf of

  2. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  3. Quantitative x-ray phase-contrast imaging of air-assisted water sprays with high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Im, Kyoung-Su; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W. K.; Wang, Jin; Micheli, P.; Laub, C.

    2006-10-01

    X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging along with a single-image phase retrieval reconstruction was used to visualize the near-nozzle breakup of optically dense water jets atomized by a high-speed, annular air flow. The influence of the atomizing air on water mass distribution was investigated to reveal the complex air/liquid interactions at various breakup stages. Unlike low-Weber-number jets, the breakup of high-Weber-number jets can occur in the liquid core, which causes sudden decreases in liquid volume fraction.

  4. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  5. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging (OKC, OK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  6. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  7. Estimating the radon concentration in water and indoor air.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F

    2009-05-01

    The paper presents the results of radon concentration measurements in the vicinity of water, indoor air and in contact to building walls. The investigations were carried out using CR-39 track detectors. Samples of ground water flowing out of many springs mostly in Arabian Gulf area except one from Germany have been studied. The results are compared with international recommendations and the values are found to be lower than the recommended value. Measuring the mean indoor radon concentrations in air and in contact to building walls in the dwellings of Kuwait University Campus were found 24.2 +/- 7.7, and 462 +/- 422 Bq m(-3) respectively. These values lead to average effective dose equivalent rates of 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 23 +/- 21 mSv year(-1), respectively.

  8. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  9. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  10. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-05-28

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  11. Modification of methane-air nonpremixed flamelets by vortical interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Card, J.M.; Ashurst, W.T. . Combustion Research Facility); Williams, F.A. . Center for Energy and Combustion Research)

    1994-04-01

    The structure of a nonpremixed methane-air flame interacting with a vortex is described by a two-step reduced mechanism. The mixture-fraction field Z for the flamelet is approximated by a stretched parabola. This synthetic mixture-fraction field is used to relate the vortex swirl velocity to the tangential velocity along the flamelet and to identify a rate of scalar dissipation [chi] appropriate for the parabolically shaped flame tongue. The flame temperature and [chi] along the tongue are calculated in the context of rate-ratio asymptotics. It is found that the peak temperatures, and hence the smallest [chi], occur at the flame tip. In addition, analytical estimates are made to evaluate the importance of the transverse convective effects in the reaction zone relative to the usually assumed diffusive-reactive balance. Away from the tip of the flame tongue but near it, the influences of transverse convection are important, but the relative magnitude of these effects is dependent on the curvature [kappa] of the flamelet as well as on the spacing l between the mixture-fraction contour of the oxidizer stream (Z = 0) and that of the fuel stream (Z = 1); the convective influence becomes more pronounced as [kappa] and/or l is increased. However, the estimates show that the importance of transverse convection is not as large as would be indicated using activation-energy asymptotics.

  12. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  13. New research on bioregenerative air/water purification systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Anne H.; Ellender, R. D.; Watkins, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, air and water purification systems have been developed and used. This technology is based on the combined activities of plants and microorganisms as they function in a natural environment. More recently, researchers have begun to address the problems associated with indoor air pollution. Various common houseplants are currently being evaluated for their abilities to reduce concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) such as formaldehyde and benzene. With development of the Space Exploration Initiative, missions will increase in duration, and problems with resupply necessitates implementation of regenerative technology. Aspects of bioregenerative technology have been included in a habitat known as the BioHome. The ultimate goal is to use this technology in conjunction with physicochemical systems for air and water purification within closed systems. This study continued the risk assessment of bioregenerative technology with emphasis on biological hazards. In an effort to evaluate the risk for human infection, analyses were directed at enumeration of fecal streptococci and enteric viruses with the BioHome waste water treatment system.

  14. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  15. Bacterial Swimming at Air/Water and Oil/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    The microbes inhabiting the planet over billions of years have adapted to diverse physical environments of water, soil, and interfaces between water and either solid or air. Following recent studies on bacterial swimming and accumulation near solid surfaces, we turn our attention to the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at water/air and water/oil interfaces. The latter is motivated by relevance to microbial degradation of crude oil in light of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our ongoing study suggests that Caulobacter swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at both water/air and water/oil interfaces, accumulating at the surface to a greater degree than boundary confinement properties like that of solid surfaces would predict. At the water/air interface, swimmers move in tight circles at half the speed of swimmers in the bulk fluid. At the water/oil interface, swimming circles are even tighter with further reduced swimming speed. We report experimental data and present preliminary analysis of the findings based on low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, the known surface tension, and surface viscosity at the interface. The analysis will help determine properties of the bacterium such as their surface charge and hydrophobicity.

  16. Energy and air emission effects of water supply.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-15

    Life-cycle air emission effects of supplying water are explored using a hybrid life-cycle assessment For the typically sized U.S. utility analyzed, recycled water is preferable to desalination and comparable to importation. Seawater desalination has an energy and air emission footprint that is 1.5-2.4 times larger than that of imported water. However, some desalination modes fare better; brackish groundwater is 53-66% as environmentally intensive as seawater desalination. The annual water needs (326 m3) of a typical Californian that is met with imported water requires 5.8 GJ of energy and creates 360 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. With seawater desalination, energy use would increase to 14 GJ and 800 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. Meeting the water demand of California with desalination would consume 52% of the state's electricity. Supply options were reassessed using alternative electricity mixes, including the average mix of the United States and several renewable sources. Desalination using solar thermal energy has lower greenhouse gas emissions than that of imported and recycled water (using California's electricity mix), but using the U.S. mix increases the environmental footprint by 1.5 times. A comparison with a more energy-intensive international scenario shows that CO2 equivalent emissions for desalination in Dubai are 1.6 times larger than in California. The methods, decision support tool (WEST), and results of this study should persuade decision makers to make informed water policy choices by including energy consumption and material use effects in the decision-making process.

  17. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  18. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  19. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative agreement or...

  20. Air/water oxydesulfurization of coal: laboratory investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Warzinski, R. P.; Friedman, S.; Ruether, J. A.; LaCount, R. B.

    1980-08-01

    Air/water oxidative desulfurization has been demonstrated in autoclave experiments at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for various coals representative of the major US coal basins. This experimentation has shown that the reaction proceeds effectively for pulverized coals at temperatures of 150 to 200/sup 0/C with air at a total system pressure of 500 to 1500 psig. Above 200/sup 0/C, the loss of coal and product heating value increases due to oxidative consumption of carbon and hydrogen. The pyritic sulfur solubilization reactions are typically complete (95 percent removal) within 15 to 40 minutes at temperature; however, significant apparent organic sulfur removal requires residence times of up to 60 minutes at the higher temperatures. The principal products of the reaction are sulfuric acid, which can be neutralized with limestone, and iron oxide. Under certain conditions, especially for high pyritic sulfur coals, the precipitation of sulfur-containing compounds from the products of the pyrite reaction may cause anomalous variations in the sulfur form data. The influence of various parameters on the efficiency of sulfur removal from coal by air/water oxydesulfurization has been studied.

  1. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  2. Quantifying the effect of the air/water interface in marine active source EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David

    2015-07-01

    The marine controlled source EM surveying method has become an accepted tool for deep water exploration for oil and gas reserves. In shallow water (< 500 m) data are complicated by the signal which interacts with the water-air interface which can dominate the response at the receiver. By decomposing the 1-D response to an impulsive current dipole source in the time domain and frequency domain I separate the response into: (1) an earth response, (2) a direct arrival, (3) a coupled airwave which travels through the air and (4) a surface coupling term which travels through the earth. The last two terms are coupled to the sea surface as well as to the earth resistivity structure but one travels through the air between source and receiver and the other only through the earth. Using a range of simple models I quantify the effect of these four terms in the time domain and the frequency domain. The results show that in shallow water the total response is significantly larger than in very deep water and that a large part of this extra energy comes from surface coupling, which is reflected at the sea surface and does not propagate through the air but through the earth. As a result, this term is highly sensitive to the resistivity of the earth. This means that the sea surface in shallow water not only significantly increases the signal strength of CSEM data but also enhances the sensitivity to subsurface resistivity structure. Compared with the surface coupling term, the coupled part of the airwave contains very little information about the earth, and is limited to the near surface. Time domain separation of the airwave from the surface coupling response results in greater sensitivity to a deep resistive target than frequency domain separation although there is also reasonable sensitivity in the frequency domain.

  3. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements. PMID:26999022

  4. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  5. Monitoring air and water quality in Canada's Chemical Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.

    1994-01-01

    As nations begin strengthening environmental enforcement initiatives, governments and industries are evaluating the cost-effectiveness of waste management cooperatives,'' in which several companies operating in an area, such as an industrial park, establish a single organization to conduct monitoring, treatment and disposal activities for the group. One such cooperative is the Lambton Industrial Society (LIS), which monitors air and water quality, and oversees waste management activities for 15 major petrochemical industries in and near Sarnia, Ontario. LIS manages a network of air and water monitoring stations, waste disposal and treatment systems, and an innovative biological monitoring program to oversee long-term water quality in the St. Clair River. Since 1975, discharges of total organic carbon, ammonia, phenols, suspended solids, and oil and grease have been reduced by 95 percent.'' Similar reductions are being realized for another 140 priority pollutants.'' An automatic remote analyzer provides concentrations of 20 VOCs at a point downstream of the industrial site. Results are transmitted to a central LIS computer, and the data may be accessed by any member company.

  6. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  7. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

  8. Interactions of nitrogenous air pollutants and ozone with California forests

    SciTech Connect

    Bytnerowicz, A.

    1994-12-31

    Ozone has been blamed for the decline of ponderosa and Jeffrey pines in Sierra Nevada and the San Bernardino Mountains. However, also other components of photochemical smog, and especially various nitrogenous compounds, play an important role in the observed changes in California forests. Gaseous nitric acid and peroxyacetyl nitrate may directly effects plants (development of foliar injury) or may predispose foliage to the deleterious effects of acidic wet deposition, elevated levels of the UV-B radiation or other stresses. In addition, the long-term deposition of nitrate and ammonium in wet precipitation, dry deposition of gaseous nitric acid, ammonia, nitrogen oxides, particulate nitrate and ammonium can significantly change nitrogen status of forests in California. Initially, changes in phenology of plants, higher rates of physiological processes, changed plant chemical composition, altered biochemical processes and improved growth can be observed. These changes may lead to increased susceptibility of plants to various abiotic and biotic stresses. After long periods of increased nitrogen deposition, deficiencies of calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, and other nutrients may develop. As a consequence of the elevated N deposition interacting with ozone phytotoxicity, perturbations in normal growth of plants and changes in species composition in forest stands may be taking place. Oversaturating forests with nitrogen may also result in increased nitrate content in ground water of the affected watersheds.

  9. Air-sea interaction at the subtropical convergence south of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.; Ballegooyen, R.C. van

    1994-12-31

    The oceanic region south of Africa plays a key role in the control of Southern Africa weather and climate. This is particularly the case for the Subtropical Convergence region, the northern border of the Southern Ocean. An extensive research cruise to investigate this specific front was carried out during June and July 1993. A strong front, the Subtropical Convergence was identified, however its geographic disposition was complicated by the presence of an intense warm eddy detached from the Agulhas current. The warm surface water in the eddy created a strong contrast between it and the overlying atmosphere. Oceanographic measurements (XBT and CTD) were jointly made with radiosonde observations and air-sea interaction measurements. The air-sea interaction measurement system included a Gill sonic anemometer, an Ophir infrared hygrometer, an Eppley pyranometer, an Eppley pyrgeometer and a Vaissala temperature and relative humidity probe. Turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were calculated in real time using the inertial dissipation method and the bulk method. All these measurements allowed a thorough investigation of the net heat loss of the ocean, the deepening of the mixed layer during a severe storm as well as the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and ocean-atmosphere exchanges.

  10. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  11. Hurricane Isabel, Amount of Atmospheric Water Vapor Observed By AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These false-color images show the amount of atmospheric water vapor observed by AIRS two weeks prior to the passage of Hurricane Isabel, and then when it was a Category 5 storm. The region shown includes parts of South America and the West Indies. Puerto Rico is the large island below the upper left corner.

    Total water vapor represents the depth of a layer if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to condense and fall to the surface. The color bar on the right sides of the plots give the thickness of this layer in millimeters (mm). The first image, from August 28, shows typical tropical water vapor amounts over the ocean: between roughly 25 and 50 mm, or 1 to 2 inches. The highest values of roughly 80 mm, seen as a red blob over South America, corresponds to intense thunderstorms. Thunderstorms pull in water vapor from surrounding regions and concentrate it, with much of it then falling as rain.

    Figure 1 shows total water during the passage of Hurricane Isabel on September 13. The storm is apparent: the ring of moderate values surrounding a very strong maximum of 100 mm. Total water of more than 80 mm is unusual, and these values correspond to the intense thunderstorms contained within Isabel. The thunderstorms--and the large values of total water--are fed by evaporation from the ocean in the hurricane's high winds. The water vapor near the center of the storm does not remain there long, since hurricane rain rates as high 50 mm (2 inches) per hour imply rapid cycling of the water we observe. Away from the storm the amount of total water vapor is rather low, associated with fair weather where air that ascended near the storm's eye returns to earth, having dropped its moisture as rain. Also seen in the second images are two small regions of about 70 mm of total water over south America. These are yet more thunderstorms, though likely much more benign than those in Isabel.

    The

  12. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  13. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion. PMID:27505711

  14. Aire knockdown in medullary thymic epithelial cells affects Aire protein, deregulates cell adhesion genes and decreases thymocyte interaction.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Nicole; Assis, Amanda Freire; Cotrim-Sousa, Larissa Cotrim; Lopes, Gabriel Sarti; Mosella, Maritza Salas; Lima, Djalma Sousa; Bombonato-Prado, Karina F; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that even a partial reduction of Aire mRNA levels by siRNA-induced Aire knockdown (Aire KD) has important consequences to medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Aire knockdown is sufficient to reduce Aire protein levels, impair its nuclear location, and cause an imbalance in large-scale gene expression, including genes that encode cell adhesion molecules. These genes drew our attention because adhesion molecules are implicated in the process of mTEC-thymocyte adhesion, which is critical for T cell development and the establishment of central self-tolerance. Accordingly, we consider the following: 1) mTECs contribute to the elimination of self-reactive thymocytes through adhesion; 2) Adhesion molecules play a crucial role during physical contact between these cells; and 3) Aire is an important transcriptional regulator in mTECs. However, its role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion remains unclear. Because Aire controls adhesion molecule genes, we hypothesized that the disruption of its expression could influence mTEC-thymocyte interaction. To test this hypothesis, we used a murine Aire(+) mTEC cell line as a model system to reproduce mTEC-thymocyte adhesion in vitro. Transcriptome analysis of the mTEC cell line revealed that Aire KD led to the down-modulation of more than 800 genes, including those encoding for proteins involved in cell adhesion, i.e., the extracellular matrix constituent Lama1, the CAM family adhesion molecules Vcam1 and Icam4, and those that encode peripheral tissue antigens. Thymocytes co-cultured with Aire KD mTECs had a significantly reduced capacity to adhere to these cells. This finding is the first direct evidence that Aire also plays a role in controlling mTEC-thymocyte adhesion.

  15. Sediment mediated species interactions in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten

    2002-10-01

    Self-structuring in marine sediment communities is achieved by the mobility of the organisms, the trophic web, and biogenic transformations of the habitat. The latter are: bioconstruction and bioturbations, sediment stabilisation and destabilisation, with facilitating and inhibiting effects. This cursory overview intends to show that in near-shore mud and sand, biogenic habitat transformations pervade all community interactions. Consequently these deserve as much attention in benthic ecosystem analyses as do trophic pathways. Abundant phototrophs and suspension feeders tend to accumulate sediment and organic matter. Underneath phototrophic mats, composite layers of anaerobic microorganisms abound. Benthic animals provide anchorage to tufts of algae, and these in turn provide shelter and food for mobile benthos. Rooted plants slow down hydrodynamics and generate complex habitats above the sediment surface but below a meshwork of roots may inhibit burrowing animals. Abundant suspension feeders stabilise sediments, and may build loose hummocks, multi-species epibenthic thickets or solid reefs, accommodating diverse epibenthic assemblages. Their raised and rough surfaces enhance turbulence. Below the sediment surface, tubes and burrows of sessile or discretely motile animals provide microoxic habitats for diverse assemblages of small organisms. At the surface, mucus of motile organisms increases sediment cohesion. Accumulated dead hardparts of the benthos support epibionts when at the surface but cause resistance to the burrowers below. Reworking and irrigation of the sediment by the infauna increases oxygenation, and particulate and solute fluxes with the overlying water. Mounds and pits generated by resident burrowers as well as by large visiting grazers and predators further diversify the benthos. All these bioengineered structures and processes generate dynamic and complex habitat-mediated interaction webs, affecting and meshed into the trophic web, which they may

  16. Nano- and microstructure of air/oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Mata, Jitendra P; White, John W; Zank, Johann

    2009-04-01

    We report the creation of air/oil/water interfaces with variable-thickness oil films using polyisobutylene-based (PIB) surfactants cospread with long-chain paraffinic alkanes on clean water surfaces. The resultant stable oil layers are readily measurable with simple surface techniques, exhibit physical densities the same as expected for bulk oils, and are up to approximately 100 A thick above the water surface as determined using X-ray reflectometry. This provides a ready system for studying the competition of surfactants at the oil/water interface. Results from the competition of a nonionic polyamide surfactant or an anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate with the PIB surfactant are reported. However, this smooth oil layer does not account for the total volume of spread oil nor is the increase in thickness proportional to the film compression. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) reveals surfactant and oil structures on the scale of 1 to 10 microm at the interface. At low surface pressure (pi < 24 mN m(-1)) large, approximately 10 microm inhomogeneities are observed. Beyond a phase transition observed at pi approximately = 24 mN m(-1), a structure with a spongy appearance and a microscale texture develops. These structures have implications for understanding the microstructure at the oil/water interface in emulsions. PMID:19714829

  17. Blast waves produced by interactions of femtosecond laser pulses with water.

    PubMed

    Li, Y T; Zhang, J; Teng, H; Li, K; Peng, X Y; Jin, Z; Lu, X; Zheng, Z Y; Yu, Q Z

    2003-05-01

    The behaviors of the blast waves produced by femtosecond laser-water interactions, and the blast waves induced by laser self-focusing in air, have been investigated using optical shadowgraphy at a maximum intensity of 1 x 10(16) W/cm(2). The temporal evolution of the blast wave launched by the water plasma can be described by a planar blast wave model including source mass. An aneurismlike structure, due to the quick propagation inside a hollow channel formed by laser self-focusing, is observed. The expansion of the channel in air is found to agree with a cylindrical self-similar blast wave solution. PMID:12786283

  18. A simulation study to identify the sea water depth for the presence of air waves in sea bed logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkarim, Muhammad; Shafie, Afza; Yahya, Noorhana Binti; Razali, Radzuan; Ahmad, Wan Fatimah Wan

    2012-09-01

    Sea Bed Logging (SBL) is an offshore geophysical technique that can give information about resistivity variation beneath the seafloor. This information is crucial in offshore oil and gas exploration. However, data collected through this technique in shallow water at low frequencies is associated with a problem termed "air wave effect". The air wave effect is a phenomena resulting from Electro-Magnetic (EM) waves produced by the antenna (source) which interact with air-sea interface to generate air waves that diffuse from sea surface to the receivers. These air wave signals dominate the receivers at far offsets to the source and consequently, the refracted signal due the target is hardly distinguishable. The refracted signals from the target being masked by the airwaves can make it difficult to identify the hydrocarbon reservoir. The aim of this study is to investigate the sea water depth for the presence of air waves. Synthetic data are generated by simulating SBL environment without Hydro-Carbon (HC) target and varying the sea water depth from 1000m to 100m with the interval of 100m. The simulated distances for the source-receiver separation (offset) are divided into five ranges. The magnitude versus offset plot together with the Friedman and Wilcoxon statistical test are used to analyze the data. Results show that the air waves are present at 400m of sea water depth and below.

  19. Vulnerability of groundwater resources to interaction with river water in a boreal catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautio, A.; Kivimäki, A.-L.; Korkka-Niemi, K.; Nygård, M.; Salonen, V.-P.; Lahti, K.; Vahtera, H.

    2015-02-01

    A low altitude aerial infrared (AIR) survey was conducted to identify hydraulic connections between aquifers and rivers, and to map spatial surface temperature patterns along boreal rivers. In addition, the stable isotopic compositions (δ18O, δD), dissolved silica (DSi) concentrations and electrical conductivity of water in combination with AIR data were used as tracers to verify the observed groundwater discharge into the river system in a boreal catchment. The results of AIR surveys and hydrogeochemical studies performed in the boreal catchment are presented. Based on low temperature anomalies in the AIR survey, around 370 groundwater-surface water interaction sites were located along the main river channel and its tributaries (203 km altogether). On the basis of AIR survey, the longitudinal temperature patterns of the studied rivers differed noticeably. The stable isotopes and DSi composition revealed major differences between the studied rivers. The interaction locations identified in the proximity of 12 municipal water intake plants during the low-flow seasons should be considered as potential risk areas for water intake plants during flood periods (groundwater quality deterioration due to bank infiltration), and should be taken under consideration in river basin management under changing climatic situations.

  20. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders. PMID:25721855

  1. Deformation of a water shell during free fall in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakoryakov, V. E.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    The basic regularities of the change in the shape and sizes (the initial volume is 0.05-0.5 L) of a water shell are singled out in its deformation during free fall in air from a height of 3 m. The 3D recording of the basic stages of deformation (flattening of the shell, nucleation, growth, and destruction of bubbles, formation of the droplet cloud) is carried out using high-speed (up to 105 frames per second) Phantom V411 and Phantom Miro M310 video cameras and the program complex Tema Automotive (with the function of continuous tracking). The physical model of destruction of large water bodies is formulated at free fall with the formation of the droplet cloud.

  2. Propensity of Hydrated Excess Protons and Hydroxide Anions for the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Chen, Chen; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Kumar, Revati; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Significant effort has been undertaken to better understand the molecular details governing the propensity of ions for the air-water interface. Facilitated by computationally efficient reactive molecular dynamics simulations, new and statistically conclusive molecular-scale results on the affinity of the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide anion for the air-water interface are presented. These simulations capture the dynamic bond breaking and formation processes (charge defect delocalization) that are important for correctly describing the solvation and transport of these complex species. The excess proton is found to be attracted to the interface, which is correlated with a favorable enthalpic contribution and consistent with reducing the disruption in the hydrogen bond network caused by the ion complex. However, a recent refinement of the underlying reactive potential energy function for the hydrated excess proton shows the interfacial attraction to be weaker, albeit nonzero, a result that is consistent with the experimental surface tension measurements. The influence of a weak hydrogen bond donated from water to the protonated oxygen, recently found to play an important role in excess hydrated proton transport in bulk water, is seen to also be important for this study. In contrast, the hydroxide ion is found to be repelled from the air-water interface. This repulsion is characterized by a reduction of the energetically favorable ion-water interactions, which creates an enthalpic penalty as the ion approaches the interface. Finally, we find that the fluctuation in the coordination number around water sheds new light on the observed entropic trends for both ions. PMID:26366480

  3. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  4. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  5. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  6. 14 CFR § 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Â...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  7. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  8. Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its

  9. Non-contact microrheology at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Shlomovitz, Roie; Levine, Alex; Dennin, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical properties of biological interfaces, such as cell membranes, have the potential to be measured with optical tweezers. We report on an approach to measure air-water interfacial properties through microrheology of particles near, but not contacting, the surface. An inverted optical tweezer traps beads of micron size or greater in the bulk, and can then translate them perpendicular to the interface. Through the measurement of thermally driven fluctuations, the mobility of the particle is found to vary as a function of submerged depth and the boundary conditions at the interface. Near a rigid wall, the mobility is confirmed to decrease in a way consistent with Faxèn's law. Very close to the free air-water interface, the mobility changes with the opposite sign, increasing by about 30% at the surface, consistent with recent calculations by Shlomovitz and Levine. In addition, the presence of a Langmuir monolayer at the interface is found to significantly change the mobility of the particle close to the interface. With an accurate theory, it should be possible to infer the shear modulus of a monolayer from the fluctuations of the particle beneath the interface. Since particles are not embedded in the monolayer, this technique avoids impacting the system of study.

  10. Environmental application of nanotechnology: air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rusul Khaleel; Hayyan, Maan; AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Adeeb; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2016-07-01

    Global deterioration of water, soil, and atmosphere by the release of toxic chemicals from the ongoing anthropogenic activities is becoming a serious problem throughout the world. This poses numerous issues relevant to ecosystem and human health that intensify the application challenges of conventional treatment technologies. Therefore, this review sheds the light on the recent progresses in nanotechnology and its vital role to encompass the imperative demand to monitor and treat the emerging hazardous wastes with lower cost, less energy, as well as higher efficiency. Essentially, the key aspects of this account are to briefly outline the advantages of nanotechnology over conventional treatment technologies and to relevantly highlight the treatment applications of some nanomaterials (e.g., carbon-based nanoparticles, antibacterial nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanoparticles) in the following environments: (1) air (treatment of greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols via adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, thermal decomposition, and air filtration processes), (2) soil (application of nanomaterials as amendment agents for phytoremediation processes and utilization of stabilizers to enhance their performance), and (3) water (removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, pathogens through adsorption, membrane processes, photocatalysis, and disinfection processes).

  11. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  12. Ion specific effects: decoupling ion-ion and ion-water interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinsuk; Kang, Tae Hui; Kim, Mahn Won; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Ion-specific effects in aqueous solution, known as the Hofmeister effect is prevalent in diverse systems ranging from pure ionic to complex protein solutions. The objective of this paper is to explicitly demonstrate how complex ion-ion and ion-water interactions manifest themselves in the Hofmeister effects, based on a series of recent experimental observation. These effects are not considered in the classical description of ion effects, such as the Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory that, likely for that reason, fail to describe the origin of the phenomenological Hofmeister effect. However, given that models considering the basic forces of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions can offer rationalization for the core experimental observations, a universal interaction model stands a chance to be developed. In this perspective, we separately derive the contribution from ion-ion electrostatic interaction and ion-water interaction from second harmonic generation (SHG) data at the air-ion solution interface, which yields an estimate of ion-water interactions in solution. Hofmeister ion effects observed on biological solutes in solution should be similarly influenced by contributions from ion-ion and ion-water interactions, where the same ion-water interaction parameters derived from SHG data at the air-ion solution interface could be applicable. A key experimental data set available from solution systems to probe ion-water interaction is the modulation of water diffusion dynamics near ions in bulk ion solution, as well as near biological liposome surfaces. It is obtained from Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP), a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry technique. The surface water diffusivity is influenced by the contribution from ion-water interactions, both from localized surface charges and adsorbed ions, although the relative contribution of the former is larger on liposome surfaces. In this perspective, ion-water interaction

  13. Interaction between air pollution dispersion and residential heating demands

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Dungan, J.; Tichler, J.; Carney, T.

    1983-03-01

    The effect of the short-term correlation of a specific emission (sulfur dioxide) from residential space heating, with air pollution dispersion rates on the accuracy of model estimates of urban air pollution on a seasonal or annual basis is analyzed. Hourly climatological and residential emission estimates for six U.S. cities and a simplified area source-dispersion model based on a circular receptor grid are used. The effect on annual average concentration estimations is found to be slight (approximately + or - 12 percent), while the maximum hourly concentrations are shown to vary considerably more, since maximum heat demand and worst-case dispersion are not coincident. Accounting for the correlations between heating demand and dispersion makes possible a differentiation in air pollution potential between coastal and interior cities.

  14. Interaction of the NH2 Radical with the Surface of a Water Droplet.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; Zhao, Yu; Li, Lei; Li, Hui; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-09-23

    We present a comprehensive computational study of NH2 (radical) solvation in a water nanodroplet. The ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation shows that NH2 tends to accumulate at the air-water interface. The hydrogen-bonding analysis shows that compared to the hydrogen bond of HNH··OH2, the hydrogen bond of HOH··NH2 is the dominant interaction between NH2 and water. Due to the loose hydrogen-bonding network formed between NH2 and the droplet interface, the NH2 can easily move around on the droplet surface, which speeds up the dynamics of NH2 at the air-water interface. Moreover, the structural analysis indicates that the NH2 prefers an orientation such that both N atom and one of its H atoms interact with the water droplet, while the other H atom is mostly exposed to the air. As a result, the NH2 radical becomes more accessible for reaction at the water interface. More importantly, the solvation of NH2 modifies the amplitude of vibration of the N-H bond, thereby affecting the Mulliken charges and electrophilicity of NH2. As such, reactive properties of the NH2 are altered by the droplet interface, and this can either speed up reactions or allow other reactions processes to occur in the atmosphere. Hence, the solvation of NH2 on water droplets, in chemistry of the atmosphere, may not be negligible when considering the effects of clouds.

  15. Spectroscopic signatures of ozone at the air-water interface and photochemistry implications.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Ruiz-López, Manuel F; Francisco, Joseph S

    2014-08-12

    First-principles simulations suggest that additional OH formation in the troposphere can result from ozone interactions with the surface of cloud droplets. Ozone exhibits an affinity for the air-water interface, which modifies its UV and visible light spectroscopic signatures and photolytic rate constant in the troposphere. Ozone cross sections on the red side of the Hartley band (290- to 350-nm region) and in the Chappuis band (450-700 nm) are increased due to electronic ozone-water interactions. This effect, combined with the potential contribution of the O3 + hν → O((3)P) + O2(X(3)Σg(-)) photolytic channel at the interface, leads to an enhancement of the OH radical formation rate by four orders of magnitude. This finding suggests that clouds can influence the overall oxidizing capacity of the troposphere on a global scale by stimulating the production of OH radicals through ozone photolysis by UV and visible light at the air-water interface.

  16. Volatilization of chemicals from tap water to indoor air from contaminated water used for showering

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, J. . National Center for Environmental Assessment); Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1999-07-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may enter indoor air during the use of contaminated tap water. When this occurs, occupants can become exposed to potentially toxic VOCs via the inhalation route. The propensity for VOCs to volatilize into indoor air during the routine use of showers was investigated. A series of mass transfer experiments were conducted while a shower was operated within an enclosed chamber. Acetone, ethyl acetate, toluene, ethylbenzene, and cyclohexane were used as volatile tracers. Chemical-specific stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. An assessment of the importance of gas-phase resistance to mass transfer from water to air was also completed. Chemical-specific stripping efficiencies ranged from 6.3% (for acetone) to 80% (for cyclohexane) for household showers used under normal conditions. As described in this paper, data resulting from this study allow for the determination of overall mass transfer coefficients, and corresponding volatilization rates, for any showering event and chemical of interest. As such, the information presented herein should lead to improved estimates of human inhalation exposure to toxic chemicals that volatilize from water to indoor air.

  17. PERCHLORATE CROP INTERACTIONS VIA CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and sods at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground- and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  18. Air-water gas exchange by waving vegetation stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Martinez, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    Exchange between wetland surface water and the atmosphere is driven by a variety of motions, ranging from rainfall impact to thermal convection and animal locomotion. Here we examine the effect of wind-driven vegetation movement. Wind causes the stems of emergent vegetation to wave back and forth, stirring the water column and facilitating air-water exchange. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a gas transfer velocity (k600 value) was measured via laboratory experiments. Vegetation waving was studied in isolation by mechanically forcing a model canopy to oscillate at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those found in the field. The results show that stirring due to vegetation waving produces k600 values from 0.55 cm/h to 1.60 cm/h. The dependence of k600 on waving amplitude and frequency are evident from the laboratory data. These results indicate that vegetation waving has a nonnegligible effect on gas transport; thus, it can contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fluxes underpinning biogeochemical processes.

  19. Controlled interactions of femtosecond light filaments in air

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Bonggu; Schrauth, Samuel E.; Hensley, Christopher J.; Vuong, Luat T.; Hui, Pui; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2010-06-15

    We experimentally demonstrate coherent control of two light filaments in air generated by ultrafast laser pulses, as proposed by Xi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 025003 (2006)]. We show that depending on the relative phase and the incidence angle, the filaments can experience fusion, repulsion, energy redistribution, and spiral motion for propagation in air. By translating the initial beams on subwavelength scales, we achieve {approx}1-mm transverse deflection of approximately 0.5-mJ energy for parallel propagation and 7 deg. angular deflection for spiral motion in 3-m propagation. Our approach using the relative beam phases to reliably control propagation of femtosecond light filaments is potentially applicable to remote sensing and lightning guiding.

  20. Microscopic dynamics of nanoparticle monolayers at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Basu, J K

    2013-04-15

    We present results of surface mechanical and particle tracking measurements of nanoparticles trapped at the air-water interface as a function of their areal density. We monitor both the surface pressure (Π) and isothermal compression modulus (ϵ) as well as the dynamics of nanoparticle clusters, using fluorescence confocal microscopy while they are compressed to very high density near the two dimensional close packing density Φ∼0.82. We observe non-monotonic variation in both ϵ and the dynamic heterogeneity, characterized by the dynamical susceptibility χ4 with Φ, in such high density monolayers. We provide insight into the underlying nature of such transitions in close packed high density nanoparticle monolayers in terms of the morphology and flexibility of these soft colloidal particles. We discuss the significance our results in the context of related studies on two dimensional granular or colloidal systems. PMID:23411354

  1. X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies of interaction between human adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin-1 and DPPE-GM1 lipid monolayer at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Majewski, J; André, S; Jones, E; Chi, E; Gabius, H-J

    2015-07-01

    The specific interaction of ganglioside GM1 with the homodimeric (prototype) endogenous lectin galectin-1 triggers growth regulation in tumor and activated effector T cells. This proven biorelevance directed interest to studying association of the lectin to a model surface, i.e. a 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine/ganglioside GM1 (80 : 20 mol%) monolayer, at a bioeffective concentration. Surface expansion by the lectin insertion was detected at a surface pressure of 20 mN/m. On combining the methods of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity, a transient decrease in lipid-ordered phase of the monolayer was observed. The measured electron density distribution indicated that galectin-1 is oriented with its long axis in the surface plane, ideal for cis-crosslinking. The data reveal a conspicuous difference to the way the pentameric lectin part of the cholera toxin, another GM1-specific lectin, is bound to the monolayer. They also encourage further efforts to monitor effects of structurally different members of the galectin family such as the functionally antagonistic chimera-type galectin-3.

  2. X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies of interaction between human adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin-1 and DPPE-GM1 lipid monolayer at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Majewski, J; André, S; Jones, E; Chi, E; Gabius, H-J

    2015-07-01

    The specific interaction of ganglioside GM1 with the homodimeric (prototype) endogenous lectin galectin-1 triggers growth regulation in tumor and activated effector T cells. This proven biorelevance directed interest to studying association of the lectin to a model surface, i.e. a 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine/ganglioside GM1 (80 : 20 mol%) monolayer, at a bioeffective concentration. Surface expansion by the lectin insertion was detected at a surface pressure of 20 mN/m. On combining the methods of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity, a transient decrease in lipid-ordered phase of the monolayer was observed. The measured electron density distribution indicated that galectin-1 is oriented with its long axis in the surface plane, ideal for cis-crosslinking. The data reveal a conspicuous difference to the way the pentameric lectin part of the cholera toxin, another GM1-specific lectin, is bound to the monolayer. They also encourage further efforts to monitor effects of structurally different members of the galectin family such as the functionally antagonistic chimera-type galectin-3. PMID:26542007

  3. Removing heavy metals in water: the interaction of cactus mucilage and arsenate (As (V)).

    PubMed

    Fox, Dawn I; Pichler, Thomas; Yeh, Daniel H; Alcantar, Norma A

    2012-04-17

    High concentrations of arsenic in groundwater continue to present health threats to millions of consumers worldwide. Particularly, affected communities in the developing world need accessible technologies for arsenic removal from drinking water. We explore the application of cactus mucilage, pectic polysaccharide extracts from Opuntia ficus-indica for arsenic removal. Synthetic arsenate (As (V)) solutions were treated with two extracts, a gelling extract (GE) and a nongelling extract (NE) in batch trials. The arsenic concentration at the air-water interface was measured after equilibration. The GE and NE treated solutions showed on average 14% and 9% increases in arsenic concentration at the air-water interface respectively indicating that the mucilage bonded and transported the arsenic to the air-water interface. FTIR studies showed that the -CO groups (carboxyl and carbonyl groups) and -OH (hydroxyl) functional groups of the mucilage were involved in the interaction with the arsenate. Mucilage activity was greater in weakly basic (pH 9) and weakly acidic (pH 5.5) pH. This interaction can be optimized and harnessed for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. This work breaks the ground for the application of natural pectic materials to the removal of anionic metallic species from water. PMID:22401577

  4. Experimental Study and CFD modeling of high speed water jets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Anirban; Barron, R. M.; Balachandar, R.

    2007-11-01

    High speed turbulent water jets are extensively used in industrial cleaning applications. They interact vigorously with the surrounding air and loose mass in the form of water droplets which moves along with the entrained air stream. The transfer of momentum to the surroundings reduces the jet velocity and thus the pressure at the impinging surface is significantly lower than the supply pressure. Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) measurements of velocity field and pressure measurements at different axial and radial locations were performed. The potential core of the jet was found to extend to around 100 nozzle diameters. The dynamic pressure along the centerline was found to decay linearly, which can be used to estimate the decay of water volume fraction along the centerline. An empirical formulation of mass transfer (in the form of droplets) from water phase to the surroundings has been developed and incorporated into the commercial CFD code FLUENT. The flow was simulated using the RNG k-ɛ turbulence model and Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model. The predicted pressure distribution at the impinging surface was found to match closely with the experimental findings.

  5. Phospholipid surface bilayers at the air-water interface. II. Water permeability of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine surface bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, L; Gershfeld, N L

    1985-01-01

    Dispersions of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in water have been reported to form a structure at 29 degrees C at the equilibrium air/water surface with a molecular density equal to that of a typical bilayer. In this study, the water permeability of this structure has been evaluated by measuring the rate of water evaporation from DMPC dispersions in water in the temperature range where the surface film density exceeds that of a monolayer. Evaporation rates for the lipid dispersions did not deviate from those for lipid-free systems throughout the entire temperature range examined (20-35 degrees C) except at 29 degrees C, where a barrier to evaporation was detected. This strengthens the view that the structure that forms at this temperature has the properties of a typical bilayer. PMID:3978199

  6. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  7. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  8. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  9. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  10. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  11. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  12. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  13. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  14. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  15. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  16. Relay cropping for improved air and water quality.

    PubMed

    Schepers, James S; Francis, Dennis D; Shanahan, John F

    2005-01-01

    Using plants to extract excess nitrate from soil is important in protecting against eutrophication of standing water, hypoxic conditions in lakes and oceans, or elevated nitrate concentrations in domestic water supplies Global climate change issues have raised new concerns about nitrogen (N) management as it relates to crop production even though there may not be an immediate threat to water quality. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are frequently considered the primary cause of global climate change, but under anaerobic conditions, animals can contribute by expelling methane (CH4) as do soil microbes. In terms of the potential for global climate change, CH4 is approximately 25 times more harmful than CO2. This differential effect is minuscule compared to when nitrous oxide (N2O) is released into the atmosphere because it is approximately 300 times more harmful than CO2. N2O losses from soil have been positively correlated with residual N (nitrate, NO3-) concentrations in soil. It stands to reason that phytoremediation via nitrate scavenger crops is one approach to help protect air quality, as well as soil and water quality. Winter wheat was inserted into a seed corn/soybean rotation to utilize soil nitrate and thereby reduce the potential for nitrate leaching and N2O emissions. The net effect of the 2001-2003 relay cropping sequence was to produce three crops in two years, scavenge 130 kg N/ha from the root zone, produce an extra 2 Mg residue/ha, and increase producer profitability by approximately 250 dollars/ha. PMID:15948582

  17. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  18. Air-sea interaction with SSM/I and altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A number of important developments in satellite remote sensing techniques have occurred recently which offer the possibility of studying over vast areas of the ocean the temporally evolving energy exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere. Commencing in spring of 1985, passive and active microwave sensors that can provide valuable data for scientific utilization will start to become operational on Department of Defense (DOD) missions. The passive microwave radiometer can be used to estimate surface wind speed, total air column humidity, and rain rate. The active radar, or altimeter, senses surface gravity wave height and surface wind speed.

  19. Evidence for interaction between air pollution and high temperature in the causation of excess mortality.

    PubMed

    Katsouyanni, K; Pantazopoulou, A; Touloumi, G; Tselepidaki, I; Moustris, K; Asimakopoulos, D; Poulopoulou, G; Trichopoulos, D

    1993-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated repeatedly that air pollution in Athens is associated with a small but statistically significant increase in mortality. Extremely high air temperatures can also cause excess mortality. This study investigated whether air pollution and air temperature have synergistic effects on excess mortality in Athens. Data concerning the increased number of deaths in July 1987 (when a major "heat wave" hit Greece) were compared to the deaths in July of the 6 previous years. This comparison revealed a greater increase in the number of deaths in Athens (97%), compared to all other urban areas (33%) and to all non-urban areas (27%). Data on the daily levels of smoke, sulfur dioxide, and ozone; the number of deaths that occurred daily; and meteorological variables were collected for a 5-y period. The daily value of Thom's discomfort index was calculated. Multiple linear regression models were used to investigate main and interactive effects of air temperature and Thom's discomfort index and air pollution indices. The daily number of deaths increased by more than 40 when the mean 24-h air temperature exceeded 30 degrees C. The main effects of an air pollution index are not statistically significant, but the interaction between high levels of air pollution and high temperature (> or = 30 degrees C) are statistically significant (p < .05) for sulfur dioxide and are suggestive (p < .20) for ozone and smoke. Similar results were obtained when the discomfort index was used, instead of temperature in the models. PMID:8357272

  20. Airborne Bacterial Interactions: Functions Out of Thin Air?

    PubMed Central

    Audrain, Bianca; Létoffé, Sylvie; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce and release a large diversity of small molecules including organic and inorganic volatile compounds, hereafter referred to as bacterial volatile compounds (BVCs). Whereas BVCs were often only considered as wasted metabolic by-product sometimes perceived by animal olfactory systems, it is increasingly clear that they can also mediate cross-kingdom interactions with fungi, plants and animals. Recently, in vitro studies also reported the impact of BVCs on bacterial biology through modulation of antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. Here, we review BVCs influence on bacterial adaptation to their environment and discuss the biological relevance of recently reported inter- and intra-species bacterial interactions mediated by BVCs. PMID:26733998

  1. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  2. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater. PMID:27056469

  3. ISSUES IN SIMULATING ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE AND AQUEOUS MONOMETHYLMERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on two areas relevant to assessing the global fate and bioavailability of mercury: elemental mercury air/water exchange and aqueous environmental monomethylmercury speciation.

  4. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  5. Polyampholyte/surfactant complexes at the water-air interface: a surface tension study.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Mabya; Koetz, Joachim

    2013-06-25

    The present paper is related to interactions between strongly alternating polyampholytes, i.e., copolymers of N,N'-diallyl-N,N'-dimethylammonium chloride and maleamic acid derivatives, varying in hydrophobicity and excess charges and the oppositely charged anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Surface tension measurements have revealed a complex behavior with the formation of polyampholyte-SDS complexes at water-air interfaces which depends on both the hydrophobic character of the polyampholyte and electrostatic attractive forces between the polyampholyte and the anionic surfactant in dependence on pH. Hereby, maleamic acid copolymers with additional carboxylic groups in the phenylic side chain show a significant lower surface tension at the critical association concentration (CAC) due to the formation of surface-active SDS complexes and multicomplexes. In the presence of only one carboxylic group in the p-position the CAC can be strongly shifted by varying the pH due to repulsive electrostatic interactions.

  6. Nature of the water/aromatic parallel alignment interactions.

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Janjić, Goran V; Medaković, Vesna B; Veljković, Dušan Ž; Michalak, Artur; Zarić, Snežana D; Milčić, Miloš K

    2015-01-30

    The water/aromatic parallel alignment interactions are interactions where the water molecule or one of its O-H bonds is parallel to the aromatic ring plane. The calculated energies of the interactions are significant, up to ΔE(CCSD)(T)(limit) = -2.45 kcal mol(-1) at large horizontal displacement, out of benzene ring and CH bond region. These interactions are stronger than CH···O water/benzene interactions, but weaker than OH···π interactions. To investigate the nature of water/aromatic parallel alignment interactions, energy decomposition methods, symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, and extended transition state-natural orbitals for chemical valence (NOCV), were used. The calculations have shown that, for the complexes at large horizontal displacements, major contribution to interaction energy comes from electrostatic interactions between monomers, and for the complexes at small horizontal displacements, dispersion interactions are dominant binding force. The NOCV-based analysis has shown that in structures with strong interaction energies charge transfer of the type π → σ*(O-H) between the monomers also exists.

  7. Conformational changes of a calix[8]arene derivative at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Pedrosa, José M; Martín-Romero, María T; Muñoz, Eulogia; Richardson, Tim H; Camacho, Luis

    2005-03-10

    The particular behavior of a p-tert-butyl calix[8]arene derivative (C8A) has been studied at the air-water interface using surface pressure-area isotherms, surface potential-area isotherms, film relaxation measurements, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and infrared spectroscopy for Langmuir-Blodgett films. Thus, it is observed that the properties of the film, for example, isotherms, domain formation, and FTIR spectra, recorded during the first compression cycle differ appreciably from those during the second compression and following cycles. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of the conformational changes of the C8A molecules by surface pressure, allowing us to inquire into the inter- and intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds) of those molecules. Thus, the compression induces changes in the kind of hydrogen bonds from intra- and intermolecular with other C8A molecules to hydrogen bonds with water molecules. PMID:16851456

  8. Conformational changes of a calix[8]arene derivative at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Pedrosa, José M; Martín-Romero, María T; Muñoz, Eulogia; Richardson, Tim H; Camacho, Luis

    2005-03-10

    The particular behavior of a p-tert-butyl calix[8]arene derivative (C8A) has been studied at the air-water interface using surface pressure-area isotherms, surface potential-area isotherms, film relaxation measurements, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and infrared spectroscopy for Langmuir-Blodgett films. Thus, it is observed that the properties of the film, for example, isotherms, domain formation, and FTIR spectra, recorded during the first compression cycle differ appreciably from those during the second compression and following cycles. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of the conformational changes of the C8A molecules by surface pressure, allowing us to inquire into the inter- and intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds) of those molecules. Thus, the compression induces changes in the kind of hydrogen bonds from intra- and intermolecular with other C8A molecules to hydrogen bonds with water molecules.

  9. (Water-rock interaction): Foreign trip report, August 1--15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.

    1989-08-17

    The traveler attended the Sixth International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction, Malvern, United Kingdom, at which she presented a paper entitled ''Geochemical Controls on Groundwater Chemistry in Shales.'' The traveler also participated in the postsession field trip to Cornwall, United Kingdom, which included visits to areas of tin mineralization, kaolinite quarries, the Lizard ophiolite, and the experimental Hot Dry Rock Project site. The emphasis of the symposium was the importance of water-rock interactions to environmental and geological problems and processes. Topics at the symposium ranged from air-water interaction to geothermal and metamorphic fluids, and from detailed field studies to the theoretical thermodynamics of the reactions. In contrast to many meetings in the earth sciences, the role of fluids (on which the traveler works primarily) was strongly emphasized.

  10. Interaction between water and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) containing polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Hamaura, T; Newton, J M

    1999-11-01

    Information on the interaction between water and polymers is indispensable for manufacturing solid dispersion of a drug by hot-melt extrusion because this interaction affects various properties of the water-polymer mixtures, such as their viscoelastic properties. In this study, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) K30 (PVP) containing 0%, 10%, and 20% poly(ethylene glycol) 400 (PEG) was used as model amorphous polymers. The interaction of water with these polymers was assessed by the evaluation of the glass transition temperature (Tg), the point on the isotherm corresponding to the weight of sorbed water required to form a complete monolayer on the solid surface (apparent Wm), and the maximal amount of nonfreezing water, which were measured by differential scanning calorimetry and water sorption isotherms. In all of the systems with a water content below a certain water fraction (0.1 for PVP, 0.12 for PVP-PEG 10%, and 0.16 for PVP-PEG 20%), the Tg values were successfully predicted using theoretical equations, whereas the experimental Tg values were higher than predicted for those with a water content above these water fraction levels. In addition, these values of water fraction are similar to the apparent W(m) values determined using the Guggenheim-Anderson-DeBoer (GAB) equation (0.110, 0.117, and 0.147 weight fraction of water for PVP, PVP-PEG 10%, and PVP-PEG 20%, respectively). Nonfreezing water is detected above 0.47, 0.49, and 0.51 weight fraction of water for PVP, PVP-PEG 10%, and PVP-PEG 20%, respectively. Miscibility between water and PVP or PVP-PEG seems to change according to the water content in the system. All parameters increase with the concentration of PEG in the sample. This may be explained by the fact that PEG has a larger number of polymer repeating units, which may therefore interact with water more than PVP.

  11. Air-sea Interaction Influence on the MJO propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, P. W.; Chen, S.; Doyle, J.; Flatau, M. K.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is a multi-scale low frequency mode that influences the intraseasonal variability of weather across the globe. One of the outstanding forecast challenges is the large model errors in the MJO eastward propagation as it transitions from the Indian Ocean to the Maritime Continent. We will discuss the air-sea coupling impact on the MJO propagation using the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) running in an extended forecast mode on the second CINDY/DYNAMO MJO. Preliminary comparison with uncoupled forecast indicates the effect of the full ocean coupling is to damp the westward propagating modes and retrograde the eastward propagating mode. The impacts of these changes are examined through the analysis of the model sensitivity and satellite data.

  12. Impact of artificial monolayer application on stored water quality at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N; Gallego-Elvira, B

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation mitigation has the potential to significantly improve water use efficiency, with repeat applications of artificial monolayer formulations the most cost-effective strategy for large water storages. Field investigations of the impact of artificial monolayers on water quality have been limited by wind and wave turbulence, and beaching. Two suspended covers differing in permeability to wind and light were used to attenuate wind turbulence, to favour the maintenance of a condensed monolayer at the air/water interface of a 10 m diameter tank. An octadecanol formulation was applied twice-weekly to one of two covered tanks, while a third clean water tank remained uncovered for the 14-week duration of the trial. Microlayer and subsurface water samples were extracted once a week to distinguish impacts associated with the installation of covers, from the impact of prolonged monolayer application. The monolayer was selectively toxic to some phytoplankton, but the toxicity of hydrocarbons leaching from a replacement liner had a greater impact. Monolayer application did not increase water temperature, humified dissolved organic matter, or the biochemical oxygen demand, and did not reduce dissolved oxygen. The impact of an octadecanol monolayer on water quality and the microlayer may not be as detrimental as previously considered. PMID:26398042

  13. Air-Sea Interactions over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Alejandro; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing, three dimensions, and realistic coastlines. Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions indicated that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality, which limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  14. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  15. Real-time imaging of crystallization in polylactide enantiomeric monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Snively, Christopher M; Liu, Yujuan; Rabolt, John F; Chase, D Bruce

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) offers significant advantages over conventional approaches including fast acquisition speed, excellent compensation for water vapor, and an excellent capacity for large infrared accessories, e.g., a water trough. In this study, the origin of stereocomplexation in a polylactide enantiomeric monolayer at the air-water interface was investigated using PA-IRRAS. PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that a mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the two-dimensional monolayer developed at the air-water interface before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. PA-IRRAS spectra of the stereocomplex exhibited distinct band shifts in crystalline sensitive components, e.g., the vas(C-O-C, h) mode, as well as amorphous-dependent components, e.g., the vs(C-O-C) mode, when compared with the spectra of PLLA alone. On the other hand, time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra, which were obtained as the films were being compressed, revealed that both monolayers of PLLA and mixed PLLA/PDLA stereocomplex were crystallized into a 10(3)-helix and a 3(1)-helix, respectively, with a distinct band shift in crystalline sensitive components only. Fourier self-deconvolution of the spectra demonstrated that the band shift in crystalline sensitive components is correlated with the intermolecular interaction of polymer chains. PMID:18781784

  16. Interactive short-term effects of equivalent temperature and air pollution on human mortality in Berlin and Lisbon.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Katrin; Canário, Paulo; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Scherber, Katharina; Andrade, Henrique; Alcoforado, Maria João; Endlicher, Wilfried

    2013-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that both temperature and air pollution are predictors of mortality. Thus far, few studies have focused on the potential interactive effects between the thermal environment and different measures of air pollution. Such interactions, however, are biologically plausible, as (extreme) temperature or increased air pollution might make individuals more susceptible to the effects of each respective predictor. This study investigated the interactive effects between equivalent temperature and air pollution (ozone and particulate matter) in Berlin (Germany) and Lisbon (Portugal) using different types of Poisson regression models. The findings suggest that interactive effects exist between air pollutants and equivalent temperature. Bivariate response surface models and generalised additive models (GAMs) including interaction terms showed an increased risk of mortality during periods of elevated equivalent temperatures and air pollution. Cold effects were mostly unaffected by air pollution. The study underscores the importance of air pollution control in mitigating heat effects.

  17. Bromine and heavy halide chemistry at the air/water and air/ice interfaces: a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Shepson, P. B.; Szleifer, I.; Carignano, M.

    2010-12-01

    The air-water and air-ice interfaces are critically important surfaces, with respect to the physical and chemical properties of the Earth's atmosphere. In particular chloride, bromide and iodide ions are strongly involved in the reactions occurring at aerosol surfaces that are hydrated and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer. Unfortunately, experimental access to these interfaces are quite problematic and the computational approach, based on molecular dynamic simulations and quantum mechanic calculations, is an interesting alternative approach. In this work, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to study the halide enhancements at the air-water interface in the case of a dilute mixture of iodide, bromide and chloride ions. The MD results show how the air- water halide enhancement is different in the case of mixtures from the case of binary solutions (i.e. anions plus counter-positive ions) and how the presence of these halides at the interfaces depends from their relative concentrations in solution. In detail, heavy halides are strongly enhanced at the interfaces even if they are minor constituents in the bulk. Furthermore the enhancement of the larger halide ions, like bromide, at the surface is greater if lighter halides, like chloride, are in greater excess in the bulk. The applications of this last result on some real system, like sea-water, and the importance of bromide ions in the polar chemistry of ozone depletion events suggest a combined approach, MD and quantum mechanism (QM) calculation, to investigate the ozonation reaction of bromide (Br-+O3 → BrO-+O2 ) in the ice-QLL and in bulk water. The study of the reaction constants suggests how the different environments can affect the kinetics of such reaction. These results can help to understand the complex chemistry occurring at the air-water interface of hydrated aerosol and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer.

  18. Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2011-12-31

    This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

  19. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  20. Air pollution, ultrafine and nanoparticle toxicology: cellular and molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Stone, Vicki; Johnston, Helinor; Clift, Martin J D

    2007-12-01

    Nanotechnology is involved with the creation and/or manipulation of materials at the nanometer (nm) scale, and has arisen as a consequence of the novel properties that materials exhibit within the "nano" size range. The attraction of producing, and exploiting nanparticles (NPs; one dimension less than 100 nm) is a consequence of the fact that the properties are often strikingly different from bulk forms composed from the same material. As a consequence, the field of nanotechnology has generated substantial interest resulting in incorporation of NPs into a wide variety of products including electronics, food, clothing, medicines, cosmetics and sporting equipment. While there is general recognition that nanotechnology has the potential to advance science, quality of life and to generate substantial financial gains, a number of reports suggest that potential toxicity should be considered in order to allow the safe and sustainable development of such products. For example, substances which are ordinarily innocuous can elicit toxicity due to the altered chemical and physical properties that become evident within nano dimensions leading to potentially detrimental consequences for the producer, consumer or environment. Research into respirable air pollution particles (PM10) has focused on the role of ultrafine particle (diameter less than 100 nm) in inducing oxidative stress leading to inflammation and resulting in exacerbation of preexisting respiratory and cardiovascular disease. Epidemiological studies have repeatedly found a positive correlation between the level of particulate air pollution and increased morbidity and mortality rates in both adults and children. Such studies have also identified a link between respiratory ill health and the number of ambient ultrafine particles. In vivo and in vitro toxicology studies confirm that for low solubility, low toxicity materials such as TiO2, carbon black and polystyrene beads, ultrafine particles are more toxic and

  1. Interfacial characterization of Pluronic PE9400 at biocompatible (air-water and limonene-water) interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis M; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Ramírez, Pablo; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Muñoz, José

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we provide an accurate characterization of non-ionic triblock copolymer Pluronic PE9400 at the air-water and limonene-water interfaces, comprising a systematic analysis of surface tension isotherms, dynamic curves, dilatational rheology and desorption profiles. The surface pressure isotherms display two different slopes of the Π-c plot suggesting the existence of two adsorption regimes for PE9400 at both interfaces. Application of a theoretical model, which assumes the coexistence of different adsorbed states characterized by their molar areas, allows quantification of the conformational changes occurring at the adsorbed layer, indentifying differences between the conformations adopted at the air-water and the limonene-water interface. The presence of two maxima in the dilatational modulus vs. interfacial pressure importantly corroborates this conformational change from a 2D flat conformation to 3D brush one. Moreover, the dilatational response provides mechanical diferences between the interfacial layers formed at the two interfaces analyzed. Dynamic surface pressure data were transformed into a dimensionless form and fitted to another model which considers the influence of the reorganization process on the adsorption dynamics. Finally, the desorption profiles reveal that Pluronic PE9400 is irreversibly adsorbed at both interfaces regardless of the interfacial conformation and nature of the interface. The systematic characterization presented in this work provides important new findings on the interfacial properties of pluronics which can be applied in the rational development of new products, such as biocompatible limonene-based emulsions and/or microemulsions.

  2. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  3. Interaction of water with bioactive glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Todd R.; Cormack, A. N.

    2006-08-01

    The bioactivity of bioactive glasses is related to their dissolution in the presence of body fluid, or water. The dissolution process involves disruption of the tetrahedral network structure through the formation of silanol groups on the take-up of water by bioactive glasses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the dissolution energy varies considerably depending on the nature and environment of the Si-O-Si bond being broken. However, no obvious correlation with bioactivity is observed, suggesting that although the network disruption is a necessary process, it is not rate determining.

  4. Chemical water/rock interaction under reservoir condition

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Tanifuji, K.; Takahashi, H.; Wang, Y.; Yamasaki, N.; Nakatsuka, K.

    1995-01-26

    A simple model is proposed for water/rock interaction in rock fractures through which geothermal water flows. Water/rock interaction experiments were carried out at high temperature and pressure (200-350 C, 18 MPa) in order to obtain basic solubility and reaction rate data. Based on the experimental data, changes of idealized fracture apertures with time are calculated numerically. The results of the calculations show that the precipitation from water can lead to plugging of the fractures under certain conditions. Finally, the results are compared with the experimental data.

  5. Air-Quality and Climate Interaction within Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huszar, Peter; Halenka, Tomas; Belda, Michal

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies show considerable effect of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols on climate on regional and local scale, especially within the industrial and urbanized areas. Moreover, there is strong potential of urban environment to affect these processes, especially due to urban heat island. For the purpose of qualifying and quantifying these effects the surface parameterisation in regional climate model RegCM has been extended with Single Layer Urban Canopy Model (SLUCM), which can be used both in dynamic scale within BATS scheme and more detailed SUBBATS scale. Experimental tests of the urban parameterization has been performed on Central Europe region in 10 km resolution with 2 km resolution of SUBBATS scheme. Results show clearly urban heat island (UHI) patterns for most the big cities or urbanized areas in the region and sensitivity tests with eliminating urban and suburban land use types provide the estimate of urban parameterization influence. Parameters of the scheme are tuned for Central Europe cities with special emphasis to Prague within the UHI Project. Detailed analysis at 2 km scale shows the local features of the UHI in Prague region. These improved simulations with urban parameterization included are used for offline coupling with CAMx to assess the effects on air quality in the region.

  6. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  7. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  8. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water.

  9. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the over powering effects of gravity. During his 6-month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R. Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and then the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles was recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS). Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  10. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water. PMID:9380841

  11. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovar, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the overpowering effects of gravity. During his six month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles were recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System. Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on Shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  12. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  13. The Role of Plant-Microbe Interactions and Their Exploitation for Phytoremediation of Air Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Thijs, Sofie; Popek, Robert; Witters, Nele; Przybysz, Arkadiusz; Espenshade, Jordan; Gawronska, Helena; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gawronski, Stanislaw W

    2015-01-01

    Since air pollution has been linked to a plethora of human health problems, strategies to improve air quality are indispensable. Despite the complexity in composition of air pollution, phytoremediation was shown to be effective in cleaning air. Plants are known to scavenge significant amounts of air pollutants on their aboveground plant parts. Leaf fall and runoff lead to transfer of (part of) the adsorbed pollutants to the soil and rhizosphere below. After uptake in the roots and leaves, plants can metabolize, sequestrate and/or excrete air pollutants. In addition, plant-associated microorganisms play an important role by degrading, detoxifying or sequestrating the pollutants and by promoting plant growth. In this review, an overview of the available knowledge about the role and potential of plant-microbe interactions to improve indoor and outdoor air quality is provided. Most importantly, common air pollutants (particulate matter, volatile organic compounds and inorganic air pollutants) and their toxicity are described. For each of these pollutant types, a concise overview of the specific contributions of the plant and its microbiome is presented. To conclude, the state of the art and its related future challenges are presented. PMID:26516837

  14. The Role of Plant-Microbe Interactions and Their Exploitation for Phytoremediation of Air Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Thijs, Sofie; Popek, Robert; Witters, Nele; Przybysz, Arkadiusz; Espenshade, Jordan; Gawronska, Helena; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gawronski, Stanislaw W

    2015-10-26

    Since air pollution has been linked to a plethora of human health problems, strategies to improve air quality are indispensable. Despite the complexity in composition of air pollution, phytoremediation was shown to be effective in cleaning air. Plants are known to scavenge significant amounts of air pollutants on their aboveground plant parts. Leaf fall and runoff lead to transfer of (part of) the adsorbed pollutants to the soil and rhizosphere below. After uptake in the roots and leaves, plants can metabolize, sequestrate and/or excrete air pollutants. In addition, plant-associated microorganisms play an important role by degrading, detoxifying or sequestrating the pollutants and by promoting plant growth. In this review, an overview of the available knowledge about the role and potential of plant-microbe interactions to improve indoor and outdoor air quality is provided. Most importantly, common air pollutants (particulate matter, volatile organic compounds and inorganic air pollutants) and their toxicity are described. For each of these pollutant types, a concise overview of the specific contributions of the plant and its microbiome is presented. To conclude, the state of the art and its related future challenges are presented.

  15. The Role of Plant–Microbe Interactions and Their Exploitation for Phytoremediation of Air Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Weyens, Nele; Thijs, Sofie; Popek, Robert; Witters, Nele; Przybysz, Arkadiusz; Espenshade, Jordan; Gawronska, Helena; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Gawronski, Stanislaw W.

    2015-01-01

    Since air pollution has been linked to a plethora of human health problems, strategies to improve air quality are indispensable. Despite the complexity in composition of air pollution, phytoremediation was shown to be effective in cleaning air. Plants are known to scavenge significant amounts of air pollutants on their aboveground plant parts. Leaf fall and runoff lead to transfer of (part of) the adsorbed pollutants to the soil and rhizosphere below. After uptake in the roots and leaves, plants can metabolize, sequestrate and/or excrete air pollutants. In addition, plant-associated microorganisms play an important role by degrading, detoxifying or sequestrating the pollutants and by promoting plant growth. In this review, an overview of the available knowledge about the role and potential of plant–microbe interactions to improve indoor and outdoor air quality is provided. Most importantly, common air pollutants (particulate matter, volatile organic compounds and inorganic air pollutants) and their toxicity are described. For each of these pollutant types, a concise overview of the specific contributions of the plant and its microbiome is presented. To conclude, the state of the art and its related future challenges are presented. PMID:26516837

  16. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medders, Gregory; Gotz, Andreas; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  17. Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

    1988-01-01

    The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

  18. Satellite observations of air-sea interaction over the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Nonaka, M.; Hafner, J.; Liu, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Satellite microwave measurements are analyzed, revealing robust co-variability in sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed over the Kuroshio and its Extension (KE). Ocean hydrodynamic instabilities cause the KE to meander and result into large SST variations. Increased (reduced) wind speeds are found to be associated with warm (cold) SST anomalies. This positive SST-wind correlation in KE is confirmed by in-situ buoy measurements and is consistent with a vertical shear adjustment mechanism. Namely, an increase in SST reduces the static stability of the near-surface atmosphere, intensifying the vertical turbulence mixing and bringing fast-moving air from aloft to the sea surface. South of Japan, the Kuroshio is known to vary between nearshore and offshore paths. Both paths seem semi-permanent and can persist months to years. As the Kuroshio shifts its path, coherent wind changes are detected. In particular, winds are high south of Tokyo when the Kuroshio takes the nearshore path while they are greatly reduced when this warm current leaves the coast in the offshore path. Further upstream in the East China Sea, on the warmer flank of the Kuroshio Front, there are a zone of high wind speed and a band of raining cloud due to the region's unstable atmospheric stratification near the surface. Surface wind convergence is roughly collocated with the Kuroshio Current. By increasing the baroclinicity and condensational heating, the Kuroshio Front aids the growth of the so-called Taiwan cyclone, an important winter weather phenomenon for Japan. The positive SST-wind correlation over the strong Kuroshio Current and its extension is opposite to the negative one often observed in regions of weak currents such as south of the Aleutian low that is considered to be indicative of atmosphere-to-ocean forcing.

  19. The interaction between clothing and air weapon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wightman, G; Wark, K; Thomson, J

    2015-01-01

    Comparatively few studies have been carried out on air weapon injuries yet there are significant number of injuries and fatalities caused by these low power weapons because of their availability and the public perception that because they need no licence they are assumed to be safe. In this study ballistic gel was tested by Bloom and rupture tests to check on consistency of production. Two series of tests were carried out firing into unclothed gel blocks and blocks loosely covered by different items of clothing to simulate attire (tee shirt, jeans, fleece, and jacket). The damage to the clothing caused by different shaped pellets when fired at different ranges was examined. The apparent hole size was affected by the shape of pellet (round, pointed, flat and hollow point) and whether damage was predominantly caused by pushing yarn to one side or by laceration of the yarn through cutting or tearing. The study also compared penetration into clothed gel and unclothed gel under identical conditions, and loose clothing greatly reduced penetration. With loose clothing at 9.1 m range clothing reduced penetration to 50-70% of the penetration of unclothed gel but at 18.3m range only 7 out of 36 shots penetrated the gel. This cannot be accounted for by the energy loss at the longer range (3-7% reduction from 9.1 m to 18.3 m range in unclothed gels) and it is suggested that impulse may have a role to play. Shots that did not penetrate the gel were used to estimate the possible stopping time for the pellet (around 75 μs) and force (1700 N) or stress (100 MPa) required to bring the pellet to a halt. Even with these low energy projectiles, cloth fibres were entrained in the gel showing the potential for penetration of the body and subsequent infection. PMID:25460102

  20. The interaction between clothing and air weapon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wightman, G; Wark, K; Thomson, J

    2015-01-01

    Comparatively few studies have been carried out on air weapon injuries yet there are significant number of injuries and fatalities caused by these low power weapons because of their availability and the public perception that because they need no licence they are assumed to be safe. In this study ballistic gel was tested by Bloom and rupture tests to check on consistency of production. Two series of tests were carried out firing into unclothed gel blocks and blocks loosely covered by different items of clothing to simulate attire (tee shirt, jeans, fleece, and jacket). The damage to the clothing caused by different shaped pellets when fired at different ranges was examined. The apparent hole size was affected by the shape of pellet (round, pointed, flat and hollow point) and whether damage was predominantly caused by pushing yarn to one side or by laceration of the yarn through cutting or tearing. The study also compared penetration into clothed gel and unclothed gel under identical conditions, and loose clothing greatly reduced penetration. With loose clothing at 9.1 m range clothing reduced penetration to 50-70% of the penetration of unclothed gel but at 18.3m range only 7 out of 36 shots penetrated the gel. This cannot be accounted for by the energy loss at the longer range (3-7% reduction from 9.1 m to 18.3 m range in unclothed gels) and it is suggested that impulse may have a role to play. Shots that did not penetrate the gel were used to estimate the possible stopping time for the pellet (around 75 μs) and force (1700 N) or stress (100 MPa) required to bring the pellet to a halt. Even with these low energy projectiles, cloth fibres were entrained in the gel showing the potential for penetration of the body and subsequent infection.

  1. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  2. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  3. Beyond Poisson-Boltzmann: Modeling Biomolecule-Water and Water-Water Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Patrice; Orland, Henri; Delarue, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We present an extension to the Poisson-Boltzmann model in which the solvent is modeled as an assembly of self-orienting dipoles of variable densities. Interactions between these dipoles are included implicitly using a Yukawa potential field. This model leads to a set of equations whose solutions give the dipole densities; we use the latter to study the organization of water around biomolecules. The computed water density profiles resemble those derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We also derive an excess free energy that discriminates correct from incorrect conformations of proteins. PMID:19257790

  4. Health effects of air pollution in southern Europe: are there interacting factors?

    PubMed Central

    Katsouyanni, K

    1995-01-01

    Recent results suggest that adverse health effects of air pollution exist at levels of pollutants around or even below air quality standards set by national and international institutions. Furthermore, there are indications that air pollution effects on health may be partly determined by specific mixtures of air pollutants and may be altered by other environmental, behavioral, and social patterns. Southern European countries share some common characteristics in terms of climate, geography, and life activity patterns. Results from studies undertaken in France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain investigating short- and long-term air pollution health effects are presented and their consistency demonstrated. These results provide adequate evidence that health effects--particularly short-term--of the currently measured urban air pollution levels exist. However, information available so far does not allow an assessment of regional differences in the health effects of air pollution as far as the Mediterranean region of Europe is concerned. It is suggested that the interaction between the traditional pollution (mainly characterized by high levels of black smoke and SO2) and photochemical pollution must be investigated in this area, as well as the possible interaction between air pollution and high temperature and other meteorologic factors. In addition, measurements of individual exposure to different pollutants, affected by the pollutant's levels in specific micro-environments and the individual's time-activity pattern, must be undertaken for a better understanding of the air pollution-health link. Finally, the importance of the reported air pollution health effects in terms of public health must be addressed more closely. PMID:7614942

  5. The interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, P.

    1990-09-21

    We have studied the interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) in order to model the effects of surface structure and humidity on the bonding and decomposition of perfluoroalkyl ether lubricants with metal surfaces. In order to understand the interactions on Ru(100), we have first investigated the interactions of each of these adsorbates alone on the clean surface. The interactions of water with Ru(100) have been studied using both thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). From these studies we conclude that a small amount of water dissociates on this surface (5--10% of a monolayer), but water is adsorbed in a predominantly molecular form on this surface with an increasing degree of hydrogen-bonding with increasing coverage. The effects of hydrogen and oxygen coadsorption on the interactions of water with this surface have also been studied using TDS. Finally, the interactions of coadsorbed water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) have been investigated using TDS.

  6. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing. PMID:22452199

  7. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing.

  8. Modeling the interaction Between Ethylene Diamine and Water Films on the Surface of a Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.; Walther, Jens H.; Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    It has been observed that a carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip coated with ethylene diamine (EDA) penetrates the liquid water-air interface more easily than an uncoated nanotube tip. The EDA coating remains intact through repeated cycles of dipping and removal. In order to understand the physical basis for this observation, we use ab initio quantum chemistry calculations to study the EDA-CNT-water interaction and to parameterize a force field describing this system. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out for EDA-water mixtures and an EDA-coated carbon nanotube immmed in water. These simulations are similar to our earlier MD study that characterized the CNT-water interface. The attractive CNT-EDA and CNT-water interactions arise primarily from van der Waals forces, and the EDA-EDA, EDA-water and water-water interactions are mainly due to hydrogen bond formation. The binding energ of single EDA molecule to the nanotube is nearly three times larger than the corresponding value found for water (4.3 versus 1.5 kcal mol, respectively). The EDA molecules readily stick to and diffuse along the CNT surface. As a resulf mixing of the EDA and water films does not occur on the timescale of the MD simulations. The EDA film reduces the hydrophobicity of the nanotube surface and acts like a prototypical surfactant in stabilizing the suspension of carbon nanotubes in water. For this presentation, we use the MD simulations to determine how the presence of the carbon nanotube surface perturbs the properties of EDA-water mixtures.

  9. Capillarity-induced directed self-assembly of patchy hexagram particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Min; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Yeom, Su-Jin; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Directed self-assembly can produce ordered or organized superstructures from pre-existing building blocks through pre-programmed interactions. Encoding desired information into building blocks with specific directionality and strength, however, poses a significant challenge for the development of self-assembled superstructures. Here, we demonstrate that controlling the shape and patchiness of particles trapped at the air-water interface can represent a powerful approach for forming ordered macroscopic complex structures through capillary interactions. We designed hexagram particles using a micromolding method that allowed for precise control over the shape and, more importantly, the chemical patchiness of the particles. The assembly behaviors of these hexagram particles at the air-water interface were strongly affected by chemical patchiness. In particular, two-dimensional millimeter-scale ordered structures could be formed by varying the patchiness of the hexagram particles, and we attribute this effect to the delicate balance between the attractive and repulsive interactions among the patchy hexagram particles. Our results provide important clues for encoding information into patchy particles to achieve macroscopic assemblies via a simple molding technique and potentially pave a new pathway for the programmable assembly of particles at the air-water interface.

  10. Capillarity-induced directed self-assembly of patchy hexagram particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Min; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Yeom, Su-Jin; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Directed self-assembly can produce ordered or organized superstructures from pre-existing building blocks through pre-programmed interactions. Encoding desired information into building blocks with specific directionality and strength, however, poses a significant challenge for the development of self-assembled superstructures. Here, we demonstrate that controlling the shape and patchiness of particles trapped at the air-water interface can represent a powerful approach for forming ordered macroscopic complex structures through capillary interactions. We designed hexagram particles using a micromolding method that allowed for precise control over the shape and, more importantly, the chemical patchiness of the particles. The assembly behaviors of these hexagram particles at the air-water interface were strongly affected by chemical patchiness. In particular, two-dimensional millimeter-scale ordered structures could be formed by varying the patchiness of the hexagram particles, and we attribute this effect to the delicate balance between the attractive and repulsive interactions among the patchy hexagram particles. Our results provide important clues for encoding information into patchy particles to achieve macroscopic assemblies via a simple molding technique and potentially pave a new pathway for the programmable assembly of particles at the air-water interface. PMID:27328067

  11. Influence of water depth on the sound generated by air-bubble vibration in the water musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Yoshito; Nakazono, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a water musical instrument that generates sound by the falling of water drops within resonance tubes. The instrument can give people who hear it the healing effect inherent in the sound of water. The sound produced by falling water drops arises from air- bubble vibrations. To investigate the impact of water depth on the air-bubble vibrations, we conducted experiments at varying values of water pressure and nozzle shape. We found that air-bubble vibration frequency does not change at a water depth of 50 mm or greater. Between 35 and 40 mm, however, the frequency decreases. At water depths of 30 mm or below, the air-bubble vibration frequency increases. In our tests, we varied the nozzle diameter from 2 to 4 mm. In addition, we discovered that the time taken for air-bubble vibration to start after the water drops start falling is constant at water depths of 40 mm or greater, but slower at depths below 40 mm.

  12. Aggregation behaviors of gelatin with cationic gemini surfactant at air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Xu, Guiying; Feng, Yujun; Li, Yiming

    2007-03-10

    The dilational rheological properties of gelatin with cationic gemini surfactant 1,2-ethane bis(dimethyl dodecyl ammonium bromide) (C(12)C(2)C(12)) at air/water interface were investigated using oscillating barriers method at low frequency (0.005-0.1 Hz), which was compared with single-chain surfactant dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). The results indicate that the maximum dilational modulus and the film stability of gelatin-C(12)C(2)C(12) are higher than those of gelatin-DTAB. At high concentration of C(12)C(2)C(12) or DTAB, the dilational modulus of gelatin-surfactant system becomes close to that corresponding to pure surfactant, suggesting gelatin at interface is replaced by surfactant. This replacement is also observed by surface tension measurement. However, it is found that gelatin-C(12)C(2)C(12) system has two obvious breaks but gelatin-DTAB has not in surface tension isotherms. These phenomena are ascribed to the double charges and strong hydrophobicity of C(12)C(2)C(12). Based on these experimental results, a mechanism of gelatin-surfactant interaction at air/water interface is proposed.

  13. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  14. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure.

  15. Actinide Dioxides in Water: Interactions at the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Hayun, Shmuel; Asta, Mark; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-12-15

    A comprehensive understanding of chemical interactions between water and actinide dioxide surfaces is critical for safe operation and storage of nuclear fuels. Despite substantial previous research, understanding the nature of these interactions remains incomplete. In this work, we combine accurate calorimetric measurements with first-principles computational studies to characterize surface energies and adsorption enthalpies of water on two fluorite-structured compounds, ThO₂ and CeO₂, that are relevant for understanding the behavior of water on actinide oxide surfaces more generally. We determine coverage-dependent adsorption enthalpies and demonstrate a mixed molecular and dissociative structure for the first hydration layer. The results show a correlation between the magnitude of the anhydrous surface energy and the water adsorption enthalpy. Further, they suggest a structural model featuring one adsorbed water molecule per one surface cation on the most stable facet that is expected to be a common structural signature of water adsorbed on actinide dioxide compounds.

  16. Particle-water interactions of platinum-based anticancer drugs in river water and estuarine water.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Mascorda, Llucia

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic, platinum-based anticancer drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, enter the aquatic environment largely in municipal wastes via excretion from outpatients undergoing chemotherapy. The environmental behaviour, effects and fate of these drugs are, however, unknown. In this study, the adsorption of the drugs to untreated and chemically modified (oxide-free and organic-free) sediment was examined in both river water and low salinity (S=3.2) estuarine water in order to determine the nature and extent of their interactions with suspended particles. In all cases, adsorption isotherms were linear, and the slopes of the relationships, or distribution coefficients (KDs), ranged from about 10(2) to 10(3) ml g(-1). Overall, adsorption decreased in the order: cisplatin>carboplatin>oxaliplatin; in river water and: cisplatin>carboplatin, oxaliplatin; in estuarine water. There was no clear dependence of adsorption on sediment treatment but, for all sediment types, both cisplatin and carboplatin adsorption was greater in river water than in estuarine water. Qualitatively, these observations are consistent with the rates of formation of reactive, aquated degradation products and the dependencies of these rates on aqueous chloride concentration. We predict that during transport through an estuarine turbidity maximum (of suspended sediment concentration=1 g L(-1)), up to about 45% of cisplatin and 35% of carboplatin are filtered out from the aqueous phase but that no more than 7% of oxaliplatin is retained.

  17. Detachment of deposited colloids by advancing and receding air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2011-08-16

    Moving air-water interfaces can detach colloidal particles from stationary surfaces. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of advancing and receding air-water interfaces on colloid detachment as a function of interface velocity. We deposited fluorescent, negatively charged, carboxylate-modified polystyrene colloids (diameter of 1 μm) into a cylindrical glass channel. The colloids were hydrophilic with an advancing air-water contact angle of 60° and a receding contact angle of 40°. After colloid deposition, two air bubbles were sequentially introduced into the glass channel and passed through the channel at different velocities (0.5, 7.7, 72, 982, and 10,800 cm/h). The passage of the bubbles represented a sequence of receding and advancing air-water interfaces. Colloids remaining in the glass channel after each interface passage were visualized with confocal microscopy and quantified by image analysis. The advancing air-water interface was significantly more effective in detaching colloids from the glass surface than the receding interface. Most of the colloids were detached during the first passage of the advancing air-water interface, while the subsequent interface passages did not remove significant amounts of colloids. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborate our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small and that of the channel-air-water contact angle is large.

  18. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  19. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  20. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma.

  1. Water-Mediated Interactions between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R

    2016-09-01

    All surfaces in water experience at short separations hydration repulsion or hydrophobic attraction, depending on the surface polarity. These interactions dominate the more long-ranged electrostatic and van der Waals interactions and are ubiquitous in biological and colloidal systems. Despite their importance in all scenarios where the surface separation is in the nanometer range, the origin of these hydration interactions is still unclear. Using atomistic solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the interaction free energies of charge-neutral model surfaces with different elastic and water-binding properties. The surface polarity is shown to be the most important parameter that not only determines the hydration properties and thereby the water contact angle of a single surface but also the surface-surface interaction and whether two surfaces attract or repel. Elastic properties of the surfaces are less important. On the basis of surface contact angles and surface-surface binding affinities, we construct a universal interaction diagram featuring three different interaction regimes-hydration repulsion, cavitation-induced attraction-and for intermediate surface polarities-dry adhesion. On the basis of scaling arguments and perturbation theory, we establish simple combination rules that predict the interaction behavior for combinations of dissimilar surfaces. PMID:27487420

  2. Water-Mediated Interactions between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R

    2016-09-01

    All surfaces in water experience at short separations hydration repulsion or hydrophobic attraction, depending on the surface polarity. These interactions dominate the more long-ranged electrostatic and van der Waals interactions and are ubiquitous in biological and colloidal systems. Despite their importance in all scenarios where the surface separation is in the nanometer range, the origin of these hydration interactions is still unclear. Using atomistic solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the interaction free energies of charge-neutral model surfaces with different elastic and water-binding properties. The surface polarity is shown to be the most important parameter that not only determines the hydration properties and thereby the water contact angle of a single surface but also the surface-surface interaction and whether two surfaces attract or repel. Elastic properties of the surfaces are less important. On the basis of surface contact angles and surface-surface binding affinities, we construct a universal interaction diagram featuring three different interaction regimes-hydration repulsion, cavitation-induced attraction-and for intermediate surface polarities-dry adhesion. On the basis of scaling arguments and perturbation theory, we establish simple combination rules that predict the interaction behavior for combinations of dissimilar surfaces.

  3. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  4. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article.

  5. Effects of air and water temperatures on resting metabolism of auklets and other diving birds.

    PubMed

    Richman, Samantha E; Lovvorn, James R

    2011-01-01

    For small aquatic endotherms, heat loss while floating on water can be a dominant energy cost, and requires accurate estimation in energetics models for different species. We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) in air and on water for a small diving bird, the Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus), and compared these results to published data for other diving birds of diverse taxa and sizes. For 8 Cassin's auklets (~165 g), the lower critical temperature was higher on water (21 °C) than in air (16 °C). Lowest values of RMR (W kg⁻¹) averaged 19% higher on water (12.14 ± 3.14 SD) than in air (10.22 ± 1.43). At lower temperatures, RMR averaged 25% higher on water than in air, increasing with similar slope. RMR was higher on water than in air for alcids, cormorants, and small penguins but not for diving ducks, which appear exceptionally resistant to heat loss in water. Changes in RMR (W) with body mass either in air or on water were mostly linear over the 5- to 20-fold body mass ranges of alcids, diving ducks, and penguins, while cormorants showed no relationship of RMR with mass. The often large energetic effects of time spent floating on water can differ substantially among major taxa of diving birds, so that relevant estimates are critical to understanding their patterns of daily energy use. PMID:21527823

  6. Effects of air and water temperatures on resting metabolism of auklets and other diving birds.

    PubMed

    Richman, Samantha E; Lovvorn, James R

    2011-01-01

    For small aquatic endotherms, heat loss while floating on water can be a dominant energy cost, and requires accurate estimation in energetics models for different species. We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) in air and on water for a small diving bird, the Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus), and compared these results to published data for other diving birds of diverse taxa and sizes. For 8 Cassin's auklets (~165 g), the lower critical temperature was higher on water (21 °C) than in air (16 °C). Lowest values of RMR (W kg⁻¹) averaged 19% higher on water (12.14 ± 3.14 SD) than in air (10.22 ± 1.43). At lower temperatures, RMR averaged 25% higher on water than in air, increasing with similar slope. RMR was higher on water than in air for alcids, cormorants, and small penguins but not for diving ducks, which appear exceptionally resistant to heat loss in water. Changes in RMR (W) with body mass either in air or on water were mostly linear over the 5- to 20-fold body mass ranges of alcids, diving ducks, and penguins, while cormorants showed no relationship of RMR with mass. The often large energetic effects of time spent floating on water can differ substantially among major taxa of diving birds, so that relevant estimates are critical to understanding their patterns of daily energy use.

  7. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  8. Mechanical Stability of Polystyrene and Janus Particle Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Lenis, Jessica; Razavi, Sepideh; Cao, Kathleen D; Lin, Binhua; Lee, Ka Yee C; Tu, Raymond S; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2015-12-16

    The compressional instability of particle-laden air/water interfaces is investigated with plain and surface-anisotropic (Janus) particles. We hypothesize that the amphiphilic nature of Janus particles leads to both anisotropic particle-particle and particle-interface interactions that can yield particle films with unique collapse mechanisms. Analysis of Langmuir isotherms and microstructural characterization of the homogeneous polystyrene particle films during compression reveal an interfacial buckling instability followed by folding, which is in good agreement with predictions from classical elasticity theory. In contrast, Janus particle films exhibit a different behavior during compression, where the collapse mode occurs through the subduction of the Janus particle film. Our results suggest that particle-laden films comprised of surface-anisotropic particles can be engineered to evolve new material properties. PMID:26588066

  9. Acoustic wave propagation in air-bubble curtains in water. Part 2. Field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Domenico, S.N.

    1982-03-01

    A field experiment consisted of hydrophone recordings in a pond, 25 ft deep, of signals transmitted through air-bubble curtains from a water gun source. The air curtains issued from one to 13 pipes (20 ft long and spaced at 1.67-ft intervals). Air pressures used in the pipes were 15, 25, and 50 psi. Length and complexity of the signals indicate that reverberations occurred to an increasing extent as the number of consecutive air curtains was increased. Analysis of the first pulse in the recorded signals, after approximate removal of hydrophone and recorder response, indicates that the reverberations occur principally in the bubble-free corridors between air curtains. This pulse broadens and its peak amplitude is delayed linearly as the number of successive air curtains is increased. The peak amplitude is decreased substantially by the first air curtain and thereafter remains between 0.1 and 0.2 of the amplitude without air curtains.

  10. Ultrasonic predator–prey interactions in water–convergent evolution with insects and bats in air?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Maria; Wahlberg, Magnus; Surlykke, Annemarie; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2013-01-01

    Toothed whales and bats have independently evolved biosonar systems to navigate and locate and catch prey. Such active sensing allows them to operate in darkness, but with the potential cost of warning prey by the emission of intense ultrasonic signals. At least six orders of nocturnal insects have independently evolved ears sensitive to ultrasound and exhibit evasive maneuvers when exposed to bat calls. Among aquatic prey on the other hand, the ability to detect and avoid ultrasound emitting predators seems to be limited to only one subfamily of Clupeidae: the Alosinae (shad and menhaden). These differences are likely rooted in the different physical properties of air and water where cuticular mechanoreceptors have been adapted to serve as ultrasound sensitive ears, whereas ultrasound detection in water have called for sensory cells mechanically connected to highly specialized gas volumes that can oscillate at high frequencies. In addition, there are most likely differences in the risk of predation between insects and fish from echolocating predators. The selection pressure among insects for evolving ultrasound sensitive ears is high, because essentially all nocturnal predation on flying insects stems from echolocating bats. In the interaction between toothed whales and their prey the selection pressure seems weaker, because toothed whales are by no means the only marine predators placing a selection pressure on their prey to evolve specific means to detect and avoid them. Toothed whales can generate extremely intense sound pressure levels, and it has been suggested that they may use these to debilitate prey. Recent experiments, however, show that neither fish with swim bladders, nor squid are debilitated by such signals. This strongly suggests that the production of high amplitude ultrasonic clicks serve the function of improving the detection range of the toothed whale biosonar system rather than debilitation of prey. PMID:23781206

  11. Air pollutant interactions with vegetation: research needs in data acquisition and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S. E.; McLauglin, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this discussion is to consider problems involved in the acquisition, interpretation, and application of data collected in studies of air pollutant interactions with the terrestrial environment. Emphasis will be placed on a critical evaluation of current deficiencies and future research needs by addressing the following questions: (1) which pollutants are either sufficiently toxic, pervasive, or persistent to warrant the expense of monitoring and effects research; (2) what are the interactions of multiple pollutants during deposition and how do these influence toxicity; (3) how de we collect, report, and interpret deposition and air quality data to ensure its maximum utility in assessment of potential regional environmental effects; (4) what processes do we study, and how are they measured to most efficiently describe the relationship between air quality dose and ultimate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems; and (5) how do we integrate site-specific studies into regional estimates of present and potential environmental degradation (or benefit).

  12. PLATIN (plant-atmosphere interaction) I: A model of plant-atmosphere interaction for estimating absorbed doses of gaseous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Grünhage, L; Haenel, H D

    1997-01-01

    A PLant-ATmosphere INteraction model (PLATIN) was developed for estimating air pollutant absorbed doses under ambient conditions. PLATIN is based on the canopy energy balance combined with a gas transport submodel. The model has three major resistance components: (1) a turbulent atmospheric resistance Rah(zm) that describes the atmospheric transport properties between a measurement height above the canopy and the conceptual height z=d+z0m which represents the sink for momentum according to the big-leaf concept; (2) a quasilaminar layer resistance R(b,A) that quantifies the way in which the transfer of sensible heat and matter (e.g. latent heat, ozone) differs from momentum transfer; (3) a canopy or surface resistance R(c,A) that describes the influences of the plant/soil system on the exchange processes. Soil water content is simulated by a Force-Restore model. By a simple interception submodel precipitation and dew are partitioned into intercepted water and water reaching the soil surface. PLATIN can be run in a prognostic or a diagnostic mode. It is also intended for on-line use in air quality monitoring networks.

  13. Metabolism and thermoregulation during fasting in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus, in air and water.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, A; Schmidt, A; Handrich, Y; Woakes, A J; Butler, P J

    2005-09-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rate (Vo(2)) and body temperatures in 10 king penguins in air and water. Vo(2) was measured during rest and at submaximal and maximal exercise before (fed) and after (fasted) an average fasting duration of 14.4 +/- 2.3 days (mean +/- 1 SD, range 10-19 days) in air and water. Concurrently, we measured subcutaneous temperature and temperature of the upper (heart and liver), middle (stomach) and lower (intestine) abdomen. The mean body mass (M(b)) was 13.8 +/- 1.2 kg in fed and 11.0 +/- 0.6 kg in fasted birds. After fasting, resting Vo(2) was 93% higher in water than in air (air: 86.9 +/- 8.8 ml/min; water: 167.3 +/- 36.7 ml/min, P < 0.01), while there was no difference in resting Vo(2) between air and water in fed animals (air: 117.1 +/- 20.0 ml O(2)/min; water: 114.8 +/- 32.7 ml O(2)/min, P > 0.6). In air, Vo(2) decreased with M(b), while it increased with M(b) in water. Body temperature did not change with fasting in air, whereas in water, there were complex changes in the peripheral body temperatures. These latter changes may, therefore, be indicative of a loss in body insulation and of variations in peripheral perfusion. Four animals were given a single meal after fasting and the temperature changes were partly reversed 24 h after refeeding in all body regions except the subcutaneous, indicating a rapid reversal to a prefasting state where body heat loss is minimal. The data emphasize the importance in considering nutritional status when studying king penguins and that the fasting-related physiological changes diverge in air and water. PMID:15890795

  14. Long-Range Interactions Restrict Water Transport in Pyrophyllite Interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Water diffusion within smectite clay interlayers is reduced by confinement and hence is highly determined by the interlayer spacings that are adopted during swelling. However, a molecular understanding of the short- and long-range forces governing interlayer water structure and dynamics is lacking. Using molecular dynamics simulations of water intercalated between pyrophyllite (smectite prototype) layers we provide a detailed picture of the variation of interlayered water mobility accompanying smectite expansion. Subtle changes in hydrogen bond network structure cause significant changes in water mobility that is greater for stable hydration states and reduced for intermediate separations. By studying pyrophyllite with and without external water we reveal that long-range electrostatic forces apply a restraining effect upon interlayer water mobility. Our findings are relevant for broad range of confining nanostructures with walls thin enough to permit long-range interactions that could affect the mobility of confined solvent molecules and solute species. PMID:27118164

  15. Long-Range Interactions Restrict Water Transport in Pyrophyllite Interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Water diffusion within smectite clay interlayers is reduced by confinement and hence is highly determined by the interlayer spacings that are adopted during swelling. However, a molecular understanding of the short- and long-range forces governing interlayer water structure and dynamics is lacking. Using molecular dynamics simulations of water intercalated between pyrophyllite (smectite prototype) layers we provide a detailed picture of the variation of interlayered water mobility accompanying smectite expansion. Subtle changes in hydrogen bond network structure cause significant changes in water mobility that is greater for stable hydration states and reduced for intermediate separations. By studying pyrophyllite with and without external water we reveal that long-range electrostatic forces apply a restraining effect upon interlayer water mobility. Our findings are relevant for broad range of confining nanostructures with walls thin enough to permit long-range interactions that could affect the mobility of confined solvent molecules and solute species.

  16. WETAIR: A computer code for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of air-water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program subroutine, WETAIR, was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of air water mixtures. It determines the thermodynamic state from assigned values of temperature and density, pressure and density, temperature and pressure, pressure and entropy, or pressure and enthalpy. The WETAIR calculates the properties of dry air and water (steam) by interpolating to obtain values from property tables. Then it uses simple mixing laws to calculate the properties of air water mixtures. Properties of mixtures with water contents below 40 percent (by mass) can be calculated at temperatures from 273.2 to 1497 K and pressures to 450 MN/sq m. Dry air properties can be calculated at temperatures as low as 150 K. Water properties can be calculated at temperatures to 1747 K and pressures to 100 MN/sq m. The WETAIR is available in both SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  17. Characteristics of Water Vapor Under Partially Cloudy Conditions: Observations by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.

    2003-12-01

    The variability and quality of tropical water vapor derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are characterized. Profiles of water vapor, temperature and surface characteristics (states) are derived from coincident Advance Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and 3x3 sets of AIRS footprints. States are obtained under partially cloudy conditions by estimating the radiances emitted from the clear portions of the AIRS footprints. This procedure, referred to as cloud clearing, amplifies the measurement noise, and the amplification increases with cloud amount and uniformity. Cumulus and stratus cloud amount are related to the water vapor saturation, and noise amplification and water vapor amount may be partially correlated. The correlations between the uncertainty of retrieved water vapor, cloudiness and noise amplification are characterized. Retrieved water vapor is generally good when the amplification is less than three. Water vapor profiles are compared with correlative data, such as radiosondes and numerical weather center analyses and are in relatively good agreement in the lower troposphere

  18. Predicting Air-Water Geysers and Their Implications on Reducing Combined Sewer Overflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2014-12-01

    An air-water geyser in a closed conduit system is characterized by an explosive jetting of a mixture of air and water through drop-shafts. In this study, three scenarios of geysers are numerically simulated using a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The three tested scenarios are comprised of a drop shaft that is closed at its bottom and partially or fully open at the top. Initially, the lower section of the drop shaft is filled with pressurized air, the middle section with stagnant water and the upper section with air at atmospheric pressure. The pressure and volume of the pressurized air, and hence the stored energy, is different for all three test cases. The volume of the stagnant water and the air at atmospheric pressure are kept constant in the tests. The numerical simulations aim to identify the correlation between dimensionless energy stored in the pressurized air pocket and dimensionless maximum pressure reached at the outlet. This dimensionless correlation could be used to determine the energy threshold that does not produce air-water geyser, which in turn could be used in the design of combined sewer systems for minimizing geysers.

  19. Properties of diphytanoyl phospholipids at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yasmann, Anthony; Sukharev, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC) is a synthetic ester lipid with methylated tails found in archaeal ether lipids. Because of the stability of DPhPC bilayers and the absence of phase transitions over a broad range of temperatures, the lipid is used as an artificial membrane matrix for the reconstitution of channels, pumps, and membrane-active peptides. We characterized monomolecular films made of DPhPC and its natural ether analog DOPhPC at the air-water interface. We measured compression isotherms and dipole potentials of films made of DPhPC, DPhPE, and DOPhPC. We determined that at 40 mN/m the molecular area of DPhPC is 81.2 Å(2), consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering data obtained in liposomes. This indicates that 40 mN/m is the monolayer-bilayer equivalence pressure for this lipid. At this packing density, the compressibility modulus (Cs(-1 )= 122 ± 7 mN/m) and interfacial dipole potential (V = 355 ± 16 mV) were near their maximums. The molecular dipole moment was estimated to be 0.64 ± 0.02 D. The ether DOPhPC compacted to 70.4 Å(2)/lipid at 40 mN/m displaying a peak compressibility similar to that of DPhPC. The maximal dipole potential of the ether lipid was about half of that for DPhPC at this density, and the elemental dipole moment was about a quarter. The spreading of DPhPC and DOPhPC liposomes reduced the surface tension of the aqueous phase by 46 and 49 mN/m, respectively. This corresponds well to the monolayer collapse pressure. The equilibration time shortened as the temperature increased from 20 to 60 °C, but the surface pressure at equilibrium did not change. The data illustrates the properties of branched chains and the contributions of ester bonds in setting the mechanical and electrostatic parameters of diphytanoyl lipids. These properties determine an environment in which reconstituted voltage- or mechano-activated proteins may function. Electrostatic properties are important in the preparation of asymmetric folded bilayers

  20. Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights Atsushi Tsuda Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo In the western Pacific (WESTPAC) region, dust originating from Asian and Australian arid regions to the North and South Pacific, biomass burning emissions from the Southeast Asia to sub-tropical Pacific, and other anthropogenic substances are transported regionally and globally to affect cloud and rainfall patterns, air quality, and radiative budgets downwind. Deposition of these compounds into the Asian marginal seas and onto the Pacific Ocean influence surface primary productivity and species composition. In the WESTPAC region, subarctic, subtropical oceans and marginal seas are located relatively narrow latitudinal range and these areas are influenced by the dust and anthropogenic inputs. Moreover, anthropogenic emission areas are located between the arid region and the oceans. The W-PASS (Western Pacific Air-Sea interaction Study) project has been funded for 5 years as a part of SOLAS-Japan activity in the summer of 2006. We aim to resolve air-sea interaction through field observation studies mainly using research vessels and island observatories over the western Pacific. We have carried out 5 cruises to the western North Pacific focusing on air-sea interactions. Also, an intensive marine atmospheric observation including direct atmospheric deposition measurement was accomplished by a dozen W-PASS research groups at the NIES Atmospheric and Aerosol Monitoring Station of Cape Hedo in the northernmost tip of the Okinawa main Island facing the East China Sea in the spring 2008. A few weak Kosa (dust) events, anthropogenic air outflows, typical local air and occupation of marine background air were identified during the campaign period. The W-PASS has four research groups mainly focusing on VOC emissions, air-sea gas exchange processes, biogeochemical responses to dust depositions and its modeling. We also

  1. Interaction of Light Filaments Generated by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Xi Tingting; Lu Xin; Zhang Jie

    2006-01-20

    The interaction of two light filaments propagating in air is simulated. Simulations show that the interaction of the two light filaments displays interesting features such as attraction, fusion, repulsion, and spiral propagation, depending on the relative phase shift and the crossing angle between them. A long and stable channel can be formed by fusing two in-phase light filaments. The channel becomes unstable with the increase of the crossing angle and phase shift. The interaction of two light filaments in different planes is studied and the spiral propagation is observed.

  2. Acetazolamide inhibits osmotic water permeability by interaction with aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junwei; Wang, Xiaohua; Chang, Yongjie; Zhang, Jianzhao; Song, Qianliu; Yu, Heming; Li, Xuejun

    2006-03-15

    Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins, are transmembrane proteins that mediate osmotic water permeability. In a previous study, we found that acetazolamide could inhibit osmotic water transportation across Xenopus oocytes by blocking the function of aquaporin-1 (AQP1). The purpose of the current study was to confirm the effect of acetazolamide on water osmotic permeability using the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1 and to investigate the interaction between acetazolamide and AQP1. The fluorescence intensity of HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1, which corresponds to the cell volume when the cells swell in a hyposmotic solution, was recorded under confocal laser fluorescence microscopy. The osmotic water permeability was assessed by the change in the ratio of cell fluorescence to certain cell area. Acetazolamide, at concentrations of 1 and 10muM, inhibited the osmotic water permeability in HEK293 cells transfected with pEGFP/AQP1. The direct binding between acetazolamide and AQP1 was detected by surface plasmon resonance. AQP1 was prepared from rat red blood cells and immobilized on a CM5 chip. The binding assay showed that acetazolamide could directly interact with AQP1. This study demonstrated that acetazolamide inhibited osmotic water permeability through interaction with AQP1. PMID:16480680

  3. Use Of The Operational Air Quality Monitor (AQM) For In-Flight Water Testing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    A primary requirement for manned spaceflight is Environmental Health which ensures air and water contaminants, acoustic profiles, microbial flora, and radiation exposures within the cabin are maintained to levels needed for crew health and for vehicle system functionality. The reliance on ground analyses of returned samples is a limitation in the current environmental monitoring strategy that will prevent future Exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. This proposal attempts to address this shortcoming by advancing in-flight analyses of water and air. Ground analysis of in-flight, air and water samples typically employ vapor-phase analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify and quantify organic compounds present in the samples. We envision the use of newly-developed direct ionization approaches as the most viable avenue leading towards an integrated analytical platform for the monitoring of water, air, and, potentially bio-samples in the cabin environment. Development of an in-flight instrument capable of analyzing air and water samples would be the logical next step to meeting the environmental monitoring needs of Exploration missions. Currently, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) on-board ISS provides this specific information for a number of target compounds in the air. However, there is a significant subset of common target compounds between air and water. Naturally, the following question arises, "Can the AQM be used for both air and water quality monitoring?" Previous directorate-level IR&D funding led to the development of a water sample introduction method for mass spectrometry using electrothermal vaporization (ETV). This project will focus on the integration of the ETV with a ground-based AQM. The capabilities of this integrated platform will be evaluated using a subset of toxicologically important compounds.

  4. 77 FR 49349 - Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... Water Filtration Plant, then due west to the shore. Entry into, transiting, or anchoring within the... corner of the Jardine Water Filtration Plant, then due west to the shore. (b) Enforcement period. This... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL...

  5. Quantifying the Role of Water in Protein–Carbohydrate Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tschampel, Sarah M.; Woods, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Water-mediated interactions play a key role in carbohydrate–lectin binding, where the interactions involve a conserved water that is separated from the bulk solvent and present a bridge between the side chains of the protein and the carbohydrate ligand. To apply quantum mechanical methods to examine the role of conserved waters, we present an analysis in which the relevant carbohydrate atoms are modeled by methanol, and in which the protein is replaced by a limited number of amino acid side chains. Clusters containing a conserved water and a representative amino acid fragment were also examined to determine the influence of amino acid side chains on interaction energies. To quantify the differential binding energies of methanol versus water, quantum mechanical calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level in which either a methanol molecule was bound to the conserved water (liganded state) or in which a water molecule replaces the methanol (unliganded state). Not surprisingly, the binding of a water to clusters containing charged amino acid side chains was more favorable by 1.55 to 7.23 kcal/mol than that for the binding of a water to the corresponding pure water clusters. In contrast, the binding energy of water to clusters containing polar-uncharged amino acid side chains ranged from 4.35 kcal/mol less favorable to 4.72 kcal/mol more favorable than for binding to the analogous pure water clusters. The overall trend for the binding of methanol versus water, in any of the clusters, favored methanol by an average value of 1.05 kcal/mol. To extend these studies to a complex between a protein (Concanavalin A) and its carbohydrate ligand, a cluster was examined that contained the side chains of three key amino acids, namely asparagine, aspartate, and arginine, as well as a key water molecule, arranged as in the X-ray diffraction structure of Con A. Again, using methanol as a model for the endogenous carbohydrate ligand, energies of

  6. A Comprehensive Analysis of AIRS Near Surface Air Temperature and Water Vapor Over Land and Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. V. T.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Manning, E. M.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Version 6 (V6) of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder's (AIRS) combined infrared and microwave (IR+MW) retrieval of near surface air temperature (NSAT) and water vapor (NSWV) is validated over the United States with the densely populated MESONET data. MESONET data is a collection of surface/near surface meteorological data from many federal and state agencies. The ones used for this analysis are measured from instruments maintained by the National Weather Service (NWS), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Interagency Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS), resulting in a little more than four thousand locations throughout the US. Over the Tropical oceans, NSAT and NSWV are compared to a network of moored buoys from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON), and the Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). With the analysis of AIRS surface and near surface products over ocean, we glean information on how retrieval of NSAT and NSWV over land can be improved and why it needs some adjustments. We also compare AIRS initial guess of near surface products that are trained on fifty days of ECMWF along with AIRS calibrated radiances, to ECMWF analysis data. The comparison is done to show the differing characteristics of AIRS initial guesses from ECMWF.

  7. Characterization of AIRS temperature and water vapor measurement capability using correlative observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Eldering, Annmarie; Lee, Sung-Yung

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation we address several fundamental issues in the measurement of temperature and water vapor by AIRS: accuracy, precision, vertical resolution and biases as a function of cloud amount. We use two correlative data sources. First we compare AIRS total water vapor with that from the Advanced microwave Sounding Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) instrument, also onboard the Aqua spacecraft. AMSRE uses a mature methodology with a heritage including the operational Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) instruments. AIRS and AMSR-E observations are collocated and simultaneous, providing a very large data set for comparison: about 200,000 over-ocean matches daily. We show small cloud-dependent biases between AIRS and AMSR-E total water vapor for several oceanic regions. Our second correlative data source is several hundred dedicated radiosondes launched during AIRS overpasses.

  8. Interaction of surface and subsurface waters in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Bychinski, Valerii; Sandimirov, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Purpose of the study - to assess the influence of the Khibiny massif on the formation of the chemical composition of surface and subsurface waters, generated within its boundaries using physical-chemical modeling ("Selector" software package). Objects of monitoring - rivers with sources in the upper reaches of the Khibiny massif (surface waters), and boreholes, located in these rivers' valleys (subsurface waters) have been chosen as objects of monitoring. Processes of formation of surface and subsurface waters, generated within the boundaries of the Khibiny massif, have been considered within the framework of a unified system "water-rock-atmosphere-carbon". The initial data of the model: chemical compositions of the Khibiny massif rocks and chemical analyses of atmospheric and surface waters. Besides, there have been considered Clarke concentrations S, Cl, F, C, their influence on the formation of chemical composition of water solutions; geochemical mobility of chemical elements. The previously developed model has been improved with the purpose of assessment of the influence of organic substance, either liquid or solid, on the formation of the chemical composition of water. The record of the base model of the multisystem includes 24 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e), 872 dependent components, including, in a water solution - 295, in a gas phase - 76, liquid hydrocarbons - 111, solid phases, organic and mineral substances - 390. The record of solid phases of multisystem is made with consideration of the mineral composition of the Khibiny massif. Using the created model, the physical-chemical modeling of surface and subsurface water generation has been carried out: 1. The system "water-rock-atmosphere" has been studied, depending on the interaction degree (ksi) of rock with water. A model like this allowed investigating the interactions of surface waters (rivers and lakes) with rocks that form the Khibiny massif. 2

  9. Interactions of fire emissions and urban pollution over California: Ozone formation and air quality simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H. B.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; Weinheimer, A.; Wisthaler, A.

    2012-09-01

    An instrumented DC-8 aircraft was employed to perform airborne observations in rural and urban environs of California during the summer 2008 NASA ARCTAS-CARB campaign. The fortuitous occurrence of large wildfire episodes in Northern California allowed for studies of fire emissions, their composition, and their interactions with rural and urban air. Relative to CO, emissions of HCN were shown to vary non-linearly with fire characteristics while those of CH3CN were nearly unchanged, making the latter a superior quantitative tracer of biomass combustion. Although some fire plumes over California contained little NOx and virtually no O3 enhancement, others contained ample VOCs and sufficient NOx, largely from urban influences, to result in significant ozone formation. The highest observed O3 mixing ratios (170 ppb) were also in fire-influenced urban air masses. Attempts to simulate these interactions using CMAQ, a high-resolution state of the art air quality model, were only minimally successful and indicated several shortcomings in simulating fire emission influences on urban smog formation. A variety of secondary oxidation products (e.g. O3, PAN, HCHO) were substantially underestimated in fire-influenced air masses. Available data involving fire plumes and anthropogenic pollution interactions are presently quite sparse and additional observational and mechanistic studies are needed.

  10. Air Stripping Designs and Reactive Water Purification Processes for the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Air stripping designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry's Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Distillation processes are modeled in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support are presented. The advantages to the various designs are summarized with respect to water purity levels, power consumption, and processing rates. An evaluation of reactive distillation and air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  11. Dynamic investigation of PEFC stacks in interaction with the air supply system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipps, F.; Simons, G.; Schiefer, K.

    This paper explores the behaviour of a dynamically operated fuel cell system regarding to an automotive application, examining the air supply and their interaction with the fuel cell stacks. The dynamic limits of stack operation are also discussed. Finally, the paper provides a description of the test facility used in these investigations. The research of dynamically operated fuel cell stacks shows that in order to achieve high energy efficiency, a power-dependent modulation of the pressure and flow rate of the air supply is necessary. A test facility designed for energy management and power train research (up to 42 kW) was used for the experiment. A number of 11.5 kW fuel cell stacks was examined experimentally with respect to performance in interaction with the air supply in stationary and dynamic operation. The stacks were tested individually and in parallel. All of them were operated "dead-end" on the hydrogen side. Experimental results varying the parameters and load curves applied to the air supply system are given in the paper. The results show different dynamic behaviours between the stacks and a substantial difference in efficiency and dynamic response of the fuel cell system operated with different strategies. The results of different operating strategies for fuel cell systems, with respect to the interaction between the fuel cell stack and the air supply and in their dependency on air mass flow and pressure level are presented. The examinations were done with the test facility using real current demand profile of the experimental car HyLite ® from zero to full load and the New European Drive Cycle (NEDC).

  12. Sustainable water services and interaction with water resources in Europe and in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraqué, B.; Formiga Johnsson, R. M.; Britto, A. L.

    2007-09-01

    The increasing interaction between large cities and nature makes "urban water" an issue: water resources and water services - including public water supply, sewage collection and treatment, and in large cities, storm water control -, which had become separate issues thanks to the process of water transport and treatment technologies, are now increasingly interfering with each other. We cannot take nature for granted anymore, and we need to protect water resources, if only to reduce the long term cost of transporting and treating water. In this paper, we compare the historical development of water industry technologies in European and Brazilian metropolitan areas, in their socio-economic and political context, tracing it through three "ages" of water technology and services which developed under civil engineering, sanitary engineering, and environmental engineering perspectives: the "quantity of water" and civil engineering paradigm was developed on the assumption that water should be drawn from natural environments far from the cities; in the "water quality" and chemical/sanitation engineering paradigm, water treatment was invented and allowed cities to take water from rivers closer to them and treat it, but also to reduce sewer discharge impacts; finally, the environmental engineering paradigm proposes to overcome the supply side perspective, by introducing demand side management, water conservation, water allocation flexibilisation, and an integrated approach to water services, water resources management, and land use policies.

  13. Building water bridges in air: Electrohydrodynamics of the floating water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Álvaro G.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of electrical fields and liquids can lead to a phenomenon that defies intuition. Some famous examples can be found in electrohydrodynamics as Taylor cones, whipping jets, or noncoalescing drops. A less famous example is the floating water bridge: a slender thread of water held between two glass beakers in which a high voltage difference is applied. Surprisingly, the water bridge defies gravity even when the beakers are separated at distances up to 2 cm. In this paper, experimental measurements and simple models are proposed and discussed for the stability of the bridge and the source of the flow, revealing an important role of polarization forces on the stability of the water bridge. On the other hand, the observed flow can only be explained due to the non-negligible free charge present in the surface. In this sense, the floating water bridge can be considered as an extreme case of a leaky dielectric liquid [J. R. Melcher and G. I. Taylor, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 1, 111 (1969)].

  14. Solubility of methane in water: the significance of the methane-water interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2005-12-15

    The influence of the methane-water interaction potential on the value of the Henry constant obtained from molecular dynamics simulations was investigated. The SPC, SPC/E, MSPC/E, and TIP3P potentials were used to describe water and the OPLS-UA and TraPPE potentials for methane. Nonbonding interactions between unlike atoms were calculated both with one of four mixing rules and with our new methane-water interaction potential. The Henry constants obtained from simulations using any of the mixing rules differed significantly from the experimental ones. Good agreement between simulation and experiment was achieved with the new potential over the whole temperature range. PMID:16375336

  15. Solubility of methane in water: the significance of the methane-water interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2005-12-15

    The influence of the methane-water interaction potential on the value of the Henry constant obtained from molecular dynamics simulations was investigated. The SPC, SPC/E, MSPC/E, and TIP3P potentials were used to describe water and the OPLS-UA and TraPPE potentials for methane. Nonbonding interactions between unlike atoms were calculated both with one of four mixing rules and with our new methane-water interaction potential. The Henry constants obtained from simulations using any of the mixing rules differed significantly from the experimental ones. Good agreement between simulation and experiment was achieved with the new potential over the whole temperature range.

  16. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air using a desiccant

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method can be considered as four phases: (1) adsorbing water from air into a desiccant, (2) isolating the water-laden desiccant from the air source, (3) desorbing water as vapor from the desiccant into a chamber, and (4) isolating the desiccant from the chamber, and compressing the vapor in the chamber to form liquid condensate. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. Careful design of the dead volumes and pressure balances can minimize the energy required. The dried air can be exchanged for fresh moist air and the process repeated. An apparatus comprises a first chamber in fluid communication with a desiccant, and having ports to intake moist air and exhaust dried air. The apparatus also comprises a second chamber in fluid communication with the desiccant. The second chamber allows variable internal pressure, and has a port for removal of liquid condensate. Each chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with the desiccant. The first chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with a course of moist air. Various arrangements of valves, pistons, and chambers are described.

  17. Driving Students and Parents to Cleaner Air: An Interview with Michelle Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    After spending three years as a kindergarten teacher and one as a reading specialist, Michelle Waters recently became the education outreach coordinator for the Georgia-based Clean Air Campaign. In that role, she has helped roll out a comprehensive Better Air Schools initiative to 20 Atlanta-area elementary schools. The program includes a…

  18. The transfer of carbon fibers through a commercial aircraft water separator and air cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The fraction of carbon fibers passing through a water separator and an air filter was determined in order to estimate the proportion of fibers outside a closed aircraft that are transmitted to the electronics through the air conditioning system. When both devices were used together and only fibers 3 mm or larger were considered, a transfer function of .001 was obtained.

  19. DESIGN NOTE: Measuring the residual air pressure in triple-point-of-water cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    Residual gas pressure is one of the factors influencing the temperature realized by triple-point-of-water cells. This note describes a simple procedure for measuring and correcting for the residual air pressure in sealed cells. The procedure is applicable to any cell with a McLeod-gauge extension or sufficient remnant 'seal-off' tube to trap an air bubble.

  20. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  1. Water-protein interactions from high-resolution protein crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2004-01-01

    To understand the role of water in life at molecular and atomic levels, structures and interactions at the protein-water interface have been investigated by cryogenic X-ray crystallography. The method enabled a much clearer visualization of definite hydration sites on the protein surface than at ambient temperature. Using the structural models of proteins, including several hydration water molecules, the characteristics in hydration structures were systematically analysed for the amount, the interaction geometries between water molecules and proteins, and the local and global distribution of water molecules on the surface of proteins. The tetrahedral hydrogen-bond geometry of water molecules in bulk solvent was retained at the interface and enabled the extension of a three-dimensional chain connection of a hydrogen-bond network among hydration water molecules and polar protein atoms over the entire surface of proteins. Networks of hydrogen bonds were quite flexible to accommodate and/or to regulate the conformational changes of proteins such as domain motions. The present experimental results may have profound implications in the understanding of the physico-chemical principles governing the dynamics of proteins in an aqueous environment and a discussion of why water is essential to life at a molecular level. PMID:15306376

  2. Two-dimensional plasma grating by non-collinear femtosecond filament interaction in air

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jia; Li Wenxue; Pan Haifeng; Zeng Heping

    2011-10-10

    We experimentally demonstrated that two-dimensional (2D) plasma gratings could be generated in air by nonlinear interaction of three femtosecond filaments. The intensity interference of non-collinearly overlapped filaments was self-projected along a relatively long distance and accompanied with a wavelength-scale periodic change of the refractive index in the encircling air due to periodic plasma density modulation. The 2D plasma gratings supported 2D diffraction of the generated third-harmonic pulses. By using in-line time-resolved holographic imaging and time-delayed diffraction, the 2D plasma gratings were evidenced to last a few tens picoseconds after the excitation pulses.

  3. The Clean Air and Clean Water Acts: The "Fifth" and "Eighth" Most Significant Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Laurel A.

    1991-01-01

    The history and impact of this federal legislation are discussed. An assessment of the progress of federal legislation in these areas is presented. Key issues for federal legislation regarding water and air quality are identified. (CW)

  4. Boundary layer flow of air over water on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, John; Alving, Amy E.; Joseph, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    A non-similar boundary layer theory for air blowing over a water layer on a flat plate is formulated and studied as a two-fluid problem in which the position of the interface is unknown. The problem is considered at large Reynolds number (based on x), away from the leading edge. A simple non-similar analytic solution of the problem is derived for which the interface height is proportional to x(sub 1/4) and the water and air flow satisfy the Blasius boundary layer equations, with a linear profile in the water and a Blasius profile in the air. Numerical studies of the initial value problem suggests that this asymptotic, non-similar air-water boundary layer solution is a global attractor for all initial conditions.

  5. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  6. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  7. Extreme subseasonal tropical air-sea interactions and their relation to ocean thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with extreme, rapid timescale tropical air-sea interactions and the influence of large-scale oceanic conditions on these interactions. The focus is on two types of extreme events: equatorial Indian Ocean cooling events and tropical cyclones. Cooling events occur on timescales of a few days to several weeks, in which atmospheric forcing causes Sea Surface Temperature (SST) cooling in the range of 1--5K, in both observational and coupled climate models. Cooling events are driven by changes in air-sea enthalpy fluxes and Ekman upwelling. Because the cooling due to Ekman upwelling depends on thermocline depth, large-scale oceanic conditions influence SST cooling. La Nina and negative Indian Ocean Dipole conditions are conducive to a shallower southwest equatorial thermocline, resulting in greater intraseasonal SST cooling during these interannual events; El Nino and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions lead to a deeper thermocline and reduced SST cooling. Results indicate that cooling events are related to the eastward propagation of convective patterns that resemble the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For tropical cyclones, the response of intensity to cyclone-induced SST cooling was explored over 10-years of observational data. For slow moving (V/ f < 100km) tropical cyclones, it was found that the SST cooling response increases along with storm intensity from category 0--2 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. However, from category 2--5 the magnitude of SST cooling decreases. This result confirms model predictions indicating a prominent role for oceanic feedback controlling tropical cyclone intensity. Thus, only storms that develop in regions containing deep mixed layer and thermocline can achieve high intensity, and entrainment cooling is weaker for these storms. The SST-intensity response in observations was compared to the GFDL Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM) for the periods 2005 and 2006--2009. The GHM was modified in 2006 to include a

  8. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface.

  9. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface. PMID:25666640

  10. Improved simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    teklesadik, aklilu; van Griensven, Ann; Anibas, Christian; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater storage can have a significant contribution to stream flow, therefore a thorough understanding of the groundwater surface water interaction is of prime important when doing catchment modeling. The aim of this study is to improve the simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in a catchment model of the upper Zenne River basin located in Belgium. To achieve this objective we used the "Groundwater-Surface water Flow" (GSFLOW) modeling software, which is an integration of the surface water modeling tool "Precipitation and Runoff Modeling system" (PRMS) and the groundwater modeling tool MODFLOW. For this case study, the PRMS model and MODFLOW model were built and calibrated independently. The PRMS upper Zenne River basin model is divided into 84 hydrological response units (HRUs) and is calibrated with flow data at the Tubize gauging station. The spatial discretization of the MODFLOW upper Zenne groundwater flow model consists of 100m grids. Natural groundwater divides and the Brussels-Charleroi canal are used as boundary conditions for the MODFLOW model. The model is calibrated using piezometric data. The GSFLOW results were evaluated against a SWAT model application and field observations of groundwater-surface water interactions along a cross section of the Zenne River and riparian zone. The field observations confirm that there is no exchange of groundwater beyond the Brussel-Charleroi canal and that the interaction at the river bed is relatively low. The results show that there is a significant difference in the groundwater simulations when using GSFLOW versus SWAT. This indicates that the groundwater component representation in the SWAT model could be improved and that a more realistic implementation of the interactions between groundwater and surface water is advisable. This could be achieved by integrating SWAT and MODFLOW.

  11. Ground performance of air conditioning and water recycle system for a space plant box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, A.; Okuma, T.; Goto, E.; Kitaya, Y.; Saito, T.; Takahashi, H.

    Researchers from 5 Japanese universities have developed a plant growth facility (Space Plant Box) for seed to seed experiments under microgravity. The breadboard model of the Space Plant Box was fabricated by assembling subsystems developed for microgravity. The subsystems include air conditioning and water recycle system, air circulation system, water and nutrient delivery system, lighting system and plant monitoring system. The air conditioning and water recycle system is simply composed of a single heat exchanger, two fans and hydrophilic fibrous strings. The strings allow water movement from the cooler fin in the Cooling Box to root supporting materials in the Plant Growth Chamber driven by water potential deficit. Relative humidity in the Plant Growth Chamber can be changed over a wide range by controlling the ratio of latent heat exchange to sensible heat exchange on the cooling fin of the heat exchanger. The transpiration rate was successfully measured by circulating air inside the Plant Growth Chamber only. Most water was recycled and a small amount of water needed to be added from the outside. The simple, air conditioning and water recycle system for the Space Plant Box showed good performance through a barley ( Hordeum vulgare L.) growth experiment.

  12. Ground performance of air conditioning and water recycle system for a Space Plant Box.

    PubMed

    Tani, A; Okuma, T; Goto, E; Kitaya, Y; Saito, T; Takahashi, H

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from 5 Japanese universities have developed a plant growth facility (Space Plant Box) for seed to seed experiments under microgravity. The breadboard model of the Space Plant Box was fabricated by assembling subsystems developed for microgravity. The subsystems include air conditioning and water recycle system, air circulation system, water and nutrient delivery system, lighting system and plant monitoring system. The air conditioning and water recycle system is simply composed of a single heat exchanger, two fans and hydrophilic fibrous strings. The strings allow water movement from the cooler fin in the Cooling Box to root supporting materials in the Plant Growth Chamber driven by water potential deficit. Relative humidity in the Plant Growth Chamber can be changed over a wide range by controlling the ratio of latent heat exchange to sensible heat exchange on the cooling fin of the heat exchanger. The transpiration rate was successfully measured by circulating air inside the Plant Growth Chamber only. Most water was recycled and a small amount of water needed to be added from the outside. The simple, air conditioning and water recycle system for the Space Plant Box showed good performance through a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth experiment.

  13. Influence of forced air volume on water evaporation during sewage sludge bio-drying.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Zheng, Guo-Di; Liu, Hong-Tao; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Mechanical aeration is critical to sewage sludge bio-drying, and the actual water loss caused by aeration can be better understood from investigations of the relationship between aeration and water evaporation from the sewage sludge bio-drying pile based on in situ measurements. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of forced air volume on the evaporation of water from a sewage sludge bio-drying pile. Dewatered sewage sludge was bio-dried using control technology for bio-drying, during which time the temperature, superficial air velocity and water evaporation were measured and calculated. The results indicated that the peak air velocity and water evaporation occurred in the thermophilic phase and second temperature-increasing phase, with the highest values of 0.063 ± 0.027 m s(-1) and 28.9 kg ton(-1) matrix d(-1), respectively, being observed on day 4. Air velocity above the pile during aeration was 43-100% higher than when there was no aeration, and there was a significantly positive correlation between air volume and water evaporation from day 1 to 15. The order of daily means of water evaporation was thermophilic phase > second temperature-increasing phase > temperature-increasing phase > cooling phase. Forced aeration controlled the pile temperature and improved evaporation, making it the key factor influencing water loss during the process of sewage sludge bio-drying.

  14. Correlation between cellulose thin film supramolecular structures and interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Tammelin, Tekla; Abburi, Ramarao; Gestranius, Marie; Laine, Christiane; Setälä, Harri; Österberg, Monika

    2015-06-01

    Water interactions of ultra-thin films of wood-derived polysaccharides were investigated by using surface sensitive methods, Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These approaches allow systematic molecular level detection and reveal information on the inherent behaviour of biobased materials with nanosensitivity. The influence of structural features of cellulose films i.e. crystallinity, surface roughness and porosity on water interactions was clarified. Cellulose films were prepared using spin-coating and Langmuir-Schaefer deposition to obtain thin films of equal thickness, identical cellulose origin, simultaneously with different supramolecular structures. The uptake/release of water molecules and swelling were characterized using QCM-D, and the structural features of the films were evaluated by AFM. More crystalline cellulose film possessed nanoporosity and as a consequence higher accessible surface area (more binding sites for water) and thus, it was capable of binding more water molecules in humid air and when immersed in water when compared to amorphous cellulose film. Due to the ordered structure, more crystalline cellulose film remained rigid and elastic although the water binding ability was more pronounced compared to amorphous film. The lower amount of bound water induced softening of the amorphous cellulose film and the elastic layer became viscoelastic at high humidity. Finally, cellulose thin films were modified by adsorbing a layer of 1-butyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl xylan, and the effect on moisture uptake was investigated. It was found that the supramolecular structure of the cellulose substrate has an effect not only on the adsorbed amount of xylan derivative but also on the water interactions of the material. PMID:25903294

  15. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  16. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  17. Water permeability of primary mouse keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpstone, M.B.; Kennedy, A.H.; Harmon, C.S.; Potts, R.O.

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the development of the epidermal permeability barrier in vitro, tritiated water (HTO) flux was measured across murine keratinocytes cultured at the air-liquid interface. Using a micro-diffusion technique, it was shown that air-liquid cultures form areas where the water diffusion is comparable to that of intact neonatal mouse skin. When water permeability is measured over a large area of the culture surface, however, significantly higher flux is obtained. These results show that under the culture conditions used, areas of water barrier comparable to intact neonatal mouse skin coexist with regions of less complete barrier formation.

  18. Capillary forces between sediment particles and an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Lapin, Sergey; Flury, Markus

    2012-04-17

    In the vadose zone, air-water interfaces play an important role in particle fate and transport, as particles can attach to the air-water interfaces by action of capillary forces. This attachment can either retard or enhance the movement of particles, depending on whether the air-water interfaces are stationary or mobile. Here we use three standard PTFE particles (sphere, circular cylinder, and tent) and seven natural mineral particles (basalt, granite, hematite, magnetite, mica, milky quartz, and clear quartz) to quantify the capillary forces between an air-water interface and the different particles. Capillary forces were determined experimentally using tensiometry, and theoretically assuming volume-equivalent spherical, ellipsoidal, and circular cylinder shapes. We experimentally distinguished between the maximum capillary force and the snap-off force when the air-water interface detaches from the particle. Theoretical and experimental values of capillary forces were of similar order of magnitude. The sphere gave the smallest theoretical capillary force, and the circular cylinder had the largest force due to pinning of the air-water interface. Pinning was less pronounced for natural particles when compared to the circular cylinder. Ellipsoids gave the best agreement with measured forces, suggesting that this shape can provide a reasonable estimation of capillary forces for many natural particles.

  19. Oxygen and carbon dioxide sensitivity of ventilation in amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, breathing air and water.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Andrew T; Henry, Raymond P

    2004-05-01

    Amphibious crabs, Cardisoma guanhumi, were acclimated to breathing either air or water and exposed to altered levels of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide in the medium. Hypercapnia (22, 36 and 73 torr CO(2)) stimulated a significant hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) in both groups of crabs, with a much greater effect on scaphognathite frequency (Deltaf(SC)=+700%) in air-breathing crabs than water-breathing crabs (Deltaf(SC)=+100%). In contrast, hyperoxia induced significant hypoventilation in both sets of crabs. However, simultaneous hyperoxia and hypercapnia triggered a greater than 10-fold increase in f(SC) in air-breathing crabs but no change in water-breathing crabs. For water-breathing crabs hypoxia simultaneous with hypercapnia triggered the same response as hypoxia alone-bradycardia (-50%), and a significant increase in f(SC) at moderate exposures but not at the more extreme levels. The response of air-breathing crabs to hypoxia concurrent with hypercapnia was proportionally closer to the response to hypercapnia alone than to hypoxia. Thus, C. guanhumi were more sensitive to ambient CO(2) than O(2) when breathing air, characteristic of fully terrestrial species, and more sensitive to ambient O(2) when breathing water, characteristic of fully aquatic species. C. guanhumi possesses both an O(2)- and a CO(2)-based ventilatory drive whether breathing air or water, but the relative importance switches when the respiratory medium is altered.

  20. The behavior of NaOH at the air-water interface, a computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations with a polarizable multi-state empirical valence bond model were carried out to investigate NaOH dissociation and pairing in water bulk and at the air-water interface. It was found that NaOH readily dissociates in the bulk, and the effect of the air-water interface on NaOH dissociation is fairly minor. Also, NaOH complexes were found to be strongly repelled from the air-water interface, which is consistent with surface tension measurements. At the same time, a very strong preference for the hydroxide anion to be oriented towards the air was found that persisted a few angstroms towards the liquid from the Gibbs dividing surface of the air-water interface. This was due to a preference for the hydroxide anion to have its hydrogen pointing towards the air, and the fact that the sodium ion was more likely to be found near the hydroxide oxygen than hydrogen. As a consequence, the simulation results show that surfaces of NaOH solutions should be negatively charged, in agreement with experimental observations, but also that the hydroxide has little surface affinity. This provides the possibility that the surface of water can be devoid of hydroxide anions, but still have a strong negative charge. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  1. Imbalance in Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions and its Relationship to the Coastal Zone Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Salokhiddinov, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    We report here some efforts and results in studying the imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and processes of groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding creating hazards in the coastal zones. Hazards, hydrological and geophysical risk analysis related to imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding have been to a large extent under-emphasized for coastal zone applications either due to economical limitations or underestimation of significance of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This is particularly true for tsunamis creating salt water intrusion to coastal aquifers, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models, and to increasing mineralization of potable water because of intensive water diversions and also the abundance of highly toxic pollutants (mainly pesticides) in water, air and food, which contribute to the deterioration of the coastal population's health. In the wake of pressing environmental and economic issues, it is of prime importance for the scientific community to shed light onto the great efforts by hydrologists and geophysicists to quantify conceptual uncertainties and to provide quality assurances of potential coastal zone hazard evaluation and prediction under conditions of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This paper proposes consideration of two case studies which are important and significant for future understanding of a concept of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and development and essential for feasibility studies of hazards in the coastal zone. The territory of the Aral Sea Region in Central Asia is known as an ecological disaster coastal zone. It is now obvious that, in order to provide reasonable living conditions to the coastal zone population, it is first of all necessary to drastically improve the quality of the water dedicated to human needs. Due

  2. Dynamics of water interacting with interfaces, molecules, and ions.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D

    2012-01-17

    Water is a critical component of many chemical processes, in fields as diverse as biology and geology. Water in chemical, biological, and other systems frequently occurs in very crowded situations: the confined water must interact with a variety of interfaces and molecular groups, often on a characteristic length scale of nanometers. Water's behavior in diverse environments is an important contributor to the functioning of chemical systems. In biology, water is found in cells, where it hydrates membranes and large biomolecules. In geology, interfacial water molecules can control ion adsorption and mineral dissolution. Embedded water molecules can change the structure of zeolites. In chemistry, water is an important polar solvent that is often in contact with interfaces, for example, in ion-exchange resin systems. Water is a very small molecule; its unusual properties for its size are attributable to the formation of extended hydrogen bond networks. A water molecule is similar in mass and volume to methane, but methane is a gas at room temperature, with melting and boiling points of 91 and 112 K, respectively. This is in contrast to water, with melting and boiling points of 273 and 373 K, respectively. The difference is that water forms up to four hydrogen bonds with approximately tetrahedral geometry. Water's hydrogen bond network is not static. Hydrogen bonds are constantly forming and breaking. In bulk water, the time scale for hydrogen bond randomization through concerted formation and dissociation of hydrogen bonds is approximately 2 ps. Water's rapid hydrogen bond rearrangement makes possible many of the processes that occur in water, such as protein folding and ion solvation. However, many processes involving water do not take place in pure bulk water, and water's hydrogen bond structural dynamics can be substantially influenced by the presence of, for example, interfaces, ions, and large molecules. In this Account, spectroscopic studies that have been used

  3. From Fysics to Phorestry: How do I engage diverse audiences in land-air interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    The educational component of the CAREER award "A New Direction into Near-Surface Transport for Weak-Wind Conditions in Plant Canopies" (AGS #0955444) calls for an integration of in-classroom teaching and a new field class to provide students from across the disciplines with an opportunity to explore and learn mechanisms of land-air interactions. The charge is clear, but how do I best do this? This contribution presents a concept of how to address the diverse interests and needs with backgrounds ranging from atmospheric science & engineering to botany & forestry by emphasizing the underlying physical principles of light, heat, and water exchange that are of common interest to many scientific disciplines. The idea behind the teaching technique is to let the students escape from their rather passive role in the classroom by providing opportunities for active participation and discovery through a) developing an online syllabus created by the students for the students, b) offering field excursions to expose students to the research activities funded through this award, c) helping small student teams formulate their own research questions, develop their own experimental design, and collect and evaluate measurements in the field class. In addition to discussing the concept and giving some concrete topical examples, a summary of the student feedback received to date will also be included. However, since the award is just about to enter its second year at the time of writing, a major part of this concept still awaits implementation. Seeking input from other awardees and experienced teachers and educators is therefore intended. A secondary objective of this contribution is to describe the many positive impacts on my career that are evident even after the first year by exposing my research and teaching activities to a much broader audience including the Long-Term Ecological Research community at the HJ Andrews experimental forest in Oregon.

  4. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE PAGES

    Medders, Gregory; Gotz, Andreas; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interaction energy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. It is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation ofmore » the water interactions from the gas to the condensed phase. Similarly, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  5. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Water Separator On-Orbit Operation, Failure, and Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.; Shaw, Laura A.; Laliberte, Yvon

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The Water Separator (WS) pulls in air and water from the CHX, and centrifugally separates the mixture, sending the water to the condensate bus and the air back into the CHX outlet airstream. Two distinct early failures of the CCAA Water Separator in the Quest Airlock forced operational changes and brought about the re-design of the Water Separator to improve the useful life via modification kits. The on-orbit operational environment of the Airlock presented challenges that were not foreseen with the original design of the Water Separator. Operational changes were instituted to prolong the life of the third installed WS, while waiting for newly designed Water Separators to be delivered on-orbit. The modification kit design involved several different components of the Water Separator, including the innovative use of a fabrication technique to build the impellers used in Water Separators out of titanium instead of aluminum. The technique allowed for the cost effective production of the low quantity build. This paper will describe the failures of the Water Separators in the Quest Airlock, the operational constraints that were implemented to prolong the life of the installed Water Separators throughout the USOS, and the innovative re-design of the CCAA Water Separator.

  6. Potable water recovery for spacecraft application by electrolytic pretreatment/air evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    A process for the recovery of potable water from urine using electrolytic pretreatment followed by distillation in a closed-cycle air evaporator has been developed and tested. Both the electrolytic pretreatment unit and the air evaporation unit are six-person, flight-concept prototype, automated units. Significantly extended wick lifetimes have been achieved in the air evaporation unit using electrolytically pretreated, as opposed to chemically pretreated, urine feed. Parametric test data are presented on product water quality, wick life, process power, maintenance requirements, and expendable requirements.

  7. Major Upgrades to the AIRS Version-6 Water Vapor Profile Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This research is a continuation of part of what was shown at the last AIRS Science Team Meeting and the AIRS 2015 NetMeeting. AIRS Version 6 was finalized in late 2012 and is now operational. Version 6 contained many significant improvements in retrieval methodology compared to Version 5. Version 6 retrieval methodology used for the water vapor profile q(p) and ozone profile O3(p) retrievals is basically unchanged from Version 5, or even from Version 4. Subsequent research has made significant improvements in both water vapor and O3 profiles compared to Version 6.

  8. Magma-water interactions in subaqueous and emergent basaltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokelaar, Peter

    1986-10-01

    In the subaqueous growth and emergence of a basaltic volcano clasts are formed by one or a combination of (1) explosive release of magmatic volatiles; (2) explosive expansion and collapse of steam formed at magma-water contact surfaces; (3) explosive expansion of steam following enclosure of water in magma, or entrapment of water close to magma; and (4) cooling-contraction. These processes, named respectively magmatic explosivity, contact-surface steam explosivity, bulk interaction steam explosivity, and cooling-contraction granulation, can be enhanced by mutual interaction and feedback. The first three (explosive) processes are limited at certain water depths (hydrostatic pressures) and become increasingly vigorous at shallower levels. The depth of onset of magmatic explosivity depends largely on juvenile volatile content; it is up to 200 m for tholeiitic magmas and up to 1 km for alkalic magmas. At the depth where formation of clastic deposits becomes predominant over effusion of lavas, magmatic explosivity is subordinate to steam explosivity as a clast-forming process. The upward transition to accumulation of dominantly clastic deposits is not simply related to the onset of substantial exsolution of magmatic volatiles and can occur without it. Contact-surface explosivity commonly requires initiation by a vigorous impact between magma and water and, although no certain depth limit is known, likelihood of such explosivity decreases rapidly with depth. Clast generation by bulk interaction explosivity appears to be restricted to depths much shallower than that of the critical pressure of water, which in sea water is at about 3 km. Cooling-contraction granulation can occur in any depth of water, but at shallow levels may be replaced by contact-surface explosivity. During continuous eruption under water, tephra can be ejected and deposited within a cupola of steam such that rapid quenching does not occur. Emergent volcanoes are characterized by distinctive steam

  9. Effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on lipid raft model at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Uto, Takuhiro; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate an interfacial behavior of the aglycon of glycyrrhizin (GC), glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), with a lipid raft model consisting of equimolar ternary mixtures of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL), Langmuir monolayer techniques were systematically conducted. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms showed that the adsorbed GA at the air/water interface was desorbed into the bulk upon compression of the lipid monolayer. In situ morphological analysis by Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the raft domains became smaller as the concentrations of GA in the subphase (CGA) increased, suggesting that GA promotes the formation of fluid networks related to various cellular processes via lipid rafts. In addition, ex situ morphological analysis by atomic force microscopy revealed that GA interacts with lipid raft by lying down at the surface. Interestingly, the distinctive striped regions were formed at CGA=5.0 μM. This phenomenon was observed to be induced by the interaction of CHOL with adsorbed GA and is involved in the membrane-disrupting activity of saponin and its aglycon. A quantitative comparison of GA with GC (Sakamoto et al., 2013) revealed that GA interacts more strongly with the raft model than GC in the monolayer state. Various biological activities of GA are known to be stronger than those of GC. This fact allows us to hypothesize that differences in the interactions of GA/GC with the model monolayer correlate to their degree of exertion for numerous activities.

  10. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  11. Theoretical study of vibrational energy transfer of free OH groups at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Renhui; Wei, Wenmei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2016-04-14

    Recent experimental studies have shown that the vibrational dynamics of free OH groups at the water-air interface is significantly different from that in bulk water. In this work, by performing molecular dynamics simulations and mixed quantum/classical calculations, we investigate different vibrational energy transfer pathways of free OH groups at the water-air interface. The calculated intramolecular vibrational energy transfer rate constant and the free OH bond reorientation time scale agree well with the experiment. It is also found that, due to the small intermolecular vibrational couplings, the intermolecular vibrational energy transfer pathway that is very important in bulk water plays a much less significant role in the vibrational energy relaxation of the free OH groups at the water-air interface.

  12. Fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and EN82H weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and its weld, EN82H, was characterized in 54 C to 338 C air and hydrogenated water. Elastic-plastic J{sub IC} testing was performed due to the inherent high toughness of these materials. Alloy 600 exhibited excellent fracture toughness under all test conditions. While EN82H welds displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, a dramatic toughness degradation occurred in water at temperatures below 149 C. Comparison of the cracking response in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that the loss in toughness is due to a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism. At loading rates about approx. 1000 MPa {radical}m/h, the toughness in low temperature water is improved because there is insufficient time for hydrogen to embrittle grain boundaries. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate macroscopic properties with key microstructural features and operative fracture mechanisms.

  13. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  14. Ammonia Flux at the Air-Water Interface of Tampa Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizak, C. A.; Poor, N. D.

    2003-12-01

    Recent nitrogen deposition research in the Tampa Bay Estuary indicates that ammonia deposition dominates the total dry nitrogen flux to the bay. Gaseous plus aerosol ammonia contribute approximately 450 tons per year or 60% of the total nitrogen deposition of 760 tons per year to the estuary. Research data also indicate that during the summer months, Tampa Bay may act as a source for atmospheric ammonia as water temperature and ammonium concentrations increase. Ammonia flux estimates will be derived from thirty days of daily summer air and water sampling at the Gandy Bridge air monitoring site located adjacent to Tampa Bay. Ammonia concentrations were measured at two heights with a URG, Inc. dual-pump annular denuder system (ADS), and water grab samples from two depths were analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. Hourly relative humidity, air and water temperature, pH and salinity were recorded at this site, and hourly wind speed and direction were obtained from the Environmental Protection Commission of Hillsborough County. Rainwater samples were obtained with a University of Michigan sequential rainwater collector and analyzed in the laboratory for ammonium concentration. The direction and magnitude for the ammonia flux will be calculated with a modified NOAA buoy model from measurements of wind speed, air and water temperature, air and water ammonia and ammonium concentrations, relative humidity, water pH and salinity. The results of this research will be used to improve the NOAA Buoy model, and to compare observed with modeled ammonia gradients.

  15. Remarkable impact of water on the discharge performance of a silicon-air battery.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Gil; Macdonald, Digby D; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2011-08-22

    Here, we report on a Si-air/ionic liquid electrolyte battery whose performance improves with small amounts of water in the electrolyte. The shift of the generation zone of the SiO(2) discharge product from the air cathode surface into the bulk region of the liquid electrolyte, caused by water addition, is demonstrated through various means. Addition of 15 vol% water leads to an increase of 40% in the discharge capacity as compared to the capacity obtained using a pure ionic liquid electrolyte. If the water content increases above 20 vol%, the Si-air cell capacity dramatically decreases. The water-ionic liquid electrolyte mixture shows a maximum in the ionic conductivity with a water content of 10 vol%. In-depth studies indicate a reduced amount of discharge product at the air electrode using 15 vol% H(2)O electrolyte. The morphology of the anode surface, as well as the developed surface film in the presence of water-containing ionic liquid, is reported. This study shows that exposing a Si-air battery to a humid environment does not result in capacity losses, but rather improves cell performance.

  16. Air stripping of ammonia in a water-sparged aerocyclone reactor.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xuejun; Wang, Fuping; Zhao, Qinghua; Zhao, Tiantao; Xiang, Jinxin

    2009-10-30

    Air stripping of ammonia is a widely used process for the pretreatment of wastewater. Scaling and fouling on the packing surface in packed towers and a lower stripping efficiency are the two major problems in this process. New equipment that is suitable for the air stripping of wastewater with suspended solids has been developed. Air stripping of ammonia from water with Ca(OH)2 was performed in the newly designed gas-liquid contactor, a water-sparged aerocyclone (WSA). WSA exhibited a higher air stripping efficiency and an excellent mass transfer performance, it also consumed less air compared with stripping tanks and packed towers. In addition, no scaling and fouling was observed in the inner structure of the WSA. During the stripping process, the stripping efficiency and mass transfer coefficient naturally increases with the liquid phase temperature and air flow rate. There is a critical value for the air flow rate over which stripping efficiency and the mass transfer coefficient increases rapidly. An efficient air stripping of ammonia should be conducted at a higher ambient temperature (>25 degrees C), and a higher air flow rate (>1.4 l/s).

  17. Modeling decadal timescale interactions between surface water and ground water in the central Everglades, Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Newlin, J.T.; Krupa, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-water and ground-water flow are coupled in the central Everglades, although the remoteness of this system has hindered many previous attempts to quantify interactions between surface water and ground water. We modeled flow through a 43,000 ha basin in the central Everglades called Water Conservation Area 2A. The purpose of the model was to quantify recharge and discharge in the basin's vast interior areas. The presence and distribution of tritium in ground water was the principal constraint on the modeling, based on measurements in 25 research wells ranging in depth from 2 to 37 m. In addition to average characteristics of surface-water flow, the model parameters included depth of the layer of 'interactive' ground water that is actively exchanged with surface water, average residence time of interactive ground water, and the associated recharge and discharge fluxes across the wetland ground surface. Results indicated that only a relatively thin (8 m) layer of the 60 m deep surfical aquifer actively exchanges surface water and ground water on a decadal timescale. The calculated storage depth of interactive ground water was 3.1 m after adjustment for the porosity of peat and sandy limestone. Modeling of the tritium data yielded an average residence time of 90 years in interactive ground water, with associated recharge and discharge fluxes equal to 0.01 cm d -1. 3H/3He isotopic ratio measurements (which correct for effects of vertical mixing in the aquifer with deeper, tritium-dead water) were available from several wells, and these indicated an average residence time of 25 years, suggesting that residence time was overestimated using tritium measurements alone. Indeed, both residence time and storage depth would be expected to be overestimated due to vertical mixing. The estimate of recharge and discharge (0.01 cm d-1) that resulted from tritium modeling therefore is still considered reliable, because the ratio of residence time and storage depth (used to

  18. Model-Based Design of Air Traffic Controller-Automation Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romahn, Stephan; Callantine, Todd J.; Palmer, Everett A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A model of controller and automation activities was used to design the controller-automation interactions necessary to implement a new terminal area air traffic management concept. The model was then used to design a controller interface that provides the requisite information and functionality. Using data from a preliminary study, the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS) was used to help validate the model as a computational tool for describing controller performance.

  19. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives. PMID:23755221

  20. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives.

  1. Experimental study on bi-phase flow Air-Oil in Water Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Davide; Poesio, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phase slug flow oil-in-water emulsion [5%-20%] and air through a horizontal pipe (inner diameter 22mm) is experimentally studied. A test with water and air has been performed as comparison. First we create and analyze the flow pattern map to identify slug flow liquid and air inlet conditions. Flow maps are similar for all the used liquid. A video analysis procedure using an high speed camera has been created to obtain all the characteristics of unit slugs: slug velocity, slug length, bubble velocity, bubbles length and slug frequency. We compare translational velocity and frequency with models finding a good agreement. We calculate the pdfs of the lengths to find the correlations between mean values and STD on different air and liquid superficial velocities. We also perform pressure measurements along the pipe. We conclude that the percentage of oil-in- water has no influence on results in terms of velocity, lengths, frequency and pressure drop.

  2. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed.

  3. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed. PMID:21290417

  4. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  5. Surface modification of gold nanoparticles and their monolayer behavior at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chaio-Ling; Wang, Ke-Hsuan; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Hsu, Wen-Ping; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared by two different methods. The first method was chemically grafting the particles with different lengths of alkylthiol (C6SH, C12SH and C18SH). For the second method, the Au particles were surface modified first by mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) to render a surface with carboxylic acid groups which play a role to physically adsorb cationic surfactant in chloroform. This method was termed physical/chemical method. In the first method, the effects of alkyl chain length and dispersion solvent on the monolayer behavior of surface modified gold nanoparticles was evaluated. The gold nanoparticles prepared by 1-hexanthiol demonstrated the narrowest size distribution. Most of them showed narrower particle size distributions in chloroform than in hexane. For the physical/chemical method, the particles can spread more uniformly on the water surface which is attributed to the amphiphilic character of the particles at the air/water interface. However, the particles cannot pack closely due to the relatively weak particle-particle interaction. The effect of alkyl chain length was also assessed for the second method.

  6. Aqueduct: an interactive tool to empower global water risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, Paul; Gassert, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas (Aqueduct) is a publicly available, global database and interactive tool that maps indicators of water related risks for decision makers worldwide. Aqueduct makes use of the latest geo-statistical modeling techniques to compute a composite index and translate the most recently available hydrological data into practical information on water related risks for companies, investors, and governments alike. Twelve global indicators are grouped into a Water Risk Framework designed in response to the growing concerns from private sector actors around water scarcity, water quality, climate change, and increasing demand for freshwater. The Aqueduct framework includes indicators of water stress, variability in supply, storage, flood, drought, groundwater, water quality and social conflict, addressing both spatial and temporal variation in water hazards. It organizes indicators into three categories of risk that bring together multiple dimensions of water related risk into comprehensive aggregated scores, which allow for dynamic weighting to capture users' unique exposure to water hazards. All information is compiled into an online, open access platform, from which decision-makers can view indicators, scores, and maps, conduct global risk assessments, and export data and shape files for further analysis. Companies can use this tool to evaluate their exposure to water risks across operations and supply chains, investors to assess water-related risks in their portfolio, and public-sector actors to better understand water security. Additionally, the open nature of the data and maps allow other organizations to build off of this effort with new research, for example in the areas of water-energy or water-food relationships. This presentation will showcase the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas online tool and the features and functionalities it offers, as well as explain how it can be used for both private and public sector applications. The session will

  7. Interaction between neritic and warm water tintinnids in surface waters of East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhao, Y.; Chen, X.; Zhang, W.; Xu, J.; Li, J.; Xiao, T.

    2016-02-01

    Tintinnid are important microzooplankton in marine pelagic habitats. In the temperate shelf area, tintinnid could be divided into neritic, warm-water and cosmopolitan biogeographical types. Up to now, there is no understanding in the interaction between neritic and warm-water genera in shelf waters. Here we studied the interaction of neritic and warm-water tintinnids in East China Sea during three cruises (May, August and October) in 2013. Our hypothesis were (1) that the factors influencing the expansion of neritic and warm-water genera were different and (2) that different genera within each biogeographical type had different adaptation abilities in the process of expansion. Totally 94 species in 36 genera were identified in three cruises. According to the distribution of each tintinnid genus in the three cruises, tintinnid genera were divided into three biogeographical types: neritic, warm-water and cosmopolitan. The data confirmed our hypothesis. The factor influencing neritic tintinnid species richness and abundance was water depth while salinity was the factor influencing species richness and abundance of warm-water tintinnids. According to the difference in their expansion ability, neritic and warm-water genera could be divided into core genera and pioneer genera. In the case of neritic genera, core and pioneer neritic genera stayed together in May and August while pioneer neritic genera expanded a lot out to the oceanic water in October. In the case of warm-water genera, the pioneer genera always expanded a lot out to the coast in all three cruises. In May and August, the pioneers of neritic and warm-water genera did not meet. However, in October, the cores of neritic and warm-water genera collided. Our data clearly showed that the core and pioneer of both neritic and warm-water genera interacted in different modes in different months. Whether the cores of neritic and warm-water genera will further mixed in winter is an open question.

  8. 78 FR 17229 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; the Missouri Air Conservation Law; the Missouri Clean Water Law and..., the Clean Water Act, the Missouri Clean Water Law, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and...

  9. Water treatment: Air stripping. December 1981-July 1989 (Citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for December 1981-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including ground-water decontamination and waste-water purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water-treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in ground-water and soil cleanup. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 74 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  10. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals. PMID:26196214

  11. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

  12. Air-cooled condensers eliminate plant water use

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, W.; Peltier, R.

    2008-09-15

    River or ocean water has been the mainstay for condensing turbine exhaust steam since the first steam turbine began generating electricity. A primary challenge facing today's plant developers, especially in drought-prone regions, is incorporating processes that reduce plant water use and consumption. One solution is to shed the conventional mindset that once-through cooling is the only option and adopt dry cooling technologies that reduce plant water use from a flood to a few sips. A case study at the Astoria Energy plant, New York City is described. 14 figs.

  13. Optimizing Noble Gas-Water Interactions via Monte Carlo Simulations.

    PubMed

    Warr, Oliver; Ballentine, Chris J; Mu, Junju; Masters, Andrew

    2015-11-12

    In this work we present optimized noble gas-water Lennard-Jones 6-12 pair potentials for each noble gas. Given the significantly different atomic nature of water and the noble gases, the standard Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules produce inaccurate unlike molecular interactions between these two species. Consequently, we find simulated Henry's coefficients deviate significantly from their experimental counterparts for the investigated thermodynamic range (293-353 K at 1 and 10 atm), due to a poor unlike potential well term (εij). Where εij is too high or low, so too is the strength of the resultant noble gas-water interaction. This observed inadequacy in using the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules is countered in this work by scaling εij for helium, neon, argon, and krypton by factors of 0.91, 0.8, 1.1, and 1.05, respectively, to reach a much improved agreement with experimental Henry's coefficients. Due to the highly sensitive nature of the xenon εij term, coupled with the reasonable agreement of the initial values, no scaling factor is applied for this noble gas. These resulting optimized pair potentials also accurately predict partitioning within a CO2-H2O binary phase system as well as diffusion coefficients in ambient water. This further supports the quality of these interaction potentials. Consequently, they can now form a well-grounded basis for the future molecular modeling of multiphase geological systems. PMID:26452070

  14. Evaluation of Vertically Resolved Water Winds from AIRS using Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Dobkowski, Edwin C.; Gregorich, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of wind velocity as a function of altitude is key to weather forecast improvements. The ability of hyperspectral sounders in principle to measure vertically resolved water winds, which has long been recognized, has been tested with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. AIRS retrievals of total column water above 300 mb have been correlated with the radiosonde upper-tropospheric wind velocity and moisture data. The excellent correlation is illustrated with results obtained from hurricane Katrina and from the western United States. AIRS is a hyperspectral infrared sounder in low Earth orbit. It was launched in May 2002. We illustrate the use of AIRS data for the measurement of upper tropospheric water by using the 2387/cm CO2 R-branch channel and the 1551/cm water vapor channel. The 2387/cm channel measures the temperature at 300 mb totally independent of water vapor. The weighting function of the 1551/cm channel peaks at 300 mb only under moist conditions; the peak shifts downward (higher temperature) for less water and upward (lower temperature) for more water. The difference between the brightness temperatures bt2387 and bt1551 cancels the local several degree weather related variability of the temperature and measures the component due to the water vapor at 300 mb.

  15. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  16. Atmospheric Precipitable Water and its association with Surface Air Temperatures over Different Climate Regims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, H.; Fetzer, E. J.; Olsene, E. T.; Granger, S. L.; Kahn, B. H.; Fishbein, E. F.; Chen, L.; Teixeira, J.; Lambrigtsen, B. H.

    2008-12-01

    As a greenhouse gas and a key component in the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric water vapor is very important in the earth's climate system. The relationship between air temperature and water vapor content at the surface and in different layers of the atmosphere have been examined in many studies in trying to better understand the magnitude of water vapor feedback in our climate system. Studies have found large spatial variability and large regional and vertical deviations from the Clapeyron-Clausius relation of constant relative humidity. However, there is an ongoing need to understand the climatology of the relationship between the surface air temperature and total column water vapor, and to examine any potential thresholds associated with sudden changes in this relationship as air temperatures continue to increase. This study uses 5-year total precipitable water vapor records measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and surface air temperature to examine their relationships at tropical to mid latitude conditions found at 60°S- 60°N for winter and summer seasons. In addition, the relationships will be examined for different climate regimes based on Koppen's system. This will help distinguish the geographical regions and physical processes where different relationships are found. This information will improve our understanding of the regional patterns of water vapor feedback associated with warming climate.

  17. Effect of grafted polymer species on particle monolayer structure at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Emiko; Okazaki, Yoshitaka; Komune, Seishu; Yoshinaga, Kohji

    2011-03-01

    We have studied poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted(PMMA) particle monolayer systems at the air-water interface. In previous papers, we reported that PMMA chains grafted from particles (silica particle and polystyrene latex) were extended on water surfaces. Through observing deposited particle monolayers on substrates using SEM, we have confirmed that PMMA of large molecular weights were either dispersed or arrayed in structure with long inter-particle distances approximately 500 nm. In contrast, low molecular weight PMMA were observed to aggregate upon deposition. We speculated that the difference in morphology in deposited particle monolayers would be attributed to the affinity between the grafted polymer and the substrate. To examine the effect of this affinity three new polymer-grafted silica particles were synthesized with a fairly high graft density of about 0.14 approximately 0.43 nm(-2). As well as PMMA-grafted silica particles (SiO2-PMMA), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(t-butyl methacrylate)--grafted silica particles (SiO2-PHEMA and SiO2-PtBuMA) were also prepared and subjected to pi-A isotherm measurements and SEM observations. These pi-A isotherms indicated that polymer-grafted silica formed monolayer at the air-water interface, and the onset area of increasing surface pressure suggests that the polymer chains are extended on a water surface. However, the morphology of the deposited monolayer is highly dependent on polymer species: SiO2-PHEMA showed that the dispersed particle monolayer structure was independent of grafted molecular weight while SiO2-tBuMA showed an aggregated structure that was also independent of grafted moleculer weight. SiO2-PMMA showed intermediate tendencies: dispersed structure was observed with high grafted molecular weight and aggregated structure was observed with low grafted molecule weight. The morphology on glass substrate would be explaiened by hydrophilic interaction between grafted polymer and hydrophilic glass

  18. Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, Hiromichi Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2014-03-15

    Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

  19. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  20. Understanding Surface water Ground water Interactions in Arkansas-Red River Basin using Coupled Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface water exists primarily as groundwater and also in small quantity as soil water in the unsaturated zone. This soil water plays a vital role in the hydrologic cycle by supporting plant growth, regulating the amount of water lost to evapo-transpiration and affecting the surface water groundwater interaction to a certain extent. As such, the interaction between surface water and groundwater is complex and little understood. This study aims at investigating the surface water groundwater interaction in the Arkansas-Red river basin, using a coupled modeling platform. For this purpose, an ecohydrological model (SWAP) has been coupled with the groundwater model (MODFLOW). Inputs to this coupled model are collected from NEXRAD precipitation data at a resolution of ~4 km, meteorological forcings from Oklahoma mesonet and NCDC sites, STATSGO soil property data, LAI (Leaf Area Index) data from MODIS at a resolution of ~1 km, and DEM (Digital Elevation Model). For numerical modeling, a spatial resolution of ~1 km and a temporal resolution of one day is used. The modeled base flow and total groundwater storage change would be tested using ground water table observation data. The modeled ground water storage is further improved using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite data at a resolution of ~400 km, with the help of appropriate data assimilation technique.

  1. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results. PMID:23384061

  2. LIF measurements of oxygen concentration gradients along flat and wavy air-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Philip T., Jr.; Duke, Steve R.

    Instantaneous spatially-varying measurements of concentration gradients occurring during aeration for flat, stagnant air-water interfaces and for interfaces with mechanically-generated waves are presented. Measurements were obtained in a laboratory wave tank using a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique that images planar oxygen concentration fields near air-water interfaces. Pulsed nitrogen laser light focused to a thin sheet induces the fluorescence of pyrene butyric acid (in micromolar concentration) in deoxygenated water. The PBA fluorescence is quenched by dissolved oxygen. A high-resolution CCD camera images in two dimensions the intensities of the fluorescence field, providing spatial measurements of oxygen concentration with magnification of 7 μm per pixel. The concentration fields, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses along the flat and wavy air-water interfaces are quantified and compared to previous measurements associated with sheared gas-liquid interfaces and with wind-generated waves.

  3. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  5. The patterns and implications of diurnal variations in d-excess of plant water, shallow soil water and air moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wang, L.; Xiao, H.; Cheng, G.; Ruan, Y.; Zhou, M.; Wang, F.

    2014-04-01

    Deuterium excess (d-excess) of air moisture is traditionally considered as a conservative tracer of oceanic evaporation conditions. Recent studies challenge this view and emphasize the importance of vegetation activity in controlling the dynamics of air moisture d-excess. However direct field observations supporting the role of vegetation in d-excess variations is not well documented. In this study, we quantified d-excess of air moisture, leaf and xylem water of multiple dominant species as well as shallow soil water (5 and 10 cm) at hourly interval during three extensive field campaigns at two climatically different locations within the Heihe River Basin. The results showed that with the increase of temperature (T) and decrease of relative humidity (RH), the δD-δ18O plots of leaf water, xylem water and shallow soil water deviated gradually from their corresponding local meteoric water line. There were significant differences in d-excess values among different water pools at all the study sites. The most positive d-excess values were found in air moisture (9.3‰) and the most negative d-excess values (-85.6‰) were found in leaf water. The d-excess values of air moisture (dmoisture) and leaf water (dleaf) during the sunny days, and shallow soil water (dsoil) during the first sunny day after rain event showed strong diurnal patterns. There were significantly positive relationships between dleaf and RH and negative relationships between dmoisture and RH. The correlations of dleaf and dmoisture with T were opposite to their relationships with RH. In addition, we found the opposite diurnal variations for dleaf and dmoisture during the sunny day, and for dleaf during the sunny days, and shallow soil water dsoil and dmoisture during the first sunny day after rain event. Significant negative relationships were found between dleaf and dmoisture in all the sites during the sunny day. Our results provide direct evidence that dmoisture of the surface air at continental

  6. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1992-11-17

    Water plays a central role affecting all aspects of the dynamics in aridland ecosystems. Productivity, stability, and competitive interactions among ecosystem components within aridlands are key processes related directly to water in deserts. The ecological studies in this project revolve around one fundamental premise: that integrated aspects of plant metabolism provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities and ecosystems. While it is difficult to extrapolate from instantaneous physiological observations to higher scales, such as whole plant performance or to interactions between plants as components of ecosystems, several key aspects of plant metabolism are scalable. Analyses of stable isotopic composition in plant tissues at natural abundance levels provide a useful tool that can provide insight into the consequences of physiological processes over temporal and spatial scales. Some plant processes continuously fractionate among light and heavy stable isotopic forms of an element; over time this results in integrated measures of plant metabolism. For example, carbon isotope fractionation during photosynthesis results in leaf carbon isotopic composition that is a measure of the set-point for photosynthetic metabolism and of water-use efficiency. Thus it provides information on the temporal scaling of a key physiological process. In contrast, hydrogen is not fractionated during water uptake through the root. Soil water availability in shallow, deep, and/or groundwater layers vary spatially; therefore hydrogen isotope ratios of xylem sap provide a direct measure of the water source currently used by a plant. The longer-term record of carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios is recorded annually in xylem tissues (tree rings). The research in this project addresses variation in stable isotopic composition of aridland plants and its consequences for plant performance and community-level interactions.

  7. Dynamic Ice-Water Interactions Form Europa's Chaos Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, D. D.; Schmidt, B. E.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P.

    2011-12-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. We present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. This model is consistent with key observations of chaos, predicts observables for future missions, and indicates that the surface is likely still active today[1]. We apply lessons from ice-water interaction in the terrestrial cryosphere to hypothesize a dynamic lense-collapse model to for Europa's chaos terrain. Chaos terrain morphology, like that of Conamara chaos and Thera Macula, suggests a four-phase formation [1]: 1) Surface deflection occurs as ice melts over ascending thermal plumes, as regularly occurs on Earth as subglacial volcanoes activate. The same process can occur at Europa if thermal plumes cause pressure melt as they cross ice-impurity eutectics. 2) Resulting hydraulic gradients and driving forces produce a sealed, pressurized melt lense, akin to the hydraulic sealing of subglacial caldera lakes. On Europa, the water cannot escape the lense due to the horizontally continuous ice shell. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid above the lense opens cracks, allowing for the ice to be hydrofractured by pressurized water. Fracture, brine injection and percolation within the ice and possible iceberg toppling produces ice-melange-like granular matrix material. 4) Refreezing of the melt lense and brine-filled pores and cracks within the matrix results in raised chaos. Brine soaking and injection concentrates the ice in brines and adds water volume to the shell. As this englacial water freezes, the now water-filled ice will expand, not unlike the process of forming pingos and other "expansion ice" phenomena on Earth. The refreezing can raise the surface and create the oft-observed matrix "domes" In this presentation, we describe how catastrophic ice-water interactions on Earth have

  8. Interactions between water temperature and contaminant toxicity to freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ronald W; Chapman, John C; Lim, Richard P; Gehrke, Peter C; Sunderam, Ramasamy M

    2015-08-01

    Warming of freshwaters as a result of climate change is expected to have complex interactions with the toxicity of contaminants to aquatic organisms. The present study evaluated the effects of temperature on the acute toxicity of endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, and phenol to 3 warm water species of fish-silver perch, rainbowfish, and western carp gudgeon-and 1 cold water species, rainbow trout. Endosulfan was more toxic to silver perch at 30 °C and 35 °C than at 15 °C, 20 °C and 25 °C during short exposures of 24 h, but at 96 h, temperature had no effect on toxicity. Toxicity to rainbow trout increased with increasing temperature, whereas warm water species exhibited maximum toxicity at around 30 °C, decreasing again toward 35 °C. Chlorpyrifos became more toxic to all species with increasing temperature. Phenol toxicity to all species decreased at low to intermediate temperatures; but as temperatures increased further toward the upper thermal limit, phenol became more toxic. Increasing toxicity in the upper thermal range of cold water species may contribute to upstream range contraction in rivers with high toxicant loads. In contrast, warm water species may not exhibit a range shift within rivers as a result of interactions between temperature and toxicity. Catchment management to offset global warming at local scales may present opportunities to mitigate increased toxicity of contaminants to fish.

  9. Enforcement under the 1990 CAAA: Hot air or hot water?

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisch, J.

    1998-06-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) have caused varying degrees of anxiety in facility and environmental managers. How worried should they be? One area of special concern is Title VII, Provisions Relating to Enforcement, which has led to field citations, new civil penalties, provisions for citizen suits and, of most concern, the new criminal provision. The CAAA include strong new enforcement authority, which allows the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take swift and strong action against violators. The Agency can issue tickets up to $5,000 per violation, penalties up to $25,000 per day for administrative penalties and $250,000 and up to five years in prison for criminal violations. Sources that maintain compliance with air pollution regulations and maintain accurate records and documentation have nothing to fear from these new regulations. However, sources that violate federal requirements, falsify records or knowingly create risks to the environment or human health can look forward to aggressive enforcement by EPA. This article briefly discusses the new provisions, whom they affect, how one may be able to minimize the potential liabilities and what to do if the EPA begins an enforcement action.

  10. Regional-scale identification of groundwater-surface water interaction using hydrochemistry and multivariate statistical methods, Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenmos, M. R.; Daughney, C. J.; Jackson, B. M.; Morgenstern, U.

    2011-11-01

    Identifying areas of interaction between groundwater and surface water is crucial for effective environmental management, because this interaction is known to influence water quantity and quality. This paper applies hydrochemistry and multivariate statistics to identify locations and mechanisms of groundwater-surface water interaction in the pastorally dominated Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted using site-specific median values of Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, Cl, SO4 and electrical conductivity from 22 surface water sites and 246 groundwater sites. Surface water and groundwater monitoring sites were grouped together in three of the seven clusters identified by HCA, with the inference made that similarities in hydrochemistry indicate groundwater-surface water interaction. PCA indicated that the clusters were largely differentiated by total dissolved solids concentration, redox condition and ratio of major ions. Shallow aerobic groundwaters, located in close proximity to losing reaches of rivers, were grouped with similar Ca-HCO3 type surface waters, indicating potential recharge to aquifers from these river systems. Groundwaters that displayed a rainfall-recharged chemical signature with higher Na relative to Ca, higher Cl relative to HCO3 and an accumulation of NO3 were grouped with neighbouring surface waters, suggesting the provision of groundwater base flow to these river systems and the transfer of this chemical signature from underlying aquifers. The hydrochemical techniques used in this study did not reveal groundwater-surface water interaction in some parts of the study area, specifically where deep anoxic groundwaters, high in total dissolved solids with a distinct Na-Cl signature, showed no apparent link to surface water. The drivers of hydrochemistry inferred from HCA and PCA are consistent with previous measurements of 18O, water age and excess air. Overall, this study has

  11. Regional-scale identification of groundwater-surface water interaction using hydrochemistry and multivariate statistical methods, Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenmos, M. R.; Daughney, C. J.; Jackson, B. M.; Morgenstern, U.

    2011-07-01

    Identifying areas of interaction between groundwater and surface water is crucial for effective environmental management, because this interaction is known to influence water quantity and quality. This paper applies hydrochemistry and multivariate statistics to identify locations and mechanisms of groundwater-surface water interaction in the pastorally dominated Wairarapa Valley, New Zealand. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted using site-specific median values of Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, Cl, SO4 and electrical conductivity from 22 surface water sites and 246 groundwater sites. Surface water and groundwater monitoring sites were grouped together in three of the seven clusters identified by HCA, with the inference made that similarities in hydrochemistry indicate groundwater-surface water interaction. PCA indicated that the clusters were largely differentiated by total dissolved solids concentration, redox potential and ratio of major ions. Shallow aerobic groundwaters, located in close proximity to losing reaches of rivers, were grouped with similar Ca-HCO3 type surface waters, indicating potential recharge to aquifers from these river systems. Groundwaters that displayed a rainfall-recharged chemical signature with higher Na relative to Ca, higher Cl relative to HCO3 and an accumulation of NO3 were grouped with neighbouring surface waters, suggesting the provision of groundwater base flow to these river systems and the transfer of this chemical signature from underlying aquifers. The hydrochemical techniques used in this study did not reveal groundwater-surface water interaction in some parts of the study area, specifically where deep anoxic groundwaters, high in total dissolved solids with a distinct Na-Cl signature, showed no apparent link to surface water. The drivers of hydrochemistry inferred from HCA and PCA are consistent with previous measurements of 18O, water age and excess air. Overall, this study has

  12. Interpreting Vibrational Sum-frequency Spectra of Sulfur Dioxide at the Air/Water Interface: A Comprehensive Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Tao, Fu-Ming; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the solvation and spectroscopic properties of SO2 at the air/water interface using molecular simulation techniques. Molecular interactions from both Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) and classical polarizable models were utilized to understand the properties of SO2:(H2O)x complexes in the vicinity of the air/water interface. The KS-DFT was included to allow comparisons with sum-frequency generation spectroscopy through the identification of surface SO2:(H2O)x complexes. Using our simulation results, we were able to develop a much more detailed picture for the surface structure of SO2 that is consistent with the spectroscopic data obtained Richmond and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 16806 (2005)). We also found many similarities and differences between to the two interaction potentials, including a noticeable weakness of the classical potential model in reproducing the asymmetric hydrogen bonding of water with SO2 due to its inability to account for SO2 resonance structures. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  15. Application of LIF to investigate gas transfer near the air-water interface in a grid-stirred tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlina; Jirka, G. H.

    The interaction between oxygen absorption into liquids and bottom shear-induced turbulence was investigated in a grid-stirred tank using a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. The LIF technique enabled visualization as well as quantification of planar concentration fields of the dissolved oxygen (DO) near the air-water interface. Qualitative observation of the images provided more insight into the physical mechanism controlling the gas transfer process. The high data resolution is an advantage for revealing the concentration distribution within the boundary layer, which is a few hundreds of a micrometer thick. Mean and turbulent fluctuation characteristics were obtained and compared with previous results.

  16. Effects of dissolved air flotation hydraulic loading rate on water treatment performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tobiason, J.E.; Edzwald, J.K.; Amato, T.; Maggi, L.J.

    1999-07-01

    The performance of dissolved air flotation (DAF) followed by granular media filtration for water treatment was evaluated via pilot-scale studies for two water sources. The study focused on short flocculation times (5--8 minutes), high DAF hydraulic loading rates (17--44 m/hr (7--18 gpm/ft{sup 2})) and rapid rate filtration (10--20 m/hr (4--8 gpm/ft{sup 2})). Excellent treatment performance was achieved in terms of DAF clarified water turbidity, filtered water turbidity, organic matter removal and filtered water production. Bubble carryover from the DAF tank was mitigated by employing either internal or external air removal strategies. Overall, the results demonstrate the effectiveness of an integrated, high rate flocculation/DAF/filtration water treatment strategy.

  17. Water use regimes: Characterizing direct human interaction with hydrologic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, P.K.; Vogel, R.M.; Steeves, P.A.; Zarriello, P.J.; DeSimone, L.A.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The sustainability of human water use practices is a rapidly growing concern in the United States and around the world. To better characterize direct human interaction with hydrologic systems (stream basins and aquifers), we introduce the concept of the water use regime. Unlike scalar indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic stress in the literature, the water use regime is a two-dimensional, vector indicator that can be depicted on simple x-y plots of normalized human withdrawals (hout) versus normalized human return flows (hin). Four end-member regimes, natural-flow-dominated (undeveloped), human-flow-dominated (churned), withdrawal-dominated (depleted), and return-flow-dominated (surcharged), are defined in relation to limiting values of hout and hin. For illustration, the water use regimes of 19 diverse hydrologic systems are plotted and interpreted. Several of these systems, including the Yellow River Basin, China, and the California Central Valley Aquifer, are shown to approach particular end-member regimes. Spatial and temporal regime variations, both seasonal and long-term, are depicted. Practical issues of data availability and regime uncertainty are addressed in relation to the statistical properties of the ratio estimators hout and hin. The water use regime is shown to be a useful tool for comparative water resources assessment and for describing both historic and alternative future pathways of water resource development at a range of scales. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Water from air: An overlooked source of moisture in arid and semiarid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Theresa; Morrissey, Ember M; Reed, Sasha C.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Water drives the functioning of Earth’s arid and semiarid lands. Drylands can obtain water from sources other than precipitation, yet little is known about how non-rainfall water inputs influence dryland communities and their activity. In particular, water vapor adsorption – movement of atmospheric water vapor into soil when soil air is drier than the overlying air – likely occurs often in drylands, yet its effects on ecosystem processes are not known. By adding 18O-enriched water vapor to the atmosphere of a closed system, we documented the conversion of water vapor to soil liquid water across a temperature range typical of arid ecosystems. This phenomenon rapidly increased soil moisture and stimulated microbial carbon (C) cycling, and the flux of water vapor to soil had a stronger impact than temperature on microbial activity. In a semiarid grassland, we also observed that non-rainfall water inputs stimulated microbial activity and C cycling. Together these data suggest that, during rain-free periods, atmospheric moisture in drylands may significantly contribute to variation in soil water content, thereby influencing ecosystem processes. The simple physical process of adsorption of water vapor to soil particles, forming liquid water, represents an overlooked but potentially important contributor to C cycling in drylands.

  19. Water from air: an overlooked source of moisture in arid and semiarid regions.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Theresa A; Morrissey, Ember M; Reed, Sasha C; Hungate, Bruce A; Schwartz, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Water drives the functioning of Earth's arid and semiarid lands. Drylands can obtain water from sources other than precipitation, yet little is known about how non-rainfall water inputs influence dryland communities and their activity. In particular, water vapor adsorption--movement of atmospheric water vapor into soil when soil air is drier than the overlying air--likely occurs often in drylands, yet its effects on ecosystem processes are not known. By adding (18)O-enriched water vapor to the atmosphere of a closed system, we documented the conversion of water vapor to soil liquid water across a temperature range typical of arid ecosystems. This phenomenon rapidly increased soil moisture and stimulated microbial carbon (C) cycling, and the flux of water vapor to soil had a stronger impact than temperature on microbial activity. In a semiarid grassland, we also observed that non-rainfall water inputs stimulated microbial activity and C cycling. Together these data suggest that, during rain-free periods, atmospheric moisture in drylands may significantly contribute to variation in soil water content, thereby influencing ecosystem processes. The simple physical process of adsorption of water vapor to soil particles, forming liquid water, represents an overlooked but potentially important contributor to C cycling in drylands. PMID:26345615

  20. Water from air: an overlooked source of moisture in arid and semiarid regions

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Theresa A.; Morrissey, Ember M.; Reed, Sasha C.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Water drives the functioning of Earth’s arid and semiarid lands. Drylands can obtain water from sources other than precipitation, yet little is known about how non-rainfall water inputs influence dryland communities and their activity. In particular, water vapor adsorption – movement of atmospheric water vapor into soil when soil air is drier than the overlying air – likely occurs often in drylands, yet its effects on ecosystem processes are not known. By adding 18O-enriched water vapor to the atmosphere of a closed system, we documented the conversion of water vapor to soil liquid water across a temperature range typical of arid ecosystems. This phenomenon rapidly increased soil moisture and stimulated microbial carbon (C) cycling, and the flux of water vapor to soil had a stronger impact than temperature on microbial activity. In a semiarid grassland, we also observed that non-rainfall water inputs stimulated microbial activity and C cycling. Together these data suggest that, during rain-free periods, atmospheric moisture in drylands may significantly contribute to variation in soil water content, thereby influencing ecosystem processes. The simple physical process of adsorption of water vapor to soil particles, forming liquid water, represents an overlooked but potentially important contributor to C cycling in drylands. PMID:26345615

  1. Development of a state and federal water, soil, and air regulatory data base

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Tayloe, S.L.; Mavournin, K.H.; Hovatter, P.S.; Francis, M.W.; Lu, P.Y.; Talmage, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental restoration of chemically-contaminated sites requires the knowledge of state and federal regulations for acceptable concentrations of chemicals in soil; air; and drinking, surface, and ground water. The Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis Section of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a data base that contains regulatory or guidance levels established pursuant to federal and state laws including the Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and relevant hazardous waste statutes. Drinking water and ground water regulatory parts of the data base are complete, including federal regulations as well as regulations for the 50 states. Work is progressing on surface water, air, and soil regulations. Each regulatory set consists of three interconnected files: chemical and state identification, state or federal administration officials, and regulations. This resource provides a unique chemical profile of each state, and allows comparison between states or between federal and state regulations. The resource can be utilized to identify regulatory levels for contaminants of health and environmental concern as well as to screen soil, air, and water for chemicals of potential concern.

  2. Remediation of MTBE from drinking water: air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Balaji; Sorial, George A; Speth, Thomas F; Clark, Patrick; Zaffiro, Alan; Patterson, Craig; Hand, David W

    2004-05-01

    The widespread use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as an oxygenate in gasoline has resulted in the contamination of a large number of ground and surface water sources. Even though air stripping has been proven to be an effective treatment technology for MTBE removal, off-gas treatment often is required in conjunction with it. This study evaluated the combined treatment technologies of air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption on a pilot scale for the treatment of MTBE-contaminated water. The effect of air/water ratios on the treatment efficiency was studied, and the mass transfer coefficient was determined. Air/water ratios of 105:1, 151:1, 177:1, 190:1, 202:1, and 206:1 were used, and a treatment efficiency of >99% was achieved for all the runs conducted. The depth of packing required to achieve maximum treatment efficiency decreased with increasing air/water ratio. Relative humidity (RH) impacts on the MTBE adsorption capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) and carbonaceous resin were determined from pilot plant studies. Breakthrough profiles obtained from the pilot plant studies conducted at 20, 30, and 50% RH indicated that GAC has a higher adsorptive capacity than resin. The adsorptive capacity of GAC decreased with increasing RH, whereas RH did not impact the resin adsorptive capacity.

  3. Estimating pH at the Air/Water Interface with a Confocal Fluorescence Microscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiya; Imanishi, Yasushi; Harata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    One way to determine the pH at the air/water interface with a confocal fluorescence microscope has been proposed. The relation between the pH at the air/water interface and that in a bulk solution has been formulated in connection with the adsorption equilibrium and the dissociation equilibrium of the dye adsorbed. Rhodamine B (RhB) is used as a surface-active fluorescent pH probe. The corrected fluorescence spectrum of RhB molecules at the air/water interface with the surface density of 1.0 nmol m(-2) level shows pH-dependent shifts representing an acid-base equilibrium. Two ways to determine the unknown acid-base equilibrium constant of RhB molecules at the air/water interface have been discussed. With surface-tension measurements, the adsorption properties, maximum surface density, and adsorption equilibrium constants were estimated for both cationic and zwitterionic forms of RhB molecules at the air/water interface.

  4. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-04-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw , the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  5. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-10-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw, the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  6. Reactive Distillation and Air Stripping Processes for Water Recycling and Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Reactive distillation designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Reactive distillation integrates a reactor with a distillation column. A review of the literature in this field has revealed a variety of functional reactive columns in industry. Wastewater may be purified by a combination of a reactor and a distiller (e.g., the EWRS or VPCAR concepts) or, in principle, through a design which integrates the reactor with the distiller. A review of the literature in reactive distillation has identified some different designs in such combinations of reactor and distiller. An evaluation of reactive distillation and reactive air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  7. Groundwater and river water interaction at Ciromban and Cibeureum riverbank, Tasikmalaya: Can we solve water shortage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, A.; Abdulbari, N.; Nugraha, M. I.; Prasetio, Y.; Tulak, G. P.; Darul, A.; Irawan, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    Water shortage is a common problem in the high density settlement along the riverbank of Ciromban and Cibeureum River, Tasikmalaya, as the quality of the water also decreases. One of the solution is to maximize the use of river water. This study aims to investigate the interaction between river and groundwater along the riverbank as a function of land use impact. A river water and unconfined groundwater level mapping has been conducted to make water flow map, assuming both waters are in the same flow system. Physical parameters, temperature, TDS, and pH were measured at each stations to understand water characteristics. Based on observations at 50 dug wells and 12 river stations on July-August 2014, a close interaction between both water bodies has been identified with two flow systems: effluent flow (or gaining stream) at Cibereum river segment and influent flow (losing stream) at Ciromban river segment. Physical parameters show a high correlation in temperature, pH, and TDS. Hence, further evaluation should be taken before using river water as raw water supply in Tasikmalaya area.

  8. An Integrated Approach to Economic and Environmental Aspects of Air Pollution and Climate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarofim, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Emissions of greenhouses gases and conventional pollutants are closely linked through shared generation processes and thus policies directed toward long-lived greenhouse gases affect emissions of conventional pollutants and, similarly, policies directed toward conventional pollutants affect emissions of greenhouse gases. Some conventional pollutants such as aerosols also have direct radiative effects. NOx and VOCs are ozone precursors, another substance with both radiative and health impacts, and these ozone precursors also interact with the chemistry of the hydroxyl radical which is the major methane sink. Realistic scenarios of future emissions and concentrations must therefore account for both air pollution and greenhouse gas policies and how they interact economically as well as atmospherically, including the regional pattern of emissions and regulation. We have modified a 16 region computable general equilibrium economic model (the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis model) by including elasticities of substitution for ozone precursors and aerosols in order to examine these interactions between climate policy and air pollution policy on a global scale. Urban emissions are distributed based on population density, and aged using a reduced form urban model before release into an atmospheric chemistry/climate model (the earth systems component of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model). This integrated approach enables examination of the direct impacts of air pollution on climate, the ancillary and complementary interactions between air pollution and climate policies, and the impact of different population distribution algorithms or urban emission aging schemes on global scale properties. This modeling exercise shows that while ozone levels are reduced due to NOx and VOC reductions, these reductions lead to an increase in methane concentrations that eliminates the temperature effects of the ozone reductions. However, black carbon reductions do have

  9. Groundwater interactions with surface waters: consequences on diffuse pollution pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Salvetti, Roberta; Gorla, Elena; Parati, Paolo; Malagò, Anna; Ragusa, Francesca; Vismara, Renato

    2010-05-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water are complex. Surface-waters and groundwaters are, in fact, linked components of a hydrologic continuum. In general, diffuse pollution in surface waters is difficult to quantify since it follows a multitude of pathways and acts on different time scales. During rainfall events most of the diffuse pollutant load follows the surface runoff pathways and, reaches the surface acquifers however, a fraction of this load will follows the sub-surface runoff pathways and it will possibly reach the surface acquifers after a certain time lag. The time scale of the sub-surface runoff pathways is very different from the surface runoff time scale and rarely a subsurface diffuse pollution event can be directly correlated to a specific rainfall event. This is the reason why even though there are models that enable to simulate the groundwater-surface water system (GW-SW), yet the effect of these interactions in terms of diffuse pollution pathways and their correspondent effect on the quality of surface waters to date are largely unknown. To upgrade the conceptual modeling of the "groundwater-surface water" system, a broader perspective of such interactions across and between surfacewater bodies is needed. Multidimensional analyses may help in understanding the effect of such interactions, as the characterization of the hydraulic interface and its spatial variability. To fully understand these interactions, modeling studies need to be coupled to sound and robust monitoring of surface- and ground- water quality data. Modeling can be combined with multivariate statistical techniques (e.g. factor analysis) to improve our capability to "detect" the effect of the sub-surface runoff on the water quality of specific water courses. Aim of this study was to analyse the groundwater contribution to the total nutrient river load of different watersheds that share a very intensive agriculture and landfarming system. The studied watersheds all

  10. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... meaning set forth in 40 CFR 15.4. (b) TVA will not award a contract to any offeror whose performance would... is exempt at the time of contract award from the provisions of 40 CFR part 15 as set forth therein... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given...

  11. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1).

  12. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1). PMID:25971342

  13. Ground-water and stream-water interaction in the Owl Creek basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding of the interaction of ground-water and surface-water resources is vital to water management when water availability is limited.Inflow of ground water is the primary source ofwater during stream base flow. The water chemistry of streams may substantially be affected by that inflow of ground water. This report is part of a study to examine ground-water and surface-water interaction in the Owl Creek Basin, Wyoming, completed by the U.S. Geological Survey incooperation with the Northern Arapaho Tribe and the Shoshone Tribe. During a low flow period between November\\x1113 - 17, 1991, streamflowmeasurements and water-quality samples were collected at 16 selected sites along major streams and tributaries in the Owl Creek Basin,Wyoming. The data were used to identify stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow and to examine causes of changes in stream chemistry.Streamflow measurements, radon-222 activity load, and dissolved solids load were used to identified stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow.Streamflow measurements identified three stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. Analysis of radon-222 activity load identified five stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. Dissolvedsolids load identified six stream reaches receiving ground-water inflow. When these three methods were combined, stream reaches in two areas, theEmbar Area and the Thermopolis Anticline Area, were identified as receiving ground-water inflow.The Embar Area and the Thermopolis Anticline Area were then evaluated to determine the source of increased chemical load in stream water. Three potential sources were analyzed: tributary inflow, surficial geology, and anticlines. Two sources,tributary inflow and surficial geology, were related to changes in isotopic ratios and chemical load in the Embar Area. In two reaches in the Embar Area, isotopic ratios of 18O/16O, D/H, and 34S/32S indicated that tributary inflow affected stream-water chemistry. Increased chemical load of

  14. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  15. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2 mm in thickness.

  16. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression that incorporated meteorological, landuse and population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (water quality guidelines for the protection of human health from the consumption of fish. Spatial distributions of

  17. Interactions of physical, chemical, and biological weather calling for an integrated approach to assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Dahl, Aslög; Bossioli, Elissavet; Baklanov, Alexander; Vik, Aasmund Fahre; Agnew, Paul; Karatzas, Kostas D; Sofiev, Mikhail

    2012-12-01

    This article reviews interactions and health impacts of physical, chemical, and biological weather. Interactions and synergistic effects between the three types of weather call for integrated assessment, forecasting, and communication of air quality. Today's air quality legislation falls short of addressing air quality degradation by biological weather, despite increasing evidence for the feasibility of both mitigation and adaptation policy options. In comparison with the existing capabilities for physical and chemical weather, the monitoring of biological weather is lacking stable operational agreements and resources. Furthermore, integrated effects of physical, chemical, and biological weather suggest a critical review of air quality management practices. Additional research is required to improve the coupled modeling of physical, chemical, and biological weather as well as the assessment and communication of integrated air quality. Findings from several recent COST Actions underline the importance of an increased dialog between scientists from the fields of meteorology, air quality, aerobiology, health, and policy makers.

  18. Synthesis of water soluble glycine capped silver nanoparticles and their surface selective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Agasti, Nityananda; Singh, Vinay K.; Kaushik, N.K.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles at ambient reaction conditions. • Glycine as stabilizing agent for silver nanoparticles. • Surface selective interaction of glycine with silver nanoparticles. • Glycine concentration influences crystalinity and optical property of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has been an area of significant interest because of their wide range of applications. In the present study, we have successfully synthesized water soluble silver nanoparticles assisted by small amino acid glycine. The method is primarily based on reduction of AgNO{sub 3} with NaBH{sub 4} in aqueous solution under atmospheric air in the presence of glycine. UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X–ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques used for characterization of resulting silver nanoparticles demonstrated that, glycine is an effective capping agent to stabilize silver nanoparticles. Surface selective interaction of glycine on (1 1 1) face of silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The optical property and crystalline behavior of silver nanoparticles were found to be sensitive to concentration of glycine. X–ray diffraction studies ascertained the phase specific interaction of glycine on silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were of diameter 60 nm. We thus demonstrated an efficient synthetic method for synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles capped by amino acid under mild reaction conditions with excellent reproducibility.

  19. The Ecohydrological Interactions Between Mesquite and its Water Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. L.; Hultine, K.; Ferré, P.

    2003-12-01

    Velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina), a native woody plant to southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, has successfully expanded its range and encroached into both upland and riparian grasslands during the 20th century. In this study, we examined the interactions between mesquite and its water sources in order to determine how the trees responded to moisture availability. This study took place in a riparian area and because the trees had access to both deep groundwater and surface water, these interactions resulted in important hydrological and ecological consequences. Surprisingly, we found that the mesquite responded to and even manipulated both surface and deep soil moisture even though they apparently had access to a stable groundwater source throughout the growing season. During dry season nights, observations of root sap flow showed that the trees moved moisture upwards in the taproot and out into the surface soils in lateral roots. As a consequence of this "hydraulic lift", diurnal soil respiration measurements showed that the soil microbes were stimulated following the nocturnal release of moisture into the near-surface regions. During rainy season nights, there was sap flow movement toward the tree in the surface lateral roots and downwards in the taproot indicating "hydraulic descent". Borehole GPR measurements of the deeper, 2 - 10 m, vadose zone moisture content increased apparently as a result of this tree-facilitated water movement. Also, hydraulic descent influenced water table elevations indicating direct groundwater recharge via plant pathways.

  20. Interaction between bubble and air-backed plate with circular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Wang, S. P.; Zhang, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear interaction between a violent bubble and an air-backed plate with a circular hole. A numerical model is established using the incompressible potential theory coupled with the boundary integral method. A double-node technique is used to solve the overdetermined problem caused by the intersection between the solid wall and the free surface. A spark-generated bubble near the air-backed plate with a circular hole is observed experimentally using a high-speed camera. Our numerical results agree well with the experimental results. Both experimental and numerical results show that a multilevel spike emerges during the bubble's expansion and contraction. Careful numerical simulation reveals that this special type of spike is caused by the discontinuity in the boundary condition. The influences of the hole size and depth on the bubble and spike dynamics are also analyzed.

  1. Hydrology and hydraulics: Water, noise and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. A.

    The 12 papers deal with the following areas: prediction of channel bed grade changes at highway stream crossing; stream channel grade changes and their effects on highway crossing; assessment of commonly used methods of estimating flood frequency; magnitude and frequency of urban floods in the United States; comparison of prediction methods for soil erosion from highway construction sites; drainage control through vegetation and soil management; effects of dredged highway construction on water quality in a Louisiana wetland.

  2. Assessment of internal contamination problems associated with bioregenerative air/water purification systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Anne H.; Bounds, B. Keith; Gardner, Warren

    1990-01-01

    The emphasis is to characterize the mechanisms of bioregenerative revitalization of air and water as well as to assess the possible risks associated with such a system in a closed environment. Marsh and aquatic plants are utilized for purposes of wastewater treatment as well as possible desalinization and demineralization. Foliage plants are also being screened for their ability to remove toxic organics from ambient air. Preliminary test results indicate that treated wastewater is typically of potable quality with numbers of pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella significantly reduced by the artificial marsh system. Microbiological analyses of ambient air indicate the presence of bacilli as well as thermophilic actinomycetes.

  3. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature

  4. The study of droplet-laden turbulent air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg A.; Troitskaya, Yuliya I.; Zilitinkevich, Sergej S.

    2016-04-01

    The detailed knowledge of the interaction of wind with surface water waves is necessary for correct parameterization of turbulent exchange at the air-sea interface in prognostic models. At sufficiently strong winds, sea-spray-generated droplets interfere with the wind-waves interaction. The results of field experiments and laboratory measurements (Andreas et al., JGR 2010) show that mass fraction of air-borne spume water droplets increases with the wind speed and their impact on the carrier air-flow may become significant. Phenomenological models of droplet-laden marine atmospheric boundary layer (Kudryavtsev & Makin, Bound.-Layer Met. 2011) predict that droplets significantly increase the wind velocity and suppress the turbulent air stress. The results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent particle-laden Couette flow over a flat surface show that inertial particles may significantly reduce the carrier flow vertical momentum flux (Richter & Sullivan, GRL 2013). The results also show that in the range of droplet sizes typically found near the air-sea interface, particle inertial effects are significant and dominate any particle-induced stratification effects. However, so far there has been no attempt to perform DNS of a droplet-laden air-flow over waved water surface. In this report, we present results of DNS of droplet-laden, turbulent Couette air-flow over waved water surface. The carrier, turbulent Couette-flow configuration in DNS is similar to that used in previous numerical studies (Sullivan et al., JFM 2000, Shen et al., JFM 2010, Druzhinin et al., JGR 2012). Discrete droplets are considered as non-deformable solid spheres and tracked in a Lagrangian framework, and their impact on the carrier flow is modeled with the use of a point-force approximation. The droplets parameters in DNS are matched to the typical known spume-droplets parameters in laboratory and field experiments. The DNS results show that both gravitational settling of droplets and

  5. Regional Analysis of Energy, Water, Land and Climate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Averyt, K.; Harriss, R. C.; Hibbard, K. A.; Newmark, R. L.; Rose, S. K.; Shevliakova, E.; Wilson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Energy, water, and land systems interact in many ways and are impacted by management and climate change. These systems and their interactions often differ in significant ways from region-to-region. To explore the coupled energy-water-land system and its relation to climate change and management a simple conceptual model of demand, endowment and technology (DET) is proposed. A consistent and comparable analysis framework is needed as climate change and resource management practices have the potential to impact each DET element, resource, and region differently. These linkages are further complicated by policy and trade agreements where endowments of one region are used to meet demands in another. This paper reviews the unique DET characteristics of land, energy and water resources across the United States. Analyses are conducted according to the eight geographic regions defined in the 2014 National Climate Assessment. Evident from the analyses are regional differences in resources endowments in land (strong East-West gradient in forest, cropland and desert), water (similar East-West gradient), and energy. Demands likewise vary regionally reflecting differences in population density and endowment (e.g., higher water use in West reflecting insufficient precipitation to support dryland farming). The effect of technology and policy are particularly evident in differences in the energy portfolios across the eight regions. Integrated analyses that account for the various spatial and temporal differences in regional energy, water and land systems are critical to informing effective policy requirements for future energy, climate and resource management. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Local and regional interactions between air quality and climate in New Delhi- A sector based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrapu, Pallavi

    Deteriorating air quality is one of the major problems faced worldwide and in particular in Asia. The world's most polluted megacities are located in Asia highlighting the urgent need for efforts to improve the air quality. New Delhi (India), one of the world's most polluted cities, was the host of the Common Wealth Games during the period of 4-14 October 2010. This high profile event provided a good opportunity to accelerate efforts to improve air quality. Computational advances now allow air quality forecast models to fully couple the meteorology with chemical constituents within a unified modeling system that allows two-way interactions. The WRF-Chem model is used to simulate air quality in New Delhi. The thesis focuses on evaluating air quality and meteorology feedbacks. Four nested domains ranging from South Asia, Northern India, NCR Delhi and Delhi city at 45km, 15km, 5km and 1.67km resolution for a period of 20 day (26th Sep--15th Oct, 2010) are used in the study. The predicted mean surface concentrations of various pollutants show similar spatial distributions with peak values in the middle of the domain reflecting the traffic and population patterns in the city. Along with these activities, construction dust and industrial emissions contribute to high levels of criteria pollutants. The study evaluates the WRF-Chem capabilities using a new emission inventory developed over Delhi at a fine resolution of 1.67km and evaluating the results with observational data from 11 monitoring sties placed at various Game venues. The contribution of emission sectors including transportation, power, industry, and domestic to pollutant concentrations at targeted regions are studied and the results show that transportation and domestic sector are the major contributors to the pollution levels in Delhi, followed by industry. Apart from these sectors, emissions outside of Delhi contribute 20-50% to surface concentrations depending on the species. This indicates that pollution

  7. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  8. Microorganism levels in air near spray irrigation of municipal waste water: The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study

    SciTech Connect

    Camann, D.E.; Moore, B.E.; Harding, H.J.; Sorber, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Lubbock Infection Surveillance Study (LISS) investigated possible adverse effects on human health from slow-rate land application of municipal wastewater. Extensive air sampling was conducted to characterize the irrigation site as a source of infectious microbial aerosols. Spray irrigation of poor-quality waste water received directly from the treatment plant significantly elevated air densities of fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, mycobacteria, and coliphage above ambient background levels for at least 200 m downwind. Enteroviruses were repeatedly recovered at 44 to 60 m downwind at a higher level (geometric mean = 0.05 pfu/m3) than observed at other waste water aerosol sites in the U.S. and in Israel. Waste water storage in reservoirs reduced downwind air densities of indicator organisms by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Leaf photosynthetic and water-relations responses for 'Valencia' orange trees exposed to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Poe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf responses were measured to test a hypothesis that reduced photosynthetic capacity and/or altered water relations were associated with reductions in yield for 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.), Osbeck) exposed to ambient oxidant air pollution. Exposures were continuous for 4 years to three levels of oxidants (in charcoal-filtered, half-filtered, and non-filtered air). Oxidants had no effect on net leaf photosynthetic rates or on photosynthetic pigment concentrations. A single set of measurements indicated that oxidants increased leaf starch concentrations (24%) prior to flowering, suggesting a change in photosynthate allocation. Leaves exposed to oxidants had small, but consistent, changes in water relations over the summer growing season, compared to trees growing in filtered air. Other changes included decreased stomatal conductance (12%) and transpiration (9%) rates, and increased water pressure potentials (5%). While all responses were subtle, their cumulative impact over 4 years indicated that 'Valencia' orange trees were subject to increased ambient oxidant stress.

  10. Multi-scale Cryptosporidium/sand interactions in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tufenkji, Nathalie; Dixon, David R; Considine, Robert; Drummond, Calum J

    2006-10-01

    Owing to its widespread occurrence in drinking water supplies and its significant resistance to environmental stresses, Cryptosporidium parvum is regarded as one of the most important waterborne microbial parasites. Accordingly, a substantial research effort has been aimed at elucidating the physical, chemical and biological factors controlling the transport and removal of Cryptosporidium oocysts in natural subsurface environments and drinking water treatment facilities. In this review, a multi-scale approach is taken to discuss the current state-of-knowledge on Cryptosporidium-sand interactions at a nano-scale, bench-scale and field-scale relevant to water treatment operations. Studies conducted at the nano-scale and bench-scale illustrate how techniques based on the principles of colloid and surface chemistry are providing new insights about oocyst-sand interactions during transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts in granular porous media. Specifically, atomic force microscopy and impinging jet experiments reveal the importance of oocyst surface biomolecules in controlling Cryptosporidium/sand interactions by a mechanism of steric hindrance. Traditional bench-scale column transport studies conducted over a broad range of experimental conditions highlight the role of physicochemical filtration and physical straining in the removal of oocysts from the pore fluid. Such experiments have also been used to evaluate the influence of biofilms formed on grain surfaces and the presence of natural organic matter on oocyst-sand interactions. Whilst filtration studies conducted at the plant-scale have been useful for evaluating the effectiveness of various materials as surrogates for Cryptosporidium oocysts, at this macro-scale, little could be learnt about the fundamental mechanisms controlling oocyst-sand interactions. This review of the literature on Cryptosporidium-sand interactions at different length scales points to the importance of combining studies at the plant

  11. Ground-water conditions at Beale Air Force Base and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-water conditions were studied in a 168-square-mile area between the Sierra Nevada and the Feather River in Yuba County, Calif. The area is in the eastern part of the Sacramento Valley and includes most of Beale Air Force Base. Source, occurrence, movement, and chemical quality of the ground water were evaluated. Ground water occurs in sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The base of the freshwater is in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Oligocene and Eocene age, that contain water of high dissolved-solids concentration. The ground water occurs under unconfined and partly confined conditions. At Beale Air Force Base it is at times partly confined. Recharge is principally from the rivers. Pumpage in the study area was estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet in 1975. In the 1960's, water levels in most parts of the study area declined less rapidly than in earlier years or became fairly stable. In the 1970's, water levels at Beale Air Force Base declined only slightly. Spacing of wells on the base and rates of pumping are such that excessive pumping interference is avoided. Water quality at the base and throughout the study area is generally good. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 700 to 900 milligrams per liter in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks beneath the base well field. (USGS)

  12. Demonstration of adaptive optics for mitigating laser propagation through a random air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new concept of mitigating signal distortions caused by random air-water interface using an adaptive optics (AO) system. This is the first time the concept of using an AO for mitigating the effects of distortions caused mainly by a random air-water interface is presented. We have demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the distortions using AO in a laboratory water tank for investigating the propagation effects of a laser beam through an airwater interface. The AO system consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor for mitigating surface water distortions has a unique way of stabilizing and aiming a laser onto an object underneath the water. Essentially the AO system mathematically takes the complex conjugate of the random phase caused by air-water interface allowing the laser beam to penetrate through the water by cancelling with the complex conjugates. The results show the improvement of a number of metrics including Strehl ratio, a measure of the quality of optical image formation for diffraction limited optical system. These are the first results demonstrating the feasibility of developing a new sensor system such as Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) utilizing AO for mitigating surface water distortions.

  13. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery...

  14. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery...

  15. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery...

  16. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery...

  17. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery...

  18. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  19. Experimental verification of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    Calvo, David C; Nicholas, Michael; Orris, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of enhanced sound transmission from water to air at low frequencies are presented. The pressure at a monitoring hydrophone is found to decrease for shallow source depths in agreement with the classical theory of a monopole source in proximity to a pressure release interface. On the other hand, for source depths below 1/10 of an acoustic wavelength in water, the radiation pattern in the air measured by two microphones becomes progressively omnidirectional in contrast to the classical geometrical acoustics picture in which sound is contained within a cone of 13.4° half angle. The measured directivities agree with wavenumber integration results for a point source over a range of frequencies and source depths. The wider radiation pattern owes itself to the conversion of evanescent waves in the water into propagating waves in the air that fill the angular space outside the cone. A ratio of pressure measurements made using an on-axis microphone and a near-axis hydrophone are also reported and compared with theory. Collectively, these pressure measurements are consistent with the theory of anomalous transparency of the water-air interface in which a large fraction of acoustic power emitted by a shallow source is radiated into the air.

  20. Universal scaling of potential energy functions describing intermolecular interactions. II. The halide-water and alkali metal-water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Akase, Dai; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-08-14

    The scaled versions of the newly introduced [S. S. Xantheas and J. C. Werhahn, J. Chem. Phys.141, 064117 (2014)] generalized forms of some popular potential energy functions (PEFs) describing intermolecular interactions – Mie, Lennard-Jones, Morse, and Buckingham exponential-6 – have been used to fit the ab initio relaxed approach paths and fixed approach paths for the halide-water, X-(H2O), X = F, Cl, Br, I, and alkali metal-water, M+(H2O), M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, interactions. The generalized forms of those PEFs have an additional parameter with respect to the original forms and produce fits to the ab initio data that are between one and two orders of magnitude better in the χ2 than the original PEFs. They were found to describe both the long-range, minimum and repulsive wall of the respective potential energy surfaces quite accurately. Overall the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) and generalized Buckingham exponential-6 (gBe-6) potentials were found to best fit the ab initio data for these two classes of ion-water interactions. Finally, the fitted values of the parameter of the (eM) and (gBe-6) PEFs that control the repulsive wall of the potential correlate remarkably well with the ionic radii of the halide and alkali metal ions.

  1. Spacecraft environmental interactions: A joint Air Force and NASA research and technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, C. P.; Purvis, C. K.; Hudson, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A joint Air Force/NASA comprehensive research and technology program on spacecraft environmental interactions to develop technology to control interactions between large spacecraft systems and the charged-particle environment of space is described. This technology will support NASA/Department of Defense operations of the shuttle/IUS, shuttle/Centaur, and the force application and surveillance and detection missions, planning for transatmospheric vehicles and the NASA space station, and the AFSC military space system technology model. The program consists of combined contractual and in-house efforts aimed at understanding spacecraft environmental interaction phenomena and relating results of ground-based tests to space conditions. A concerted effort is being made to identify project-related environmental interactions of concern. The basic properties of materials are being investigated to develop or modify the materials as needed. A group simulation investigation is evaluating basic plasma interaction phenomena to provide inputs to the analytical modeling investigation. Systems performance is being evaluated by both groundbased tests and analysis.

  2. Impacts of Ozone-vegetation Interactions and Biogeochemical Feedbacks on Atmospheric Composition and Air Quality Under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeke, M.; Tai, A. P. K.; Lombardozzi, D.; Val Martin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ozone pollution is one of the major environmental concerns due to its damaging effects on human and vegetation. One of the largest uncertainties of future surface ozone prediction comes from its interaction with vegetation under a changing climate. Ozone can be modulated by vegetation through, e.g., biogenic emissions, dry deposition and transpiration. These processes are in turn affected by chronic exposure to ozone via lowered photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance. Both ozone and vegetation growth are expected to be altered by climate change. To better understand these climate-ozone-vegetation interactions and possible feedbacks on ozone itself via vegetation, we implement an online ozone-vegetation scheme [Lombardozzi et al., 2015] into the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with active atmospheric chemistry, climate and land surface components. Previous overestimation of surface ozone in eastern US, Canada and Europe is shown to be reduced by >8 ppb, reflecting improved model-observation comparison. Simulated surface ozone is lower by 3.7 ppb on average globally. Such reductions (and improvements) in simulated ozone are caused mainly by lower isoprene emission arising from reduced leaf area index in response to chronic ozone exposure. Effects via transpiration are also potentially significant but require better characterization. Such findings suggest that ozone-vegetation interaction may substantially alter future ozone simulations, especially under changing climate and ambient CO2 levels, which would further modulate ozone-vegetation interactions. Inclusion of such interactions in Earth system models is thus necessary to give more realistic estimation and prediction of surface ozone. This is crucial for better policy formulation regarding air quality, land use and climate change mitigation. Reference list: Lombardozzi, D., et al. "The Influence of Chronic Ozone Exposure on Global Carbon and Water Cycles." Journal of Climate 28.1 (2015): 292-305.

  3. Using aliphatic alcohols as gaseous tracers in determination of water contents and air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Menghau; Chen, Bi-Hsiang

    2011-11-01

    A new type of gaseous tracer utilizing nontoxic aliphatic alcohols for the determination of water content and air-water interfacial area is tested on unsaturated sands of low water content. Alcohol vapors are generated at room temperature and passed through the experimental sand column. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of these vapors are obtained by monitoring their effluent concentrations using GC-FID. The retardation factor with respect to each vapor transport process is obtained by optimizing BTCs data using the CXTFIT program in the reverse problem mode. The water content and the interfacial area are subsequently calculated from their retardation factors by both equilibrium and nonequilibrium transport models. Experimental results indicate that the pentanol tracer is feasible in the determination of water content at conditions when the degree of water saturation is low. In the determination of air-water interfacial area, decanol is selected due to its interfacial adsorption characteristics. By comparing to interfacial areas from theoretical predictions as well as other conventional tarcer methods, the ones determined from the decanol tracer tests are found to be close to the true interfacial areas when the water content is low.

  4. Air- and water-stable gold-coated gadolinium metal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chao; Wagner, Michael J

    2013-06-12

    Gold-coated gadolinium nanocrystals, with an average diameter of 3.20 ± 0.35 nm, have been synthesized at ambient temperature by alkalide reduction. Whereas uncoated gadolinium nanoparticles react violently with air and water, the gold-coated gadolinium nanocrystals reported here show no reaction even upon long-term exposure. This is the first example of air- and water-stable lanthanide metal nanocrystals, which may allow for the development of magnetic and biomedical applications of gadolinium and other lanthanide metal and alloy nanocrystals.

  5. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  6. DNS of scalar transfer across an air-water interface during inception and growth of Langmuir circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Amine; Tejada-Martinez, Andres; Veron, Fabrice; Ma, Yi; USF/UDEL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Upon a blowing of a wind over an initially quiescent air-sea interface, first short capillary waves are generated which in time coexist with longer waves as part of a broad spectrum of waves. The interaction between the Stokes drift velocity induced by surface gravity waves and the mean current induced by surface wind stress leads to Langmuir turbulence (LT) characterized by Langmuir circulation (LC) consisting of parallel downwind-elongated, counter rotating vortices roughly aligned in the direction of the wind. The typical length scale of LC ranges from several centimeters when short capillary waves first appear up to tens of meters when the spectrum of waves broadens. Results are presented from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s. Cases with a freely deforming interface (characterized by gravity-capillary waves giving rise to small-scale LC) and with the interface intentionally held fixed (i.e. without LC) will be compared to understand the mechanisms by which the LT enhances scalar transfer from the airside to the waterside and bulk concentration throughout the water column. Time-permitting, we will compare our results with available laboratory physical experiments.

  7. Groundwater- Surface Water Interaction at the Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Roland; Banzhaf, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Today, both scientists and practitioners agree that management of water resources has to be performed in an integrated way. At the same time there is an increasing need for research at the regional scale (here 103 to 106 km2), because (i) this is the scale where interaction between environmental and human systems is fully developed through various links between supply and consumption, sources and sinks, etc. and (ii) the regional scale links global change to local impacts and action. The regional scale is the scale of management - to acknowledge this might be an important first step in finding the appropriate ways to address it. In any case, it is of utmost importance, that groundwater-surface water (GW-SW) interaction - as a central process of the hydrological cycle - is considered on the regional scale too. The starting point for the present contribution is two regional integrated models developed by the first author and the problems encountered in the attempt to implement adequately the GW-SW interaction therein. To evaluate if solutions to these problems were available from other studies, the available knowledge and tools were reviewed to extract common findings and guidance on how to analyse, describe and finally model GW-SW on the regional scale. Here we compare the characteristics of GW-SW interaction at different scales, the particularities of the regional scale, the available knowledge on how to regionalize and/or upscale processes, properties and parameters from smaller to larger scales and the model concepts available to describe GW-SW interaction at the regional scale. The overall conclusions are somewhat disillusioning: A large variety of research efforts has addressed the underlying problem setting and a plethora of tools were developed, yet GW-SW interaction at the regional scale is rarely explicitly addressed in a systematic way. It is evident that regional scale hydrological research on coupled surface-subsurface systems has to deal with high

  8. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  9. Interaction and permeability of water with liquid crystalline thermoset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianxun

    The complex transport behavior of water in both liquid crystalline thermoset and non-liquid crystalline thermoset systems were investigated. The liquid crystalline thermoset was 4,4'-diglycidyloxy-alpha-methylstilbene with sulfanilamine (SAA) as the crosslinking agent, the non-liquid crystalline thermoset the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A. The liquid crystalline thermosets have higher barrier properties than isotropic non-LC epoxy resins. The efficient chain packing of the smectic mesophase of the liquid crystalline thermosets is attributed as the main factor for this difference. Permeation testing results show that the diffusion coefficient, permeability, and solubility coefficient depend on the amine/epoxide functional ratio. FTIR results confirmed that hydrophilic groups in the crosslinked network are one of the major factors that control the sorption and diffusion of water in epoxy resins. Two possible water-epoxy hydrogen bond configurations are identified, namely hydrogen bond formation of water to amine groups and hydrogen bond formation of water molecules to hydroxyl groups. Thus, diffusion of water molecules into epoxy resins depends on two major factors, namely, the availability of appropriate microvoids in the cured network and the interaction between the water molecules and the epoxy resin matrix. Depression of glass transition temperature was revealed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. The intrinsic moisture sensitivity of the epoxy resins is traceable directly to the molecular structure of the network. The presence of polar groups provides the chemical basis for moisture sensitivity. The entropy model can satisfactorily describe the nature of the depression of glass transition temperature. The hypothesis of a heterogeneous network was confirmed by phase images of atomic force microscopy for all of the epoxy samples. High crosslinked domains are surrounded by low crosslinked regions. Quantitative analysis of phase images shows that the relative

  10. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE PAGES

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representationmore » of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  11. Air - water temperature relationships in the trout streams of southeastern Minnesota’s carbonate - sandstone landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krider, Lori A.; Magner, Joseph A.; Perry, Jim; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate-sandstone geology in southeastern Minnesota creates a heterogeneous landscape of springs, seeps, and sinkholes that supply groundwater into streams. Air temperatures are effective predictors of water temperature in surface-water dominated streams. However, no published work investigates the relationship between air and water temperatures in groundwater-fed streams (GWFS) across watersheds. We used simple linear regressions to examine weekly air-water temperature relationships for 40 GWFS in southeastern Minnesota. A 40-stream, composite linear regression model has a slope of 0.38, an intercept of 6.63, and R2 of 0.83. The regression models for GWFS have lower slopes and higher intercepts in comparison to surface-water dominated streams. Regression models for streams with high R2 values offer promise for use as predictive tools for future climate conditions. Climate change is expected to alter the thermal regime of groundwater-fed systems, but will do so at a slower rate than surface-water dominated systems. A regression model of intercept vs. slope can be used to identify streams for which water temperatures are more meteorologically than groundwater controlled, and thus more vulnerable to climate change. Such relationships can be used to guide restoration vs. management strategies to protect trout streams.

  12. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Minton, John M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time environmental monitoring on ISS is necessary to provide data in a timely fashion and to help ensure astronaut health. Current real-time water TOC monitoring provides high-quality trending information, but compound-specific data is needed. The combination of ETV with the AQM showed that compounds of interest could be liberated from water and analyzed in the same manner as air sampling. Calibration of the AQM using water samples allowed for the quantitative analysis of ISS archival samples. Some calibration issues remain, but the excellent accuracy of DMSD indicates that ETV holds promise for as a sample introduction method for water analysis in spaceflight.

  13. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  14. Langmuir nanoarchitectonics: one-touch fabrication of regularly sized nanodisks at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taizo; Sakakibara, Keita; Endo, Hiroshi; Akada, Misaho; Okamoto, Ken; Shundo, Atsuomi; Lee, Michael V; Ji, Qingmin; Fujisawa, Takuya; Oka, Kenichiro; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2013-06-18

    In this article, we propose a novel methodology for the formation of monodisperse regularly sized disks of several nanometer thickness and with diameters of less than 100 nm using Langmuir monolayers as fabrication media. An amphiphilic triimide, tri-n-dodecylmellitic triimide (1), was spread as a monolayer at the air-water interface with a water-soluble macrocyclic oligoamine, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen), in the subphase. The imide moieties of 1 act as hydrogen bond acceptors and can interact weakly with the secondary amine moieties of cyclen as hydrogen bond donors. The monolayer behavior of 1 was investigated through π-A isotherm measurements and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The presence of cyclen in the subphase significantly shifted isotherms and induced the formation of starfish-like microstructures. Transferred monolayers on solid supports were analyzed by reflection absorption FT-IR (FT-IR-RAS) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Langmuir monolayer transferred onto freshly cleaved mica by a surface touching (i.e., Langmuir-Schaefer) method contained disk-shaped objects with a defined height of ca. 3 nm and tunable diameter in the tens of nanometers range. Several structural parameters such as the disk height, molecular aggregation numbers in disk units, and 2D disk density per unit surface area are further discussed on the basis of AFM observations together with aggregate structure estimation and thermodynamic calculations. It should be emphasized that these well-defined structures are produced through simple routine procedures such as solution spreading, mechanical compression, and touching a substrate at the surface. The controlled formation of defined nanostructures through easy macroscopic processes should lead to unique approaches for economical, energy-efficient nanofabrication.

  15. Local and Regional Interactions Between Air Quality and Climate in New Delhi -- a Sector Based Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrapu, P.; Cheng, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Beig, G.; Spak, S.; Lin, M.; Decker, M.; Schultz, M. G.; Winiwarter, W.

    2011-12-01

    Out of the 26 mega-cities in the world, 13 of them are affected by atmospheric brown clouds with high aerosol loadings and 5 of them are in South Asia. New Delhi (India) is one of the world's most polluted megacities. In this study we evaluate the air pollution levels in Delhi and their impacts on weather and climate. The two way interactions between pollution and meteorology are evaluated using the WRF-Chem model. The analysis period is focused on October 2010, the time period of the Commonwealth Games. The model is compared to BC and PM2.5 measurements at 11 sites. A sector based analysis is performed to assess the contributions to pollution and direct radiative forcing from transport, residential, power and industrial emissions. The contributions from emissions outside of Delhi are also evaluated to see the extent that regional emissions need to be controlled to meet air quality targets in Delhi. Results of simulations for emission scenarios generated by the GAINS model that address air quality and climate strategies are also discussed

  16. Laboratory modeling of air-sea interaction under severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Vasiliy, Kazakov; Nicolay, Bogatov; Olga, Ermakova; Mikhail, Salin; Daniil, Sergeev; Maxim, Vdovin

    2010-05-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested by Emanuel (1995) on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field (Powell, Vickery, Reinhold, 2003, French et al, 2007, Black, et al, 2007) and laboratory (Donelan et al, 2004) experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed by Kudryavtsev & Makin (2007) and Kukulka,Hara Belcher (2007), the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange (Andreas, 2004; Makin, 2005; Kudryavtsev, 2006). The main objective of this work is investigation of factors determining momentum exchange under high wind speeds basing on the laboratory experiment in a well controlled environment. The experiments were carried out in the Thermo-Stratified WInd-WAve Tank (TSWIWAT) of the Institute of Applied Physics. The parameters of the facility are as follows: airflow 0 - 25 m/s (equivalent 10-m neutral wind speed U10 up to 60 m/s), dimensions 10m x 0.4m x 0.7 m, temperature stratification of the water layer. Simultaneous measurements of the airflow velocity profiles and wind waves were carried out in the wide range of wind velocities. Airflow

  17. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces. PMID:27339861

  18. Virial Approximation of the TEOS-10 Equation for the Fugacity of Water in Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, Rainer; Lovell-Smith, Jeremy W.; Hellmuth, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Fugacity is considered the proper real-gas substitute for the partial pressure commonly used to describe ideal-gas mixtures. However, in several fields such as geophysics, meteorology, or air conditioning, partial pressure is still preferred over fugacity when non-equilibrium conditions of humid air are quantified. One reason may be that for ambient air, the deviations from ideal-gas behavior are small, another that explicit correlation equations for the fugacity of water vapor in humid air are scarce in the literature. This situation has improved with the publication of the new oceanographic standard TEOS-10, the International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010, which provides highly accurate values for the chemical potential and the fugacity of water vapor in humid air over wide ranges of pressure and temperature. This paper describes the way fugacity is obtained from the fundamental equations of TEOS-10, and it derives computationally more convenient virial approximations for the fugacity, consistent with TEOS-10. Analytically extracted from the TEOS-10 equation of state of humid air, equations for the 2nd and 3rd virial coefficients are reported and compared with correlations available from the literature. The virial fugacity equation is valid in the temperature range between and +200 at pressures up to 5 MPa, and between and +1000 at low pressures such as those encountered in the terrestrial atmosphere at higher altitudes.

  19. Large Field of View PIV Measurements of Air Entrainment by SLS SMAT Water Sound Suppression System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Matthew; Pothos, Stamatios; Bissell, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Water-based sound suppressions systems have been used to reduce the acoustic impact of space vehicle launches. Water flows at a high rate during launch in order to suppress Engine Generated Acoustics and other potentially damaging sources of noise. For the Space Shuttle, peak flow rates exceeded 900,000 gallons per minute. Such large water flow rates have the potential to induce substantial entrainment of the surrounding air, affecting the launch conditions and generating airflow around the launch vehicle. Validation testing is necessary to quantify this impact for future space launch systems. In this study, PIV measurements were performed to map the flow field above the SMAT sub-scale launch vehicle scaled launch stand. Air entrainment effects generated by a water-based sound suppression system were studied. Mean and fluctuating fluid velocities were mapped up to 1m above the test stand deck and compared to simulation results. Measurements performed with NASA MSFC.

  20. Heat Transfer and Observation of Droplet-Surface Interactions During Air-Mist Cooling at CSP Secondary System Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta L., Mario E.; Mejía G., M. Esther; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2016-04-01

    Air-mists are key elements in the secondary cooling of modern thin steel slab continuous casters. The selection of water, W, and air, A, flow rates, and pressures in pneumatic nozzles open up a wide spectrum of cooling possibilities by their influence on droplet diameter, d, droplet velocity, v, and water impact flux, w. Nonetheless, due to the harsh environment resulting from the high temperatures and dense mists involved, there is very little information about the correlation between heat flux extracted, - q, and mist characteristics, and none about the dynamics of drop-wall interactions. For obtaining both kinds of information, this work combines a steady-state heat flux measuring method with a visualization technique based on a high-speed camera and a laser illumination system. For wall temperatures, T w, between ~723 K and ~1453 K (~450 °C and ~1180 °C), which correspond to film boiling regime, it was confirmed that - q increases with increase in v, w, and T w and with decrease in d. It should be noticed, however, that the increase in w generally decreases the spray cooling effectiveness because striking drops do not evaporate efficiently due to the interference by liquid remains from previous drops. Visualization of the events happening close to the surface also reveals that the contact time of the liquid with the surface is very brief and that rebounding, splashing, sliding, and levitation of drops lead to ineffective contact with the surface. At the center of the mist footprint, where drops impinge nearly normal to the surface those with enough momentum establish intimate contact with it before forming a vapor layer that pushes away the remaining liquid. Also, some drops are observed sliding upon the surface or levitating close to it; these are drops with low momentum which are influenced by the deflecting air stream. At footprint positions where oblique impingement occurs, frequently drops are spotted sliding or levitating and liquid films flowing in

  1. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  2. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed.

  3. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  4. Influence of entrapped air pockets on hydraulic transients in water pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen

    2011-01-01

    The pressure variations associated with a filling undulating pipeline containing an entrapped air pocket are investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of entrapped air on abnormal transient pressures is often ambiguous since the compressibility of the air pocket permits the liquid flow to accelerate but also partly cushions the system, with the balance of these tendencies being associated with the initial void fraction of the air pocket. Earlier experimental research involved systems with an initial void fraction greater than 5.8%; this paper focuses on initial void fractions ranging from 0% to 10%, in order to more completely characterize the transient response. Experimental results show that the maximum pressure increases and then decreases as the initial void fraction decreases. A simplified model is developed by neglecting the liquid inertia and energy loss of a short water column near the air-water interface. Comparisons of the calculated and observed results show the model is able to accurately predict peak pressures as a function of void fraction and filling conditions. Rigid water column models, however, perform poorly with small void fractions.

  5. Impacts of Air-Sea Interaction on Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Wang, Bin; Braun, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of hurricane-ocean coupling on intensity and track of tropical cyclones (TCs) is investigated through idealized numerical experiments using a coupled hurricane-ocean model. The focus is placed on how air-sea interaction affects TC tracks and intensity. It is found that the symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) cooling is primarily responsible for the TC weakening in the coupled experiments because the induced asymmetric circulation associated with the asymmetric SST anomalies is weak and shallow. The track difference between the coupled and fixed SST experiments is generally small because of the competing processes. One is associated with the modified TC asymmetries. The asymmetric SST anomalies - weaken the surface fluxes in the rear and enhance the fluxes in the front. As a result, the enhanced diabatic heating is located on the southern side for a westward-moving TC, tending to shift the TC southward. The symmetric SST anomalies weakens the TC intensity and thus the dymmetrization process, leading to more prominent TC asymmetries. The other is associated with the weakening of the beta drift resulting from the weakening of the TC outer strength. In the coupled experiment, the weakening of the beta drift leads to a more northward shift. By adjusting the vortex outer strength of the initial vortices, the beta drift can vary while the effect of air-sea interaction changes little. Two types of track differences simulated in the previous numerical studies are obtained.

  6. Geochemical characterization of surface water and spring water in SE Kashmir Valley, western Himalaya: Implications to water-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeelani, Gh; Bhat, Nadeem A.; Shivanna, K.; Bhat, M. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Water samples from precipitation, glacier melt, snow melt, glacial lake, streams and karst springs were collected across SE of Kashmir Valley, to understand the hydrogeochemical processes governing the evolution of the water in a natural and non-industrial area of western Himalayas. The time series data on solute chemistry suggest that the hydrochemical processes controlling the chemistry of spring waters is more complex than the surface water. This is attributed to more time available for infiltrating water to interact with the diverse host lithology. Total dissolved solids (TDS), in general, increases with decrease in altitude. However, high TDS of some streams at higher altitudes and low TDS of some springs at lower altitudes indicated contribution of high TDS waters from glacial lakes and low TDS waters from streams, respectively. The results show that some karst springs are recharged by surface water; Achabalnag by the Bringi stream and Andernag and Martandnag by the Liddar stream. Calcite dissolution, dedolomitization and silicate weathering were found to be the main processes controlling the chemistry of the spring waters and calcite dissolution as the dominant process in controlling the chemistry of the surface waters. The spring waters were undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite in most of the seasons except in November, which is attributed to the replenishment of the CO2 by recharging waters during most of the seasons.

  7. Air-sea interaction and formation of the Asian summer monsoon onset vortex over the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoxiong; Guan, Yue; Liu, Yimin; Yan, Jinghui; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-01-01

    In spring over the southern Bay of Bengal (BOB), a vortex commonly develops, followed by the Asian summer monsoon onset. An analysis of relevant data and a case study reveals that the BOB monsoon onset vortex is formed as a consequence of air-sea interaction over BOB, which is modulated by Tibetan Plateau forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast over the South Asian area during the spring season. Tibetan Plateau forcing in spring generates a prevailing cold northwesterly over India in the lower troposphere. Strong surface sensible heating is then released, forming a prominent surface cyclone with a strong southwesterly along the coastal ocean in northwestern BOB. This southwesterly induces a local offshore current and upwelling, resulting in cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The southwesterly, together with the near-equatorial westerly, also results in a surface anticyclone with descending air over most of BOB and a cyclone with ascending air over the southern part of BOB. In the eastern part of central BOB, where sky is clear, surface wind is weak, and ocean mixed layer is shallow, intense solar radiation and low energy loss due to weak surface latent and sensible heat fluxes act onto a thin ocean layer, resulting in the development of a unique BOB warm pool in spring. Near the surface, water vapor is transferred from northern BOB and other regions to southeastern BOB, where surface sensible heating is relatively high. The atmospheric available potential energy is generated and converted to kinetic energy, thereby resulting in vortex formation. The vortex then intensifies and moves northward, where SST is higher and surface sensible heating is stronger. Meanwhile, the zonal-mean kinetic energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy in the area east of the vortex, and the vortex turns eastward. Eventually, southwesterly sweeps over eastern BOB and merges with the subtropical westerly, leading to the onset of the Asian summer monsoon.

  8. Radon removal from flowing air by a water scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Denison, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    As part of a process that is being developed to vitrify tailings from Belgian Congo ore that is stored in large silos at a former U.S. Department of Energy uranium-processing facility in southwestern Ohio, process off-gas is produced that contains large concentrations of radon gas (on the order of hundreds of thousands of picocuries per litre). To meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency restrictions, the process off-gas must be stripped of its radon content before it is vented to the atmosphere. It is appropriate to consider a charcoal bed as part of an off-gas treatment system for the removal of radon at the vitrification facility. However, a difficulty arises in incorporating a charcoal bed into an off-gas treatment system at a vitrification facility. That difficulty is that the capability of the charcoal bed to capture and retain radon gas decreases with increasing bed temperature. Thus, it may be necessary to include a water scrubber in the off-gas treatment system to cool the process off-gas before it is passed through the charcoal bed.

  9. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  10. The interaction of wind and water in the desertification environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobberger, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    An appropriate process/response model for the physical basis of desertification is provided by the interactions of wind and water in the desert fringe environment. Essentially, the process of desertification can be thought of as a progressive environmental transition from predominantly fluvial to aeolian processes. This is a simple but useful way of looking at desertification; in this context, desertification is morphogenetic in character. To illustrate the model, a study of drought-related changes in central Mali will serve to trace the interrelated responses of geomorphologic processes to drought conditions.

  11. Interaction of ice binding proteins with ice, water and ions.

    PubMed

    Oude Vrielink, Anneloes S; Aloi, Antonio; Olijve, Luuk L C; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-03-01

    Ice binding proteins (IBPs) are produced by various cold-adapted organisms to protect their body tissues against freeze damage. First discovered in Antarctic fish living in shallow waters, IBPs were later found in insects, microorganisms, and plants. Despite great structural diversity, all IBPs adhere to growing ice crystals, which is essential for their extensive repertoire of biological functions. Some IBPs maintain liquid inclusions within ice or inhibit recrystallization of ice, while other types suppress freezing by blocking further ice growth. In contrast, ice nucleating proteins stimulate ice nucleation just below 0 °C. Despite huge commercial interest and major scientific breakthroughs, the precise working mechanism of IBPs has not yet been unraveled. In this review, the authors outline the state-of-the-art in experimental and theoretical IBP research and discuss future scientific challenges. The interaction of IBPs with ice, water and ions is examined, focusing in particular on ice growth inhibition mechanisms. PMID:26787386

  12. Interaction of ice binding proteins with ice, water and ions.

    PubMed

    Oude Vrielink, Anneloes S; Aloi, Antonio; Olijve, Luuk L C; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-03-19

    Ice binding proteins (IBPs) are produced by various cold-adapted organisms to protect their body tissues against freeze damage. First discovered in Antarctic fish living in shallow waters, IBPs were later found in insects, microorganisms, and plants. Despite great structural diversity, all IBPs adhere to growing ice crystals, which is essential for their extensive repertoire of biological functions. Some IBPs maintain liquid inclusions within ice or inhibit recrystallization of ice, while other types suppress freezing by blocking further ice growth. In contrast, ice nucleating proteins stimulate ice nucleation just below 0 °C. Despite huge commercial interest and major scientific breakthroughs, the precise working mechanism of IBPs has not yet been unraveled. In this review, the authors outline the state-of-the-art in experimental and theoretical IBP research and discuss future scientific challenges. The interaction of IBPs with ice, water and ions is examined, focusing in particular on ice growth inhibition mechanisms.

  13. Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mark K. Gee Zia Mirza

    2008-10-01

    PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to

  14. A climatology of air-sea interactions at the Mediterranean LION and AZUR buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniaux, Guy; Prieur, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Giordani, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The LION and AZUR buoys (respectively at 42.1°N 4.7°E and 43.4°N 7.8°E) provide an extended data set since respectively 1999 and 2001 to present for studying air-sea interactions in the northwestern Mediterranean basin. The two buoys are located where high wind events occur (resp. north western and north easterly gale winds), that force and condition deep oceanic winter convection in that region. A short-term climatology (resp. 13 and 11 years) of air-sea interactions has been developed, which includes classical meteo-oceanic parameters, but also waves period and significant wave heights and radiative fluxes. Moreover turbulent surface fluxes have been estimated from various bulk parameterizations, in order to estimate uncertainties on fluxes. An important dispersion of turbulent fluxes is found at high wind speeds according to the parameterization used, larger than taking into account the second order effects of cool skin, warm layer and waves. An important annual cycle affects air temperatures (ATs), SSTs and turbulent fluxes at the two buoys. The annual cycle of ATs and SSTs can be well reconstructed from the first two annual harmonics, while for the turbulent heat fluxes the erratic occurrence of high and low flux events, well correlated with high/dry and low windy periods, strongly affect their annual and interannual cycles. The frequency of high surface heat fluxes and high wind stress is found highest during the autumn and winter months, despite the fact that north-westerly gale winds occur all year long at LION buoy. During calm weather period, ATs and SSTs experience an important diurnal cycle (on average 1 and 0.5°C respectively), that affect latent and sensible heat fluxes. Finally, an estimate of the interannual variability of the turbulent fluxes in Autumn and Winter is discussed, in order to characterize their potential role on deep ocean convection.

  15. Variability of the horizontal gradients of the air and the water surface temperatures in the vernal frontal zone period of Lake Ladoga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, M. A.; Guzivaty, V. V.; Karetnikov, S. G.

    2012-11-01

    Every year, the during springtime heating conditions, the seasonal thermal frontal zone appears in Lake Ladoga. It features high horizontal water temperature gradients. The coastal waters, stably stratified in density, interact with the waters of the open lake that are unstably stratified because of the free convection developing in the temperature range between 0°C and the maximum density of the water at 4°C. In Lake Ladoga, the advance of the vernal frontal zone lasts about 7-8 weeks from mid-May to the beginning of July. Both the water temperature and air temperature distributions over the water's surface show that large spatial temperature ranges exist in the vernal front reaching more than 11°C. We investigated the spatial horizontal gradients of the water's surface and the air temperature using a spatial grid with a resolution of 5 km. The surface water temperature and the air temperature gradients were compared with each other as well as with the temperatures in the region of varying depths. During the spring peak of the frontal activity in Lake Ladoga, most of the fronts feature mean temperatures greater than 4°C. This indicates that the thermal bar marks the offshore edge of the most extensive frontal zone.

  16. OTEC Cold Water Pipe-Platform Subsystem Dynamic Interaction Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Varley, Robert; Halkyard, John; Johnson, Peter; Shi, Shan; Marinho, Thiago

    2014-05-09

    A commercial floating 100-megawatt (MW) ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plant will require a cold water pipe (CWP) with a diameter of 10-meter (m) and length of up to 1,000 m. The mass of the cold water pipe, including entrained water, can exceed the mass of the platform supporting it. The offshore industry uses software-modeling tools to develop platform and riser (pipe) designs to survive the offshore environment. These tools are typically validated by scale model tests in facilities able to replicate real at-sea meteorological and ocean (metocean) conditions to provide the understanding and confidence to proceed to final design and full-scale fabrication. However, today’s offshore platforms (similar to and usually larger than those needed for OTEC applications) incorporate risers (or pipes) with diameters well under one meter. Secondly, the preferred construction method for large diameter OTEC CWPs is the use of composite materials, primarily a form of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP). The use of these material results in relatively low pipe stiffness and large strains compared to steel construction. These factors suggest the need for further validation of offshore industry software tools. The purpose of this project was to validate the ability to model numerically the dynamic interaction between a large cold water-filled fiberglass pipe and a floating OTEC platform excited by metocean weather conditions using measurements from a scale model tested in an ocean basin test facility.

  17. Carbon monoxide and water vapor contamination of compressed breathing air for firefighters and divers.

    PubMed

    Austin, C C; Ecobichon, D J; Dussault, G; Tirado, C

    1997-12-12

    Compressed breathing air, used in self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) by firefighters and other categories of workers as well as by recreational and commercial divers, is prepared with the aid of high-pressure compressors operating in the range of 5000 psig. There have been reports of unexplained deaths of SCUBA divers and anecdotal accounts of decreased time to exhaustion in firefighters using SCBAs. Compressed breathing air has been found to contain elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor that are consistent with carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) poisoning and freezing of the user's regulator on the breathing apparatus. The Coburn-Forster-Kane equation (CFK equation) was used to estimate COHb levels at rest and at maximum exercise when exposed to different levels of CO in contaminated breathing air. The results demonstrated that, at maximum exercise, the COHb ranged from 6.0 to 17% with the use of 1 to 4 SCBA cylinders contaminated by 250 ppm CO. Standard operating procedures have been developed at the Montreal Fire Department to minimize the risk of compressed breathing air contamination. Results of the quality analysis/quality control program indicate that implementation of these procedures has improved the quality of the compressed breathing air. Recommendations are made for improvement of the air testing procedures mandated by the Canadian CAN3 180.1-M85 Standard on Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

  18. Turbulence at the Air-Water Interface in Lakes of Different Sizes: Consequences for Gas Transfer Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, S.; Crowe, A. T.; Amaral, J. H.; Arneborg, L.; Bastviken, D.; Forsberg, B. R.; Melack, J. M.; Tota, J.; Tedford, E. W.; Karlsson, J.; Podgrajsek, E.; Andersson, A.; Rutgersson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Similarity scaling predicts that wind induced shear will be the dominant source of turbulence near the air-water interface in lakes with low to moderate wind forcing. Turbulence is expected to be enhanced with wave activity; results are conflicting on the effects of heating and cooling. We measured turbulence with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and / or a temperature-gradient microstructure profiler and obtained correlative time series measurements of meteorology and water column temperature in a 800 m2 arctic pond, a 1 ha boreal lake, and a large tropical reservoir. Turbulence measurements with both instruments corroborated those calculated from similarity scaling in the boreal lake. Within the arctic pond, dissipation rates obtained with the ADV were in agreement with those from similarity scaling when winds exceeded ~1.5 m/s with a greater frequency of measurable dissipation rates when surface waves were present. Dissipation rates in the tropical reservoir reached and often exceeded 10-6 m2 s-3 in the upper meter under light winds and decreased by an order of magnitude with cooling or rainfall. Under cooling, dissipation rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in the uppermost 25 cm bin than in the water column below. Gas transfer coefficients calculated from concurrent measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes with floating chambers and the surface renewal model using the estimates of turbulence were in agreement. These results support the predictions of Monin-Obuhov similarity scaling in that shear dominates turbulence production near the air-water interface under heating and cooling, illustrate spatial variability in turbulence production in small water bodies due to the intermittency of wind interacting with the water's surface, are in agreement with prior oceanic observations that shear and associated turbulence can be intensified in shallow mixing layers under heating with light winds, and illustrate the utility of similarity scaling for

  19. Modelling aerosol-cloud-meteorology interaction: A case study with a fully coupled air quality model (GEM-MACH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Makar, P. A.; Zhang, J.; Milbrandt, J.; Gravel, S.; Hayden, K. L.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2015-08-01

    A fully coupled on-line air quality forecast model, GEM-MACH, was used to study aerosol-cloud interactions for a case of an urban-industrial plume impacting stratocumulus. The aerosol effect on the cloud microphysics was achieved by the use of parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation predicted from the on-line size- and composition-resolved aerosols and coupled with a double-moment cloud microphysics parameterization. The model simulations with and without the on-line aerosol effect on cloud microphysics were compared and evaluated against in-situ aerosol and cloud observations from ICARTT 2004. Inclusion of the on-line aerosol interaction with cloud resulted in an increase in modelled cloud amount and cloud liquid water content (LWC) due to increased cloud droplet number concentration (Nd), a decrease in cloud droplet size and a reduction in warm precipitation. The modelled LWC and Nd agreed more closely with the observations when the on-line aerosol was allowed to affect the cloud than when aerosol effects on cloud were not explicitly simulated. The increased cloud amount due to the aerosol effects reduced the modelled downward shortwave radiative flux and air temperature at the surface, contributing to a decrease in ozone over the region of enhanced cloud and an increase in particle sulphate from an increased capacity for aqueous-phase production. Aerosol activation is shown to have a significant influence on the cloud microphysics and cloud processing of trace gases and aerosols. The importance of reasonable parameterization of cloud updraft speed is demonstrated.

  20. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.