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Sample records for air water interface

  1. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  2. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  3. Entrapment of ciliates at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Ferracci, Jonathan; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    The importance of water-air interfaces (WAI) on microorganism activities has been recognized by many researchers. In this paper, we report a novel phenomenon: the entrapment of ciliates Tetrahymena at the WAI. We first characterized the behavior of cells at the interface and showed that the cells' swimming velocity was considerably reduced at the WAI. To verify the possible causes of the entrapment, we investigated the effects of positive chemotaxis for oxygen, negative geotaxis and surface properties. Even though the taxes were still effective, the entrapment phenomenon was not dependent on the physiological conditions, but was instead affected by the physical properties at the interface. This knowledge is useful for a better understanding of the physiology of microorganisms at interfaces in nature and in industry. PMID:24130692

  4. Nano- and microstructure of air/oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Mata, Jitendra P; White, John W; Zank, Johann

    2009-04-01

    We report the creation of air/oil/water interfaces with variable-thickness oil films using polyisobutylene-based (PIB) surfactants cospread with long-chain paraffinic alkanes on clean water surfaces. The resultant stable oil layers are readily measurable with simple surface techniques, exhibit physical densities the same as expected for bulk oils, and are up to approximately 100 A thick above the water surface as determined using X-ray reflectometry. This provides a ready system for studying the competition of surfactants at the oil/water interface. Results from the competition of a nonionic polyamide surfactant or an anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate with the PIB surfactant are reported. However, this smooth oil layer does not account for the total volume of spread oil nor is the increase in thickness proportional to the film compression. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) reveals surfactant and oil structures on the scale of 1 to 10 microm at the interface. At low surface pressure (pi < 24 mN m(-1)) large, approximately 10 microm inhomogeneities are observed. Beyond a phase transition observed at pi approximately = 24 mN m(-1), a structure with a spongy appearance and a microscale texture develops. These structures have implications for understanding the microstructure at the oil/water interface in emulsions. PMID:19714829

  5. Tangential stress beneath wind-driven air water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banner, Michael L.; Peirson, William L.

    1998-06-01

    The detailed structure of the aqueous surface sublayer flow immediately adjacent to the wind-driven air water interface is investigated in a laboratory wind-wave flume using particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. The goal is to investigate quantitatively the character of the flow in this crucial, very thin region which is often disrupted by microscale breaking events. In this study, we also examine critically the conclusions of Okuda, Kawai & Toba (1977), who argued that for very short, strongly forced wind-wave conditions, shear stress is the dominant mechanism for transmitting the atmospheric wind stress into the water motion waves and surface drift currents. In strong contrast, other authors have more recently observed very substantial normal stress contributions on the air side. The availability of PIV and associated image technology now permits a timely re-examination of the results of Okuda et al., which have been influential in shaping present perceptions of the physics of this dynamically important region. The PIV technique used in the present study overcomes many of the inherent shortcomings of the hydrogen bubble measurements, and allows reliable determination of the fluid velocity and shear within 200 [mu]m of the instantaneous wind-driven air water interface.

  6. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  7. Surfactin at the Water/Air Interface and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Darré, Leonardo; Kohlmeyer, Axel; Thomas, Robert K; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Domene, Carmen

    2015-10-13

    The lipopeptide surfactin produced by certain strains of Bacillus subtillis is a potent biosurfactant with high amphiphilicity and a strong tendency for self-aggregation. Surfactin possesses a number of valuable biological properties such as antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and hemolytic activities. Owing to these properties, in addition to the general advantages of biosurfactants over synthetic surfactants, surfactin has potential biotechnological and biomedical applications. Here, the aggregation properties of surfactin in solution together with its behavior at the water/air interface were studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD) at three different pH values. Validation of the MD structural data was performed by comparing neutron reflectivity and volume fraction profiles computed from the simulations with their experimental counterparts. Analysis of the MD trajectories supported conclusions about the distribution, conformations, and interactions of surfactin in solution and at the water-air interface. Considering altogether, the work presented provides atomistic models for the rationalization of some of the structural and dynamic characteristics as well as the modes of action of surfactin at different pH values. PMID:26393968

  8. Microrheology Using Optical Tweezers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatwright, Thomas; Levine, Alex; Dennin, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Microrheological techniques have been used successfully to determine mechanical properties of materials important in cellular structure. Also critical to cellular mechanical functions are biological membranes. Many aspects of biological membranes can be modeled using Langmuir monolayers, which are single layers surfactants at the air-water interface. The macroscopic mechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers have been extensively characterized. In contrast to macroscopic measurements, we report on experimental methods for studying the rheological properties of Langmuir monolayers on the micron scale. A water immersion optical tweezers system is used to trap ˜1 micron diameter beads in a monolayer. The passive motion of the trapped beads is recorded at high frequency and the complex shear modulus is calculated. Preliminary microrheological data of a fatty acid monolayer showing dependence on surface pressure will be presented. Experimental obstacles will also be discussed.

  9. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface. PMID:18290440

  10. Bacterial Swimming at Air/Water and Oil/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    The microbes inhabiting the planet over billions of years have adapted to diverse physical environments of water, soil, and interfaces between water and either solid or air. Following recent studies on bacterial swimming and accumulation near solid surfaces, we turn our attention to the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at water/air and water/oil interfaces. The latter is motivated by relevance to microbial degradation of crude oil in light of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Our ongoing study suggests that Caulobacter swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at both water/air and water/oil interfaces, accumulating at the surface to a greater degree than boundary confinement properties like that of solid surfaces would predict. At the water/air interface, swimmers move in tight circles at half the speed of swimmers in the bulk fluid. At the water/oil interface, swimming circles are even tighter with further reduced swimming speed. We report experimental data and present preliminary analysis of the findings based on low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, the known surface tension, and surface viscosity at the interface. The analysis will help determine properties of the bacterium such as their surface charge and hydrophobicity.

  11. Microscopic dynamics of nanoparticle monolayers at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R; Basu, J K

    2013-04-15

    We present results of surface mechanical and particle tracking measurements of nanoparticles trapped at the air-water interface as a function of their areal density. We monitor both the surface pressure (Π) and isothermal compression modulus (ϵ) as well as the dynamics of nanoparticle clusters, using fluorescence confocal microscopy while they are compressed to very high density near the two dimensional close packing density Φ∼0.82. We observe non-monotonic variation in both ϵ and the dynamic heterogeneity, characterized by the dynamical susceptibility χ4 with Φ, in such high density monolayers. We provide insight into the underlying nature of such transitions in close packed high density nanoparticle monolayers in terms of the morphology and flexibility of these soft colloidal particles. We discuss the significance our results in the context of related studies on two dimensional granular or colloidal systems. PMID:23411354

  12. Methane flux across the air-water interface - Air velocity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Harriss, R. C.; Bartlett, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Methane loss to the atmosphere from flooded wetlands is influenced by the degree of supersaturation and wind stress at the water surface. Measurements in freshwater ponds in the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Florida, demonstrated that for the combined variability of CH4 concentrations in surface water and air velocity over the water surface, CH4 flux varied from 0.01 to 1.22 g/sq m/day. The liquid exchange coefficient for a two-layer model of the gas-liquid interface was calculated as 1.7 cm/h for CH4 at air velocity of zero and as 1.1 + 1.2 v to the 1.96th power cm/h for air velocities from 1.4 to 3.5 m/s and water temperatures of 20 C.

  13. Pulse laser ablation at water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro

    2010-06-01

    We studied a new pulse laser ablation phenomenon on a liquid surface layer, which is caused by the difference between the refractive indices of the two materials involved. The present study was motivated by our previous study, which showed that laser ablation can occur at the interface between a transparent material and a gas or liquid medium when the laser pulse is focused through the transparent material. In this case, the ablation threshold fluence is reduced remarkably. In the present study, experiments were conducted in water and air in order to confirm this phenomenon for a combination of two fluid media with different refractive indices. This phenomenon was observed in detail by pulse laser shadowgraphy. A high-resolution film was used to record the phenomenon with a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 10-ns duration as a light source. The laser ablation phenomenon on the liquid surface layer caused by a focused Nd:YAG laser pulse with 1064-nm wavelength was found to be followed by the splashing of the liquid surface, inducing a liquid jet with many ligaments. The liquid jet extension velocity was around 1000 m/s in a typical case. The liquid jet decelerated drastically due to rapid atomization at the tips of the ligaments. The liquid jet phenomenon was found to depend on the pulse laser parameters such as the laser fluence on the liquid surface, laser energy, and laser beam pattern. The threshold laser fluence for the generation of a liquid jet was 20 J/cm2. By increasing the incident laser energy with a fixed laser fluence, the laser focused area increased, which eventually led to an increase in the size of the plasma column. The larger the laser energy, the larger the jet size and the longer the temporal behavior. The laser beam pattern was found to have significant effects on the liquid jet’s velocity, shape, and history.

  14. Monolayers at air-water interfaces: from origins-of-life to nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Hill, Jonathan P

    2011-08-01

    The air-water interface presents several interesting features, namely a) a molecularly flat environment, b) a boundary region between two phases with different dielectric constants, c) permits or promotes dynamic interactions within the interface region, and d) a point of interaction between hydrophobic compounds and aqueous molecules. Accordingly, Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface have several unique characteristics and properties, which require investigation. In this review-type personal account, typical examples of molecular recognition and molecular patterning at air-water interfaces are first introduced, followed by descriptions of specific and unusual properties of monolayers on water. In addition, two examples of our own results concerning Langmuir monolayers are explained. We have selected examples from two apparently unrelated research areas, these being the origin of life and future nanotechnology, in order to emphasize the diverse scientific contribution of research on monolayers at the air-water interface. PMID:21739568

  15. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry. PMID:27509207

  16. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles. PMID:26551757

  17. Bromine and heavy halide chemistry at the air/water and air/ice interfaces: a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Shepson, P. B.; Szleifer, I.; Carignano, M.

    2010-12-01

    The air-water and air-ice interfaces are critically important surfaces, with respect to the physical and chemical properties of the Earth's atmosphere. In particular chloride, bromide and iodide ions are strongly involved in the reactions occurring at aerosol surfaces that are hydrated and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer. Unfortunately, experimental access to these interfaces are quite problematic and the computational approach, based on molecular dynamic simulations and quantum mechanic calculations, is an interesting alternative approach. In this work, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations are used to study the halide enhancements at the air-water interface in the case of a dilute mixture of iodide, bromide and chloride ions. The MD results show how the air- water halide enhancement is different in the case of mixtures from the case of binary solutions (i.e. anions plus counter-positive ions) and how the presence of these halides at the interfaces depends from their relative concentrations in solution. In detail, heavy halides are strongly enhanced at the interfaces even if they are minor constituents in the bulk. Furthermore the enhancement of the larger halide ions, like bromide, at the surface is greater if lighter halides, like chloride, are in greater excess in the bulk. The applications of this last result on some real system, like sea-water, and the importance of bromide ions in the polar chemistry of ozone depletion events suggest a combined approach, MD and quantum mechanism (QM) calculation, to investigate the ozonation reaction of bromide (Br-+O3 → BrO-+O2 ) in the ice-QLL and in bulk water. The study of the reaction constants suggests how the different environments can affect the kinetics of such reaction. These results can help to understand the complex chemistry occurring at the air-water interface of hydrated aerosol and at the air-ice interface in the polar boundary layer.

  18. Theoretical study of vibrational energy transfer of free OH groups at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Renhui; Wei, Wenmei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown that the vibrational dynamics of free OH groups at the water-air interface is significantly different from that in bulk water. In this work, by performing molecular dynamics simulations and mixed quantum/classical calculations, we investigate different vibrational energy transfer pathways of free OH groups at the water-air interface. The calculated intramolecular vibrational energy transfer rate constant and the free OH bond reorientation time scale agree well with the experiment. It is also found that, due to the small intermolecular vibrational couplings, the intermolecular vibrational energy transfer pathway that is very important in bulk water plays a much less significant role in the vibrational energy relaxation of the free OH groups at the water-air interface.

  19. Theoretical study of vibrational energy transfer of free OH groups at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Renhui; Wei, Wenmei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang

    2016-04-14

    Recent experimental studies have shown that the vibrational dynamics of free OH groups at the water-air interface is significantly different from that in bulk water. In this work, by performing molecular dynamics simulations and mixed quantum/classical calculations, we investigate different vibrational energy transfer pathways of free OH groups at the water-air interface. The calculated intramolecular vibrational energy transfer rate constant and the free OH bond reorientation time scale agree well with the experiment. It is also found that, due to the small intermolecular vibrational couplings, the intermolecular vibrational energy transfer pathway that is very important in bulk water plays a much less significant role in the vibrational energy relaxation of the free OH groups at the water-air interface. PMID:27083739

  20. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  1. The behavior of NaOH at the air-water interface, a computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2010-07-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations with a polarizable multi-state empirical valence bond model were carried out to investigate NaOH dissociation and pairing in water bulk and at the air-water interface. It was found that NaOH readily dissociates in the bulk, and the effect of the air-water interface on NaOH dissociation is fairly minor. Also, NaOH complexes were found to be strongly repelled from the air-water interface, which is consistent with surface tension measurements. At the same time, a very strong preference for the hydroxide anion to be oriented towards the air was found that persisted a few angstroms towards the liquid from the Gibbs dividing surface of the air-water interface. This was due to a preference for the hydroxide anion to have its hydrogen pointing towards the air, and the fact that the sodium ion was more likely to be found near the hydroxide oxygen than hydrogen. As a consequence, the simulation results show that surfaces of NaOH solutions should be negatively charged, in agreement with experimental observations, but also that the hydroxide has little surface affinity. This provides the possibility that the surface of water can be devoid of hydroxide anions, but still have a strong negative charge. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface. PMID:26697736

  3. Structure of phospholipid monolayers containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipids at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, J.; Smith, G.S.; Kuhl, T.L.; Israelachvili, J.N.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-04-17

    The density distribution of a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface mixed with varying amounts of lipid with poly(ethylene glycol)polymer headgroups (polymer-lipid or PEG-lipid) was measured using neutron reflectometry. The structure of the monolayer at the interface was greatly perturbed by the presence of the bulky polymer-lipid headgroups resulting in a large increase in the thickness of the headgroup region normal to the interface and a systematic roughening of the interface with increasing polymer-lipid content. These results show how bulky hydrophilic moieties cause significant deformations and out-of-place protrusions of phospholipid monolayers and presumably bilayers, vesicles and biological membranes. In terms of polymer physics, very short polymer chains tethered to the air-water interface follow scaling behavior with a mushroom to brush transition with increasing polymer grafting density. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  5. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria. PMID:26943272

  6. Thermodynamics of iodide adsorption at the instantaneous air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of ion adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler ["Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010), 10.1021/jp909219k]. Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost water layer, and the interfacial location of the ion is favored by enthalpy and opposed by entropy.

  7. Characterization of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gragson, D.E.; Jensen, J.M.; Baker, S.M.

    1999-09-14

    Interfacial tension measurements are employed to explore the spreading behavior of predominantly hydrophobic poly(styrene)--poly(ethylene oxide), PS-PEO, diblock copolymers at air/water and cyclohexane/water interfaces. Two copolymers with 7%- and 15.5%-PEO are examined in this study. The former is expected to have a PS block limiting area in air roughly equal to the limiting PEO pancake area, whereas the latter is expected to have a limiting PS block area in air approximately 3 times smaller than the limiting PEO pancake area. At the air/water interface, the 7%-PEO copolymer does not spread well, which is attributed to interference from the hydrophobic PS block. In contrast, the 7%-PEO copolymer spreads well at the cyclohexane/water interface, producing an isotherm with a terminating mean molecular area 3 times smaller than that obtained at the air/water interface. The 15.5%-PEO copolymer spreads well at both the air/water ad cyclohexane/water interfaces due to less interference from the smaller hydrophobic PS block. These observations are compared to compression isotherms, and the results are discussed in terms of the solvating nature of the adjacent cyclohexane phase for the PS block.

  8. Demonstration of adaptive optics for mitigating laser propagation through a random air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Phillip; Majumdar, Arun K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new concept of mitigating signal distortions caused by random air-water interface using an adaptive optics (AO) system. This is the first time the concept of using an AO for mitigating the effects of distortions caused mainly by a random air-water interface is presented. We have demonstrated the feasibility of correcting the distortions using AO in a laboratory water tank for investigating the propagation effects of a laser beam through an airwater interface. The AO system consisting of a fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and a Shack-Hartmann Wavefront Sensor for mitigating surface water distortions has a unique way of stabilizing and aiming a laser onto an object underneath the water. Essentially the AO system mathematically takes the complex conjugate of the random phase caused by air-water interface allowing the laser beam to penetrate through the water by cancelling with the complex conjugates. The results show the improvement of a number of metrics including Strehl ratio, a measure of the quality of optical image formation for diffraction limited optical system. These are the first results demonstrating the feasibility of developing a new sensor system such as Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) utilizing AO for mitigating surface water distortions.

  9. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants. PMID:25358083

  10. Hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akella, Sathish; Singh, Dhiraj; Singh, Ravi; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when placed at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface due to Marangoni forces. This steady camphor influx from tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the camphor outflux due to evaporation. When spontaneous fluctuations in evaporation break the axial symmetry of Marangoni force acting radially outwards, the camphor tablet is propelled like a boat along the water surface. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of a self-propelled camphor boat at air-water interfaces. We observe three different modes of motion, namely continuous, harmonic and periodic, due to the volatile nature of camphor. We explain these modes in terms of ratio of two time-scales: the time-scale over which viscous forces are dominant over the Marangoni forces (τη) and the time-scale over which Marangoni forces are dominant over the viscous forces (τσ). The continuous, harmonic and periodic motions are observed when τη /τσ ~ 1 , τη /τσ >= 1 and τη /τσ >> 1 respectively. Experimentally, the ratio of the time scales is varied by changing the interfacial tension of the air-water interface using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  11. Water permeability of primary mouse keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpstone, M.B.; Kennedy, A.H.; Harmon, C.S.; Potts, R.O.

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the development of the epidermal permeability barrier in vitro, tritiated water (HTO) flux was measured across murine keratinocytes cultured at the air-liquid interface. Using a micro-diffusion technique, it was shown that air-liquid cultures form areas where the water diffusion is comparable to that of intact neonatal mouse skin. When water permeability is measured over a large area of the culture surface, however, significantly higher flux is obtained. These results show that under the culture conditions used, areas of water barrier comparable to intact neonatal mouse skin coexist with regions of less complete barrier formation.

  12. Thermodynamics of Iodide Adsorption at the Instantaneous Air-Water Interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2013-03-21

    We perform simulations using both polarizable and non-polarizable force fields to study the adsorption of iodide to the air-water interface. A novel aspect of our analysis is that the progress of the adsorption is measured as the distance from the instantaneous interface, which is defined by a coarse-graining scheme proposed recently by Willard and Chandler.\\cite{chandler1} Referring structural and thermodynamic quantities to the instantaneous interface unmasks molecular-scale details that are obscured by thermal fluctuations when the same quantities are referred to an average measure of the position of the interface, such as the Gibbs dividing surface. Our results suggest that an ion adsorbed at the interface resides primarily in the topmost layer water.

  13. Air-Liquid Interfaces: II. Water Structure and Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Heather; Gopalakrishnan, Sandhya; Ma, Gang; Liu, Dingfang; Levering, Lori

    2004-03-01

    Aqueous salt solutions were investigated using scanning sum frequency generation (SFG), a highly surface-selective spectroscopy, and ATR-IR and Raman spectroscopies. Water surface structure was investigated for NaF, NaCl, NaBr and NaI aqueous solutions and surface data indicate a significantly disturbed hydrogen bonding environment from that of neat water. The spectra strongly suggest the presence of bromide and iodide anions in the interfacial region in addition to an increase in interfacial depth; yet the surfaces of the sodium fluoride and chloride salt solutions do not show evidence of surface water perturbation. Ammonium chloride and sulfate, and sodium sulfate aqueous solutions were also investigated. Surface water structure varied considerably between the three salt solutions. Electric double layer effects are indicated.

  14. Protein adsorption at the electrified air-water interface: implications on foam stability.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Rumpel, Armin; Walter, Johannes; Dombrowski, Jannika; Kulozik, Ulrich; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-22

    The surface chemistry of ions, water molecules, and proteins as well as their ability to form stable networks in foams can influence and control macroscopic properties such as taste and texture of dairy products considerably. Despite the significant relevance of protein adsorption at liquid interfaces, a molecular level understanding on the arrangement of proteins at interfaces and their interactions has been elusive. Therefore, we have addressed the adsorption of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the air-water interface with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry. SFG provides specific information on the composition and average orientation of molecules at interfaces, while complementary information on the thickness of the adsorbed layer can be obtained with ellipsometry. Adsorption of charged BSA proteins at the water surface leads to an electrified interface, pH dependent charging, and electric field-induced polar ordering of interfacial H(2)O and BSA. Varying the bulk pH of protein solutions changes the intensities of the protein related vibrational bands substantially, while dramatic changes in vibrational bands of interfacial H(2)O are simultaneously observed. These observations have allowed us to determine the isoelectric point of BSA directly at the electrolyte-air interface for the first time. BSA covered air-water interfaces with a pH near the isoelectric point form an amorphous network of possibly agglomerated BSA proteins. Finally, we provide a direct correlation of the molecular structure of BSA interfaces with foam stability and new information on the link between microscopic properties of BSA at water surfaces and macroscopic properties such as the stability of protein foams. PMID:22530646

  15. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  16. Photosensitized Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols above the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Ciuraru, R; Boréave, A; George, C

    2016-08-16

    In this study, we evaluated photosensitized chemistry at the air-sea interface as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our results show that, in addition to biogenic emissions, abiotic processes could also be important in the marine boundary layer. Photosensitized production of marine secondary organic aerosol was studied in a custom-built multiphase atmospheric simulation chamber. The experimental chamber contained water, humic acid (1-10 mg L(-1)) as a proxy for dissolved organic matter, and nonanoic acid (0.1-10 mM), a fatty acid proxy which formed an organic film at the air-water interface. Dark secondary reaction with ozone after illumination resulted in SOA particle concentrations in excess of 1000 cm(-3), illustrating the production of unsaturated compounds by chemical reactions at the air-water interface. SOA numbers via photosensitization alone and in the absence of ozone did not exceed background levels. From these results, we derived a dependence of SOA numbers on nonanoic acid surface coverage and dissolved organic matter concentration. We present a discussion on the potential role of the air-sea interface in the production of atmospheric organic aerosol from photosensitized origins. PMID:27434860

  17. Physicochemical Study of Viral Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torres-Salgado, Jose F; Comas-Garcia, Mauricio; Villagrana-Escareño, Maria V; Durán-Meza, Ana L; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Cadena-Nava, Ruben D

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses into icosahedral nucleocapsids is a spontaneous process driven by protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions. The precise nature of these interactions results in the assembly of extremely monodisperse and structurally indistinguishable nucleocapsids. In this work, by using a ssRNA plant virus (cowpea chlorotic mottle virus [CCMV]) as a charged nanoparticle we show that the diffusion of these nanoparticles from the bulk solution to the air/water interface is an irreversible adsorption process. By using the Langmuir technique, we measured the diffusion and adsorption of viral nucleocapsids at the air/water interface at different pH conditions. The pH changes, and therefore in the net surface charge of the virions, have a great influence in the diffusion rate from the bulk solution to the air/water interface. Moreover, assembly of mesoscopic and microscopic viral aggregates at this interface depends on the net surface charge of the virions and the surface pressure. By using Brewster's angle microscopy we characterized these structures at the interface. Most common structures observed were clusters of virions and soap-frothlike micron-size structures. Furthermore, the CCMV films were compressed to form monolayers and multilayers from moderate to high surface pressures, respectively. After transferring the films from the air/water interface onto mica by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, their morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. These viral monolayers showed closed-packing nano- and microscopic arrangements. PMID:26999022

  18. A self-consistent field study of a hydrocarbon droplet at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Emilia; Leermakers, Frans A M; Vermeer, Arnoldus W P

    2012-04-14

    A molecularly detailed self-consistent field (SCF) approach is applied to describe a sessile hydrocarbon droplet placed at the air-water interface. Predictions of the contact angle for macroscopic droplets follow from using Neumann's equation, wherein the macroscopic interfacial tensions are computed from one-gradient calculations for flat interfaces. A two-gradient cylindrical coordinate system with mirror-like boundary conditions is used to analyse the three dimensional shape of the nano-scale oil droplet at the air-water interface. These small droplets have a finite value of the Laplace pressure and concomitant line tension. It has been calculated that the oil-water and oil-vapour interfacial tensions are curvature dependent and increase slightly with increasing interfacial curvature. In contrast, the line tension tends to decrease with curvature. In all cases there is only a weak influence of the line tension on the droplet shape. We therefore argue that the nano-scale droplets, which are described in the SCF approach, are representative for macroscopic droplets and that the method can be used to efficiently generate accurate information on the spreading of oil droplets at the air-water interface in molecularly more complex situations. As an example, non-ionic surfactants have been included in the system to illustrate how a molecularly more complex situation will change the wetting properties of the sessile drop. This short forecast is aimed to outline and to stress the potential of the method. PMID:22395192

  19. Self-Assembly of Peptides at the Air/Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-03-01

    Peptides are commonly used as building blocks for design and development of novel materials with a variety of application areas ranging from drug design to biotechnology. The precise control of molecular architecture and specific nature of the nonbonded interactions among peptides enable aggregates with well defined structural and functional properties. The interaction of peptides with interfaces leads to dramatic changes in their conformational and aggregation behavior. In this talk, I will discuss our research on the interplay of intermolecular forces and influence of interfaces. In the first part the amphiphilic nature of short peptide oligomers and their behavior at the air/water interface will be discussed. The surface driving force and its decomposition will be analyzed. In the second part aggregation of peptides in bulk water and at an interface will be discussed. Different design features which can be tuned to control aggregation behavior will be analyzed.

  20. Free Energies of Cavity and Noncavity Hydrated Electrons Near the Instantaneous Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jennifer R; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Glover, William J

    2016-08-18

    The properties of the hydrated electron at the air/water interface are computed for both a cavity and a noncavity model using mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulation. We take advantage of our recently developed formalism for umbrella sampling with a restrained quantum expectation value to calculate free-energy profiles of the hydrated electron's position relative to the water surface. We show that it is critical to use an instantaneous description of the air/water interface rather than the Gibbs' dividing surface to obtain accurate potentials of mean force. We find that noncavity electrons, which prefer to encompass several water molecules, avoid the interface where water molecules are scarce. In contrast, cavity models of the hydrated electron, which prefer to expel water, have a local free-energy minimum near the interface. When the cavity electron occupies this minimum, its absorption spectrum is quite red-shifted, its binding energy is significantly lowered, and its dynamics speed up quite a bit compared with the bulk, features that have not been found by experiment. The surface activity of the electron therefore serves as a useful test of cavity versus noncavity electron solvation. PMID:27479028

  1. Propensity of Hydrated Excess Protons and Hydroxide Anions for the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Chen, Chen; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Kumar, Revati; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Significant effort has been undertaken to better understand the molecular details governing the propensity of ions for the air-water interface. Facilitated by computationally efficient reactive molecular dynamics simulations, new and statistically conclusive molecular-scale results on the affinity of the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide anion for the air-water interface are presented. These simulations capture the dynamic bond breaking and formation processes (charge defect delocalization) that are important for correctly describing the solvation and transport of these complex species. The excess proton is found to be attracted to the interface, which is correlated with a favorable enthalpic contribution and consistent with reducing the disruption in the hydrogen bond network caused by the ion complex. However, a recent refinement of the underlying reactive potential energy function for the hydrated excess proton shows the interfacial attraction to be weaker, albeit nonzero, a result that is consistent with the experimental surface tension measurements. The influence of a weak hydrogen bond donated from water to the protonated oxygen, recently found to play an important role in excess hydrated proton transport in bulk water, is seen to also be important for this study. In contrast, the hydroxide ion is found to be repelled from the air-water interface. This repulsion is characterized by a reduction of the energetically favorable ion-water interactions, which creates an enthalpic penalty as the ion approaches the interface. Finally, we find that the fluctuation in the coordination number around water sheds new light on the observed entropic trends for both ions. PMID:26366480

  2. Interfacial properties of mixed films of long-chain organics at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Tervahattu, Heikki; Vaida, Veronica

    Organic molecules residing at the air-water interface of atmospheric aerosols will have a critical and direct effect on the aerosols' chemical, physical, and optical properties. It is important to study the interfacial properties of such compounds in order to accurately assess these effects. In this study, the compositions of two organic binary films at the air-water interface were monitored as a function of exposure time to the ambient atmosphere. One film was composed of tetracosanoic acid (lignoceric acid, CH 3(CH 2) 22COOH) and nonacosane (C 29H 60), and the second film was composed of octadecanoic acid (stearic acid, CH 3(CH 2) 16COOH) and octadecane (C 18H 38). These films were used as simplified proxies for the organic coating on atmospheric aerosols. The effect of lengthening the hydrocarbon chain on the interfacial longevity of the compounds in the mixed organic film at the air-aqueous interface was determined. The results show that octadecane in a mixed film desorbs from the interface after 72 h while octadecanoic acid remains. For nonacosane, further lengthening of the carbon chain greatly increased its interfacial longevity so that it was comparable with the fatty acids, which remained stable at the interface for at least 144 h. These results are used to explain the preponderance of long-chain fatty acids on the surfaces of collected aerosols and give insight into the degree to which the presence of other long-chain organics may affect the aerosol's chemical and physical properties.

  3. Thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose adsorbed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oscar E; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2006-01-01

    Surface pressure isotherms and structural and surface dilatational properties of three hydroxypropylmethycelluloses (HPMCs, called E4M, E50LV, and F4M) adsorbed films at the air-water interface were determined. In this work we present evidence that HPMC molecules are able to diffuse and saturate the air-water interface at very low concentrations in the bulk phase. As bulk concentration increased, structural changes at a molecular level occurred at the interface. These changes corresponded to transition from an expanded structure (structure I) to a condensed one (structure II). When the surface concentration of HPMC was high enough, the collapse of the monolayer was observed. The three HPMCs formed very elastic films at the air-water interface, even at low surface pressures. E4M showed features that make it unique. For instance it showed the highest surface activity, mainly at low bulk concentrations (<10(-4) wt %). The differences observed in surface activity may be attributed to differences in the hydroxypropyl molar substitution and molecular weight of HPMC. All three HPMCs formed films of similar viscoelasticity and elastic dilatational modulus, which can be accounted for by their similar degree of methyl substitution. PMID:16398540

  4. Microstructure of Hairy-Rod Polymers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, B. T.; Riou, S. A.; Su, Z.; Hsu, S. L.

    1997-03-01

    To better understand the role of long flexible side groups on the microstructure of "hairy-rod" polymer thin films, a series of poly(γ-methyl-L-glutamate-co-γ-n-octadecyl-L- glutamate) of varying degree copolymerization has been investigated at the air-water interface by external reflectance infrared spectroscopy. Coupled with a Langmuir trough, the microstructure of the monolayer films was charaterized directly at the air-water interface as a function of varying surface packing density. The conformational order of the n-octadecyl side groups was subsequently shown to vary strongly as a function of n-octadecyl side group content as well as surface packing density. When conformationally disordered, the n-octadecyl side groups could be likened to that of a Rsolvent-likeS matrix for the rigid- rod main chains in the plane of the interface. By controlling the conformational order and therefore the Rsolvent-likeS character of the n-octadecyl side groups, it was possible to control an in-plane orientation of the rigid-rod main chains relative to that of the compression axis of the Langmuir trough. The orientation of the n- octadecyl side groups out of the plane of the air-water interface was also determined.

  5. Rheology and microrheology of materials at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Robert Benjamin

    2008-10-01

    The study of materials at the air-water interface is an important area of research in soft condensed matter physics. Films at the air-water interface have been a system of interest to physics, chemistry and biology for the last 20 years. The unique properties of these surface films provide ideal models for 2-d films, surface chemistry and provide a platform for creating 2 dimensional analogue materials to cellular membranes. Measurements of the surface rheology of cross-linked F-actin networks associated with a lipid monolayer at the air-water interface of a Langmuir monolayer have been performed. The rheological measurements are made using a Couette cell. These data demonstrate that the network has a finite elastic modulus that grows as a function of the cross-linking concentration. We also note that under steady-state flow the system behaves as a power law fluid in which the effective viscosity decreases with imposed shear. A Langmuir monolayer trough that is equipped for simultaneous microrheology and standard rheology measurements has been constructed. The central elements are the trough itself with a full range of optical tools accessing the air-water interface from below the trough and a portable knife-edge torsion pendulum that can access the interface from above. The ability to simultaneously measure the mechanical response of Langmuir monolayers on very different length scales is an important step for our understanding of the mechanical response of two-dimensional viscoelastic networks. The optical tweezer microrheometer is used to study the micromechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers. Microrheology measurements are made a variety of surface pressures that correspond to different ordered phases of the monolayer. The complex shear modulus shows an order of magnitude increase for the liquid condensed phase of DPPC compared to the liquid expanded phase.

  6. Hydrodynamics of a fixed camphor boat at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dhiraj; Akella, Sathish; Singh, Ravi; Mandre, Shreyas; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    A camphor tablet, when introduced at the air-water interface undergoes sublimation and the camphor vapour spreads radially outwards across the surface. This radial spreading of camphor is due to Marangoni forces setup by the camphor concentration gradient. We report experiments on the hydrodynamics of this process for a camphor tablet held fixed at the air-water interface. During the initial transient, the time-dependent spread radius R (t) of camphor scales algebraically with time t (R (t) ~t 1 / 2) in agreement with empirical scalings reported for spreading of volatile oils on water surface. But unlike surfactants, the camphor stops spreading when the influx of camphor from the tablet onto the air-water interface is balanced by the outflux of camphor due to evaporation, and a steady-state condition is reached. The spreading camphor however, shears the underlying fluid and sets up bulk convective flow. We explain the coupled steady-state dynamics between the interfacial camphor spreading and bulk convective flow with a boundary layer approximation, supported by experimental evidence. This work was supported by the Collective Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University.

  7. Linear and nonlinear microrheology of lysozyme layers forming at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Allan, Daniel B; Firester, Daniel M; Allard, Victor P; Reich, Daniel H; Stebe, Kathleen J; Leheny, Robert L

    2014-09-28

    We report experiments studying the mechanical evolution of layers of the protein lysozyme adsorbing at the air-water interface using passive and active microrheology techniques to investigate the linear and nonlinear rheological response, respectively. Following formation of a new interface, the linear shear rheology, which we interrogate through the Brownian motion of spherical colloids at the interface, becomes viscoelastic with a complex modulus that has approximately power-law frequency dependence. The power-law exponent characterizing this frequency dependence decreases steadily with increasing layer age. Meanwhile, the nonlinear microrheology, probed via the rotational motion of magnetic nanowires at the interface, reveals a layer response characteristic of a shear-thinning power-law fluid with a flow index that decreases with age. We discuss two possible frameworks for understanding this mechanical evolution: gelation and the formation of a soft glass phase. PMID:24969505

  8. Proteins at air-water interfaces: a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Allan, Daniel B; Leheny, Robert L; Reich, Daniel H

    2014-11-01

    We present a coarse-grained model to describe the adsorption and deformation of proteins at an air-water interface. The interface is introduced empirically in the form of a localized field that couples to a hydropathy scale of amino acids. We consider three kinds of proteins: protein G, egg-white lysozyme, and hydrophobin. We characterize the nature of the deformation and the orientation of the proteins induced by their proximity to and association with the interface. We also study protein diffusion in the layer formed at the interface and show that the diffusion slows with increasing concentration in a manner similar to that for a colloidal suspension approaching the glass transition. PMID:25310625

  9. Specific ion adsorption at the air/water interface: The role of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinek, Dominik; Herz, Alexander; Vrbka, Lubos; Sedlmeier, Felix; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I.; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-09-01

    Classical force fields for molecular simulations of aqueous electrolytes are still controversial. We study alkali and halide ions at the air/water interface using novel non-polarizable force fields that were optimized based on bulk thermodynamics. In qualitative agreement with polarizable force-field simulations, ion repulsion from the interface decreases with increasing ion size. Iodide is even enhanced at the interface, which is rationalized by hydrophobic solvation at the interface, but exhibits a smaller surface propensity than in previous polarizable simulations. Surprisingly, lithium is less repelled than other cations because of its tightly bound hydration shell. A generalized Poisson-Boltzmann approach that includes ionic potentials of mean force from simulation almost quantitatively matches experimental interfacial tension increments for 1 molar sodium halides and alkali chlorides. We conclude that properly optimized non-polarizable force fields are transferable to interfacial environments and hold the potential for unravelling ion-specific effects even in biological situations involving peptidic surfaces.

  10. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  11. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  12. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    PubMed

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film. PMID:12080141

  13. Anisotropic orientational motion of molecular adsorbates at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zimdars, D.; Dadap, J.I.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Heinz, T.F.

    1999-04-29

    The ultrafast orientational motions of coumarin 314 (C314) adsorbed at the air/water interface were investigated by time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TRSHG). The theory and method of using TRSHG to detect both out-of-plane and in-plane orientational motions are discussed. The interfacial solute motions were found to be anisotropic, with differing out-of-plane and in-plane reorientation time constants. This report presents the first direct observation of in-plane orientational motion of a molecule (C314) at the air/water interface using TRSHG. The in-plane reorientation time constant is 600 {+-} 40 ps. The out-of-plane reorientation time constant is 350 {+-} 20 ps. The out-of-plane orientational motion of C314 is similar to the previous results on rhodamine 6G at the air/water interface which indicated increased interfacial friction compared with bulk aqueous solution. The surface reorientation times are 2--3 times slower than the bulk isotropic orientational diffusion time.

  14. Semifluorinated Alkanes at the Air-Water Interface: Tailoring Structure and Rheology at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, Rene; Keller, Rabea; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vermant, Jan; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Semifluorinated alkanes form monolayers with interesting properties at the air-water interface due to their pronounced amphi-solvophobic nature and the stiffness of the fluorocarbons. In the present work, using a combination of structural and dynamic probes, we investigated how small molecular changes can be used to control the properties of such an interface, in particular its organization, rheology, and reversibility during compression-expansion cycles. Starting from a reference system perfluor(dodecyl)dodecane, we first retained the linear structure but changed the linkage groups between the alkyl chains and the fluorocarbons, by introducing either a phenyl group or two oxygens. Next, the molecular structure was changed from linear to branched, with four side chains (two fluorocarbons and two hydrocarbons) connected to extended aromatic cores. Neutron reflectivity at the air-water interface and scanning force microscopy on deposited films show how the changes in the molecular structure affect molecular arrangement relative to the interface. Rheological and compression-expansion measurements demonstrate the significant consequences of these changes in molecular structure and interactions on the interfacial properties. Remarkably, even with these simple molecules, a wide range of surface rheological behaviors can be engineered, from viscous over viscoelastic to brittle solids, for very similar values of the surface pressure. PMID:26978461

  15. Protein Folding at the Air-Water Interface Studied with X-Ray Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidalevitz, David; Huang, Zhengqing; Rice, Stuart A.

    1999-03-01

    We report the results of x-ray reflectivity measurements of thin films formed by different water-soluble proteins at the air-aqueous solution interface. It is demonstrated that glucose oxidase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and urease molecules denaturate at the air-aqueous solution interface to form 8- to 14- angstrom -thick peptide sheets. X-ray reflectivity data indicate that the spreading of a lipid monolayer at the aqueous solution surface before protein injection does not prevent proteins from unfolding. On the other hand, crosslinking of proteins results in intact enzyme layers at the subphase surface. A model that involves interaction of glucose oxidase molecules with a phospholipid monolayer is proposed. In this model, an observed decrease of the lipid electron density in the protein presence is explained in terms of "holes" in the monolayer film caused by protein molecule adsorption.

  16. Dynamic mechanical properties of a polyelectrolyte adsorbed insoluble lipid monolayer at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Young; Kim, Mahn Won

    2015-04-23

    Polymers have been used to stabilize interfaces or to tune the mechanical properties of interfaces in various contexts, such as in oil emulsions or biological membranes. Although the structural properties of these systems are relatively well-studied, instrumental limitations continue to make it difficult to understand how the addition of polymer affects the dynamic mechanical properties of thin and soft films. We have solved this challenge by developing a new instrument, an optical-tweezer-based interface shear microrheometer (ISMR). With this technique, we observed that the interface shear modulus, G*, of a dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) monolayer at the air-water interface significantly increased with adsorption of polystyrenesulfonate (PSS). In addition, the viscous film (DODAC monolayer) became a viscoelastic film with PSS adsorption. At a low salt concentration, 10 mM of NaCl in the subphase, the viscoelasticity of the DODAC/PSS composite was predominantly determined by a particular property of PSS, that is, it behaves as a Gaussian chain in a θ-solvent. At a high salt concentration, 316 mM of NaCl, the thin film behaved as a polymer melt excluding water molecules. PMID:25826703

  17. Trapping of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate at the Air-Water Interface of Oscillating Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Corti, Mario; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2015-06-16

    We report that at very low initial bulk concentrations, a couple of hundred times below the critical micellar concentration (CMC), anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorbed at the air-water interface of a gas bubble cannot be removed, on the time scale of the experiment (hours), when the surrounding solution is gently replaced by pure water. Extremely sensitive interferometric measurements of the resonance frequency of the bubble-forced oscillations give precise access to the concentration of the surfactant monolayer. The bulk-interface dynamic exchange of SDS molecules is shown to be inhibited below a concentration which we believe refers to a kind of gas-liquid phase transition of the surface monolayer. Above this threshold we recover the expected concentration-dependent desorption. The experimental observations are interpreted within simple energetic considerations supported by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. PMID:26039913

  18. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid-coated air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation. PMID:27516601

  19. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid–coated air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D. James; George, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids–covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation.

  20. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  1. Effect Of Air-Water Interface On Microorganism Transport Under Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkzaban, S.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Schijven, J. F.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater may become contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms from land application of treated wastewater, septic wells, and effluent from septic tanks, and leaking sewage pipes. The unsaturated zone is of special importance since it often represents the first line of natural defense against groundwater pollution. Moreover, many experimental studies have shown that contaminant removal is more significant under lower saturation levels. Interaction of microbial particles with the air-water interfaces (AWI) has been previously suggested to explain high removal of pathogenic microorganisms during transport through unsaturated soil. The objective of this research was to explore the effect of AWI on virus transport. The transport of bacteriophages MS2 and FiX174 in sand columns was studied under various conditions, such as different pH, and saturation levels. Fitting of a transport model to the breakthrough curves was performed to determine the adsorption parameters. FiX174 with isoelectric point of 6.7 exhibited high affinity to the air-water interface by decreasing pH from 7.5 to 6.2. MS2 with isoelectric point of 3.5 has lower affinity to air-water interfaces than FiX174, but has similar pH- dependence. These results show the importance of electrostatic interactions, instead of hydrophobic, between the AWI and viruses. Adsorption to AWI is strongly pH dependent, increasing as pH decreases. It was found that two-site kinetic model should be used for modeling of virus transport under unsaturated conditions Moreover, by draining the unsaturated column, we found out that the attached viruses to AWI are viable, which is in contrast with the literature where retained viruses to AWI are considered as inactivated.

  2. Communication: Vibrational sum-frequency spectrum of the air-water interface, revisited.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J L

    2016-07-21

    Before 2015, heterodyne-detected sum-frequency-generation experiments on the air-water interface showed the presence of a positive feature at low frequency in the imaginary part of the susceptibility. However, three very recent experiments indicate that this positive feature is in fact absent. Armed with a better understanding, developed by others, of how to calculate sum-frequency spectra, we recalculate the spectrum and find good agreement with these new experiments. In addition, we provide a revised interpretation of the spectrum. PMID:27448864

  3. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  4. Communication: Vibrational sum-frequency spectrum of the air-water interface, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yicun; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    Before 2015, heterodyne-detected sum-frequency-generation experiments on the air-water interface showed the presence of a positive feature at low frequency in the imaginary part of the susceptibility. However, three very recent experiments indicate that this positive feature is in fact absent. Armed with a better understanding, developed by others, of how to calculate sum-frequency spectra, we recalculate the spectrum and find good agreement with these new experiments. In addition, we provide a revised interpretation of the spectrum.

  5. Ligand interaction with the purified serotonin transporter in solution and at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Faivre, V.; Manivet, P.; Callaway, J.C.; Morimoto, H.; Airaksinen, M.M.; Baszkin, A.; Launay, J.M.; Rosilio, V.

    2000-06-01

    The purified serotonin transporter (SERT) was spread at the air/water interface and the effects both of its surface density and of the temperature on its interfacial behavior were studied. The recorded isotherms evidenced the existence of a stable monolayer undergoing a lengthy rearrangement. SERT/ligand interactions appeared to be dependent on the nature of the studied molecules. Whereas an unrelated drug (chlorcyclizine) did not bind to the spread SERT, it interacted with its specific ligands. Compared to heterocyclic drugs, for which binding appeared to be concentration-dependent, a 'two-site' mechanism was evidenced for pinoline and imipramine.

  6. "Ene" Reactions of Singlet Oxygen at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Malek, Belaid; Fang, William; Abramova, Inna; Walalawela, Niluksha; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Greer, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Prenylsurfactants [(CH3)2C═CH(CH2)nSO3(-) Na(+) (n = 4, 6, or 8)] were designed to probe the "ene" reaction mechanism of singlet oxygen at the air-water interface. Increasing the number of carbon atoms in the hydrophobic chain caused an increase in the regioselectivity for a secondary rather than tertiary surfactant hydroperoxide, arguing for an orthogonal alkene on water. The use of water, deuterium oxide, and H2O/D2O mixtures helped to distinguish mechanistic alternatives to homogeneous solution conditions that include dewetting of the π bond and an unsymmetrical perepoxide transition state in the hydroperoxide-forming step. The prenylsurfactants and a photoreactor technique allowed a certain degree of interfacial control of the hydroperoxidation reaction on a liquid support, where the oxidant (airborne (1)O2) is delivered as a gas. PMID:27385423

  7. Field observations of turbulent dissipation rate profiles immediately below the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binbin; Liao, Qian

    2016-06-01

    Near surface profiles of turbulence immediately below the air-water interface were measured with a free-floating Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system on Lake Michigan. The surface-following configuration allowed the system to measure the statistics of the aqueous-side turbulence in the topmost layer immediately below the water surface (z≈0˜15 cm, z points downward with 0 at the interface). Profiles of turbulent dissipation rate (ɛ) were investigated under a variety of wind and wave conditions. Various methods were applied to estimate the dissipation rate. Results suggest that these methods yield consistent dissipation rate profiles with reasonable scattering. In general, the dissipation rate decreases from the water surface following a power law relation in the top layer, ɛ˜z-0.7, i.e., the slope of the decrease was lower than that predicted by the wall turbulence theory, and the dissipation was considerably higher in the top layer for cases with higher wave ages. The measured dissipation rate profiles collapse when they were normalized with the wave speed, wave height, water-side friction velocity, and the wave age. This scaling suggests that the enhanced turbulence may be attributed to the additional source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) at the "skin layer" (likely due to micro-breaking), and its downward transport in the water column.

  8. Correlation of average hydrophobicity, water/air interface surface rheological properties and foaming properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Medrano, A; Abirached, C; Araujo, A C; Panizzolo, L A; Moyna, P; Añón, M C

    2012-04-01

    A comparative study on the behavior in the air-water interface of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactoalbumin, glycinin and β-conglycinin was performed. The behavior at the interface was evaluated by equilibrium surface tension and surface rheological properties of adsorbed films. There were significant differences (α ≤ 0.05) in the values of the constants of adsorption to the interface of the four proteins. The glycinin had the slowest rate of adsorption, due to its low average hydrophobicity, low molecular flexibility and large molecular size. Smaller proteins like β-lactoglobulin and α-lactoalbumin tended to greater equilibrium pressure values than the larger proteins because of its higher rate of adsorption to the interface. The foam capacity of proteins showed a positive correlation with the average hydrophobicity; the maximal retained liquid volume or the initial rate of passage of liquid to foam were significantly lower (α ≤ 0.05) when protein was glycinin. The dilatational modulus of glycinin was the lowest, which implies lowest resistance to disruption of the film. Glycinin protein has lower proportion of gravitational drainage and higher disproportionation having perhaps a less resistant film. In conclusion, β-conglycinin and whey proteins showed a similar behavior, so β-conglycinin might be the best soybean protein to replace milk proteins in food formulations. PMID:22414931

  9. Measuring interactions between polydimethylsiloxane and serum proteins at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhengzheng; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Baumgart, Tobias; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2013-07-30

    The interaction between synthetic polymers and proteins at interfaces is relevant to basic science as well as a wide range of applications in biotechnology and medicine. One particularly common and important interface is the air-water interface (AWI). Due to the special energetics and dynamics of molecules at the AWI, the interplay between synthetic polymer and protein can be very different from that in bulk solution. In this paper, we applied the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the compression state of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film at the AWI affects the subsequent adsorption of serum protein [e.g., human serum albumin (HSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG)] and the interaction between PDMS and protein. Of particular note is our observation of circular PDMS domains with micrometer diameters that form at the AWI in the highly compressed state of the surface film: proteins were shown to adsorb preferentially to the surface of these circular PDMS domains, accompanied by a greater than 4-fold increase in protein found in the interfacial film. The PDMS-only film and the PDMS-IgG composite film were transferred to cover glass, and platinum-carbon replicas of the transferred films were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We conclude that the structure of the PDMS film greatly affects the amount and distribution of protein at the interface. PMID:23819833

  10. Equation of state and adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Omkar S; Maestro, Armando; Duits, Michel H G; van den Ende, Dirk; Stuart, Martien Cohen; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-09-28

    Understanding the adsorption dynamics of soft microgel particles is a key step in designing such particles for potential applications as stimuli-responsive Pickering stabilizers for foams or emulsions. In this study we experimentally determine an equation of state (EOS) for poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles adsorbed onto an air-water interface using a Langmuir film balance. We detect a finite surface pressure at very low surface concentration of particles, for which standard theories based on hard disk models predict negligible pressures, implying that the particles must deform strongly upon adsorption to the interface. Furthermore, we study the evolution of the surface pressure due to the adsorption of PNIPAM particles as a function of time using pendant drop tensiometry. The equation of state determined in the equilibrium measurements allows us to extract the adsorbed amount as a function of time. We find a mixed-kinetic adsorption that is initially controlled by the diffusion of particles towards the interface. At later stages, a slow exponential relaxation indicates the presence of a coverage-dependent adsorption barrier related to crowding of particles at the interface. PMID:24954112

  11. Mechanisms of Polyelectrolyte Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Patrick C.; Palazoglu, Omer A.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally occurring cationic polyelectrolyte, restores the adsorption of the clinical lung surfactant Survanta to the air-water interface in the presence of albumin at much lower concentrations than uncharged polymers such as polyethylene glycol. This is consistent with the positively charged chitosan forming ion pairs with negative charges on the albumin and lung surfactant particles, reducing the net charge in the double-layer, and decreasing the electrostatic energy barrier to adsorption to the air-water interface. However, chitosan, like other polyelectrolytes, cannot perfectly match the charge distribution on the surfactant, which leads to patches of positive and negative charge at net neutrality. Increasing the chitosan concentration further leads to a reduction in the rate of surfactant adsorption consistent with an over-compensation of the negative charge on the surfactant and albumin surfaces, which creates a new repulsive electrostatic potential between the now cationic surfaces. This charge neutralization followed by charge inversion explains the window of polyelectrolyte concentration that enhances surfactant adsorption; the same physical mechanism is observed in flocculation and re-stabilization of anionic colloids by chitosan and in alternate layer deposition of anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes on charged colloids. PMID:19366599

  12. Rapid Facial Fabrication of Silica Colloidal Crystal Film at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiming

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and facial strategy has been developed to self-assemble 2D or 3D silica colloidal crystals at the air/water interface. The surface hydrophilicity of monodisperse silica microspheres were prepared by the Stöber method and modified by physical adsorption of a cationic surfactant (CTAB). The surface-modified silica microspheres were dispersed into an organic solvent and readily self-assemble at the air/water interface to form 2D monolayer film. The surface potential (ζ ) of silica microspheres could be changed with different concentration of CTAB aqueous solution. When the surface potential of silica particles was of -36.67 mV, a 2D monolayer film with close-packed and high-ordered structure could be easily obtained and may further be transferred onto a solid substrate layer by layer to develop a 3D multilayer film. UV-visible spectrophotometer was used to analyze the orderliness of colloidal crystal film, the Bragg diffraction positions and silica diameters were in good agreement with those were theoretically calculated. In addition, Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the arrangement of colloidal crystals. PMID:26682401

  13. Langmuir-Blodgett film of hydrophobin protein from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Houmadi, S; Ciuchi, F; De Santo, M P; De Stefano, L; Rea, I; Giardina, P; Armenante, A; Lacaze, E; Giocondo, M

    2008-11-18

    We present results concerning the formation of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of a class I hydrophobin from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface, and their structure as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films when deposited on silicon substrates. LB films of the hydrophobin were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We observed that the compressed film at the air-water interface exhibits a molecular depletion even at low surface pressure. In order to estimate the surface molecular concentration, we fit the experimental isotherm with Volmer's equation describing the equation of state for molecular monolayers. We found that about (1)/ 10 of the molecules contribute to the surface film formation. When transferred on silicon substrates, compact and uniform monomolecular layers about 2.5 nm thick, comparable to a typical molecular size, were observed. The monolayers coexist with protein aggregates, under the typical rodlet form with a uniform thickness of about 5.0 nm. The observed rodlets appear to be a hydrophilic bilayer and can then be responsible for the surface molecular depletion. PMID:18925762

  14. Hydration, Orientation, and Conformation of Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wren, Sumi N; Gordon, Brittany P; Valley, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Laura E; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2015-06-18

    Aqueous-phase processing of methylglyoxal (MG) has been suggested to constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected because its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form geminal diols, as well as because MG and its hydration products can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active, but an improved description of its surface behavior is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation. These studies investigate MG adsorption, focusing on its hydration state at the air-water interface, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach that involves vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations. Together, the experimental and theoretical data show that MG exists predominantly in a singly hydrated state (diol) at the interface, with a diol-tetrol ratio at the surface higher than that for the bulk. In addition to exhibiting a strong surface activity, we find that MG significantly perturbs the water structure at the interface. The results have implications for understanding the atmospheric fate of methylglyoxal. PMID:25989368

  15. A spitting image: specializations in archerfish eyes for vision at the interface between air and water

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Shelby; Hart, Nathan S.; Marshall, N. Justin; Collin, Shaun P.

    2010-01-01

    Archerfish are famous for spitting jets of water to capture terrestrial insects, a task that not only requires oral dexterity, but also the ability to detect small camouflaged prey against a visually complex background of overhanging foliage. Because detection of olfactory, auditory and tactile cues is diminished at air–water interfaces, archerfish must depend almost entirely on visual cues to mediate their sensory interactions with the aerial world. During spitting, their eyes remain below the water's surface and must adapt to the optical demands of both aquatic and aerial fields of view. These challenges suggest that archerfish eyes may be specially adapted to life at the interface between air and water. Using microspectrophotometry to characterize the spectral absorbance of photoreceptors, we find that archerfish have differentially tuned their rods and cones across their retina, correlated with spectral differences in aquatic and aerial fields of view. Spatial resolving power also differs for aquatic and aerial fields of view with maximum visual resolution (6.9 cycles per degree) aligned with their preferred spitting angle. These measurements provide insight into the functional significance of intraretinal variability in archerfish and infer intraretinal variability may be expected among surface fishes or vertebrates where different fields of view vary markedly. PMID:20392734

  16. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initialmore » monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.« less

  17. Conformational changes of a calix[8]arene derivative at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Pedrosa, José M; Martín-Romero, María T; Muñoz, Eulogia; Richardson, Tim H; Camacho, Luis

    2005-03-10

    The particular behavior of a p-tert-butyl calix[8]arene derivative (C8A) has been studied at the air-water interface using surface pressure-area isotherms, surface potential-area isotherms, film relaxation measurements, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and infrared spectroscopy for Langmuir-Blodgett films. Thus, it is observed that the properties of the film, for example, isotherms, domain formation, and FTIR spectra, recorded during the first compression cycle differ appreciably from those during the second compression and following cycles. The results obtained are interpreted on the basis of the conformational changes of the C8A molecules by surface pressure, allowing us to inquire into the inter- and intramolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds) of those molecules. Thus, the compression induces changes in the kind of hydrogen bonds from intra- and intermolecular with other C8A molecules to hydrogen bonds with water molecules. PMID:16851456

  18. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.

  19. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate. PMID:25687953

  20. Brewster Angle Microscopy Study of Model Stratum Corneum Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Ellen; Champagne, Alex; William, Joseph; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    As the first and last barrier in the body, the stratum corneum (SC) is essential to life. Understanding the interactions and organization of lipids within the SC provides insight into essential physiological processes, including water loss prevention and the adsorption of substances from the environment. Langmuir monolayers have long been used to study complex systems, such as biological membranes and marine aerosols, due to their ability to shed light on intermolecular interactions. In this study, lipid mixtures with varying cholesterol and cerebroside ratios were investigated at the air/water interface. Surface tension measurements along with Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images were used to examine the lipid phase transitions. Results indicate that cholesterol and cerebrosides form miscible monolayers, exhibiting ideal behavior. BAM images of a singular, uniform collapse phase also suggest formation of a miscible monolayer.

  1. Catechol oxidation by ozone and hydroxyl radicals at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pillar, Elizabeth A; Camm, Robert C; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2014-12-16

    Anthropogenic emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons promptly react with hydroxyl radicals undergoing oxidation to form phenols and polyphenols (e.g., catechol) typically identified in the complex mixture of humic-like substances (HULIS). Because further processing of polyphenols in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) can continue mediated by a mechanism of ozonolysis at interfaces, a better understanding about how these reactions proceed at the air-water interface is needed. This work shows how catechol, a molecular probe of the oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons present in SOA, can contribute interfacial reactive species that enhance the production of HULIS under atmospheric conditions. Reactive semiquinone radicals are quickly produced upon the encounter of 40 ppbv-6.0 ppmv O3(g) with microdroplets containing [catechol] = 1-150 μM. While the previous pathway results in the instantaneous formation of mono- and polyhydroxylated aromatic rings (PHA) and chromophoric mono- and polyhydroxylated quinones (PHQ), a different channel produces oxo- and dicarboxylic acids of low molecular weight (LMW). The cleavage of catechol occurs at the 1,2 carbon-carbon bond at the air-water interface through the formation of (1) an ozonide intermediate, (2) a hydroperoxide, and (3) cis,cis-muconic acid. However, variable [catechol] and [O3(g)] can affect the ratio of the primary products (cis,cis-muconic acid and trihydroxybenzenes) and higher order products observed (PHA, PHQ, and LMW oxo- and dicarboxylic acids). Secondary processing is confirmed by mass spectrometry, showing the production of crotonic, maleinaldehydic, maleic, glyoxylic, and oxalic acids. The proposed pathway can contribute precursors to aqueous SOA (AqSOA) formation, converting aromatic hydrocarbons into polyfunctional species widely found in tropospheric aerosols with light-absorbing brown carbon. PMID:25423038

  2. Real-time imaging of crystallization in polylactide enantiomeric monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Snively, Christopher M; Liu, Yujuan; Rabolt, John F; Chase, D Bruce

    2008-10-01

    A newly developed planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) offers significant advantages over conventional approaches including fast acquisition speed, excellent compensation for water vapor, and an excellent capacity for large infrared accessories, e.g., a water trough. In this study, the origin of stereocomplexation in a polylactide enantiomeric monolayer at the air-water interface was investigated using PA-IRRAS. PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that a mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the two-dimensional monolayer developed at the air-water interface before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. PA-IRRAS spectra of the stereocomplex exhibited distinct band shifts in crystalline sensitive components, e.g., the vas(C-O-C, h) mode, as well as amorphous-dependent components, e.g., the vs(C-O-C) mode, when compared with the spectra of PLLA alone. On the other hand, time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra, which were obtained as the films were being compressed, revealed that both monolayers of PLLA and mixed PLLA/PDLA stereocomplex were crystallized into a 10(3)-helix and a 3(1)-helix, respectively, with a distinct band shift in crystalline sensitive components only. Fourier self-deconvolution of the spectra demonstrated that the band shift in crystalline sensitive components is correlated with the intermolecular interaction of polymer chains. PMID:18781784

  3. Carbon dioxide partial pressure and carbon fluxes of air-water interface in Taihu Lake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chengxin; Hu, Weiping; Ford, Phillip W.; Chen, Yuwei; Qu, Wenchuan; Zhang, Lu

    2005-03-01

    To obtain carbon dioxide (CO2) flux between water-air interface of Taihu lake, monthly water samplers at 14 sites and the local meteorological data of the lake were collected and analyzed in 1998. Carbon dioxide partial pressures (pCO2) at air-water interface in the lake were calculated using alkalinity, pH, ionic strength, active coefficient, and water temperature. The carbon fluxes at different sublakes and areas were estimated by concentration gradient between water and air in consideration of Schmidt numbers of 600 and daily mean windspeed at 10 m above water surface. The results indicated that the mean values of pCO2 in Wuli Lake, Meiliang Bay, hydrophyte area, west littoral zone, riverine mouths, and the open lake areas were 1 807.8±1 071.4 (mean±standard deviation) μatm (1atm=1.013 25×105Pa), 416.3±217.0 μatm, 576.5±758.8 μatm, 304.2±243.5 μatm, 1 933.6±1 144.7 μatm, and 448.5±202.6 μatm, respectively. Maximum and minimum pCO2 values were found in the hypertrophic (4 053.7 μatm) and the eutrophic (3.2 μatm) areas. The riverine mouth areas have the maximum fluxes (82.0±62.8 mmol/m2a). But there was no significant difference between eutrophic and mesotrophic areas in pCO2 and the flux of CO2. The hydrophyte area, however, has the minimum (-0.58±12.9 mmol/m2a). In respect to CO2 equilibrium, input of the rivers will obviously influence inorganic carbon distribution in the riverine estuary. For example, the annual mean CO2 flux in Zhihugang River estuary was 19 times of that in Meiliang Bay, although the former is only a part of the latter. The sites in the body of the lake show a clear seasonal cycle with pCO2 higher than atmospheric equilibrium in winter, and much lower than atmospheric in summer due to CO2 consumption by photosynthesis. The CO2 amount of the net annual evasion that enters the atmosphere is 28.42×104 t/a, of which those from the west littoral zone and the open lake account for 53.8% and 36.7%, respectively.

  4. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  5. Halide anion dependence of ionic surfactant adsorption in air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doseok; Wang, Wenjie; Sung, Woongmo; Ao, Mingqi; Vaknin, David

    2014-03-01

    It was recently proposed that there is surface excess of halide anions at the air/water interface, and more surface excess of I- than Br- or Cl-, which cannot be explained by Debye-Huckel theory. In case of charged surfaces such as Gibbs monolayer consisting of cationic surfactant molecules, surface excess of anions can also be expected. In this study, by using surface-sensitive grazing angle X-ray fluorescence in conjunction with surface tension measurement, we investigated adsorption behavior of [C12mim]Cl, [C12mim]Br, [C12mim]I aqueous solutions, in which the surface is first covered by [C12mim]+ cations at low concentrations, and the adsorption of the halide anions to this charged interface would follow with the increase in the concentration of solutes. From the surface tension measurements, it was observed that critical micelle concentration of [C12mim]I solution was 4.6 mM, much smaller than that of [C12mim]Cl (16.7 mM) indicating surface activity of surfactant increases with size of halide anions. From X-ray fluorescence, surface excess of halide anion was measured quantitatively from the interface of these solutions. By putting NaCl and NaI in [C12mim]I and [C12mim]Cl solutions, respectively, competition between Cl- and I- adsorption was investigated, to find that I- has stronger adsorption on the charged surface than Cl-.

  6. Relative Order of Sulfuric Acid, Bisulfate, Hydronium, and Cations at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2015-11-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), bisulfate (HSO4(-)), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) are among the most abundant species in tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols due to high levels of atmospheric SO2 emitted from biomass burning and volcanic eruptions. The air/aqueous interfaces of sulfuric acid and bisulfate solutions play key roles in heterogeneous reactions, acid rain, radiative balance, and polar stratospheric cloud nucleation. Molecular-level knowledge about the interfacial distribution of these inorganic species and their perturbation of water organization facilitates a better understanding of the reactivity and growth of atmospheric aerosols and of the aerosol surface charge, thus shedding light on topics of air pollution, climate change, and thundercloud electrification. Here, the air/aqueous interface of NaHSO4, NH4HSO4, and Mg(HSO4)2 salt solutions as well as H2SO4 and HCl acid solutions are investigated by means of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected (HD) VSFG spectroscopy. VSFG spectra of all acid solutions show higher SFG response in the OH-bonded region relative to neat water, with 1.1 M H2SO4 being more enhanced than 1.1 M HCl. In addition, VSFG spectra of bisulfate salt solutions highly resemble that of the dilute H2SO4 solution (0.26 M) at a comparable pH. HD-VSFG (Im χ((2))) spectra of acid and bisulfate salt solutions further reveal that hydrogen-bonded water molecules are oriented preferentially toward the bulk liquid phase. General agreement between Im χ((2)) spectra of 1.1 M H2SO4 and 1.1 M HCl acid solutions indicate that HSO4(-) ions have a similar surface preference as that of chloride (Cl(-)) ions. By comparing the direction and magnitude of the electric fields arising from the interfacial ion distributions and the concentration of each species, the most reasonable relative surface preference that can be deduced from a simplified model follows the order H3O(+) > HSO4(-) > Na(+), NH4(+), Mg(2+) > SO4(2-). Interestingly

  7. [Diurnal variations of greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface of aquaculture ponds in the Min River estuary].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Tong, Chuan; He, Qing-Hua; Huang, Jia-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Wetland reclamation and aquaculture is one of the main disturbance types in coastal wetlands. Diurnal variations of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface were determined using a floating chambers + gas chromatography method in a shrimp pond, and a mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp in October in the Shanyutan Wetland of the Min River estuary, southeast China. Meanwhile, the meteorological indicators in ground surface and physical, chemical and biological indicators of surface water were also measured. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface all demonstrated distinct diurnal variations. Both shrimp pond and mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp functioned as a sink of CO2 [the diurnal averaged CO2 fluxes were -48.79 and -105.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively], and a source of CH4 [the diurnal averaged CH4 fluxes were 1.00 and 5.74 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively]; the diurnal averaged CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture of fish and shrimp pond were higher than that of the shrimp pond. Greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface from the aquaculture ponds were influenced by many factors. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the concentration of Chlorophyll was the major factor affecting the CO2 fluxes, and the concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the shrimp pond; whereas water temperature and Chlorophyll were the major factors affecting the CO2 fluxes, and dissolved oxygen, PO4(3-) and pH were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp. PMID:23379142

  8. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces. PMID:27339861

  9. Entropy of adsorption of mixed surfactants from solutions onto the air/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, L.-W.; Chen, J.-H.; Zhou, N.-F.

    1995-01-01

    The partial molar entropy change for mixed surfactant molecules adsorbed from solution at the air/water interface has been investigated by surface thermodynamics based upon the experimental surface tension isotherms at various temperatures. Results for different surfactant mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium tetradecyl sulfate, decylpyridinium chloride and sodium alkylsulfonates have shown that the partial molar entropy changes for adsorption of the mixed surfactants were generally negative and decreased with increasing adsorption to a minimum near the maximum adsorption and then increased abruptly. The entropy decrease can be explained by the adsorption-orientation of surfactant molecules in the adsorbed monolayer and the abrupt entropy increase at the maximum adsorption is possible due to the strong repulsion between the adsorbed molecules.

  10. Transition States for Submerged Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Partially-Pinned Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Hooman; Hemeda, Ahmed; VCU Team

    2015-11-01

    The pressure at which a superhydrophobic surface transitions from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state is often referred to as the critical pressure. Our mathematical simulations have shown that the Cassie-to-Wenzel transition is a gradual process that takes place over a range of pressures as oppose to an event that happens at a certain pressure. During the transition period, the air-water interface may go through a series pinned, partially-pinned, and de-pinned states that depend on the geometry of the surface asperities. This in turn indicates that the drag-reduction effect produced by a submerged superhydrophobic surface can vary with the hydrostatic pressure, and is highly dependent on sharpness of the surface asperities. The study reported here reviews our recent discoveries in simulating the wetted area and drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with different microstructures. National Science Foundation CMM 1029924 and CBET 1402655 programs.

  11. Near-surface turbulence for evaporative convection at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, K. A.; Saylor, J. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2001-11-01

    Turbulence measurements are reported for the flow beneath an air/water interface undergoing evaporative convection. Measurements were obtained using a two component laser Doppler velocimeter system. Two hydrodynamic boundary conditions were considered for the free surface: a shear free surface, which is the case when surfactants are absent, and a constant elasticity surface, created by depositing a monolayer of oleyl alcohol. The shear free boundary condition case results in significantly higher levels of near surface turbulence than the constant elasticity case. This difference between the two cases decreases with distance from the free surface. Profiles of the turbulent fluctuations were obtained for the horizontal and vertical velocity components and are compared with the somewhat analogous case of a heated solid wall.

  12. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  13. DNS and measurements of scalar transfer across an air-water interface during inception and growth of Langmuir circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, A.; Ma, Y.; Buckley, M.; Tejada-Martinez, A. E.; Veron, F.

    2016-05-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of an initially quiescent coupled air-water interface driven by an air flow with free stream speed of 5 m/s have been conducted and scalar transfer from the air side to the water side and subsequent vertical transport in the water column have been analysed. Two simulations are compared: one with a freely deforming interface, giving rise to gravity-capillary waves and aqueous Langmuir turbulence (LT) characterized by small-scale (centimeter-scale) Langmuir cells (LC), and the other with the interface intentionally held flat, i.e., without LC. It is concluded that LT serves to enhance vertical transport of the scalar in the water side and in the process increases scalar transfer efficiency from the air side to the water side relative to the shear-dominated turbulence in the flat interface case. Furthermore, transition to LT was observed to be accompanied by a spike in scalar flux characterized by an order of magnitude increase. These episodic flux increases, if linked to gusts and overall unsteadiness in the wind field, are expected to be an important contributor in determining the long-term average of the air-sea gas fluxes.

  14. Spread Films of Human Serum Albumin at the Air-Water Interface: Optimization, Morphology, and Durability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Ang, Joo Chuan; Sebastiani, Federica; Tummino, Andrea; White, John W

    2015-12-22

    It has been known for almost one hundred years that a lower surface tension can be achieved at the air-water interface by spreading protein from a concentrated solution than by adsorption from an equivalent total bulk concentration. Nevertheless, the factors that control this nonequilibrium process have not been fully understood. In the present work, we apply ellipsometry, neutron reflectometry, X-ray reflectometry, and Brewster angle microscopy to elaborate the surface loading of human serum albumin in terms of both the macroscopic film morphology and the spreading dynamics. We show that the dominant contribution to the surface loading mechanism is the Marangoni spreading of protein from the bulk of the droplets rather than the direct transfer of their surface films. The films can be spread on a dilute subphase if the concentration of the spreading solution is sufficient; if not, dissolution of the protein occurs, and only a textured adsorbed layer slowly forms. The morphology of the spread protein films comprises an extended network with regions of less textured material or gaps. Further, mechanical cycling of the surface area of the spread films anneals the network into a membrane that approach constant compressibility and has increased durability. Our work provides a new perspective on an old problem in colloid and interface science. The scope for optimization of the surface loading mechanism in a range of systems leading to its exploitation in deposition-based technologies in the future is discussed. PMID:26607026

  15. Hydrogen bonding and orientation effects on the accommodation of methylamine at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Ross D; Carignano, Marcelo A; Kais, Sabre; Zhu, Chongjing; Zhong, Jie; Zeng, Xiao C; Francisco, Joseph S; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Methylamine is an abundant amine compound detected in the atmosphere which can affect the nature of atmospheric aerosol surfaces, changing their chemical and optical properties. Molecular dynamics simulation results show that methylamine accommodation on water is close to unity with the hydrophilic head group solvated in the interfacial environment and the methyl group pointing into the air phase. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bond network indicates stronger hydrogen bonds between water and the primary amine group at the interface, suggesting that atmospheric trace gases will likely react with the methyl group instead of the solvated amine site. These findings suggest new chemical pathways for methylamine acting on atmospheric aerosols in which the methyl group is the site of orientation specific chemistry involving its conversion into a carbonyl site providing hydrophilic groups for uptake of additional water. This conversion may explain the tendency of aged organic aerosols to form cloud condensation nuclei. At the same time, formation of NH2 radical and formaldehyde is suggested to be a new source for NH2 radicals at aerosol surfaces, other than by reaction of absorbed NH3. The results have general implications for the chemistry of other amphiphilic organics, amines in particular, at the surface of atmospherically relevant aerosols. PMID:27276960

  16. Duolayers at the Air/Water Interface: Improved Lifetime through Ionic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prime, Emma L; Solomon, David H; Dagley, Ian J; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-08-01

    Ionic interactions to stabilize Langmuir films at the air/water interface have been used to develop improved duolayer films. Two-component mixtures of octadecanoic (stearic) acid and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (polyDADMAC) with different ratios were prepared and applied to the water surface. Surface pressure isotherm cycles demonstrated a significant improvement in film stability with the inclusion of the polymer. Viscoelastic properties were measured using canal viscometry and oscillating barriers, with both methods showing that the optimum ratio for improved properties was four octadecanoic acid molecules to one DADMAC unit (1:0.25). At this ratio it is expected multiple strong ionic interactions are formed along each polymer chain. Brewster angle microscopy showed decreased domain size with increased ratios of polyDADMAC, indicating that the polymer is interspersed across the surface. This new method to stabilize and increase the viscoelastic properties of charged monolayer films, using a premixed composition, will have application in areas such as water evaporation mitigation, optical devices, and foaming. PMID:27420341

  17. Hydrogen bonding and orientation effects on the accommodation of methylamine at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross D.; Carignano, Marcelo A.; Kais, Sabre; Zhu, Chongjing; Zhong, Jie; Zeng, Xiao C.; Francisco, Joseph S.; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Methylamine is an abundant amine compound detected in the atmosphere which can affect the nature of atmospheric aerosol surfaces, changing their chemical and optical properties. Molecular dynamics simulation results show that methylamine accommodation on water is close to unity with the hydrophilic head group solvated in the interfacial environment and the methyl group pointing into the air phase. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bond network indicates stronger hydrogen bonds between water and the primary amine group at the interface, suggesting that atmospheric trace gases will likely react with the methyl group instead of the solvated amine site. These findings suggest new chemical pathways for methylamine acting on atmospheric aerosols in which the methyl group is the site of orientation specific chemistry involving its conversion into a carbonyl site providing hydrophilic groups for uptake of additional water. This conversion may explain the tendency of aged organic aerosols to form cloud condensation nuclei. At the same time, formation of NH2 radical and formaldehyde is suggested to be a new source for NH2 radicals at aerosol surfaces, other than by reaction of absorbed NH3. The results have general implications for the chemistry of other amphiphilic organics, amines in particular, at the surface of atmospherically relevant aerosols.

  18. Compression-Induced Fusion of Glassy Core Polymer Micelles at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Won, You-Yeon

    The surface mechanical and morphological properties of glassy core polymer micelles at the air-water interface were investigated. Asymmetric PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG block copolymers with PEG weight fractions larger than 0.5 were formulated in the form of aqueous micelles and spread onto water. Compressed films of PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG micelles reach high dynamic surface pressures. On the detailed level, however, PS-PEG and PtBMA-PEG micelles exhibit different surface pressure-area profiles. The PtBMA-PEG isotherm shows a transition to a plateau around a surface pressure of 24 mN/m, which is attributed to the PtBMA block as it forms a continuous film; this interpretation is supported by the fact that the surface pressure at the plateau transition is identical to the value of the spreading coefficient for PtBMA. This presents evidence that the core domains of PtBMA-PEG micelles melt and merge into a film when the micellar monolayer is laterally compressed. Such behavior was not observed with PS-PEG micelles. We suspect that under lateral compression, PtBMA-PEG micelles undergo fusion into a continuous film because PtBMA has the natural tendency to spread on the water surface, whereas PS-PEG micelles does not because the dewetting tendency of PS preventing formation of a uniform layer.

  19. Effect of grafted polymer species on particle monolayer structure at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Emiko; Okazaki, Yoshitaka; Komune, Seishu; Yoshinaga, Kohji

    2011-03-01

    We have studied poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted(PMMA) particle monolayer systems at the air-water interface. In previous papers, we reported that PMMA chains grafted from particles (silica particle and polystyrene latex) were extended on water surfaces. Through observing deposited particle monolayers on substrates using SEM, we have confirmed that PMMA of large molecular weights were either dispersed or arrayed in structure with long inter-particle distances approximately 500 nm. In contrast, low molecular weight PMMA were observed to aggregate upon deposition. We speculated that the difference in morphology in deposited particle monolayers would be attributed to the affinity between the grafted polymer and the substrate. To examine the effect of this affinity three new polymer-grafted silica particles were synthesized with a fairly high graft density of about 0.14 approximately 0.43 nm(-2). As well as PMMA-grafted silica particles (SiO2-PMMA), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(t-butyl methacrylate)--grafted silica particles (SiO2-PHEMA and SiO2-PtBuMA) were also prepared and subjected to pi-A isotherm measurements and SEM observations. These pi-A isotherms indicated that polymer-grafted silica formed monolayer at the air-water interface, and the onset area of increasing surface pressure suggests that the polymer chains are extended on a water surface. However, the morphology of the deposited monolayer is highly dependent on polymer species: SiO2-PHEMA showed that the dispersed particle monolayer structure was independent of grafted molecular weight while SiO2-tBuMA showed an aggregated structure that was also independent of grafted moleculer weight. SiO2-PMMA showed intermediate tendencies: dispersed structure was observed with high grafted molecular weight and aggregated structure was observed with low grafted molecule weight. The morphology on glass substrate would be explaiened by hydrophilic interaction between grafted polymer and hydrophilic glass

  20. Gas exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces in south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Blayne; Hammond, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Radon 222 concentrations in the water and sedimentary columns and radon exchange rates across the sediment-water and air-water interfaces have been measured in a section of south San Francisco Bay. Two independent methods have been used to determine sediment-water exchange rates, and the annual averages of these methods agree within the uncertainty of the determinations, about 20%. The annual average of benthic fluxes from shoal areas is nearly a factor of 2 greater than fluxes from the channel areas. Fluxes from the shoal and channel areas exceed those expected from simple molecular diffusion by factors of 4 and 2, respectively, apparently due to macrofaunal irrigation. Values of the gas transfer coefficient for radon exchange across the air-water interface were determined by constructing a radon mass balance for the water column and by direct measurement using floating chambers. The chamber method appears to yield results which are too high. Transfer coefficients computed using the mass balance method range from 0.4 m/day to 1.8 m/day, with a 6-year average of 1.0 m/day. Gas exchange is linearly dependent upon wind speed over a wind speed range of 3.2–6.4 m/s, but shows no dependence upon current velocity. Gas transfer coefficients predicted from an empirical relationship between gas exchange rates and wind speed observed in lakes and the oceans are within 30% of the coefficients determined from the radon mass balance and are considerably more accurate than coefficients predicted from theoretical gas exchange models.

  1. Substrateless Welding of Self-Assembled Silver Nanowires at Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang; Wang, Zhongyong; Ye, Qinxian; He, Jiaqing; Nie, Xiao; He, Gufeng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-10

    Integrating connected silver nanowire networks with flexible polymers has appeared as a popular way to prepare flexible electronics. To reduce the contact resistance and enhance the connectivity between silver nanowires, various welding techniques have been developed. Herein, rather than welding on solid supporting substrates, which often requires complicated transferring operations and also may pose damage to heat-sensitive substrates, we report an alternative approach to prepare easily transferrable conductive networks through welding of self-assembled silver nanowires at the air/water interface using plasmonic heating. The intriguing welding behavior of partially aligned silver nanowires was analyzed with combined experimental observation and theoretical modeling. The underlying water not only physically supports the assembled silver nanowires but also buffers potential overheating during the welding process, thereby enabling effective welding within a broad range of illumination power density and illumination duration. The welded networks could be directly integrated with PDMS substrates to prepare high-performance stable flexible heaters that are stretchable, bendable, and can be easily patterned to explore selective heating applications. PMID:27437907

  2. Consistency in the Sum Frequency Generation Intensity and Phase Vibrational Spectra of the Air/Neat Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ranran; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Rong; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2011-06-16

    Tremendous progresses have been made in quantitative understanding and interpretation of the hydrogen bonding and ordering structure at the air/water interface since the first sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) measurement on the neat air/water interface by Q. Du et al. in 1993 (PRL, 70, 2312-2316, 1993.). However, there are still disagreements and controversies on the consistency between the different experiment measurements and the theoretical computational results. One critical problem lies in the inconsistency between the SFG-VS intensity measurements and the recently developed SFG-VS phase spectra measurements of the neat air/water interface, which has inspired various theoretical efforts trying to understand them. In this report, the reliability of the SFG-VS intensity spectra of the neat air/water interface is to be quantitatively examined, and the sources of possible inaccuracies in the SFG-VS phase spectral measurement is to be discussed based on the non-resonant SHG phase measurement results. The conclusion is that the SFG-VS intensity spectra data from different laboratories are now quantitatively converging and in agreement with each other, and the possible inaccuracies and inconsistencies in the SFG-VS phase spectra measurements need to be carefully examined against the properly corrected phase standard.

  3. epi-Fluorescence imaging at the air-water interface of fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Kristen; Sacks, Stuart; Li, Shanghao; Leblanc, Roger M

    2014-08-18

    Protein fibrillization is associated with many devastating neurodegenerative diseases. This process has been studied using spectroscopic and microscopic methods. In this study, epi-fluorescence at the air-water interface was developed as an innovative technique for observing fibrillization of bovine serum albumin and human insulin. PMID:24976597

  4. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  5. Advances in simulating radiance signatures for dynamic air/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Gerace, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    The air-water interface poses a number of problems for both collecting and simulating imagery. At the surface, the magnitude of observed radiance can change by multiple orders of magnitude at high spatiotemporal frequency due to glinting effects. In the volume, similarly high frequency focusing of photons by a dynamic wave surface significantly changes the reflected radiance of in-water objects and the scattered return of the volume itself. These phenomena are often manifest as saturated pixels and artifacts in collected imagery (often enhanced by time delays between neighboring pixels or interpolation between adjacent filters) and as noise and greater required computation times in simulated imagery. This paper describes recent advances made to the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to address the simulation issues to better facilitate an understanding of a multi/hyper-spectral collection. Glint effects are simulated using a dynamic height field that can be driven by wave frequency models and generates a sea state at arbitrary time scales. The volume scattering problem is handled by coupling the geometry representing the surface (facetization by the height field) with the single scattering contribution at any point in the water. The problem is constrained somewhat by assuming that contributions come from a Snell's window above the scattering point and by assuming a direct source (sun). Diffuse single scattered and multiple scattered energy contributions are handled by Monte Carlo techniques employed previously. The model is compared to existing radiative transfer codes where possible, with the objective of providing a robust movel of time-dependent absolute radiance at many wavelengths.

  6. Dipolar interactions between domains in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rufeil-Fiori, Elena; Wilke, Natalia; Banchio, Adolfo J

    2016-05-25

    A great variety of biologically relevant monolayers present phase coexistence characterized by domains formed by lipids in an ordered phase state dispersed in a continuous, disordered phase. From the difference in surface densities between these phases, inter-domain dipolar interactions arise. These interactions are relevant for the determination of the spacial distribution of domains as well as their dynamics. In this work, we propose a novel way of estimating the dipolar repulsion using a passive method that involves the analysis of images of the monolayer with phase coexistence. This method is based on the comparison of the pair correlation function obtained from experiments with that obtained from Brownian dynamics simulations of a model system. As an example, we determined the difference in dipolar density of a binary monolayer of DSPC/DMPC at the air-water interface from the analysis of the radial distribution of domains, and the results are compared with those obtained by surface potential determinations. A systematic analysis for the experimentally relevant parameter range is given, which may be used as a working curve for obtaining the dipolar repulsion in different systems. PMID:27139819

  7. Milk whey proteins and xanthan gum interactions in solution and at the air-water interface: a rheokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adrián A; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Rubiolo, Amelia C; Santiago, Liliana G

    2010-11-01

    In this contribution, we present experimental information about the effect of xanthan gum (XG) on the adsorption behaviour of two milk whey protein samples (MWP), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and whey protein concentrate (WPC), at the air-water interface. The MWP concentration studied corresponded to the protein bulk concentration which is able to saturate the air-water interface (1.0 wt%). Temperature, pH and ionic strength of aqueous systems were kept constant at 20 degrees C, pH 7 and 0.05 M, respectively, while the XG bulk concentration varied in the range 0.00-0.25 wt%. Biopolymer interactions in solution were analyzed by extrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy using 1-anilino-8-naphtalene sulphonic acid (ANS) as a protein fluorescence probe. Interfacial biopolymer interactions were evaluated by dynamic tensiometry and surface dilatational rheology. Adsorption behaviour was discussed from a rheokinetic point of view in terms of molecular diffusion, penetration and conformational rearrangement of adsorbed protein residues at the air-water interface. Differences in the interaction magnitude, both in solution and at the interface vicinity, and in the adsorption rheokinetic parameters were observed in MWP/XG mixed systems depending on the protein type (beta-LG or WPC) and biopolymer relative concentration. beta-LG adsorption in XG presence could be promoted by mechanisms based on biopolymer segregative interactions and thermodynamic incompatibility in the interface vicinity, resulting in better surface and viscoelastic properties. The same mechanism could be responsible of WPC interfacial adsorption in the presence of XG. The interfacial functionality of WPC was improved by the synergistic interactions with XG, although WPC chemical complexity might complicate the elucidation of molecular events that govern adsorption dynamics of WPC/XG mixed systems at the air-water interface. PMID:20692133

  8. Multi-scale modeling of mycosubtilin lipopeptides at the air/water interface: structure and optical second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Loison, Claire; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2014-02-01

    Monolayers of the lipopeptide mycosubtilin are studied at the air/water interface. Their structure is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. All-atom models suggest that the lipopeptide is flexible and aggregates at the interface. To achieve simulation times of several microseconds, a coarse-grained (CG) model based on the MARTINI force field was also used. These CG simulations describe the formation of half-micelles at the interface for surface densities up to 1 lipopeptide per nm(2). In these aggregates, the tyrosine side chain orientation is found to be constrained: on average, its main axis, as defined along the C-OH bond, aligns along the interface normal and points towards the air side. The origin of the optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from mycosubtilin monolayers at the air/water interface is also investigated. The molecular hyperpolarizability of the lipopeptide is obtained from quantum chemistry calculations. The tyrosine side chain contribution to the hyperpolarizability is found to be dominant. The orientation distribution of tyrosine, associated with a dominant hyperpolarizability component along the C-OH bond of the tyrosine, yields a ratio of the susceptibility elements χ((2))(ZZZ)/χ((2))(ZXX) consistent with the experimental measurements recently reported by M. N. Nasir et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 19919]. PMID:24346061

  9. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface. PMID:27389283

  10. Dissecting the Molecular Structure of the Air/Water Interface from Quantum Simulations of the Sum-Frequency Generation Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Medders, Gregory R; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-03-23

    The molecular characterization of the air/water interface is a key step in understanding fundamental multiphase phenomena ranging from heterogeneous chemical processes in the atmosphere to the hydration of biomolecules. The apparent simplicity of the air/water interface, however, masks an underlying complexity associated with the dynamic nature of the water hydrogen-bond network that has so far hindered an unambiguous characterization of its microscopic properties. Here, we demonstrate that the application of quantum many-body molecular dynamics, which enables spectroscopically accurate simulations of water from the gas to the condensed phase, leads to a definitive molecular-level picture of the interface region. For the first time, excellent agreement is obtained between the simulated vibrational sum-frequency generation spectrum and the most recent state-of-the-art measurements, without requiring any empirical frequency shift or ad hoc scaling of the spectral intensity. A systematic dissection of the spectral features demonstrates that a rigorous representation of nuclear quantum effects as well as of many-body energy and electrostatic contributions is necessary for a quantitative reproduction of the experimental data. The unprecedented accuracy of the simulations presented here indicates that quantum many-body molecular dynamics can enable predictive studies of aqueous interfaces, which by complementing analogous experimental measurements will provide unique molecular insights into multiphase and heterogeneous processes of relevance in chemistry, biology, materials science, and environmental research. PMID:26943730

  11. Dynamic adsorption of weakly interacting polymer/surfactant mixtures at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Angus-Smyth, Anna; Campbell, Richard A; Bain, Colin D

    2012-08-28

    The dynamic adsorption of polymer/surfactant mixtures containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with either tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C(14)TAB) or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied at the expanding air/water interface created by an overflowing cylinder, which has a surface age of 0.1-1 s. The composition of the adsorption layer is obtained by a new approach that co-models data obtained from ellipsometry and only one isotopic contrast from neutron reflectometry (NR) without the need for any deuterated polymer. The precision and accuracy of the polymer surface excess obtained matches the levels achieved from NR measurements of different isotopic contrasts involving deuterated polymer, and requires much less neutron beamtime. The PEO concentration was fixed at 100 ppm and the electrolyte concentration at 0.1 M while the surfactant concentration was varied over three orders of magnitude. For both systems, at low bulk surfactant concentrations, adsorption of the polymer is diffusion-controlled while surfactant adsorption is under mixed kinetic/diffusion control. Adsorption of PEO is inhibited once the surfactant coverage exceeds 2 μmol m(-2). For PEO/C(14)TAB, polymer adsorption drops abruptly to zero over a narrow range of surfactant concentration. For PEO/SDS, inhibition of polymer adsorption is much more gradual, and a small amount remains adsorbed even at bulk surfactant concentrations above the cmc. The difference in behavior of the two mixtures is ascribed to favorable interactions between the PEO and SDS in the bulk solution and at the surface. PMID:22746543

  12. Anomalously large electro-optic Pockels effect at the air-water interface with an electric field applied parallel to the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuto; Osawa, Kengo; Yukita, Shunpei; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2016-05-01

    The optical Pockels effect was observed at the air-water interface by electromodulation spectroscopy. When an AC electric field of frequency f was applied parallel to a water surface between Pt electrodes, the field induced a change in the transmitted light intensity synchronized at 1f proportional to the field strength. The 1f signals dominated over 2f signals by one order of magnitude and the signal disappeared when the electrodes were completely immersed under the water surface, strongly suggesting that the observed phenomena were due to the Pockels effect at the air-water interface. The Pockels coefficient was estimated to be | r | = 1.4 × 105 pm/V, which is much larger than that at the solid-water interface. However, this is unusual because the parallel electric field does not induce the break in inversion symmetry required for the appearance of the Pockels effect. The electrowetting effect was experimentally ruled out as a mechanism for the Pockels effect, and this made the existence of a field perpendicular to the surface, although extremely weak, the most likely explanation.

  13. Surface adsorption behaviour of milk whey protein and pectin mixtures under conditions of air-water interface saturation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adrián A; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Rubiolo, Amelia C; Santiago, Liliana G

    2011-07-01

    Milk whey proteins (MWP) and pectins (Ps) are biopolymer ingredients commonly used in the manufacture of colloidal food products. Therefore, knowledge of the interfacial characteristics of these biopolymers and their mixtures is very important for the design of food dispersion formulations (foams and/or emulsions). In this paper, we examine the adsorption and surface dilatational behaviour of MWP/Ps systems under conditions in which biopolymers can saturate the air-water interface on their own. Experiments were performed at constant temperature (20 °C), pH 7 and ionic strength 0.05 M. Two MWP samples, β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and whey protein concentrate (WPC), and two Ps samples, low-methoxyl pectin (LMP) and high-methoxyl pectin (HMP) were evaluated. The contribution of biopolymers (MWP and Ps) to the interfacial properties of mixed systems was evaluated on the basis of their individual surface molecular characteristics. Biopolymer bulk concentration capable of saturating the air-water interface was estimated from surface pressure isotherms. Under conditions of interfacial saturation, dynamic adsorption behaviour (surface pressure and dilatational rheological characteristics) of MWP/Ps systems was discussed from a kinetic point of view, in terms of molecular diffusion, penetration and configurational rearrangement at the air-water interface. The main adsorption mechanism in MWP/LMP mixtures might be the MWP interfacial segregation due to the thermodynamic incompatibility between MWP and LMP (synergistic mechanism); while the interfacial adsorption in MWP/HMP mixtures could be characterized by a competitive mechanism between MWP and HMP at the air-water interface (antagonistic mechanism). The magnitude of these phenomena could be closely related to differences in molecular composition and/or aggregation state of MWP (β-LG and WPC). PMID:21440425

  14. Influence of the tyrosine environment on the second harmonic generation of iturinic antimicrobial lipopeptides at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Benichou, Emmanuel; Loison, Claire; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Besson, Françoise; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2013-12-01

    The second harmonic generation (SHG) response at the air-water interface from the tyrosine-containing natural iturinic cyclo-lipopeptides mycosubtilin, iturin A and bacillomycin D is reported. It is shown that this response is dominated by the single tyrosine residue present in these molecules owing to the large first hyperpolarizability arising from the non-centrosymmetric aromatic ring structure of this amino acid. The SHG response of these iturinic antibiotics is also compared to the response of surfactin, a cyclo-lipopeptide with a similar l,d-amino acid sequence but lacking a tyrosine residue, and PalmATA, a synthetic linear lipopeptide possessing a single tyrosine residue but lacking the amino acid sequence structuring the cycle of the iturinic antibiotics. From the light polarization analysis of the SHG response, it is shown that the tyrosine local environment is critical in defining the SHG response of these peptides at the air-water interface. Our results demonstrate that tyrosine, similar to tryptophan, can be used as an endogenous molecular probe of peptides and proteins for SHG at the air-water interface, paving the way for SHG studies of other tyrosine-containing bioactive molecules. PMID:24149982

  15. Capillarity-induced directed self-assembly of patchy hexagram particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Min; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Kim, Jongmin; Yeom, Su-Jin; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Directed self-assembly can produce ordered or organized superstructures from pre-existing building blocks through pre-programmed interactions. Encoding desired information into building blocks with specific directionality and strength, however, poses a significant challenge for the development of self-assembled superstructures. Here, we demonstrate that controlling the shape and patchiness of particles trapped at the air-water interface can represent a powerful approach for forming ordered macroscopic complex structures through capillary interactions. We designed hexagram particles using a micromolding method that allowed for precise control over the shape and, more importantly, the chemical patchiness of the particles. The assembly behaviors of these hexagram particles at the air-water interface were strongly affected by chemical patchiness. In particular, two-dimensional millimeter-scale ordered structures could be formed by varying the patchiness of the hexagram particles, and we attribute this effect to the delicate balance between the attractive and repulsive interactions among the patchy hexagram particles. Our results provide important clues for encoding information into patchy particles to achieve macroscopic assemblies via a simple molding technique and potentially pave a new pathway for the programmable assembly of particles at the air-water interface. PMID:27328067

  16. Toward a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Kuo, I-Feng W; Tobias, Douglas J; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self-ions, H3O(+) and OH(-), for the air-water interface have implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O(+) and/or OH(-) prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs interfacial behavior of H3O(+) and OH(-) that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O(+) as a function of the position of the ion in the vicinity of an air-water interface. The PMF suggests that H3O(+) has equal propensity for the interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O(+) to our previously computed PMF for OH(-) adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs in the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O(+) is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH(-) partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions. PMID:24762096

  17. Water structure at the air-aqueous interface of divalent cation and nitrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Man; Spinney, Rick; Allen, Heather C

    2009-04-01

    The water surface structure of aqueous magnesium, calcium, and strontium nitrate solutions with six to seven water molecules on average solvating each ion was investigated using vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman (polarized) and infrared spectroscopies were used for understanding solvation effects. Infrared reflection spectra were analyzed to further understand the VSFG data. The VSFG spectral changes indicate that the divalent countercation species play a key role in the surface perturbation of the water. In addition, the data show that the solvated ions, and possibly their ion pairs, approach the aqueous surface. The identity of the divalent cation may cause a difference in the concentration gradient near the surface, thereby increasing the VSFG-active region, which then indicates an increase in the interfacial depth. The interface becomes thickened with Mg(2+) < Ca(2+) < Sr(2+). The free OH orientation measured from the surface normal from the salt solutions changes from 33 (from neat water) to approximately 60 degrees . PMID:19239253

  18. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  19. Reactivity of aldehydes at the air-water interface. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Martins-Costa, Marilia T C; García-Prieto, Francisco F; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-02-14

    Understanding the influence of solute-solvent interactions on chemical reactivity has been a subject of intense research in the last few decades. Theoretical studies have focused on bulk solvation phenomena and a variety of models and methods have been developed that are now widely used by both theoreticians and experimentalists. Much less attention has been paid, however, to processes that occur at liquid interfaces despite the important role such interfaces play in chemistry and biology. In this study, we have carried out sequential molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations to analyse the influence of the air-water interface on the reactivity of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde, three simple aldehydes of atmospheric interest. The calculated free-energy profiles exhibit a minimum at the interface, where the average reactivity indices may display large solvation effects. The study emphasizes the role of solvation dynamics, which are responsible for large fluctuations of some molecular properties. We also show that the photolysis rate constant of benzaldehyde in the range 290-308 nm increases by one order of magnitude at the surface of a water droplet, from 2.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) in the gas phase to 2.8 × 10(-4) s(-1) at the air-water interface, and we discuss the potential impact of this result on the chemistry of the troposphere. Experimental data in this domain are still scarce and computer simulations like those presented in this work may provide some insights that can be useful to design new experiments. PMID:25451554

  20. Thermometric measurements of the molecular sublayer at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B.; Donelan, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    A series of measurements was conducted in the Air-Sea Interaction Saltwater Tank (ASIST) to study the response of the air-water interfacial molecular sublayer under various heat flux and wind speed conditions. In-situ gradients were measured with a platinum-plated tungsten wire microthermometer, which resolved the temperature of the thermally conductive sublayer. Air-sea heat flux was controlled by changing the air-water temperature difference (ΔTAW) and the wind speed, and measurements were made for three ΔTAW regimes over a range of wind speeds. A function was fitted to the measured temperature profiles as a way of extracting the boundary layer thickness in a consistent fashion, from which the λ coefficient after Saunders (1967) was computed. This dataset returned a mean λ coefficient of 2.4 +/- 0.5, which was generally lower than previous studies, and was found to be independent of wind speed in the range of 1 to 9 ms-1.

  1. Adsorption at the air-water interface and emulsification properties of grain legume protein derivatives from pea and broad bean.

    PubMed

    Tsoukala, A; Papalamprou, E; Makri, E; Doxastakis, G; Braudo, E E

    2006-12-01

    Functional properties of native and modified (through induced autolysis) pea (Pisum sativum L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) protein derivatives are studied. In specific, protein solubility and behavior at the air-water interface through surface pressure measurements are investigated. Furthermore the ability of the protein products to act as emulsifying agents and to stabilize emulsions is studied through oil droplet size distribution measurements and by the protein adsorbed at the oil-water interface. The data reveal that the ability of the proteins to act as surfactants and build up a rigid film around the oil droplets, mainly depends on their suitable molecular configuration and structure. Hydrolysis did not promote the functionality of the legume proteins. Broad bean exhibited better functionality than pea, before and after hydrolysis. Some comparisons were also made with lupin (Lupinus albus L.) protein isolate. PMID:17049437

  2. OH-Radical Oxidation of Surface-Active cis-Pinonic Acid at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Yosuke

    2016-05-26

    Gaseous biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are immediately oxidized by gaseous oxidants to form BVOC-acids that rapidly condense onto aqueous aerosol phase and thus contribute to the growth of atmospheric particles. Because BVOC-acids are highly hydrophobic and hence surface-active in nature, it seems critical to study the oxidation by gaseous hydroxyl radical (·OH(g)) at the air-water interface. Here we report on the fast (≤10 μs) oxidation of aqueous cis-pinonic acid (C10H16O3, CPA, cis-pinonate anion's m/z = 183), a representative BVOC-acid, by ·OH(g) at the air-water interface for the first time. We find that cis-pinonate anion is more enriched at the air-water interface by ∼4 and ∼14 times than n-octanoate anion at 10 and 100 μM, respectively, as revealed by an interface-specific mass spectrometry of the equimolar mixture of microjets. Exposure of aqueous CPA microjets to ·OH(g) pulses from the 266 nm laser photolysis of O3(g)/O2(g)/H2O(g)/N2(g) mixtures yields pinonic peroxyl radicals (m/z = 214) that lead to the functionalization products carbonyls (m/z = 197), alcohols (m/z = 199), and pinonic hydroperoxides (m/z = 215) in addition to smaller-mass products including carbonyls (m/z = 155 and 157). We confirmed the formation of the corresponding alcohols, aldehydes, and hydroperoxides in experiments performed in D2O solvent. The analysis of total mass balance implies a significant amount (>70%) of products would be emitted into the gas-phase during the heterogeneous ·OH-oxidations. Our results suggest ·OH-oxidations of amphiphilic BVOC-acids at the air-water interface may play a far more significant role in photochemical aging process of aqueous aerosols than previously assumed. PMID:27098046

  3. Photoswitching the mechanical properties in Langmuir layers of semifluorinated alkyl-azobenzenes at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Antigoni; Jonas, Ulrich; Loppinet, Benoit; Geue, Thomas; Stangenberg, René; Li, Dan; Berger, Rüdiger; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-11-21

    Semifluorinated alkyl-azobenzene derivatives (SFAB) can form stable Langmuir layers at the air-water interface. These systems combine the amphiphobic character of semifluorinated alkyl units as structure-directing motifs with photochromic behavior based on the well-known reversible cis-trans isomerization upon irradiation with UV and visible light. Herein, we report our investigations of the structural and dynamic tunability of these SFAB layers at the air-water interface in response to an external light stimulus. The monolayer structures and properties of [4-(heptadecafluorooctyl)phenyl](4-octylphenyl)diazene (F8-azo-H8) and bis(4-octylphenyl)diazene (H8-azo-H8) were studied by neutron reflectivity, surface pressure-area isotherms with compression-expansion cycles, and interfacial rheology. We find that UV irradiation reversibly influences the packing behavior of the azobenzene molecules and interpret this as a transition from organized layer structures with the main axis of the molecule vertically oriented in the trans form to random packing of the cis isomer. Interestingly, this trans-cis isomerization leads to an increase in surface pressure, which is accompanied by a decrease in viscoelastic moduli. These results suggest ways of tailoring the properties of responsive fluid interfaces. PMID:26451399

  4. Influence of dissolved humic substances on the mass transfer of organic compounds across the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of two volatile organic compounds was studied under various conditions of agitation intensity, solution pH and ionic strength. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of model compounds from an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution (dynamic system). Under these conditions, the overall transfer rate is controlled by the mass-transfer resistance on the water side of the water-gas interface. The experimental results show that the presence of DHS hinders the transport of the organic molecules from the water into the gas phase under all investigated conditions. Mass-transfer coefficients were significantly reduced even by low, environmentally relevant concentrations of DHS. The retardation effect increased with increasing DHS concentration. The magnitude of the retardation effect on water-gas exchange was compared for Suwannee River fulvic and humic acids, a commercially available leonardite humic acid and two synthetic surfactants. The observed results are in accordance with the concept of hydrodynamic effects. Surface pressure forces due to surface film formation change the hydrodynamic characteristics of water motion at the water-air interface and thus impede surface renewal. PMID:22051345

  5. Electrochemical Surface Potential due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Stern, Abraham C.; Levin, Yan; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2012-06-07

    Herein, we present research that suggests that the underlying physics that drive simple empirical models of anions (e.g. point charge, no polarization) to the air-water interface, with water described by SPC/E, or related partial charge models is different than when both ions and water are modeled with quantum mechanical based interactions. Specifically, we will show that the driving force of ions to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and the negative electrochemical surface potential. We will demonstrate that we can fully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory (DCT). Our research suggests that a significant part of the electrochemical surface potential in empirical models appears to be an artifact of the failure of point charge models in the vicinity of a broken symmetry. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle.

  6. Towards Organized Hybrid Nanomaterials at the Air/Water Interface Based on Liquid-Crystal/ZnO Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Paczesny, Jan; Wolska-Pietkiewicz, Małgorzata; Binkiewicz, Ilona; Wróbel, Zbigniew; Wadowska, Monika; Matuła, Kinga; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Pociecha, Damian; Smalc-Koziorowska, Julita; Lewiński, Janusz; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-11-16

    The ability to self-assemble nanosized ligand-stabilized metal oxide or semiconductor materials offers an intriguing route to engineer nanomaterials with new tailored properties from the disparate components. We describe a novel one-pot two-step organometallic approach to prepare ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) coated with deprotonated 4-(dodecyloxy)benzoic acid (i.e., an X-type liquid-crystalline ligand) as a model LC system (termed ZnO-LC1 NCs). Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films of the resulting hybrids are investigated. The observed behavior of the ZnO NCs at the air/water interface is rationalized by invoking a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by the anchored liquid-crystalline shell. The ordered superstructures form according to mechanism based on a ZnO-interdigitation process mediated by liquid crystals (termed ZIP-LC). The external and directed force applied upon compression at the air/water interface and the packing of the ligands that stabilize the ZnO cores drives the formation of nanorods of ordered internal structure. To study the process in detail, we follow a nontraditional protocol of thin-film investigation. We collect the films from the air/water interface in powder form (ZnO-LC1 LB), resuspend the powder in organic solvents and utilize otherwise unavailable experimental techniques. The structural and physical properties of the resulting superlattices were studied by using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray studies, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis, UV/Vis absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. PMID:26427916

  7. Thermodynamic, morphological and structural properties of dissociated fatty acid monolayers at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Research on monolayers of amphiphilic lipids on aqueous solution is of basic importance in surface science. Due to the applicability of a variety of surface sensitive techniques, floating insoluble monolayers are very suitable model systems for the study of order, structure formation and material transport in two dimensions or the interactions of molecules at the interface with ions or molecules in the bulk (headword 'molecular recognition'). From the behavior of monolayers conclusions can be drawn on the properties of lipid layers on solid substrates or in biological membranes. This work deals with specific and fundamental interactions in monolayers both on the molecular and on the microscopic scale and with their relation to the lattice structure, morphology and thermodynamic behavior of monolayers at the air-water interface. As model system especially monolayers of long chain fatty acids are used, since there the molecular interactions can be gradually adjusted by varying the degree of dissociation by means of the suphase pH value. For manipulating the molecular interactions besides the subphase composition also temperature and monolayer composition are systematically varied. The change in the monolayer properties as a function of an external parameter is analyzed by means of isotherm and surface potential measurements, Brewster-angle microscopy, X-ray diffraction at grazing incidence and polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. For this a quantitative measure for the molecular interactions and for the chain conformational order is derived from the X-ray data. The most interesting results of this work are the elucidation of the origin of regular polygonal and dendritic domain shapes, the various effects of cholesterol on molecular packing and lattice order of long chain amphiphiles, as well as the detection of an abrupt change in the head group bonding interactions, the chain conformational order and the phase transition pressure

  8. Surface Partitioning and Stability of Mixed Films of Fluorinated Alcohols and Acids at the Air- Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontu, N. A.; Vaida, V.

    2007-05-01

    The production of fluorinated compounds over the past 50 years has had numerous industrial applications. For example, perfluorinated carboxylic acids are used in the synthesis of polymers and fire retardants, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates act as surface protectors, and fluorotelomer alcohols are incorporated into products such as paints, coatings, polymers, and adhesives. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) are linear polyfluorinated alcohols with the formula CF3(CF2)nCH2CH2OH (n=1,3,5,...). They have been suggested as possible precursors for perfluorinated carboxylic acids and detected in the troposphere over several North American sites. Perfluorocarboxylic acids have even been detected in the arctic food chain, human blood, tissues of animals and environmental waters. We report the surface activity of fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated carboxylic acids at the air-water interface by using a Langmuir trough. Isotherms of the pure compounds along with mixed films with other organic carboxylic acids were collected. The main objective of these experiments was to understand their heterogeneous chemistry by characterizing the pure and mixed films, which serves as a representative model for organic films on atmospheric surfaces such as those found on oceans and aqueous aerosols. Film properties and behavior, notably stabilization, evaporation from the subphase, and miscibility in the single-component mixtures as well as in the mixed films will be discussed. An important consequence of FTOHs and perfluorocarboxylic acids being found to partition to the air-water interface is the possibility of their transport and widespread distribution and deposition using atmospheric aerosols.

  9. Exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingjun; Lin, Tian; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Tian, Chongguo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, air and surface seawater samples collected from the Bohai (BS) and Yellow Seas (YS) in May 2012 were determined exchange of PAHs, especially of low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs (three- and four-ring PAHs) at the air-water interface. Net volatilization fluxes of LMW PAHs were 266-1454 ng/m2/d and decreased with distance from the coast, indicating that these PAHs transported from coastal runoff were potential contributors to the atmosphere in the BS and YS. Moreover, LMW PAHs were enriched in the dissolved phase compared with those in the particulate phase in the water column, possibly suggesting that the volatilized LMW PAHs were directly derived from wastewater discharge or petroleum pollution rather than released from contaminated sediments. The air-sea exchange fluxes of the three-ring PAHs were 2- to 20-fold higher than their atmospheric deposition fluxes in the BS and YS. The input to and output from the water reached equilibrium for four-ring PAHs. Differently, five- and six-ring PAHs were introduced into the marine environment primarily through dry and wet deposition, indicating that the water column was still a sink of these PAHs from the surrounding atmosphere.

  10. Thermal stability effects on the structure of the velocity field above an air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are described for turbulent flows above laboratory water waves, under various wind and thermal stratification conditions. Experimental results, when presented in the framework of Monin-Obukhov (1954) similarity theory, support local scaling based on evaluation of stratification effects at the same nondimensional distance from the mean water surface. Such scaling allows an extension of application of the above theory to the outer region of the boundary layer. Throughout the fully turbulent region, ratios of mean velocity gradients, eddy viscosities, and turbulence intensities under nonneutral and neutral conditions correlate well with the parameter z/Lambda (Lambda being a local Obukhov length and z the vertical coordinate of the mean air flow) and show good agreement with established field correlations. The influence of stratification on the wind-stress coefficient can be estimated from an empirical relationship in terms of its value under neutral conditions and a bulk Richardson number.

  11. Tensiometry and dilational rheology of mixed β-lactoglobulin/ionic surfactant adsorption layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Gochev, Georgi; Miller, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    Oscillating drop tensiometry was applied to study adsorbed interfacial layers at water/air and water/hexane interfaces formed from mixed solutions of β-lactoglobulin (BLG, 1 μM in 10 mM buffer, pH 7 - negative net charge) and the anionic surfactant SDS or the cationic DoTAB. The interfacial pressure Π and the dilational viscoelasticity modulus |E| of the mixed layers were measured for mixtures of varying surfactant concentrations. The double capillary technique was employed which enables exchange of the protein solution in the drop bulk by surfactant solution (sequential adsorption) or by pure buffer (washing out). The first protocol allows probing the influence of the surfactant on a pre-adsorbed protein layer thus studying the protein/surfactant interactions at the interface. The second protocol gives access to the residual values of Π and |E| measured after the washing out procedure thus bringing information about the process of protein desorption. The DoTAB/BLG complexes exhibit higher surface activity and higher resistance to desorption in comparison with those for the SDS/BLG complexes due to hydrophobization via electrostatic binding of surfactant molecules. The neutral DoTAB/BLG complexes achieve maximum elastic response of the mixed layer. Mixed BLG/surfactant layers at the water/oil interface are found to reach higher surface pressure and lower maximum dilational elasticity than those at the water/air surface. The sequential adsorption mode experiments and the desorption study reveal that binding of DoTAB to pre-adsorbed BLG globules is somehow restricted at the water/air surface in comparison with the case of complex formation in the solution bulk and subsequently adsorbed at the water/air surface. Maximum elasticity is achieved with washed out layers obtained after simultaneous adsorption, i.e. isolation of the most surface active DoTAB/BLG complex. These specific effects are much less pronounced at the W/H interface. PMID:25666640

  12. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase. PMID:25640463

  13. Coadsorption of human milk lactoferrin into the dipalmitoylglycerolphosphatidylcholine phospholipid monolayer spread at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Miano, Fausto; Zhao, Xiubo; Lu, Jian R; Penfold, Jeff

    2007-02-15

    The coadsorption of human milk lactoferrin into a spread monolayer of dipalmitoylglycerol phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at the air/water interface has been studied by neutron reflection. The system is a good model of the preocular tear film outer interface, which was the motivation for the study. The association of the protein with the surface was indicated by an increase of the surface pressure exerted by the DPPC monolayer. The extent of lactoferrin coadsorption was found to decrease with increasing surface pressure in the lipid monolayer, a trend consistent with the observation reported for other proteins, such as lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin. The neutron reflectivity measurements were subsequently carried out at the three surface pressures of 8, 15, and 35 mN/m to examine the structure and composition of lactoferrin coadsorbed at the interface. Whereas the DPPC monolayer effectively prevented lactoferrin insertion at the high surface pressure, a measurable amount of lactoferrin was found at the air/water interface at the two lower surface pressures. At 15 mN/m it was difficult to identify the distribution of lactoferrin with respect to the DPPC monolayer, due to its relatively low adsorbed amount and much broader distribution. At the lowest surface pressure of 8 mN/m, the lactoferrin coadsorption was found to increase with time over the first few hours. After 5 h the distribution of the lactoferrin layer became similar to, though quantitatively lower than, that adsorbed in the absence of the DPPC monolayer. It is characterized by a top dense sublayer of 15 A with a bottom diffuse sublayer of 60 A, indicating structural unfolding induced by surface adsorption under these conditions. PMID:17114223

  14. Coadsorption of Human Milk Lactoferrin into the Dipalmitoylglycerolphosphatidylcholine Phospholipid Monolayer Spread at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Fausto; Zhao, Xiubo; Lu, Jian R.; Penfold, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The coadsorption of human milk lactoferrin into a spread monolayer of dipalmitoylglycerol phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at the air/water interface has been studied by neutron reflection. The system is a good model of the preocular tear film outer interface, which was the motivation for the study. The association of the protein with the surface was indicated by an increase of the surface pressure exerted by the DPPC monolayer. The extent of lactoferrin coadsorption was found to decrease with increasing surface pressure in the lipid monolayer, a trend consistent with the observation reported for other proteins, such as lysozyme and β-lactoglobulin. The neutron reflectivity measurements were subsequently carried out at the three surface pressures of 8, 15, and 35 mN/m to examine the structure and composition of lactoferrin coadsorbed at the interface. Whereas the DPPC monolayer effectively prevented lactoferrin insertion at the high surface pressure, a measurable amount of lactoferrin was found at the air/water interface at the two lower surface pressures. At 15 mN/m it was difficult to identify the distribution of lactoferrin with respect to the DPPC monolayer, due to its relatively low adsorbed amount and much broader distribution. At the lowest surface pressure of 8 mN/m, the lactoferrin coadsorption was found to increase with time over the first few hours. After 5 h the distribution of the lactoferrin layer became similar to, though quantitatively lower than, that adsorbed in the absence of the DPPC monolayer. It is characterized by a top dense sublayer of 15 Å with a bottom diffuse sublayer of 60 Å, indicating structural unfolding induced by surface adsorption under these conditions. PMID:17114223

  15. Turbulence at the Air-Water Interface in Lakes of Different Sizes: Consequences for Gas Transfer Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, S.; Crowe, A. T.; Amaral, J. H.; Arneborg, L.; Bastviken, D.; Forsberg, B. R.; Melack, J. M.; Tota, J.; Tedford, E. W.; Karlsson, J.; Podgrajsek, E.; Andersson, A.; Rutgersson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Similarity scaling predicts that wind induced shear will be the dominant source of turbulence near the air-water interface in lakes with low to moderate wind forcing. Turbulence is expected to be enhanced with wave activity; results are conflicting on the effects of heating and cooling. We measured turbulence with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and / or a temperature-gradient microstructure profiler and obtained correlative time series measurements of meteorology and water column temperature in a 800 m2 arctic pond, a 1 ha boreal lake, and a large tropical reservoir. Turbulence measurements with both instruments corroborated those calculated from similarity scaling in the boreal lake. Within the arctic pond, dissipation rates obtained with the ADV were in agreement with those from similarity scaling when winds exceeded ~1.5 m/s with a greater frequency of measurable dissipation rates when surface waves were present. Dissipation rates in the tropical reservoir reached and often exceeded 10-6 m2 s-3 in the upper meter under light winds and decreased by an order of magnitude with cooling or rainfall. Under cooling, dissipation rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in the uppermost 25 cm bin than in the water column below. Gas transfer coefficients calculated from concurrent measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes with floating chambers and the surface renewal model using the estimates of turbulence were in agreement. These results support the predictions of Monin-Obuhov similarity scaling in that shear dominates turbulence production near the air-water interface under heating and cooling, illustrate spatial variability in turbulence production in small water bodies due to the intermittency of wind interacting with the water's surface, are in agreement with prior oceanic observations that shear and associated turbulence can be intensified in shallow mixing layers under heating with light winds, and illustrate the utility of similarity scaling for

  16. Polystyrene-poly(ethylene oxide) diblock copolymer: the effect of polystyrene and spreading concentration at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Glagola, Cameron P; Miceli, Lia M; Milchak, Marissa A; Halle, Emily H; Logan, Jennifer L

    2012-03-20

    Polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) is an amphiphilic diblock copolymer that undergoes microphase separation when spread at the air/water interface, forming nanosized domains. In this study, we investigate the impact of PS by examining a series of PS-PEO samples containing constant PEO (~17,000 g·mol(-1)) and variable PS (from 3600 to 200,000 g·mol(-1)) through isothermal characterization and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The polymers separated into two categories: predominantly hydrophobic and predominantly hydrophilic with a weight percent of PEO of ~20% providing the boundary between the two. AFM results indicated that predominantly hydrophilic PS-PEO forms dots while more hydrophobic samples yield a mixture of dots and spaghetti with continent-like structures appearing at ~7% PEO or less. These structures reflect a blend of polymer spreading, entanglement, and vitrification as the solvent evaporates. Changing the spreading concentration provides insight into this process with higher concentrations representing earlier kinetic stages and lower concentrations demonstrating later ones. Comparison of isothermal results and AFM analysis shows how polymer behavior at the air/water interface correlates with the observed nanostructures. Understanding the impact of polymer composition and spreading concentration is significant in leading to greater control over the nanostructures obtained through PS-PEO self-assembly and their eventual application as polymer templates. PMID:22339480

  17. [Summer Greenhouse Gases Exchange Flux Across Water-air Interface in Three Water Reservoirs Located in Different Geologic Setting in Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-hong; Pu, Jun-bing; Sun, Ping-an; Yuan, Dao-xian; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Tao; Mo, Xue

    2015-11-01

    Due to special hydrogeochemical characteristics of calcium-rich, alkaline and DIC-rich ( dissolved inorganic carbon) environment controlled by the weathering products from carbonate rock, the exchange characteristics, processes and controlling factors of greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) across water-air interface in karst water reservoir show obvious differences from those of non-karst water reservoir. Three water reservoirs (Dalongdong reservoir-karst reservoir, Wulixia reservoir--semi karst reservoir, Si'anjiang reservoir-non-karst reservoir) located in different geologic setting in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China were chosen to reveal characteristics and controlling factors of greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface. Two common approaches, floating chamber (FC) and thin boundary layer models (TBL), were employed to research and contrast greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface from three reservoirs. The results showed that: (1) surface-layer water in reservoir area and discharging water under dam in Dalongdong water reservoir were the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in reservoir area in Wulixia water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and the source of atmospheric CH4, while discharging water under dam was the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in Si'anjiang water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and source of atmospheric CH4. (2) CO2 and CH4 effluxes in discharging water under dam were much more than those in surface-layer water in reservoir area regardless of karst reservoir or non karst reservoir. Accordingly, more attention should be paid to the CO2 and CH4 emission from discharging water under dam. (3) In the absence of submerged soil organic matters and plants, the difference of CH4 effluxes between karst groundwater-fed reservoir ( Dalongdong water reservoir) and non-karst area ( Wulixia water reservoir and Si'anjiang water reservoir) was less. However, CO2

  18. Structure of Human Annexin A6 at the Air-Water Interface and in a Membrane-Bound State

    PubMed Central

    Golczak, Marcin; Kirilenko, Aneta; Bandorowicz-Pikula, Joanna; Desbat, Bernard; Pikula, Slawomir

    2004-01-01

    We postulate the existence of a pH-sensitive domain in annexin A6 (AnxA6), on the basis of our observation of pH-dependent conformational and orientation changes of this protein and its N- (AnxA6a) and C-terminal (AnxA6b) halves in the presence of lipids. Brewster angle microscopy shows that AnxA6, AnxA6a, and AnxA6b in the absence of lipids accumulate at the air-water interface and form a stable, homogeneous layer at pH below 6.0. Under these conditions polarization modulation IR absorption spectroscopy reveals significant conformational changes of AnxA6a whereas AnxA6b preserves its α-helical structure. The orientation of protein α-helices is parallel with respect to the interface. In the presence of lipids, polarization modulation IR reflection absorption spectroscopy experiments suggest that AnxA6a incorporates into the lipid/air interface, whereas AnxA6b is adsorbed under the lipid monolayer. In this case AnxA6a regains its α-helical structures. At a higher pressure of the lipid monolayer the average orientation of the α-helices of AnxA6a changes from flat to tilted by 45° with respect to normal to the membrane interface. For AnxA6b no such changes are detected, even at a high pressure of the lipid monolayer—suggesting that the putative pH-sensitive domain of AnxA6 is localized in the N-terminal half of the protein. PMID:15298924

  19. Water at Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin H; Hodgson, Andrew; Liu, Li-Min; Limmer, David T; Michaelides, Angelos; Pedevilla, Philipp; Rossmeisl, Jan; Shen, Huaze; Tocci, Gabriele; Tyrode, Eric; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Werner, Josephina; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-07-13

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding. PMID:27232062

  20. Surface activity and molecular organization of metallacarboranes at the air-water interface revealed by nonlinear optics.

    PubMed

    Gassin, Pierre-Marie; Girard, Luc; Martin-Gassin, Gaelle; Brusselle, Damien; Jonchère, Alban; Diat, Olivier; Viñas, Clara; Teixidor, Francesc; Bauduin, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Because of their amphiphilic structure, surfactants adsorb at the water-air interface with their hydrophobic tails pointing out of the water and their polar heads plunging into the liquid phase. Unlike classical surfactants, metallabisdicarbollides (MCs) do not have a well-defined amphiphilic structure. They are nanometer-sized inorganic anions with an ellipsoidal shape composed of two carborane semicages sandwiching a metal ion. However, MCs have been shown to share many properties with surfactants, such as self-assembly in water (formation of micelles and vesicles), formation of lamellar lyotropic phases, and surface activity. By combining second harmonic generation and surface tension measurement, we show here that cobaltabis(dicarbollide) anion {[(C2B9H11)2Co](-) also named [COSAN](-)} with H(+) as a counterion, the most representative metallacarborane, adsorbs vertically at the water surface with its long axis normal to the surface. This vertical molecular orientation facilitates the formation of intermolecular and nonconventional dihydrogen bonds such as the B-H(δ-)···(δ+)H-C bond that has recently been proven to be at the origin of the self-assembly of MCs in water. Therefore, it appears here that lateral dihydrogen bonds are also involved in the surface activity of MCs. PMID:25644035

  1. Structure and conformation of peptides at air/aqueous interface and their impact on interfacial water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Jena, Kailash; Tomar, Deepak

    Process of protein folding is very essential for the proper functioning of the protein molecules at membrane surface and other organelles. Understanding the process of protein folding at various biological relevant aqueous interfaces are very important to understand various complicated chemical and physical processes relevant to chemistry, physics, and medicine. The building blocks of proteins molecules are amino acids and the chemistry of each amino acid is very different; as a consequence their sequence plays an important role for various conformations upon adsorption for the protein molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the interfacial structure and conformation of two amino acids (L-Proline and L-Tyrosine) and peptide molecules formed from these two amino acids (L-Tyr-Pro). We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to probe the air/aqueous interface. We have studied the impact of adsorption of the amino acids and the peptide molecules on the interfacial water structure by slowly varying concentration and ionic strength of the solutions. Our preliminary result shows a huge impact of the adsorption process of peptide molecules on the hydrogen bonding environment of interfacial structure of water. Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab-140001.

  2. Synthesis of a Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Monolayer through Dynamic Imine Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenyang; Shao, Feng; Szczerbiński, Jacek; McCaffrey, Ryan; Zenobi, Renato; Jin, Yinghua; Schlüter, A Dieter; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional covalent organic monolayer was synthesized from simple aromatic triamine and dialdehyde building blocks by dynamic imine chemistry at the air/water interface (Langmuir-Blodgett method). The obtained monolayer was characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, which unambiguously confirmed the formation of a large (millimeter range), unimolecularly thin aromatic polyimine sheet. The imine-linked chemical structure of the obtained monolayer was characterized by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and the peak assignment was supported by spectra simulated by density functional theory. Given the modular nature and broad substrate scope of imine formation, the work reported herein opens up many new possibilities for the synthesis of customizable 2D polymers and systematic studies of their structure-property relationships. PMID:26768822

  3. Introducing high-quality planar defects into colloidal crystals via self-assembly at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kuo; Demeyer, Pieter-Jan; Zhou, Xingping; Kruglova, Olga; Verellen, Niels; Moshchalkov, Victor V.; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile method for fabrication of colloidal crystals containing a planar defect by using PS@SiO2 core-shell spheres as building blocks. A monolayer of solid spheres was embedded in core-shell colloidal crystals serving as the defect layer, which formed by means of self-assembly at the air/water interface. Compared with previous methods, this fabrication method results in pronounced passbands in the band gaps of the colloidal photonic crystal. The FWHM of the obtained passband is only ~16nm, which is narrower than the previously reported results. The influence of the defect layer thickness on the optical properties of these sandwiched structures was also investigated. No high-cost processes or specific equipment is needed in our approach. Inverse opals with planar defects can be obtained via calcination of the PS cores, without the need of infiltration. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations performed using the FDTD method.

  4. The Equilibria of Diosgenin-Phosphatidylcholine and Diosgenin-Cholesterol in Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Janicka, Katarzyna; Jastrzebska, Izabella; Petelska, Aneta Dorota

    2016-08-01

    Diosgenin (Dio) has shown many treatment properties, but the most important property is cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated monolayers of Dio, cholesterol (Ch), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) at the air/water interface. The measurements were carried with a Langmuir Teflon trough and a Nima 9000 tensiometer program. The surface tension values of pure and mixed monolayers were used to calculate π-A isotherms and determine molecular surface areas. We were able to demonstrate the formation of complexes between Dio and PC and Dio and Ch molecules also. We considered the equilibrium between individual components and the formed complexes. In addition, we established that diosgenin and the lipids formed highly stable 1:1 complexes. PMID:27350149

  5. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures. PMID:27091668

  6. Studies on 2D hybrid films of half surfactant-covered Au nanoparticles at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shufeng; Tetsuya, Oikawa; Tomoyuki, Watanabe; Kondo, Takeshi; Kawai, Takeshi

    2005-05-15

    A hybrid monolayer film of Au nanoparticles, half-covered with dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC), was prepared at the air/water interface and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a quartz-crystal microbalance, and infrared spectra measurements. TEM images of the hybrid film showed that the distribution of Au nanoparticles depends on the surface density of DODAC and reaction time. IR spectral data provided evidence for a surface-enhanced effect of the Au nanoparticles. The wavenumber of CH(2)-stretch vibrations of DODAC in the infrared external reflection spectra revealed that the DODAC molecules were adsorbed onto the Au nanoparticles in a close-packed crystalline state for any surface density of DODAC, which is different from the usual behavior of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:15837481

  7. Effect of monolayer lipid charges on the structure and orientation of protein VAMP1 at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Wissam; Milochau, Alexandra; Buchoux, Sebastien; Lang, Jochen; Desbat, Bernard; Oda, Reiko

    2010-05-01

    SNARE proteins are implicated in membrane fusion during neurotransmission and peptide hormone secretion. Relatively little is known about the molecular interactions of their trans- and juxtamembrane domains with lipid membranes. Here, we report the structure and the assembling behavior of one of the SNARE proteins, VAMP1/synaptobrevin1 incorporated in a lipid monolayer at an air-water interface which mimics the membrane environment. Our results show that the protein is extremely sensitive to surface pressure as well as the lipid composition. Monolayers of proteins alone or in the presence of the neutral phospholipid DMPC underwent structural transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet upon surface compression. In contrast, the anionic phospholipid DMPG inhibited this transition in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the orientation of the proteins was highly sensitive to the charge density of the lipid layers. Thus, the structure of VAMP1 is clearly controlled by protein-lipid interactions. PMID:20085749

  8. Semiconductor Conjugated Polymer-Quantum Dot Nanocomposites at the Air/Water Interface and Their Performance in Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiqun; Goodman, Matthew; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jun

    2009-03-01

    Organic-inorganic nanocomposites consisting of electroactive conjugated polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) intimately tethered on the surface of semiconductor CdSe quantum dot (i.e., P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites) at the air/water interface formed via Langmuir isotherms were explored for the first time. The P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites displayed a high pressure plateau in the Langmuir isotherm, illustrating their complex packing at the air/water interface. Furthermore, photovoltaic devices fabricated from the LB depositions of the P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites exhibited a relatively high short circuit current, ISC, while maintaining a thin film profile. These studies provide insights into the fundamental behaviors of semiconductor organic-inorganic nanocomposites confined at the air/water interface as well as in the active layer of an organic-based photovoltaic device.

  9. Hierarchical assembly of an achiral pi-conjugated molecule into a chiral nanotube through the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pingping; Wang, Haifeng; Chen, Penglei; Zhan, Xiaowei; Kuang, Xun; Zhu, Daoben; Liu, Minghua

    2009-06-16

    An achiral pi-conjugated fluorinated fused pyrazine derivative has been spread at the air/water interface, and its assembling property is investigated. It has been found that the compound, although without any long alkyl chain, could be spread as a floating film on water surface, the surface pressure of which can be compressed up to ca. 70 mN/m. An inflection point has been observed in the isotherm of the floating film on water surface. The atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as the transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations revealed that the floating film first formed a multilayer structure and then was compressed into nanotubes after the inflection region as a result of the rolling of the ultrathin film. Interestingly, the rolled nanotubes show circular dichroism although the molecule itself is an achiral species, suggesting the chiral nanotube is predominantly produced on the water surface. The investigation provides an effective way to fabricate supramolecular-based organic chiral nanotubes through an interfacial supramolecular assembly process. PMID:19459675

  10. Urban water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  11. Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy for Studying Organic Layers at Water-Air Interfaces: Microlayer Monitoring and Surface Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laß, Kristian; Kleber, Joscha; Bange, Hermann; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-04-01

    The sea surface microlayer, according to commonly accepted terminology, comprises the topmost millimetre of the oceanic water column. It is often enriched with organic matter and is directly influenced by sunlight exposure and gas exchange with the atmosphere, hence making it a place for active biochemistry and photochemistry as well as for heterogeneous reactions. In addition, surface active material either is formed or accumulates directly at the air-water interface and gives rise to very thin layers, sometimes down to monomolecular thickness. This "sea surface nanolayer" determines the viscoelastic properties of the seawater surface and thus may impact the turbulent air-sea gas exchange rates. To this effect, this small scale layer presumably plays an important role for large scale changes of atmospheric trace gas concentrations (e.g., by modulating the ocean carbon sink characteristics) with possible implications for coupled climate models. To date, detailed knowledge about the composition, structure, and reactivity of the sea surface nanolayer is still scarce. Due to its small vertical dimension and the small amount of material, this surfactant layer is very difficult to separate and analyse. A way out is the application of second-order nonlinear optical methods, which make a direct surface-specific and background-free detection of this interfacial layer possible. In recent years, we have introduced the use of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy to gain insight into natural and artificial organic monolayers at the air-water interface. In this contribution, the application of VSFG spectroscopy for the analysis of the sea surface nanolayer will be illustrated. Resulting spectra are interpreted in terms of layer composition and surfactant classes, in particular with respect to carbohydrate-containing molecules such as glycolipids. The partitioning of the detected surfactants into soluble and non-soluble ("wet" and "dry") surfactants will be

  12. Partially Hydrated Electrons at the Air/Water Interface Observed by UV-Excited Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Korenobu; Kusaka, Ryoji; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Nagata, Takashi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-06-22

    Hydrated electrons are the most fundamental anion species, consisting only of electrons and surrounding water molecules. Although hydrated electrons have been extensively studied in the bulk aqueous solutions, even their existence is still controversial at the water surface. Here, we report the observation and characterization of hydrated electrons at the air/water interface using new time-resolved interface-selective nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy. With the generation of electrons at the air/water interface by ultraviolet photoirradiation, we observed the appearance of a strong transient band in the OH stretch region by heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation. Through the comparison with the time-resolved spectra at the air/indole solution interface, the transient band was assigned to the vibration of water molecules that solvate electrons at the interface. The analysis of the frequency and decay of the observed transient band indicated that the electrons are only partially hydrated at the water surface, and that they escape into the bulk within 100 ps. PMID:27281547

  13. Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air-water interface: oxidation kinetics, reaction products and atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Pfrang, Christian; Sebastiani, Federica; Lucas, Claire O M; King, Martin D; Hoare, Ioan D; Chang, Debby; Campbell, Richard A

    2014-07-14

    Ozonolysis of methyl oleate monolayers at the air-water interface results in surprisingly rapid loss of material through cleavage of the C=C bond and evaporation/dissolution of reaction products. We determine using neutron reflectometry a rate coefficient of (5.7 ± 0.9) × 10(-10) cm(2) molecule(-1) s(-1) and an uptake coefficient of ∼3 × 10(-5) for the oxidation of a methyl ester monolayer: the atmospheric lifetime is ∼10 min. We obtained direct experimental evidence that <2% of organic material remains at the surface on atmospheric timescales. Therefore known long atmospheric residence times of unsaturated fatty acids suggest that these molecules cannot be present at the interface throughout their ageing cycle, i.e. the reported atmospheric longevity is likely to be attributed to presence in the bulk and viscosity-limited reactive loss. Possible reaction products were characterized by ellipsometry and uncertainties in the atmospheric fate of organic surfactants such as oleic acid and its methyl ester are discussed. Our results suggest that a minor change to the structure of the molecule (fatty acid vs. its methyl ester) considerably impacts on reactivity and fate of the organic film. PMID:24870051

  14. Impact of biogenic amine molecular weight and structure on surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun

    2016-02-01

    The oligoamines, such as ethylenediamine to pentaethylenetetramine, and the aliphatic biogenic amines, such as putrescine, spermidine and spermine, strongly interact with anionic surfactants, such as sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS. It has been shown that this results in pronounced surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface and the transition from monolayer to multilayer adsorption which depends upon solution pH and oligoamine structure. In the neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, results presented here the role of the oligoamine structure on the adsorption of SDS is investigated more fully using a range of different biogenic amines. The effect of the extent of the intra-molecular spacing between amine groups on the adsorption has been extended by comparing results for cadavarine with putrescine and ethylenediamine. The impact of more complex biogenic amine structures on the adsorption has been investigated with the aromatic phenethylamine, and the heterocyclic amines histamine and melamine. The results provide an important insight into how surfactant adsorption at interfaces can be manipulated by the addition of biogenic amines, and into the role of solution pH and oligoamine structure in modifying the interaction between the surfactant and oligoamine. The results impact greatly upon potential applications and in understanding some of the important biological functions of biogenic amines. PMID:26524255

  15. Unusual Adsorption at the Air-Water Interface of a Zwitterionic Carboxybetaine with a Large Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kun; Li, Pei Xun; Dong, Chu Chuan; Thomas, Robert K; Penfold, Jeffrey

    2016-04-12

    The structures of layers of three different dodecylcarboxybetaine surfactants adsorbed at the air-water interface have been determined by neutron reflection. The zwitterionic compounds differed in the length of the spacer separating the quaternary ammonium and carboxylate groups, which was (CH2)1, (CH2)4, or (CH2)8. The limiting area per molecule was found to be 45, 52, or 84 Å(2), respectively, and compared reasonably with results from surface tension showing that the Gibbs prefactor is 1 in each case. Isotopic labeling was used to distinguish between the position of the alkyl and spacer groups in the layer. The spacer was found to be well-immersed in water for the (CH2)1 and (CH2)4 spacers but significantly above water for the (CH2)8 spacer. The distribution of the (CH2)8 spacer along the surface normal was found to be similar to that of the dodecyl group; i.e., it projects out of the water, contrary to an earlier hypothesis that it forms a loop. Comparison of the overlap of water with dodecyl and spacer groups also indicates that the (CH2)8 spacer is well out of the water. This in turn suggests that the anionic carboxylic acid group, which is dissociated in solution, is not ionized in the adsorbed layer. A further observation is that the dodecylcarboxybetaine with the (CH2)8 spacer reaches surface saturation at one-tenth of the critical micelle concentration. This is highly unusual and is attributed to the long spacer destabilizing the micelle relative to the surface layer. PMID:27010322

  16. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  17. Adsorption of egg phosphatidylcholine to an air/water and triolein/water bubble interface: use of the 2-dimensional phase rule to estimate the surface composition of a phospholipid/triolein/water surface as a function of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Mitsche, Matthew A; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M

    2010-03-11

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces, including all membranes, the alveoli of the lungs, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bubble of either air or triolein (TO) formed in a low-salt buffer. The surface tension (gamma) was measured using a drop tensiometer. We observed that EPC binds irreversibly to both interfaces and at equilibrium exerts approximately 12 and 15 mN/m of pressure (Pi) at an air and TO interface, respectively. After EPC was bound to the interface, the unbound EPC was washed out of the cuvette, and the surface was compressed to study the Pi/area relationship. To determine the surface concentration (Gamma), which cannot be measured directly, compression isotherms from a Langmuir trough and drop tensiometer were compared. The air-water interfaces had identical characteristics using both techniques; thus, Gamma on the bubble can be determined by overlaying the two isotherms. Both TO and EPC are surface-active, so in a mixed TO/EPC monolayer, both molecules will be exposed to water. Since TO is less surface-active than EPC, as Pi increases, the TO is progressively ejected. To understand the Pi/area isotherm of EPC on a TO bubble, a variety of TO-EPC mixtures were spread at the air-water interface. The isotherms show an abrupt break in the curve caused by the ejection of TO from the monolayer into a new bulk phase. By overlaying the compression isotherm above the ejection point with a TO bubble compression isotherm, Gamma can be estimated. This allows determination of Gamma of EPC on a TO bubble as a function of Pi. PMID:20151713

  18. Towards a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Kuo, I-F W.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self ions, H3O+ and OH- , for the air-water interface has implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O+ and/or OH- prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs. interfacial behavior of H3O+ and OH- that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchangecorrelation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O+ as a function of the position of the ion in a 215-molecule water slab. The PMF is flat, suggesting that H3O+ has equal propensity for the air-water interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O+ to our previously computed PMF for OH- adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs. the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O+ is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH- partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions. DJT was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0909227. CJM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. The potential of mean force required resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC05-00OR22725. The remaining simulations

  19. Organization of T-shaped facial amphiphiles at the air/water interface studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Chen, Bin; Tschierske, Carsten; Kressler, Jörg; Blume, Alfred

    2012-10-11

    We studied the behavior of monolayers at the air/water interface of T-shaped facial amphiphiles which show liquid-crystalline mesophases in the bulk. The compounds are composed of a rigid p-terphenyl core (TP) with two terminal hydrophobic ether linked alkyl chains of equal length and one facial hydrophilic tri(ethylene oxide) chain with a carboxylic acid end group. Due to their amphiphilic nature they form stable Langmuir films at the air/water interface. Depending on the alkyl chain length they show markedly different compression isotherms. We used infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to study the changes in molecular organization of the TP films upon compression. We could retrieve information on layer thickness, alkyl chain crystallization, and the orientation of the TP cores within the films. Films of TPs with long (16 carbon atoms: TP 16/3) and short (10 carbon atoms: TP 10/3) alkyl chains were compared. Compression of TP 16/3 leads to crystallization of the terminal alkyl chains, whereas the alkyl chains of TP 10/3 stay fluid over the complete compression range. TP 10/3 shows an extended plateau in the compression isotherm which is due to a layering transition. The mechanism of this layering transition is discussed. Special attention was paid to the question of whether a so-called roll-over collapse occurs during compression. From the beginning to the end of the plateau, the layer thickness is increased from 15 to 38 Å and the orientation of the TP cores changes from parallel to the water surface to isotropic. We conclude that the plateau in the compression isotherm reflects the transition of a TP monolayer to a TP multilayer. The monolayer consists of a sublayer of well-organized TP cores underneath a sublayer of fluid alkyl chains whereas the multilayer consists of a well oriented bottom layer and a disordered top layer. Our findings do not support the model of a roll-over collapse. This study demonstrates how the IRRA band intensity of OH

  20. Toward a simple molecular understanding of sum frequency generation at air-water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Smith, Jared D.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2009-01-13

    Second-order vibrational spectroscopies successfully isolate signals from interfaces, but they report on intermolecular structure in a complicated and indirect way. Here we adapt a perspective on vibrational response developed for bulk spectroscopies to explore the microscopic fluctuations to which sum frequency generation (SFG), a popular surface-specific measurement, is most sensitive. We focus exclusively on inhomogeneous broadening of spectral susceptibilities for OH stretching of HOD as a dilute solute in D{sub 2}O. Exploiting a simple connection between vibrational frequency shifts and an electric field variable, we identify several functions of molecular orientation whose averages govern SFG. The frequency-dependence of these quantities is well captured by a pair of averages, involving alignment of OH and OD bonds with the surface normal at corresponding values of the electric field. The approximate form we obtain for SFG susceptibility highlights a dramatic sensitivity to the way a simulated liquid slab is partitioned for calculating second-order response.

  1. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  2. Investigating Langmuir films at the air-water interface using a planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Shin

    In this work, a new planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) was developed to investigate a broad range of Langmuir films at the air-water interface. This instrument is capable of recording sample and reference spectra simultaneously with an optical setup that is the same as that of a single-beam instrument but splits the incident infrared beam into two sections on a plane mirror (H) or a water trough. With this design, the instrument could accommodate large infrared accessories, such as a water trough. In addition, water bands were subtracted to obtain a high quality spectrum for a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) Langmuir film on the water subphase with a resolution of about 8 cm-1 in 10.8 sec. With this instrument, two types of monolayer systems were studied; polymeric and lipid Langmuir films at the air-water interface. For the polymeric monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of the polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that the mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the mixed solution developed the two-dimensional monolayer at the air-water interface. The stereocomplexation occurred before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. For the lipid monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was also used as a probe to investigate the origin of the disruption of a lipid monolayer upon protein adsorption at the air-water interface. Analysis of the time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra revealed that Cu(II) ion-chelated DSIDA lipid monolayer (Cu 2+-DSIDA) was readily disrupted by myoglobin adsorption as demonstrated by a blue shift of 1.7 cm-1 and a lower intensity in the vas(CH2) stretch mode of the lipid monolayer over a period of five hours. To find the origin of the disruption of the lipid monolayer, a

  3. pH effects on the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin modified air-water interfaces and its impact on foam rheology.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Lexis, Meike; Gochev, Georgi; Konnerth, Christoph; Miller, Reinhard; Willenbacher, Norbert; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-09-17

    Macroscopic properties of aqueous β-lactoglobulin (BLG) foams and the molecular properties of BLG modified air-water interfaces as their major structural element were investigated with a unique combination of foam rheology measurements and interfacial sensitive methods such as sum-frequency generation and interfacial dilatational rheology. The molecular structure and protein-protein interactions at the air-water interface can be changed substantially with the solution pH and result in major changes in interfacial dilational and foam rheology. At a pH near the interfacial isoelectric point BLG molecules carry zero net charge and disordered multilayers with the highest interfacial dilatational elasticity are formed at the air-water interface. Increasing or decreasing the pH with respect to the isoelectric point leads to the formation of a BLG monolayer with repulsive electrostatic interactions among the adsorbed molecules which decrease the interfacial dilational elasticity. The latter molecular information does explain the behavior of BLG foams in our rheological studies, where in fact the highest apparent yield stresses and storage moduli are established with foams from electrolyte solutions with a pH close to the isoelectric point of BLG. At this pH the gas bubbles of the foam are stabilized by BLG multilayers with attractive intermolecular interactions at the ubiquitous air-water interfaces, while BLG layers with repulsive interactions decrease the apparent yield stress and storage moduli as stabilization of gas bubbles with a monolayer of BLG is less effective. PMID:23961700

  4. An experimental and theoretical study of the aggregate structure of calix[6]arenes in Langmuir films at the water/air interface.

    PubMed

    de Lara, Lucas S; Wrobel, Ellen C; Lazzarotto, Márcio; de Lázaro, Sérgio R; Camilo, Alexandre; Wohnrath, Karen

    2016-08-17

    In this paper, the aggregate formation of para-tert-butylcalix[6]arene molecules (Calix6) in dimeric structures was investigated at the water/air interface using experimental and theoretical studies. A specific orientation for such Calix6 molecules was observed with an average area of 133 Å(2), which corresponds to a flat-on orientation with the OH groups parallel to the interface. By varying the pressure on the Calix6 monolayer, the molecules tend to organize at the water/air interface and subsequently, at higher pressures, aggregates were formed atop the monolayer as cluster structures. Morphological characterization by the Brewster Angle Microscopy technique showed the formation of larger domains at lower pressures. Based on such experimental evidence, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate possible dimeric structures for aggregated Calix6 molecules, which are localized at the water/air interface, where one molecule remains in the water phase and the other remains in the air phase. By increasing surface pressure, experimental and theoretical results corroborate the intermolecular interactions among Calix6 molecules. These results are relevant because a dimeric structure has a molecular cavity, which is a candidate for host-guest chemistry, an ion receptor or a drug-delivery system. PMID:27485988

  5. Stabilization of alkylated azacrown ether by fatty acid at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zarbakhsh, Ali; Campana, Mario; Webster, John R P; Wojciechowski, Kamil

    2010-12-01

    The adsorbed amount of partially deuterated dihexadecyl-diaza-18-crown-6 ether (d-ACE16) in the presence of different chain length fatty acids as a function of surface pressure was determined by neutron reflectometry technique. The highest adsorbed amount of the azacrown ether was observed for the mixture of ACE16 with hexadecanoic (palmitic) acid, pointing to the importance of chain length matching between the two species for optimum stabilization of the mixed monolayer. The contrast variation technique was used to estimate the contribution to the total adsorbed amount from stearic acid and ACE16. It was found that the mixed Langmuir monolayer is stable against dissolution up to a surface pressure of 20 mN m(-1). Above this pressure, however, the spread and adsorbed amounts start to deviate, indicative of partial dissolution into the aqueous subphase. The consequences of this behavior for the transport of metal ions through the interfaces of permeation liquid membranes (PLMs) are discussed. PMID:21049946

  6. Intraday evaporation and heat fluxes variation at air-water interface of extremely shallow lakes in Chilean Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Jaime; de la Fuente, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Salars are landscapes formed by evapo-concentration of salts that usually have extremely shallow terminal lagoons (de la Fuente & Niño, 2010). They are located in the altiplanic region of the Andes Mountains of Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, and they sustain highly vulnerable and isolated ecosystems in the Andean Desert. These ecosystems are sustained by benthic primary production, which is directly linked to mass, heat and momentum transfer between the water column and the atmosphere (de la Fuente, 2014). Despite the importance of these transport processes across the air-water interface, there are few studies describing their intraday variation and how they are influenced by the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer in the altiplano. The main objective of this work is to analyze the intraday vertical transport variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum between the atmosphere and a shallow water body on Salar del Huasco located in northern Chile (20°19'40"S, 68°51'25"W). To achieve this goal, we measured atmospheric and water variables in a campaign realized on late October 2015, using high frequency meteorological instruments (a sonic anemometer with an incorporated infrared gas analyzer, and a standard meteorological station) and water sensors. From these data, we characterize the intraday variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum fluxes, we quantify the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer stability on them, and we estimate transfer coefficients associated to latent heat, sensible heat, hydrodynamic drag and vertical transport of water vapor. As first results, we found that latent and sensible heat fluxes are highly influenced by wind speed rather buoyancy, and we can identify four intraday intervals with different thermo-hydrodynamic features: (1) cooling under stable condition with wind speed near 0 from midnight until sunrise; (2) free convection with nearly no wind speed under unstable condition from sunrise until midday

  7. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization.

    PubMed

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H E; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex. PMID:20835481

  8. Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air-water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, Mathias; Bleek, Katrin; Kita-Tokarczyk, Katarzyna; Reiche, Jürgen; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Schacher, Felix; Müller, Axel H. E.; Taubert, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    The self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymer poly(butadiene)-block-poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] at the air-water interface and the mineralization of the monolayers with calcium phosphate was investigated at different pH values. As expected for polyelectrolytes, the subphase pH strongly affects the monolayer properties. The focus of the current study, however, is on the effect of an oscillating (instead of a static) polymer monolayer on calcium phosphate mineralization. Monitoring of the surface pressure vs. mineralization time shows that the monolayer is quite stable if the mineralization is performed at pH 8. In contrast, the monolayer at pH 5 shows a measurable decrease of the surface pressure already after ca. 2 h of mineralization. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that mineralization at low pH under constant oscillation leads to small particles, which are arranged in circular features and larger entities with holes of ca. 200 nm. The larger features with the holes disappear as the mineralization is continued in favor of the smaller particles. These grow with time and form necklace-like architectures of spherical particles with a uniform diameter. In contrast, mineralization at pH 8 leads to very uniform particle morphologies already after 2 h. The mineralization products consist of a circular feature with a dark dot in the center. The increasing contrast of the precipitates in the electron micrographs with mineralization time indicates an increasing degree of mineralization vs. reaction time. The study therefore shows that mechanical effects on mineralization at interfaces are quite complex.

  9. Large-scale recrystallization of the S-layer of Bacillus coagulans E38-66 at the air/water interface and on lipid films.

    PubMed Central

    Pum, D; Weinhandl, M; Hödl, C; Sleytr, U B

    1993-01-01

    S-layer protein isolated from Bacillus coagulans E38-66 could be recrystallized into large-scale coherent monolayers at an air/water interface and on phospholipid films spread on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Because of the asymmetry in the physiochemical surface properties of the S-layer protein, the subunits were associated with their more hydrophobic outer face with the air/water interface and oriented with their negatively charged inner face to the zwitterionic head groups of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayer films. The dynamic crystal growth at both types of interfaces was first initiated at several distant nucleation points. The individual monocrystalline areas grew isotropically in all directions until the front edge of neighboring crystals was met. The recrystallized S-layer protein and the S-layer-DPPE layer could be chemically cross-linked from the subphase with glutaraldehyde. Images PMID:8478338

  10. Long-timescale dynamics of thiol capped Au nanoparticle clusters at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Madhumita; Datta, Alokmay

    2014-04-01

    A two-dimensional network of thiol-capped Au nanoparticle (AuNP) clusters is self-organized on a Stearic Acid (amphiphilic fatty acid) Langmuir monolayer on water surface. The AuNP clusters are found to form a pattern of connected and enclosed microspaces in the stearic acid template. The network features can be controlled by changing the surface pressure of the monolayer during compression. The two-dimensional dynamics of this network has been studied over a long timescale using Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM). The dynamics is very slow, indicating the stability of the network system, and is essentially driven by the tendency to lower the number of nodes or joints in the network.

  11. SUPRAMOLECULAR SYSTEMS BEHAVIOR AT THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE. MOLECULAR DYNAMIC SIMULATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, C.; Saavedra, M.; Gargallo, L.; Radic, D.

    2008-08-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) was development to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of a monolayer of supramolecular systems. The simulations were performed at room temperature, on inclusion complexes (ICs) of {alpha}-cyclodextrin (CD) with poly(ethylene-oxide)(PEO), poly({epsilon}-caprolactone)(PEC) and poly(tetrahydrofuran)(PTHF). The simulations were carried out for a surface area of 30A ring . The trajectories of the MDS show that the system more stable was IC-PEC, being the less stable IC-PEO. The disordered monolayer for the systems was proved by the orientation correlation function and the radial distribution function between the polar groups of ICs and the water molecules. We found that the system IC-PEC was more stable that the systems IC-PTHF and IC-PEO.

  12. Self-Assembly and Lipid Interactions of Diacylglycerol Lactone Derivatives Studied at the Air/Water Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philosof-Mazor, Liron; Volinsky, Roman; Comin, Maria J.; Lewin, Nancy E.; Kedei, Noemi; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.; Jelinek, Raz

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG-lactones) have been shown to be effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways. The biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules depends in part upon their lipid interactions within the cellular plasma membrane. This study explores the thermodynamic and structural features of DAG-lactone derivatives and their lipid interactions at the air/water interface. Surface-pressure/area isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy revealed the significance of specific side-groups attached to the terminus of a very rigid 4-(2-phenylethynyl) benzoyl chain of the DAG-lactones, which affected both the self-assembly of the molecules and their interactions with phospholipids. The experimental data highlight the formation of different phases within mixed DAG-lactone/phospholipid monolayers and underscore the relationship between the two components in binary mixtures of different mole ratios. Importantly, the results suggest that DAG-lactones are predominantly incorporated within fluid phospholipid phases rather than in the condensed phases that form, for example, by cholesterol. Moreover, the size and charge of the phospholipid headgroups do not seem to affect DAG-lactone interactions with lipids. PMID:18788772

  13. FTIR external reflectance studies of lipid monolayers at the air-water interface: Applications to pulmonary surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, Jennifer M.; Dluhy, Richard A.

    1998-06-01

    FTIR external reflectance spectra of monomolecular films of natural products and model mixtures relevant to pulmonary surfactant physiology were collected concurrently with surface measurements directly at the air-water interface. Films studied were calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and its phospholipid fraction (PPL) along with 2:1 DPPC-d62:DPPG and 2:1 DPPC-d62:DOPG containing 0, 1 or 2 wt % of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C (SP-B+C). The CH2 antisymmetric and symmetric stretching bands (~2920 and 2852 cm-1) along with the analogous CD2 stretching bands (~2194 and 2089 cm-1) were analyzed, and band heights, integrated intensities and peak frequency positions were plotted as a function of measured surface pressure. Data suggest that 2:1 DPPC-d62:DPPG+2 wt % SP-B+C is the most ordered and stable of the films and can be compressed to the highest sustainable surface pressure. Data from the model mixtures indicate that the surfactant protein interacts differently with each of the lipid components. Plots of the CH/CD intensity ratios versus surface pressure show an increase in this ratio upon the addition of SP-B+C as the protein apparently orders the CH component (DPPG or DOPG) and slightly disorders the CD component (DPPC-d62).

  14. Coarse Grained Simulations of the Electrolytes at the Water-Air Interface from Many Body Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2012-03-13

    Modeling interfacial properties is a major challenge for mesoscopic simulation methods. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) is then a promising method to model heterogeneous systems at long time and length scales. However no rule exists to obtain a set of MDPD parameters capable to reproduce the thermodynamic properties of a molecular system of a specific chemistry. In this letter, we provide a general multiscale method to obtain a set of parameters from atomistic simulations using Flory-Huggins theory (FH) to be used with dissipative particle dynamics. We demonstrate the high quality and the transferability of the resulting parameters on the salt concentration dependence of surface tension. We also show the specificity of inorganic salt at the water-air interface. Our results indicate that the increase of surface tension with the salt concentration cannot be explained in terms of the charge image concept based on the Wagner, Onsager, and Samaras theory but rather in terms of the ion hydration. PMID:26593339

  15. Superposition-additive approach: thermodynamic parameters of clusterization of monosubstituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2011-12-21

    The applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole electric polarisabilities, molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities, π-electron circular currents, as well as for the estimation of the thermodynamic parameters of substituted alkanes, was demonstrated earlier. Now the applicability of the superposition-additive approach for the description of clusterization of fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, carboxylic acids at the air/water interface is studied. Two superposition-additive schemes are used that ensure the maximum superimposition of the graphs of the considered molecular structures including the intermolecular CH-HC interactions within the clusters. The thermodynamic parameters of clusterization are calculated for dimers, trimers and tetramers. The calculations are based on the values of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of clusterization calculated earlier using the semiempirical quantum chemical PM3 method. It is shown that the proposed approach is capable of the reproduction with sufficiently enough accuracy of the values calculated previously. PMID:22042000

  16. Influence of temperature on microdomain organization of mixed cationic-zwitterionic lipidic monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Bordi, F; Cametti, C; Di Venanzio, C; Sennato, S; Zuzzi, S

    2008-02-15

    The thermodynamic behavior of mixed DOTAP-DPPC monolayers at the air-water interface has been investigated in the temperature range from 15 to 45 degrees C, covering the temperature interval where the thermotropic phase transition of DPPC, from solid-like to liquid-like, takes place. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility of the two lipids in the mixed monolayer was evaluated in terms of the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing DeltaG(ex), activity coefficients f(1) and f(2) and interaction parameter omega between the two lipids. The mixed DOTAP-DPPC film was found to have positive deviations from ideality at low DOTAP mole fractions, indicating a phase-separated binary mixture. This effect depends on the temperature and is largely conditioned by the structural chain conformation of the DPPC lipid monolayer. The thermodynamic parameters associated to the stability and the miscibility of these two lipids in a monolayer structure have been discussed in the light of the phase diagram of the DOTAP-DPPC aqueous mixtures obtained from differential scanning calorimetry measurements. The correlation between the temperature behavior of DOTAP-DPPC monolayers and their bulk aqueous mixtures has been briefly discussed. PMID:17936597

  17. An automatic remotely web-based control equipment for investigating gas flux at water - air interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.; Varner, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Robust measurements of natural GHG emissions are vital for evaluating regional to global carbon budgets and for assessing climate feedbacks on natural emissions to improve climate models. Diffusive and ebullitive (bubble) transport are two major pathways of gas release from surface waters. Capturing the high temporal variability of these fluxes has been labor intensive using manual based methods, or expensive using available high resolution equipment (e.g. eddy correlation methods). Here, we present an inexpensive device that includes an easily mobile diffusive flux chamber and a bubble counter (inverted funnel) all in one. It is equipped with wireless data readout and web-based remote monitoring and control functions. The device can be programmed to measure in situ mixing ratios of gas in the chamber, and accumulation of ebullitive gas in the funnel. The device can also collect gas samples into sample bottles for subsequent analyses (e.g concentration, stable isotopes) in the laboratory.

  18. Surface potential of methyl isobutyl carbinol adsorption layer at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Le, Thu N; Ang, Ha M

    2012-01-26

    The surface potential (ΔV) and surface tension (γ) of MIBC (methyl isobutyl carbinol) were measured on the subphase of pure water and electrolyte solutions (NaCl at 0.02 and 2 M). In contrast to ionic surfactants, it was found that surface potential gradually increased with MIBC concentration. The ΔV curves were strongly influenced by the presence of NaCl. The available model in literature, in which surface potential is linearly proportional to surface excess, failed to describe the experimental data. Consequently, a new model, employing a partial charge of alcohol adsorption layer, was proposed. The new model predicted the experimental data consistently for MIBC in different NaCl solutions. However, the model required additional information for ionic impurity to predict adsorption in the absence of electrolyte. Such inclusion of impurities is, however, unnecessary for industrial applications. The modeling results successfully quantify the influence of electrolytes on surface potential of MIBC, which is critical for froth stability. PMID:22172075

  19. Adsorption at air-water and oil-water interfaces and self-assembly in aqueous solution of ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun X; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John R P; Terry, Ann E

    2015-03-17

    The Tween nonionic surfactants are ethoxylated sorbitan esters, which have 20 ethylene oxide groups attached to the sorbitan headgroup and a single alkyl chain, lauryl, palmityl, stearyl, or oleyl. They are an important class of surfactants that are extensively used in emulsion and foam stabilization and in applications associated with foods, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. A range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants, with differing degrees of ethoxylation from 3 to 50 ethylene oxide groups, have been synthesized and characterized by neutron reflection, small-angle neutron scattering, and surface tension. In conjunction with different alkyl chain groups, this provides the opportunity to modify their surface properties, their self-assembly in solution, and their interaction with macromolecules, such as proteins. Adsorption at the air-water and oil-water interfaces and solution self-assembly of the range of ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants synthesized are presented and discussed. PMID:25697294

  20. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  1. Photochemical Reactions at the Air-Water Interface in the Troposphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, M. R.; Kameel, F. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing awareness that isoprene, ISO, is only partially processed in the gas-phase has turned attention to its reactive uptake by fog, cloud and aerosol droplets. As a hydrophobic gas, ISO would preferentially partition to the surface rather than the bulk of aqueous media. Such media also contain dissolved O2 and water-soluble unsaturated organics, and support OH generation rates (from the solar photolysis of H2O2 dissolved therein) that are several orders of magnitude faster than in the gas-phase. Hence, ISO should be converted to heavier products rather than into the C4-C5 volatile compounds produced in the gas-phase. Here we substantiate such scenario by reporting that the λ > 305 nm photolysis of H2O2 in aqueous dilute ISO solutions yields C10H15OH species as primary products, whose formation both requires and is inhibited by O2. A minimum of seven C10H15OH isomers are resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and detected as MH+ (m/z = 153) and MH+-18 (m/z = 135) signals by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Our findings are consistent with the addition of OH to ISO, followed by HO-ISO reactions with ISO (in competition with O2) leading to second generation HO(ISO)2 radicals that terminate as C10H15OH via β-H abstraction by O2. We show that a significant fraction of gas-phase olefins should be converted into less volatile species via this process on airborne wet particles.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  3. Miscibility of dl-α-tocopherol β-glucoside in DPPC monolayer at air/water and air/solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Neunert, G; Makowiecki, J; Piosik, E; Hertmanowski, R; Polewski, K; Martynski, T

    2016-10-01

    The role of newly synthesized tocopherol glycosidic derivative in modifying molecular organization and phase transitions of phospholipid monolayer at the air/water interface has been investigated. Two-component Langmuir films of dl-α-tocopheryl β-D-glucopyranoside (BG) mixed with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the whole range of mole fractions were formed at the water surface. An analysis of surface pressure versus mean molecular area (π-A) isotherms and Brewster angle microscope images showed that the presence of BG molecules changes the structure and packing of the DPPC monolayer in a BG concentration dependent manner. BG molecules incorporated into DPPC monolayer inhibit its liquid expanded to liquid condensed phase transition proportionally to the BG concentration. The monolayers were also transferred onto solid substrates and visualized using an atomic force microscope. The results obtained indicate almost complete miscibility of BG and DPPC in the monolayers at surface pressures present in the biological cell membrane (30-35·10(-3) N·m(-1)) for a BG mole fraction as high as 0.3. This makes the monolayer less packed and more disordered, leading to an increased permeability. The results support our previous molecular dynamics simulation data. PMID:27287132

  4. Enhanced stabilization of aerosol-OT surfactant monolayer upon interaction with small amounts of bovine serum albumin at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Wilker; Ferreira, Marystela; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Itri, Rosangela

    2004-10-10

    An investigation is made of the influence from small amounts of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the lateral organization of low molecular weight surfactant sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) at the air-water interface. Surface pressure (pi - A), surface potential (deltaV - A) and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) experiments were carried out, with particular emphasis on the monolayer stability under successive compression-expansion cycles. AOT monolayer is not stable at the air-water interface, which means that the majority of AOT molecules go into the aqueous subphase as monomers and/or normal micelles. When a waiting time elapses between spreading and compression, the surfactant monolayer tends to reorganize partially at the air-water interface, with a monolayer expansion being observed for waiting times as large as 12 h. The incorporation of very small amount of BSA (10(-9)M) at the interface, also inferred from BAM, increases the monolayer stability as revealed by pi - A and deltaV - A results. For a waiting time of circa 3 h, the mixed monolayer reaches its maximum stability. This must be related to protein (and/or protein-surfactant complexes) adsorbed onto the AOT monolayer, thus altering the BSA conformation to accommodate its hydrophobic/hydrophilic residues. Furthermore, the effects from such small amounts of BSA in the monolayer formation and stabilization mean that the AOT monolayer responds cooperatively to BSA. PMID:15465300

  5. Monolayers of the lipid derivatives of isoniazid at the air/water interface and the formation of self-assembled nanostructures in water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yiguang; Chen, Shufeng; Xin, Rui; Zhou, Yisheng

    2008-07-15

    Isoniazid (INH, isonicotinic acid hydrazide) is one of the most commonly used anti-tubercular drugs. However, resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to anti-mycobacterial agents including INH is an increasing problem worldwide. Development of new anti-mycobacterial agents thus has attracted attention. Five lipid derivatives of INH were prepared in this study. They formed monolayers at the air/water interface, and some nanostructures with different morphologies were obtained through molecular self-assembly in water. The derivatives included one fatty acyl derivative containing a 12-C hydrocarbon-long chain (1), three fatty alcohol derivatives with a succinyl as spacer and an 8, 12 or 16-C hydrocarbon-long chain (2, 3 and 4), and one tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazine-2-thione (THTT) derivative containing a 12-C hydrocarbon-long chain (5). The surface pressure-area isotherms depended on the volume and configuration of heads and the length of tails of derivatives. Compound 2 had a relatively large head and a short tail, easily standing uprightly at the interface. Under a certain surface pressure, the linear polar head groups of 3 could be partly squeezed out and insert into subphase because the length of heads were comparable to the one of tails. The very long tails of 4 always maintained above the interface and led to a high collapse pressure. Compound 5 possessed an extended and large head consisting of the THTT and INH groups so that the relatively short tails tilted at the interface and difficultly contact with each other. The THTT rings might be partly squeezed out and enter into air under a certain surface pressure. The self-assembly behaviours of derivatives in water depended on the molecular configuration and agreed with the corresponding monolayer behaviours. The flexible and medium-long tails (1 and 3) led to the derivatives to form nanoscale vesicles, though the short or very long tails did not (2 and 4). Interestingly, intermolecular hydrogen

  6. Charge and pressure-tuned surface patterning of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalate complexes at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miao; Li, Haolong; Zhang, Liying; Wang, Yizhan; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Jianming; Wu, Lixin

    2012-10-16

    In this paper, four organic-inorganic hybrid complexes were prepared using a cationic surfactant dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DODA) to replace the counter cations of four Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) clusters with gradually increased negative charges, PW(12)O(40)(3-), SiW(12)O(40)(4-), BW(12)O(40)(5-), and CoW(12)O(40)(6-). The formed surfactant-encapsulated POM (SEP) complexes showed typical amphiphilic properties and can be spread onto the air-water interface to form Langmuir monolayers. The interfacial behavior of the SEP monolayer films was systemically studied by multiple in situ and ex situ characterization methods including Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), reflection-absorption infrared (RAIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the increasing alkyl chain density of SEPs leads to an enhanced stability and a higher collapse pressure of SEP Langmuir monolayers. Moreover, a second layer evolved as patterns from the initial monolayers of all the SEPs, when the surface pressures approached the collapse values. The rational combination of alkyl chain density and surface pressure can precisely control the size and the morphology of SEP patterns transforming from disk-like to leaf-like structures on a micrometer scale. The pattern formation was demonstrated to be driven by the self-optimized surface energy of SEP monolayers. This finding can direct a new strategy for the fabrication of POM-hybrid films with controllable patterns, which should be instructive for designing POM-based thin film devices. PMID:22991980

  7. External reflection FTIR of peptide monolayer films in situ at the air/water interface: experimental design, spectra-structure correlations, and effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Flach, C R; Brauner, J W; Taylor, J W; Baldwin, R C; Mendelsohn, R

    1994-01-01

    A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer has been interfaced with a surface balance and a new external reflection infrared sampling accessory, which permits the acquisition of spectra from protein monolayers in situ at the air/water interface. The accessory, a sample shuttle that permits the collection of spectra in alternating fashion from sample and background troughs, reduces interference from water vapor rotation-vibration bands in the amide I and amide II regions of protein spectra (1520-1690 cm-1) by nearly an order of magnitude. Residual interference from water vapor absorbance ranges from 50 to 200 microabsorbance units. The performance of the device is demonstrated through spectra of synthetic peptides designed to adopt alpha-helical, antiparallel beta-sheet, mixed beta-sheet/beta-turn, and unordered conformations at the air/water interface. The extent of exchange on the surface can be monitored from the relative intensities of the amide II and amide I modes. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange may lower the amide I frequency by as much as 11-12 cm-1 for helical secondary structures. This shifts the vibrational mode into a region normally associated with unordered structures and leads to uncertainties in the application of algorithms commonly used for determination of secondary structure from amide I contours of proteins in D2O solution. PMID:7919013

  8. Morphology and thermochromic phase transition of merocyanine J-aggregate monolayers at the air-water and solid-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Noritaka; Saito, Kentaro; Serata, Toshinori; Aida, Hiroaki; Uesu, Yoshiaki

    2001-07-01

    Thermal changes of the merocyanine dye (MD) monolayer at the air-water interface were investigated under various subphase conditions in order to elucidate the formation mechanism and to control morphological and chromatic properties of two-dimensional MD J-aggregate crystallites (JC) formed in the monolayer. The dissociation temperature (Td) of the JC to the monomer MD was measured for different counterions of MD molecules in the subphase. The JC size was found to be dependent on the subphase temperature; it becomes larger when the JC is formed at a temperature closer to Td. This phenomenon is qualitatively reproduced by the numerical simulation of the Cahn-Hilliard equation. In the case of the MD monolayer on the subphase which contains two kinds of counterions, it exhibits a reversible thermochromic transition between two different JC states. The chromatic change is discrete, and is attributed to the structural phase transition of the JC induced by the mutual recombination of two kinds of counterions to MD molecules. The structural difference between the high and low temperature JC states is examined by the point dipole model. The transition temperature and thermal hysteresis width can be varied by the fraction of 2 counterions. In situ observations using a multipurpose nonlinear optical microscope revealed that the transition is of first order and the nucleation and growth process of the low temperature phase in the high temperature matrix was observed. The JC size of the low temperature phase became much larger through the recrystallization process. For future application of this phenomenon, an airtight cell consisting of two monolayers at the solid-water interface and the subphase was developed. In the cell, the same reversible transition occurs, but with a slow relaxation.

  9. Molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-n-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines at the air-water interface and Cu(II)-promoted vesicle formation via metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Miao, Wangen; Liu, Huijin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Du, Xuezhong

    2010-09-01

    The molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-N-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines (HPA) at the air-water interface on pure water and aqueous Cu(II) subphases have been investigated using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The Schiff base units were oriented with their long axes almost perpendicular to the water surface, and both imine and pyridinyl nitrogen atoms of the Schiff base units were coordinated to Cu(II) ions together with their geometrical conversions. The alkyl chains in the monolayers were quantitatively determined on the assumption that the HPA monolayers at the air-water interface were composed of sublayers of alkyl chains and Schiff base units, and the chain orientation angle on pure water was 30 +/- 2 degrees and increased to 37 +/- 2 degrees on the aqueous Cu(II) subphase. The HPA amphiphiles could not be dispersed in pure water but could self-organize into vesicles with metal-coordinated headgroups and interdigitated-packed alkyl chains in the presence of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the aggregate structures and specific properties of the coordinated vesicles. PMID:20698514

  10. Interaction of poly(ethylene-glycols) with air-water interfaces and lipid monolayers: investigations on surface pressure and surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Winterhalter, M; Bürner, H; Marzinka, S; Benz, R; Kasianowicz, J J

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the surface activity of different-sized poly(ethylene-glycols) (PEG; M(r) 200-100,000 Da) in the presence or absence of lipid monolayers and over a wide range of bulk PEG concentrations (10(-8)-10% w/v). Measurements of the surface potential and surface pressure demonstrate that PEGs interact with the air-water and lipid-water interfaces. Without lipid, PEG added either to the subphase or to the air-water interface forms relatively stable monolayers. Except for very low molecular weight polymers (PEGs < 1000 Da), low concentrations of PEG in the subphase (between 10(-5) and 10(-4)% w/v) increase the surface potential from zero (with respect to the potential of a pure air-water interface) to a plateau value of approximately 440 mV. At much higher polymer concentrations, > 10(-1)% (w/v), depending on the molecular weight of the PEG and corresponding to the concentration at which the polymers in solution are likely to overlap, the surface potential decreases. High concentrations of PEG in the subphase cause a similar decrease in the surface potential of densely packed lipid monolayers spread from either diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), or dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (DOPS). Adding PEG as a monolayer at the air-water interface also affects the surface activity of DPhPC or DPPC monolayers. At low lipid concentration, the surface pressure and potential are determined by the polymer. For intermediate lipid concentrations, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms show that the effects due to lipid and PEG are not always additive and that the polymer's effect is distinct for the two lipids. When PEG-lipid-mixed monolayers are compressed to surface pressures greater than the collapse pressure for a PEG monolayer, the surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms approach that of the lipid alone, suggesting that for this experimental condition PEG is expelled from the

  11. Environmental controls of energy and trace gas exchanges at the water-air interface: Global synthesis of eddy fluxes over inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, M.; Desai, A. R.; Bohrer, G.; Blanken, P.; Deshmukh, C. S.; Franz, D.; Guérin, F.; Heiskanen, J. J.; Jammet, M.; Jonsson, A.; Karlsson, J.; Koebsch, F.; Liu, H.; Lohila, A.; Lundin, E.; Mammarella, I.; Rutgersson, A.; Sachs, T.; Serça, D.; Spence, C.; Strachan, I. B.; Vesala, T.; Weyhenmeyer, G. A.; Xiao, W.; Glatzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Current estimates of energy and trace gases from inland waters often rely on limited point in time measurements, therefore, short time variation of fluxes and mechanism controlling the fluxes are particularly understudied. Here we present the results of a global synthesis of eddy fluxes from 29 globally distributed aquatic sites. The objective of this study was to quantify the magnitudes and variation of energy and CO2 fluxes and investigate their responses to environmental controls across half-hourly to monthly time scales. The coupled observations of in-lake physical and biogeochemical parameters with meteorology and eddy covariance fluxes were analyzed using decomposed correlation and wavelength coherence analysis to quantify the critical time scales that are associated with variation of energy and CO2 fluxes, and related drivers. The rates of fluxes were synthesized according to time scale, climate, and water body type. The diurnal cycles of both energy and CO2 fluxes variation were attributed to wind speed, solar radiation cycle, vapor pressure deficit, temperature gradients at water-air interface, and metabolism. Weekly time scales of variations were correlated with synoptic weather patterns. The monthly sums of energy fluxes showed a latitudinal gradient with the maxima observed in mid-latitude waterbodies. We found an inconsistent latitudinal pattern of monthly CO2 fluxes. Instead, we found correlation with proxies of lake productivity suggesting lake-specific characteristics play an important role in controlling flux magnitudes and variation. The results presented here highlight the importance of quantifying short-term variation of energy and trace gases fluxes towards improving the understanding of the water and carbon cycles and linked ecological processes.

  12. Ellipsometric study of molecular orientations of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase at the air-water interface by simultaneous determination of refractive index and thickness.

    PubMed

    Muth, Marco; Schmid, Reiner P; Schnitzlein, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Ellipsometric studies of very thin organic films suffer from the low refractive index contrast between layer and bulk substrate. We demonstrate that null ellipsometry can not only provide detailed information about the adsorption kinetics and surface excess values, but in addition on layer thicknesses with submonolayer resolution of a lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus at the air-water interface. While measuring very close to the Brewster angle, refractive indices and layer-thicknesses can both be determined with a precision that is sufficiently high to make conclusions on the density and orientation of the molecules at the interface. The orientation was found to be concentration- and pH value-dependent. At the isoelectric point, the lipase was almost vertically oriented with respect to the surface, while for pure distilled water and low lipase concentration a rather horizontal alignment was found. Further experiments, varying the size of the interfacial area in a Langmuir trough, confirm the different layer structures. PMID:26735895

  13. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  14. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  15. Effects of the conjugation of whey proteins with gellan polysaccharides on surfactant-induced competitive displacement from the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Cai, B; Ikeda, S

    2016-08-01

    Whey proteins can be used to stabilize foams and emulsions against coalescence because of their ability to form viscoelastic films at the interface that resist film rupture on collision between colloidal particles. However, whey proteins are competitively displaced from the interface if small-molecule surfactants are added, leading to destabilization of the entire system. This is because surfactants are more effective in molecular packing at the interface, and they lower interfacial tension to a greater degree than whey proteins do, but their interfacial films are poor in viscoelasticity. We hypothesized that whey proteins would become more resistant to surfactant-induced competitive displacement if they were conjugated with network-forming polysaccharides. The protein moiety of the conjugate would be expected to enable its adsorption to the interface, and the polysaccharide moiety would be expected to form self-assembled networks, strengthening the interfacial film as a whole. In this study, whey proteins were conjugated with gellan polysaccharides using the Maillard reaction. Atomic force microscopy images of interfacial films formed by the whey protein-gellan conjugate at the air-water interface and transferred onto mica sheets using the Langmuir-Blodgett method revealed that gellan did form self-assembled networks at the interface and that interfacial films also contained a large number of unconjugated whey protein molecules. Following the addition of a small-molecule surfactant (Tween 20) to the sub-phase, surface pressure increased, indicating spontaneous adsorption of surfactants to the interface. Atomic force microscopy images showed decreases in interfacial area coverage by whey proteins as surface pressure increased. At a given surface pressure, the interfacial area coverage by whey protein-gellan conjugates was greater than coverage by unconjugated whey proteins, confirming that whey proteins became more resistant to surfactant-induced displacement after

  16. Self-assembly of diblock co-polymers at air-water interface: A microscopy and x-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, R. P.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The spontaneous surface aggregation of diblock copolymer, containing polystyrene-polydimethylsiloxane or PS-PDMS, have been studied at air-water interface using Brewster's angle microscopy (BAM) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) technique. Pronounced differences in the molecular weight and solvent dependence of the size of aggregation on the water surface are observed. Structural characterization is done using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a monolayer transferred to Si substrate. It shows that, individual polymer chains coalesce to form some disc like micelle aggregation on the Si surface which is also evident from the BAM image of the water floated monolayer. GISAXS study is also corroborating the same result.

  17. Simulated Solvation of Organic Ions II: Study of Linear Alkylated Carboxylate Ions in Water Nanodrops and in Liquid Water. Propensity for Air/Water Interface and Convergence to Bulk Solvation Properties.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2015-09-10

    We investigated the solvation of carboxylate ions from formate to hexanoate, in droplets of 50 to 1000 water molecules and neat water, by computations using standard molecular dynamics and sophisticated polarizable models. The carboxylate ions from methanoate to hexanoate show strong propensity for the air/water interface in small droplets. Only the ions larger than propanoate retain propensity for the interface in larger droplets, where their enthalpic stabilization by ion/water dispersion is reduced there by 3 kcal mol(-1) per CH2 group. This is compensated by entropy effects over +3.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) per CH2 group. On the surface, the anionic headgroups are strongly oriented toward the aqueous core, while the hydrophobic alkyl chains are repelled into air and lose their structure-making effects. These results reproduce the structure-making effects of alkyl groups in solution, and suggest that the hydrocarbon chains of ionic headgroups and alkyl substituents solvate independently. Extrapolation to bulk solution using standard extrapolation schemes yields absolute carboxylate solvation energies. The results for formate and acetate yield a proton solvation enthalpy of about 270 kcal mol(-1), close to the experiment-based value. The largest carboxylate ions yield a value smaller by about 10 kcal mol(-1), which requires studies in much larger droplets. PMID:26287943

  18. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d3 (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles.

  19. A semi-analytical calculation of the electrostatic pair interaction between nonuniformly charged colloidal spheres at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lian, Zengju

    2016-07-01

    We study the electrostatic pair interaction between two nonuniformly like-charged colloidal spheres trapped in an air-water interface. Under the linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximation, a general form of the electrostatic potential for the system is shown in terms of multipole expansions. After combining the translation-rotation transform of the coordinates with the numerical multipoint collection, we give a semi-analytical result of the electrostatic pair interaction between the colloids. The pair interaction changes quantitatively or even qualitatively with different distributions of the surface charges on the particles. Because of the anisotropic distribution of the surface charge and the asymmetric dielectric medium, the dipole moment of the ion cloud associating with the particle orients diagonally to the air-water interface with an angle α. When the angle is large, the colloids interact repulsively, while they attract each other when the angle is small. The attractive colloids may be "Janus-like" charged and be arranged with some specific configurations. Whatever the repulsions or the attractions, they all decay asymptotically ∝1/d(3) (d is the center-center distance of the particles) which is consistent with our general acknowledge. The calculation results also provide an insight of the effect of the ion concentration, particle size, and the total charge of the particle on the pair interaction between the particles. PMID:27394119

  20. Mechanism of Action of Thymol on Cell Membranes Investigated through Lipid Langmuir Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface and Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, João Victor N; Capello, Tabata M; Siqueira, Leonardo J A; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the design of biocidal drugs is to identify compounds with potential action on microorganisms and to understand at the molecular level their mechanism of action. In this study, thymol, a monoterpenoid found in the oil of leaves of Lippia sidoides with possible action in biological surfaces, was incorporated in lipid monolayers at the air-water interface that represented cell membrane models. The interaction of thymol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at the air-water interface was investigated by means of surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), polarization-modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and molecular dynamics simulation. Thymol expands DPPC monolayers, decreases their surface elasticity, and changes the morphology of the lipid monolayer, which evidence the incorporation of this compound in the lipid Langmuir film. Such incorporation could be corroborated by PM-IRRAS since some specific bands for DPPC were changed upon thymol incorporation. Furthermore, potential of mean force obtained by molecular dynamics simulations indicates that the most stable position of the drug along the lipid film is near the hydrophobic regions of DPPC. These results may be useful to understand the interaction between thymol and cell membranes during biochemical phenomena, which may be associated with its pharmaceutical properties at the molecular level. PMID:26982820

  1. How does spacer length of imidazolium gemini surfactants control the fabrication of 2D-Langmuir films of silver-nanoparticles at the air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Datta, Sougata; Biswas, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-09-15

    A series of gemini surfactants based on cationic imidazolium ring as polar headgroup, abbreviated as [Im-n-Im], 2Br(-) (n=2, 5, 6 and 12), was synthesized. Their ability to stabilize silver nanoparticles in aqueous media was investigated. The resulting suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They exhibit specific morphologies by adopting different supramolecular assemblies in aqueous media depending on the internal packing arrangements and on the number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-]. Individual colloids were extracted from the aqueous to chloroform layer and spread at the air/water interface to allow the formation of well-defined Langmuir films. By analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, the details about the packing behavior and orientation of the imidazolium gemini surfactant capped silver nanoparticles were obtained. Morphological features of the dynamic process of monolayer compression at the air-water interface were elucidated using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). These monolayers were further transferred on mica sheets by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique at their associated collapse pressure and the morphology of these monolayers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-] of the gemini surfactants exerted critical influence in modulating the characteristics of the resulting Langmuir films. PMID:24998058

  2. Spectroscopic [correction of eSpectroscopic] and structural properties of valine gramicidin A in monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Blaudez, Daniel; Vaknin, David; Desbat, Bernard; Ocko, Benjamin M; Salesse, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Monomolecular films of valine gramicidin A (VGA) were investigated in situ at the air-water interface by x-ray reflectivity and x-ray grazing incidence diffraction as well as polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). These techniques were combined to obtain information on the secondary structure and the orientation of VGA and to characterize the shoulder observed in its pi-A isotherm. The thickness of the film was obtained by x-ray reflectivity, and the secondary structure of VGA was monitored using the frequency position of the amide I band. The PM-IRRAS spectra were compared with the simulated ones to identify the conformation adopted by VGA in monolayer. At large molecular area, VGA shows a disordered secondary structure, whereas at smaller molecular areas, VGA adopts an anti-parallel double-strand intertwined beta(5.6) helical conformation with 30 degrees orientation with respect to the normal with a thickness of 25 A. The interface between bulk water and the VGA monolayer was investigated by x-ray reflectivity as well as by comparing the experimental and the simulated PM-IRRAS spectra on D(2)O and H(2)O, which suggested the presence of oriented water molecules between the bulk and the monolayer. PMID:12496123

  3. Reorientation of the ‘free OH’ group in the top-most layer of air/water interface of sodium fluoride aqueous solution probed with sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ran-Ran; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-09-17

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have established the specific anion, as well as cation effects on the hydrogen-bond structures at the air/water interface of electrolyte solutions. However, the ion effects on the top-most layer of the air/water interface, which is signified by the non-hydrogen-bonded so-called ‘free O-H’ group, has not been discussed or studied. In this report, we present the measurement of changes of the orientational angle of the ‘free O-H’ group at the air/water interface of the sodium fluoride (NaF) solutions at different concentrations using the interface selective sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in the ssp and ppp polarizations. The polarization dependent SFG-VS results show that the average tilt angle of the ‘free O-H’ changes from about 35.3 degrees ± 0.5 degrees to 43.4 degrees ± 2.1degrees as the NaF concentration increase from 0 to 0.94M (nearly saturated). Such tilt angle change is around the axis of the other O-H group of the same water molecule at the top-most layer at the air/water interface that is hydrogen-bonded to the water molecules below the top-most layer. These results provide quantitative molecular details of the ion effects of the NaF salt on the structure of the water molecules at the top-most layer of the air/water interfacial, even though both the Na+ cation and the F- anion are believed to be among the most excluded ions from the air/water interface.

  4. Langmuir structure of poly (2-vinylpyridine-b-hexyl isocyanate) rod-coil diblock copolymers at the air/water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Farhan

    2005-03-01

    We conducted a systematic interfacial study for the complete range (5%-90% of rod mole percentage) of an amphiphilic rod-coil system, poly (hexyl isocyanate)-b-(2-vinylpyridine) at the air/water and air/solid interface. We applied Langmuir balance technique, scanning probe microscopy (SPM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray reflectivity for the complete characterization of the monolayer at the interfaces. The phase isotherms showed the well amphiphilic balance for the diblock copolymers, and the formation of stable monolayers. With the increasing rod content, the consistent increase in the monolayer packing density was observed by the phase isotherms and supported by X-ray reflectivity. SPM and TEM characterization showed their interesting surface morphology according to the varying rod mole percentage in the rod-coil system. Rod mole percentage 5%-15% showed micellar morphology. Rod mole percentage 23%-32% showed distinct and dispersed rods, whereas rod mole percentage 70%-90% showed well packed structure similar to lamella phase. We found the tendency of the diblock system to adopt a packed monomolecular structure has increased by the increasing rod content. This lead us to conclude that it is the hexyl-isocyanate (rod part) that governs mostly the interfacial behavior of rod-coil block copolymers.

  5. Hydrodynamical entrapment of ciliates at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferracci, Jonathan; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    We found the new phenomenon of the entrapment of ciliates at the air-water interface, though they are not trapped by a solid interface. We first characterize the behaviours of cells at the interface by comparing it to those away from interfaces. The results showed that the cell's swimming velocity is considerably reduced at the air-water interface. In order to experimentally verify the possible physiological causes of the entrapment, we observed their behaviours in absence of positive chemotaxis for oxygen and the negative geotaxis. The results illustrated that the entrapment phenomenon was not dependent on these physiological conditions. The experiments using surfactant revealed that the entrapment phenomenon was strongly affected by the velocity-stress conditions at the interface. This fact was confirmed numerically by a boundary element method, i.e. the stress-free condition at the air-liquid interface is one of the main mechanisms of the entrapment phenomenon found in the experiments. Since the entrapment phenomenon found in this study affects the cell-cell interactions and the mass transport at the interface, the knowledge obtained in this study is useful for better understanding the complex behaviours of swimming microorganisms in nature. PhD student in the Physiological Flow Studies Laboratory.

  6. Floatable, Self-Cleaning, and Carbon-Black-Based Superhydrophobic Gauze for the Solar Evaporation Enhancement at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Chen, Jingwei; Guo, Dawei; Cao, Moyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-06-24

    Efficient solar evaporation plays an indispensable role in nature as well as the industry process. However, the traditional evaporation process depends on the total temperature increase of bulk water. Recently, localized heating at the air-water interface has been demonstrated as a potential strategy for the improvement of solar evaporation. Here, we show that the carbon-black-based superhydrophobic gauze was able to float on the surface of water and selectively heat the surface water under irradiation, resulting in an enhanced evaporation rate. The fabrication process of the superhydrophobic black gauze was low-cost, scalable, and easy-to-prepare. Control experiments were conducted under different light intensities, and the results proved that the floating black gauze achieved an evaporation rate 2-3 times higher than that of the traditional process. A higher temperature of the surface water was observed in the floating gauze group, revealing a main reason for the evaporation enhancement. Furthermore, the self-cleaning ability of the superhydrophobic black gauze enabled a convenient recycling and reusing process toward practical application. The present material may open a new avenue for application of the superhydrophobic substrate and meet extensive requirements in the fields related to solar evaporation. PMID:26027770

  7. Savinase action on bovine serum albumin (BSA) monolayers demonstrated with measurements at the air-water interface and liquid Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, Konstantin; Callisen, Thomas H; Svendsen, Allan; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    We studied the enzymatic action of Savinase on bovine serum albumin (BSA) organized in a monolayer spread at the air/water interface or adsorbed at the mica surface. We carried out two types of experiments. In the first one we followed the degradation of the protein monolayer by measuring the surface pressure and surface area decrease versus time. In the second approach we applied AFM imaging of the supported BSA monolayers adsorbed on mica solid supports and extracted information for the enzyme action by analyzing the obtained images of the surface topography in the course of enzyme action. In both cases we obtained an estimate for the turnover number (TON) of the enzyme reaction. PMID:21868205

  8. Solution self-assembly and adsorption at the air-water interface of the monorhamnose and dirhamnose rhamnolipids and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, M L; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Smyth, T J P; Perfumo, A; Marchant, R; Banat, I M; Stevenson, P; Parry, A; Tucker, I; Grillo, I

    2010-12-01

    The self-assembly in solution and adsorption at the air-water interface, measured by small-angle neutron scattering, SANS, and neutron reflectivity, NR, of the monorhamnose and dirhamnose rhamnolipids (R1, R2) and their mixtures, are discussed. The production of the deuterium-labeled rhamnolipids (required for the NR studies) from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture and their separation into the pure R1 and R2 components is described. At the air-water interface, R1 and R2 exhibit Langmuir-like adsorption isotherms, with saturated area/molecule values of about 60 and 75 Å(2), respectively. In R1/R2 mixtures, there is a strong partitioning of R1 to the surface and R2 competes less favorably because of the steric or packing constraints of the larger R2 dirhamnose headgroup. In dilute solution (<20 mM), R1 and R2 form small globular micelles, L(1), with aggregation numbers of about 50 and 30, respectively. At higher solution concentrations, R1 has a predominantly planar structure, L(α) (unilamellar, ULV, or bilamellar, BLV, vesicles) whereas R2 remains globular, with an aggregation number that increases with increasing surfactant concentration. For R1/R2 mixtures, solutions rich in R2 are predominantly micellar whereas solutions rich in R1 have a more planar structure. At an intermediate composition (60 to 80 mol % R1), there are mixed L(α)/L(1) and L(1)/L(α) regions. However, the higher preferred curvature associated with R2 tends to dominate the mixed R1/R2 microstructure and its associated phase behavior. PMID:21028852

  9. Visualization of an adsorption model for surfactant transport from micelle solutions to a clean air/water interface using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing; Yuan, Mingjun

    2011-05-01

    This work pertains to visualizing a transport model for adsorption of surfactants from micelle solutions onto a clean air/water interface. Under the condition of surfactant adsorption from very dilute solutions, the time scale for diffusion of a surfactant monomer is much slower than the time scale for kinetic breakdown of the aggregates. A theoretical model predicts two regimes for the adsorption dynamics. We visualize these two regimes under the mechanism of solubilization using fluorescence microscopy, in which an insoluble fluorescent probe, NBD-HAD (4-(hexadecylamino)-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole), is used to illuminate the micelles. The dye fluoresces in the microenvironment of micelles but is quenched in the aqueous solution on laser excitation. The region containing micelles is illuminated, but the region which does not contain micelles appears dark. For surfactant solution of C(14)E(6) at concentration just above the critical micelle concentration (C(CMC)), C(CMC)=4.4 mg/L, a dark region between the bright image of the air/water interface and the micelle-containing zone is observed. This dark region becomes smaller with time and finally disappears once equilibrium is reached. For a surfactant solution of C(14)E(6) at the concentration of 4.74C(CMC), which is higher than a critical total surfactant concentration (C(T)(c)) of 4.25C(CMC), we observe bright images through surfactant solutions during the adsorption process. Fluorescence images validate the theoretical model. PMID:21349535

  10. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  11. Efficient Spectral Diffusion at the Air/Water Interface Revealed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-05-19

    Femtosecond vibrational dynamics at the air/water interface is investigated by time-resolved heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (TR-HD-VSFG) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The low- and high-frequency sides of the hydrogen-bonded (HB) OH stretch band at the interface are selectively excited with special attention to the bandwidth and energy of the pump pulses. Narrow bleach is observed immediately after excitation of the high-frequency side of the HB OH band at ∼3500 cm(-1), compared to the broad bleach observed with excitation of the low-frequency side at ∼3300 cm(-1). However, the time-resolved spectra observed with the two different excitations become very similar at 0.5 ps and almost indistinguishable by 1.0 ps. This reveals that efficient spectral diffusion occurs regardless of the difference of the pump frequency. The experimental observations are well-reproduced by complementary MD simulation. There is no experimental and theoretical evidence that supports extraordinary slow dynamics in the high-frequency side of the HB OH band, which was reported before. PMID:27120559

  12. Oxygen transport resistance at gas diffusion layer - Air channel interface with film flow of water in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2016-01-01

    Water present as films on the gas diffusion layer-air channel interface in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) alters the oxygen transport resistance, which is expressed through Sherwood number (Sh). The effect of multiple films along the flow length on Sh is investigated through 3D and stationary simulations. The effects of air Péclet number, non-dimensional film width, length, and spacing are studied. Using the simulation results, non-dimensional correlations are developed for local Sh within a mean absolute percentage error of 9%. These correlations can be used for simulating PEMFC performance over temperature and relative humidity ranges of 20-80 °C and 0-100%, respectively. Sh on the film side can be up to 31% lower than that for a dry channel, while a film may reduce the interfacial width by up to 39%. The corresponding increase in transport resistance results in lowering the voltage by 5 and 8 mV respectively at a current density of 1.5 A cm-2. However, their combined effect leads to a voltage loss of 20 mV due to this additional mass transport resistance. It is therefore important to incorporate the additional resistance introduced by the films while modeling fuel cell performance.

  13. The Turbulent Boundary Layer Near the Air-Water Interface on a Surface-Piercing Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, Nathan; Masnadi, Naeem; Duncan, James H.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in the vicinity of the water free surface along a flat, vertically oriented surface-piercing plate are studied experimentally using a laboratory-scale experiment. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. This belt device is mounted inside a large water tank with the water level set just below the top edge of the belt. The belt, rollers, and supporting frame are contained within a sheet metal box to keep the device dry except for one 6-meter-long straight test section between rollers. The belt is launched from rest with a 3- g acceleration in order to quickly reach steady state velocity. This creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along a flat-sided ship moving at the same velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region since the belt motion began. Cinematic Stereo PIV measurements are performed in planes parallel to the free surface by imaging the flow from underneath the tank in order to study the modification of the boundary layer flow field due to the effects of the water free surface. The support of the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110029 is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Regionalized global budget of the CO2 exchange at the air-water interface in continental shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laruelle, Goulven G.; Lauerwald, Ronny; Pfeil, Benjamin; Regnier, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decade, estimates of the atmospheric CO2 uptake by continental shelf seas were constrained within the 0.18-0.45 Pg C yr-1 range. However, most of those estimates are based on extrapolations from limited data sets of local flux measurements (n < 100). Here we propose to derive the CO2 air-sea exchange of the shelf seas by extracting 3 · 106 direct surface ocean CO2 measurements from the global database SOCAT (Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas), atmospheric CO2 values from GlobalVIEW and calculating gas transfer rates using readily available global temperature, salinity, and wind speed fields. We then aggregate our results using a global segmentation of the shelf in 45 units and 152 subunits to establish a consistent regionalized CO2 exchange budget at the global scale. Within each unit, the data density determines the spatial and temporal resolutions at which the air-sea CO2 fluxes are calculated and range from a 0.5° resolution in the best surveyed regions to a whole unit resolution in areas where data coverage is limited. Our approach also accounts, for the first time, for the partial sea ice cover of polar shelves. Our new regionalized global CO2 sink estimate of 0.19 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 falls in the low end of previous estimates. Reported to an ice-free surface area of 22 · 106 km2, this value yields a flux density of 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1, ~40% more intense than that of the open ocean. Our results also highlight the significant contribution of Arctic shelves to this global CO2 uptake (0.07 Pg C yr-1).

  15. Interfacial Water Structure and Cation Binding with the Dppc Phosphate at Air /aqueous Interfaces Studied by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular-level knowledge of water structure and cation binding specificity to lipid headgroups at lipid/water interfaces plays a key role in many relevant chemical, biological, and environmental processes. To obtain information on the molecular organization at aqueous interfaces, vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) has been applied extensively as an interface-specific technique. Dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) is a major component of cell membranes and has been used as a proxy for the organic coating on fat-coated aerosols. In the present work, in addition to conventional VSFG studies on cation interaction with the phosphate headgroup moiety of DPPC, we employ phase-sensitive vibrational sum frequency generation (PS-VSFG) to investigate the average direction of the transition dipole moment of interfacial water molecules. The average orientation of water structure at DPPC/water interfaces is inferred. DPPC orients interfacial water molecules on average with their net transition dipole moment pointing towards the surface. The influence of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ is identified in regard to interfacial water structure and DPPC headgroup organization. Ca2+ is observed to have greater impact on the water structure and a unique binding affinity to the phosphate headgroup relative to other cations tested. In highly concentrated Ca2+ regimes the already disturbed interfacial hydrogen-bonding network reorganizes to resemble that of the neat salt solution interface.

  16. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: molecular dynamics simulations of oil alkanes and dispersants in atmospheric air/salt water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Zhang, Zenghui; Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2014-01-01

    Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the properties of oil n-alkanes [i.e., n-pentadecane (C15), n-icosane (C20) and n-triacontane (C30)], as well as several surfactant species [i.e., the standard anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and three model dispersants similar to the Tween and Span species present in Corexit 9500A] at air/salt water interfaces. This study was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, and our simulation results show that, from the thermodynamic point of view, the n-alkanes and the model dispersants have a strong preference to remain at the air/salt water interface, as indicated by the presence of deep free energy minima at these interfaces. The free energy minimum of these n-alkanes becomes deeper as their chain length increases, and as the concentration of surfactant species at the interface increases. The n-alkanes tend to adopt a flat orientation and form aggregates at the bare air/salt water interface. When this interface is coated with surfactants, the n-alkanes tend to adopt more tilted orientations with respect to the vector normal to the interface. These simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings reported in the accompanying paper [Ehrenhauser et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts 2013, in press, (DOI: 10.1039/c3em00390f)]. The fact that these long-chain n-alkanes show a strong thermodynamic preference to remain at the air/salt water interfaces, especially if these interfaces are coated with surfactants, makes these species very likely to adsorb at the surface of bubbles or droplets and be ejected to the atmosphere by sea surface processes such as whitecaps (breaking waves) and bubble bursting. Finally, the experimental finding that more oil hydrocarbons are ejected when Corexit 9500A is present in the system is consistent with the deeper free energy minima observed for the n-alkanes at the air/salt water

  17. Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Ciuraru, Raluca; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface. Liselotte Tinel, Stéphanie Rossignol, Raluca Ciuraru and Christian George Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5256, IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69626, France Recently the surface microlayer (SML) has received growing attention for its role in the deposition and emission of trace gases. This SML is presumably a highly efficient environment for photochemical reactions thanks to its physical and chemical properties, showing enrichment in chromophores [1]. Still, little is known about the possible photochemical processes that could influence the emission and deposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the SML. A recent study underlines the particularity of the presence of an organic microlayer, showing enhanced formation of peptide bonds at the air-water interface, although this reaction is thermodynamically disfavoured in bulk water [2]. Also, emissions of small gas phase carbonyl compounds formed photochemically by dissolved organic matter have been measured above natural water and glyoxal, for example, measured above the open ocean is thought to be photochemically produced [3, 4]. This study presents the results of a set of laboratory studies set up in order to better understand the role of the SML in the photochemical production of VOCs. Recently, our group has shown the formation of VOCs by light driven reactions in a small quartz reactor (14mL) containing aqueous solutions of humic acids (HA) in the presence of an organic (artificial or natural) microlayer [5]. The main VOCs produced were oxidized species, such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols, as classically can be expected by the oxidation of the organics present at the interface initiated by triplet excited chromophores present in the HA. But also alkenes, dienes, including isoprene and

  18. Measurement of the Surface Dilatational Viscosity of an Insoluble Surfactant Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface Using a Pendant Drop Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Jose; Couzis, Alex; Maldarelli, Charles; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When a fluid interface with surfactants is at rest, the interfacial stress is isotropic (as given by the equilibrium interfacial tension), and is described by the equation of state which relates the surface tension to the surfactant surface concentration. When surfactants are subjected to shear and dilatational flows, flow induced interaction of the surfactants; can create interfacial stresses apart from the equilibrium surface tension. The simplest relationship between surface strain rate and surface stress is the Boussinesq-Scriven constitutive equation completely characterized by three coefficients: equilibrium interfacial tension, surface shear viscosity, and surface dilatational viscosity Equilibrium interfacial tension and surface shear viscosity measurements are very well established. On the other hand, surface dilatational viscosity measurements are difficult because a flow which change the surface area also changes the surfactant surface concentration creating changes in the equilibrium interfacial tension that must be also taken into account. Surface dilatational viscosity measurements of existing techniques differ by five orders of magnitude and use spatially damped surface waves and rapidly expanding bubbles. In this presentation we introduce a new technique for measuring the surface dilatational viscosity by contracting an aqueous pendant drop attached to a needle tip and having and insoluble surfactant monolayer at the air-water interface. The isotropic total tension on the surface consists of the equilibrium surface tension and the tension due to the dilation. Compression rates are undertaken slow enough so that bulk hydrodynamic stresses are small compared to the surface tension force. Under these conditions we show that the total tension is uniform along the surface and that the Young-Laplace equation governs the drop shape with the equilibrium surface tension replaced by the constant surface isotropic stress. We illustrate this technique using

  19. Structure of Ceramide-1-Phosphate at the Air-Water Solution Interface in the Absence and Presence of Ca[superscript 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Kooijman, Edgar E.; Vaknin, David; Bu, Wei; Joshi, Leela; Kang, Shin-Woong; Gericke, Arne; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-03-24

    Ceramide-1-phosphate, the phosphorylated form of ceramide, gained attention recently due to its diverse intracellular roles, in particular in inflammation mediated by cPLA{sub 2}{alpha}. However, surprisingly little is known about the physical chemical properties of this lipid and its potential impact on physiological function. For example, the presence of Ca{sup 2+} is indispensable for the interaction of Cer-1-P with the C2 domain of cPLA{sub 2}{alpha}. We report on the structure and morphology of Cer-1-P in monomolecular layers at the air/water solution interface in the absence and presence of Ca{sup 2+} using diverse biophysical techniques, including synchrotron x-ray reflectivity and grazing angle diffraction, to gain insight into the role and function of Cer-1-P in biomembranes. We show that relatively small changes in pH and the presence of monovalent cations dramatically affect the behavior of Cer-1-P. On pure water Cer-1-P forms a solid monolayer despite the negative charge of the phosphomonoester headgroup. In contrast, pH 7.2 buffer yields a considerably less solid-like monolayer, indicating that charge-charge repulsion becomes important at higher pH. Calcium was found to bind strongly to the headgroup of Cer-1-P even in the presence of a 100-fold larger Na{sup +} concentration. Analysis of the x-ray reflectivity data allowed us to estimate how much Ca{sup 2+} is bound to the headgroup, 0.5 Ca{sup 2+} and 1.0 Ca{sup 2+} ions per Cer-1-P molecule for the water and buffer subphase respectively. These results can be qualitatively understood based on the molecular structure of Cer-1-P and the electrostatic/hydrogen-bond interactions of its phosphomonoester headgroup. Biological implications of our results are also discussed.

  20. Adsorption of counter ions to a stearate monolayer spread at the water-air interface: A synchrotron x-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J.M.; Yun, W.B.; Yang, X. ); Montano, P.A. . Dept. of Physics); Ramanathan, M. ); Capasso, C. )

    1988-06-01

    The Near Total External Fluorescence (NTEF) technique was used to measure in-situ the adsorption of a metal ion from a subphase solution to the liquid-air interface, induced by a surfactant monolayer on the interface. For a monolayer formed by spreading stearic acid (a surfactant material) on a 10{sup {minus}3} mole/l solution of MnCl{sub 2}, the ratio of Mn ions segregated to the interface to the number of stearate molecules on the surface was determined to be approximately 0.6 {plus minus} 0.2. SEXAFS experiments revealed local order of the Mn ions at the surface at the condensed phase but no order showed up in the expanded phase. We explain these findings using a self consistent Poisson-Boltzman calculation of a partially ionized monolayer. Our model also explains earlier reports of adsorption of metal ions to the liquid/monolayer interface. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Sea spray production by bag breakup mode of fragmentation of the air-water interface at strong and hurricane wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-04-01

    Sea sprays is a typical element of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) of large importance for marine meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and climate studies. They are considered as a crucial factor in the development of hurricanes and severe extratropical storms, since they can significantly enhance exchange of mass, heat and momentum between the ocean and the atmosphere. This exchange is directly provided by spume droplets with the sizes from 10 microns to a few millimeters mechanically torn off the crests of a breaking waves and fall down to the ocean due to gravity. The fluxes associated with the spray are determined by the rate of droplet production at the surface quantified by the sea spray generation function (SSGF), defined as the number of spray particles of radius r produced from the unit area of water surface in unit time. However, the mechanism of spume droplets' formation is unknown and empirical estimates of SSGF varied over six orders of magnitude; therefore, the production rate of large sea spray droplets is not adequately described and there are significant uncertainties in estimations of exchange processes in hurricanes. Experimental core of our work comprise laboratory experiments employing high-speed video-filming, which have made it possible to disclose how water surface looks like at extremely strong winds and how exactly droplets are torn off wave crests. We classified events responsible for spume droplet, including bursting of submerged bubbles, generation and breakup of "projections" or liquid filaments (Koa, 1981) and "bag breakup", namely, inflating and consequent blowing of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film, "bags". The process is similar to "bag-breakup" mode of fragmentation of liquid droplets and jets in gaseous flows. Basing on statistical analysis of results of these experiments we show that the main mechanism of spray-generation is attributed to "bag-breakup mechanism On the base of general principles

  2. Conformational analyses of bacillomycin D, a natural antimicrobial lipopeptide, alone or in interaction with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Besson, Françoise

    2012-12-01

    Bacillomycin D is a natural antimicrobial lipopeptide belonging to the iturin family. It is produced by Bacillus subtilis strains. Bacillomycin D is characterized by its strong antifungal and hemolytic properties, due to its interaction with the plasma membrane of sensitive cells. Until now, only few limited analyses were conducted to understand the biological activities of bacillomycin D at the molecular level. Our purpose was to analyze the conformation of bacillomycin D using IR spectroscopy and to model its interactions with cytoplasmic membranes using Langmuir interfacial monolayers. Our findings indicate that bacillomycin D contains turns and allow to model its three-dimensional structure. Bacillomycin D formed a monolayer film at the air-water interface and kept its turn conformation, as shown by polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). To identify the membrane lipid target of bacillomycin D, its interactions with pure lipid monolayers were analyzed and an original behavior of the lipopeptide toward cholesterol-containing monolayers was shown. This original behavior was lost when bacillomycin D was interacting with pure cholesteryl acetate monolayers, suggesting the involvement of the alcohol group of cholesterol in the lipopeptide-cholesterol interaction. PMID:22967349

  3. Surface interactions, thermodynamics and topography of binary monolayers of Insulin with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Grasso, E J; Oliveira, R G; Maggio, B

    2016-02-15

    The molecular packing, thermodynamics and surface topography of binary Langmuir monolayers of Insulin and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) or POCP (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) at the air/water interface on Zn(2+) containing solutions were studied. Miscibility and interactions were ascertained by the variation of surface pressure-mean molecular area isotherms, surface compressional modulus and surface (dipole) potential with the film composition. Brewster Angle Microscopy was used to visualize the surface topography of the monolayers. Below 20mN/m Insulin forms stable homogenous films with DPPC and POPC at all mole fractions studied (except for films with XINS=0.05 at 10mN/m where domain coexistence was observed). Above 20mN/m, a segregation process between mixed phases occurred in all monolayers without squeezing out of individual components. Under compression the films exhibit formation of a viscoelastic or kinetically trapped organization leading to considerable composition-dependent hysteresis under expansion that occurs with entropic-enthalpic compensation. The spontaneously unfavorable interactions of Insulin with DPPC are driven by favorable enthalpy that is overcome by unfavorable entropic ordering; in films with POPC both the enthalpic and entropic effects are unfavorable. The surface topography reveals domain coexistence at relatively high pressure showing a striped appearance. The interactions of Insulin with two major membrane phospholipids induces composition-dependent and long-range changes of the surface organization that ought to be considered in the context of the information-transducing capabilities of the hormone for cell functioning. PMID:26624532

  4. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  5. Interaction of the cationic peptide bactenecin with phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface: i interaction with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidilcholine.

    PubMed

    López-Oyama, A B; Flores-Vázquez, A L; Burboa, M G; Gutiérrez-Millán, L E; Ruiz-García, J; Valdez, M A

    2009-07-23

    In this work we have investigated the influence of NaCl on the adsorption of the antimicrobial cationic peptide bactenecin in the monolayer of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) at the air-water interface, as a function of NaCl concentrations in the subphase. We show that the effect of the salt concentration on DPPC monolayers is a monotonic decrease of the liquid-condensed-liquid-expanded (LC-LE) coexistence region. By contrast, the effect of the bactenecin adsorption at the DPPC monolayer not only removed the LC-LE coexistence region plateau, but also shifted the DPPC isotherms to higher pressures and increased the compressibility of the DPPC/bactenecin monolayers with respect to the pure DPPC monolayer around the LC phase. Analysis of the domain structure, obtained by Brewster angle and atomic force microscopes, indicates that the salt concentration in the subphase builds an electrostatic barrier, increasing the rigidity of DPPC monolayers and limiting the bactenecin adsorption at the LC-LE phase coexistence. PMID:19569630

  6. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind

  7. Self-Assembled Large-Scale Monolayer of Au Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface Used as a SERS Substrate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinghua; Xu, Minmin; Yuan, Yaxian; Gu, Renao; Yao, Jianlin

    2016-05-10

    Self-assembly of metal nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention because of its unique applications in technologies such as plasmonics, surface-enhanced optics, sensors, and catalysts. However, fabrication of ordered nanoparticle structures remains a significant challenge. Thus, developing an efficient approach for the assembly of large-scale Au nanoparticles films for theoretical studies and for various applications is highly desired. In this paper, a facial approach for fabricating a monolayer film of Au nanoparticles was developed successfully. Using the surfactant polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a large-scale monolayer film of well-ordered, uniform-sized Au nanoparticles was fabricated at the air/water interface. The film exhibited a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure having interparticle gaps smaller than 2 nm. These gaps generated numerous uniform "hot spots" for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. The as-prepared monolayer film could be transferred to a solid substrate for use as a suitable SERS substrate with high activity, high uniformity, and high stability. The low spot-to-spot and substrate-to-substrate variations of intensity (<10%), the large surface enhancement factor (∼10(6)), and the high stability (∼45 days) make the substrate suitable for SERS measurements. Transfer of the monolayer film onto a glassy carbon electrode produced an Au electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure suitable for electrochemical SERS measurements. The adsorption process of ionic liquids on the electrode with the monolayer film is similar to that on bulk metal electrodes. The present strategy provides an effective way for self-assembly of Au nanoparticles into well-defined nanostructures that may form optimal reproducible SERS substrates for quantitative analysis. It also provides an electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure for electrochemical investigations. PMID:27101361

  8. Controlled deposition of functionalized silica coated zinc oxide nano-assemblies at the air/water interface for blood cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Dewan, Srishti; Chawla, Seema; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Sumana, Gajjala; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2016-09-21

    We report results of the studies relating to controlled deposition of the amino-functionalized silica-coated zinc oxide (Am-Si@ZnO) nano-assemblies onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The monolayers have been deposited by transferring the spread solution of Am-Si@ZnO stearic acid prepared in chloroform at the air-water interface, at optimized pressure (16 mN/m), concentration (10 mg/ml) and temperature (23 °C). The high-resolution transmission electron microscopic studies of the Am-Si@ZnO nanocomposite reveal that the nanoparticles have a microscopic structure comprising of hexagonal assemblies of ZnO with typical dimensions of 30 nm. The surface morphology of the LB multilayer observed by scanning electron microscopy shows uniform surface of the Am-Si@ZnO film in the nanometer range (<80 nm). These electrodes have been utilized for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) detection by covalently immobilizing the amino-terminated oligonucleotide probe sequence via glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. The response studies of these fabricated electrodes carried out using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that this Am-Si@ZnO LB film based nucleic acid sensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA (10(-6)-10(-16) M) with a detection limit of 1 × 10(-16) M. This fabricated platform is validated with clinical samples of CML positive patients and the results demonstrate its immense potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:27590542

  9. Effect of the fluorination degree of hydrophobic chains on the monolayer behavior of unsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholines bearing partially fluorinated 9-octadecynoyl (stearoloyl) groups at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Baba, Teruhiko; Takai, Katsuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the fluorination degree of hydrophobic chains on the monolayer behavior of unsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholines (PCs) was examined by employing a series of PCs bearing partially fluorinated 9-octadecynoyl (stearoloyl) groups (DFnStPCs, n: the number of fluorinated carbon atoms in a stearoloyl group; n=1, 2, 4, 8), including their hydrophobic parts--partially fluorinated stearolic acids (FnStAs)--at the air-water interface. π-A isotherm measurements and Brewster angle microscope observations revealed: (i) all DFnStPCs including FnStAs form monolayers of liquid character at 25 °C; (ii) they form more expanded monolayers than their non-fluorinated counterparts, distearoloyl-PC (DStPC) and stearolic acid, while the monolayer stability increases with n; (iii) compared with DStPC and DF8StPC, DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4) in the low-π region tend to show a weakening in their self-aggregation property and an increase in the work required for monolayer compression; (iv) although DF8StPC forms the most expanded monolayer, the behavior of DF8StPC resembles that of DStPC rather than that of DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4). The monolayer behavior of DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4) is explained by postulating a flatly-lying conformation of hydrophobic chains, in which three polar parts (ester group, triple bond, CF2-CH2 linkage) in chains are immersed in the subphase at large areas. DStPC and DF8StPC lacking a CF2-CH2 linkage, however, do not likely adopt such a conformation. PMID:25264284

  10. Orientational dynamics of water at an extended hydrophobic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figge, Florian; Xiao, Shunhao; McGuire, John A.; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Laage, Damien

    Aqueous interfaces are central to many physical processes, but the dynamics of interfacial water molecules have been little studied. We have measured the orientational dynamics of water at its interface with a self-assembled monolayer of octadecylsilane on fused silica. A surface-sensitive sum-frequency probe generated by mixing a visible and a vibrationally resonant infrared (IR) pulse is used to monitor the dangling (non-hydrogen-bonded) OH stretch vibration after excitation with a resonant IR pump pulse. By measuring pure and isotopically diluted water with orthogonal pump polarizations, we find that relaxation of the dangling OH stretch excitation is dominated by the out-of-plane jump from a dangling to a hydrogen-bonded configuration and the subsequent redistribution of energy from the surface hydrogen-bonded OH stretch excitation. The out-of-plane jump time is 1.5(1)ps, 30% slower than that reported for the air-water interface and twice as short as the jump time between hydrogen bonded configurations in the bulk. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the slower dynamics at the hydrophobic interface compared to the water-air interface are due to the hydrogen bonds at the hydrophobic interface being stronger than those at the water-air interface. The authors acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. CHE- 1151590).

  11. DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

  12. Orientational Dynamics of Water at an Extended Hydrophobic Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shunhao; Figge, Florian; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Laage, Damien; McGuire, John A

    2016-05-01

    We report on the orientational dynamics of water at an extended hydrophobic interface with an octadecylsilane self-assembled monolayer on fused silica. The interfacial dangling OH stretch mode is excited with a resonant pump, and its evolution followed in time by a surface-specific, vibrationally resonant, infrared-visible sum-frequency probe. High sensitivity pump-probe anisotropy measurements and isotopic dilution clearly reveal that the decay of the dangling OH stretch excitation is almost entirely due to a jump to a hydrogen-bonded configuration that occurs in 1.61 ± 0.10 ps. This is more than twice as fast as the jump time from one hydrogen-bonded configuration to another in bulk H2O but about 50% slower than the reported out-of-plane reorientation at the air/water interface. In contrast, the intrinsic population lifetime of the dangling OH stretch in the absence of such jumps is found to be >10 ps. Molecular dynamics simulations of air/water and hexane/water interfaces reproduce the fast jump dynamics of interfacial dangling OH with calculated jump times of 1.4 and 1.7 ps for the air and hydrophobic interfaces, respectively. The simulations highlight that while the air/water and hydrophobic/water surfaces exhibit great structural similarities, a small stabilization of the OH groups by the hydrophobic interface produces the pronounced difference in the dynamics of dangling bonds. PMID:27045950

  13. The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Marco; Cannicci, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mostert, Bruce; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Giomi, Folco

    2016-01-01

    The principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism's thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism's functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab's aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style. PMID:26758742

  14. The trade-off between heat tolerance and metabolic cost drives the bimodal life strategy at the air-water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, Marco; Cannicci, Stefano; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mostert, Bruce; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Giomi, Folco

    2016-01-01

    The principle of oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance in ectotherms suggests that the long-term upper limits of an organism's thermal niche are equivalent to the upper limits of the organism's functional capacity for oxygen provision to tissues. Air-breathing ectotherms show wider thermal tolerances, since they can take advantage of the higher availability of oxygen in air than in water. Bimodal species move from aquatic to aerial media and switch between habitats in response to environmental variations such as cyclical or anomalous temperature fluctuations. Here we tested the prediction that bimodal species cope better with thermal stress than truly aquatic species using the crab Pachygrapsus marmoratus as a model species. When in water, oxygen consumption rates of P. marmoratus acutely rise during warming. Beyond a temperature threshold of 23 °C the crab's aerobic metabolism in air remains lower than in water. In parallel, the haemolymph oxygen partial pressure of submerged animals progressive decreases during warming, while it remains low but constant during emersion. Our results demonstrate the ability of a bimodal breathing ectotherm to extend its thermal tolerance during air-breathing, suggesting that there are temperature-related physiological benefits during the evolution of the bimodal life style. PMID:26758742

  15. Superposition-additive approach in the description of thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization of substituted alkanes at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Belyaeva, E A; Fomina, E S; Vasylyev, A O; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Miller, R

    2012-12-01

    The superposition-additive approach developed previously was shown to be applicable for the calculations of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and atomization of conjugate systems, their dipole polarizability, molecular diamagnetic susceptibility, π-electronic ring currents, etc. In the present work, the applicability of this approach for the calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of formation and clusterization at the water/air interface of alkanes, fatty alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, nitriles, fatty acids (C(n)H(2n+1)X, X is the functional group) and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids (C(n)H(2n-1)COOH) is studied. Using the proposed approach the thermodynamic quantities determined agree well with the available data, either calculated using the semiempirical (PM3) quantum chemical method, or obtained in experiments. In particular, for enthalpy and Gibbs' energy of the formation of substituted alkane monomers from the elementary substances, and their absolute entropy, the standard deviations of the values calculated according to the superposition-additive scheme with the mutual superimposition domain C(n-2)H(2n-4) (n is the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain) from the results of PM3 calculations for alkanes, alcohols, thioalcohols, amines, fatty acids, nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids are respectively: 0.05, 0.004, 2.87, 0.02, 0.01, 0.77, and 0.01 kJ/mol for enthalpy; 2.32, 5.26, 4.49, 0.53, 1.22, 1.02, 5.30 J/(molK) for absolute entropy; 0.69, 1.56, 3.82, 0.15, 0.37, 0.69, 1.58 kJ/mol for Gibbs' energy, whereas the deviations from the experimental data are: 0.52, 5.75, 1.40, 1.00, 4.86 kJ/mol; 0.52, 0.63, 1.40, 6.11, 2.21 J/(molK); 2.52, 5.76, 1.58, 1.78, 4.86 kJ/mol, respectively (for nitriles and cis-unsaturated carboxylic acids experimental data are not available). The proposed approach provides also quite accurate estimates of enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy of boiling and melting, critical temperatures and standard heat

  16. Water rolling and floating upon water: marbles supported by a water/marble interface.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina

    2009-05-01

    Floating of liquid marbles on a water/air interface was studied. The critical density allowing floating marbles containing NaCl solution was established experimentally and compared with its calculated value. A satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the critical density is reported. PMID:19251263

  17. Oxidation of oleic acid at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura F.; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F.; Beekman, Christopher P.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Allen, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both freshwater and saltwater sources. Oleic acid monolayers at the air/water interface and at the air/sodium chloride solution interface were investigated using surface-specific, broad-bandwidth, sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Complementary techniques of infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy and surface pressure measurements taken during monolayer oxidation confirmed the sum frequency results. Using this nonlinear optical technique coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 M sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous subphase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  18. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  19. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L. A.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) University of Colorado light-emitting diode cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas-phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive dicarbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and < 1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples.

  20. Bacteria motility at oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Smirga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    The swimming dynamics of bacteria are strongly influenced by interfaces: Motile bacteria often accumulate at rigid boundaries, such as liquid-solid interfaces, and at soft boundaries, such as liquid-air or liquid-liquid interfaces. Attachment of bacteria to these interfaces is crucial for the formation of biofilms (liquid-solid), pellicles (liquid-air), and oil-degrading communities (liquid-liquid). We investigated the motility of the oil-degrading bacteria Marinobacter aquaeolei in the presence of oil droplets. We created individual oil droplets using dedicated microfluidic devices and captured the swimming behavior of individual bacteria near the interface and their attachment dynamics to the droplets with high-speed and epifluorescent microscopy. We find that Marinobacter aquaeolei has a high affinity towards interfaces and their swimming dynamics at soft interfaces differ from both those in the bulk and at rigid boundaries. Characterizing the interaction and attachment of motile bacteria to liquid-liquid interfaces will promote a fundamental understanding to oil-microbe interactions in aquatic environments and potentially lead to improved oil bioremediation strategies.

  1. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  2. Dielectric constant of water in the interface.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ∼5 to 18 Å. PMID:27394114

  3. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.; Bazerbashi, M. F.; Beekman, C. P.; Hadad, C. M.; Allen, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of the acyl chains is thought to be key to aerosol growth. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air- sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Using sum frequency generation spectroscopy coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  4. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura

    2008-03-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air-sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Coupling sum frequency generation spectroscopy with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  5. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and light-emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive di-carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and <1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples. The potential impact of such chemistry on the atmosphere of the marine boundary layer is discussed.

  6. OH-Radical Specific Addition to Glutathione S-Atom at the Air-Water Interface: Relevance to the Redox Balance of the Lung Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in epithelial lining fluids (ELF) prevent inhaled air pollutants from reaching lung tissue. This process, however, may upset ELF's redox balance, which is deemed to be expressed by the ratio of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) to its putative oxidation product GSSG. Previously, we found that at physiological pH O3(g) rapidly oxidizes GS(2-)(aq) (but not GSH(-)) to GSO3(-) rather than GSSG. Here, we report that in moderately acidic pH ≤ 5 media ·OH(g) oxidizes GSH(-)(aq) to sulfenic GSOH(-), sulfinic GSO2(-), and sulfonic GSO3(-) acids via ·OH specific additions to reduced S-atoms. The remarkable specificity of ·OH on water versus its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during [OH···GSH] interfacial encounters. Thus, both O3 and ·OH oxidize GSH to GSOH(-) under most conditions, and since GSOH(-) is reduced back to GSH in vivo by NADPH, redox balance may be in fact signaled by GSH/GSOH ratios. PMID:26722895

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of water at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Skinner, J L; Pieniazek, P A; Gruenbaum, S M

    2012-01-17

    Understanding liquid water's behavior at the molecular level is essential to progress in fields as disparate as biology and atmospheric sciences. Moreover, the properties of water in bulk and water at interfaces can be very different, making the study of the hydrogen-bonding networks therein very important. With recent experimental advances in vibrational spectroscopy, such as ultrafast pulses and heterodyne detection, it is now possible to probe the structure and dynamics of bulk and interfacial water in unprecedented detail. We consider here three aqueous interfaces: the water liquid-vapor interface, the interface between water and the surfactant headgroups of reverse micelles, and the interface between water and the lipid headgroups of aligned multi-bilayers. In the first case, sum-frequency spectroscopy is used to probe the interface. In the second and third cases, the confined water pools are sufficiently small that techniques of bulk spectroscopy (such as FTIR, pump-probe, two-dimensional IR, and the like) can be used to probe the interfacial water. In this Account, we discuss our attempts to model these three systems and interpret the existing experiments. For the water liquid-vapor interface, we find that three-body interactions are essential for reproducing the experimental sum-frequency spectrum, and presumably for the structure of the interface as well. The observed spectrum is interpreted as arising from overlapping and canceling positive and negative contributions from molecules in different hydrogen-bonding environments. For the reverse micelles, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed blue shift of the water OD stretch (for dilute HOD in H(2)O) arises from weaker hydrogen bonding to sulfonate oxygens. We interpret the observed slow-down in water rotational dynamics as arising from curvature-induced frustration. For the water confined between lipid bilayers, our theoretical models confirm that the experimentally observed red

  8. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Emily E.; Wong, Daryl B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse micelle interface are measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch, and the results are compared to orientational relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface. The comparison provides insights into the influence of a neutral vs. ionic interface on hydrogen bond dynamics. Measurements are made and analyzed for large nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520reverse micelles (water nanopool with a 9-nm diameter). The results are compared with those from a previous study of reverse micelles of the same size formed with the ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). The results demonstrate that the orientational relaxation times for interfacial water molecules in the two types of reverse micelles are very similar (13 ps for Igepal and 18 ps for AOT) and are significantly slower than that of bulk water (2.6 ps). The comparison of water orientational relaxation at neutral and ionic interfaces shows that the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in determining the hydrogen bond dynamics, whereas the chemical nature of the interface plays a secondary role. PMID:19706895

  9. Automatic Web-Based, Radio-Network System To Monitor And Control Equipment For Investigating Gas Flux At Water - Air Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Wik, M.; Beckman, P.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Robust measurements of natural GHG emissions are vital for evaluating regional to global carbon budgets and for assessing climate feedbacks on natural emissions to improve climate models. Diffusive and ebullitive (bubble) transport are two major pathways of gas release from surface waters. To capture the high temporal variability of these fluxes in a well-defined footprint, we designed and built an inexpensive automatic device that includes an easily mobile diffusive flux chamber and a bubble counter, all in one. Besides a function of automatically collecting gas samples for subsequent various analyses in the laboratory, this device utilizes low cost CO2 sensor (SenseAir, Sweden) and CH4 sensor (Figaro, Japan) to measure GHG fluxes. To measure the spatial variability of emissions, each of the devices is equipped with an XBee module to enable a local radio communication DigiMesh network for time synchronization and data readout at a server-controller station on the lakeshore. Software of this server-controller is operated on a low cost Raspberry Pi computer which has a 3G connection for remote monitoring - controlling functions from anywhere in the world. From field studies in Abisko, Sweden in summer 2014 and 2015, the system has resulted in measurements of GHG fluxes comparable to manual methods. In addition, the deployments have shown the advantage of a low cost automatic network system to study GHG fluxes on lakes in remote locations.

  10. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems. PMID:27010817

  11. Chemical physics of water-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Vis, Mark; Erné, Ben H; Tromp, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    A brief review is given on recent progress in experimental and theoretical investigations of the interface between coexisting aqueous phases of biopolymers. The experimental aspects are introduced using results obtained from a model system consisting of aqueous mixtures of nongelling gelatin and dextran. The focus is on the interfacial tension and interfacial electric potential (Donnan potential). These quantities are experimentally accessible and can be shown to be closely related. PMID:26746162

  12. Rheology of asphaltene-toluene/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sztukowski, Danuta M; Yarranton, Harvey W

    2005-12-01

    The stability of water-in-crude oil emulsions is frequently attributed to a rigid asphaltene film at the water/oil interface. The rheological properties of these films and their relationship to emulsion stability are ill defined. In this study, the interfacial tension, elastic modulus, and viscous modulus were measured using a drop shape analyzer for model oils consisting of asphaltenes dissolved in toluene for concentrations varying from 0.002 to 20 kg/m(3). The effects of oscillation frequency, asphaltene concentration, and interface aging time were examined. The films exhibited viscoelastic behavior. The total modulus increased as the interface aged at all asphaltene concentrations. An attempt was made to model the rheology for the full range of asphaltene concentration. The instantaneous elasticity was modeled with a surface equation of state (SEOS), and the elastic and viscous moduli, with the Lucassen-van den Tempel (LVDT) model. It was found that only the early-time data could be modeled using the SEOS-LVDT approach; that is, the instantaneous, elastic, and viscous moduli of interfaces aged for at most 10 minutes. At longer interface aging times, the SEOS-LVDT approach was invalid, likely because of irreversible adsorption of asphaltenes on the interface and the formation of a network structure. PMID:16316096

  13. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  14. The apparent charge of nanoparticles trapped at a water interface.

    PubMed

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Roth, Joseph; Bohinc, Klemen; May, Sylvio

    2016-05-14

    Charged spherical nanoparticles trapped at the interface between water and air or water and oil exhibit repulsive electrostatic forces that contain a long-ranged dipolar and a short-ranged exponentially decaying component. The former are induced by the unscreened electrostatic field through the non-polar low-permittivity medium, and the latter result from the overlap of the diffuse ion clouds that form in the aqueous phase close to the nanoparticles. The magnitude of the long-ranged dipolar interaction is largely determined by the residual charges that remain attached to the air- (or oil-) exposed region of the nanoparticle. In the present work we address the question to what extent the charges on the water-immersed part of the nanoparticle provide an additional contribution to the dipolar interaction. To this end, we model the electrostatic properties of a spherical particle - a nanoparticle or a colloid - that partitions equatorially to the air-water interface, thereby employing nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory in the aqueous solution and accounting for the propagation of the electric field through the interior of the particle. We demonstrate that the apparent charge density on the air-exposed region of the particle, which determines the dipole potential, is influenced by the electrostatic properties in the aqueous solution. We also show that this electrostatic coupling through the particle can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple analytic planar capacitor model. Our results help to rationalize the experimentally observed weak but non-vanishing salt dependence of the forces that stabilize ordered two-dimensional arrays of interface-trapped nanoparticles or colloids. PMID:27049110

  15. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  16. Ultrafast vibrational dynamics at water interfaces.

    PubMed

    McGuire, John A; Shen, Y Ron

    2006-09-29

    Time-resolved sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy permits the study of hitherto neglected ultrafast vibrational dynamics of neat water interfaces. Measurements on interfacial bonded OH stretch modes revealed relaxation behavior on sub-picosecond time scales in close resemblance to that of bulk water. Vibrational excitation is followed by spectral diffusion, vibrational relaxation, and thermalization in the hydrogen-bonding network. Dephasing of the excitation occurs in water molecules surrounded by acetone. PMID:17008527

  17. Instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Norihiro; Naito, Kensuke; Yokokawa, Miwa

    2015-04-01

    It is known that plane water-ice interface becomes unstable to evolve into a train of waves. The underside of ice formed on the water surface of rivers are often observed to be covered with ice ripples. Relatively steep channels which discharge melting water from glaciers are characterized by beds covered with a series of steps. Though the flowing agent inducing instability is not water but gas including water vapor, a similar train of steps have been recently observed on the Polar Ice Caps on Mars (Spiral Troughs). They are expected to be caused by the instability of water-ice interface induced by flowing fluid on ice. There have been some studies on this instability in terms of linear stability analysis. Recently, Caporeale and Ridolfi (2012) have proposed a complete linear stability analysis in the case of laminar flow, and found that plane water-ice interface is unstable in the range of sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, and that the important parameters are the Reynolds number, the slope angle, and the water surface temperature. However, the flow inducing instability on water-ice interface in the field should be in the turbulent regime. Extension of the analysis to the case of fully developed turbulent flow with larger Reynolds numbers is needed. We have performed a linear stability analysis on the instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow conditions with the use of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the mixing length turbulent model, the continuity equation of flow, the diffusion/dispersion equation of heat, and the Stefan equation. In order to reproduce the accurate velocity distribution and the heat transfer in the vicinity of smooth walls with the use of the mixing length model, it is important to take into account of the rapid decrease in the mixing length in the viscous sublayer. We employ the Driest model (1956) to the formulation. In addition, as the thermal boundary condition at the water surface, we describe the

  18. SOFC chromite sintering and electrolyte/air-electrode interface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Youngblood, G.E.

    1992-04-01

    Air sintering of chromites was investigated in La(Sr)CrO{sub 3}, La(Ca)CrO{sub 3}, and Y(Ca)CrO{sub 3}. Effects of alkaline earth dopant level and chromium enrichment/depletion on chromite sintered densities and microstructures are discussed. Ac impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization coupled with an unbonded interface cell were used to examine SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) electrochemical reactions at solid-solid-gas interfaces, particularly for La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. 5 refs.

  19. SOFC chromite sintering and electrolyte/air-electrode interface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Youngblood, G.E.

    1992-04-01

    Air sintering of chromites was investigated in La(Sr)CrO[sub 3], La(Ca)CrO[sub 3], and Y(Ca)CrO[sub 3]. Effects of alkaline earth dopant level and chromium enrichment/depletion on chromite sintered densities and microstructures are discussed. Ac impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization coupled with an unbonded interface cell were used to examine SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) electrochemical reactions at solid-solid-gas interfaces, particularly for La[sub 1-x]Sr[sub x]MnO[sub 3]. 5 refs.

  20. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  1. The impact and bounce of air bubbles at a flat fluid interface.

    PubMed

    Manica, Rogerio; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-04-01

    The rise and impact of bubbles at an initially flat but deformable liquid-air interface in ultraclean liquid systems are modelled by taking into account the buoyancy force, hydrodynamic drag, inertial added mass effect and drainage of the thin film between the bubble and the interface. The bubble-surface interaction is analyzed using lubrication theory that allows for both bubble and surface deformation under a balance of normal stresses and surface tension as well as the long-range nature of deformation along the interface. The quantitative result for collision and bounce is sensitive to the impact velocity of the rising bubble. This velocity is controlled by the combined effects of interfacial tension via the Young-Laplace equation and hydrodynamic stress on the surface, which determine the deformation of the bubble. The drag force that arises from the hydrodynamic stress in turn depends on the hydrodynamic boundary conditions on the bubble surface and its shape. These interrelated factors are accounted for in a consistent manner. The model can predict the rise velocity and shape of millimeter-size bubbles in ultra-clean water, in two silicone oils of different densities and viscosities and in ethanol without any adjustable parameters. The collision and bounce of such bubbles with a flat water/air, silicone oil/air and ethanol/air interface can then be predicted with excellent agreement when compared to experimental observations. PMID:26924623

  2. The formation of surface multilayers at the air-water interface from sodium polyethylene glycol monoalkyl ether sulfate/AlCl(3) solutions: the role of the size of the polyethylene oxide group.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Penfold, Jeff; Thomas, Robert K; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John P R

    2013-09-17

    Neutron reflectivity, NR, and surface tension, ST, have been used to study the surface adsorption properties at the air-water interface of the anionic surfactant sodium polyethylene glycol monododecyl ether sulfate (sodium lauryl ether sulfate, SLES) in the presence of Al(3+) multivalent counterions, by the addition of AlCl3. In the absence of AlCl3 and at low AlCl3 concentrations monolayer adsorption is observed. With increasing AlCl3 concentration, surface multilayer formation is observed, driven by SLES/Al(3+) complex formation. The onset of multilayer formation occurs initially as a single bilayer or a multilayer structure with a limited number of bilayers, N, ≤3, and ultimately at higher AlCl3 concentrations N is large, >20. The evolution in the surface structure is determined by the surfactant and AlCl3 concentrations, and the size of the polyethylene oxide group in the different SLES surfactants studied. From the NR data, approximate surface phase diagrams are constructed, and the evolution of the surface structure with surfactant and electrolyte concentration is shown to be dependent on the size of the polyethylene oxide group. As the polyethylene oxide group increases in size the multilayer formation requires increasingly higher surfactant and AlCl3 concentrations to promote the formation. This is attributed to the increased steric hindrance of the polyethylene oxide group disrupting SLES/Al(3+) complex formation. PMID:23968161

  3. Quantum chemical clarification of the alkyl chain length threshold of nonionic surfactants for monolayer formation at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2016-03-21

    A theoretical basis is provided for the experimental fact that for various surfactant classes the alkyl chain length threshold varies for the formation of condensed monolayers. The existence of the alkyl chain length threshold for a surfactant enabling the formation of monolayers is determined by the entropy increment to the Gibbs' energy, assessed by using the quantum chemical semiempiric method PM3. The value of the clusterization threshold is not stipulated by the surfactant solubility in water, rather by the electron-donor and electron-seeking properties of the head groups. These properties in turn impact the value of the solubility threshold for surfactants. The value of the clusterization threshold depends quadratically on the substituent constants, i.e. it is independent of whether the functional group is a donor or an acceptor of electrons. Rather it depends only on the donor or the acceptor 'force' of the substituent. The square-law dependence of the surface clusterization threshold of the amphiphile on the solubility threshold is evidenced. PMID:26957020

  4. Air-stable droplet interface bilayers on oil-infused surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G; Sarles, Stephen A; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are versatile model membranes useful for synthetic biology and biosensing; however, to date they have always been confined to fluid reservoirs. Here, we demonstrate that when two or more water droplets collide on an oil-infused substrate, they exhibit non-coalescence due to the formation of a thin oil film that gets squeezed between the droplets from the bottom-up. We show that when phospholipids are included in the water droplets, a stable droplet interface bilayer forms between the non-coalescing water droplets. As with traditional oil-submerged DIBs, we were able to characterize ion channel transport by incorporating peptides into each droplet. Our findings reveal that droplet interface bilayers can function in air environments, which could potentially enable biosensing of atmospheric particulates.

  5. AirJump: Using Interfaces to Instantly Perform Simultaneous Extractions.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; LaVanway, Alex J; Guckenberger, David J; Anderson, Meghan A; Beebe, David J

    2016-06-22

    Analyte isolation is an important process that spans a range of biomedical disciplines, including diagnostics, research, and forensics. While downstream analytical techniques have advanced in terms of both capability and throughput, analyte isolation technology has lagged behind, increasingly becoming the bottleneck in these processes. Thus, there exists a need for simple, fast, and easy to integrate analyte separation protocols to alleviate this bottleneck. Recently, a new class of technologies has emerged that leverages the movement of paramagnetic particle (PMP)-bound analytes through phase barriers to achieve a high efficiency separation in a single or a few steps. Specifically, the passage of a PMP/analyte aggregate through a phase interface (aqueous/air in this case) acts to efficiently "exclude" unbound (contaminant) material from PMP-bound analytes with higher efficiency than traditional washing-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) protocols (i.e., bind, wash several times, elute). Here, we describe for the first time a new type of "exclusion-based" sample preparation, which we term "AirJump". Upon realizing that much of the contaminant carryover stems from interactions with the sample vessel surface (e.g., pipetting residue, wetting), we aim to eliminate the influence of that factor. Thus, AirJump isolates PMP-bound analyte by "jumping" analyte directly out of a free liquid/air interface. Through careful characterization, we have demonstrated the validity of AirJump isolation through comparison to traditional washing-based isolations. Additionally, we have confirmed the suitability of AirJump in three important independent biological isolations, including protein immunoprecipitation, viral RNA isolation, and cell culture gene expression analysis. Taken together, these data sets demonstrate that AirJump performs efficiently, with high analyte yield, high purity, no cross contamination, rapid time-to-isolation, and excellent reproducibility. PMID:27249333

  6. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  7. Long term stability of immiscible ferrofluid/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouin, Bernard; Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2010-11-01

    Recently we have demonstrated pinned-contact, coupled droplet pairs of aqueous ferrofluids in air that can form electromagnetically-activated capillary switches and oscillators. The great variety of available ferrofluids, however, enables the use of immiscible oil-based ferrofluid droplets in a water environment to obtain the same behavior. Such immersed ferrofluid oscillators exhibit natural frequencies (for 5 mm devices) of about 10 Hz. Here we report on the observation of a gradual increase in the resonant frequency of the system in time. Experimental observations suggest that the drift in the natural frequency is a consequence of changes occurring at the ferrofluid/water interface. The interfacial structure of such a complex system (water, oil, surfactant, iron particles) is examined along with its evolution in time, using various microscopy techniques.

  8. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, Gilbert E.; Edwards, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air interface (10) is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve (18), from which extends a vacuum-tight duct (26), that termintes in an aperture (28). Means (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip (30) across the aperture (28) at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band (62) urges foil strip (30), when stationary, against and into the aperture (28). Gas pressure means (68, 70) periodically lift off and separate foil strip (30) from aperture (28), so that it may be readily advanced.

  9. Development of air touch interface for floating 3D image in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    We developed a prototype virtual air touch interface system for interaction in the virtual 3D space. The spatial imaging display system provides the observer virtual 3D objects. These 3D images are floating in the air and one can directly touch objects or virtual images. To take mutual action we need to prepare the interface system which can recognize that the user moves his hand near the virtual objects. Because a conventional touch-panel system detects the user's operation on the display screen but the touching point differs from the actual displaying space, it is important to realize that the user can operate at the same space. A typical method is to use the computer vision. In this paper, the authors propose the interface system using a theremin which is a musical instrument having the unusual aspect of being controlled by the performer's hand motions near the antennas.

  10. Advanced Crew Interface Designs for Safer Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced crew interface designs to improve performance for safe air travel. NASA's goal is to provide enabling technologies that will increase aviation safety by a factor of five within 10 years, and by a factor of ten within 25 years. This research is part of NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise's strategy to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. The Enterprise has set bold goals that are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  11. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Douglas J.; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Levin, Yan; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface, and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory that is capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces. MDB and CJM acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is supported by the Linus Pauling Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at PNNL.

  12. Stereoselective synthesis of (2S,3S,4Z)-4-fluoro-1,3-dihydroxy-2-(octadecanoylamino)octadec-4-ene, [(Z)-4-fluoroceramide], and its phase behavior at the air/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Gergana S

    2008-01-01

    natural ceramide. Conclusions Asymmetric aldol reaction proved to be successful for the preparation of enantiopure 4-fluoroceramide. Surface/pressure isotherms and hysteresis curves of ceramide and its 4-fluoro derivative showed that the presence of fluorine leads to stronger intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic chains of neighboring molecules, and therefore to increasing stability of the monolayer of 4-fluoroceramide at the air water interface. PMID:18941484

  13. Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Amara L.; Marr, Linsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials in consumer products. Some of these products are likely to be aerosolized, making silver nanoparticles a high priority for inhalation toxicity assessment. To study the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles, we have exposed cultured lung cells to them at the air-liquid interface. Cells were exposed to suspensions of silver or nickel oxide (positive control) nanoparticles at concentrations of 2.6, 6.6, and 13.2 μg cm−2 (volume concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μg ml−1) and to 0.7 μg cm−2 silver or 2.1 μg cm−2 nickel oxide aerosol at the air-liquid interface. Unlike a number of in vitro studies employing suspensions of silver nanoparticles, which have shown strong toxic effects, both suspensions and aerosolized nanoparticles caused negligible cytotoxicity and only a mild inflammatory response, in agreement with animal exposures. Additionally, we have developed a novel method using a differential mobility analyzer to select aerosolized nanoparticles of a single diameter to assess the size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:23484109

  14. Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) at the Oil/Water Interface: A Neutron Reflection Study.

    PubMed

    Campana, M; Hosking, S L; Petkov, J T; Tucker, I M; Webster, J R P; Zarbakhsh, A; Lu, J R

    2015-05-26

    The structure of the adsorbed protein layer at the oil/water interface is essential to the understanding of the role of proteins in emulsion stabilization, and it is important to glean the mechanistic events of protein adsorption at such buried interfaces. This article reports on a novel experimental methodology for probing protein adsorption at the buried oil/water interface. Neutron reflectivity was used with a carefully selected set of isotopic contrasts to study the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the hexadecane/water interface, and the results were compared to those for the air/water interface. The adsorption isotherm was determined at the isoelectric point, and the results showed that a higher degree of adsorption could be achieved at the more hydrophobic interface. The adsorbed BSA molecules formed a monolayer on the aqueous side of the interface. The molecules in this layer were partially denatured by the presence of oil, and once released from the spatial constraint by the globular framework they were free to establish more favorable interactions with the hydrophobic medium. Thus, a loose layer extending toward the oil phase was clearly observed, resulting in an overall broader interface. By analogy to the air/water interface, as the concentration of BSA increased to 1.0 mg mL(-1) a secondary layer extending toward the aqueous phase was observed, possibly resulting from the steric repulsion upon the saturation of the primary monolayer. Results clearly indicate a more compact arrangement of molecules at the oil/water interface: this must be caused by the loss of the globular structure as a consequence of the denaturing action of the hexadecane. PMID:25875917

  15. Coherent X-ray Scattering from Liquid-Air Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpyrko, Oleg

    Advances in synchrotron x-ray scattering techniques allow studies of structure and dynamics of liquid surfaces with unprecedented resolution. I will review x-ray scattering measurements of thermally excited capillary fluctuations in liquids, thin polymer liquid films and polymer surfaces in confined geometry. X-ray Diffuse scattering profile due to Debye-Waller like roughening of the surface allows to probe the distribution of capillary fluctuations over a wide range of length scales, while using X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) one is able to directly couple to nanoscale dynamics of these surface fluctuations, over a wide range of temporal and spacial scales. I will also discuss recent XPCS measurements of lateral diffusion dynamics in Langmuir monolayers assembled at the liquid-air interface. This research was supported by NSF CAREER Grant 0956131.

  16. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  17. Water gun vs air gun: A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Detrick, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The water gun is a relatively new marine seismic sound source that produces an acoustic signal by an implosive rather than explosive mechanism. A comparison of the source characteristics of two different-sized water guns with those of conventional air guns shows the the water gun signature is cleaner and much shorter than that of a comparable-sized air gun: about 60-100 milliseconds (ms) for an 80-in3. (1.31-liter (I)) water gun compared with several hundred ms for an 80-in3. (1.31-1) air gun. The source spectra of water guns are richer in high frequencies (>200 Hz) than are those of air guns, but they also have less energy than those of air guns at low frequencies. A comparison between water gun and air gun reflection profiles in both shallow (Long Island Sound)-and deep (western Bermuda Rise)-water settings suggests that the water gun offers a good compromise between very high resolution, limited penetration systems (e.g. 3.5-kHz profilers and sparkers) and the large volume air guns and tuned air gun arrays generally used where significant penetration is required. ?? 1984 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  18. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    Air-sea interaction dramatically changes from moderate to very high wind speed conditions (Donelan et al. 2004). Unresolved physics of the air-sea interface are one of the weakest components in tropical cyclone prediction models. Rapid disruption of the air-water interface under very high wind speed conditions was reported in laboratory experiments (Koga 1981) and numerical simulations (Soloviev et al. 2012), which resembled the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at an interface with very large density difference. Kelly (1965) demonstrated that the KH instability at the air-sea interface can develop through parametric amplification of waves. Farrell and Ioannou (2008) showed that gustiness results in the parametric KH instability of the air-sea interface, while the gusts are due to interacting waves and turbulence. The stochastic forcing enters multiplicatively in this theory and produces an exponential wave growth, augmenting the growth from the Miles (1959) theory as the turbulence level increases. Here we complement this concept by adding the effect of the two-phase environment near the mean interface, which introduces additional viscosity in the system (turning it into a rheological system). The two-phase environment includes air-bubbles and re-entering spray (spume), which eliminates a portion of the wind-wave wavenumber spectrum that is responsible for a substantial part of the air sea drag coefficient. The previously developed KH-type interfacial parameterization (Soloviev and Lukas 2010) is unified with two versions of the wave growth model. The unified parameterization in both cases exhibits the increase of the drag coefficient with wind speed until approximately 30 m/s. Above this wind speed threshold, the drag coefficient either nearly levels off or even slightly drops (for the wave growth model that accounts for the shear) and then starts again increasing above approximately 65 m/s wind speed. Remarkably, the unified parameterization reveals a local minimum

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of water permeation across Nafion membrane interfaces.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kevin B; Benziger, Jay B; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2014-07-24

    Permeation of water across the membrane/vapor and membrane/liquid-water interfaces of Nafion is studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, providing direct calculations of mass-transfer resistance. Water mass transfer within one nanometer of the vapor interface is shown to be 2 orders of magnitude slower than at any other point within the membrane, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. This interfacial resistance is much stronger than the resistance suggested by prior simulation work calculating self-diffusivity near the interface. The key difference between the prior approach and the NEMD approach is that the NEMD approach implicitly incorporates changes in solubility in the direction normal to the interface. Water is shown to be very insoluble near the vapor interface, which is rich in hydrophobic perfluorocarbon chains, in agreement with advancing contact angle experiments. Hydrophilic side chains are buried beneath this hydrophobic layer and aligned toward the interior of the membrane. Hydrophilic pores are not exposed to the vapor interface as proposed in prior theoretical work. At the membrane/liquid-water interface, highly swollen polymer chains extend into the liquid-water phase, forming a nanoscopically rough interface that is consistent with atomic force microscopy experiments. In these swollen conformations, hydrophilic side chains are exposed to the liquid-water phase, suggesting that the interface is hydrophilic, in agreement with receding contact angle experiments. The mass-transfer resistance of this interface is negligible compared to that of the bulk, in qualitative agreement with permeation experiments. The water activity at the vapor and liquid-water interfaces are nearly the same, yet large conformational and transport differences are observed, consistent with a mass-transfer-based understanding of Schroeder's paradox for Nafion. PMID:24971638

  20. A molecular view of latex-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zifeng; Fichthorn, Kristen; Milner, Scott; Yuan, Fang; Larson, Ronald

    2013-03-01

    Latex paints and coatings are colloidal suspensions, in which amorphous polymer particles are dispersed in an aqueous phase. The polymer-water interface plays a key role in the stability and rheology of the suspension. To obtain a molecular level view of this interface, atomistic simulations were performed for a slab of poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(butyl acrylate) random copolymer in water, focusing on polymer and water density profiles, the hydrogen bonding of water with polymer carbonyl groups, and surface tension. The carbonyl groups at the interface were found to orient significantly towards water. We also calculated the temperature dependence of the surface tension between the polymer/water and polymer/ vacuum interfaces, including tail corrections for cut-off dispersion interactions, and we predict the contact angle of a water droplet at room temperature. Dow Chemical Corporate

  1. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  2. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Hayes, Douglas G; Collier, C Patrick

    2015-04-14

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, airDIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that the lifetimes of airDIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining the temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (which was 7 °C at 38.5% relative humidity and 22 °C air temperature) to 20 °C results in the loss of hydrated water molecules from the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation, resulting in a phase transition with increased disorder. This dehydration transition primarily affects the bilayer electrical resistance by increasing the permeability through an increasingly disordered polar headgroup region of the bilayer. Temperature and relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of airDIB membranes while still allowing for operation in ambient environments. PMID:25790280

  3. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  4. Dosimetry of interface region near closed air cavities for Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Chandra P; Darko, Johnson; Vidyasagar, P B; Schreiner, L John

    2010-04-01

    Underdosing of treatment targets can occur in radiation therapy due to electronic disequilibrium around air-tissue interfaces when tumors are situated near natural air cavities. These effects have been shown to increase with the beam energy and decrease with the field size. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy techniques employ combinations of multiple small radiation beamlets of varying intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. The use of small beamlets in these techniques may therefore result in underdosing of treatment target in the air-tissue interfaces region surrounding an air cavity. This work was undertaken to investigate dose reductions near the air-water interfaces of 1x1x1 and 3x3x3 cm(3) air cavities, typically encountered in the treatment of head and neck cancer utilizing radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT and tomotherapy using small fields of Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photons. Additional investigations were performed for larger photon field sizes encompassing the entire air-cavity, such as encountered in conventional three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) techniques. The EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose reductions (in water) in air-water interface region for single, parallel opposed and four field irradiations with 2x2 cm(2) (beamlet), 10x2 cm(2) (fan beam), 5x5 and 7x7 cm(2) field sizes. The magnitude of dose reduction in water near air-water interface increases with photon energy; decreases with distance from the interface as well as decreases as the number of beams are increased. No dose reductions were observed for large field sizes encompassing the air cavities. The results demonstrate that Co-60 beams may provide significantly smaller interface dose reductions than 6 MV and 15 MV irradiations for small field irradiations such as used in IMRT and tomotherapy. PMID:20589116

  5. Kinetics of surfactant desorption at an air-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C E; Breward, C J W; Griffiths, I M; Howell, P D; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Tucker, I; Petkov, J T; Webster, J R P

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase can be exchanged (diluted) using a laminar flow while the surface region remains unaltered. The rate of the re-equilibration is relatively slow and occurs over many tens of minutes, which is comparable with the dilution time scale of approximately 10-30 min. A detailed mathematical model, in which the rate of the desorption is determined by transport through a near-surface diffusion layer into a diluted bulk solution below, is developed and provides a good description of the time-dependent adsorption data. A key parameter of the model is the ratio of the depth of the diffusion layer, H(c), to the depth of the fluid, H(f), and we find that this is related to the reduced Péclet number, Pe*, for the system, via H(c)/H(f) = C/Pe*(1/2). Although from a highly idealized experimental arrangement, the results provide an important insight into the "rinse mechanism", which is applicable to a wide variety of domestic and industrial circumstances. PMID:23167573

  6. Profile of the Interface between a Hydrophobic Surface and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Salas, Ursula; Stalgren, Johan; Majkrzak, Charles; Heinrich, Frank; Toney, Michael; Vanderah, David

    2008-03-01

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous and play a fundamental role in biology, chemistry, and geology. The structure of water near interfaces is of the utmost importance, including chemical reactivity and macromolecular function. Theoretical work by Chandler et al. on polar-apolar interfaces predicts that a water depletion layer exists between a hydrophobic surface and bulk water for hydrophobes larger than ˜20nm2 (a ˜4A in radius apolar molecule). Until now, what the interface really looks like remains in dispute since recent experiments give conflicting results: from complete wetting (no water depletion layer) to a water depletion layer. Those experiments that have found a water depletion layer report 40-70% water in the depletion zone: 40 -70% and a width of ˜3A. However, an alternative interpretation to the profiles exists where no depletion layer is required. By studying hydrophobic SAM surfaces against several water mixtures we obtained the hydrophobic/water profile by phase sensitive neutron reflectivity. With this model independent technique we observe a 2 times wider and drier depletion water layer: 6A thick and 0-25% water. Given the level of disagreement, I will review the topic of immiscible interfaces and show how phase sensitive reflectometry is unique in obtaining nm resolution profiles without fitting bias.

  7. A molecular perspective of water at metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Javier; Hodgson, Andrew; Michaelides, Angelos

    2012-08-01

    Water/solid interfaces are relevant to a broad range of physicochemical phenomena and technological processes such as corrosion, lubrication, heterogeneous catalysis and electrochemistry. Although many fields have contributed to rapid progress in the fundamental knowledge of water at interfaces, detailed molecular-level understanding of water/solid interfaces comes mainly from studies on flat metal substrates. These studies have recently shown that a remarkably rich variety of structures form at the interface between water and even seemingly simple flat surfaces. In this Review we discuss the most exciting work in this area, in particular the emerging physical insight and general concepts about how water binds to metal surfaces. We also provide a perspective on outstanding problems, challenges and open questions.

  8. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  9. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results inmore » loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.« less

  10. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Taylor, Graham; Sarles, Stephen A.; Boreyko, Jonathan; Hayes, Douglas G.; Collier, Pat

    2015-03-19

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. However, air-DIBs are subject to evaporation, which can, over time, destabilize them and reduce their useful lifetime compared to traditional DIBs that are fully submerged in oil. Here, we show that lifetimes of air-DIBs can be extended by as much as an order of magnitude by maintaining them at a temperature just above the dew point. We find that raising the temperature from near the dew point (7 C at 38.5 % relative humidity) to room temperature results in loss of water molecules of hydration from the polar head groups of the lipid bilayer membrane due to evaporation in an irreversible process that increases the overall entropy of the system. This dehydration transition affects primarily the bilayer resistance, by increasing ion permeability through the increasingly disordered polar head group region of the bilayer. Temperature and/or relative humidity are conveniently tunable parameters for controlling the stability and composition of air-DIBs membranes, while still allowing for operation in ambient environments.

  11. Air and groundwater flow at the interface between fractured host rock and a bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessirier, B.; Jarsjo, J.; Frampton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Designs of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel include several levels of confinement. The Swedish and Finnish concept KBS-3 targets for example sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock as host formation and would have the waste canisters embedded in an engineered buffer of compacted MX-80 bentonite. The host rock is a highly heterogeneous dual porosity material containing fractures and a rock matrix. Bentonite is a complex expansive porous material. Its water content and mechanical properties are interdependent. Beyond the specific physics of unsaturated flow and transport in each medium, the interface between them is critical. Detailed knowledge of the transitory two-phase flow regime, induced by the insertion of the unsaturated buffer in a saturated rock environment, is necessary to assess the performance of planned KBS-3 deposition holes. A set of numerical simulations based on the equations of two-phase flow for water and air in porous media were conducted to investigate the dynamics of air and groundwater flow near the rock/bentonite interface in the period following installation of the unsaturated bentonite buffer. We assume state of the two-phase flow parameter values for bentonite from laboratory water uptake tests and typical fracture and rock properties from the Äspö Hard rock laboratory (Sweden) gathered under several field characterization campaigns. The results point to desaturation of the rock domain as far as 10 cm away from the interface into matrix-dominated regions for up to 160 days. Similar observations were made during the Bentonite Rock Interaction Experiment (BRIE) at the Äspö HRL, with a desaturation sustained for even longer times. More than the mere time to mechanical and hydraulic equilibrium, the occurrence of sustained unsaturated conditions opens the possibility for biogeochemical processes that could be critical in the safety assessment of the planned repository.

  12. UPCONING OF A SALT-WATER/FRESH-WATER INTERFACE BELOW A PUMPING WELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical solutions for the upconing of an abrupt salt-water/fresh-water interface beneath a pumping well and for the concentration profile across a moving interface are developed for two types of upconing problems. The first considers the position of the interface and the salin...

  13. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  14. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

    1995-09-05

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

  15. Photosensitized production of functionalized and unsaturated organic compounds at the air-sea interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuraru, Raluca; Fine, Ludovic; van Pinxteren, Manuela; D'Anna, Barbara; Herrmann, Hartmut; George, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) has different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to the subsurface water, with an enrichment of organic matter i.e., dissolved organic matter including UV absorbing humic substances, fatty acids and many others. Here we present experimental evidence that dissolved organic matter, such as humic acids, when exposed to sunlight, can photosensitize the chemical conversion of linear saturated fatty acids at the air-water interface into unsaturated functionalized gas phase products (i.e. saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and acids, alkenes and dienes,…) which are known precursors of secondary organic aerosols. These functionalized molecules have previously been thought to be of biological origin, but here we demonstrate that abiotic interfacial photochemistry has the potential to produce such molecules. As the ocean is widely covered by the SML, this new understanding will impact on our ability to describe atmospheric chemistry in the marine environment.

  16. Passive micromixer using by convection and surface tension effects with air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jongil; Warrick, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a passive micromixer that utilizes an air-liquid interface and surface tension effects to enhance fluid mixing via convection and Marangoni effects. Performance of the microfluidic component is tested within a passive-pumping-based device that consists of three microchannels connected in succession using passive micro-mixers. Mixing was quantified at 5 key points along the length of the device using microscope images of patterned streams of Alexa 488 fluorescent-dyed water and pure DI water flowing through the device. The passive micro-mixer mixed fluid 15–20 times more effectively than diffusion between laminar flow streams alone and is a novel micro-mixer embodiment that provides an additional strategy for removing external components from microscale devices for simpler, autonomous operation. PMID:25104979

  17. Photosensitized production of functionalized and unsaturated organic compounds at the air-sea interface

    PubMed Central

    Ciuraru, Raluca; Fine, Ludovic; van Pinxteren, Manuela; D’Anna, Barbara; Herrmann, Hartmut; George, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) has different physical, chemical and biological properties compared to the subsurface water, with an enrichment of organic matter i.e., dissolved organic matter including UV absorbing humic substances, fatty acids and many others. Here we present experimental evidence that dissolved organic matter, such as humic acids, when exposed to sunlight, can photosensitize the chemical conversion of linear saturated fatty acids at the air-water interface into unsaturated functionalized gas phase products (i.e. saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and acids, alkenes and dienes,…) which are known precursors of secondary organic aerosols. These functionalized molecules have previously been thought to be of biological origin, but here we demonstrate that abiotic interfacial photochemistry has the potential to produce such molecules. As the ocean is widely covered by the SML, this new understanding will impact on our ability to describe atmospheric chemistry in the marine environment. PMID:26244712

  18. Water sites at a clay interface

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, J.

    1997-01-15

    Aqueous suspensions of swelling clays (smectites) find uses in many industrial applications including drilling fluids, suspending agents and water treatment. {sup 2}H NMR quadrupolar splittings of clay suspensions monitor the orientation of water molecules near the solid surface. Two limiting water interfacial sites explain the results on montmorillonite, hectorite, and saponite suspensions. The location of cation isomorphous substitution and the Ca{sup 2+}/Na{sup +} molar ratio of exchangeable cations modulate their relative importance. With beidellite suspensions, water orientation at the clay surface cannot be described within the above scheme.

  19. Effects of Temperature, Oxygen Level, Ionic Strength, and pH on the Reaction of Benzene with Hydroxyl Radicals at the Air-Water Interface in Comparison to the Bulk Aqueous Phase.

    PubMed

    Heath, Aubrey A; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols (e.g., fog droplets) are complex, multiphase mediums. Depending on location, time of day, and/or air mass source, there can be considerable variability within these droplets, relating to temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Due to the droplets' inherently small size, the reactions that occur within these droplets are determined by bulk aqueous phase and air-water interfacial conditions. In this study, the reaction of benzene and hydroxyl radicals is examined kinetically in a thin-film flow-tube reactor. By varying the aqueous volume (e.g., film thickness) along the length of the reactor, both bulk and interfacial reaction rates are measured from a single system. Temperature, pH, and ionic strength are varied to model conditions typical of fog events. Oxygen-poor conditions are measured to study oxygen's overall effect on the reaction pathway. Initial rate activation energies and the bulk aqueous phase and interfacial contributions to the overall rate constant are also obtained. PMID:26158391

  20. Probing the dynamics of geometrically confined ferroelectric mesogens at the air interface.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Achu; Choudhary, Amit; Singh, Pankaj; Haranath, D; Biradar, Ashok M

    2015-01-28

    This article focuses on the alignment and dynamics of mesogens at the ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC)/air interface in a confined geometry. The interface has been systematically prepared and characterised with provision for applying an electric field separately to the bulk and air interface of the FLC. Polarizing optical microscopy (POM) investigations done at the FLC/air interface have exposed the concave geometry, cell thickness dependent boundary width and phase dependent optical textures of the FLC meniscus at the interface. Dielectric spectroscopy investigations revealed the presence of an additional molecular relaxation mode at the FLC/air interface, which is attributed to the short axis rotation of homeotropically aligned mesogens at the interface. Based on the observations from the POM, dielectric spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction profiles, we schematically envisaged the molecular arrangement and dynamics of the FLC/air boundary. These studies would be helpful for innovations in liquid crystal based devices and also for many other applications, where soft surfaces, interfaces and confinement play a momentous role. PMID:25489720

  1. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  2. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander V.; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A.; Haus, Brian K.; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-06-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms-1. Around 60 ms-1, the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone.

  3. Spectroscopic Properties of Anisole at the Air-Ice Interface: A Combined Experimental-Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Malongwe, Joseph K'Ekuboni; Nachtigallová, Dana; Corrochano, Pablo; Klán, Petr

    2016-06-14

    A combined experimental and computational approach was used to investigate the spectroscopic properties of anisole in aqueous solutions and at the ice-air interface in the temperature range of 77-298 K. The absorption, diffuse reflectance, and emission spectra of ice samples containing anisole prepared by different techniques, such as slow freezing (frozen aqueous solutions), shock freezing (ice grains), or anisole vapor deposition on ice grains, were measured to evaluate changes in the contaminated ice matrix that occur at different temperatures. It was found that the position of the lowest absorption band of anisole and its tail shift bathochromically by ∼4 nm in frozen samples compared to liquid aqueous solutions. On the other hand, the emission spectra of aqueous anisole solutions were found to fundamentally change upon freezing. While one emission band (∼290 nm) was observed under all circumstances, the second band at ∼350 nm, assigned to an anisole excimer, appeared only at certain temperatures (150-250 K). Its disappearance at lower temperatures is attributed to the formation of crystalline anisole on the ice surface. DFT and ADC(2) calculations were used to interpret the absorption and emission spectra of anisole monomer and dimer associates. Various stable arrangements of the anisole associates were found at the disordered water-air interface in the ground and excited states, but only those with a substantial overlap of the aromatic rings are manifested by the emission band at ∼350 nm. PMID:27243785

  4. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones

    PubMed Central

    Soloviev, Alexander V.; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A.; Haus, Brian K.; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms−1. Around 60 ms−1, the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  5. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  6. Photosensitized Production of Atmospherically Reactive Organic Compounds at the Air/Aqueous Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on experiments that probe photosensitized chemistry at the air/water interface, a region that does not just connect the two phases but displays its own specific chemistry. Here, we follow reactions of octanol, a proxy for environmentally relevant soluble surfactants, initiated by an attack by triplet-state carbonyl compounds, which are themselves concentrated at the interface by the presence of this surfactant. Gas-phase products are determined using PTR-ToF-MS, and those remaining in the organic layer are determined by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and HPLC-HRMS. We observe the photosensitized production of carboxylic acids as well as unsaturated and branched-chain oxygenated products, compounds that act as organic aerosol precursors and had been thought to be produced solely by biological activity. A mechanism that is consistent with the observations is detailed here, and the energetics of several key reactions are calculated using quantum chemical methods. The results suggest that the concentrating nature of the interface leads to its being a favorable venue for radical reactions yielding complex and functionalized products that themselves could initiate further secondary chemistry and new particle formation in the atmospheric environment. PMID:26068588

  7. Photosensitized Production of Atmospherically Reactive Organic Compounds at the Air/Aqueous Interface.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongbo; Ciuraru, Raluca; Dupart, Yoan; Passananti, Monica; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sebastien; Donaldson, D James; Chen, Jianmin; George, Christian

    2015-07-01

    We report on experiments that probe photosensitized chemistry at the air/water interface, a region that does not just connect the two phases but displays its own specific chemistry. Here, we follow reactions of octanol, a proxy for environmentally relevant soluble surfactants, initiated by an attack by triplet-state carbonyl compounds, which are themselves concentrated at the interface by the presence of this surfactant. Gas-phase products are determined using PTR-ToF-MS, and those remaining in the organic layer are determined by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and HPLC-HRMS. We observe the photosensitized production of carboxylic acids as well as unsaturated and branched-chain oxygenated products, compounds that act as organic aerosol precursors and had been thought to be produced solely by biological activity. A mechanism that is consistent with the observations is detailed here, and the energetics of several key reactions are calculated using quantum chemical methods. The results suggest that the concentrating nature of the interface leads to its being a favorable venue for radical reactions yielding complex and functionalized products that themselves could initiate further secondary chemistry and new particle formation in the atmospheric environment. PMID:26068588

  8. Interfacial nanobubbles are leaky: permeability of the gas/water interface.

    PubMed

    German, Sean R; Wu, Xi; An, Hongjie; Craig, Vincent S J; Mega, Tony L; Zhang, Xuehua

    2014-06-24

    Currently there is no widespread agreement on an explanation for the stability of surface nanobubbles. One means by which several explanations can be differentiated is through the predictions they make about the degree of permeability of the gas-solution interface. Here we test the hypothesis that the gas-solution interface of surface nanobubbles is permeable by experimental measurements of the exchange of carbon dioxide. We present measurements by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), demonstrating that the gas inside surface nanobubbles is not sealed inside the bubbles, but rather exchanges with the dissolved gas in the liquid phase. Such gas transfer is measurable by using the infrared active gas CO2. We find that bubbles formed in air-saturated water that is then perfused with CO2-saturated water give rise to distinctive gaseous CO2 signals in ATR-FTIR measurements. Also the CO2 gas inside nanobubbles quickly dissolves into the surrounding air-saturated water. AFM images before and after fluid exchange show that CO2 bubbles shrink upon exposure to air-equilibrated liquid but remain stable for hours. Also air bubbles in contact with CO2-saturated water increase in size and Ostwald ripening occurs more rapidly due to the relatively high gas solubility of CO2 in water. PMID:24863586

  9. Penguin vision in air and water.

    PubMed

    Howland, H C; Sivak, J G

    1984-01-01

    Refractive states measured by retinoscopy and photorefraction indicate that rockhopper (Eudyptes crestatus), Magellanic (Spheniscus magellanicus) and gentoo (Pygoscelis papua) penguins are approximately emmetropic in air and water. Extensive myopia in air, as predicted by early authors, is nonexistent. Photorefractive measurements of refractive state in water indicate that rockhopper, gentoo, Magellanic and king (Aptenodytes patagonica) penguins can accommodate sufficiently to make up for the loss of refractive power of the cornea. Corneas of rockhopper and Megellanic penguins are flattened relative to the overall size of the eye. This feature minimizes the optical effect of submergence. PMID:6534014

  10. Novel method for Ag colloidal cluster formation by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Teppei; Akimoto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Kitazumi, Kosuke; Kajiya, Shuji; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel method for formation of sub-nanoclusters by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface. The density of plasma induced by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface should be lower than that produced by laser ablation in liquid. In the lower density plasma, the produced clusters rarely grow or aggregate into larger clusters because the collision probability is low, resulting in the formation of small clusters. Ag sub-nanoclusters were observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These results show that low-density plasma can be applied to small-cluster formation and that laser ablation at the air-liquid interface produces a good reactive field for the formation of sub-nanoclusters. Our results highlight the importance of low-density plasma induced at the air-liquid interface for sub-nanocluster formation.

  11. Water Intercalation for Seamless, Electrically Insulating, and Thermally Transparent Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlei; Xu, Zhiping

    2016-01-27

    The interface between functional nanostructures and host substrates is of pivotal importance in the design of their nanoelectronic applications because it conveys energy and information between the device and environment. We report here an interface-engineering approach to establish a seamless, electrically insulating, while thermally transparent interface between graphene and metal substrates by introducing water intercalation. Molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles calculations are performed to demonstrate this concept of design, showing that the presence of the interfacial water layer helps to unfold wrinkles formed in the graphene membrane, insulate the electronic coupling between graphene and the substrate, and elevate the interfacial thermal conductance. The findings here lay the ground for a new class of nanoelectronic setups through interface engineering, which could lead to significant improvement in the performance of nanodevices, such as the field-effect transistors. PMID:26720217

  12. Combined air and water pollution control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, Billy C. (Inventor); Jarrell, Lamont (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A bioaquatic air pollution control system for controlling both water and atmospheric pollution is disclosed. The pollution control system includes an exhaust for directing polluted gases out of a furnace and a fluid circulating system which circulates fluid, such as waste water, from a source, past the furnace where the fluid flow entrains the pollutants from the furnace. The combined fluid and pollutants are then directed through a rock/plant/microbial filtering system. A suction pump pumps the treated waste water from the filter system past the exhaust to again entrain more pollutants from the furnace where they are combined with the fluid (waste water) and directed to the filter system.

  13. Composition, concentration and charge profiles of water-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, R. Hans; Vis, M.; Erné, B. H.; Blokhuis, E. M.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of interfaces are discussed between coexisting phases in phase separated aqueous solutions of polymers. Such interfaces are found in food, where protein-rich and polysaccharide-rich phases coexist. Three aspects of such interfaces are highlighted: the interfacial profiles in terms of polymer composition and polymer concentration, the curvature dependence of the interfacial tension, and the interfacial potential, arising when one of the separated polymers is charged. In all three cases a theoretical approach and methods for experimental verification are presented.

  14. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  15. Colloidal crystal formation at the "Nafion-water" interface.

    PubMed

    Bunkin, Nikolay F; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Kozlov, Valeriy A; Shkirin, Alexey V; Suyazov, Nikolay V

    2014-03-27

    In our recent work [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154] it was first obtained that the water layer, having a size of several tens of micrometers and being adjacent to the swollen Nafion interface, is characterized by enhanced optical density; the refractive index of water at the interface is 1.46. Furthermore, the birefringence effect was observed in this layer. To explain these results, it has been hypothesized that because of "disentangling" of charged polymer chains from the Nafion surface toward the bulk of water, a photonic crystal close to the surface is formed [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154]. In this paper, we describe experiments with laser-stimulated luminescence from dry and swollen Nafion. It was shown in the experiment with dry Nafion that the apparatus function of our experimental setup (Green's function) is well-described by a Gaussian profile. It was obtained that a highly concentrated colloidal suspension of Nafion particles with a steep spatial boundary is formed in the water layer adjacent to the interface. The volume density of the Nafion particles as a function of the distance from the Nafion interface was found. These findings can be considered indirect confirmation of the previously formulated photonic crystal hypothesis [Bunkin et al. Water 2013, 4, 129-154]. PMID:24568638

  16. Static and dynamic correlations in water at hydrophobic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain; Hummer, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    We study the static and dynamic properties of the water-density fluctuations in the interface of large nonpolar solutes. With the help of extensive molecular dynamics simulations of TIP4P water near smooth spherical solutes, we show that for large solutes, the interfacial density profile is broadened by capillary waves. For purely repulsive solutes, the squared width of the interface increases linearly with the logarithm of the solute size, as predicted by capillary-wave theory. The apparent interfacial tension extracted from the slope agrees with that of a free liquid–vapor interface. The characteristic length of local density fluctuations is ≈0.5 nm, measured along the arc, again consistent with that of a free liquid–vapor interface. Probed locally, the interfacial density fluctuations exhibit large variances that exceed those expected for an ideal gas. Qualitatively consistent with theories of the free liquid–vapor interface, we find that the water interface near large and strongly nonpolar solutes is flickering, broadened by capillary-wave fluctuations. These fluctuations result in transitions between locally wet and dry regions that are slow on a molecular time scale. PMID:19074279

  17. Boundary layer flow of air over water on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, John; Alving, Amy E.; Joseph, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    A non-similar boundary layer theory for air blowing over a water layer on a flat plate is formulated and studied as a two-fluid problem in which the position of the interface is unknown. The problem is considered at large Reynolds number (based on x), away from the leading edge. A simple non-similar analytic solution of the problem is derived for which the interface height is proportional to x(sub 1/4) and the water and air flow satisfy the Blasius boundary layer equations, with a linear profile in the water and a Blasius profile in the air. Numerical studies of the initial value problem suggests that this asymptotic, non-similar air-water boundary layer solution is a global attractor for all initial conditions.

  18. Quenching using air-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, R.A.; Garwood, R.; Ward, J.; Xia, Q.

    1996-12-31

    With the current trend toward reduced manufacturing cycle time there is considerable interest in minimizing heat treatment related distortion and the residual stresses that are present in components. There is therefore a need to optimize the quenching process for a particular part such that the desired cooling rate, and hence mechanical properties, are obtained while minimizing distortion. This paper describes work aimed at developing a system to provide heat transfer rates between those obtained for oil quenching and fan cooling. Tests are described in which quenching was carried out by spraying water into the stream of air exiting a fan cooling system. Data are also presented for air mist quenching using atomizing nozzles. Comparison of computer predicted cooling rates and residual stress levels in components are presented for oil quenching, fan cooling, fan plus water injection cooling and air-mist cooling.

  19. Integration of air and water quality issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental sustainability of dairy farms is dependent upon a number of air and water quality issues. Atmospheric emissions include hazardous compounds such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide along with greenhouse gases and their implications with global climate change. Runoff of sediment, phosph...

  20. Local order of liquid water at the electrochemical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Serra, Marivi; Pedroza, Luana

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the aqueous electrochemical interface in an atomic level is of fundamental importance in many areas, such as catalysis and materials science. In this work we analyze in detail the structural, dynamic and energetic properties of liquid-water interacting with (111) Pd and Au surfaces at ambient temperature, using first principles molecular dynamics, with and without van der Waals interactions. We show that, contrary to what was found when studying ice-like water layers, van der Waals interactions play a critical role in modeling the aqueous/electrode interface. We show the differences in the ordering of water at the interface for Pd and Au, and we explain the change in work functions of these two metals in aqueous solution. DOE Early Career Award No. DE-SC0003871.

  1. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  2. Artificial Photosynthesis at Dynamic Self-Assembled Interfaces in Water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Malte; Troppmann, Stefan; König, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis is one of the big scientific challenges of today. Self-assembled dynamic interfaces, such as vesicles or micelles, have been used as microreactors to mimic biological photosynthesis. These aggregates can help to overcome typical problems of homogeneous photocatalytic water splitting. Microheterogeneous environments organize catalyst-photosensitizer assemblies at the interface in close proximity and thus enhance intermolecular interactions. Thereby vesicles and micelles may promote photoinitiated charge separation and suppress back electron transfer. The dynamic self-assembled interfaces solubilize non-polar compounds and protect sensitive catalytic units and intermediates against degradation. In addition, vesicles provide compartmentation that was used to separate different redox environments needed for an overall water splitting system. This Minireview provides an overview of the applications of micellar and vesicular microheterogeneous systems for solar energy conversion by photosensitized water oxidation and hydrogen generation. PMID:26552728

  3. The Oil-Water Interface: Mapping the Solvation Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Richard C.; Wu, Kai; Iedema, Martin J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Cowin, James P.

    2009-01-06

    Ions moving across the oil water interface are strongly impacted by the continuous changes in solvation. The solvation potential for Cs+ is directly measured as they approach the oil-water interface (“oil” = 3-methylpentane), from 0.4 to 4 nm away. The oil-water interfaces are created at 40K using molecular beam epitaxy and a softlanding ion beam, with pre-placed ions. The solvation potential slope was determined at each distance by balancing it against an increasing electrostatic potential made by increasing the number of imbedded ions at that distance, and monitoring the resulting ion motion. The potential approaches the Born model for greater than z>0.4nm, and shows the predicted reduction of the polarizability at z<0.4nm.

  4. Temporal variability of CO₂ fluxes at the sediment-air interface in mangroves (New Caledonia).

    PubMed

    Leopold, Audrey; Marchand, Cyril; Deborde, Jonathan; Allenbach, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Carbon budgets in mangrove forests are uncertain mainly due to the lack of data concerning carbon export in dissolved and gaseous forms. Temporal variability of in situ CO2 fluxes was investigated at the sediment-air interface in different seasons in different mangrove stands in a semi-arid climate. Fluxes were measured using dynamic closed incubation chambers (transparent and opaque) connected to an infra-red gas analyzer. Microclimatic conditions and chl-a contents of surface sediments were determined. Over all mangrove stands, CO2 fluxes on intact sediments were relatively low, ranging from -3.93 to 8.85 mmolCO₂·m(-2)·h(-1) in the light and in the dark, respectively. Changes in the fluxes over time appeared to depend to a great extent on the development of the biofilm at the sediment surface. We suggest that in intact sediments and in the dark, CO2 fluxes measured at the sediment-air interface rather reflect the metabolism of benthic organisms than sediment respiration (heterotrophic and autotrophic). However, without the biofilm, sediment water content and air temperature were main drivers of seasonal differences in CO2 fluxes, and their influence differed depending on the intertidal location of the stand. After removal of the biofilm, Q10 values in the Avicennia and the Rhizophora stands were 1.84 and 2.1, respectively, revealing the sensitivity of mangrove sediments to an increase in temperature. This study provides evidence that, if the influence of the biofilm is not taken into account, the in situ CO2 emission data currently used to calculate the budget will lead to underestimation of CO2 production linked to heterotrophic respiration fueled by organic matter detritus from the mangrove. PMID:25302449

  5. A Janus-paper PDMS platform for air-liquid interface cell culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rahim; Ochoa, Manuel; Donaldson, Amy; Parupudi, Tejasvi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ghaemmaghami, Amir; Ziaie, Babak

    2015-05-01

    A commercially available Janus paper with one hydrophobic (polyethylene-coated) face and a hygroscopic/hydrophilic one is irreversibly bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate incorporating microfluidic channels via corona discharge surface treatment. The bond strength between the polymer-coated side and PDMS is characterized as a function of corona treatment time and annealing temperature/time. A maximum strength of 392 kPa is obtained with a 2 min corona treatment followed by 60 min of annealing at 120 °C. The water contact angle of the corona-treated polymer side decreases with increased discharge duration from 98° to 22°. The hygroscopic/hydrophilic side is seeded with human lung fibroblast cells encapsulated in a methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel to show the potential of this technology for nutrient and chemical delivery in an air-liquid interface cell culture.

  6. Compact optical system for imaging underwater and through the air/sea interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, Derek; Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan

    2012-06-01

    Typical line-of-sight (LOS)/monostatic optical imaging systems include a laser source and receiver that are co-located on the same platform. The performance of such systems is deteriorated in turbid ocean water due to the large amount of light that is scattered on the path to and from an object of interest. Imagery collected with the LOS/monostatic system through the air/sea interface is also distorted due to wave focusing/defocusing effects. The approach of this project is to investigate an alternate, non-line-of-sight (NLOS)/bistatic approach that offers some advantages over these traditional LOS/monostatic imaging techniques. In this NLOS system the laser and receiver are located on separate platforms with the laser located closer to the object of interest. As the laser sequentially scans the underwater object, a time-varying intensity signal corresponding to reflectivity changes in the object is detected by the distant receiver. A modulated laser illuminator is used to communicate information about the scan to the distant receiver so it can recreate the image with the collected scattered light. This NLOS/bistatic configuration also enables one to view an underwater target through the air-sea interface (transmitter below the surface and receiver above the surface) without the distortions experienced with the LOS/monostatic sensor. In this paper, we will review the results of recent laboratory water tank experiments where an underwater object was imaged with the receiver both below and above the sea surface.

  7. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-07-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 mm square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3 . Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ } ) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  8. Barrier function of human keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mak, V H; Cumpstone, M B; Kennedy, A H; Harmon, C S; Guy, R H; Potts, R O

    1991-03-01

    Stratum corneum (SC), the outermost and least permeable layer of skin, is the major barrier to passive transepidermal water loss. In the research described in this paper, we have used human keratinocyte cultures, grown at the air-liquid (A/L) interface, to examine the relationship between epidermal differentiation (including SC formation) and barrier function. Histologically, the A/L culture showed several markers of complete differentiation, including the presence of well-organized and defined epidermal cell layers, keratohyalin granules, and a multilayered SC. The permeability of tritiated water through epidermal cultures, which had grown for 3 weeks at the A/L interface, was measured with a microdiffusion apparatus. The results of these experiments demonstrated that: a) the human keratinocyte cultures developed a substantial barrier (i.e., a multilayered SC) to water diffusion across the entire surface. If the relative humidity of the culturing environment was lowered from 100% to around 75%, the barrier was significantly improved; b) the differentiation promoter, 1.25-dihydroxy-vitamin-D3, increased the number of SC layers and reduced water permeation through the culture; c) the nature of the keratinocyte support matrix could be altered to improve the morphology as well as the barrier function of the epidermal cultures. Overall, the observations are consistent with the relationship that is believed to exist between SC intercellular lipid content and percutaneous penetration. Confirmation of this hypothesis will further the considerable potential of human keratinocyte A/L cultures as a valuable and relevant model in which to study drug absorption and metabolism. PMID:2002253

  9. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  10. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  11. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  12. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  13. Computer modelling studies of the bilayer/water interface.

    PubMed

    Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Baczynski, Krzysztof; Markiewicz, Michal; Murzyn, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    This review summarises high resolution studies on the interface of lamellar lipid bilayers composed of the most typical lipid molecules which constitute the lipid matrix of biomembranes. The presented results were obtained predominantly by computer modelling methods. Whenever possible, the results were compared with experimental results obtained for similar systems. The first and main section of the review is concerned with the bilayer-water interface and is divided into four subsections. The first describes the simplest case, where the interface consists only of lipid head groups and water molecules and focuses on interactions between the lipid heads and water molecules; the second describes the interface containing also mono- and divalent ions and concentrates on lipid-ion interactions; the third describes direct inter-lipid interactions. These three subsections are followed by a discussion on the network of direct and indirect inter-lipid interactions at the bilayer interface. The second section summarises recent computer simulation studies on the interactions of antibacterial membrane active compounds with various models of the bacterial outer membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26825705

  14. Tapered-fiber-based refractive index sensor at an air/solution interface.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Harris, Jeremie; Wang, Xiaozhen; Lin, Ganbin; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-10-20

    An approach to achieve refractive index sensing at an air and aqueous glycerol solution interface is proposed using a tapered-fiber-based microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MFMZI). Compared to a surrounding uniform medium of air or solutions, the spectral interference visibility of the MFMZI at the air/solution interface is significantly reduced due to a weak coupling between the fundamental cladding mode and high-order asymmetric cladding modes, which are extremely sensitive to the external refractive index. The MFMZI is experimentally demonstrated as an evanescent wave refractive index sensor to measure concentrations of glycerol solutions by monitoring average power attenuation of the tapered fiber. PMID:23089794

  15. Melittin at a membrane/water interface: Effects on water orientation and water penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachar, Michal; Becker, Oren M.

    1999-11-01

    Melittin, a small peptide found in bee venom, is known to induce membrane lysis. A molecular dynamics simulation of melittin embedded in a hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer is analyzed in order to study the peptide's effect on water molecules at the membrane/water interface. The peptide, with a protonated N-terminus, was embedded in a trans-bilayer orientation. The simulation highlights the microscopic mechanism by which melittin induces the formation of transmembrane water "pores," leading to membrane lysis. It was found that melittin has a profound effect on the behavior of the water molecules at the membrane/water interface. It modifies the orientation of the water dipoles and induces water penetration into the bilayer. In fact, melittin's residue Lys-7 and its protonated N-terminus facilitate the formation of transmembrane water pores by steering water penetration from both sides of the bilayer. The initial step towards pore formation takes about 200 ps, and the process relays on melittin's bent conformation and tilted orientation. A large body of experimental observations supports the simulation results and the suggested microscopic mechanism.

  16. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Ardekani, A M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called "squirmer," we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(εlnε), where ε is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface. PMID:23848775

  17. Probing Hydrophilic Interface of Solid/Liquid-Water by Nanoultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Szu-Chi; Huang, Yu-Ru; -Ju Chen, I.; Chen, Yun-Wen; Gusev, Vitalyi; Chen, Miin-Jang; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the numerous devoted studies, water at solid interfaces remains puzzling. An ongoing debate concerns the nature of interfacial water at a hydrophilic surface, whether it is more solid-like, ice-like, or liquid-like. To answer this question, a complete picture of the distribution of the water molecule structure and molecular interactions has to be obtained in a non-invasive way and on an ultrafast time scale. We developed a new experimental technique that extends the classical acoustic technique to the molecular level. Using nanoacoustic waves with a femtosecond pulsewidth and an ångström resolution to noninvasively diagnose the hydration structure distribution at ambient solid/water interface, we performed a complete mapping of the viscoelastic properties and of the density in the whole interfacial water region at hydrophilic surfaces. Our results suggest that water in the interfacial region possesses mixed properties and that the different pictures obtained up to now can be unified. Moreover, we discuss the effect of the interfacial water structure on the abnormal thermal transport properties of solid/liquid interfaces. PMID:25176017

  18. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  19. A simple method for locating the fresh water-salt water interface using pressure data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kue-Young; Chon, Chul-Min; Park, Ki-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    Salt water intrusion is a key issue in dealing with exploitation, restoration, and management of fresh ground water in coastal aquifers. Constant monitoring of the fresh water-salt water interface is necessary for proper management of ground water resources. This study presents a simple method to estimate the depth of the fresh water-salt water interface in coastal aquifers using two sets of pressure data obtained from the fresh and saline zones within a single borehole. This method uses the density difference between fresh water and saline water and can practically be used at coastal aquifers that have a relatively sharp fresh water-salt water interface with a thin transition zone. The proposed method was applied to data collected from a coastal aquifer on Jeju Island, Korea, to estimate the variations in the depth of the interface. The interface varied with daily tidal fluctuations and heavy rainfall in the rainy season. The estimated depth of the interface showed a good agreement with the measured electrical conductivity profile. PMID:17973750

  20. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  1. Conjugated polymelectrolyte assembly at water-oil interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Huang, Caili; Thomas, Russell; Russell Team

    Conjugated polyelectrolytes featured with conjugated backbone and functional side chains are interesting optoelectronic materials and widely used to modify electrodes in electronic devices such as light emitting diodes and solar cells to enhance device performance. Conjugated polyelectrolyte can be designed to have alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic side chains, and thus inducing interesting surface and interface properties. In this work, we using polyfluorene based material, to study its behavior at water-toluene interface. The aliphatic side-chains will favorably interact with toluene, and amine side-chains will interact with water, making this material a good surfactant. At interface the polymer chain is stretched to a Janus type of geometry. Flattened molecules will assemble into ultra thin films via pi-pi intermolecular stacking, and thus creating barriers between liquids. When liquid volume is reduced, jamming at interface will show up. These properties are strongly affected by the environment of the liquids, such as temperature and PH values, and polyelectrolyte diffusion to interfaces. This study leads to new methods to structure liquids using single component, which can be extended to applications such as electro-spinning or fabricate flow devices.

  2. Estuary Turbulence and Air-Water Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Philip Mark

    The mixing of constituents between estuarine bottom and surface waters or between estuarine surface waters and the atmosphere are two topics of growing interest, in part due to the potentially important role of estuaries in global carbon budgets. These two types of mixing are typically driven by turbulence, and a research project was developed to improve the scientific understanding of atmospheric and tidal controls on estuary turbulence and airwater exchange processes. Highlights of method development and field research on the Hudson River estuary include several deployments of bottom mounted current profilers to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget, and construction and deployment of an instrumented catamaran that makes autonomous measurements of air-water CO2 exchange (FCO2), water TKE dissipation at 50 cm depth (epsilon50), and other physical properties just above and below the air-water interface. On the Hudson, wind correlates strongly with epsilon50, but surface water speed and airwater heat flux also have moderate correlations with epsilon50. In partially mixed estuaries such as the Hudson, as well as salt wedge estuaries, baroclinic pressure forcing typically causes spring ebb tides to have much stronger upper water column shear than flood tides. The Hudson data are used to show that this shear leads to local shear instability and stronger near-surface turbulence on spring ebbs. Also, buoyancy budget terms are compared to demonstrate how water-to-air heat fluxes can influence stratification and indirectly influence epsilon50. Looking more closely at the role of wind forcing, it is demonstrated that inland propagation of the sea breeze on warm sunny days leads to arrival in phase with peak solar forcing at seaward stations, but several hours later at up-estuary stations. Passage of the sea breeze front raises the air-water CO2 flux by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and drives epsilon50 comparable to spring tide levels in the upper meter of the water

  3. Air-Water Gas Exchange in Wetland Water Columns Due To Wind and Thermal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a parameterization of the air-water gas transfer rate in wetlands, and do so in terms of easily measured environmental variables. This parameterization is intended to support biogeochemical modeling in wetlands by providing an interfacial flux of key importance. Our approach uses laboratory experiments describe the oxygen transfer across an air-water interface in a model wetland. The oxygen transfer is sensitive to the externally imposed wind, vegetation characteristics, and vertical thermal convection. We vary these systematically, determining the gas transfer (or "piston") velocity that describes interfacial gas flux. We measure velocity vector fields near the air-water interface using particle image velocimetry, and use these measurements to help explain the mechanisms behind the measured trends in oxygen transfer. The explanatory power of these measurements includes the relationship between plant geometry and surface divergence. We explore the potential impact of our results on wetland modeling and management, for issues such as carbon sequestration and methane emission.

  4. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  5. Nitrous oxide supersaturation at the liquid/air interface of animal waste.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Andra, Syam S; Hardy, Michael; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali; Bach, Stephan B H; Mullens, Conor P

    2009-12-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations around the globe generate large amounts of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in the surrounding atmosphere. Liquid animal waste systems have received little attention with respect to N(2)O emissions. We hypothesized that the solution chemistry of animal waste aqueous suspensions would promote conditions that lead to N(2)O supersaturation at the liquid/air interface. The concentration of dissolved N(2)O in poultry litter (PL) aqueous suspensions at 25 degrees C was 0.36 microg N(2)O mL(-1), at least an order of magnitude greater than that measured in water in equilibrium with ambient air, suggesting N(2)O supersaturation. There was a nonlinear increase in the N(2)O Henry constants of PL from 2810 atm/mole fraction at 35 degrees C to 17 300 atm/mole fraction at 41 degrees C. The extremely high N(2)O Henry constants were partially ascribed to N(2)O complexation with aromatic moieties. Complexed N(2)O structures were unstable at temperatures > 35 degrees C, supplying the headspace with additional free N(2)O concentrations. PMID:19573962

  6. Sea surface microlayers: A unified physicochemical and biological perspective of the air-ocean interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Michael; Engel, Anja; Frka, Sanja; Gašparović, Blaženka; Guitart, Carlos; Murrell, J. Colin; Salter, Matthew; Stolle, Christian; Upstill-Goddard, Robert; Wurl, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) covers more than 70% of the Earth's surface and is the boundary layer interface between the ocean and the atmosphere. This important biogeochemical and ecological system is critical to a diverse range of Earth system processes, including the synthesis, transformation and cycling of organic material, and the air-sea exchange of gases, particles and aerosols. In this review we discuss the SML paradigm, taking into account physicochemical and biological characteristics that define SML structure and function. These include enrichments in biogenic molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteinaceous material that contribute to organic carbon cycling, distinct microbial assemblages that participate in air-sea gas exchange, the generation of climate-active aerosols and the accumulation of anthropogenic pollutants with potentially serious implications for the health of the ocean. Characteristically large physical, chemical and biological gradients thus separate the SML from the underlying water and the available evidence implies that the SML retains its integrity over wide ranging environmental conditions. In support of this we present previously unpublished time series data on bacterioneuston composition and SML surfactant activity immediately following physical SML disruption; these imply timescales of the order of minutes for the reestablishment of the SML following disruption. A progressive approach to understanding the SML and hence its role in global biogeochemistry can only be achieved by considering as an integrated whole, all the key components of this complex environment.

  7. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  8. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  9. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  10. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  11. 14 CFR § 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean air and water. § 1260.34 Section Â... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  12. The temperature jump at a growing ice-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elif Genceli Güner, F.; Wåhlin, Johan; Hinge, Mogens; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2015-02-01

    During an ice growth rate of around 0.02 mm/s, we report a temperature jump at an ice-water interface above 0 °C up to 1.68 °C (0.01 ± °C), as measured with thermochromatic-liquid-crystals. This gives experimental proof for the existence of an interfacial temperature jump during a liquid-solid phase transition, confirming similar results for liquid-vapour transition, and supporting idea of the surface as a separate thermodynamic system. The fact that there is no continuity in intensive variables across the interface, unlike what is assumed in standard engineering models, has a bearing on the understanding and modelling of coupled heat and mass transport at interfaces in nature and man-made applications.

  13. Hydrodynamics of Particles at an Oil-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Dani, Archit; Keiser, Geoff; Yeganeh, Mohsen; Maldarelli, Charles

    2015-12-15

    This study is a theoretical and experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of the mutual approach of two floating spherical particles moving along an oil-water interface. An analytical expression is obtained for the (inertialess) Stokes drag for an isolated particle translating on a flat interface as a function of the immersion depth into the water phase for the case in which the viscosity of the oil is much larger than that of the water. An approximation for the viscous drag due to the mutual approach of identical spheres is formulated as the product of the isolated drag multiplied by the resistance of approaching spheres in an infinite medium. Experiments are undertaken on the capillary attraction of large, millimeter-sized Teflon spheres floating at the interface between a very viscous oil and water. With the use of image visualization and particle tracking, the separation distance as a function of time [[Formula: see text](t)] is measured along with the immersion depth and predicted by setting the capillary attraction force equal to the viscous drag resistance. The excellent agreement validates the approximating formula. PMID:26488685

  14. SWAN: An expert system with natural language interface for tactical air capability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    SWAN is an expert system and natural language interface for assessing the war fighting capability of Air Force units in Europe. The expert system is an object oriented knowledge based simulation with an alternate worlds facility for performing what-if excursions. Responses from the system take the form of generated text, tables, or graphs. The natural language interface is an expert system in its own right, with a knowledge base and rules which understand how to access external databases, models, or expert systems. The distinguishing feature of the Air Force expert system is its use of meta-knowledge to generate explanations in the frame and procedure based environment.

  15. Adsorption of diatoms at the oil-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi, Niloofar; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Statistically robust experimental observations on 3D trajectory of diatoms approaching an oil-water interface is crucial for understanding sorption mechanisms of active particles, and interfacial rheology with over-arching implications in interfacial dynamics, droplet break and coalescence. Digital Holographic Cinematography is utilized to measure 3-D trajectories of diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudomona and T. weissflogii and simultaneously track the interface. Experiments are conducted in a 300 × 100 × 100 mm chamber containing 32 ppt artificial seawater. A stationary pendant drop is created on the tip of a needle located at the center of the chamber. Three oil samples, Louisiana crude, hexadecane, and mineral oil, are used. Diatoms are injected at a height above the drop with a negligible velocity, where Diatom precipitates freely on its excess weight. Holograms of diatom and drop are recorded at 5 fps with a magnification of 1.3X and are streamed in real time allowing for long-term study of sorption onto a slowly aging interface. A novel autofocus algorithm enables us to determine 3D locations within an uncertainty of 0.05 particle diameter. This allows us to perform super-resolution measurement to determine the effects of location and orientation of diatoms on the adsorption rate at the oil-water interface. Funded by GoMRI.

  16. Protein denaturation by combined effect of shear and air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-06-20

    The effect of shear alone on the aggregation of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) has been found to be insignificant. This study focused on the synergetic effect of shear and gas-liquid interface on these two model proteins. Two shearing systems, the concentric-cylinder shear device (CCSD) and the rotor/stator homogenizer, were used to generate high shear (> 10(6)) in aqueous solutions in the presence of air. High shear in the presence of an air-liquid interface had no major effect on rhDNase but caused rhGH to form noncovalent aggregates. rhGH aggregation was induced by the air-liquid interface and was found to increase with increasing protein concentration and the air-liquid interfacial area. The aggregation was irreversible and exhibited a first-order kinetics with respect to the protein concentration and air-liquid interfacial area. Shear and shear rate enhanced the interaction because of its continuous generation of new air-liquid interfaces. In the presence of a surfactant, aggregation could be delayed or prevented depending upon the type and the concentration of the surfactant. The effect of air-liquid interface on proteins at low shear was examined using a nitrogen bubbling method. We found that foaming is very detrimental to rhGH even though the shear involved is low. The use of anti-foaming materials could prevent rhGH aggregation during bubbling. The superior stability exhibited by rhDNase may be linked to the higher surface tension and lower foaming tendency of its aqueous solution. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 54: 503-512, 1997. PMID:18636406

  17. Surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew; Pratt, Lawrence R.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of an extended molecular dynamics calculation of the surface potential (SP) of the water liquid-vapor interface is presented. The SP predicted by the TIP4P model is -(130 + or - 50) mV. This value is of reasonable magnitude but of opposite sign to the expectations based on laboratory experiments. The electrostatic potential shows a nonmonotonic variation with depth into the liquid.

  18. Bacterial Adhesion to Hexadecane (Model NAPL)-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S.; Zoueki, C. R.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    The rates of biodegradation of NAPLs have been shown to be influenced by the adhesion of hydrocarbon- degrading microorganisms as well as their proximity to the NAPL-water interface. Several studies provide evidence for bacterial adhesion or biofilm formation at alkane- or crude oil-water interfaces, but there is a significant knowledge gap in our understanding of the processes that influence initial adhesion of bacteria on to NAPL-water interfaces. In this study bacterial adhesion to hexadecane, and a series of NAPLs comprised of hexadecane amended with toluene, and/or with asphaltenes and resins, which are the surface active fractions of crude oils, were examined using a Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. The microorganisms employed were Mycobacterium kubicae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida, which are hydrocarbon degraders or soil microorganisms. MATH assays as well as electrophoretic mobility measurements of the bacterial cells and the NAPL droplet surfaces in aqueous solutions were conducted at three solution pHs (4, 6 and 7). Asphaltenes and resins were shown to generally decrease microbial adhesion. Results of the MATH assay were not in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of bacteria- hydrocarbon interactions based on the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) model of free energy of interaction between the cell and NAPL droplets. In this model the free energy of interaction between two colloidal particles is predicted based on electrical double layer, van der Waals and hydrophobic forces. It is likely that the steric repulsion between bacteria and NAPL surfaces, caused by biopolymers on bacterial surfaces and aphaltenes and resins at the NAPL-water interface contributed to the decreased adhesion compared to that predicted by the XDLVO model.

  19. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  20. Photodetoxification and purification of water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.; Blake, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The scope of interest in this section is basic research in photochemistry that can remove barriers to the development of photochemical technologies for the removal of hazardous chemicals from contaminated air or water (photodetoxification). Photochemistry is be broadly interpreted to include direct photochemistry, indirect photochemistry (sensitized and photocatalytic), photochemistry of species adsorbed on inert surfaces, and complementary effects of high energy radiation photons and particles. These may occur in either homogeneous or heterogeneous media. The photon source may span the range from ionizing radiation to the near infrared.

  1. Stable Encapsulated Air Nanobubbles in Water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Liu, Guojun; Hu, Heng; Li, Terry Yantian; Johri, Amer M; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-23

    The dispersion into water of nanocapsules bearing a highly hydrophobic fluorinated internal lining yielded encapsulated air nanobubbles. These bubbles, like their micrometer-sized counterparts (microbubbles), effectively reflected ultrasound. More importantly, the nanobubbles survived under ultrasonication 100-times longer than a commercial microbubble sample that is currently in clinical use. We justify this unprecedented stability theoretically. These nanobubbles, owing to their small size and potential ability to permeate the capillary networks of tissues, may expand the applications of microbubbles in diagnostic ultrasonography and find new applications in ultrasound-regulated drug delivery. PMID:26439669

  2. Asphaltene surface activity at oil/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) dynamic surface tension (DST), dynamic interfacial tension (DIFT), and zero shear viscosity were used to study the surface activity of Ratawi asphaltenes in organic solvents, in the asphaltene/water/toluene emulsions and at the toluene/aqueous solution interfaces. In organic solvents, the kinetic process of micellization and the micellar structure are characterized. Their dependence on asphaltene concentration was investigated. The emulsion droplet structure and their capability in water uptake was tested. Also, the enhancement of surface activity of asphaltenes and its potential applications are briefly discussed.

  3. The Ultrastructural Morphology of Air Embolism: Platelet Adhesion to the Interface and Endothelial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Warren, B. A.; Philp, R. B.; Inwood, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the ill effects following air embolism cannot be attributed solely to the space occupying and surface tension effects of the air bubbles altering the normal flow of blood through the vasculature. Decompression sickness was induced in rats and the following features of this process observed by electron microscopy in the vessels of the mesentery: imprisonment of blood elements (especially platelets) took place within the various enclosures created by the boundaries set up by different sized air bubbles between the layer of blood and the vessel walls, and the air/blood interface. Air bubble size and the thickness of the film of blood between bubbles varied enormously. The air/blood interface had the following characteristics: (1) A surface associated protein layer measuring 20 nm which coated the air bubbles and which could slide off the bubble of origin and float freely in the blood. (2) Material morphologically similar to the surface layer was found away from the surface and included small lipid droplets between its layers, and platelets adhered to this to form small aggregates suspended from the interface. (3) The surface layer fused with like laminae and was found within the fluid blood in the vessel, sometimes with adherent platelet aggregates. (4) Platelet adhesion to the bubble interface with the formation of platelet aggregates of an early type i.e. without gross fibrin formation within the aggregates. (5) Pressure damage to underlying endothelial cells by the passage of air bubbles under pressure resulted in herniation of the endothelial cells through fenestrations in the more rigid structures of the vessel wall. (6) Deposits of fibrin on the walls of the vessels were noted after endothelial damage. (7) Lipid droplets were found attached to the surface associated protein on the air side of the air/blood interface and were also found incorporated within it, i.e. covered by this layer on both sides, in which case they took on an ellipsoidal

  4. Pen-Based Interface Using Hand Motions in the Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Misue, Kazuo; Tanaka, Jiro

    A system which employs a stylus as an input device is suitable for creative activities like writing and painting. However, such a system does not always provide the user with a GUI that is easy to operate using the stylus. In addition, system usability is diminished because the stylus is not always integrated into the system in a way that takes into consideration the features of a pen. The purpose of our research is to improve the usability of a system which uses a stylus as an input device. We propose shortcut actions, which are interaction techniques for operation with a stylus that are controlled through a user's hand motions made in the air. We developed the Context Sensitive Stylus as a device to implement the shortcut actions. The Context Sensitive Stylus consists of an accelerometer and a conventional stylus. We also developed application programs to which we applied the shortcut actions; e.g., a drawing tool, a scroll supporting tool, and so on. Results from our evaluation of the shortcut actions indicate that users can concentrate better on their work when using the shortcut actions than when using conventional menu operations.

  5. NBC detection in air and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Smith, Steven J.; McMurtry, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in a Navy STTR project to develop a system capable of the 'real-time' detection and quanitification of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) warfare agents, and of related industrial chemicals including NBC agent synthesis by-products in water and in air immediately above the water's surface. This project uses JPL's Soft Ionization Membrane (SIM) technology which totally ionizes molecules without fragmentation (a process that can markedly improve the sensitivity and specificity of molecule compostition identification), and JPL's Rotating Field Mass Spectrometer (RFMS) technology which has large enough dynamic mass range to enable detection of nuclear materials as well as biological and chemical agents. This Navy project integrates these JPL Environmental Monitoring UnitS (REMUS) an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). It is anticipated that the REMUS AUV will be capable of 'real-time' detection and quantification of NBC warefare agents.

  6. Air-stable droplet interface bilayers on oil-infused surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Polizos, Georgios; Datskos, Panos G.; Sarles, Stephen A.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers are versatile model membranes useful for synthetic biology and biosensing; however, to date they have always been confined to fluid reservoirs. Here, we demonstrate that when two or more water droplets collide on an oil-infused substrate, they exhibit noncoalescence due to the formation of a thin oil film that gets squeezed between the droplets from the bottom up. We show that when phospholipids are included in the water droplets, a stable droplet interface bilayer forms between the noncoalescing water droplets. As with traditional oil-submerged droplet interface bilayers, we were able to characterize ion channel transport by incorporating peptides into each droplet. Our findings reveal that droplet interface bilayers can function in ambient environments, which could potentially enable biosensing of airborne matter. PMID:24821774

  7. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  8. Development of a graphical user interface to visualize upper-air meteorological data

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.

    1997-07-01

    Upper-air meteorological data (soundings) are often analyzed by means of thermodynamic diagrams relating temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure. This report describes the components of a graphical user interface which have been developed to visualize soundings in this manner at any global location and time of interest.

  9. Mueller matrix imaging of targets under an air-sea interface.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng-Wang; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-01-10

    The Mueller matrix imaging method is a powerful tool for target detection. In this study, the effect of the air-sea interface on the detection of underwater objects is studied. A backward Monte Carlo code has been developed to study this effect. The main result is that the reflection of the diffuse sky light by the interface reduces the Mueller image contrast. If the air-sea interface is ruffled by wind, the distinction between different regions of the underwater target is smoothed out. The effect of the finite size of an active light source is also studied. The image contrast is found to be relatively insensitive to the size of the light source. The volume scattering function plays an important role on the underwater object detection. Generally, a smaller asymmetry parameter decreases the contrast of the polarimetry images. PMID:19137035

  10. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  11. Instability of an interface between air and a low conducting liquid subjected to charge injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicón, Rafael; Pérez, Alberto T.

    2006-10-01

    We study the linear stability of an interface between air and a low conducting liquid in the presence of unipolar injection of charge. As a consequence of charge injection, a volume charge density builds up in the air gap and a surface charge density on the interface. Above a certain voltage threshold the electrical stresses may destabilize the interface, giving rise to a characteristic cell pattern known as rose-window instability. Contrary to what occurs in the classical volume electrohydrodynamic instability in insulating liquids, the typical cell size is several times larger than the liquid depth. We analyze the linear stability through the usual procedure of decomposing an arbitrary perturbation into normal modes. The resulting homogeneous linear system of ordinary differential equations is solved using a commercial software package. Finally, an analytical method is developed that provides a solution valid in the limit of small wavenumbers.

  12. Computational study of effect of water finger on ion transport through water-oil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, Nobuaki; Wang, Lingjian; Morita, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    When an ion transports from water to oil through water-oil interface, it accompanies hydrated water molecules and transiently forms a chain of water, called "water finger." We thoroughly investigated the role of the water finger in chloride ion transport through water-dichloromethane interface by using molecular dynamics technique. We developed a proper coordinate w to describe the water finger structure and calculated the free energy landscape and the friction for the ion transport as a function of ion position z and the water finger coordinate w. It is clearly shown that the formation and break of water finger accompanies an activation barrier for the ion transport, which has been overlooked in the conventional free energy curve along the ion position z. The present analysis of the friction does not support the hypothesis of augmented local friction (reduced local diffusion coefficient) at the interface. These results mean that the experimentally observed rate constants of interfacial ion transfer are reduced from the diffusion-limited one because of the activation barrier associated to the water finger, not the anomalous local diffusion. We also found that the nascent ion just after the break of water finger has excessive hydration water than that in the oil phase.

  13. Computational study of effect of water finger on ion transport through water-oil interface.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Nobuaki; Wang, Lingjian; Morita, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    When an ion transports from water to oil through water-oil interface, it accompanies hydrated water molecules and transiently forms a chain of water, called "water finger." We thoroughly investigated the role of the water finger in chloride ion transport through water-dichloromethane interface by using molecular dynamics technique. We developed a proper coordinate w to describe the water finger structure and calculated the free energy landscape and the friction for the ion transport as a function of ion position z and the water finger coordinate w. It is clearly shown that the formation and break of water finger accompanies an activation barrier for the ion transport, which has been overlooked in the conventional free energy curve along the ion position z. The present analysis of the friction does not support the hypothesis of augmented local friction (reduced local diffusion coefficient) at the interface. These results mean that the experimentally observed rate constants of interfacial ion transfer are reduced from the diffusion-limited one because of the activation barrier associated to the water finger, not the anomalous local diffusion. We also found that the nascent ion just after the break of water finger has excessive hydration water than that in the oil phase. PMID:27394116

  14. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or...

  15. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34... Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award... (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1319(c)), and is...

  16. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Peptide Folding and Translocation Across the Water-Membrane Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The ability of small peptides to organize at aqueous interfaces was examined by performing a series of large-scale, molecular dynamics computer simulations of several peptides composed of two amino acids, nonpolar leucine (L) and polar glutamine (Q). The peptides differed in size and sequence of the amino acids. Studies on dipeptides LL, LQ, QL and QQ were extended to two heptamers, LQQLLQL and LQLQLQL, designed to maximize interfacial stability of an alpha-helix and a beta-strand, respectively, by exposing polar side chains to water and nonpolar side chains to a nonpolar phase. Finally, a transition of an undecamer, composed entirely of leucine residues, from a disordered structure in water to an alpha-helix in a nonpolar phase representing the interior of the membrane was investigated. Complete folding of a peptide in solution was accomplished for the first time in computer simulations. The simulations revealed several basic principles governing the sequence-dependent organization of peptides at interfaces. Short peptides tend to accumulate at interfaces and acquire ordered structures, providing that they have a proper sequence of polar and nonpolar amino acids. The dominant factor determining the interfacial structure of peptides is the hydrophobic effect, which is manifested at aqueous interfaces as a tendency for polar and nonpolar groups of the solute to segregate into the aqueous and nonpolar phases, respectively. If peptides consist of nonpolar residue's only, they become inserted into the nonpolar phase. As demonstrated by the example of the leucine undecamer, such peptides fold into an alpha-helix as they partition into the nonpolar medium. The folding proceeds through an intermediate, called 3-10-helix, which remains in equilibrium with the alpha-helix. Once in the nonpolar environment, the peptides can readily change their orientation with respect to the interface from parallel to perpendicular, especially in response to local electric fields. The

  18. Mechanical Characterization of Molecular Assemblies at Oil/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wa

    The self-assembly of charged molecules in liquid phases and their ability to form functional layers at immiscible interfaces are areas of great interest. However, the implementation of these assemblies is often limited by a lack of understanding of the detailed assembly mechanisms. In order to enhance the performance of interfacial assemblies it is essential to be able to characterize the physical and mechanical properties of assembled layers, as well as develop model systems that will allow us to examine the factors that govern their interaction with the surrounding environment. The key purpose of this thesis is to develop an understanding of some of the important factors influencing interfacial assemblies at immiscible liquid interfaces. The first portion of the work involves mechanical characterization of interfacial layers formed by large amphiphilic molecules. The study of block and gradient copolymers, reveals the effect of copolymer sequence distribution on the ability of these molecules to form interfacial assemblies. Specifically, the unique network structure formed by gradient copolymers at oil/water interfaces enables us to create a robust membrane at the interface by ionic crosslinking. The second part of this thesis explores smaller molecule assemblies at liquid interfaces, including commonly used commercial surfactant (span 80) and nano particles (graphene oxide). Both studies demonstrate an interesting correlation between molecular structure and overall properties of the assembled layers. Factors such as interfacial density, particle sizes and pH can greatly influence the structure of the assembled layers, resulting in interesting phenomena such as spontaneous emulsification, wrinkling and layer collapse. The bulk of the oil/water interface study was performed using axisymmetric drop shape analysis (DSA), which successfully quantifies the mechanical tension in the interfacial layer. This analysis was further extended by a development of a double

  19. Theoretical analysis of injecting the compressed air through a defensive well into aquifer aimed to separate between polluted and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, M.; Ravina, I.

    2012-12-01

    Injecting a compressed air, through a well, located between the sea or a polluted lake and fresh ground water, creates a "hydraulic barrier" that prevents their mixing. Steady influx of air to a saturated soil produces a pressure gradient from the well and replacement of water by air, hence the interface between air and water increases. After the compression process is stopped, the soil pores are filled with air, so that saturated soil becomes unsaturated with a decreased conductivity. Creating such a barrier, first by the air pressure and second by blocking of the pores, is welcomed at the interface sea-fresh water area, for example. It prevents the loss of fresh water to the sea and it decreases sea water movement into the aquifer. Another positive effect of the air injection is the air flow through unsaturated zone, above the ground water, that decreases polluted water down-seepage from the surface thus defending the fresh ground water against pollution. The regular water well or special drilled one will be used as defensive well. The radius of defensive well can be smaller than the one of the water well. The explanation of the defensive well exploitation in the field for one and multi layer aquifers is presented. Analytical evaluations of the pressure loss and shape of the air-water interfaces in saturated soil are presented for: (a) steady air flow for a one layer aquifer and for a three layer one (leaky aquifer case), (b) transient air flow for a one layer aquifer. It is shown that the shape of air-water interfaces is generally an inverted cone, where the decrease of air pressure in the aquifer with the distance from the well is approximately logarithmic. The necessary pressure to create the effective air flow in the aquifer is only about tens percent higher than static water pressure in the well.

  20. The molecular scale structure of water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2004-03-01

    The molecular scale structure of water at surfaces and interfaces is an unresolved and fundamental topic in many areas of science and technology, and determines its wetting properties. In our studies of this very interesting topic we used scanning probes (STM, AFM), and electron and vibrational spectroscopies. STM studies on Pd(111) reveal that at low temperature (below 130K) water adsorbs as an intact molecule, forming clusters of dimers, trimers, etc. and finally H-bonded hexagonal structures with a V3xV3R30º periodicity. When the temperature is below 100K the O-H bonds in this structure are nearly parallel to the substrate except at the island edges where they point down towards the substrate or up leaving dangling bonds. Above 130K other structures form with molecules having unsaturated H bonds that point outwards from the surface and forming a superstructure of the V3xV3 structure. We have also studied the formation of dangling bonds in other water interfaces, including ice-vapor and on insulating substrates. On the ice surface, a thin layer exists that contains many H-dangling bonds near 0ºC. The thickness of this layer is less than a nanometer below -1ºC. On the basal plane of mica (an alumino silicate) water forms hexagonal structures with no unsaturated H-bonds and with the molecular dipole pointing on average towards the surface. On subsequent layers below 0ºC, the dipolar orientation persist and gives rise to ferroelectric ice. Above 0ºC however water layers above the first have free, unsaturated H-bonds pointing outwards from the surface as in the liquid form. On alkali halide surfaces water adsorbs preferentially at step edges at low humidity solvating the cations first. At higher humidity both cations and anions are solvated and finally, at deliquescence, when the salt dissolves, the anions segregate preferentially at the surface.

  1. Water-mediated ion–ion interactions are enhanced at the water vapor–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Vasudevan; Vembanur, Srivathsan; Garde, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that ions are present near the vapor–liquid interface of aqueous salt solutions. Charged groups can also be driven to interfaces by attaching them to hydrophobic moieties. Despite their importance in many self-assembly phenomena, how ion–ion interactions are affected by interfaces is not understood. We use molecular simulations to show that the effective forces between small ions change character dramatically near the water vapor–liquid interface. Specifically, the water-mediated attraction between oppositely charged ions is enhanced relative to that in bulk water. Further, the repulsion between like-charged ions is weaker than that expected from a continuum dielectric description and can even become attractive as the ions are drawn to the vapor side. We show that thermodynamics of ion association are governed by a delicate balance of ion hydration, interfacial tension, and restriction of capillary fluctuations at the interface, leading to nonintuitive phenomena, such as water-mediated like charge attraction. “Sticky” electrostatic interactions may have important consequences on biomolecular structure, assembly, and aggregation at soft liquid interfaces. We demonstrate this by studying an interfacially active model peptide that changes its structure from α-helical to a hairpin-turn–like one in response to charging of its ends. PMID:24889634

  2. Formation of transferable transparent pristine graphene films at water/heptane interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyer, A. J.; Carrillo, J.-M. Y.; Woltornist, S. J.; Adamson, D. H.; Dobrynin, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    We present a method of forming one to four layer thick pristine graphene films on glass substrates. These transparent and electrically conductive films are formed from natural graphite without the use of chemical treatment. The films are initially formed at a water/heptane interface and then transferred to a glass slide. Computer simulations of the graphene sheets at water/heptane interface show that the films are metastable, kinetically trapped assemblies. To evaluate stability of the film we used the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method to calculate the potential of the mean force and the height of the local potential barrier for single sheet and double sheet assembly of the graphene at water/heptane interface. The film structure on a glass slides was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. These measurements show that the films are composed of overlapping graphene sheets one to four layers thick covering approximately 80% of the substrate. These low cost films are expected to find applications in the economical replacement of current inorganic transparent conductive films. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research award number FA9550-10-0462

  3. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  4. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

  5. Water at an electrochemical interface - a simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, Adam; Reed, Stewart; Madden, Paul; Chandler, David

    2008-08-22

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the properties of water in an aqueous ionic solution close to an interface with a model metallic electrode are described. In the simulations the electrode behaves as an ideally polarizable hydrophilic metal, supporting image charge interactions with charged species, and it is maintained at a constant electrical potential with respect to the solution so that the model is a textbook representation of an electrochemical interface through which no current is passing. We show how water is strongly attracted to and ordered at the electrode surface. This ordering is different to the structure that might be imagined from continuum models of electrode interfaces. Further, this ordering significantly affects the probability of ions reaching the surface. We describe the concomitant motion and configurations of the water and ions as functions of the electrode potential, and we analyze the length scales over which ionic atmospheres fluctuate. The statistics of these fluctuations depend upon surface structure and ionic strength. The fluctuations are large, sufficiently so that the mean ionic atmosphere is a poor descriptor of the aqueous environment near a metal surface. The importance of this finding for a description of electrochemical reactions is examined by calculating, directly from the simulation, Marcus free energy profiles for transfer of charge between the electrode and a redox species in the solution and comparing the results with the predictions of continuum theories. Significant departures from the electrochemical textbook descriptions of the phenomenon are found and their physical origins are characterized from the atomistic perspective of the simulations.

  6. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; do Amaral, Thais Helena Andreolli; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  7. Phase Segregation at the Liquid-Air Interface Prior to Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Salguero, Carolina; Gracia-Fadrique, Jesús

    2015-08-13

    Binary systems with partial miscibility segregate into two liquid phases when their overall composition lies within the interval defined by the saturation points; out of this interval, there is one single phase, either solvent-rich or solute-rich. In most systems, in the one-phase regions, surface tension decreases with increasing solute concentration due to solute adsorption at the liquid-air interface. Therefore, the solute concentration at the surface is higher than in the bulk, leading to the hypothesis that phase segregation starts at the liquid-air interface with the formation of two surface phases, before the liquid-liquid equilibrium. This phenomenon is called surface segregation and is a step toward understanding liquid segregation at a molecular level and detailing the constitution of fluid interfaces. Surface segregation of aqueous binary systems of alkyl acetates with partial miscibility was theoretically demonstrated by means of a thermodynamic stability test based on energy minimization. Experimentally, the coexistence of two surface regions was verified through Brewster's angle microscopy. The observations were further interpreted with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations, which show the diffusion of the acetates from the bulk toward the liquid-air interface, where acetates aggregate into acetate-rich domains. PMID:26189700

  8. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  9. Janus particles at the planar water-oil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Jiang, Shan; Granick, Steve

    2008-03-01

    Amphiphilic Janus particles (hydrophobic on one side, hydrophilic on the other) were placed at the planar water-oil interface at various surface coverage and found to self-assemble into two-dimensional crystals with long-range hexagonal order, which we studied by fluorescence and phase contrast microscopy. Surprising dependence is observed not only on the surface chemical makeup of the hydrophilic side but also on the Janus balance (i.e. the relative sizes of hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions), which is analogous to the HLB balance that characterizes molecular surfactants.

  10. Transport properties of water at functionalized molecular interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Dyer, Kippi; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    Understanding transport properties of solvent such as diffusion and viscosity at interfaces with biomacromolecules and hard materials is of fundamental importance to both biology and biotechnology. Our study utilizes equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to calculate solvent transport properties at a model peptide and microarray surface. Both diffusion and selected components of viscosity are considered. Solvent diffusion is found to be affected near the peptide and surface. The stress-stress correlation function of solvent near the hard surface exhibits long time memory. Both diffusion and viscosity are shown to be closely correlated with the density distribution function of water along the microarray surface. PMID:19791920

  11. Transport properties of water at functionalized molecular interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Dyer, Kippi; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2009-09-01

    Understanding transport properties of solvent such as diffusion and viscosity at interfaces with biomacromolecules and hard materials is of fundamental importance to both biology and biotechnology. Our study utilizes equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to calculate solvent transport properties at a model peptide and microarray surface. Both diffusion and selected components of viscosity are considered. Solvent diffusion is found to be affected near the peptide and surface. The stress-stress correlation function of solvent near the hard surface exhibits long time memory. Both diffusion and viscosity are shown to be closely correlated with the density distribution function of water along the microarray surface.

  12. Prosthetics socket that incorporates an air splint system focusing on dynamic interface pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee’s satisfaction and comfort. This paper presents the design and performance of a new prosthetic socket that uses an air splint system. Methods The air splint prosthetic socket system was implemented by combining the air splint with a pressure sensor that the transhumeral user controls through the use of a microcontroller. The modular construction of the system developed allows the FSR pressure sensors that are placed inside the air splint socket to determine the required size and fitting for the socket used. Fifteen transhumeral amputees participated in the study. Results The subject’s dynamic pressure on the socket that’s applied while wearing the air splint systems was recorded using F-socket transducers and microcontroller analysis. The values collected by the F-socket sensor for the air splint prosthetic socket system were determined accordingly by comparing the dynamic pressure applied using statically socket. The pressure volume of the air splint fluctuated and was recorded at an average of 38 kPa (2.5) to 41 kPa (1.3) over three hours. Conclusion The air splint socket might reduce the pressure within the interface of residual limb. This is particularly important during the daily life activities and may reduce the pain and discomfort at the residual limb in comparison to the static socket. The potential development of an auto-adjusted socket that uses an air splint system as the prosthetic socket will be of interest to researchers involved in rehabilitation engineering, prosthetics and orthotics. PMID:25085005

  13. Gas transfer - A gas tension method for studying equilibration across a gas-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Meredith L.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    1992-11-01

    New strategies are required in the study of gas exchange under energetic and changeable conditions where current techniques are limited, especially in their ability to represent the contribution of injected bubbles. We have developed a gas tension device (GTD) that uses a solid-state differential pressure sensor to make continuous in situ measurements of the difference between pressure of dissolved gas (gas tension, for succinctness) and pressure of gas in the gas phase above a water parcel. This information allows the determination of the rate of approach to a dynamic equilibrium and of the degree of water phase saturation at steady state. The method is demonstrated in the lab by following the invasion of CO2 into seawater with bubble injection. The GTD introduces a new and versatile measurement method for the study of gas transfer across air-water interfaces, one which avoids many of the sampling and bias problems of traditional approaches.

  14. Molecular structure and hydrophobic solvation thermodynamics at an octane-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Harshit A.; Nauman, E. Bruce; Garde, Shekhar

    2003-11-01

    We present results from atomically detailed molecular dynamics simulation of an octane-water liquid-liquid interface. We specifically focus on water structure, orientation, coordination numbers, and hydrogen bonding at the interface. In addition, we probe the interface through insertions of different nonpolar solutes at various locations in the system. Several interesting details of the interface emerge from our calculations. We find that the number density profiles of both water and octane vary monotonically through the interface in a sigmoidal fashion over approximately 1 nm 1-99 interfacial width. Interestingly, the overall heavy-atom density profile shows a distinct minimum in the interfacial region that reflects the hydrophobic nature of the hydration at the octane-water interface. Furthermore, calculations of excess chemical potentials of attractive Lennard-Jones and purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes display an interfacial minimum, indicating the relative ease of cavity formation at the interface. The inhomogeneous nature of the interface affects the water structure and hydrogen-bonding properties at the interface. We find that water coordination number as well as the number of hydrogen bonds water molecules make with their neighbors decreases through the interface as we move from bulk water to the octane phase. As a result, we find populations of water with low coordination numbers, including monomeric water species in the interfacial region. Although the number of hydrogen bonds per water is low in the interfacial region, a larger fraction of coordination waters is hydrogen bonded to the central water in the interfacial region.

  15. Wetting behavior of water and oil droplets in three-phase interfaces for hydrophobicity/philicity and oleophobicity/philicity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2009-12-15

    Biomimetics, mimicking nature for engineering solutions, provides a model for the development of superhydrophobic/superoleophobic and self-cleaning surfaces. A number of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces have been developed by using a hydrophobic coating, surface roughness, and the ability to form air pockets between solid and water. Oleophobic surfaces that have the potential for self-cleaning and antifouling from biological and organic contaminants in both air and water need to be studied. The surface tension of oil and organic liquids is lower than that of water, so to create a superoleophobic surface, the surface energy of the solid surface in air should be lower than that of oil. The wetting behavior of water and oil droplets for hydrophobic/philic and oleophobic/philic surfaces in three-phase interfaces was studied. In order to make the surface oleophobic at a solid-air-oil interface, a material with a surface energy lower than that of oil was used. In underwater applications, the oleophobicity/philicity of an oil droplet in water was studied on the surfaces with different surface energies of various interfaces and contact angles of water and oil droplets in air. A model for predicting the contact angles of water and oil droplets was proposed. To validate the model, the wetting behavior of flat and micropatterned surfaces with varying pitch values were studied. Furthermore, the wetting behavior of the nano- and hierarchical structures found in Lotus plant surfaces and the shark skin replica as an example of aquatic animal were also studied. On the basis of the experimental data and the model, the trends were explained. PMID:19637877

  16. Charge separation across the silica nanoparticle/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, N.M.; Henglein, A.; Meisel, D.

    1999-08-26

    Aqueous suspensions of silica particles at high concentrations were irradiated with a short pulse of electrons in the presence of scavengers of OH radicals. The scavengers were chosen to minimize their adsorption on the particle surface. It was found that essentially no holes cross the particle/water interface to generate OH radicals. All of the holes that are originally generated by the ionizing radiation in the silica remain in the particle; even at the smallest size used (7-nm diameter). This is contrasted with electrons, which were earlier shown to escape the particles into the water, even at much larger particle sizes. Implications to removal of pollutants and to management of radioactive materials are often cited as motivation for these studies.

  17. Brain-computer interface using water-based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volosyak, Ivan; Valbuena, Diana; Malechka, Tatsiana; Peuscher, Jan; Gräser, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Current brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that make use of EEG acquisition techniques require unpleasant electrode gel causing skin abrasion during the standard preparation procedure. Electrodes that require tap water instead of electrolytic electrode gel would make both daily setup and clean up much faster, easier and comfortable. This paper presents the results from ten subjects that controlled an SSVEP-based BCI speller system using two EEG sensor modalities: water-based and gel-based surface electrodes. Subjects performed in copy spelling mode using conventional gel-based electrodes and water-based electrodes with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 29.68 ± 14.088 bit min-1 and of 26.56 ± 9.224 bit min-1, respectively. A paired t-test failed to reveal significant differences in the information transfer rates and accuracies of using gel- or water-based electrodes for EEG acquisition. This promising result confirms the operational readiness of water-based electrodes for BCI applications.

  18. Water movement in building walls: interfaces influence on the moisture flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. M. P. Q.; de Freitas, V. P.; Guimarães, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Most building elements are a composite of different material layers; however the majority of the works presented in literature were developed for multi-layered elements with perfect contact interface, without resistance. Experimental results presented in literature showed that a considerable hydraulic resistance could be created by the imperfect contact between two porous building materials. Moisture transport in multi-layered building elements can deviate from the moisture transport found for the combination of the single material elements, so the assumption of perfect hydraulic contact could lead to significant errors in predicting the moisture transport. This work presents an experimental campaign and a critical analysis of water absorption in samples of two different building materials (clay brick and autoclaved aerated concrete) with and without joints at different positions (heights) and different contact configurations (natural contact and air space between layers). The results show that when the moisture reaches the interface there is a slowing of the wetting process due to the interfaces hygric resistance. The interfaces hygric resistance, in the AAC samples, is only observed for the joint located from a distance of 2 cm of the wetting plane. The penetration coefficient of the two building materials analysed is very different. Finally, the evolution of the distribution of liquid in the porous medium was analysed in terms of the Boltzmann transform method and anomalous diffusion equation.

  19. Receptor/Ligand Interactions at an Oil/Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel; Chao, Chi-Yang; Shull, Kenneth

    2006-03-01

    The strength of the interaction between biotin and avidin has sparked major research interests as the system serves as a vehicle for both targeted drug delivery and the simulation of surface recognition processes. Interfacial tension measurements (IFT) using R-PEO-biotin^1 were used to obtain dynamic information on the avidin-biotin interaction. Real time IFT data was gathered from the liquid-liquid interface by monitoring the shape of the drop via a drop shape analysis (DSA) instrument. A drop, containing dissolved R-PEO-biotin block copolymers in an ``oil like'' phase, was formed in an immiscible embedding ``water like'' phase. The block copolymers were specially designed to segregate to the liquid-liquid interface and cover the drop surface. By adding avidin to the surrounding water phase, changes in the drop shape provided dynamic data on the avidin-biotin interaction, as avidin binds to biotin only at the drop surface. This is the first study to show that DSA can be applied to the dynamic study of the interaction between avidin and biotin. ^1Biotin-functionalized block copolymers with a hydrophobic aliphatic block and a hydrophilic PEO block

  20. Solute rotational dynamics at the water liquid/vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2007-11-01

    The rotational dynamics of a number of diatomic molecules adsorbed at different locations at the interface between water and its own vapors are studied using classical molecular dynamics computer simulations. Both equilibrium orientational and energy correlations and nonequilibrium orientational and energy relaxation correlations are calculated. By varying the dipole moment of the molecule and its location, and by comparing the results with those in bulk water, the effects of dielectric and mechanical frictions on reorientation dynamics and on rotational energy relaxation can be studied. It is shown that for nonpolar and weekly polar solutes, the equilibrium orientational relaxation is much slower in the bulk than at the interface. As the solute becomes more polar, the rotation slows down and the surface and bulk dynamics become similar. The energy relaxation (both equilibrium and nonequilibrium) has the opposite trend with the solute dipole (larger dipoles relax faster), but here again the bulk and surface results converge as the solute dipole is increased. It is shown that these behaviors correlate with the peak value of the solvent-solute radial distribution function, which demonstrates the importance of the first hydration shell structure in determining the rotational dynamics and dependence of these dynamics on the solute dipole and location.

  1. Soliton-like structures on a water-ice interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichev, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper contains a proof of the existence of soliton-like solutions of the complete system of equations describing wave propagation in a fluid of finite depth under an ice cover. These solutions correspond to solitary waves of various kinds propagating along the water-ice interface. The plane-parallel motion is considered in a layer of a perfect fluid of finite depth whose characteristics obey the complete two-dimensional Euler system of equations. The ice cover is modelled by an elastic Kirchhoff-Love plate and has significant thickness, so that the plate's inertia is taken into account in the formulation of the model. The Euler equations contain the additional pressure arising from the presence of the elastic plate floating freely on the fluid surface. The indicated families of solitary waves are parameterized by the speed of the waves, and their existence is proved for speeds lying in some neighbourhood of the critical value corresponding to the quiescent state. The solitary waves, in turn, bifurcate from the quiescent state and lie in some neighbourhood of it. In other words, it is proved that solitary waves of sufficiently small amplitude exist on the water-ice interface. The proof is conducted using the projection of the required system of equations on the centre manifold and a further analysis of the finite-dimensional reduced dynamical system on the centre manifold. Bibliography: 84 titles.

  2. Analysis of bacterial detachment from substratum surfaces by the passage of air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, C; Busscher, H J; van der Mei, H C

    2001-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s(-1)), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  3. Analysis of Bacterial Detachment from Substratum Surfaces by the Passage of Air-Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Cristina; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 × 106 cells cm−2 was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s−1), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  4. Formation of mesostructured thin films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Edler, Karen J; Yang, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The growth of free-standing surfactant-templated films of inorganic oxides at the air-solution interface is an attractive route to manufacture unsupported mesostructured membranes for a range of potential applications. So far this synthesis method has been relatively neglected due to the fragility of the initial films. More recent work to understand the mechanism of formation has led to development of thicker, more robust films, as well as providing new information on the general formation mechanisms of mesoporous materials whether in film or particulate form. This review describes the properties of silica and other inorganic oxide films templated by surfactants and grown at the air-solution interface, their formation mechanisms and implications for further development of these materials. PMID:23090013

  5. Growth of large naphthalene and anthracene single-crystal sheets at the liquid–air interface

    SciTech Connect

    Postnikov, V. A.; Chertopalov, S. V.

    2015-07-15

    The growth of organic single crystals of naphthalene (C{sub 10}H{sub 8}) and anthracene (C{sub 14}H{sub 10}) at the liquid‒air interface from a mixture of solvents has been investigated. The growth technique used in the study makes it possible to obtain single-crystal sheets up to 10 mm in size for 24 h. The surface morphology and structure of the crystals have been analyzed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. C{sub 10}H{sub 8} and C{sub 14}H{sub 10} single crystals grow coplanarly along the (001) plane. A thermodynamic model of the flat-crystal nucleus formation at the liquid‒air interface, based on the analysis of the change in the free Gibbs energy, is considered.

  6. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Capeloto, Otávio Augusto; Zanuto, Vitor Santaella; Malacarne, Luis Carlos; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Lukasievicz, Gustavo Vinicius Bassi; Bialkowski, Stephen Edward; Astrath, Nelson Guilherme Castelli

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density. PMID:26856622

  7. Electrochemical impedance study of the hematite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Lasia, Andrzej; Boily, Jean-François

    2012-05-22

    Reactions taking place on hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) surfaces in contact with aqueous solutions are of paramount importance to environmental and technological processes. The electrochemical properties of the hematite/water interface are central to these processes and can be probed by open circuit potentials and cyclic voltammetric measurements of semiconducting electrodes. In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to extract resistive and capacitive attributes of this interface on millimeter-sized single-body hematite electrodes. This was carried out by developing equivalent circuit models for impedance data collected on a semiconducting hematite specimen equilibrated in solutions of 0.1 M NaCl and NH(4)Cl at various pH values. These efforts produced distinct sets of capacitance values for the diffuse and compact layers of the interface. Diffuse layer capacitances shift in the pH 3-11 range from 2.32 to 2.50 μF·cm(-2) in NaCl and from 1.43 to 1.99 μF·cm(-2) in NH(4)Cl. Furthermore, these values reach a minimum capacitance at pH 9, near a probable point of zero charge for an undefined hematite surface exposing a variety of (hydr)oxo functional groups. Compact layer capacitances pertain to the transfer of ions (charge carriers) from the diffuse layer to surface hydroxyls and are independent of pH in NaCl, with values of 32.57 ± 0.49 μF·cm(-2)·s(-φ). However, they decrease with pH in NH(4)Cl from 33.77 at pH 3.5 to 21.02 μF·cm(-2)·s(-φ) at pH 10.6 because of the interactions of ammonium species with surface (hydr)oxo groups. Values of φ (0.71-0.73 in NaCl and 0.56-0.67 in NH(4)Cl) denote the nonideal behavior of this capacitor, which is treated here as a constant phase element. Because electrode-based techniques are generally not applicable to the commonly insulating metal (oxyhydr)oxides found in the environment, this study presents opportunities for exploring mineral/water interface chemistry by EIS studies of single

  8. Molecular simulation of the magnetite-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bylaska, Eric J.

    2003-03-01

    This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of the magnetite (001)-water interface, both in pure water and in the presence of a 2.3 molal solution of NaClO 4. The simulations are carried out using a potential model designed to allow the protonation states of the surface functional groups to evolve dynamically through the molecular dynamics trajectory. The primary structural quantities investigated are the populations of the surface functional groups, the distribution of electrolyte in the solution, and the surface hydrogen bonding relationships. The surface protonation states are dominated by extensive hydrolysis of interfacial water molecules, giving rise to a dipolar surface dominated by FeOH2+-OH 2-OH - arrangements. Triply coordinated, more deeply buried, surface sites are inert, probably due to the relative lack of solvent in their vicinity. The electrolyte distribution is oscillatory, arranging preferentially in layers defined by the solvating water molecules. The presence of electrolyte has a negligible effect on the protonation states of the surface functional groups. Steady-state behavior is obtained for the protonation states of the surface functional groups and hydrogen-bonding network. Although the overall structure of the electrolyte distribution is fairly well established, the electrolyte distribution has not fully equilibrated, as evidenced by the asymmetry in the distribution from the top to the bottom of the slab.

  9. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  10. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  12. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  13. Lipid content and metabolism of human keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-medium interface.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Brown, B E; Monger, D J; Grayson, S; Elias, P M

    1988-07-01

    The differentiation of human keratinocytes in most culture systems is incomplete; e.g., lamellar bodies, the characteristic lipid-delivery organelles of epidermis, are not present. Moreover, their lipid profile does not reflect the distinctive composition found in cornifying epidermis. In contrast, keratinocytes that grow at an air-medium interface exhibit more complete differentiation. In this study, we compared the elaboration of lamellar bodies, the lipid content, and the lipid metabolism of human keratinocytes, cultured both under standard immersed conditions and after lifting to an air-medium interface. Whereas submerged cultures neither elaborated lamellar bodies nor displayed a lipid distribution characteristic of cornifying epidermis, lifted cultures displayed advanced cornification, elaborated lamellar bodies which were deposited in intercellular domains, and a lipid profile more typical of cornifying epidermis. Moreover, lipid biosynthesis was 5-10-fold more active in lifted than in immersed cultures, and was not inhibited by exogenous lipoproteins. These findings are consistent with recent studies that demonstrate both high rates of lipogenesis in differentiating layers of the epidermis as well as autonomy of lipogenesis from the influence of circulating lipoproteins. Thus, the lipid content and metabolism of human keratinocyte cultures, grown at an air-medium interface, demonstrate features that simulate the epidermis. PMID:2456290

  14. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  15. Molecular Dynamics of a Water-Lipid Bilayer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of a glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer in water. The total length of analyzed trajectories is 5ns. The calculated width of the bilayer agrees well with the experimentally measured value. The interior of the membrane is in a highly disordered fluid state. Atomic density profile, orientational and conformational distribution functions, and order parameters indicate that disorder increases toward the center of the bilayer. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal fluctuations of the bilayer surfaces occurring at the time scale of the present calculations reveals that the distribution of modes agrees with predictions of the capillary wave model. Fluctuations of both bilayer surfaces are uncorrelated, yielding Gaussian distribution of instantaneous widths of the membrane. Fluctuations of the width produce transient thinning defects in the bilayer which occasionally span almost half of the membrane. The leading mechanism of these fluctuations is the orientational and conformational motion of head groups rather than vertical motion of the whole molecules. Water considerably penetrates the head group region of the bilayer but not its hydrocarbon core. The total net excess dipole moment of the interfacial water points toward the aqueous phase, but the water polarization profile is non-monotonic. Both water and head groups significantly contribute to the surface potential across the interface. The calculated sign of the surface potential is in agreement with that from experimental measurements, but the value is markedly overestimated. The structural and electrical properties of the water-bilayer system are discussed in relation to membrane functions, in particular transport of ions and nonelectrolytes across membranes.

  16. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  17. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer; Marron, Lisa C.; Salton, Jonathan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  18. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  19. Tomography-based characterization of ice-air interface dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Pirmin Philipp; Andreoli, Christian; Schneebeli, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    Snow at or close to the surface commonly undergoes temperature gradient metamorphism under advective flow, which alters its microstructure and physical properties. A functional understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on regional and global climate to assessing avalanche formation. Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was applied to investigate the structural dynamics of temperature gradient snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow in controlled laboratory conditions. Experiments specifically analyzed sublimation and deposition of water vapor on the ice structure. In addition, an analysis of the ice-air interface dynamics was carried out using a macroscopic equivalent model of heat and water vapor transport through a snow layer. The results indicate that sublimation of the ice matrix dominated for flow rates < 10-6 m3 s-1 while during increased mass flow rates the water vapor deposition supplied by the advective flow counteracted sublimation. A flow rate dependence of water vapor deposition at the ice interface was observed, asymptotically approaching an average estimated maximum deposition rate on the whole sample of 1.05 · 10-4 kg m-3 s-1. The growth of microsized whisker-like crystals on larger ice crystals was detected on microscope photographs, leading to an increase of the specific surface area and thus suggest a change of the physical and optical properties of the snow. The estimated values of the curvature effect of the ice crystals and the interface kinetic coefficient are in good agreement with previously published values.

  20. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Rémi; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical/experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important CaF2/water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the "free OH" signature in the VSFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of CaF2/water interfaces and state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics simulations which include electronic structure effects. PMID:27068326

  1. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Rémi; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical/experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important CaF2/water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the “free OH” signature in the VSFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of CaF2/water interfaces and state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics simulations which include electronic structure effects. PMID:27068326

  2. Water orientation and hydrogen-bond structure at the fluorite/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Rémi; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Bonn, Mischa; Perez-Haro, María-José; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-04-01

    Water in contact with mineral interfaces is important for a variety of different processes. Here, we present a combined theoretical/experimental study which provides a quantitative, molecular-level understanding of the ubiquitous and important CaF2/water interface. Our results show that, at low pH, the surface is positively charged, causing a substantial degree of water ordering. The surface charge originates primarily from the dissolution of fluoride ions, rather than from adsorption of protons to the surface. At high pH we observe the presence of Ca-OH species pointing into the water. These OH groups interact remarkably weakly with the surrounding water, and are responsible for the “free OH” signature in the VSFG spectrum, which can be explained from local electronic structure effects. The quantification of the surface termination, near-surface ion distribution and water arrangement is enabled by a combination of advanced phase-resolved Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation spectra of CaF2/water interfaces and state-of-the-art ab initio molecular dynamics simulations which include electronic structure effects.

  3. Molecular interactions of pesticides at the soil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Shirzadi, Azadeh; Simpson, Myrna J; Kumar, Rajeev; Baer, Andrew J; Xu, Yunping; Simpson, André J

    2008-08-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy combined with saturation-transfer double difference (STDD) NMR can be used to analyze the molecular-level interactions of pesticides and whole soils occurring at the soil-water interface. Here 1H HR-MAS STDD NMR has been applied to some common pesticides (trifluralin, acifluorfen, and (4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl) phenol) and a pesticide degradation product (1-naphthol). Results indicate that dipolar interactions, H-bonding, hydrophobic associations, and potentially pi-pi interactions are the predominant sorption mechanisms for these molecules at the soil-aqueous interface. It is evident that the physical and chemical characteristics of soil are highly influential in determining the mechanisms of pesticide sorption, as they significantly affect soil conformation. In particular, different binding mechanisms were observed for 1-naphthol in soil swollen using a buffer versus D2O, indicating that the K(oc) alone may not be enough to accurately predict the behavior of a molecule in a real soil environment. Preliminary kinetic-based studies suggest that both the swelling solvent and soil moisture content significantly influence the sequestration of trifluralin. These studies demonstrate that HR-MAS and STDD NMR are powerful and versatile tools which can be applied to expand our knowledge of the mechanistic interactions of agrochemicals at the molecular level. PMID:18754469

  4. Linking Air, Land, and Water Pollution for Effective Environmental Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1970, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, other federal agencies, and the states have made substantial progress in improving the Nation’s air and water quality. Traditionally, the air, land, and water pollution ...

  5. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  6. Adsorption of Small Molecules at Water--Hexane and Water--Membrane Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.

    1996-03-01

    The interaction of solutes with aqueous interfaces plays a significant role in a variety of physical processes, including general anesthesia and atmospheric chemistry. We present molecular dynamics results for the transfer of several small solutes across water liquid--vapor, water--hexane and water--GMO bilayer membrane interfaces. (A. Pohorille and M. A. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. (in press, 1995).)^, (A. Pohorille, P. CIeplak, and M. A. Wilson, Chem. Phys. (in press, 1995).) The free energies of transferring small polar molecules across the interface exhibit fairly deep minima while those of nonpolar molecules do not. This is due to a balance between nonelectrostatic contributions --- primarily the work required to create a cavity large enough to accommodate the solute --- and the solute--solvent electrostatic interactions.^1 The surface excess of solute is calculated and compared with experimental results from the Gibbs adsorption isotherm. The interfacial solubilities correlate with measured anesthetic potencies of these compounds, implying that the binding sites for anesthetics are located near the water--membrane interface.

  7. X-ray microtomography determination of air-water interfacial area-water saturation relationships in sandy porous media.

    PubMed

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S; Harrold, Katherine H; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M

    2008-04-15

    In this work, total smooth air-water interfacial areas were measured for a series of nine natural and model sandy porous media as a function of water saturation using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Interfacial areas decreased linearly with water satuation, while the estimated maximum interfacial area compared favorably to the media geometric surface areas. Importantly, relative interfacial area (i.e., normalized by geometric surface area) versus water saturation plots for all media collapsed into a single linear cluster (r2 = 0.93), suggesting that geometric surface area is an important, and perhaps sufficient, descriptor of sandy media that governs total smooth interfacial area-water saturation relationships. Measured relationships were used to develop an empirical model for estimating interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. Model-based interfacial area estimates for independent media were generally slightly higher than interfacial areas measured using aqueous-phase interfacial tracer methods, which may indicate that microtomography captures regions of the air-water interface that are not accessible to aqueous-phase interfacial tracers. The empirical model presented here requires only average particle diameter and porosity as input parameters and can be used to readily estimate air-water interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. PMID:18497149

  8. Properties of the seawater-air interface. 2. Rates of surface film formation under steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dragcevic, D.; Pravdic, V.

    1981-05-01

    The laboratory techniques of dynamic surface tension and of surface electrical potential measurements were used to determine rates of formation and of reorientation of organic surface films at the seawater-air interface. Relaxation times of surface films were determined for three characteristic samples obtained by screen and bottle sampling in the coastal waters of the northern Adriatic area. These data were compared with those for model samples produced by spreading oleic acid and crude oil on or dissolving polyethyleneglycol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in artificial seawater. Relaxation times were in the range of 0.1-1 s for most of the samples. A good representative value for field samples is 0.2 s. The temperature-dependence (the energies of activation) for the surface film relaxation indicates that several processes control material transport toward the seawater-air interface. The findings are interpreted as showing that an almost ever-present organic surface film influences the mechanism and the rate of material transport across the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  9. Chemistry of the solid-water interface: Processes at the mineral-water and particle-water interface in natural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stumm, W.

    1992-01-01

    The title book covers coordination chemistry of the hydrous oxide-water interface; surface charge and the electric double layer; adsorption; chemical weathering phenomena; homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and precipitation; particle-particle interaction; carbonate reactivity; redox processes mediated by surfaces; photochemistry; and trace element transport. It can be used as a source book for teaching and for professionals in geochemical and environmental disciplines.

  10. Dynamic Surface Properties of Asphaltenes and Resins at the Oil-Air Interface.

    PubMed

    Bauget, Fabrice; Langevin, Dominique; Lenormand, Roland

    2001-07-15

    Because of the existence of large reserves, the production of heavy oils is presently the object of much interest. Some heavy oil reservoirs show anomalous behavior in primary production, with rates of production better than predicted. In Canada and Venezuela some heavy oils are produced in the form of "bubbly" oil, which is stable for several hours in open vessels. These crude oils are therefore commonly called "foamy oils". Since the presence of bubbles could be responsible for an enhanced rate of production, a better knowledge of the properties of the gas-oil interface is desirable. We have experimentally studied the effect of concentration of asphaltenes and resins on static and dynamic properties of oil-air interfaces and also on bulk viscosity. The experiments include surface tension measurements using the pendant-drop method, surface viscosity by the oscillating-drop method, foamability by continuous gas injection, and film lifetime. All the experiments were performed using resins and asphaltenes in toluene solutions at 20 degrees C. At first asphaltenes enhance foamability and film lifetime. All the experiments performed showed a change in regime for asphaltene concentrations around 10% by weight, possibly due to clustering. At the studied concentrations, the adsorption process at the air-oil interface is not diffusion controlled but rather involves a reorganization of asphaltene molecules in a network structure. The formation of a solid skin is well identified by the increase of the elastic modulus. This elastic modulus is also an important property for foam stability, since a rigid interface limits bubble rupture. The interface rigidity at long times decreases with increases in resin fraction, which could decrease foam stability as well as emulsion stability. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11427016

  11. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pham, An; Barisik, Murat; Kim, BoHung

    2013-12-28

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface. PMID:24387383

  12. Pressure dependence of Kapitza resistance at gold/water and silicon/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, An; Kim, BoHung; Barisik, Murat

    2013-12-28

    We conducted non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate Kapitza length at solid/liquid interfaces under the effects of bulk liquid pressures. Gold and silicon were utilized as hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid walls with different wetting surface behaviors, while the number of confined liquid water molecules was adjusted to obtain different pressures inside the channels. The interactions of solid/liquid couples were reparameterized accurately by measuring the water contact angle of solid substrates. In this paper, we present a thorough analysis of the structure, normal stress, and temperature distribution of liquid water to elucidate thermal energy transport across interfaces. Our results demonstrate excellent agreement between the pressures of liquid water in nano-channels and published thermodynamics data. The pressures measured as normal stress components were characterized using a long cut-off distance reinforced by a long-range van der Waals tail correction term. To clarify the effects of bulk liquid pressures on water structure at hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid surfaces, we defined solid/liquid interface spacing as the distance between the surface and the peak value of the first water density layer. Near the gold surface, we found that interface spacing and peak value of first water density layer were constant and did not depend on bulk liquid pressure; near the silicon surface, those values depended directly upon bulk liquid. Our results reveal that the pressure dependence of Kapitza length strongly depends on the wettability of the solid surface. In the case of the hydrophilic gold surface, Kapitza length was stable despite increasing bulk liquid pressure, while it varied significantly at the hydrophobic silicon surface.

  13. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    PubMed Central

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  14. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  15. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials. PMID:25127447

  16. Strong collective attraction in colloidal clusters on a liquid-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pergamenshchik, V M

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that in a cluster of many colloids, trapped at a liquid-air interface, the well-known vertical-force-induced pairwise logarithmic attraction changes to a strongly enhanced power-law attraction. In large two-dimensional clusters, the attraction energy scales as the inverse square of the distance between colloids. The enhancement is given by the ratio eta = (square of the capillary length) / (interface surface area per colloid) and can be as large as 10;{5} . This explains why a very small vertical force on colloids, which is too weak to bring two of them together, can stabilize many-body structures on a liquid-air interface. The profile of a cluster is shown to consist of a large slow collective envelope modulated by a fast low-amplitude perturbation due to individual colloids. A closed equation for the slow envelope, which incorporates an arbitrary power-law repulsion between colloids, is derived. For example, this equation is solved for a large circular cluster with the hard-core colloid repulsion. It is suggested that the predicted effect is responsible for mysterious stabilization of colloidal structures observed in experiments on a surface of isotropic liquid and nematic liquid crystal. PMID:19257035

  17. Virtual prototype interface for the Air Force Manned SpacePlane project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Lewis, John; Johnson, Troy D.

    1998-08-01

    The advent of requirements for worldwide deployment of space assets in support of Air Force operational missions has resulted in the need for a Manned SpacePlane (MSP) that can perform these missions with minimal preflight preparation and little, if any, in-orbit support from a mission control center. Because successful mission accomplishment will depend almost completely upon the MSP crew and the on-board capabilities of the spaceplane, the MSP user interface is a crucial component of successful mission accomplishment. In recognition of this fact, the USAF Phillips Laboratory in conjunction with USAF Space Command initiated the Virtual SpacePlane (VSP) project. To function effectively as an MSP interface development platform, the VSP must demonstrate the capability to simulate anticipated MSP missions and portray the MSP in operation throughout its entire flight regime, from takeoff through space operations and on to recovery via a horizontal landing at an airfield. Therefore, we architected, designed, and implemented a complete VSP that can be used to simulate anticipated Manned SpacePlane missions. The primary objective of the VSP is to be a virtual prototype for user interface design and development, the VSP software architecture and design facilities uncovering, refining and validating MSP user interface requirements. The Virtual SpacePlane reuses software components developed for the Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler (SM) distributed virtual environment (DVE) applications, the Common Object Database (CODB) architecture, and Information Pod (Pod) interface tools developed in our labs. The Virtual Cockpit and Solar System Modeler supplied baseline interface components and tools, 3D graphical models, vehicle motion dynamics models, and DVE communication capabilities. Because we knew that the VSP's requirements would expand and evolve over the life of the project, we use the CODB architecture to facilitate our use of Rapid Evolutionary and Exploratory

  18. 9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view to the south. The water purification system is visible in the right foreground of the photograph and the instrument air receiver tank is visible in the right background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  19. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  20. Forced convective melting at an evolving ice-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Hirsh, Benjamin; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-11-01

    The intrusion of warm Circumpolar Deep Water into the ocean cavity between the base of ice shelves and the sea bed in Antarctica causes melting at the ice shelves' basal surface, producing a turbulent melt plume. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments to investigate how the presence of forced convection (turbulent mixing) changes the delivery of heat to the ice-water interface. We also develop a theoretical model for the heat balance of the system that can be used to predict the change in ice thickness with time. In cases of turbulent mixing, the heat balance includes a term for turbulent heat transfer that depends on the friction velocity and an empirical coefficient. We obtain a new value for this coefficient by comparing the modeled ice thickness against measurements from a set of nine experiments covering one order of magnitude of Reynolds numbers. Our results are consistent with the altimetry-inferred melting rate under Antarctic ice shelves and can be used in climate models to predict their disintegration. This work was supported by NSF grant EAR-110371.

  1. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed. PMID:21290417

  2. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:26385430

  3. Interfacing air pathway models with other media models for impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.L.

    1980-10-01

    The assessment of the impacts/effects of a coal conversion industry on human health, ecological systems, property and aesthetics requires knowledge about effluent and fugitive emissions, dispersion of pollutants in abiotic media, chemical and physical transformations of pollutants during transport, and pollutant fate passing through biotic pathways. Some of the environmental impacts that result from coal conversion facility effluents are subtle, acute, subacute or chronic effects in humans and other ecosystem members, acute or chronic damage of materials and property, odors, impaired atmospheric visibility, and impacts on local, regional and global weather and climate. This great variety of impacts and effects places great demands on the abiotic and biotic numerical simulators (modelers) in terms of time and space scales, transformation rates, and system structure. This paper primarily addresses the demands placed on the atmospheric analyst. The paper considers the important air pathway processes, the interfacing of air pathway models with other media models, and the classes of air pathway models currently available. In addition, a strong plea is made for interaction and communication between all modeling groups to promote efficient construction of intermedia models that truly interface across pathway boundaries.

  4. The surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system incorporating interface roughness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Fan, X. L.; Wang, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the effect of interface roughness on the strain energy release rate and surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system. This is achieved by a parameter investigation of the interfacial shapes, in which the extended finite element method (XFEM) and periodic boundary condition are used. Predictions for the stress field and driving force of multiple surface cracks in the film/substrate system are presented. It is seen that the interface roughness has significant effects on the strain energy release rate, the interfacial stress distribution, and the crack propagation patterns. One can see the completely different distributions of stress and strain energy release rate in the regions of convex and concave asperities of the substrate. Variation of the interface asperity is responsible for the oscillatory characteristics of strain energy release rate, which can cause the local arrest of surface cracks. It is concluded that artificially created rough interface can enhance the durability of film/substrate system with multiple cracks.

  5. Efficiency of air/liquid interfaces in detaching bacteria from a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Gas/liquid interfaces are known to be significantly more effective than shear stress in detaching microscale colloids from substrates by inducing surface tension forces. Providing that a three-phase contact at the interface of a gas bubble, the liquid phase and the particle occurs, the magnitude of the surface tension force can potentially exceed by orders of magnitude the adhesion force, which keeps the micro particles on the surface. We investigate the ability of a moving air/liquid interface to stimulate the detachment of bacteria from a surface. Bacteria are micron-sized living organisms with strong tendency to attach to almost any substrate that they come into contact with. Attachment of bacteria on the surface is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of their growth medium, substrate, and cell surface. Moreover, once fixed on the surface, the microorganisms evolve in time to create intricate biofilm structures, which are highly challenging to be removed. The objective of this study to characterise the efficiency of this detachment process as a function of bacterial attachment as well as hydrodynamic parameters such the surface tension and the interface velocity. Swiss National Science Foundation P2ELP2-158896.

  6. Interfacial properties of asphaltenes at toluene-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zarkar, Sharli; Pauchard, Vincent; Farooq, Umer; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2015-05-01

    Asphaltenes are "n-alkane insoluble" species in crude oil that stabilize water-in-oil emulsions. To understand asphaltene adsorption mechanisms at oil-water interfaces and coalescence blockage, we first studied the behavior in aliphatic oil-water systems in which asphaltenes are almost insoluble. They adsorbed as monomers, giving a unique master curve relating interfacial tension (IFT) to interfacial coverage through a Langmuir equation of state (EoS). The long-time surface coverage was independent of asphaltene bulk concentration and asymptotically approached the 2-D packing limit for polydisperse disks. On coalescence, the surface coverage exceeded the 2-D limit and the asphaltene film appeared to become solidlike, apparently undergoing a transition to a soft glassy material and blocking further coalescence. However, real systems consist of mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic components in which asphaltenes may be quite soluble. To understand solubility effects, we focus here on how the increased bulk solubility of asphaltenes affects their interfacial properties in comparison to aliphatic oil-water systems. Unlike the "almost irreversible" adsorption of asphaltenes where the asymptotic interfacial coverage was independent of the bulk concentration, an equilibrium surface pressure, dependent on bulk concentration, was obtained for toluene-water systems because of adsorption being balanced by desorption. The equilibrium surface coverage could be obtained from the short- and long-term Ward-Tordai approximations. The behavior of the equilibrium surface pressure with the equilibrium surface coverage was then derived. These data for various asphaltene concentrations were used to determine the EoS, which for toluene-water could also be fitted by the Langmuir EoS with Γ∞ = 3.3 molecule/nm(2), the same value as that found for these asphaltenes in aliphatic media. Asphaltene solubility in the bulk phase only appears to affect the adsorption isotherm but not the Eo

  7. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-04-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw , the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  8. Relevance of interfacial viscoelasticity in stability and conformation of biomolecular organizates at air/fluid interface.

    PubMed

    Antony M, Steffi; Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2016-08-01

    Soft materials are complex macromolecular systems often exhibiting perplexing non-Newtonian viscoelastic properties, especially when the macromolecules are entangled, crowded or cross-linked. These materials are ubiquitous in the biology, food and pharma industry and have several applications in biotechnology and in the field of biosensors. Based on the length scales, topologies, flexibility and concentration, the systems behave both as liquids (viscous) and solids (elastic). Particularly, for proteins and protein-lipid systems, viscoelasticity is an important parameter because it often relates directly to stability and thermodynamic interactions of the pure biological components as well as their mixtures. Despite the large body of work that is available in solution macro-rheometry, there are still a number of issues that need to be addressed in dealing with proteins at air/fluid interfaces and with protein-polymer or protein-lipid interfaces that often exhibit very low interfacial viscosity values. Considering the important applications that they have in biopharmaceutical, biotechnological and nutraceutical industries, there is a need for developing methods that meet the following three specific issues: small volume, large dynamic range of shear rates and interfacial properties of different biomolecules. Further, the techniques that are developed should include Newtonian, shear thinning and yielding properties, which are representative of the different solution behaviors typically encountered. The review presented here is a comprehensive account of the rheological properties of different biomolecules at air/fluid and solid/fluid interfaces. It addresses the usefulness of 'viscoelasticity' of the systems at the interfaces analyzed at the molecular level that can be correlated with the microscopic material properties and touches upon some recent techniques in microrheology that are being used to measure the unusually low viscosity values sensitively. PMID:27174489

  9. Method to estimate drag coefficient at the air/ice interface over drifting open pack ice from remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.

    1984-01-01

    A knowledge in near real time, of the surface drag coefficient for drifting pack ice is vital for predicting its motions. And since this is not routinely available from measurements it must be replaced by estimates. Hence, a method for estimating this variable, as well as the drag coefficient at the water/ice interface and the ice thickness, for drifting open pack ice was developed. These estimates were derived from three-day sequences of LANDSAT-1 MSS images and surface weather charts and from the observed minima and maxima of these variables. The method was tested with four data sets in the southeastern Beaufort sea. Acceptable results were obtained for three data sets. Routine application of the method depends on the availability of data from an all-weather air or spaceborne remote sensing system, producing images with high geometric fidelity and high resolution.

  10. Theoretical vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of water near lipid and surfactant monolayer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Gruenbaum, S. M.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-11-14

    Understanding the structure of water near cell membranes is crucial for characterizing water-mediated events such as molecular transport. To obtain structural information of water near a membrane, it is useful to have a surface-selective technique that can probe only interfacial water molecules. One such technique is vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. As model systems for studying membrane headgroup/water interactions, in this paper we consider lipid and surfactant monolayers on water. We adopt a theoretical approach combining molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive VSFG to investigate water structure near these interfaces. Our simulated spectra are in qualitative agreement with experiments and reveal orientational ordering of interfacial water molecules near cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic interfaces. OH bonds of water molecules point toward an anionic interface leading to a positive VSFG peak, whereas the water hydrogen atoms point away from a cationic interface leading to a negative VSFG peak. Coexistence of these two interfacial water species is observed near interfaces between water and mixtures of cationic and anionic lipids, as indicated by the presence of both negative and positive peaks in their VSFG spectra. In the case of a zwitterionic interface, OH orientation is toward the interface on the average, resulting in a positive VSFG peak.

  11. Selectively dissolution-recrystallization of ZnO crystals at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiulan; Masuda, Yoshitake; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    Unique morphologies of ZnO crystals were grown firstly at the air-liquid interface. The formation of bamboo leaf- and morning glory-like morphologies depended on the exposed crystal face. ZnO nanosheets were formed by selective dissolution, random diffusion, and recrystallization with a preferential orientation at the edge of pre-existing ZnO nanowhiskers, due to the local deviation of the pH value, which are derived from the volatile and highly soluble ammonia molecules at different fine regions. The high-resolution TEM and selected area electron diffraction clarified the formation mechanism.

  12. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents... Acts. 1316.5 Section 1316.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given...

  13. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents... Acts. 1316.5 Section 1316.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given...

  14. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  15. β-Cyclodextrin at the Water/1-Bromobutane Interface: Molecular Insight into Reverse Phase Transfer Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Elk, Jackson Chief; Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-05-12

    Molecular insight into the role of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) as a phase transfer catalyst at the liquid/liquid interface is obtained by molecular dynamics simulations of the structure and dynamics of βCD adsorbed at the interface between water and 1-bromobutane. In particular, we consider the structure and dynamics of the water and bromobutane molecules inside the βCD cavity and compare them with the behavior when βCD is dissolved in bulk water. βCD is preferentially oriented at the interface, with the cavity opening along the interface normal. While in bulk water the cavity includes 6-8 water molecules that are relatively mobile with short residence time, at the interface the cavity is mostly dehydrated and includes a single bromobutane molecule. This inclusion complex is stable in bulk water. The implication of this behavior for reverse phase transfer catalysis is discussed. PMID:25909764

  16. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  17. The molecular structure of the interface between water and a hydrophobic substrate is liquid-vapor like

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willard, Adam P.; Chandler, David

    2014-11-01

    With molecular simulation for water and a tunable hydrophobic substrate, we apply the instantaneous interface construction [A. P. Willard and D. Chandler, "Instantaneous liquid interfaces," J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010)] to examine the similarity between a water-vapor interface and a water-hydrophobic surface interface. We show that attractive interactions between a hydrophobic surface and water affect capillary wave fluctuations of the instantaneous liquid interface, but these attractive interactions have essentially no effect on the intrinsic interface. The intrinsic interface refers to molecular structure in terms of distances from the instantaneous interface. Further, the intrinsic interface of liquid water and a hydrophobic substrate differs little from that of water and its vapor. The same is not true, we show, for an interface between water and a hydrophilic substrate. In that case, strong directional substrate-water interactions disrupt the liquid-vapor-like interfacial hydrogen bonding network.

  18. The carbon dioxide-water interface at conditions of gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Lietz, Daniela; Venturini, Federica; Gutt, Christian; Tolan, Metin

    2009-01-21

    The structure of the carbon dioxide-water interface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and reflectivity at temperature and pressure conditions which allow the formation of gas hydrate. The water-gaseous CO2 and the water-liquid CO2 interface were examined. The two interfaces show a very different behavior with respect to the formation of gas hydrate. While the liquid-gas interface exhibits the formation of thin liquid CO2 layers on the water surface, the formation of small clusters of gas hydrate was observed at the liquid-liquid interface. The data obtained from both interfaces points to a gas hydrate formation process which may be explained by the so-called local structuring hypothesis. PMID:19105749

  19. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  20. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  1. Interaction of monovalent ions with the water liquid-vapor interface - A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics calculations are presented for a series of ions at infinite dilution near the water liquid-vapor interface. The free energies of ion transfer from the bulk to the interface are discussed, as are the accompanying changes of water structure at the surface and ion mobilities as a function of their proximity to the interface. It is shown that simple dielectric models do not provide an accurate description of ions at the water surface. The results of the study should be useful in the development of better models incorporating the shape and molecular structure of the interface.

  2. Nitrogen dynamics at the groundwater-surface water interface of a degraded urban stream (journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization degrades stream ecosystems by altering hydrology and nutrient dynamics, yet relatively little effort has been devoted to understanding biogeochemistry of urban streams at the ground water-surface water interface. This zone may be especially important for nitrogen re...

  3. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  4. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  5. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  6. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Glazkova, Elena A.; Svarovskaya, Natalia V.; Bakina, Olga V.; Kazantsev, Sergey O.; Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  7. Ultrafast self-action of surface-plasmon polaritons at an air/metal interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Alexandre; Hoang, Thang B.; Fang, Chao; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Smith, David R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of surface-plasmon polaritons (SPP) on a single air/metal interface. Inspired by nonlinear dielectric waveguide theory, we analytically derive a model that describes the nonlinear propagation of SPPs, thus bridging the description of plasmonic and dielectric waveguides. The model, the numerical simulations, and the experiments, which are carried out in the 100 fs regime, reveal that the SPP undergoes strong ultrafast self-action which manifests itself through self-induced absorption. Our observations are consistent with a large, bulk, third-order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(3 )) of gold and provide a self-consistent theory of self-action of SPPs at an air/metal interface. Experimentally, we find Im {χ-(3 )} ˜3 ×10-16m2/V2 . These findings have important implications in the nonlinear physics of plasmonics and metamaterials as they provide evidence that nonlinear absorption has a significant effect on the propagation of SPPs excited by intense optical pulses. This self-action is also expected to affect the anomalous absorption of light near subwavelength structures as well as the strength of desirable nonlinear processes such as third-harmonic generation and four-wave mixing, which will inevitably compete with nonlinear absorption.

  8. High resolution microprofiling, fractionation and speciation at sediment water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Within aquatic environments, the exchange between the sediment and the overlaying water is often driven by steep gradients of, e.g., the oxygen concentration, the redox potential or the pH value at the sediment water interface (SWI). Important transport processes at the SWI are sedimentation and resuspension of particulate matter and diffusional fluxes of dissolved substances. To gain a better understanding of the key factors and processes determining the fate of substances at the SWI, methods with a spatial high resolution are required that enable the investigation of several sediment parameters in parallel to different analytes of interest in the sediment pore water. Moreover, beside the total content, questions concerning the speciation and fractionation are of concern in studying the different (transport) processes. Due to the availability of numerous micro-sensors and -electrodes (e.g., O2, redox potential, pH value, H2S, N2O) and the development of methods for pore water sampling [1], the toolbox to study the heterogeneous and often dynamic conditions at the SWI at a sub-millimetre scale were considerably improved. Nevertheless, the methods available for pore water sampling often require the installation of the sampling devices at the sampling site and/or intensive preparation procedures that may influence the conditions at the area studied and/or the characteristics of the samples taken. By combination of a micro profiling system with a new micro filtration probe head connected to a pump and a fraction collector, a micro profiling and micro sampling system ("missy") was developed that enables for the first time a direct, automate and low invasive sampling of small volumes (<500 μL) at a spatial high resolution of a few millimetres to sub-millimetres [2]. Via the application of different sample preparation procedures followed by inductively plasma-mass spectrometry analyses, it was possible to address not only the total content of metal(loid)s, but also

  9. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale. PMID:27078427

  10. Coherent description of transport across the water interface: From nanodroplets to climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Trinh, Thuat T.; Lervik, Anders; Badam, Vijay Kumar; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-03-01

    Transport of mass and energy across the vapor-liquid interface of water is of central importance in a variety of contexts such as climate models, weather forecasts, and power plants. We provide a complete description of the transport properties of the vapor-liquid interface of water with the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Transport across the planar interface is then described by 3 interface transfer coefficients where 9 more coefficients extend the description to curved interfaces. We obtain all coefficients in the range 260-560 K by taking advantage of water evaporation experiments at low temperatures, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005 rigid-water-molecule model at high temperatures, and square gradient theory to represent the whole range. Square gradient theory is used to link the region where experiments are possible (low vapor pressures) to the region where nonequilibrium molecular dynamics can be done (high vapor pressures). This enables a description of transport across the planar water interface, interfaces of bubbles, and droplets, as well as interfaces of water structures with complex geometries. The results are likely to improve the description of evaporation and condensation of water at widely different scales; they open a route to improve the understanding of nanodroplets on a small scale and the precision of climate models on a large scale.

  11. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  12. Effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt content on partitioning equilibrium of hydrophilic VOC at air-sweat interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Su, Tzy-I.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) must initially be absorbed by sweat on the surface of skin for human VOC dermal exposure. The partitioning equilibrium at the air-sweat interface is given by p=Cg*/C, where pc is the partitioning coefficient, and Cg* is the gaseous concentration in equilibrium with the aqueous VOC concentration ( CL) at a constant water temperature ( Tw). A series of thermodynamic functions of Cg*(C,T) are presented, as well as the values of pc, and the heat of gaseous-liquid phase transfer (Δ Htr) for tested VOCs, including iso-propanol (IPA, CL=12-120 mg L -1) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK, CL=10-80 mg L -1) to determine the effects of liquid VOC concentration and salt contents of sweat on pc of hydrophilic VOCs. Experimental data reveal that the pc values of IPA and MEK drop as the liquid VOC concentrations increasing from 10 to 120 mg L -1. However, sodium salt content in human sweat (sodium chloride and sodium lactate) induces the effect of salt, indicating the increase in pc. Notably, neither urea nor ammonia in human sweat increase pc. Artificial sweat, consisting of sodium chloride 0.47%, urea 0.05%, ammonia 0.004% and sodium lactate 0.6%, was used to evaluate the increase in the pc values of IPA and MEK. The liquid VOC concentration effect simultaneously develops together with the salt effect on the partition at the interface of air-sweat for hydrophilic VOC solutions. The pc values of IPA for artificial sweat decrease as much as 32.5% as CL increases from 12 to 120 mg L -1 at 300 K, and those of MEK drop by as much as 70.9% as CL increases from 10 to 80 mg L -1 at 300 K. This investigation provides a basis for elucidating the assessment of human dermal exposure to hydrophilic VOCs.

  13. Water corrosion of spent nuclear fuel: radiolysis driven dissolution at the UO2/water interface.

    PubMed

    Springell, Ross; Rennie, Sophie; Costelle, Leila; Darnbrough, James; Stitt, Camilla; Cocklin, Elizabeth; Lucas, Chris; Burrows, Robert; Sims, Howard; Wermeille, Didier; Rawle, Jonathan; Nicklin, Chris; Nuttall, William; Scott, Thomas; Lander, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has been used to probe the radiolytic corrosion of uranium dioxide. Single crystal thin films of UO(2) were exposed to an intense X-ray beam at a synchrotron source in the presence of water, in order to simultaneously provide radiation fields required to split the water into highly oxidising radiolytic products, and to probe the crystal structure and composition of the UO(2) layer, and the morphology of the UO(2)/water interface. By modeling the electron density, surface roughness and layer thickness, we have been able to reproduce the observed reflectivity and diffraction profiles and detect changes in oxide composition and rate of dissolution at the Ångström level, over a timescale of several minutes. A finite element calculation of the highly oxidising hydrogen peroxide product suggests that a more complex surface interaction than simple reaction with H(2)O(2) is responsible for an enhancement in the corrosion rate directly at the interface of water and UO(2), and this may impact on models of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel. PMID:25932469

  14. Influence of entrapped air pockets on hydraulic transients in water pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen

    2011-01-01

    The pressure variations associated with a filling undulating pipeline containing an entrapped air pocket are investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of entrapped air on abnormal transient pressures is often ambiguous since the compressibility of the air pocket permits the liquid flow to accelerate but also partly cushions the system, with the balance of these tendencies being associated with the initial void fraction of the air pocket. Earlier experimental research involved systems with an initial void fraction greater than 5.8%; this paper focuses on initial void fractions ranging from 0% to 10%, in order to more completely characterize the transient response. Experimental results show that the maximum pressure increases and then decreases as the initial void fraction decreases. A simplified model is developed by neglecting the liquid inertia and energy loss of a short water column near the air-water interface. Comparisons of the calculated and observed results show the model is able to accurately predict peak pressures as a function of void fraction and filling conditions. Rigid water column models, however, perform poorly with small void fractions.

  15. Water-Pd Interface in Catalytic Biomass Conversion: Atomic-Scale Structure and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yake; Yin, Shuxia; Liu, Xin; Shields, Darwin; Wang, Sanwu

    2012-02-01

    Biomass pyrolysis and other relevant catalytic reactions often occur at the liquid-solid interface. It is therefore of great importance to investigate the interfacial structure and other properties in order to achieve a deep understanding about the catalytic reactions for biomass conversion. We used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfaces formed by liquid water and the palladium surfaces. Such interfaces are involved in many catalytic reactions for biomass conversion. We report results about the structural properties of the water/Pd(100) and water/Pd(111) interfaces, the interaction between liquid water and the metal surfaces, and how the interaction affects the structure. We found that while the interaction between water and the metal surface is weak, it could still cause considerable effects. In particular, the interaction promotes the formation of close-packed local clusters of liquid water.

  16. Minimizing the water and air impacts of unconventional energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy generates income and, done well, can reduce air pollution compared to other fossil fuels and even water use compared to fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Alternatively, it could slow the adoption of renewables and, done poorly, release toxic chemicals into water and air. Based on research to date, some primary threats to water resources come from surface spills, wastewater disposal, and drinking-water contamination through poor well integrity. For air resources, an increase in volatile organic compounds and air toxics locally is a potential health threat, but the switch from coal to natural gas for electricity generation will reduce sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and particulate pollution regionally. Critical needs for future research include data for 1) estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) of unconventional hydrocarbons; 2) the potential for further reductions of water requirements and chemical toxicity; 3) whether unconventional resource development alters the frequency of well-integrity failures; 4) potential contamination of surface and ground waters from drilling and spills; and 5) the consequences of greenhouse gases and air pollution on ecosystems and human health.

  17. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  18. Superhydrophobic surfaces of the water bug Notonecta glauca: a model for friction reduction and air retention.

    PubMed

    Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Schneider, Erik S; Melskotte, Jan-Erik; Brede, Martin; Leder, Alfred; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    considerable fluid velocity directly at the air-water interface indicates the ability to reduce friction significantly. The combination of these two abilities makes these hierarchically structured surfaces extremely interesting as a biomimetic model for low friction fluid transport or drag reduction on ship hulls. PMID:21977425

  19. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  20. Utilizing air purge to reduce water contamination of lube systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sirois, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    Lubrication systems are exposed to contaminants including dirt, process dilutants and water. Water contamination of lubricating oil is commonly experienced by users of machinery such as steam and gas turbines, compressors, pumps, motors, generators and others. Poorly designed or maintained turbomachinery features such as bearing housing seals and shaft packing do not prevent moisture laden air, the primary source of water, from entering the lube system. This paper presents a case history where a mechanical drive steam turbine and boiler feed pump was experiencing severe water contamination of the lube system. Bearing and control system component failures resulted from water induced corrosion. Various systems and approaches for dealing with this contamination are reviewed. Installation of a very simple and cost effective system using low pressure air applied directly to the bearing housing oil seals proved a most effective method for eliminating measurable water contamination of the lubrication system and can be applied to machinery of all types.

  1. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  2. Primary Air-Liquid Interface Culture of Nasal Epithelium for Nasal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Xin; Jackson, Claire L; Cole, Janice L; Lackie, Peter M; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Lucas, Jane; Conway, Joy

    2016-07-01

    Nasal drug administration is a promising alternative to oral and parenteral administration for both local and systemic delivery of drugs. The benefits include its noninvasive nature, rapid absorption, and circumvention of first pass metabolism. Hence, the use of an in vitro model using human primary nasal epithelial cells could be key to understanding important functions and parameters of the respiratory epithelium. This model will enable investigators to address important and original research questions using a biologically relevant in vitro platform that mimics the in vivo nasal epithelial physiology. The purpose of this study was to establish, systematically characterize, and validate the use of a primary human nasal epithelium model cultured at the air-liquid interface for the study of inflammatory responses and drug transport and to simultaneously quantify drug effects on ciliary activity. PMID:27223825

  3. Lamellar Bodies Form Solid Three-dimensional Films at the Respiratory Air-Liquid Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Olmeda, Bárbara; Bertocchi, Cristina; Haller, Thomas; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for lung function. It is assembled, stored and secreted as particulate entities (lamellar body-like particles; LBPs). LBPs disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, leading to an instantaneous spreading of material and a decline in surface tension. Here, we demonstrate that the film formed by the adsorbed material spontaneously segregate into distinct ordered and disordered lipid phase regions under unprecedented near-physiological conditions and, unlike natural surfactant purified from bronchoalveolar lavages, dynamically reorganized into highly viscous multilayer domains with complex three-dimensional topographies. Multilayer domains, in coexistence with liquid phases, showed a progressive stiffening and finally solidification, probably driven by a self-driven disassembly of LBPs from a sub-surface compartment. We conclude that surface film formation from LBPs is a highly dynamic and complex process, leading to a more elaborated scenario than that observed and predicted by models using reconstituted, lavaged, or fractionated preparations. PMID:20558742

  4. The stability of a horizontal interface between air and an insulating liquid subjected to charge injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicón, Rafael; Pérez, Alberto T.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the linear stability analysis of an interface between air and an insulating liquid subjected to a perpendicular electric field, in the presence of unipolar injection of charge. Depending on the characteristics of the liquid and the depth of the liquid layer two different instability thresholds may be found. One of them is characterized by a wavelength of the order of the liquid layer thickness and corresponds to the well-known volume instability of a liquid layer subjected to charge injection. The other one is characterized by a wavelength some ten times the liquid layer thickness and corresponds to the so-called rose-window instability, an instability associated to the balance of surface stresses.

  5. Interaction of a sodium ion with the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Molecular dynamics results are presented for the density profile of a sodium ion near the water liquid-vapor interface at 320 K. These results are compared with the predictions of a simple dielectric model for the interaction of a monovalent ion with this interface. The interfacial region described by the model profile is too narrow and the profile decreases too abruptly near the solution interface. Thus, the simple model does not provide a satisfactory description of the molecular dynamics results for ion positions within two molecular diameters from the solution interface where appreciable ion concentrations are observed. These results suggest that surfaces associated with dielectric models of ionic processes at aqueous solution interfaces should be located at least two molecular diameters inside the liquid phase. A free energy expense of about 2 kcal/mol is required to move the ion within two molecular layers of the free water liquid-vapor interface.

  6. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  7. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  8. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  9. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S. Air... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.490 Atlantic Ocean...

  10. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    SciTech Connect

    Chempath, Shaji; Pratt, Lawrence R

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  11. Effect of side-chain carbonyl groups on the interface of vinyl polymers with water.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yukari; Horinouchi, Ayanobu; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Matsuno, Hisao; Kanaoka, Shokyoku; Aoshima, Sadahito; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-02-11

    The nature of the polymer-water interface in the poly(methyl 2-propenyl ether) (PMPE)-water model system is investigated by sum-frequency generation spectroscopy, which at the moment gives the best depth resolution among available techniques. PMPE, synthesized via living cationic polymerization, is structurally similar to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) except for lacking a carbonyl group. We here probe the polymer local conformation as well as the aggregation states of water at the interface. Comparing the results of our measurements to the PMMA-water system, the effect of a carbonyl group on the water structure at the interface is discussed. This knowledge should be crucial to the design and construction of highly functionalized polymer interfaces for bioapplications. PMID:24467626

  12. Structure and Depletion at Fluorocarbon and Hydrocarbon/Water Liquid/Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kashimoto,K.; Yoon, J.; Hou, B.; Chen, C.; Lin, B.; Aratono, M.; Takiue, T.; Schlossman, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of x-ray reflectivity studies of two oil/water (liquid/liquid) interfaces are inconsistent with recent predictions of the presence of a vaporlike depletion region at hydrophobic/aqueous interfaces. One of the oils, perfluorohexane, is a fluorocarbon whose superhydrophobic interface with water provides a stringent test for the presence of a depletion layer. The other oil, heptane, is a hydrocarbon and, therefore, is more relevant to the study of biomolecular hydrophobicity. These results are consistent with the subangstrom proximity of water to soft hydrophobic materials.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid/vapor interface of SPC/E water

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.S.; Dang, L,X.; Garrett, B.C.

    1996-07-11

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been used to explore the structural and dynamical properties of water`s liquid/vapor interface using the simple extended point charge (SPC/E) model. Comparisons to the existing experimental and simulation data suggest that the SPC/E potential energy function provides a semiquantitative description of this interface. The orientation of H{sub 2}O molecules at the interface is found to be bimodal in nature. The self-diffusion constant of water is calculated to be larger at the surface than in the bulk. 46 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  15. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  16. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  17. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by h