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Sample records for air water solid

  1. Hazardous solid wastes generated in the cleanup of air and water.

    PubMed

    Eisenbud, M

    1978-12-01

    Air and water pollution control programs sometimes result in production of solid wastes that are difficult to manage. The sludges from sewage treatment plants and flue gas scrubbers are two examples. In many coastal communities, there is no alternative to ocean dumpling of sewage sludges for the foreseeable future. The use of sludges as soil conditioners, their conversion to fuels by pyrolysis, and other alternatives are frequently mentioned options, but they have not been demonstrated to be practical on a large scale. The Federal requirement that ocean dumping be terminated by 1981 presents the large seaboard population centers with a dilemma, due to the absence of economically feasible alternative methods of disposal. Another major solid waste problem is arising from the Federal policy that requires flue gas desulfurization on practically all power plants. This policy, designed to reduce sulfur oxide emissions, will require that vast quantities of sludge be stored. Their environmental impact is as yet not fully evaluated. Commercial use of the sulfur or sulfates produced in these processes may be possible, but its practicability on a large scale remains to be demonstrated.

  2. Screening for sarin in air and water by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J F; Boparai, A S; Reed, L L

    2001-10-01

    A method of screening air and water samples for the chemical-warfare agent Sarin is developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). The SPME field kit sampler is ideal for collecting air and water samples in the field and transporting samples safely to the laboratory. The sampler also allows the sample to be introduced into the GC-MS system without further sample preparation. Results of the tests with Sarin using the SPME technique indicate that a sample collection time of 5 min is sufficient to detect 100 ng/L of Sarin in air. For water samples, Sarin is detected at a concentration of 12 microg/mL or higher. This method is ideal for screening samples for quick response situations.

  3. Screening for sarin in air and water by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. F.; Boparai, A. S.; Reed, L. L.

    2001-10-01

    A method of screening air and water samples for the chemical-warfare agent Sarin is developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). The SPME field kit sampler is ideal for collecting air and water samples in the field and transporting samples safely to the laboratory. The sampler also allows the sample to be introduced into the GC-MS system without further sample preparation. Results of the tests with Sarin using the SPME technique indicate that a sample collection time of 5 min is sufficient to detect 100 ng/L of Sarin in air. For water samples, Sarin is detected at a concentration of 12 {mu}g/mL or higher. This method is ideal for screening samples for quick response situations.

  4. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  5. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  6. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for the determination of volatile and semi-volatile pollutants in water and air.

    PubMed

    Llompart, M; Li, K; Fingas, M

    1998-10-16

    In this work we report the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to extract and concentrate water-soluble volatile as well as semi-volatile pollutants. Both methods of exposing the SPME fibre were utilised: immersion in the aqueous solution (SPME) and in the headspace over the solution (HSSPME). The proposed HSSPME procedure was compared to conventional static headspace (HS) analysis for artificially spiked water as well as real water samples, which had been, equilibrated with various oil and petroleum products. Both techniques gave similar results but HSSPME was much more sensitive and exhibited better precision. Detection limits were found to be in the sub-ng/ml level, with precision better than 5% R.S.D. in most cases. To evaluate the suitability of SPME for relatively high contamination level analysis, the proposed HSSPME method was applied to the screening of run-off water samples that had heavy oil suspended in them from a tire fire incident. HSSPME results were compared with liquid--liquid extraction. Library searches were conducted on the resulting GC-MS total ion chromatograms to determine the types of compounds found in such samples. Both techniques found similar composition in the water samples with the exception of alkylnaphthalenes that were detected only by HSSPME. A brief study was carried out to assess using SPME for air monitoring. By sampling and concentrating the volatile organic compounds in the coating of the SPME fibre without any other equipment, this new technique is useful as an alternative to active air monitoring by means of sampling pumps and sorbent tubes.

  7. Solid sorbent air sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galen, T. J.

    1986-04-01

    A fluid sampler for collecting a plurality of discrete samples over separate time intervals is described. The sampler comprises a sample assembly having an inlet and a plurality of discreet sample tubes each of which has inlet and outlet sides. A multiport dual acting valve is provided in the sampler in order to sequentially pass air from the sample inlet into the selected sample tubes. The sample tubes extend longitudinally of the housing and are located about the outer periphery thereof so that upon removal of an enclosure cover, they are readily accessible for operation of the sampler in an analysis mode.

  8. Solid sorbent air sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galen, T. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A fluid sampler for collecting a plurality of discrete samples over separate time intervals is described. The sampler comprises a sample assembly having an inlet and a plurality of discreet sample tubes each of which has inlet and outlet sides. A multiport dual acting valve is provided in the sampler in order to sequentially pass air from the sample inlet into the selected sample tubes. The sample tubes extend longitudinally of the housing and are located about the outer periphery thereof so that upon removal of an enclosure cover, they are readily accessible for operation of the sampler in an analysis mode.

  9. Optimization of Fenton's reagent coupled to Dissolved Air Flotation to remove cyanobacterial odorous metabolites and suspended solids from raw surface water.

    PubMed

    Elías-Maxil, Jorge A; Rigas, Fotis; Orta de Velásquez, María Teresa; Ramírez-Zamora, Rosa-María

    2011-01-01

    Ferrous salts are commonly used as coagulants in Water Treatment Plants (WTPs). When these salts are combined with hydrogen peroxide in acidic conditions - besides coagulation - an additional Advanced Oxidation Process (Fenton's reagent) can take place. Using a response surface methodology, this paper presents the optimization of a novel treatment system constituted by Fenton's reagent (FE) and Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) for removing 2-Methylisoborneol (MIB), geosmin and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) from raw water. FE was proven able to remove completely both micro pollutants found in the influent of a drinking water treatment plant. Moreover, higher clarification rate was achieved by coupling FE-DAF with respect FE-Sedimentation.

  10. Growth behavior of LiMn2O4 particles formed by solid-state reactions in air and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-11-01

    Morphology control of particles formed during conventional solid-state reactions without any additives is a challenging task. Here, we propose a new strategy to control the morphology of LiMn2O4 particles based on water vapor-induced growth of particles during solid-state reactions. We have investigated the synthesis and microstructural evolution of LiMn2O4 particles in air and water vapor atmospheres as model reactions; LiMn2O4 is used as a low-cost cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. By using spherical MnCO3 precursor impregnated with LiOH, LiMn2O4 spheres with a hollow structure were obtained in air, while angulated particles with micrometer sizes were formed in water vapor. The pore structure of the particles synthesized in water vapor was found to be affected at temperatures below 700 °C. We also show that the solid-state reaction in water vapor is a simple and valuable method for the large-scale production of particles, where the shape, size, and microstructure can be controlled.

  11. Solid Waste, Air Pollution and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupchik, George J.; Franz, Gerald J.

    1976-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among solid waste disposal, air pollution, and human disease. It is estimated that solid waste disposal contributes 9.7 percent of the total air pollution and 9.9 percent of the total air pollution health effect. Certain disposal-resource recovery systems can be implemented to meet air quality standards. (MR)

  12. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  13. DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces: Their relative impact on bacteria deposition mechanisms in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongjuan; Cochet, Nelly; Pauss, André; Lamy, Edvina

    2017-02-01

    Experimental and modeling studies were performed to investigate bacteria deposition behavior in unsaturated porous media. The coupled effect of different forces, acting on bacteria at solid-air-water interfaces and their relative importance on bacteria deposition mechanisms was explored by calculating Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as hydrophobic, capillary and hydrodynamic forces. Negatively charged non-motile bacteria and quartz sands were used in packed column experiments. The breakthrough curves and retention profiles of bacteria were simulated using the modified Mobile-IMmobile (MIM) model, to identify physico-chemical attachment or physical straining mechanisms involved in bacteria retention. These results indicated that both mechanisms might occur in both sand. However, the attachment was found to be a reversible process, because attachment coefficients were similar to those of detachment. DLVO calculations supported these results: the primary minimum did not exist, suggesting no permanent retention of bacteria to solid-water and air-water interfaces. Calculated hydrodynamic and resisting torques predicted that bacteria detachment in the secondary minimum might occur. The capillary potential energy was greater than DLVO, hydrophobic and hydrodynamic potential energies, suggesting that film straining by capillary forces might largely govern bacteria deposition under unsaturated conditions.

  14. Probing Effect of Salinity and pH on Surface Interactions between Air Bubbles and Hydrophobic Solids: Implications on Colloidal Assembly at Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin; Shi, Chen; Zhang, Shuo; Xie, Lei; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Dazhi; Zeng, Hongbo

    2017-04-05

    In this work, bubble probe atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to quantify the interactions between two air bubbles and between an air bubble and an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-hydrophobized mica under various aqueous conditions. The key parameters (e.g. surface potentials, decay length of hydrophobic attraction) were obtained by analyzing the measured forces through a theoretical model based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including effect of disjoining pressure. The bubble-OTS hydrophobic attraction with a decay length of 1.0 nm was found to be independent of solution pH and salinity. These parameters were further used to predict the attachment of OTS-hydrophobized particles onto air/water interface, demonstrating that particle attachment driven by hydrophobic attraction could be facilitated by suppressing electrical double-layer repulsion at low pH or high salinity condition. This facile methodology can be readily extended to quantify interactions of many other colloidal particles with gas/water and oil/water interfaces, with implications on colloidal assembly at different interfaces in many engineering applications.

  15. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the sensitive and rapid real-time detection of solid high explosives in air and water.

    PubMed

    Jürschik, S; Sulzer, P; Petersson, F; Mayhew, C A; Jordan, A; Agarwal, B; Haidacher, S; Seehauser, H; Becker, K; Märk, T D

    2010-12-01

    Relying on recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), we demonstrate here the capability of detecting solid explosives in air and in water in real time. Two different proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers have been used in this study. One is the PTR-TOF 8000, which has an enhanced mass resolution (m/Δm up to 8,000) and high sensitivity (~50 cps/ppbv). The second is the high-sensitivity PTR-MS, which has an improved limit of detection of about several hundreds of parts per quadrillion by volume and is coupled with a direct aqueous injection device. These instruments have been successfully used to identify and monitor the solid explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by analysing on the one hand the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces (also demonstrating the usefulness of a simple pre-concentration and thermal desorption technique) and by analysing on the other hand trace compounds in water down to a level of about 100 pptw. The ability to identify even minute amounts of threat compounds, such as explosives, particularly within a complex chemical environment, is vital to the fight against crime and terrorism and is of paramount importance for the appraisal of the fate and harmful effects of TNT at marine ammunition dumping sites and the detection of buried antipersonnel and antitank landmines.

  16. Solid-Sorbent Air Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galen, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Portable unit takes eight 24-hour samples. Volatile organic compounds in air collected for analysis by portable, self-contained sampling apparatus. Sampled air drawn through sorbent material, commercial porous polymer of 2, 3-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide. High-boiling-point organic compounds adsorbed onto polymer, while low-boiling-point organics pass through and returned to atmosphere. Sampler includes eight sample tubes filled with polymeric sorbent. Organic compounds in atmosphere absorbed when air pumped through sorbent. Designed for checking air in spacecraft, sampler adaptable to other applications as leak detection, gas-mixture analysis, and ambient-air monitoring.

  17. Model of phase distribution of hydrophobic organic chemicals in cyclodextrin-water-air-solid sorbent systems as a function of salinity, temperature, and the presence of multiple CDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental and other applications of cyclodextrins (CD) often require usage of high concentra- tion aqueous solutions of derivatized CDs. In an effort to reduce the costs, these studies also typically use technical grades where the purity of the CD solution and the degree of substitution has not been reported. Further, this grade of CD often included high levels of salt and it is commonly applied in high salinity systems. The mathematical models for water and air partitioning coefficients of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOC) with CDs that have been used in these studies under-estimate the level of HOC within CDs. This is because those models (1) do not take into account that high concentrations of CDs result in significantly lower levels of water in solution and (2) they do not account for the reduction in HOC aqueous solubility due to the presence of salt. Further, because they have poor knowledge of the CD molar concentration in their solu- tions, it is difficult to draw comparisons between studies. Herein is developed a mathematical model where cyclo- dextrin is treated as a separate phase whose relative volume is calculated from its apparent molar volume in solution and the CD concentration of the solution. The model also accounts for the affects of temperature and the presence of salt in solution through inclusion of modified versions of the Van't Hoff and Setschenow equations. With these capabilities, additional equations have been developed for calculating HOC phase distribution in air-water-CD-solid sorbent systems for a single HOC and between water and CD for a system containing multiple HOCs as well as multiple types of cyclodextrin.

  18. Highlights from Faraday Discussion 182: Solid Oxide Electrolysis: Fuels and Feedstocks from Water and Air, York, UK, July 2015.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Elena; Norby, Truls

    2016-01-31

    The rising importance of converting high peak electricity from renewables to fuels has urged field specialists to organize this Faraday Discussion on Solid Oxide Electrolysis. The topic is of essential interest in order to achieve a greater utilization of renewable energy and storage at higher densities.

  19. Removing Solids From Supercritical Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus removes precipitated inorganic salts and other solids in water-recycling process. Designed for use with oxidation in supercritical water which treats wastes and yields nearly pure water. Heating coils and insulation around vessel keep it hot. Locking bracket seals vessel but allows it to be easily opened for replacement of filled canisters.

  20. Solid Wastes and Water Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWalle, F. B.; Chian, E. S. K.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of solid wastes and water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers areas such as: (1) environmental impacts and health aspects for waste disposal, and (2) processed and hazardous wastes. A list of 80 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Polydopamine-reinforced magnetization of zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-7 for magnetic solid-phase extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the air-water environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suling; Yao, Weixuan; Ying, Jianbo; Zhao, Hongting

    2016-06-24

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) consist of metal nodes connected to imidazolate linkers, having both the properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and inorganic zeolites, such as controllable pore sizes, high porosity and surface areas, as well as exceptional thermal and chemical stability, thereby making them a class of attractive materials for diverse analytical applications. In this study, we reported a facile magnetization process of ZIF-7 (zinc benzimidazolate) for simultaneous magnetic extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by simply mixing ZIF-7 and polydopamine (PDA)-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (PDA@Fe3O4) in solutions. Functional groups (-OH and -NH2), provided by PDA as a highly efficient molecular linker, could attract and anchor ZIF-7 through noncovalent adsorption and covalent cross-link interactions, thereby promoting the complete magnetization of ZIFs and enhancing their stability and reusability. The bridging ligand benzimidazolate, could be bonded with PAHs because of its high surface area, large pores, accessible coordinative unsaturated sites (π-complexation), and π-π stacking action. This ZIF-based magnetic solid-phase extraction (SPE), coupled with gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS), was further evaluated for analysis of PAHs from rainwater and air samples of particulate matter less than 2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5). The main effective parameters, including ionic strength, solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent and desorption time, were investigated, respectively. Under optimized conditions, the developed method based on Fe3O4@PDA/ZIF-7 gave detection limits of 0.71-5.79ng/L, and quantification limits of 2.50-19.2ng/L for PAHs, respectively. The relative standard deviations for intra-day and inter-day analyses were in the range of 3.1-9.1% and 6.1-12.7%, respectively. The PAHs founded in PM2.5 were in the range of 0.40-6.79ng/m(3). Good recoveries (>82%) with low relative standard deviations

  2. Bisphenol A in Solid Waste Materials, Leachate Water, and Air Particles from Norwegian Waste-Handling Facilities: Presence and Partitioning Behavior.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Arp, Hans Peter H; Hale, Sarah E

    2015-07-07

    The plastic additive bisphenol A (BPA) is commonly found in landfill leachate at levels exceeding acute toxicity benchmarks. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling BPA emissions from waste and waste-handling facilities, a comprehensive field and laboratory campaign was conducted to quantify BPA in solid waste materials (glass, combustibles, vehicle fluff, waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), plastics, fly ash, bottom ash, and digestate), leachate water, and atmospheric dust from Norwegian sorting, incineration, and landfill facilities. Solid waste concentrations varied from below 0.002 mg/kg (fly ash) to 188 ± 125 mg/kg (plastics). A novel passive sampling method was developed to, for the first time, establish a set of waste-water partition coefficients, KD,waste, for BPA, and to quantify differences between total and freely dissolved concentrations in waste-facility leachate. Log-normalized KD,waste (L/kg) values were similar for all solid waste materials (from 2.4 to 3.1), excluding glass and metals, indicating BPA is readily leachable. Leachate concentrations were similar for landfills and WEEE/vehicle sorting facilities (from 0.7 to 200 μg/L) and dominated by the freely dissolved fraction, not bound to (plastic) colloids (agreeing with measured KD,waste values). Dust concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 50.7 mg/kgdust. Incineration appears to be an effective way to reduce BPA concentrations in solid waste, dust, and leachate.

  3. Air sampling with solid phase microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Perry Anthony

    There is an increasing need for simple yet accurate air sampling methods. The acceptance of new air sampling methods requires compatibility with conventional chromatographic equipment, and the new methods have to be environmentally friendly, simple to use, yet with equal, or better, detection limits, accuracy and precision than standard methods. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) satisfies the conditions for new air sampling methods. Analyte detection limits, accuracy and precision of analysis with SPME are typically better than with any conventional air sampling methods. Yet, air sampling with SPME requires no pumps, solvents, is re-usable, extremely simple to use, is completely compatible with current chromatographic equipment, and requires a small capital investment. The first SPME fiber coating used in this study was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a hydrophobic liquid film, to sample a large range of airborne hydrocarbons such as benzene and octane. Quantification without an external calibration procedure is possible with this coating. Well understood are the physical and chemical properties of this coating, which are quite similar to those of the siloxane stationary phase used in capillary columns. The log of analyte distribution coefficients for PDMS are linearly related to chromatographic retention indices and to the inverse of temperature. Therefore, the actual chromatogram from the analysis of the PDMS air sampler will yield the calibration parameters which are used to quantify unknown airborne analyte concentrations (ppb v to ppm v range). The second fiber coating used in this study was PDMS/divinyl benzene (PDMS/DVB) onto which o-(2,3,4,5,6- pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was adsorbed for the on-fiber derivatization of gaseous formaldehyde (ppb v range), with and without external calibration. The oxime formed from the reaction can be detected with conventional gas chromatographic detectors. Typical grab sampling times were as small as 5 seconds

  4. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  6. Dynamics of a solid sphere bouncing on or penetrating through a liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Jung, Sunghwan; Lee, Sungyon

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the dynamics of a solid particle moving from liquid to air through a liquid-air interface. The experimental setup consists of an air-piston system that shoots a solid particle into water towards the free surface from below. Experimental results indicate that the particle either penetrates or bounces back depending on the particle size, impact speed, and surface tension. In particular, the particle needs to overcome the resistive interfacial forces in order to penetrate through the liquid-air interface. This transition from bouncing to penetration regimes is captured theoretically by conducting a simple force balance and is further compared with experiments.

  7. Temperature-dependent interfacial properties of hydrophobically end-modified poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)s assemblies at the air/water interface and on solid substrates.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rodolphe; Park, Jin-Young; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Winnik, Françoise M

    2009-12-15

    We describe herein the properties at the air/water (A/W) interface of hydrophobically end-modified (HM) poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline)s (PiPrOx) bearing an n-octadecyl chain on both termini (telechelic HM-PiPrOx) or on one chain end (semitelechelic HM-PiPrOx) for different subphase temperatures and spreading solvents using the Langmuir film balance technique. The polymer interfacial properties revealed by the pi-A isotherms depend markedly on the architecture and molecular weight of the polymer. On cold water subphases (14 degrees C), diffusion of PiPrOx chains onto water takes place for all polymers in the intermediate compressibility region (5mNm(-1)). At higher subphase temperatures (36 and 48 degrees C), the HM-PiPrOx film exhibited remarkable stability with time. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) imaging of the A/W interface showed that the polymer assembly was not uniform and that large domains formed, either isolated grains or pearl necklaces, depending on the polymer structure, the concentration of the spreading solution and the subphase temperature. The Langmuir films were transferred onto hydrophilic substrates (silica) by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique and onto hydrophobic substrates (gold) by Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) film deposition, resulting in the formation of adsorbed particles ranging in size from 200 to 500nm, depending on the polymer architecture and the substrate temperature. The particles presented "Janus"-like hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics.

  8. Tailoring a compact and stable Langmuir bi-dimensional PbX-based layered perovskite film at the air-water interface and on solid support.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Carmona, Luisa; García-Espejo, Gonzalo; Martín-Romero, María T; Camacho, Luis

    2017-03-14

    The present work studies the stability of Langmuir organic-inorganic superlattice materials thin films consisting of layered perovskite-based films with controlled 2D framework as well as to design experimental conditions for increasing the efficiency of the organic-inorganic perovskite motif by mechanical stimulus. Therefore, a whole covering of the air/water interface by a compact and stable lead-based layered perovskite structure is pursued. A 2D layered perovskite-type hybrid structure of the form [(CH3(CH2)19NH3)2(PbX4)], X=Cl, and Br, in which, two-dimensional sheets stabilized by a inner bilayer of organic monoammonium cation matrix, is mechanically tailored by successive compression-expansion cycles. The formation of 2D molecular patterns has been characterized by ΔR, BAM, XRD and XPS.

  9. Model input and output files for the simulation of time of arrival of landfill leachate at the water table, Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, Peter F.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains listings of model input and output files for the simulation of the time of arrival of landfill leachate at the water table from the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF), about 10 miles northeast of downtown El Paso, Texas. This simulation was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-developed Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and Multimedia Exposure Assessment (MULTIMED) computer models were used to simulate the production of leachate by a landfill and transport of landfill leachate to the water table. Model input data files used with and output files generated by the HELP and MULTIMED models are provided in ASCII format on a 3.5-inch 1.44-megabyte IBM-PC compatible floppy disk.

  10. Supercritical water oxidation - Microgravity solids separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killilea, William R.; Hong, Glenn T.; Swallow, Kathleen C.; Thomason, Terry B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) waste treatment and water recycling technology to the problem of waste disposal in-long term manned space missions. As inorganic constituents present in the waste are not soluble in supercritical water, they must be removed from the organic-free supercritical fluid reactor effluent. Supercritical water reactor/solids separator designs capable of removing precipitated solids from the process' supercritical fluid in zero- and low- gravity environments are developed and evaluated. Preliminary experiments are then conducted to test the concepts. Feed materials for the experiments are urine, feces, and wipes with the addition of reverse osmosis brine, the rejected portion of processed hygiene water. The solid properties and their influence on the design of several oxidation-reactor/solids-separator configurations under study are presented.

  11. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility Manufacturing Building, Southeast corner of Schwartz Road and Contractors Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. Hydrologic implications of solid-water disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, William Joseph

    1970-01-01

    Site selection for disposal of solid wastes must be based on adequate water-resources information if pollutional potential is to be minimized. This will require regional as well as localized data on the water resources of the area. Only through such an approach can adequate protection be afforded to the environment in general and the water resources in particular.

  13. Water and stability of pharmaceutical solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2007-03-01

    Solid pharmaceuticals are multi-component systems consisting of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and inactive ingredients (excipients). Excipients may include inorganic salts (e.g., NaCl), carbohydrates (e.g., lactose), and polymers, to name a few, whereas APIs range from relatively simple molecules (e.g., aspirin) to proteins and olygonucleotides. Pharmaceutical solids could exist either as single-phase or heterophase systems. They also may have different extent of order, such as highly ordered crystalline phases, amorphous solids that are thermodynamically unstable but might be kinetically stable under the time frame of observation, and crystalline mesophases including liquid crystals. With all this diversity, there are common features for such systems, and two of them will be discussed in the presentation. (i) Requirements for chemical stability of pharmaceuticals are very strict. A very limited (e.g., less than 0.1%) extent of conversion is allowed in these materials over the shelf life, i.e., during several years of storage at ambient and (sometimes) not fully controlled (e.g., a medicine cabinet in one's bathroom) conditions. (ii) All pharmaceutical solids contain some water, although its amount and physical state are highly variable and may change during manufacturing and shelf life. There are many challenging questions and issues associated with the ``Water and stability of pharmaceutical solids'' subject; some of them will be considered in the presentation: (i) What are the features of chemical reactivity of crystalline vs disordered systems? (ii) What is the role of water in solid state chemical reactivity of amorphous solids, e.g., water as plasticizer vs reactant vs reaction media? (iii) How homogeneous are pharmaceutical amorphous solid solutions, e.g., carbohydrate-water systems? (iv) What is the optimal water content? With water being the most common destabilizing factor, is ``the drier - the better'' always the case?

  14. Water-solids interactions: deliquescence.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Lisa J; Taylor, Lynne S

    2010-01-01

    Deliquescence is a first order phase transition from solid to solution that occurs at a relative humidity (RH) that is characteristic to the solid ingredient. In blends containing more than one component with deliquescent behavior, the RH of the solid-solution transition will be lowered, leading to some level of dissolution at relatively low RH conditions. Dissolution arising as a result of deliquescence will impact the chemical and physical stability of complex food systems. Because chemical reactions occur much more readily in solution, deliquescence will enhance the degradation of labile food ingredients. RH fluctuations will lead to cycles of deliquescence and efflorescence (crystallization), which will contribute to particle agglomeration and caking. This review addresses the phenomenon of deliquescence, the significance of deliquescence to the food industry, measurement techniques, the kinetics and thermodynamics of deliquescence, the behavior of mixtures of deliquescent salts (including phase diagrams and thermodynamics of binary systems), and consequences of deliquescence on chemical and physical stability of powdered food and nutritional ingredient blends.

  15. Lyophilization for Water Recovery From Solid Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Litwiller, Eric; Reinhard, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This abstract describes the development of a solid waste treatment system designed for a near term human exploration mission. The technology being developed is an energy- efficient lyophilization technique that recovers water from spacecraft solid waste. In the lyophilization process water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, resulting in the separation of the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. This technology is ideally suited to applications where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO, is not. Water contained within solid wastes accounts for approximately 3% of the total water balance. If 100% closure of the water loop is desired the water contained within this waste would need to be recovered. To facilitate operation in microgravity thermoelectric heat pumps have be used in place of traditional fluid cycle heat pumps. A mathematical model of a thermoelectric lyophilizer has been developed and used to generate energy use and processing rate parameters. The results of laboratory investigations and discussions with ALS program management have been used to iteratively arrive at a prototype design. This design address operational limitations which were identified in the laboratory studies and handling and health concerns raised by ALS program management. The current prototype design is capable of integration into the ISS Waste Collection System.

  16. Air-stable n-type colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Ning, Zhijun; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Pan, Jun; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adinolfi, Valerio; Xu, Jixian; Li, Min; Kirmani, Ahmad R; Sun, Jon-Paul; Minor, James; Kemp, Kyle W; Dong, Haopeng; Rollny, Lisa; Labelle, André; Carey, Graham; Sutherland, Brandon; Hill, Ian; Amassian, Aram; Liu, Huan; Tang, Jiang; Bakr, Osman M; Sargent, Edward H

    2014-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer promise in flexible electronics, light sensing and energy conversion. These applications rely on rectifying junctions that require the creation of high-quality CQD solids that are controllably n-type (electron-rich) or p-type (hole-rich). Unfortunately, n-type semiconductors made using soft matter are notoriously prone to oxidation within minutes of air exposure. Here we report high-performance, air-stable n-type CQD solids. Using density functional theory we identify inorganic passivants that bind strongly to the CQD surface and repel oxidative attack. A materials processing strategy that wards off strong protic attack by polar solvents enabled the synthesis of an air-stable n-type PbS CQD solid. This material was used to build an air-processed inverted quantum junction device, which shows the highest current density from any CQD solar cell and a solar power conversion efficiency as high as 8%. We also feature the n-type CQD solid in the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of atmospheric NO2. This work paves the way for new families of electronic devices that leverage air-stable quantum-tuned materials.

  17. Anomalous Transmission of Infrasound Through Air-Water and Air-Ground Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, O. A.

    2009-05-01

    Speed of compressional waves in air is smaller than in water and in the ground, while mass density of air is much smaller than mass densities of water and the ground. This results in a very strong acoustic impedance contrast at air-water and air-ground interfaces. Sound transmission through a boundary with a strong impedance contrast is normally very weak. This paper reports theoretical studies of the power output of localized sound sources and acoustic power fluxes through plane gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces in a layered medium. It is found that the transparency of the interfaces increases dramatically at low frequencies. For low-frequency sound, a phenomenon of anomalous transparency can occur where most of the acoustic power generated by a source in water is radiated into the atmosphere. Contrary to the conventional wisdom based on ray-theoretical predictions and observations at higher frequencies, infrasonic energy from localized waterborne sources can be effectively transmitted into air. The main physical mechanism responsible for the anomalous transparency of air-water interface is found to be an acoustic power transfer by inhomogeneous (evanescent) waves in the plane-wave decomposition of the acoustic field in water. The effects of ocean and atmosphere stratification and of guided sound propagation in water or in air on the anomalous transparency of the air-water interface are considered. In the case of air-ground interface, the increase of the acoustic power flux into atmosphere, when a compact source approaches the interface from below, proves to be even larger than for an underwater source. The physics behind the increase of the power flux into the atmosphere, when the source depth decreases, is shown to be rather different for the air-ground and air-water interfaces. Depending on attenuation of compressional and shear waves in the ground, a leaky interface wave supported by the air-ground interface can be responsible for the bulk of acoustic power

  18. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  19. Water gun vs air gun: A comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Detrick, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    The water gun is a relatively new marine seismic sound source that produces an acoustic signal by an implosive rather than explosive mechanism. A comparison of the source characteristics of two different-sized water guns with those of conventional air guns shows the the water gun signature is cleaner and much shorter than that of a comparable-sized air gun: about 60-100 milliseconds (ms) for an 80-in3. (1.31-liter (I)) water gun compared with several hundred ms for an 80-in3. (1.31-1) air gun. The source spectra of water guns are richer in high frequencies (>200 Hz) than are those of air guns, but they also have less energy than those of air guns at low frequencies. A comparison between water gun and air gun reflection profiles in both shallow (Long Island Sound)-and deep (western Bermuda Rise)-water settings suggests that the water gun offers a good compromise between very high resolution, limited penetration systems (e.g. 3.5-kHz profilers and sparkers) and the large volume air guns and tuned air gun arrays generally used where significant penetration is required. ?? 1984 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  20. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  1. Oxygen separation from air using zirconia solid electrolyte membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Marner, W. J.; Schroeder, J. E.; Losey, R. W.; Ferrall, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Air separation using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane is a possible alternative source of oxygen. The process of zirconia oxygen separation is reviewed, and an oxygen plant concept using such separation is described. Potential cell designs, stack designs, and testing procedures are examined. Fabrication of the materials used in a zirconia module as well as distribution plate design and fabrication are examined.

  2. The existence of longitudinal vortices in the flow of air above an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, J.; Saylor, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    Many researchers have observed the formation of longitudinal vortices in boundary layers developing over heated solid surfaces. In the present work, such vortices were observed in an air boundary layer developing over a heated water surface. The existence of these vortices was documented via infrared imaging of the water surface, which showed a consistent pattern of hot and cold streaks, coinciding with the vortex position. These vortices were also visualized through smoke injected into the air-side flow. The onset position Xc and lateral vortex spacing λ were investigated for a range of wind speeds (0.1 - 1 m/s) and air/water temperature differences (26 - 42 ^oC). Plots of Xc/λ versus the Reynolds number exhibit power-law behavior similar to that of prior work on boundary layers over heated solid surfaces. However, plots of Xc/λ versus the Grashof number show significant differences from the power-law behavior observed for heated solid plates. A theory explaining the similarity and difference between the present results and those for heated solid plates is discussed which is based on differences in the thermal boundary conditions.

  3. A Li-O₂/air battery using an inorganic solid-state air cathode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Ding; Song, Ming; Cai, Shengrong; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yungui

    2014-07-23

    The "(-) lithium (Li) anode|organic anolyte + inorganic catholyte|solid-state cathode (+)" Li-O2/air battery based on an inorganic solid-state air cathode was fabricated with a simple method. The electrochemical performance and reaction products of the Li-O2/air batteries under pure O2 and ambient air were investigated, respectively. The inorganic Li-ion conductive solid-state electrolyte Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 was stable during cycling and avoided the decomposition and volatilization problems that conventional organic electrolytes faced. Moreover, the porous air cathode provided a sufficient gas-phase O2-transport channel, facilitating the achievement of a high capacity of 14192 or 7869 mA h g(-1) under pure O2 or ambient air, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the Li-O2/air battery using an inorganic porous air cathode has a great potential for practical application.

  4. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  5. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  6. Clean Air Markets - Monitoring Surface Water Chemistry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about how EPA uses Long Term Monitoring (LTM) and Temporily Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) to track the effect of the Clean Air Act Amendments on acidity of surface waters in the eastern U.S.

  7. Field air permeability and hydraulic conductivity of landfilled municipal solid waste in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huayong; Chen, Tan; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2012-05-15

    The successful design and operation of in situ treatment systems using air and water additions for sustainable landfilling are constrained by a lack of knowledge of the key parameters, such as field air permeability and hydraulic conductivity of landfilled municipal solid waste (MSW). This work provides data on the field air permeability k(a) and hydraulic conductivity K(w) of MSW obtained by conducting short-term air and water injection tests at a landfill in Beijing, China. The k(a) and K(w) values are found to in the range of 1.2 × 10(-13)-1.9 × 10(-12) m(2) and 5.9 × 10(-7)-7.2 × 10(-6) m s(-1), respectively. Both k(a) and K(w) decreased significantly with landfill depth due to the increase in overburden pressure and the finer particles of the waste in deeper layers, leading to a lower porosity of waste. The higher moisture saturation in the deeper layers also contributed to the decrease in k(a). To compare the permeability with respect to air and water, the water permeability k(w) was calculated based on the estimated K(w) and was found to be approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding k(a) for waste at the same layer. The differences in k(w) and k(a) may be due to the relative air permeability, the potential short-circuiting of air and active production of biogas, which undermine the relationship between k(w) and k(a). Therefore, to successfully design and operate air and water addition systems in a landfill, in situ measurements of the air permeability and hydraulic conductivity are essential.

  8. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  9. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  10. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  11. Solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Dennis M.; Chiu, Ing Lap

    2006-04-18

    Formation of solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents. Solutions of detoxifying reagent for chemical and biological agents are coated using small quantities of hydrophobic nanoparticles by vigorous agitation or by aerosolization of the solution in the presence of the hydrophobic nanoparticles to form a solid powder. For example, when hydrophobic fumed silica particles are shaken in the presence of IN oxone solution in approximately a 95:5-weight ratio, a dry powder results. The hydrophobic silica forms a porous coating of insoluble fine particles around the solution. Since the chemical or biological agent tends to be hydrophobic on contact with the weakly encapsulated detoxifying solution, the porous coating breaks down and the detoxifying reagent is delivered directly to the chemical or biological agent for maximum concentration at the point of need. The solid-water (coated) detoxifying solutions can be blown into contaminated ventilation ducting or other difficult to reach sites for detoxification of pools of chemical or biological agent. Once the agent has been detoxified, it can be removed by flushing the area with air or other techniques.

  12. Air emissions at a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Capenter, J.E.; Bidwell, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    The on-site and off-site ambient air concentrations of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC) and hydrogen sulfide were evaluated at a regional municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. A target list was developed to reflect those compounds typically found at MSW landfills that have potential health effects or odors. The on-site effects on ambient air were estimated conservatively by collecting air samples 10 to 13 cm above the landfill surface. The off-site impacts were predicted using air dispersion modeling that considered both fugitive and point source emissions and were based on landfill gas sampled from an active well collection system. The on-site and off-site ambient air concentrations were compared to levels set by regulatory requirements (Connecticut`s Hazard Limiting Values or HLVs) and odor threshold levels. No compound exceeded the HLVs either on- or off-site. No compounds detected on-site exceeded their odor thresholds. Several compounds evaluated at one-half their detection limit did exceed the odor threshold on-site. Only hydrogen sulfide exceeded its odor threshold off-site but remained below Connecticut`s Odor Limit Value.

  13. Applying the Clean Air Act to municipal solid waste landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, D.R.; Romzick, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    On March 12, 1996, the EPA promulgated the new Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Landfills, the first federal air regulation specifically for MSW landfills. Landfills subject to this regulation which exceeded the threshold design capacity also became subject to the Title V operating permit program. This began the application of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to most of these nontraditional air sources. Unlike landfills, typical air sources have easily defined input capacities that correspond to potential emissions while the process creates a product or output. All these concepts are difficult and confusing to apply to MSW landfills. Applicability of the following CAA regulations are specifically addressed in this paper: NSPS for MSW landfills; new Source Review (NSR)/Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD); landfill Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT); 112(g) Modification of Major Sources of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(r) Accidental Release Prevention; and Title V. Along with summarizing the potential applicability of each, the main issues are presented along with the current information on the regulations.

  14. Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone and simulated time of arrival of landfill leachate at the water table, municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frenzel, Peter F.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) is located about 10 miles northeast of downtown El Paso, Texas. The landfill is built on the Hueco Bolson, a deposit that yields water to five public-supply wells within 1.1 miles of the landfill boundary on all sides. The bolson deposits consist of lenses and mixtures of sand, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. The unsaturated zone at the landfill is about 300 feet thick. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and the Multimedia Exposure Assessment Model for Evaluating the Land Disposal of Wastes (MULTIMED) computer models were used to simulate the time of first arrival of landfill leachate at the water table. Site-specific data were collected for model input. At five sites on the landfill cover, hydraulic conductivity was measured by an in situ method; in addition, laboratory values were obtained for porosity, moisture content at field capacity, and moisture content at wilting point. Twenty-seven sediment samples were collected from two adjacent boreholes drilled near the southwest corner of the landfill. Of these, 23 samples were assumed to represent the unsaturated zone beneath the landfill. The core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for various characteristics required for the HELP and MULTIMED models: initial moisture content, dry bulk density, porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention percentages at various suction values, total organic carbon, and pH. Parameters were calculated for the van Genuchten and Brooks-Corey equations that relate hydraulic conductivity to saturation. A reported recharge value of 0.008 inch per year was estimated on the basis of soil- water chloride concentration. The HELP model was implemented using input values that were based mostly on site-specific data or assumed in a conservative manner. Exceptions were the default values used for waste characteristics. Flow through the landfill was

  15. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Arnold, P.A.; Ball, D.G.; Cook, E.G.

    1995-09-05

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method are disclosed for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air. 9 figs.

  16. Air and water cooled modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Arnold, Phillip A.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    1995-01-01

    A compact high power magnetic compression apparatus and method for delivering high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output which does not require the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids such as chlorofluorocarbons either as a dielectric or as a coolant, and which discharges very little waste heat into the surrounding air. A first magnetic switch has cooling channels formed therethrough to facilitate the removal of excess heat. The first magnetic switch is mounted on a printed circuit board. A pulse transformer comprised of a plurality of discrete electrically insulated and magnetically coupled units is also mounted on said printed board and is electrically coupled to the first magnetic switch. The pulse transformer also has cooling means attached thereto for removing heat from the pulse transformer. A second magnetic switch also having cooling means for removing excess heat is electrically coupled to the pulse transformer. Thus, the present invention is able to provide high voltage pulses of short duration at a high repetition rate and high peak power output without the use of environmentally unacceptable fluids and without discharging significant waste heat into the surrounding air.

  17. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface.

  18. Combined air and water pollution control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, Billy C. (Inventor); Jarrell, Lamont (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A bioaquatic air pollution control system for controlling both water and atmospheric pollution is disclosed. The pollution control system includes an exhaust for directing polluted gases out of a furnace and a fluid circulating system which circulates fluid, such as waste water, from a source, past the furnace where the fluid flow entrains the pollutants from the furnace. The combined fluid and pollutants are then directed through a rock/plant/microbial filtering system. A suction pump pumps the treated waste water from the filter system past the exhaust to again entrain more pollutants from the furnace where they are combined with the fluid (waste water) and directed to the filter system.

  19. Air-Water Gas Transfer in Coastal Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    water currents and turbulence, air and water temperatures , visible and infrared (IR) radiative fluxes, the visco-elastic properties of surface films, and...turbulence at the ocean interface. Measuring the spatiotemporal temperature distribution on top of the aqueous mass boundary layer, heat patterns can be...interface is obtained through quantitative analysis of infrared image sequences of the water surface temperature . Our main focus during the last year

  20. Integration of air and water quality issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environmental sustainability of dairy farms is dependent upon a number of air and water quality issues. Atmospheric emissions include hazardous compounds such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide along with greenhouse gases and their implications with global climate change. Runoff of sediment, phosph...

  1. Effect of air on water capillary flow in silica nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens; Oyarzua, Elton

    2013-11-01

    Capillarity is a classical topic in fluid dynamics. The fundamental relationship between capillarity and surface tension is solidly established. Nevertheless, capillarity is an active research area especially as the miniaturization of devices is reaching the molecular scale. Currently, with the fabrication of microsystems integrated by nanochannels, a thorough understanding of the transport of fluids in nanoconfinement is required for a successful operation of the functional parts of such devices. In this work, Molecular Dynamics simulations are conducted to study the spontaneous imbibition of water in sub 10 nm silica channels. The capillary filling speed is computed in channels subjected to different air pressures. In order to describe the interactions between the species, an effective force field is developed, which is calibrated by reproducing the water contact angle. The results show that the capillary filling speed qualitatively follows the classical Washburn model, however, quantitatively it is lower than expected. Furthermore, it is observed that the deviations increase as air pressure is higher. We attribute the deviations to amounts of air trapped at the silica-water interface which leads to changes in the dynamics contact angle of the water meniscus.

  2. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-09-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 {mm} square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3. Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ }) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  3. The heat capacity of water near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučelić, V.; Vučelić, D.

    1983-11-01

    Anomalous heat capacities of water at solid/water interfaces have been obtained. The solids vary from inorganic (zeolites, porous class, silica gel, activated carbon) to biological (protein lysozyme and adrenal gland). Water heat capacities at all interfaces exhibit the same pattern. At room temperature the small values are close to ice and increase with temperature, reaching the value of free water between 380 and 440 K.

  4. Polydopamine Films from the Forgotten Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Florian; Payamyar, Payam; Schneider, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bour, Jérôme; Addiego, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie-Pierre; Hemmerle, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2014-10-02

    The formation of polydopamine under mild oxidation conditions from dopamine solutions with mechanical agitation leads to the formation of films that can functionalize all kinds of materials. In the absence of stirring of the solution, we report the formation of polydopamine films at the air/water interface (PDA A/W) and suggest that it arises from an homogeneous nucleation process. These films grow two times faster than in solution and can be deposited on hydrophilic or hydrophobic substrates by the Langmuir-Schaeffer technique. Thanks to this new method, porous and hydrophobic materials like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes can be completely covered with a 35 nm thick PDA A/W film after only 3h of reaction. Finally the oxidation of a monomer followed by a polymerization in water is not exclusive to polydopamine since we also transferred polyaniline functional films from the air/water interface to solid substrates. These findings suggest that self-assembly from a solution containing hydrophilic monomers undergoing a chemical transformation (here oxidation and oligomerization) could be a general method to produce films at the liquid/air interface.

  5. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  6. 14 CFR § 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean air and water. § 1260.34 Section Â... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  7. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  8. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clean Air and Water... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents or actions, the following clause is included by reference in such documents or actions: Clean Air...

  9. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clean Air and Water... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents or actions, the following clause is included by reference in such documents or actions: Clean Air...

  10. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award exceeds $100,000, or a...

  11. Decision Analysis Methodology to Evaluate Integrated Solid Waste Management Alternatives for a Remote Alaskan Air Station

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Eareckson Air Station (AS), a remote U.S. Air Force installation, faces the complex decision of selecting a new municipal solid waste (MSW...strategy. The model results suggest that the Eareckson AS MSW strategy should be a Class II municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) along with a

  12. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2015-03-15

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  13. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  14. Photodetoxification and purification of water and air

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.; Blake, D.M.

    1996-09-01

    The scope of interest in this section is basic research in photochemistry that can remove barriers to the development of photochemical technologies for the removal of hazardous chemicals from contaminated air or water (photodetoxification). Photochemistry is be broadly interpreted to include direct photochemistry, indirect photochemistry (sensitized and photocatalytic), photochemistry of species adsorbed on inert surfaces, and complementary effects of high energy radiation photons and particles. These may occur in either homogeneous or heterogeneous media. The photon source may span the range from ionizing radiation to the near infrared.

  15. NBC detection in air and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.; Smith, Steven J.; McMurtry, Gary M.

    2003-01-01

    Participating in a Navy STTR project to develop a system capable of the 'real-time' detection and quanitification of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) warfare agents, and of related industrial chemicals including NBC agent synthesis by-products in water and in air immediately above the water's surface. This project uses JPL's Soft Ionization Membrane (SIM) technology which totally ionizes molecules without fragmentation (a process that can markedly improve the sensitivity and specificity of molecule compostition identification), and JPL's Rotating Field Mass Spectrometer (RFMS) technology which has large enough dynamic mass range to enable detection of nuclear materials as well as biological and chemical agents. This Navy project integrates these JPL Environmental Monitoring UnitS (REMUS) an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). It is anticipated that the REMUS AUV will be capable of 'real-time' detection and quantification of NBC warefare agents.

  16. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric stimulator. (a) Identification. An air or water caloric stimulator is a device that delivers a stream of air...) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  17. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34... Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award... (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1319(c)), and is...

  18. A second-order Godunov method for wave problems in coupled solid-water-gas systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    1999-05-20

    Wave problems in solid-water-gas systems with distinct phase interfaces are commonly encountered in practice, such as in water entry of a recovered body, reservoir-dam interaction during earthquakes, and spallation of steel plates caused by blast waves. Here, the authors present a second-order Godunov method for computing unsteady, one-dimensional wave problems with a fracture and cavitation in coupled solid-water-gas systems. The method employs a hydro-elasto-plastic body, the Tait equation, and the ideal gas law for solid, water, and gaseous phases, respectively, and models both fractures and cavities as vacuum zones with distinct borders. The numerical approach utilizes a Lagrangian formulation in conjunction with local solid-water-gas-vacuum Riemann problems, which have unique solutions and can be solved efficiently. The various phases are treated in a unified manner and no supplementary interface conditions are necessary for tracking material boundaries. Calculations are carried out for Riemann problems, wave propagation and reflection in a water-rock-air system, and spallation and cavitation in an explosion-steel-water-gas system. It is shown that the Godunov method has high resolution for shocks and phase interfaces, clearly resolves elastic and plastic waves, and successfully describes onset and propagation of fracture and cavitation zones.

  19. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  20. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  1. Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell integral air accumular containment

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Basel, Richard A.

    2004-02-10

    A fuel cell generator apparatus contains at least one fuel cell subassembly module in a module housing, where the housing is surrounded by a pressure vessel such that there is an air accumulator space, where the apparatus is associated with an air compressor of a turbine/generator/air compressor system, where pressurized air from the compressor passes into the space and occupies the space and then flows to the fuel cells in the subassembly module, where the air accumulation space provides an accumulator to control any unreacted fuel gas that might flow from the module.

  2. Probing Hydrophilic Interface of Solid/Liquid-Water by Nanoultrasonics

    PubMed Central

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Szu-Chi; Huang, Yu-Ru; -Ju Chen, I.; Chen, Yun-Wen; Gusev, Vitalyi; Chen, Miin-Jang; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the numerous devoted studies, water at solid interfaces remains puzzling. An ongoing debate concerns the nature of interfacial water at a hydrophilic surface, whether it is more solid-like, ice-like, or liquid-like. To answer this question, a complete picture of the distribution of the water molecule structure and molecular interactions has to be obtained in a non-invasive way and on an ultrafast time scale. We developed a new experimental technique that extends the classical acoustic technique to the molecular level. Using nanoacoustic waves with a femtosecond pulsewidth and an ångström resolution to noninvasively diagnose the hydration structure distribution at ambient solid/water interface, we performed a complete mapping of the viscoelastic properties and of the density in the whole interfacial water region at hydrophilic surfaces. Our results suggest that water in the interfacial region possesses mixed properties and that the different pictures obtained up to now can be unified. Moreover, we discuss the effect of the interfacial water structure on the abnormal thermal transport properties of solid/liquid interfaces. PMID:25176017

  3. Determination of total dissolved solids in water analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, C.S.

    1933-01-01

    The figure for total dissolved solids, based on the weight of the residue on evaporation after heating for 1 hour at 180??C., is reasonably close to the sum of the determined constituents for most natural waters. Waters of the carbonate type that are high in magnesium may give residues that weigh less than the sum. Natural waters of the sulfate type usually give residues that are too high on account of incomplete drying.

  4. Methylglyoxal at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wren, S. N.; Gordon, B. P.; McWilliams, L.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that aqueous-phase processing of atmospheric α-dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG) could constitute an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The uptake of MG to aqueous particles is higher than expected due to the fact that its carbonyl moieties can hydrate to form diols, as well as the fact that MG can undergo aldol condensation reactions to form larger oligomers in solution. MG is known to be surface active but an improved description of its surface behaviour is crucial to understanding MG-SOA formation, in addition to understanding its gas-to-particle partitioning and cloud forming potential. Here, we employ a combined experimental and theoretical approach involving vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFS), surface tensiometry, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory calculations to study MG's surface adsorption, in both the presence and absence of salts. We are particularly interested in determining MG's hydration state at the surface. Our experimental results indicate that MG slowly adsorbs to the air-water interface and strongly perturbs the water structure there. This perturbation is enhanced in the presence of NaCl. Together our experimental and theoretical results suggest that singly-hydrated MG is the dominant form of MG at the surface.

  5. Impact of poor solid waste management on ground water.

    PubMed

    Vasanthi, P; Kaliappan, S; Srinivasaraghavan, R

    2008-08-01

    The leachate produced by waste disposal sites contains a large amount of substances which are likely to contaminate ground water. The impact of such sites upon ground water can be judged by monitoring the concentration of potential contaminants at a number of specific monitoring points. In this study, the quality of ground water around a municipal solid waste disposal site in Chennai was investigated. Chemical analyses were carried out on water samples collected at various radial distances from the boundary of the dumping yard, at intervals of 3 months and for a period of 3 years. The study has revealed that the ground water quality does not conform to the drinking water quality standards as per Bureau of Indian Standards. The effects of dumping activity on ground water appeared most clearly as high concentrations of total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, total hardness, chlorides, chemical oxygen demand, nitrates and sulphates. Leachate collected from the site showed presence of heavy metals. The contaminant concentrations tend to decrease, during the post monsoon season and increase, during the pre monsoon season in most of the samples. The study clearly indicates that landfills in densely populated cities should have the ground water monitored on regular basis. Furthermore, ground water in and around the landfill sites shall not be used for drinking purposes unless it meets specific standards. Indiscriminate dumping of wastes in developed areas without proper solid waste management practices should be stopped.

  6. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  7. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1800 Air or water caloric... or water to the ear canal at controlled rates of flow and temperature and that is intended...

  8. Ground-water conditions at Beale Air Force Base and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Ground-water conditions were studied in a 168-square-mile area between the Sierra Nevada and the Feather River in Yuba County, Calif. The area is in the eastern part of the Sacramento Valley and includes most of Beale Air Force Base. Source, occurrence, movement, and chemical quality of the ground water were evaluated. Ground water occurs in sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The base of the freshwater is in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Oligocene and Eocene age, that contain water of high dissolved-solids concentration. The ground water occurs under unconfined and partly confined conditions. At Beale Air Force Base it is at times partly confined. Recharge is principally from the rivers. Pumpage in the study area was estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet in 1975. In the 1960's, water levels in most parts of the study area declined less rapidly than in earlier years or became fairly stable. In the 1970's, water levels at Beale Air Force Base declined only slightly. Spacing of wells on the base and rates of pumping are such that excessive pumping interference is avoided. Water quality at the base and throughout the study area is generally good. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 700 to 900 milligrams per liter in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks beneath the base well field. (USGS)

  9. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer; Marron, Lisa C.; Salton, Jonathan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  10. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  11. Nonlinear air-coupled emission: The signature to reveal and image microdamage in solid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, Igor; Busse, Gerd

    2007-12-17

    It is shown that low-frequency elastic vibrations of near-surface planar defects cause high-frequency ultrasonic radiation in surrounding air. The frequency conversion mechanism is concerned with contact nonlinearity of the defect vibrations and provides efficient generation of air-coupled higher-order ultraharmonics, ultrasubharmonics, and combination frequencies. The nonlinear air-coupled ultrasonic emission is applied for location and high-resolution imaging of damage-induced defects in a variety of solid materials.

  12. The Effect of Solid Admixtures on the Velocity of Motion of a Free Dusty Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. P.

    1957-01-01

    In dusty air flows occurring in industrial practice in transport by air pressure of friable materials, in the drying, annealing, and so forth, of a pulverized solid mass in suspension, and in other processes, the concentration of solid particles usually has a magnitude of the order of 1 kg per 1 kg of air. At such a concentration, the ratio of the volume of the particles to the volume of the air is small (less than one-thousandth part). However, regardless of this, the presence of a solid admixture manifests itself in the rules for the velocity distribution of the air in a dusty air flow. As a result, the rules of velocity change are different for clean and for dusty air flows. The estimation of the influence of the admixture on the velocity of the motion of the flow presents a definitive interest. One of the attempts to estimate that influence on the axial velocity of a free axially symmetrical jet with admixtures was made by Abramovich. Abramovich assumed beforehand that the fine particles of the admixture in the jet are subject to the motion of the air (that is, that the velocity of the admixture is approximately equal to the local velocity of the air); he then took as the basis of his considerations, in solving the problem, the condition that the amount of motion of the two-phase jet must be constant.

  13. Thermodynamic and transport properties of air/water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    Subroutine WETAIR calculates properties at nearly 1,500 K and 4,500 atmospheres. Necessary inputs are assigned values of combinations of density, pressure, temperature, and entropy. Interpolation of property tables obtains dry air and water (steam) properties, and simple mixing laws calculate properties of air/water mixture. WETAIR is used to test gas turbine engines and components operating in relatively humid air. Program is written in SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  14. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  15. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  16. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  17. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  18. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  19. Recycling of air pollution control residues from municipal solid waste incineration into lightweight aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Bordado, João M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2014-02-01

    This work focuses on the assessment of technological properties and on the leaching behavior of lightweight aggregates (LWA) produced by incorporating different quantities of air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. Currently this hazardous waste has been mostly landfilled after stabilization/solidification. The LWA were produced by pelletizing natural clay, APC residues as-received from incineration plant, or after a washing treatment, a small amount of oil and water. The pellets were fired in a laboratory chamber furnace over calcium carbonate. The main technological properties of the LWA were evaluated, mainly concerning morphology, bulk and particle densities, compressive strength, bloating index, water adsorption and porosity. Given that APC residues do not own expansive (bloating) properties, the incorporation into LWA is only possible in moderate quantities, such as 3% as received or 5% after pre-washing treatment. The leaching behavior of heavy metals from sintered LWA using water or acid solutions was investigated, and despite the low acid neutralization capacity of the synthetic aggregates, the released quantities were low over a wide pH range. In conclusion, after a washing pre-treatment and if the percentage of incorporation is low, these residues may be incorporated into LWA. However, the recycling of APC residues from MSW incineration into LWA does not revealed any technical advantage.

  20. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of a Water Soluble Drug, Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Shah, M.; Agrawal, Y. K.; Garala, K.; Ramkishan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand and investigate the relationship between experimental factors and their responses in the preparation of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride based solid lipid nanoparticles. A quadratic relationship was studied by developing central composite rotatable design. Amount of lipid and drug, stirring speed and stirring time were selected as experimental factors while particle size, zeta potential and drug entrapment were used as responses. Prior to the experimental design, a qualitative prescreening study was performed to check the effect of various solid lipids and their combinations. Results showed that changing the amount of lipid, stirring speed and stirring time had a noticeable influence on the entrapment efficiencies and particle size of the prepared solid lipid nanoparticles. The particle size of a solid lipid nanoparticle was in the range of 159-246 nm and drug encapsulation efficiencies were marginally improved by choosing a binary mixture of physically incompatible solid lipids. Release of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride from solid lipid nanoparticle was considerably slow, and it shows Higuchi matrix model as the best fitted model. Study of solid lipid nanoparticle suggested that the lipid based carrier system could potentially be exploited as a delivery system with improved drug entrapment efficiency and controlled drug release for water soluble actives. PMID:23716872

  1. 9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Water Purification System and Instrument Air Receiver Tank, view to the south. The water purification system is visible in the right foreground of the photograph and the instrument air receiver tank is visible in the right background of the photograph. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, North Bank of Clark Fork River at Cabinet Gorge, Cabinet, Bonner County, ID

  2. Optimizing the air flotation water treatment process. Final report, May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, B.

    1998-09-01

    The injection water for the Nelson Project is a combination of produced and make-up water, typical of many Eastern Kansas operations. The make-up water is a low-salinity salt water from the Arbuckle Formation and contains dissolved minerals and sulfides. The produced water contains suspended oil, suspended clay and silt particles, along with a combination of other dissolved minerals. The combination of the two waters causes several undesirable reactions. The suspended solids load contained in the combined waters would plug a 75-micron plant bag filter within one day. Wellhead filters of 75-micron size were also being used on the injection wells. The poor water quality resulted in severe loss of injectivity and frequent wellbore cleaning of the injection wells. Various mechanical and graded-bed filtration methods were considered for cleaning the water. These methods were rejected due to the lack of field equipment and service availability. A number of vendors did not even respond to the author`s request. The air flotation process was selected as offering the best hope for a long-term solution. The objective of this work is to: increase the cost effectiveness of the process through optimizing process design factors and operational parameters. A vastly modified air flotation system is the principal tool for accomplishing the project objective. The air flotation unit, as received from manufacturer Separation Specialist, was primarily designed to remove oil from produced water. The additional requirement for solids removal necessitated major physical changes in the unit. Problems encountered with the air flotation unit and specific modifications are detailed in the body of the report.

  3. Characterization of air pollution control residues produced in a municipal solid waste incinerator in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Santos, Regina C; Bordado, João C; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    This study is mainly related with the physical and chemical characterization of a solid waste, produced in a municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process, which is usually referred as air pollution control (APC) residue. The moisture content, loss on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, density, porosity, specific surface area and morphology were the physical properties addressed here. At the chemical level, total elemental content (TC), total availability (TA) and the leaching behaviour with compliance tests were determined, as well as the acid neutralization capacity (ANC). The main mineralogical crystalline phases were identified, and the thermal behaviour of the APC residues is also shown. The experimental work involves several techniques such as laser diffraction spectrometry, mercury porosimetry, helium pycnometry, gas adsorption, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), ion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA). The results point out that the APC residues do not comply with regulations in force at the developed countries, and therefore the waste should be considered hazardous. Among the considered heavy metals, lead, zinc and chromium were identified as the most problematic ones, and their total elemental quantities are similar for several samples collected in an industrial plant at different times. Moreover, the high amount of soluble salts (NaCl, KCl, calcium compounds) may constitute a major problem and should be taken into account for all management strategies. The solubility in water is very high (more than 24% for a solid/liquid ratio of 10) and thus the possible utilizations of this residue are very limited, creating difficulties also in the ordinary treatments, such as in solidification/stabilization with binders.

  4. Decision Support Model to Select the Optimal Municipal Solid Waste Management Strategy at United States Air Force Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The United States Air Force has recently defined three objectives in developing strategies regarding the management of municipal solid waste at the...insight concerning the selection and implementation of a municipal solid waste management policy.

  5. Decision Support Model to Select the Optimal Municipal Solid Waste Management Policy at United States Air Force Installations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-03

    The United States Air Force has recently defined three objectives in developing strategies regarding the management of municipal solid waste at the...insight concerning the selection and implementation of a municipal solid waste management policy.

  6. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  7. Solid polymer battery electrolyte and reactive metal-water battery

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K.; Peterson, Eric S.; Stewart, Frederick F.

    2000-01-01

    In one implementation, a reactive metal-water battery includes an anode comprising a metal in atomic or alloy form selected from the group consisting of periodic table Group 1A metals, periodic table Group 2A metals and mixtures thereof. The battery includes a cathode comprising water. Such also includes a solid polymer electrolyte comprising a polyphosphazene comprising ligands bonded with a phosphazene polymer backbone. The ligands comprise an aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion and a metal ion carrier portion. The metal ion carrier portion is bonded at one location with the polymer backbone and at another location with the aromatic ring containing hydrophobic portion. The invention also contemplates such solid polymer electrolytes use in reactive metal/water batteries, and in any other battery.

  8. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  9. Solid Lubrication by Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Air and in Vacuum for Space and Aeronautics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Andraws, Rodney; Jacques, David; VanderWal, Randy L.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate recently developed aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and dispersed MWNTs for solid lubrication applications, unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with 440 C stainless steel balls and hemispherical alumina-yttria stabilized zirconia pins in sliding contact with the MWNTs deposited on quartz disks in air and in vacuum. The results indicate that MWNTs have superior solid lubrication friction properties and endurance lives in air and vacuum under dry conditions. The coefficient of friction of the dispersed MWNTs is close to 0.05 and 0.009 in air and in vacuum, respectively, showing good dry lubricating ability. The wear life of MWNTs exceeds 1 million passes in both air and vacuum showing good durability. In general, the low coefficient of friction can be attributed to the combination of the transferred, agglomerated patches of MWNTs on the counterpart ball or pin surfaces and the presence of tubular MWNTs at interfaces.

  10. Ferry Engine Repower to Provide Benefits for Air and Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Diesel Emission Reduction Act grant to the Delaware River and Bay Authority is bringing new clean air technology to the Cape May-Lewes Ferry, thereby reducing air pollution emissions and contributing to cleaner water in the Chesapeake Bay.

  11. The configuration of water on rough natural surfaces: Implications for understanding air-water interfacial area, film thickness, and imaging resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibbey, Tohren C. G.

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media have often distinguished between interfacial area corresponding to water held by capillary forces between grains and area corresponding to water associated with solid surfaces. The focus of this work was on developing a better understanding of the nature of interfacial area associated with solid surfaces following drainage of porous media. Stereoscopic scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface elevation maps for eight different surfaces of varying roughness. An algorithm was developed to calculate the true configuration of an air-water interface in contact with the solid surface as a function of capillary pressure. The algorithm was used to calculate surface-associated water configurations for capillary pressures ranging from 10 to 100 cm water. The results of the work show that, following drainage, the configuration of surface-associated water is dominated by bridging of macroscopic surface roughness features over the range of capillary pressures studied, and nearly all of the surface-associated water is capillary held. As such, the thicknesses of surface-associated water were found to be orders-of-magnitude greater than might be expected at the same capillary pressures based on calculations of adsorbed film thickness. The fact that capillary forces in air-water interfaces dominate surface-associated water configuration means that interface shapes are largely unaffected by microscopic surface roughness, and interfaces are considerably smoother than the underlying solid. As such, calculations suggest that microscopic surface roughness likely has minimal impact on the accuracy of surface-associated air-water interfacial areas determined by limited-resolution imaging methods such as computed microtomography.

  12. An investigation of channel flow with a smooth air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madad, Reza; Elsnab, John; Chin, Cheng; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation are used to investigate fully developed laminar and turbulent channel flow with an air-water interface as the lower boundary condition. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are made over a range of Reynolds number based upon channel height and bulk velocity from 1100 to 4300, which encompasses the laminar, transitional and low Reynolds numbers turbulent regimes. The results show that the airflow statistics near the stationary wall are not significantly altered by the air-water moving interface and reflect those found in channel flows. The mean statistics on the water interface side largely exhibit results similar to simulated Poiseuille-Couette flow (PCF) with a solid moving wall. For second-order statistics, however, the simulation and experimental results show some discrepancies near the moving water surface, suggesting that a full two-phase simulation is required. A momentum and energy transport tubes analysis is investigated for laminar and turbulent PCFs. This analysis builds upon the classical notion of a streamtube and indicates that part of the energy from the pressure gradient is transported towards the stationary wall and is dissipated as heat inside the energy tubes, while the remainder is transmitted to the moving wall. For the experiments, the airflow energy is transmitted towards the water to overcome the drag force and drive the water forward; therefore, the amount of energy transferred to the water is higher than the energy transferred to a solid moving wall.

  13. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. Glazkova, Elena A. Svarovskaya, Natalia V. Bakina, Olga V. Kazantsev, Sergey O. Lerner, Marat I.

    2015-10-27

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation.

  14. Breadboard Solid Amine Water Desorbed CO2 Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Hultman, M. M.

    1980-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 removal system was developed for potential use on the shuttle as an alternate to the baseline lithium hydroxide (LiOH) system. It uses a solid amine material to adsorb CO2 from the atmosphere. The material is regenerated by heating it with steam from a zero gravity water evaporator. A full sized, thermally representative breadboard canister and a preprototype water evaporator were built and tested to shuttle requirements for CO2 control. The test program was utilized to evaluate and verify the operation and performance of these two primary components of the SAWD system.

  15. Air mediated dynamics of droplet impact on a smooth, solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John; Mahadevan, L.; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2014-11-01

    Before a falling drop can contact a solid surface, it must displace the air beneath it. Recent calculations and experiments show that as the drop approaches the surface, the air fails to drain, and instead compresses. As the air compresses, the pressure in the gas layer deforms the surface of the drop, thus inhibiting liquid-solid contact. Ultimately, the liquid droplet skates over a nanometer-thin film of air at a strikingly high velocity. These dynamics take place at fleeting timescales and diminutive length-scales, and are obscured by the bulk of the drop, making experimental observation difficult. We directly image the dynamics of the liquid-air interface, and use a novel form of TIR microscopy to study the dynamics and stability of the thin film of air beneath the drop. We show that the stability of the air film governs a novel transition in droplet impact events. NSF GRFP, ISF Grant Number 1415/12 and Harvard MRSEC (DMR-0820484).

  16. Health and Household Air Pollution from Solid Fuel Use: The Needfor Improved Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Nearly half the world’s population relies on solid fuel combustion to meet basic household energy needs (e.g., cooking and heating). Resulting air pollution exposures are estimated to cause 3% of the global burden of disease. Large variability and a lack of resource...

  17. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most expos...

  18. Air-water gas exchange of toxaphene in Lake Superior.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F

    2003-06-01

    Parallel air and water samples were collected in Lake Superior during August 1996 and May 1997, to determine the levels and air-water exchange direction of toxaphene. Concentration of toxaphene in water did not vary across Lake Superior or between seasons (averaging 918 +/- 218 pg/L) but atmospheric levels were lower in May (12 +/- 4.6 pg/m3) than in August (28 +/- 10 pg/m3). Two recalcitrant congeners, Parlar 26 and 50, also were determined. These congeners were enriched in the air samples, compared to a standard of technical toxaphene, but not in the water. Water-air fugacity ratios varied from 1.4 to 2.6 in August and 1.3 to 4.7 in May, implying volatilization of toxaphene from the lake. Estimated net fluxes ranged from 5.4 to 13 and 1.8 to 6.4 nm/m2d, respectively. The temperature dependence of toxaphene partial pressure (P) in air was log P/Pa = -3.291/T(a) + 1.67, where T(a) is air temperature. By using this relationship, the atmospheric levels of toxaphene, fugacity ratios, and net fluxes were estimated for the entire year. Fugacity ratios were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer; thus toxaphene was predicted to undergo net volatilization from the lake during all months. A net removal of approximately 220 kg/year by gas exchange was estimated.

  19. Self-assembly of a surfactin nanolayer at solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Nasser, M S; Al-Lagtah, Nasir M A

    2016-05-01

    Surfactin, a sustainable and environmentally friendly surface active agent, is used as a model to study the adsorption of biosurfactants at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces as well as the air-liquid interface. Surfactin adsorption was monitored as a function of time and concentration using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique in the case of the solid-liquid interfaces or the drop shape analysis (DSA) technique in the case of the air-liquid interface. The results obtained in this study showed that surfactin adsorption at the "hard" hydrophobic (functionalized with octadecanethiol) solid-liquid and the "soft" air-liquid interface were 1.12 ± 0.01 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 157 ± 2 Å(2)) and 1.11 ± 0.05 mg m(-2) (area per molecule of 159 ± 7 Å(2)), respectively, demonstrating the negligible effect of the interface "hardness" on surfactin adsorption. The adsorption of surfactin at the hydrophilic (functionalized with β-mercaptoethanol) solid-liquid interface was about threefold lower than its adsorption at the hydrophobic-liquid interfaces, revealing the importance of hydrophobic interaction in surfactin adsorption process. The affinity constant of surfactin for the investigated interfaces follows the following order: air > octadecanethiol > β-mercaptoethanol. Biosurfactants, such as surfactin, are expected to replace the conventional fossil-based surfactants in several applications, and therefore the current study is a contribution towards the fundamental understanding of biosurfactant behavior, on a molecular level, at hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid-liquid interfaces in addition to the air-liquid interface. Such understanding might aid further optimization of the utilization of surfactin in a number of industrial applications such as enhanced oil recovery, bioremediation, and detergency.

  20. Minimizing the water and air impacts of unconventional energy extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy generates income and, done well, can reduce air pollution compared to other fossil fuels and even water use compared to fossil fuels and nuclear energy. Alternatively, it could slow the adoption of renewables and, done poorly, release toxic chemicals into water and air. Based on research to date, some primary threats to water resources come from surface spills, wastewater disposal, and drinking-water contamination through poor well integrity. For air resources, an increase in volatile organic compounds and air toxics locally is a potential health threat, but the switch from coal to natural gas for electricity generation will reduce sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, and particulate pollution regionally. Critical needs for future research include data for 1) estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) of unconventional hydrocarbons; 2) the potential for further reductions of water requirements and chemical toxicity; 3) whether unconventional resource development alters the frequency of well-integrity failures; 4) potential contamination of surface and ground waters from drilling and spills; and 5) the consequences of greenhouse gases and air pollution on ecosystems and human health.

  1. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  4. Air-to-water heat pumps for the home

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters may be on the rise again. Retrofitters have shied away from this form of water heating due to concerns about cost, moise, efficiency, and maintaenance. Recent advances have overcome some of these problems and are helping the technology find a niche in both hot and cold climates. The topics covered in this article include the following: how heat pump water heaters work; air source from where to where, including air conditioning, heat recovery ventilation, hybrid systems; nuisances; maintenance; costs; to install or not to install; performance: a trick to quantify. 2 figs.

  5. Cold water aquifer storage. [air conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, D. L.; Davison, R. R.; Harris, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    A working prototype system is described in which water is pumped from an aquifer at 70 F in the winter time, chilled to a temperature of less than 50 F, injected into a ground-water aquifer, stored for a period of several months, pumped back to the surface in the summer time. A total of 8.1 million gallons of chilled water at an average temperature of 48 F were injected. This was followed by a storage period of 100 days. The recovery cycle was completed a year later with a total of 8.1 million gallons recovered. Approximately 20 percent of the chill energy was recovered.

  6. SUB-PPB QUANTITATION AND CONFIRMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATERS CONTAINING HIGH TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a drinking water contaminant originating from the dissolution of the salts of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium in water. It is used primarily as an oxidant in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag infla...

  7. Application of amine-tethered solid sorbents for direct CO2 capture from the ambient air.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunho; Drese, Jeffrey H; Eisenberger, Peter M; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-15

    While current carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies for large point sources can help address the impact of CO(2) buildup on global climate change, these technologies can at best slow the rate of increase of the atmospheric CO(2) concentration. In contrast, the direct CO(2) capture from ambient air offers the potential to be a truly carbon negative technology. We propose here that amine-based solid adsorbents have significant promise as key components of a hypothetical air capture process. Specifically, the CO(2) capture characteristics of hyperbranched aminosilica (HAS) materials are evaluated here using CO(2) mixtures that simulate ambient atmospheric concentrations (400 ppm CO(2) = "air capture") as well as more traditional conditions simulating flue gas (10% CO(2)). The air capture experiments demonstrate that the adsorption capacity of HAS adsorbents are only marginally influenced even with a significant dilution of the CO(2) concentration by a factor of 250, while capturing CO(2) reversibly without significant degradation of performance in multicyclic operation. These results suggest that solid amine-based air capture processes have the potential to be an effective approach to extracting CO(2) from the ambient air.

  8. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  9. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  10. Water treatment: Air stripping. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of air stripping techniques for wastewater, groundwater, and soil decontamination. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. The cleanup of organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 212 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Water treatment: Air stripping. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of air stripping techniques for wastewater, groundwater, and soil decontamination. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. The cleanup of organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 225 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Spontaneous Formation of Water Droplets at Oil-Solid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongqiang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2010-01-01

    We report observations of spontaneous formation of micrometer-sized water droplets within micrometer-thick films of a range of different oils (isotropic and nematic 4-cyano-4’-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), and silicone, olive and corn oil) that are supported on glass substrates treated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and immersed under water. Confocal imaging was used to determine that the water droplets nucleate and grow at the interface between the oils and OTS-treated glass with a contact angle of ~130°. A simple thermodynamic model based on macroscopic interfacial energetic arguments consistent with the contact angle of 130°, however, fails to account for the spontaneous formation of the water droplets. ζ-potential measurements performed with OTS-treated glass (− 59.0 ± 16.4 mV) and hydrophobic monolayers formed on gold films (2.0 ± 0.7 mV), when combined with the observed absence of droplet formation under films of oil supported on the latter surfaces, suggest that the charge of the oil-solid interface promotes partitioning of water to the interfacial region. The hydrophobic nature of the OTS-treated glass promotes dewetting of water accumulated in the interfacial region into droplets (a thin film of water is seen to form on bare glass). The inhibitory effect on droplet formation of both salt (NaCl) and sucrose (0.1mM to 500mM) added to the aqueous phase was similar, indicating that both solutes lower the chemical potential of the bulk water (osmotic effect) sufficiently to prevent partitioning of the water to the interface between the oil and supporting substrates. These results suggest that charged, hydrophobic surfaces can provide routes to spontaneous formation of surface-supported, water-in-oil emulsions. PMID:20712383

  13. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  14. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  15. Platform for monitoring water and solid fluxes in mountainous rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Guillaume; Esteves, Michel; Aubert, Coralie; Belleudy, Philippe; Coulaud, Catherine; Bois, Jérôme; Geay, Thomas; Gratiot, Nicolas; Legout, Cédric; Mercier, Bernard; Némery, Julien; Michielin, Yoann

    2016-04-01

    The project aims to develop a platform that electronically integrates a set of existing sensors for the continuous measurement at high temporal frequency of water and solid fluxes (bed load and suspension), characteristics of suspended solids (distribution in particle size, settling velocity of the particles) and other variables on water quality (color, nutrient concentration). The project is preferentially intended for rivers in mountainous catchments draining areas from 10 to 1000 km², with high suspended sediment concentrations (maxima between 10 and 300 g/l) and highly dynamic behavior, water discharge varying of several orders of magnitude in a short period of time (a few hours). The measurement of water and solid fluxes in this type of river remains a challenge and, to date, there is no built-in device on the market to continuously monitor all these variables. The development of this platform is based on a long experience of measurement of sediment fluxes in rivers within the French Critical Zone Observatories (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/), especially in the Draix-Bléone (http://oredraixbleone.irstea.fr/) and OHMCV (http://www.ohmcv.fr/) observatories. The choice was made to integrate in the platform instruments already available on the market and currently used by the scientific community (water level radar, surface velocity radar, turbidity sensor, automatic water sampler, video camera) and to include also newly developed instruments (System for the Characterization of Aggregates and Flocs - see EGU2016-8542 - and hydrophone) or commercial instruments (spectrophotometer and radiometer) to be tested in surface water with high suspended sediment concentration. Priority is given to non-intrusive instruments due to their robustness in this type of environment with high destructive potential. Development work includes the construction of a platform prototype "smart" and remotely configurable for implantation in an isolated environment (absence of electric

  16. Microencapsulation using an oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'.

    PubMed

    Carter, Benjamin O; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Wang, Weixing; Spiller, David G; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2011-08-07

    We describe the first example of a tri-phasic oil-in-water-in-air 'dry water emulsion'. The method combines highly stable oil-in-water emulsions prepared using branched copolymer surfactants, with aqueous droplet encapsulation using 'dry water' technology.

  17. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  18. Protein quantity on the air-solid interface determines degradation rates of human growth hormone in lyophilized samples.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yemin; Grobelny, Pawel; Von Allmen, Alexander; Knudson, Korben; Pikal, Michael; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2014-05-01

    Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was lyophilized with various glass-forming stabilizers, employing cycles that incorporated various freezing and annealing procedures to manipulate glass formation kinetics, associated relaxation processes, and glass-specific surface areas (SSAs). The secondary structure in the cake was monitored by infrared and in reconstituted samples by circular dichroism. The rhGH concentrations on the surface of lyophilized powders were determined from electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Glass transition temperature (Tg ), SSAs, and water contents were determined immediately after lyophilization. Lyophilized samples were incubated at 323 K for 16 weeks, and the resulting extents of rhGH aggregation, oxidation, and deamidation were determined after rehydration. Water contents and Tg were independent of lyophilization process parameters. Compared with samples lyophilized after rapid freezing, rhGH in samples that had been annealed in frozen solids prior to drying, or annealed in glassy solids after secondary drying retained more native-like protein secondary structure, had a smaller fraction of the protein on the surface of the cake, and exhibited lower levels of degradation during incubation. A simple kinetic model suggested that the differences in the extent of rhGH degradation during storage in the dried state between different formulations and processing methods could largely be ascribed to the associated levels of rhGH at the solid-air interface after lyophilization.

  19. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  20. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zones—(1) For fighter aircraft. An area approximately 30 miles... Officer, 2d Bombardment Wing, Hunter Air Force Base, Savannah, Georgia, and such agencies as he may...; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S....

  1. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zones—(1) For fighter aircraft. An area approximately 30 miles... Officer, 2d Bombardment Wing, Hunter Air Force Base, Savannah, Georgia, and such agencies as he may...; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S....

  2. 33 CFR 334.490 - Atlantic Ocean off Georgia Coast; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., U.S. Air Force. (a) The danger zones—(1) For fighter aircraft. An area approximately 30 miles... Officer, 2d Bombardment Wing, Hunter Air Force Base, Savannah, Georgia, and such agencies as he may...; air-to-air and air-to-water gunnery and bombing ranges for fighter and bombardment aircraft, U.S....

  3. Femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves in water generated at an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Strycker, B D; Springer, M M; Traverso, A J; Kolomenskii, A A; Kattawar, G W; Sokolov, A V

    2013-10-07

    We report generation of femtosecond-laser-induced shockwaves at an air-water interface by millijoule femtosecond laser pulses. We document and discuss the main processes accompanying this phenomenon, including light emission, development of the ablation plume in the air, formation of an ablation cavity, and, subsequently, a bubble developing in water. We also discuss the possibility of remotely controlling the characteristics of laser-induced sound waves in water through linear acoustic superposition of sound waves that results from millijoule femtosecond laser-pulse interaction with an air-water interface, thus opening up the possibility of remote acoustic applications in oceanic and riverine environments.

  4. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  5. Water Resources Investigations at Edwards Air Force Base since 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneed, Michelle; Nishikawa, Tracy; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California (fig. 1) has relied on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. The extraction of ground water has led to two major problems that can directly affect the mission of EAFB: declining water levels (more than 120 ft since the 1920s) and land subsidence, a gradual downward movement of the land surface (more than 4 ft since the late 1920s). As water levels decline, this valuable resource becomes depleted, thus requiring mitigating measures. Land subsidence has caused cracked (fissured) runways and accelerated erosion on Rogers lakebed. In 1988, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began investigations of the effects of declining water levels and land subsidence at EAFB and possible mitigation measures, such as the injection of imported surface water into the ground-water system. The cooperative investigations included data collection and analyses, numerical simulations of ground-water flow and land subsidence, and development of a preliminary simulation-optimization model. The results of these investigations indicate that the injection of imported water may help to control land subsidence; however, the potential ground-water-quality impacts are unknown.

  6. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  7. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Doshi, Vinod B.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Hager, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  8. Spatially resolved air-water emissions tradeoffs improve regulatory impact analyses for electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Sun, Xiaodi; Behrer, A Patrick; Azevedo, Inês L; Mauter, Meagan S

    2017-02-21

    Coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) generate air, water, and solids emissions that impose substantial human health, environmental, and climate change (HEC) damages. This work demonstrates the importance of accounting for cross-media emissions tradeoffs, plant and regional emissions factors, and spatially variation in the marginal damages of air emissions when performing regulatory impact analyses for electric power generation. As a case study, we assess the benefits and costs of treating wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater at US CFPPs using the two best available treatment technology options specified in the 2015 Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELGs). We perform a life-cycle inventory of electricity and chemical inputs to FGD wastewater treatment processes and quantify the marginal HEC damages of associated air emissions. We combine these spatially resolved damage estimates with Environmental Protection Agency estimates of water quality benefits, fuel-switching benefits, and regulatory compliance costs. We estimate that the ELGs will impose average net costs of $3.01 per cubic meter for chemical precipitation and biological wastewater treatment and $11.26 per cubic meter for zero-liquid discharge wastewater treatment (expected cost-benefit ratios of 1.8 and 1.7, respectively), with damages concentrated in regions containing a high fraction of coal generation or a large chemical manufacturing industry. Findings of net cost for FGD wastewater treatment are robust to uncertainty in auxiliary power source, location of chemical manufacturing, and binding air emissions limits in noncompliant regions, among other variables. Future regulatory design will minimize compliance costs and HEC tradeoffs by regulating air, water, and solids emissions simultaneously and performing regulatory assessments that account for spatial variation in emissions impacts.

  9. Solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs using solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao T-D; Tran, Phuong H-L; Khanh, Tran N; Van, Toi V; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2013-08-01

    Many new drugs have been discovered in pharmaceutical industry and exposed their surprised potential therapeutic effects. Unfortunately, these drugs possess low absorption and bioavailability since their solubility limitation in water. Solid dispersion (SD) is the current technique gaining so many attractions from scientists due to its effect on improving solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs. A number of patents including the most recent inventions have been undertaken in this review to address various respects of this strategy in solubilization of poorly watersoluble drugs including type of carriers, preparation methods and view of technologies used to detect SD properties and mechanisms with the aim to accomplish a SD not only effective on enhanced bioavailability but also overcome difficulties associated with stability and production. Future prospects are as well discussed with an only hope that many developments and researches in this field will be successfully reached and contributed to commercial use for treatment as much as possible.

  10. Improving the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drug by solid dispersion and solid solution: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Rina J; Zia, Hossein; Sandhu, Harpreet K; Shah, Navnit H; Malick, Waseem A

    2007-01-01

    The solid dispersions with poloxamer 188 (P188) and solid solutions with polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVPK30) were evaluated and compared in an effort to improve aqueous solubility and bioavailability of a model hydrophobic drug. All preparations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, intrinsic dissolution rates, and contact angle measurements. Accelerated stability studies also were conducted to determine the effects of aging on the stability of various formulations. The selected solid dispersion and solid solution formulations were further evaluated in beagle dogs for in vivo testing. Solid dispersions were characterized to show that the drug retains its crystallinity and forms a two-phase system. Solid solutions were characterized to be an amorphous monophasic system with transition of crystalline drug to amorphous state. The evaluation of the intrinsic dissolution rates of various preparations indicated that the solid solutions have higher initial dissolution rates compared with solid dispersions. However, after storage at accelerated conditions, the dissolution rates of solid solutions were lower due to partial reversion to crystalline form. The drug in solid dispersion showed better bioavailability in comparison to solid solution. Therefore, considering physical stability and in vivo study results, the solid dispersion was the most suitable choice to improve dissolution rates and hence the bioavailability of the poorly water soluble drug.

  11. Evolution of Nanoflowers and Nanospheres of Zinc Bisporphyrinate Tweezers at the Air/water Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Zhuo, Congcong; Hu, Chuanjiang; Liu, Ming Hua

    2017-03-22

    While the sophisticated Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett technique facilitates the fabrication of uniform ultrathin monolayer and films, it is also revealed as a powerful tool for the bottom-up constructions of the nanostructures through the air/water interface. In this paper, unique nanoflowers or nanospheres were constructed based on the synthesized m-phthalic diamide-linked Zinc bis-porphyrinate tweezers using the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. It was found that both the two tweezer type Zinc bisporphyrinates could form stable two-dimensional spreading films at the air/water interface, which could be subsequently transferred onto solid substrates by the vertical lifting method. The atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that at the initial spreading stage the compound formed flat disk-like domains and then hierarchically evolved into nanoflowers or nanospheres upon compressing the floating film. Such nanostructures have not been reported before and cannot be fabricated using the other self-assembly methods.

  12. Advanced Systems for Air and Water Quality Monitoring in Long Duration Human Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    2005-03-01

    Any space mission involving extended astronaut travel time must have an accompanying system for monitoring the quality of the onboard air and water. These systems must not only meet the detection criteria for undesirable species, at the detection limits set by NASA and the National Academy of Sciences. They must also meet generic requirements such as having low mass, volume, and power; requiring minimal astronaut assistance, and having minimal need for consumables. We will briefly review the criteria for acceptable air and water contamination levels. We will then review the monitoring methods presently in use, and those being developed. These methods include, for example, GCMS, ion mobility spectrometry, the ``electronic nose,'' infrared absorption, and solid phase extraction with colorimetry.

  13. Band structures of two dimensional solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Tian, X. G.; Chen, C. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The hierarchical phononic crystals to be considered show a two-order “hierarchical” feature, which consists of square array arranged macroscopic periodic unit cells with each unit cell itself including four sub-units. Propagation of acoustic wave in such two dimensional solid/air phononic crystals is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) with the Bloch theory. Their band structure, wave filtering property, and the physical mechanism responsible for the broadened band gap are explored. The corresponding ordinary phononic crystal without hierarchical feature is used for comparison. Obtained results show that the solid/air hierarchical phononic crystals possess tunable outstanding band gap features, which are favorable for applications such as sound insulation and vibration attenuation.

  14. Effect of Particulate Contaminants on the Development of Biofilms at Air/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-03-22

    The development of biofilms at air/water or oil/water interfaces has important ramifications on several applications, but it has received less attention than biofilm formation on solid surfaces. A key difference between the growth of biofilms on solid surfaces versus liquid interfaces is the range of complicated boundary conditions the liquid interface can create that may affect bacteria, as they adsorb onto and grow on the interface. This situation is exacerbated by the existence of complex interfaces in which interfacially adsorbed components can even more greatly affect interfacial boundary conditions. In this work, we present evidence as to how particle-laden interfaces impact biofilm growth at an air/water interface. We find that particles can enhance the rate of growth and final strength of biofilms at liquid interfaces by providing sites of increased adhesive strength for bacteria. The increased adhesion stems from creating localized areas of hydrophobicity that protrude in the water phase and provide sites where bacteria preferentially adhere. This mechanism is found to be primarily controlled by particle composition, with particle size providing a secondary effect. This increased adhesion through interfacial conditions creates biofilms with properties similar to those observed when adhesion is increased through biological means. Because of the generally understood ubiquity of increased bacteria attachment to hydrophobic surfaces, this result has general applicability to pellicle formation for many pellicle-forming bacteria.

  15. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  16. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  17. An Optimization Approach to Analyzing the Effect of Supply Water and Air Temperatures in Planning an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Ito, Koichi

    In planning an air conditioning system, supply water and air temperatures are important factors from the viewpoint of cost reduction. For example, lower temperature supply water and air reduce the coefficient of performance of a refrigeration machine, and increase the thickness of heat insulation material. However, they enable larger temperature differences, and reduce equipment sizes and power demand. The purposes of this paper are to propose an optimal planning method for a cold air distribution system, and to analyze the effect of supply water and air temperatures on the long-term economics through a numerical study for an office building. As a result, it is shown that the proposed method effectively determines supply water and air temperatures for a cold air distribution system, and that the influence of supply air temperature is larger than that of supply water temperature on the long-term economics.

  18. Correlation of air temperature above water-air sections with the forecasted low level clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, N. Sh.; Malikov, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    As a case study approach the development of low clouds forecasting methods in correlation with air temperature transformational variations on the sections "water-air" is surveyed. It was evident, that transformational variations of air temperature mainly depend on peculiarities and value of advective variations of temperature. DT is the differences of initial temperature on section water-air in started area, from contrast temperature of water surface along a trajectory of movement of air masses and from the temperature above water surface in a final point of a trajectory. Main values of transformational variations of air temperature at advection of a cold masses is 0.530C•h, and at advection of warm masses is -0.370C•h. There was dimensionless quantity K determined and implemented into practice which was characterized with difference of water temperature in forecasting point and air temperature in an initial point in the ratio of dew-points deficiency at the forecasting area. It follows, that the appropriate increasing or decreasing of K under conditions of cold and warm air masses advection, contributes decreasing of low clouds level. References: Abramovich K.G.: Conditions of development and forecasting of low level clouds. vol. #78, 124 pp., Hydrometcenter USSR 1973. Abramovich K.G.: Variations of low clouds level // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 5, 30-41, Moscow, 1968. Budiko M.I.: Empirical assessment of climatic changes toward the end of XX century // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. #12, 5-13, Moscow, 1999. Buykov M.V.: Computational modeling of daily evolutions of boundary layer of atmosphere at the presence of clouds and fog // Meteorology and Hydrology, vol. # 4, 35-44, Moscow, 1981. Huseynov N.Sh. Transformational variations of air temperature above Caspian Sea / Proceedings of Conference On Climate And Protection of Environment, 118-120, Baku, 1999. Huseynov N.Sh.: Consideration of advective and transformational variations of air temperature in

  19. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

  20. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  1. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  2. Indirect measurement of water content in an aseptic solid substrate cultivation pilot-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Peña Y Lillo, M; Pérez-Correa, R; Agosin, E; Latrille, E

    2001-01-01

    A lack of models and sensors for describing and monitoring large-scale solid substrate cultivation (SSC) bioreactors has hampered industrial development and application of this type of process. This study presents an indirect dynamic measurement model for a 200-kg-capacity fixed-bed SSC bioreactor under periodic agitation. Growth of the filamentous fungus Gibberella fujikuroi on wheat bran was used as a case study. Real data were preprocessed using previously reported methodology. The model uses CO2 production rate and inlet air conditions to estimate average bed water content and average bed temperature. The model adequately reproduces the evolution of the average bed water content and can therefore be used as an on-line estimator in pilot-scale SSC bioreactors. To obtain a reasonable fit of the bed temperature, however, inlet air humidity measurements will have to be adjusted with a data reconciliation algorithm. Good estimation of temperature is important for the future design of improved water content estimation using state observers. The model also provides insight into understanding the complex behavior of the dynamic system, which could prove useful when establishing advanced model-based operational and control strategies.

  3. External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

  4. Earth, Air, Fire and Water in Our Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lievesley, Tara

    2007-01-01

    The idea that everything is made of the four "elements", earth, air, fire and water, goes back to the ancient Greeks. In this article, the author talks about the origins of ideas about the elements. The author provides an account that attempts to summarise thousands of years of theoretical development of the elements in a thousand words or so.

  5. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  6. Water and Air Measures That Make 'PureSense'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Each day, we read about mounting global concerns regarding the ability to sustain supplies of clean water and to reduce air contamination. With water and air serving as life s most vital elements, it is important to know when these environmental necessities may be contaminated, in order to eliminate exposure immediately. The ability to respond requires an understanding of the conditions impacting safety and quality, from source to tap for water, and from outdoor to indoor environments for air. Unfortunately, the "time-to-know" is not immediate with many current technologies, which is a major problem, given the greater likelihood of risky situations in today s world. Accelerating alert and response times requires new tools, methods, and technologies. New solutions are needed to engage in more rapid detection, analysis, and response. This is the focus of a company called PureSense Environmental, Inc., which evolved out of a unique relationship with NASA. The need for real-time management and operations over the quality of water and air, and the urgency to provide new solutions, were reinforced by the events of September 11, 2001. This, and subsequent events, exposed many of the vulnerabilities facing the multiple agencies tasked with working in tandem to protect communities from harmful disaster. Much has been done since September 11 to accelerate responses to environmental contamination. Partnerships were forged across the public and private sectors to explore, test, and use new tools. Methods and technologies were adopted to move more astutely from proof-of-concept to working solutions.

  7. MONITORING CYCLICAL AIR-WATER ELEMENTAL MERCURY EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experimental work has demonstrated that elemental mercury evasion from natural water displays a diel cycle; evasion rates during the day can be two to three times evasion rates observed at night. A study with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) found that diurnal PCB air/wa...

  8. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. 21 CFR 874.1800 - Air or water caloric stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... vestibular function testing of a patient's body balance system. The vestibular stimulation of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Air or water caloric stimulator. 874.1800 Section 874.1800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given rise... which gave rise to said conviction. If no such statement is submitted, submission of an offer... facilities which have given rise to a conviction under section 113(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act or section...

  11. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given rise... which gave rise to said conviction. If no such statement is submitted, submission of an offer... facilities which have given rise to a conviction under section 113(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act or section...

  12. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, Saskia

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  13. Water, air, Earth and cosmic radiation.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc

  14. Water, Air, Earth and Cosmic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    In the context of the origin of life, rocks are considered mainly for catalysis and adsorption-desorption processes. Here it is shown how some rocks evolve in energy and might induce synthesis of molecules of biological interest. Radioactive rocks are a source of thermal energy and water radiolysis producing molecular hydrogen, H2. Mafic and ultramafic rocks evolve in water and dissolved carbon dioxide releasing thermal energy and H2. Peridotites and basalts contain ferromagnesian minerals which transform through exothermic reactions with the generation of heat. These reactions might be triggered by any heating process such as radioactive decay, hydrothermal and subduction zones or post-shock of meteorite impacts. H2 might then be generated from endothermic hydrolyses of the ferromagnesian minerals olivine and pyroxene. In both cases of mafic and radioactive rocks, production of CO might occur through high temperature hydrogenation of CO2. CO, instead of CO2, was proven to be necessary in experiments synthesizing biological-type macromolecules with a gaseous mixture of CO, N2 and H2O. In the geological context, N2 is present in the environment, and the activation source might arise from cosmic radiation and/or radionuclides. Ferromagnesian and radioactive rocks might consequently be a starting point of an hydrothermal chemical evolution towards the abiotic formation of biological molecules. The two usually separate worlds of rocks and life are shown to be connected through molecular and thermodynamic chemical evolution. This concept has been proposed earlier by the author (Bassez J Phys: Condens Matter 15:L353-L361, 2003, 2008a, 2008b; Bassez Orig Life Evol Biosph 39(3-4):223-225, 2009; Bassez et al. 2011; Bassez et al. Orig Life Evol Biosph 42(4):307-316, 2012, Bassez 2013) without thermodynamic details. This concept leads to signatures of prebiotic chemistry such as radionuclides and also iron and magnesium carbonates associated with serpentine and/or talc, which

  15. Locomotion and phenotypic transformation of the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Preston, Terence M; King, Conrad A

    2003-01-01

    The protozoon Naegleria gruberi is able to carry out amoeboid locomotion at the water-air interface in a manner indistinguishable from that exhibited on solid substrata with the production of focal contacts and associated filopodia. The speed of locomotion at this interface can be modulated by changes in electrolyte concentrations; these speed changes are identical to those observed at a water-glass interface. The nature of the water-air interface is discussed leading to the hypothesis that surface tension alone could provide suitable properties for the adhesion and translocation of amoebae at this interface without necessitating specific, absorbed molecules. The temporary swimming flagellate stage of Naegleria is able to dock at the interface, make stable adhesions to it, and revert to the amoeboid phenotype. Conversely, amoebae resident at the water-air interface can transform to swimming flagellates and escape into the bulk liquid phase. We report the presence of Naegleria amoebae in the surface microlayers of natural ponds; thus, in freshwater bodies there may be active shuttling of Naegleria amoebae from the benthos to the surface microlayers by means of the non-feeding, swimming flagellate phenotype. The public health implication of this behaviour in the case of the pathogenic relative, Naegleria fowleri, is discussed.

  16. Effetively trapping air or lqiud water for anti-icing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun

    2014-03-01

    Icing on solid surfaces leads to operational difficulties and high maintenance efforts for power networks, aircrafts, ships, ground transportation vehicles and house-hold refrigerators, to name but a few. In extreme cases, icing on surfaces causes disastrous events such as crash of aircrafts and collapse of power networks, which result in severe economic impact and large loss of life. This talk is focused on the fundamentals of the ice formation and adhesion of ice with solid substrates aiming for fighting against icing on solid surfaces. When the supercooling is low, it would be possible to remove supercooled liquid water from the solid surfaces before freezing occurs. To achieve this, we design and constructed surfaces that can trap the air at the subfreezing temperature thus condensed water microdroplets could be spontaneously removed after the coalescence. When the supercooling is high, icing on surfaces occurs spontaniously. In this case, we constructed coatings on which aqueous lubricating layer could be trapped, thus the ice adhesion on the coating is so low that the ice formed atop could be removed by a wind action or its own gravity.

  17. Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234°C and 3MPa (LT condition) and 295°C and 8MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

  18. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  19. 77 FR 6548 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Implementation of Energy, Water, and Solid Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Department of the Army Environmental Impact Statement for the Implementation of Energy, Water, and Solid... implementation of the Energy, Water, and Solid Waste Initiatives at Fort Bliss. These initiatives will work to enhance the energy and water security of Fort Bliss, Texas, which is operationally necessary,...

  20. Air and water quality monitor assessment of life support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Ken; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Holder, D.; Humphries, R.

    1988-01-01

    Preprotype air revitalization and water reclamation subsystems (Mole Sieve, Sabatier, Static Feed Electrolyzer, Trace Contaminant Control, and Thermoelectric Integrated Membrane Evaporative Subsystem) were operated and tested independently and in an integrated arrangement. During each test, water and/or gas samples were taken from each subsystem so that overall subsystem performance could be determined. The overall test design and objectives for both subsystem and integrated subsystem tests were limited, and no effort was made to meet water or gas specifications. The results of chemical analyses for each of the participating subsystems are presented along with other selected samples which were analyzed for physical properties and microbiologicals.

  1. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at higher temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Linkous, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes efforts in developing new solid polymer electrolytes that will enable operation of proton exchange membrane electrolyzers at higher temperatures than are currently possible. Several ionomers have been prepared from polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyethersulfone (PES), and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) by employing various sulfonation procedures. By controlling the extent of sulfonation, a range of proton conductivities could be achieved, whose upper limit actually exceeded that of commercially available perfluoralkyl sulfonates. Thermoconductimetric analysis of samples at various degrees of sulfonation showed an inverse relationship between conductivity and maximum operating temperature. This was attributed to the dual effect of adding sulfonate groups to the polymer: more acid groups produce more protons for increased conductivity, but they also increase water uptake, which mechanically weakens the membrane. This situation was exacerbated by the limited acidity of the aromatic sulfonic acids (pK{sub A} {approx} 2-3). The possibility of using partial fluorination to raise the acid dissociation constant is discussed.

  2. Evaluation of Technologies to Remove Suspended Solids from Waste Water

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-03-15

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site utilizes pH adjustment, submicron filtration, Hg removal resin, activated carbon, reverse osmosis, cationic exchange, and evaporation to remove contaminants from radioactive waste water. After startup, the ETF had difficulty achieving design capacity. The primary problem was fouling of the ceramic microfilters. Typical filter flow rates were only 20 percent of design capacity.A research program was conducted to identify and evaluate technologies for improving suspended solids removal from radioactive wastewater at the Savannah River Site. Technolgies investigated were a ceramic microfilter, a tubular polymeric ultrafilter, two porous metal filters, a polymeric centrifugal ultrafilter, a deep bed filter, a backwashable cartridge filter, a fabric filter, and a centriguge.

  3. Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fatmi, Zafar; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is emerging that indoor air pollution (IAP) from use of solid fuels for cooking and heating may be an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Sources of data We searched the Ovid Medline, Embase Classic, Embase and Web of Science databases through to 12 June 2015 to identify reports of primary epidemiological research concerning the relationship of CHD to IAP from solid fuel, the likely magnitude of any increase in risk, and potential pathogenic mechanisms. Areas of agreement The current balance of epidemiological evidence points to an increased risk of CHD from IAP as a consequence of using solid, and especially biomass, fuels for cooking and heating. Relative risks from long-term exposure could be two- to fourfold. Areas of controversy The evidence base is still limited, and although an association of CHD with such IAP from solid fuel is consistent with the known hazards from smoking, environmental tobacco smoke and ambient air pollution, and supported by evidence of effects on inflammatory processes, atherosclerosis and blood pressure, it requires confirmation by larger and more robust studies. Growing points The completion of two relatively small case-control studies on CHD and IAP from use of biomass fuel demonstrates the feasibility of such research, and is an encouragement to further, larger studies using similar methods. Areas timely for developing research The need for such research is particularly pressing because the incidence of CHD in developing countries is rising, and IAP may interact synergistically with the risk factors that are driving that increase. Furthermore, relatively cheap methods are available to reduce IAP from use of solid fuels, and there are indications from intervention studies that these may impact beneficially on CHD as well as other diseases caused by such pollution. PMID:27151956

  4. Nonlinear Acoustics at the Air-Water Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pree, Seth; Naranjo, Brian; Putterman, Seth

    2016-11-01

    According to linear acoustics, airborne sound incident on a water surface transmits only a tenth of a percent of its energy. This difficulty of transmitting energy across the water surface limits the feasibility of standoff ultrasound imaging. We propose to overcome this long standing problem by developing new methods of coupling into the medium at standoff. In particular, we believe that the acoustic nonlinearity of both the air and the medium may yield a range of effects in the vicinity of the surface permitting an efficient transmission of ultrasound from the air into the medium. The recent commercial availability of parametric speakers that deliver modulated 100kHz ultrasound at 135dB to nonlinearly generate music at 95dB provides an interesting platform with which to revisit the transmission of sound across acoustic impedance mismatches. We show results of experimental studies of the behavior of the air-water free surface when subjected to large amplitude acoustic pressures from the air. This work was supported by the ARO STIR program.

  5. Oxidation of fine aluminum powders with water and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipina, S. A.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Gromov, A. A.; Konovalov, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Fine aluminum powders (RA20-RA60 grades, SUAL-PM) with specific surface area from 0.37 to 0.73 m2/g and high aluminum contents (95-98 wt %) are studied. The powders are found to be waterwettable without additions of surfactants and characterized by high rates of gas liberation in reacting with a calcium hydroxide solution under normal conditions. All RA20-RA60 powders are shown to be highly reactive upon oxidation with air and close to aluminum nanopowders in the parameters of their activity when heated in air. Their stability in water could prevent active (metallic) aluminum losses during their storage.

  6. Biodrying of sewage sludge: kinetics of volatile solids degradation under different initial moisture contents and air-flow rates.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Manuel; Huiliñir, Cesar

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the kinetics of the biodegradation of volatile solids (VS) of sewage sludge for biodrying under different initial moisture contents (Mc) and air-flow rates (AFR). For the study, a 3(2) factorial design, whose factors were AFR (1, 2 or 3L/minkgTS) and initial Mc (59%, 68% and 78% w.b.), was used. Using seven kinetic models and a nonlinear regression method, kinetic parameters were estimated and the models were analyzed with two statistical indicators. Initial Mc of around 68% increases the temperature matrix and VS consumption, with higher moisture removal at lower initial Mc values. Lower AFRs gave higher matrix temperatures and VS consumption, while higher AFRs increased water removal. The kinetic models proposed successfully simulate VS biodegradation, with root mean square error (RMSE) between 0.007929 and 0.02744, and they can be used as a tool for satisfactory prediction of VS in biodrying.

  7. A Diffuse Interface Model for solid-liquid-air dissolution problems based on a porous medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Quintard, M.; Debenest, G.; Laouafa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The underground cavities may be dissolved by the flows of groundwater where the dissolution mainly happens at the liquid-solid interface. In many real cases, the cavities are not occupied only by the water, but also the gas phase, e.g., air, or other gases. In this case, there are solid-liquid-gas three phases. Normally, the air does not participate the dissolution. However, it may influence the dissolution as the position of the solid-liquid interface may gradually lower down with the dissolution process. Simulating the dissolution problems with multi- moving interfaces is a difficult task but rather interesting to study the evolution of the underground cavities. In this paper, we propose a diffuse interface model (DIM) to simulate the three-phase dissolution problem, based on a porous medium theory and a volume averaging theory te{Whitaker1999,Golfier2002,Quintard1994}. The interface is regarded as a continuous layer where the phase indicator (mainly for solid-liquid interface) and phase saturation (mainly for liquid-gas interface) vary rapidly but smoothly. The DIM equations enable us to simulate the moving interface under a fixed mesh system, instead of a deformed or moving mesh. Suppose we have three phases, solid, liquid and gas. The solid phase contains only species A. The gas phase contains only the air. The volume averaging theory is used to upscale the balance equations. The final DIM equations are presented below. The balance equation of solid phase can be written as {partialrho_{s}(1-\\varepsilon_{f})}/{partial t}=-K_{sl} where \\varepsilonf represents the volume fraction of the fluids (liquid+gas) and Ksl refers to the mass exchange between the solid phase and the liquid phase. Ksl cam be expressed as K_{sl}=rho_{l}alpha(omega_{eq}-Omega_{Al}). The balance equations of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho_{l}\\varepsilon_{f}S_{l}}/{partial t}+nabla\\cdot(rho_{l}{V}_{l})= K_{sl}. The balance equation of liquid phase can be written as {partialrho

  8. Planar solid oxide fuel cell with staged indirect-internal air and fuel preheating and reformation

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A; Williams, Mark C

    2003-10-21

    A solid oxide fuel cell arrangement and method of use that provides internal preheating of both fuel and air in order to maintain the optimum operating temperature for the production of energy. The internal preheat passes are created by the addition of two plates, one on either side of the bipolar plate, such that these plates create additional passes through the fuel cell. This internal preheat fuel cell configuration and method reduce the requirements for external heat exchanger units and air compressors. Air or fuel may be added to the fuel cell as required to maintain the optimum operating temperature through a cathode control valve or an anode control valve, respectively. A control loop comprises a temperature sensing means within the preheat air and fuel passes, a means to compare the measured temperature to a set point temperature and a determination based on the comparison as to whether the control valves should allow additional air or fuel into the preheat or bypass manifolds of the fuel cell.

  9. Modeling the impact of solid noise barriers on near road air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatram, Akula; Isakov, Vlad; Deshmukh, Parikshit; Baldauf, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Studies based on field measurements, wind tunnel experiments, and controlled tracer gas releases indicate that solid, roadside noise barriers can lead to reductions in downwind near-road air pollutant concentrations. A tracer gas study showed that a solid barrier reduced pollutant concentrations as much as 80% next to the barrier relative to an open area under unstable meteorological conditions, which corresponds to typical daytime conditions when residents living or children going to school near roadways are most likely to be exposed to traffic emissions. The data from this tracer gas study and a wind tunnel simulation were used to develop a model to describe dispersion of traffic emissions near a highway in the presence of a solid noise barrier. The model is used to interpret real-world data collected during a field study conducted in a complex urban environment next to a large highway in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. We show that the analysis of the data with the model yields useful information on the emission factors and the mitigation impact of the barrier on near-road air quality. The estimated emission factors for the four species, ultrafine particles, CO, NO2, and black carbon, are consistent with data cited in the literature. The results suggest that the model accounted for reductions in pollutant concentrations from a 4.5 m high noise barrier, ranging from 40% next to the barrier to 10% at 300 m from the barrier.

  10. Connecting Water Quality With Air Quality Through Microbial Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M. Elias

    Aerosol production from surface waters results in the transfer of aquatic materials (including nutrients and bacteria) to air. These materials can then be transported by onshore winds to land, representing a biogeochemical connection between aquatic and terrestrial systems not normally considered. In urban waterfront environments, this transfer could result in emissions of pathogenic bacteria from contaminated waters. Despite the potential importance of this link, sources, near-shore deposition, identity and viability of microbial aerosols are largely uncharacterized. This dissertation focuses on the environmental and biological mechanisms that define this water-air connection, as a means to build our understanding of the biogeochemical, biogeographical, and public health implications of the transfer of surface water materials to the near-shore environment in both urban and non-urban environments. The effects of tidal height, wind speed and fog on coastal aerosols and microbial content were first quantified on a non-urban coast of Maine, USA. Culture-based, culture-independent, and molecular methods were used to simultaneously sample microbial aerosols while monitoring meteorological parameters. Aerosols at this site displayed clear marine influence and high concentrations of ecologically-relevant nutrients. Coarse aerosol concentrations significantly increased with tidal height, onshore wind speed, and fog presence. Tidal height and fog presence did not significantly influence total microbial aerosol concentrations, but did have a significant effect on culturable microbial aerosol fallout. Molecular analyses of the microbes settling out of near-shore aerosols provided further evidence of local ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes. Aerosol and surface ocean bacterial communities shared species and in general were dominated by organisms previously sampled in marine environments. Fog presence strengthened the microbial connection between water and land through

  11. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-24

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2). Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g(-1)carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2) and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  12. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g‑1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  13. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g−1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage. PMID:28117359

  14. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  15. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  16. Use of Surfactants to Decrease Air-Water Interfacial Tension During Sparging (OKC, OK)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging is a remediation procedure of injecting air into polluted ground water. The primary intention of air sparging is to promote biodegradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the groundwater passing through the treatment sector. Sparging treatment efficiency dep...

  17. An experimental study of air entrainment and oxygen transfer at a water jet from a nozzle with air holes.

    PubMed

    Baylar, Ahmet; Emiroglu, M Emin

    2004-01-01

    An adequate supply of dissolved oxygen is important in natural rivers and in some water treatment processes. The dissolved oxygen concentration can be enhanced by entraining air bubbles in a receiving pool. When a water jet impinges a receiving pool at rest, air bubbles may be entrained and carried away below the pool free surface. This process is called plunging water jet entrainment and aeration. This paper describes an experimental study of the air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency of circular nozzles with and without air holes. In particular, the effect of varying the number, positions, and open/close status of the air holes is investigated. A negative pressure occurred depending on the air holes opened on the circular nozzles. This phenomenon affected the water jet expansion, water jet shape, air entrainment, and bubble penetration depth and, hence, the oxygen transfer efficiency. It was demonstrated that the air entrainment rate and the oxygen transfer efficiency of the circular nozzles with air holes were better than those of the circular nozzles without air holes. Therefore, adding air holes to a simple, circular nozzle could lead to a significantly increased air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency.

  18. Impact of subjacent rocks at the water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, V. A.

    2009-04-01

    At the depleted peat deposits (after peat extraction), where the residual layer of peat with the thickness of about 0,5 meters is laid at the well water permeable rocks, vegetation typical for dry conditions is developed in case of good drainage conditions; birch trees, willow, alder-trees and buckthorn prevail in this vegetation. Water and air regime is characterized here by good aeration with prevailing of oxidative processes. If water regime is regulated, these depleted peat areas are suitable for agricultural and forest lands; however, necessity of transformation of these depleted lands into forest and agricultural lands must be ecologically and economically justified. If the residual layer of peat with the thickness of 0,05-0,3 m is based at the sapropel or peat sapropel, contrast amphibiotic water and air regime with strong fluctuation of oxidative and restoration process depending on the weather conditions is formed; this regime is formed without artificial increase of the ground waters level. This does not allow bog vegetation or vegetation typical for dry conditions to develop. Thus, within 20 and more years after completion of peat extraction, such areas are not covered by vegetation in spite of favorable agro-chemical qualities of peat layer and favorable for vegetation chemical composition of soil and ground waters. Depleted peat deposits, that are based at the sapropel, are not suitable for agricultural use, because agricultural vegetation requires stable water and air regime with good aeration and oxidative and restoration potential within 400-750 mV. Contrast amphibiotic water and air regime of the depleted peat deposits that are based at sapropel excludes possibility to use them as agricultural lands. Because of this reason, areas with residual peat layer that are based at sapropel are not suitable for forest planting. Due to periodic increase of ground waters level, rot systems of the plants can not penetrate into the required depth, and mechanical

  19. Hydrophobic organic compound partitioning from bulk water to the water/air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Örjan; Gschwend, Philip M.

    Partitioning of hydrophobic organic compounds to the interface between water and air may significantly affect the distribution and transfer of many xenobiotic chemicals between vapor and aqueous phases. The fluorescent probe, 1-methylperylene, was used to investigate the affinity of hydrophobic compounds for the water-air interface by varying the ratio of interfacial surface area to water volume in a fused-quartz cuvette. We found that the water-air/water interface partitioning coefficient [ Kw-awi =1.2 mol cm -2awi/(mol ml -1w)] for this polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was quantitatively consistent with partitioning to the same interface but from the airside, recently reported in the literature for less hydrophobic PAHs. Our results demonstrate significant partitioning from bulk water to the water/air interface for a hydrophobicity range relevant to many xenobiotic compounds. Anticipated implications of this process for the environmental chemistry of hydrophobic compounds include retarded gas-phase transport in unsaturated soils, bubble-mediated transport in water, droplet-mediated transport in the atmosphere, and photochemical reactions.

  20. Estimating the radon concentration in water and indoor air.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F

    2009-05-01

    The paper presents the results of radon concentration measurements in the vicinity of water, indoor air and in contact to building walls. The investigations were carried out using CR-39 track detectors. Samples of ground water flowing out of many springs mostly in Arabian Gulf area except one from Germany have been studied. The results are compared with international recommendations and the values are found to be lower than the recommended value. Measuring the mean indoor radon concentrations in air and in contact to building walls in the dwellings of Kuwait University Campus were found 24.2 +/- 7.7, and 462 +/- 422 Bq m(-3) respectively. These values lead to average effective dose equivalent rates of 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 23 +/- 21 mSv year(-1), respectively.

  1. Materials issues in solar detoxification of air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Daniel M.; Magrini-Bair, Kim; Wolfrum, Edward; May, E. K.

    1997-10-01

    The technical feasibility of photocatalytic oxidation and reduction technology for the removal of hazardous chemicals or micro-organisms from contaminated water and air is well established. The heterogeneous process based on titanium dioxide photocatalysts is the most developed but homogeneous systems are also under development. Treatment equipment using fluorescent lamps as the photon source and supported heterogeneous photocatalysts are commercially available and one-sun and parabolic solar reactor designs have been demonstrated. Cost and performance of the solar processes have not yet reached levels that make them attractive relative to conventional alternatives. Cost reductions and increased performance require improvements in optical materials for reactors, reactor/collector design and materials of construction, durable catalyst materials and support structures, and significant improvement in the utilization of the solar spectrum in the photochemical processes. The current state of the art for solar reactors for treatment of contaminated air and water are presented and the opportunities for improvement are identified.

  2. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  3. Pharmaceutical solid dispersion technology: a strategy to improve dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shobhit; Gupta, Satish K

    2013-08-01

    Oral bioavailability is the major problem when a poorly water-soluble active agent is delivered via oral route. To overcome such problems, solid dispersion systems have been demonstrated in literature to enhance the dissolution property of poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present review, the important aspects to be considered during preparation of solid dispersion systems viz., properties of polymer and preparation techniques of solid dispersion which affect the dissolution rate are discussed. Formulation and evaluation techniques for solid dispersions have been described. The final section of article highlights the recent patents and studies related to solid dispersion systems.

  4. Air-water analogy and the study of hydraulic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supino, Giulio

    1953-01-01

    The author first sets forth some observations about the theory of models. Then he established certain general criteria for the construction of dynamically similar models in water and in air, through reference to the perfect fluid equations and to the ones pertaining to viscous flow. It is, in addition, pointed out that there are more cases in which the analogy is possible than is commonly supposed.

  5. Addendum: Output calibration in solid water for high energy photon beams (Med. Phys. 16 , 299 (1989))

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C.S. )

    1989-11-01

    The identification of water-equivalent material used in the title publication is given to be model No. 451 manufactured by Radiation Materials, Inc. (RMI). New data is presented for solid water model No. 457.(AIP)

  6. Analyzing the possibility of constructing the air heating system for an integrated solid fuel gasification combined-cycle power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, V. A.; Ryzhkov, A. F.; Val'tsev, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Combined-cycle power plants operating on solid fuel have presently been implemented only in demonstration projects. One of possible ways for improving such plants consists in making a shift to hybrid process circuits of integrated gasification combined-cycle plants with external firing of solid fuel. A high-temperature air heater serving to heat compressed air is a key element of the hybrid process circuit. The article describes application of a high-temperature recuperative metal air heater in the process circuit of an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant (IGCC). The available experience with high-temperature air heating is considered, and possible air heater layout arrangements are analyzed along with domestically produced heat-resistant grades of steel suitable for manufacturing such air heater. An alternative (with respect to the traditional one) design is proposed, according to which solid fuel is fired in a noncooled furnace extension, followed by mixing the combustion products with recirculation gases, after which the mixture is fed to a convective air heater. The use of this design makes it possible to achieve considerably smaller capital outlays and operating costs. The data obtained from thermal and aerodynamic calculations of the high-temperature air heater with a thermal capacity of 258 MW for heating air to a temperature of up to 800°C for being used in the hybrid process circuit of a combined-cycle power plant are presented.

  7. Biofilm formation at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces by Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The members of the genus Acinetobacter are Gram-negative cocobacilli that are frequently found in the environment but also in the hospital setting where they have been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infections. Among them, Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as the most common pathogenic species involved in hospital-acquired infections. One reason for this emergence may be its persistence in the hospital wards, in particular in the intensive care unit; this persistence could be partially explained by the capacity of these microorganisms to form biofilm. Therefore, our main objective was to study the prevalence of the two main types of biofilm formed by the most relevant Acinetobacter species, comparing biofilm formation between the different species. Findings Biofilm formation at the air-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces was investigated in different Acinetobacter spp. and it appeared to be generally more important at 25°C than at 37°C. The biofilm formation at the solid-liquid interface by the members of the ACB-complex was at least 3 times higher than the other species (80-91% versus 5-24%). In addition, only the isolates belonging to this complex were able to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface; between 9% and 36% of the tested isolates formed this type of pellicle. Finally, within the ACB-complex, the biofilm formed at the air-liquid interface was almost 4 times higher for A. baumannii and Acinetobacter G13TU than for Acinetobacter G3 (36%, 27% & 9% respectively). Conclusions Overall, this study has shown the capacity of the Acinetobacter spp to form two different types of biofilm: solid-liquid and air-liquid interfaces. This ability was generally higher at 25°C which might contribute to their persistence in the inanimate hospital environment. Our work has also demonstrated for the first time the ability of the members of the ACB-complex to form biofilm at the air-liquid interface, a feature that was not observed in other

  8. New research on bioregenerative air/water purification systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Anne H.; Ellender, R. D.; Watkins, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, air and water purification systems have been developed and used. This technology is based on the combined activities of plants and microorganisms as they function in a natural environment. More recently, researchers have begun to address the problems associated with indoor air pollution. Various common houseplants are currently being evaluated for their abilities to reduce concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) such as formaldehyde and benzene. With development of the Space Exploration Initiative, missions will increase in duration, and problems with resupply necessitates implementation of regenerative technology. Aspects of bioregenerative technology have been included in a habitat known as the BioHome. The ultimate goal is to use this technology in conjunction with physicochemical systems for air and water purification within closed systems. This study continued the risk assessment of bioregenerative technology with emphasis on biological hazards. In an effort to evaluate the risk for human infection, analyses were directed at enumeration of fecal streptococci and enteric viruses with the BioHome waste water treatment system.

  9. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  10. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  11. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  12. Energy and air emission effects of water supply.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jennifer R; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-04-15

    Life-cycle air emission effects of supplying water are explored using a hybrid life-cycle assessment For the typically sized U.S. utility analyzed, recycled water is preferable to desalination and comparable to importation. Seawater desalination has an energy and air emission footprint that is 1.5-2.4 times larger than that of imported water. However, some desalination modes fare better; brackish groundwater is 53-66% as environmentally intensive as seawater desalination. The annual water needs (326 m3) of a typical Californian that is met with imported water requires 5.8 GJ of energy and creates 360 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. With seawater desalination, energy use would increase to 14 GJ and 800 kg of CO2 equivalent emissions. Meeting the water demand of California with desalination would consume 52% of the state's electricity. Supply options were reassessed using alternative electricity mixes, including the average mix of the United States and several renewable sources. Desalination using solar thermal energy has lower greenhouse gas emissions than that of imported and recycled water (using California's electricity mix), but using the U.S. mix increases the environmental footprint by 1.5 times. A comparison with a more energy-intensive international scenario shows that CO2 equivalent emissions for desalination in Dubai are 1.6 times larger than in California. The methods, decision support tool (WEST), and results of this study should persuade decision makers to make informed water policy choices by including energy consumption and material use effects in the decision-making process.

  13. Solid olive waste in environmental cleanup: oil recovery and carbon production for water purification.

    PubMed

    El-Hamouz, Amer; Hilal, Hikmat S; Nassar, Nashaat; Mardawi, Zahi

    2007-07-01

    A potentially-economic three-fold strategy, to use solid olive wastes in water purification, is presented. Firstly, oil remaining in solid waste (higher than 5% of waste) was recovered by the Soxhlet extraction technique, which can be useful for the soap industry. Secondly, the remaining solid was processed to yield relatively high-surface area active carbon (AC). Thirdly, the resulting carbon was employed to reversibly adsorb chromate ions from water, aiming to establish a water purification process with reusable AC. The technique used here enabled oil recovery together with the production of a clean solid, suitable for making AC. This process also has the advantage of low production cost.

  14. Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching

    DOEpatents

    Treat, Russell L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

  15. Method of draining water through a solid waste site without leaching

    DOEpatents

    Treat, R.L.; Gee, G.W.; Whyatt, G.A.

    1993-02-02

    The present invention is a method of preventing water from leaching solid waste sites by preventing atmospheric precipitation from contacting waste as the water flows through a solid waste site. The method comprises placing at least one drain hole through the solid waste site. The drain hole is seated to prevent waste material from entering the drain hole, and the solid waste site cover material is layered and graded to direct water to flow toward the drain hole and to soil beneath the waste site.

  16. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  17. Comparison of polyphenol extractions from olive pomace and solid fraction of olive mill waste water.

    PubMed

    Tercan, Sevgul; Seker, Mahmut

    2012-01-01

    The solid fraction of olive mill waste water (OMWW) was separated from OMWW and then the solutes in the solid fraction of OMWW were extracted with ethanol. The detection of polyphenols in the ethanol extract showed the presence of polyphenols in the solid fraction of OMWW. Effects of solvent-to-solid ratio, extraction and agitation time on the extraction of polyphenols from the solid fraction of OMWW were examined and the maximum amount of polyphenol was extracted from the solid fraction of OMWW with a solvent-to-solid ratio of 15 at 70 min of extraction and 10 min of agitation time. Percent yields and purities of the polyphenols extracted from solid fraction of OMWW were higher than those of the polyphenols extracted from olive pomace with ethanol at 70 min of extraction and 10 min of agitation time with solvent-to-solid ratio of 15.

  18. 78 FR 37713 - Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show; Lake Michigan; Chicago, IL... enforce the safety zone on Lake Michigan near Chicago, Illinois for the Chicago Air and Water Show. This... Chicago Air and Water Show. During the aforementioned periods, the Coast Guard will enforce...

  19. 77 FR 49349 - Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL AGENCY... deviation to the Chicago Air and Water Show safety zone on Lake Michigan near Lincoln Park. This action is... during the Chicago Air and Water Show. This safety zone is necessary to protect spectators and...

  20. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative agreement or...

  1. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  2. Dependence of charge transfer phenomena during solid-air two-phase flow on particle disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Ken-ichiro; Suedomi, Yuuki; Honda, Hirotaka; Furutani, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuo; Masuda, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    An experimental investigation of the tribo-electrification of particles has been conducted during solid-air two-phase turbulent flow. The current induced in a metal plate by the impact of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a high-speed air flow was measured for two different plate materials. The results indicated that the contact potential difference between the particles and a stainless steel plate was positive, while for a nickel plate it was negative. These results agreed with theoretical contact charge transfer even if not only the particle size but also the kind of metal plate was changed. The specific charge of the PMMA particles during solid-air two-phase flow using an ejector, a stainless steel branch pipe, and a stainless steel straight pipe was measured using a Faraday cage. Although the charge was negative in the ejector, the particles had a positive specific charge at the outlet of the branch pipe, and this positive charge increased in the straight pipe. The charge decay along the flow direction could be reproduced by the charging and relaxation theory. However, the proportional coefficients in the theory changed with the particle size and air velocity. Therefore, an unexpected charge transfer occurred between the ejector and the branch pipe, which could not be explained solely by the contact potential difference. In the ejector, an electrical current in air might have been produced by self-discharge of particles with excess charge between the nickel diffuser in the ejector and the stainless steel nozzle or the stainless steel pipe due to a reversal in the contact potential difference between the PMMA and the stainless steel. The sign of the current depended on the particle size, possibly because the position where the particles impacted depended on their size. When dual coaxial glass pipes were used as a particle disperser, the specific charge of the PMMA particles became more positive along the particle flow direction due to the contact

  3. Interactions between glycine and amorphous solid water nanoscale films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzvetkov, George; Koller, Georg; Netzer, Falko P.

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of glycine (Gly) with amorphous solid water (ASW) nanolayers (≤ 100 ML), vapor-deposited on single crystalline AlOx surfaces at 100 K, have been investigated by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the oxygen K-edge, temperature-programmed thermal desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and temperature-dependent work function measurements. Gly-on-ASW, ASW-on-Gly, and Gly on top of ASW-on-Gly ultrathin films have been fabricated. In contrast to the uniform ASW films grown directly on the hydrophilic AlOx, water molecules adsorb on the hydrophobic Gly films in the form of 3D ASW clusters. This leads to significant differences in the NEXAFS and work function data obtained from ASW-on-AlOx and ASW-on-Gly films, respectively. Furthermore, these structural differences influence the chemical state of Gly molecules (neutral vs. zwitterionic) adsorbed on top of ASW films. N1s XPS measurements revealed an increased amount of neutral Gly molecules in the film top-deposited on the ASW-on-Gly structure in comparison to the neutral Gly in the films directly condensed on AlOx or grown on the ASW substrate. H2O TPD spectra demonstrate that the crystallization and desorption processes of ASW are affected in a different way by the Gly layers, top-deposited on to ASW-on-AlOx and ASW-on-Gly films. At the same time, Gly adlayers sink into the ASW film during crystallization/desorption of the latter and land softly on the alumina surface in the form of zwitterionic clusters.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Constants of Porous Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Cholette, Francois; Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Ayotte, Patrick

    2009-04-02

    Reflection-absorption infrared spectra (RAIRS) of amorphous solid water (ASW) films grown at 20K on a Pt(111) substrate at various incidence angle (θBeam = 0-85o) using a molecular beam are reported. They display complex features arising from the interplay between refraction, absorption within the sample, and interference effects between the multiple reflections at the film-substrate and film-vacuum interfaces. Using a simple classical optics model based on Fresnel equations, we obtain optical constants [i.e., n(ω) and k(ω)] for porous ASW in the 1000-4000cm-1 (10-2.5 μm) range. The behaviour of the optical properties of ASW in the intramolecular OH stretching region with increasing θBeam is shown to be strongly correlated with its decreasing density and increasing surface area. A direct comparison between the RAIRS and calculated vibrational spectra shows a large difference (~200cm-1) in the position of the coupled H-bonded intramolecular OH stretching vibrations spectral feature. Moreover, this band shifts in opposite directions with increasing θBeam in RAIRS and vibrational spectra demonstrating RAIRS spectra cannot be interpreted straightforwardly as vibrational spectra due to severe optical distortions from refraction and interference effects.

  5. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials.

  6. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate. PMID:25687953

  7. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  8. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; ...

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initialmore » monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.« less

  9. Reversible monolayer-to-crystalline phase transition in amphiphilic silsesquioxane at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.; Sanyal, M. K.; Bera, M. K.; Gibaud, A.; Lin, B.; Meron, M.

    2015-02-17

    We report on the counter intuitive reversible crystallisation of two-dimensional monolayer of Trisilanolisobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric SilSesquioxane (TBPOSS) on water surface using synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. Amphiphilic TBPOSS form rugged monolayers and Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering (GIXS) measurements reveal that the in-plane inter-particle correlation peaks, characteristic of two-dimensional system, observed before transition is replaced by intense localized spots after transition. The measured x-ray scattering data of the non-equilibrium crystalline phase on the air-water interface could be explained with a model that assumes periodic stacking of the TBPOSS dimers. These crystalline stacking relaxes upon decompression and the TBPOSS layer retains its initial monolayer state. The existence of these crystals in compressed phase is confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements by lifting the materials on a solid substrate.

  10. Ground-water contamination at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stark, J.R.; Cummings, T.R.; Twenter, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    A sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin underlies Wurtsmith Air Force Base in northeastern lower Michigan. The aquifer overlies a thick clay layer at an average depth of 65 feet. The water table is about 10 feet below land surface in the western part of the Base and about 25 feet below land surface in the eastern part. A ground-water divide cuts diagonally across the Base from northwest to southeast. South of the divide, ground water flows to the Au Sable River; north of the divide, it flows to Van Etten Creek and Van Etten Lake. Mathematical models were used to aid in calculating rates of groundwater flow. Rates range from about 0.8 feet per day in the eastern part of the Base to about 0.3 feet per day in the western part. Models also were used as an aid in making decisions regarding purging of contaminated water from the aquifer. In 1977, trichloroethylene was detected in the Air Force Base water-supply system. It had leaked from a buried storage tank near Building 43 in the southeastern part of the Base and moved northeastward under the influence of the natural ground-water gradient and the pumping of Base water-supply wells. In the most highly contaminated part of the plume, concentrations are greater than 1,000 micrograms per liter. Current purge pumping is removing some of the trichloroethylene, and seems to have arrested its eastward movement. Pumping of additional purge wells could increase the rate of removal. Trichloroethylene has also been detected in ground water in the vicinity of the Base alert apron, where a plume from an unknown source extends northeastward off Base. A smaller, less well-defined area of contamination also occurs just north of the larger plume. Trichloroethylene, identified near the waste-treatment plant, seepage lagoons, and the northern landfill area, is related to activities and operations in these areas. Dichloroethylene and trichloroethylene occur in significant quantities westward of Building 43, upgradient from the major

  11. Meteorological phenomena affecting the presence of solid particles suspended in the air during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñanos, P.; Galán, C.; Alcázar, P.; Dominguez, E.

    Winter is not traditionally considered to be a risky season for people who suffer from pollen allergies. However, increasing numbers of people are showing symptoms in winter. This prompted our investigation into the levels of solid material in the air, and some of the meteorological phenomena that allow their accumulation. This study showed a possible relationship between the phenomenon of thermal inversion, which occurs when very low temperatures, cloudless skies and atmospheric calms coincide, and an increase in the concentration of solid material in the atmosphere. Frequently, this situation is associated with other predictable phenomena such as fog, dew and frost. This may allow a warning system to be derived for urban pollution episodes. The effect caused by parameters such as wind and rainfall was also analysed. Solid material was differentiated into non-biological material from natural and non-natural sources (e.g. soot, dust, sand, diesel exhaust particles, partially burnt residues) and biological material. The latter mainly comprises pollen grains and fungal spores. Owing to its abundance and importance as a causal agent of winter allergies, Cupressaceae pollen was considered separately.

  12. Adsorption of polystyrene sulfonate to the air surface of water by neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    YIM,HYUN; KENT,MICHAEL S.; MATHESON,AARON J.; IVKOV,R.; SATIJA,S.; MAJEWSKI,J.; SMITH,G.S.

    2000-05-16

    The adsorption of the strong polyelectrolyte polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) to the air surface of dilute aqueous solutions was investigated as a function of molecular weight and salt concentration. Detailed segment profiles of the deuterated polymer were determined by neutron reflection. Surface activity was also examined through surface tension measurements. In general, the segment profiles are composed of a thin layer (10--20 {angstrom} thick) of high concentration at the air surface, followed by a distinct second layer of much lower segment concentration that extends to larger depths into the liquid. The high segment density at the air surface is due to a strong surface attraction, arising from the low surface tension of the PSS backbone relative to the surface tension of water. At low salt concentration, the profiles tend toward a single dense layer, suggesting that the chains lie nearly flat at the interface in that limit. The adsorbed amount increases with salt concentration, with a stronger dependence for higher molecular weight chains. The adsorbed amounts at the air/water interface are higher than reported previously for PSS adsorbed onto neutral solid surfaces, consistent with the fact that the air-liquid interface provides a stronger surface attraction. While the trends of adsorbed amount and layer thickness with salt concentration and molecular weight are in good agreement with numerical self-consistent field lattice calculations, the measured bilayer profiles are rather different from the smoothly decaying theoretical profiles. The surface tensions of the PSS solutions are significantly lowered relative to those of pure salt solutions. Combining the reflectivity and surface tension measurements, an approximately linear relationship is established between the surface pressure and the PSS adsorbed amount.

  13. Single-bubble sonoluminescence in air-saturated water.

    PubMed

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-24

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  14. Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Air-Saturated Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krefting, Dagmar; Mettin, Robert; Lauterborn, Werner

    2003-10-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is realized in air-saturated water at ambient pressure and room temperature. The behavior is similar to SBSL in degassed water, but with a higher spatial variability of the bubble position. A detailed view on the dynamics of the bubbles shows agreement between calculated shape stability borders but differs slightly in the equilibrium radii predicted by a mass diffusion model. A comparison with results in degassed water is done as well as a time resolved characterization of bubble oscillation, translation, and light emission for synchronous and recycling SBSL. The formation of streamer structures is observed in the same parameter range, when bubble nuclei are present. This may lead to a unified interpretation of SBSL and multibubble sonoluminescence.

  15. New Mechanistic Pathways for Criegee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongqin; Kumar, Manoj; Zhong, Jie; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-09-07

    Understanding Criegee chemistry has become one of central topics in atmospheric research recently. The reaction of Criegee intermediates with gas-phase water clusters has been widely viewed as a key Criegee reaction in the troposphere. However, the effect of aerosols or clouds on Criegee chemistry has received little attention. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and water clusters in the gas phase, as well as at the air/water surface using ab initio quantum chemical calculations and adaptive buffered force quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that the typical time scale for the reaction of CH2OO with water at the air/water interface is on the order of a few picoseconds, 2-3 orders of magnitude shorter than that in the gas phase. Importantly, the adbf-QM/MM dynamics simulations suggest several reaction pathways for the CH2OO + water reaction at the air/water interface, including the loop-structure-mediated mechanism and the stepwise mechanism. Contrary to the conventional gas-phase CH2OO reaction, the loop-structure is not a prerequisite for the stepwise mechanism. For the latter, a water molecule and the CH2OO at the air/water interface, upon their interaction, can result in the formation of (H3O)(+) and (OH)CH2(OO)(-). Thereafter, a hydrogen bond can be formed between (H3O)(+) and the terminal oxygen atom of (OH)CH2(OO)(-), leading to direct proton transfer and the formation of α-hydroxy methylperoxide, HOCH2OOH. The mechanistic insights obtained from this simulation study should motivate future experimental studies of the effect of water clouds on Criegee chemistry.

  16. Colorimetric-Solid Phase Extraction Technology for Water Quality Monitoring: Evaluation of C-SPE and Debubbling Methods in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen-Bosveld, April; Lipert, Robert J.; Nordling, John; Shih, Chien-Ju; Siperko, Lorraine; Porter, Marc D.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Rutz, Jeff A.; Straub, John E.; Schultz, John R.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2007-01-01

    Colorimetric-solid phase extraction (C-SPE) is being developed as a method for in-flight monitoring of spacecraft water quality. C-SPE is based on measuring the change in the diffuse reflectance spectrum of indicator disks following exposure to a water sample. Previous microgravity testing has shown that air bubbles suspended in water samples can cause uncertainty in the volume of liquid passed through the disks, leading to errors in the determination of water quality parameter concentrations. We report here the results of a recent series of C-9 microgravity experiments designed to evaluate manual manipulation as a means to collect bubble-free water samples of specified volumes from water sample bags containing up to 47% air. The effectiveness of manual manipulation was verified by comparing the results from C-SPE analyses of silver(I) and iodine performed in-flight using samples collected and debubbled in microgravity to those performed on-ground using bubble-free samples. The ground and flight results showed excellent agreement, demonstrating that manual manipulation is an effective means for collecting bubble-free water samples in microgravity.

  17. Insulin Aggregation at a Dynamic Solid-Liquid-Air Triple Interface.

    PubMed

    Frachon, Thibaut; Bruckert, Franz; Le Masne, Quentin; Monnin, Emmanuel; Weidenhaupt, Marianne

    2016-12-13

    Therapeutic proteins are privileged in drug development because of their exquisite specificity, which is due to their three-dimensional conformation in solution. During their manufacture, storage, and delivery, interactions with material surfaces and air interfaces are known to affect their stability. The growing use of automated devices for handling and injection of therapeutics increases their exposure to protocols involving intermittent wetting, during which the solid-liquid and liquid-air interfaces meet at a triple contact line, which is often dynamic. Using a microfluidic setup, we analyze the effect of a moving triple interface on insulin aggregation in real time over a hydrophobic surface. We combine thioflavin T fluorescence and reflection interference microscopy to concomitantly monitor insulin aggregation and the morphology of the liquid as it dewets the surface. We demonstrate that insulin aggregates in the region of a moving triple interface and not in regions submitted to hydrodynamic shear stress alone, induced by the moving liquid. During dewetting, liquid droplets form on the surface anchored by adsorbed proteins, and the accumulation of amyloid aggregates is observed exclusively as fluorescent rings growing eccentrically around these droplets. The fluorescent rings expand until the entire channel surface sweeped by the triple interface is covered by amyloid fibers. On the basis of our experimental results, we propose a model describing the growth mechanism of insulin amyloid fibers at a moving triple contact line, where proteins adsorbed at a hydrophobic surface are exposed to the liquid-air interface.

  18. Water distribution at solid/liquid interfaces visualized by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial phenomena at solid/water interfaces play an important role in a wide range of industrial technologies and biological processes. However, it has been a great challenge to directly probe the molecular-scale behavior of water at solid/water interfaces. Recently, there have been tremendous advancements in frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM), enabling its operation in liquids with atomic resolution. The high spatial and force resolutions of FM-AFM have enabled the visualization of one-dimensional (1D) profiles of the hydration force, two-dimensional (2D) images of hydration layers and three-dimensional (3D) images of the water distribution at solid/water interfaces. Here I present an overview of the recent advances in FM-AFM instrumentation and its applications to the study of solid/water interfaces. PMID:27877337

  19. Rigid-plug elastic-water model for transient pipe flow with entrapped air pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ling; Liu, Prof. Deyou; Karney, Professor Byran W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; OU, CHANGQI

    2011-01-01

    Pressure transients in a rapidly filling pipe with an entrapped air pocket are investigated analytically. A rigid-plug elastic water model is developed by applying elastic water hammer to the majority of the water column while applying rigid water analysis to a small portion near the air-water interface, which avoids effectively the interpolation error of previous approaches. Moreover, another two simplified models are introduced respectively based on constant water length and by neglecting water elasticity. Verification of the three models is confirmed by experimental results. Calculations show that the simplification of constant water length is feasible for small air pockets. The complete rigid water model is appropriate for cases with large initial air volume. The rigid-plug elastic model can predict all the essential features for the entire range of initial air fraction considered in this study, and it is the effective model for analysis of pressure transients of entrapped air.

  20. Desorption of Arsenic from Drinking Water Distribution System Solids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the limited knowledge regarding the soluble release of arsenic from DWDS solids, the objectives of this research were to: 1) investigate the effect of pH on the dissolution/desorption of arsenic from DWDS solids, and 2) examine the effect of orthophosphate on the soluble re...

  1. Hurricane Isabel, Amount of Atmospheric Water Vapor Observed By AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These false-color images show the amount of atmospheric water vapor observed by AIRS two weeks prior to the passage of Hurricane Isabel, and then when it was a Category 5 storm. The region shown includes parts of South America and the West Indies. Puerto Rico is the large island below the upper left corner.

    Total water vapor represents the depth of a layer if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to condense and fall to the surface. The color bar on the right sides of the plots give the thickness of this layer in millimeters (mm). The first image, from August 28, shows typical tropical water vapor amounts over the ocean: between roughly 25 and 50 mm, or 1 to 2 inches. The highest values of roughly 80 mm, seen as a red blob over South America, corresponds to intense thunderstorms. Thunderstorms pull in water vapor from surrounding regions and concentrate it, with much of it then falling as rain.

    Figure 1 shows total water during the passage of Hurricane Isabel on September 13. The storm is apparent: the ring of moderate values surrounding a very strong maximum of 100 mm. Total water of more than 80 mm is unusual, and these values correspond to the intense thunderstorms contained within Isabel. The thunderstorms--and the large values of total water--are fed by evaporation from the ocean in the hurricane's high winds. The water vapor near the center of the storm does not remain there long, since hurricane rain rates as high 50 mm (2 inches) per hour imply rapid cycling of the water we observe. Away from the storm the amount of total water vapor is rather low, associated with fair weather where air that ascended near the storm's eye returns to earth, having dropped its moisture as rain. Also seen in the second images are two small regions of about 70 mm of total water over south America. These are yet more thunderstorms, though likely much more benign than those in Isabel.

    The

  2. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  3. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  4. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  5. 14 CFR § 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Â...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  6. Inactivation of the biofilm by the air plasma containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi; Yasuoka Takeuchi lab Team

    2014-10-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factory and medical facilities. Inactivation of biofilm has the method of making it react to chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Although inactivation by chemicals has the problem that hazardous property of a residual substance and hydrogen peroxide have slow reaction velocity. We achieved advanced oxidation process (AOP) with air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were able to be generated selectively by adjusting the amount of water supplied to the plasma. We inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm in five minutes with OH radicals generated by using hydrogen peroxide and ozone.

  7. Nano- and microstructure of air/oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Mata, Jitendra P; White, John W; Zank, Johann

    2009-04-07

    We report the creation of air/oil/water interfaces with variable-thickness oil films using polyisobutylene-based (PIB) surfactants cospread with long-chain paraffinic alkanes on clean water surfaces. The resultant stable oil layers are readily measurable with simple surface techniques, exhibit physical densities the same as expected for bulk oils, and are up to approximately 100 A thick above the water surface as determined using X-ray reflectometry. This provides a ready system for studying the competition of surfactants at the oil/water interface. Results from the competition of a nonionic polyamide surfactant or an anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate with the PIB surfactant are reported. However, this smooth oil layer does not account for the total volume of spread oil nor is the increase in thickness proportional to the film compression. Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) reveals surfactant and oil structures on the scale of 1 to 10 microm at the interface. At low surface pressure (pi < 24 mN m(-1)) large, approximately 10 microm inhomogeneities are observed. Beyond a phase transition observed at pi approximately = 24 mN m(-1), a structure with a spongy appearance and a microscale texture develops. These structures have implications for understanding the microstructure at the oil/water interface in emulsions.

  8. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF TOXIC VOCS IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - LABORATORY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of a mixture of 42 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in humidified, purified air onto the solid adsorbent Carbopack X was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. The evaluation included variations in sample air temperature, relative humidity, and ozon...

  9. An Investigation of the Effects of Density, Size and Shape Upon the Air Classification of Municipal Type Solid Waste.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    municipal solid waste type materials into more than two fractions by passing the material through a vertical air classifier. This feasibility was demonstrated by suspending specimens of varying densities, sizes, and shapes in a vertical air classifier and noting the terminal velocities of the materials. Since most shredded solid waste approximates flat plates of varying sizes and shapes, flat plates of six different materials in aspect ratios (length over width) from one to four and in four different sizes from 0.0625 to 1.000 square inches (0.4032 to 6.4516

  10. Powder wettability at a static air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Julien; Forny, Laurent; Ramaioli, Marco

    2015-06-15

    The reconstitution of a beverage from a dehydrated powder involves several physical mechanisms that determine the practical difficulty to obtain a homogeneous drink in a convenient way and within an acceptable time for the preparation of a beverage. When pouring powder onto static water, the first hurdle to overcome is the air-water interface. We propose a model to predict the percentage of powder crossing the interface in 45 s, namely the duration relevant for this application. We highlight theoretically the determinant role of the contact angle and of the particle size distribution. We validate experimentally the model for single spheres and use it to predict the wettability performance of commercial food powders for different contact angles and particles sizes. A good agreement is obtained when comparing the predictions and the wettability of the tested powders.

  11. Use of Air2Air Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2009-06-30

    This program was undertaken to build and operate the first Air2Air{trademark} Water Conservation Cooling Tower at a power plant, giving a validated basis and capability for water conservation by this method. Air2Air{trademark} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10%-25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate).

  12. Proton Transfers at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Himanshu

    Proton transfer reactions at the interface of water with hydrophobic media, such as air or lipids, are ubiquitous on our planet. These reactions orchestrate a host of vital phenomena in the environment including, for example, acidification of clouds, enzymatic catalysis, chemistries of aerosol and atmospheric gases, and bioenergetic transduction. Despite their importance, however, quantitative details underlying these interactions have remained unclear. Deeper insight into these interfacial reactions is also required in addressing challenges in green chemistry, improved water quality, self-assembly of materials, the next generation of micro-nanofluidics, adhesives, coatings, catalysts, and electrodes. This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigation of proton transfer reactions at the air-water interface as a function of hydration gradients, electrochemical potential, and electrostatics. Since emerging insights hold at the lipid-water interface as well, this work is also expected to aid understanding of complex biological phenomena associated with proton migration across membranes. Based on our current understanding, it is known that the physicochemical properties of the gas-phase water are drastically different from those of bulk water. For example, the gas-phase hydronium ion, H3O +(g), can protonate most (non-alkane) organic species, whereas H 3O+(aq) can neutralize only relatively strong bases. Thus, to be able to understand and engineer water-hydrophobe interfaces, it is imperative to investigate this fluctuating region of molecular thickness wherein the 'function' of chemical species transitions from one phase to another via steep gradients in hydration, dielectric constant, and density. Aqueous interfaces are difficult to approach by current experimental techniques because designing experiments to specifically sample interfacial layers (< 1 nm thick) is an arduous task. While recent advances in surface-specific spectroscopies have provided

  13. 77 FR 47282 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    .... The Captain of the Port, Sector Lake Michigan, has determined that an air show with associated... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Air and Water Show, Lake Michigan... temporary deviation to the established Milwaukee Air and Water Show safety zone on Lake Michigan...

  14. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m-2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation.

  15. Simulation model finned water-air-coil withoutcondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of a finned water-to- air coil without condensation is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows eficient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is short computation time and use of input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important for energy efficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculation or load calculation with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short-time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control performance, are neglected. The part load behavior of the coil is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature on the water side and the air side. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part load conditions. Geometrical data for the coil are not required, The calculation of the convective heat transfer coefficients at nominal conditions is based on the ratio of the air side heat transfer coefficients multiplied by the fin eficiency and divided by the water side heat transfer coefficient. In this approach, the only geometrical information required are the cross section areas, which are needed to calculate the~uid velocities. The formulas for estimating this ratio are presented. For simplicity the model ignores condensation. The model is static and uses only explicit equations. The explicit formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability. This allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods such as automatic system optimization. The paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its

  16. Environmental application of nanotechnology: air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rusul Khaleel; Hayyan, Maan; AlSaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Adeeb; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2016-07-01

    Global deterioration of water, soil, and atmosphere by the release of toxic chemicals from the ongoing anthropogenic activities is becoming a serious problem throughout the world. This poses numerous issues relevant to ecosystem and human health that intensify the application challenges of conventional treatment technologies. Therefore, this review sheds the light on the recent progresses in nanotechnology and its vital role to encompass the imperative demand to monitor and treat the emerging hazardous wastes with lower cost, less energy, as well as higher efficiency. Essentially, the key aspects of this account are to briefly outline the advantages of nanotechnology over conventional treatment technologies and to relevantly highlight the treatment applications of some nanomaterials (e.g., carbon-based nanoparticles, antibacterial nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanoparticles) in the following environments: (1) air (treatment of greenhouse gases, volatile organic compounds, and bioaerosols via adsorption, photocatalytic degradation, thermal decomposition, and air filtration processes), (2) soil (application of nanomaterials as amendment agents for phytoremediation processes and utilization of stabilizers to enhance their performance), and (3) water (removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, pathogens through adsorption, membrane processes, photocatalysis, and disinfection processes).

  17. Thermal chemical energy of ablating silica surfaces in air breathing solid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, Michael D.

    1993-11-01

    This paper provides theoretical adaptation and extension of current industry methodologies for analytical predictions of insulation ablation in solid fuel ramjets. Solid fuel ramjets predominantly operate in a fuel-lean state and require thermal protection systems that are highly oxidation resistant, such as insulation materials that form silica-based char. However, local regions of fuel rich gases exist in ramjets where mixing and combustion of fuel and air is incomplete. Modeling corrosion of silica based char in fuel rich regions of the combustor requires new methods. Accurate ablation prediction of these fuel rich regions are in the design of ramjets. Current analytical methods used to model the ablation of insulation are most suitable for oxidative corrosion of carbonaceous insulation char. Silica-based insulation will ablate corrosively by reduction reactions with carbon and carbon based fuels. Silica ablation by carbon reduction reactions with silica is not correctly modeled by the current industry code, ACE. This paper describes the causes of the current limitations and provides extensions to the ACE methodology to allow for the modeling of silica ablation.

  18. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Water and sewage treatment systems are presented with concentration on the filtration of water. Equipment is described for organic removal, solids removal, nutrient removal, inorganic removal, and disinfection of the water. Such things as aseline hardware, additional piping connections, waste disposal, and costs involved are also reported.

  19. Air sampling of aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of ozone by solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gouhua; Koziel, Jacek A; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2004-01-30

    Effects of ozone on air sampling of standard gas mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons were tested using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Standard concentrations of ozone ranging from 10 ppb (v/v) to 6400 ppm (v/v) were generated using an in-house built ozone generator based on corona discharge. Effects of temperature, discharge voltage, and oxygen flow on the ozone generation were tested. The working dc voltage had the greatest effect on generated ozone concentration and was proportional to the ozone concentration. Generation temperature and oxygen flow rate were inversely proportional to ozone concentrations. Produced ozone was mixed with standard benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) gas at less than 100 ppb (v/v). Air samples were collected with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) 100 microm SPME fibers and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detection (FID) and GC-MS. Significant reductions of BTEX concentrations were observed. In addition, some products of BTEX-ozone-oxygen reactions were identified. SPME worked well as a rapid sampler for BTEX and BTEX-ozone-oxygen reaction products. No significant deterioration of the PDMS coating and no significant reduction of absorption capacity were observed after repeated exposure to ozone.

  20. Analysis of solid particulate matter suspended in the air of Córdoba, southwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Cariñanos, Paloma; Galán, Carmen; Alcázar, Purificación; Domínguez, Eugenio

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was made of solid particulate matter suspended in the air in the city of Cordoba. Particles greater than 10 micra were collected using volumetric particle samplers (Lanzoni VPPS 2000, Bologna, Italy), and analysed by means of aerobiological methods enabling identification of the source of biological particulate material (BPM). Particles smaller than 10 micra were collected using automatic high-volume air samplers. Subsequent analysis showed that traffic, and particularly diesel engine exhaust emissions, were the main source of non-biological particulate matter (nBPM). The dynamics of airborne BPM and nBPM were also studied over one year: although distribution patterns differed--BPM displaying marked seasonality and non-BPM exhibiting dependence on human activity--the curves ran parallel at certain times of the year. Statistical results point to the possible presence of plant residues on smaller particles. The occurrence of simultaneous peaks in airborne pollen-grain and PM10 counts suggests potential coadjuvant activity, which may lead to high-risk situations for people with respiratory disease.

  1. Evaluating the impact of ambient benzene vapor concentrations on product water from Condensation Water From Air technology.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Katherine M; Gellasch, Christopher A; Dusenbury, James S; Timmes, Thomas C; Hughes, Thomas M

    2017-07-15

    Globally, drinking water resources are diminishing in both quantity and quality. This situation has renewed interest in Condensation Water From Air (CWFA) technology, which utilizes water vapor in the air to produce water for both potable and non-potable purposes. However, there are currently insufficient data available to determine the relationship between air contaminants and the rate at which they are transferred from the air into CWFA untreated product water. This study implemented a novel experimental method utilizing an environmental test chamber to evaluate how air quality and temperature affects CWFA untreated product water quality in order to collect data that will inform the type of water treatment required to protect human health. This study found that temperature and benzene air concentration affected the untreated product water from a CWFA system. Benzene vapor concentrations representing a polluted outdoor environment resulted in benzene product water concentrations between 15% and 23% of the USEPA drinking water limit of 5μg/l. In contrast, product water benzene concentrations representing an indoor industrial environment were between 1.4 and 2.4 times higher than the drinking water limit. Lower condenser coil temperatures were correlated with an increased concentration of benzene in the product water. Environmental health professionals and engineers can integrate the results of this assessment to predict benzene concentrations in the product water and take appropriate health protective measures.

  2. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge.

  3. Evaporative assembly of MEH-PPV rings using mixed solvents at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kung-Po; Biswal, Sibani L

    2014-04-22

    Controlling the morphology of conjugated polymers has recently attracted considerable attention because of their applications in photovoltaic (PV) devices and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, we describe the self-assembly of a common conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), into ringlike structures via solvent evaporation on an air/water interface. The films are monitored using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and transferred onto a solid substrate by either the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) or the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) method and further characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The morphology of the MEH-PPV thin film at the air/water interface can be controlled by the spreading solvent. By mixing solvents of varying spreading coefficients and evaporation rates, such as chloroform and chlorobenzene, MEH-PPV can be assembled into micrometer-sized ring structures. The optical properties of these MEH-PPV ring structures are also characterized. Lastly, MEH-PPV can be used as a soft template to organize microscale structures of nanoparticles.

  4. Periodic peristalsis releasing constrained water in high solids enzymatic hydrolysis of steam exploded corn stover.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Hong-Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Periodic peristalsis was used to release water constraint and increase high solids enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. Glucan and xylan conversion in periodic peristalsis enzymatic hydrolysis (PPEH) at 21% solid loading increased by 5.2-6.4% and 6.8-8.8% compared with that in incubator shaker enzymatic hydrolysis (ISEH), respectively. Hydrolysis kinetics suggested that sugars conversion significantly increased within 24h in PPEH compared with ISEH. The peak height of main water pool increased by 7.7-43.1% within 24h in PPEH compared with ISEH. The increases in peak height of main water pool were consistent with the increases in glucan conversion. Submicroscopic particulates and macro granule residues contributed greatly to water constraint compared with glucose, xylose, ethanol, and Tween 80. Smaller particle size and longer residence time resulted in lower water constraint and facilitated the enzymatic hydrolysis performance. Periodic peristalsis was an effective method to reduce water constraint and increase high solids enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency.

  5. Experimental study of the decrease in the temperature of an air/water-cooled turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, A. A.; Sereda, A. V.; Shaiakberov, V. F.; Iskakov, K. M.; Shatalov, Iu. S.

    Results of the full-scale testing of an air/water-cooled deflector-type turbine blade are reported. Data on the decrease in the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade are presented and compared with the calculated values. An analysis of the results indicates that the use of air/water cooling makes it possible to significantly reduce the temperature of the cooling air and of the blade with practically no increase in the engine weight and dimensions.

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Fruland, R.M.

    1986-10-01

    Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  8. Molecular mobility in mixtures of absorbed water and solid poly(vinylpyrrolidone).

    PubMed

    Oksanen, C A; Zografi, G

    1993-06-01

    Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was used as model system to examine molecular mobility in mixtures of absorbed water with solid amorphous polymers. Water vapor absorption isotherms were determined, along with diffusion and proton NMR relaxation measurements of absorbed water. Concurrently, measurements of glass transition temperatures (Tg) and carbon-13 NMR relaxation times for PVP were determined as a function of water content. Two water contents were used as reference points: Wm, obtained from the fit of water absorption isotherms to the BET equation, corresponding to the first shoulder in the sigmoid isotherm; and Wg, the amount of water necessary to depress Tg to the isotherm temperature. Translational diffusion coefficients of water, along with proton T1 relaxation time constants, show that both the translational and the rotational mobility of the water is hindered by the presence of the solid polymer and that the absorbed water is most likely represented by two or more populations of water with different modes or time scales of motion. The presence of "tightly bound" or immobilized water at levels corresponding to Wm, however, is unlikely, since water molecules maintain a high degree of mobility, even at the lowest levels of water. Above Wg, water shows an increase in mobility with increasing water content, but it is always less mobile than bulk water. With increasing water content, carbon-13 T1 relaxation time constants for PVP, measured under the same conditions as above, indicate a major increase in the molecular mobility of carbon atoms associated with the pyrrolidone side chains.

  9. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  10. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  11. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  12. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  13. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  14. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  15. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  16. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  17. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  18. 15 CFR 923.45 - Air and water pollution control requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air and water pollution control....45 Air and water pollution control requirements. The program must incorporate, by reference or otherwise, all requirements established by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (Clean...

  19. Environmental Assessment: Maintenance of the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed maintenance on the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond. The EA...biological resources, water resources, air quality, safety, and hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed...traffic, noise, hazardous materials and wastes , water resources, biological resources, air quality, socioeconomics, and safety. This EA also considers

  20. An All-Solid-State Fiber-Shaped Aluminum-Air Battery with Flexibility, Stretchability, and High Electrochemical Performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifan; Zhao, Yang; Ren, Jing; Zhang, Ye; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-07-04

    Owing to the high theoretical energy density of metal-air batteries, the aluminum-air battery has been proposed as a promising long-term power supply for electronics. However, the available energy density from the aluminum-air battery is far from that anticipated and is limited by current electrode materials. Herein we described the creation of a new family of all-solid-state fiber-shaped aluminum-air batteries with a specific capacity of 935 mAh g(-1) and an energy density of 1168 Wh kg(-1) . The synthesis of an electrode composed of cross-stacked aligned carbon-nanotube/silver-nanoparticle sheets contributes to the remarkable electrochemical performance. The fiber shape also provides the aluminum-air batteries with unique advantages; for example, they are flexible and stretchable and can be woven into a variety of textiles for large-scale applications.

  1. Dissolved-solids transport in surface water of the Muddy Creek Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Muddy Creek is located in the southeastern part of central Utah and is a tributary of the Dirty Devil River, which, in turn, is a tributary of the Colorado River. Dissolved solids transported from the Muddy Creek Basin may be stored in the lower Dirty Devil River Basin, but are eventually discharged to the Colorado River and impact downstream water users. This study used selected dissolved-solids measurements made by various local, State, and Federal agencies from the 1970s through 2006, and additional dissolved-solids data that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during April 2004 through November 2006, to compute dissolved-solids loads, determine the distribution of dissolved-solids concentrations, and identify trends in dissolved-solids concentration in surface water of the Muddy Creek Basin. The dissolved-solids concentration values measured in water samples collected from Muddy Creek during April 2004 through October 2006 ranged from 385 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 5,950 mg/L. The highest dissolved-solids concentration values measured in the study area were in water samples collected at sites in South Salt Wash (27,000 mg/L) and Salt Wash (4,940 to 6,780 mg/L). The mean annual dissolved-solids load in Muddy Creek for the periods October 1976 to September 1980 and October 2005 to September 2006 was smallest at a site near the headwaters (9,670 tons per year [tons/yr]) and largest at a site at the mouth (68,700 tons/yr). For this period, the mean annual yield of dissolved solids from the Muddy Creek Basin was 44 tons per square mile. During October 2005 to September 2006, direct runoff transported as much as 45 percent of the annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Muddy Creek. A storm that occurred during October 5?7, 2006 resulted in a peak streamflow at the mouth of Muddy Creek of 7,150 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and the transport of an estimated 35,000 tons of dissolved solids, which is about 51 percent of the average annual dissolved-solids

  2. Air-water interface equilibrium partitioning coefficients of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Chu, Fu-Sui; Liou, Jia-Jiunn

    The single equilibration technique was used to determine the equilibrium partitioning coefficients ( pc) of an air-water interface for target aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene. The tested liquid concentrations ( CL) of VOC ranged from 0.5 to 20 mg/l, and the temperatures ( Tw) of the solutions were 300, 305, 310 and 315 K, respectively. The pc values were calculated using the gaseous concentrations ( Cg*) of aromatic hydrocarbons in equilibrium with the aqueous phase and the formula pc=( Cg*/ CL). The heats of VOC of liquid and gaseous phase transfer (Δ Htr) in pure water, and the highly linear regression relationship (with squared correlation coefficients, R2, from 0.900 to 0.999) between ( ln C g*) and (1/ Tw) are also evaluated. Experimental results indicated that the pc values of the target VOC components increase with Tw but, in contrast, are not significantly affected by CL in pure water. However, pc of more soluble compounds, like iso-propanol and methyl ethyl ketone, have been evaluated to be significant with CL in the earlier investigation. Finally, the co-solute effect on pc is also evaluated in this work, as determining pc of the aromatic hydrocarbons by using aqueous ethanol (in a volume ration of 1-15%) as solutes.

  3. A new class of solid oxide metal-air redox batteries for advanced stationary energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuan

    Cost-effective and large-scale energy storage technologies are a key enabler of grid modernization. Among energy storage technologies currently being researched, developed and deployed, rechargeable batteries are unique and important that can offer a myriad of advantages over the conventional large scale siting- and geography- constrained pumped-hydro and compressed-air energy storage systems. However, current rechargeable batteries still need many breakthroughs in material optimization and system design to become commercially viable for stationary energy storage. This PhD research project investigates the energy storage characteristics of a new class of rechargeable solid oxide metal-air redox batteries (SOMARBs) that combines a regenerative solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) and hydrogen chemical-looping component. The RSOFC serves as the "electrical functioning unit", alternating between the fuel cell and electrolysis mode to realize discharge and charge cycles, respectively, while the hydrogen chemical-looping component functions as an energy storage unit (ESU), performing electrical-chemical energy conversion in situ via a H2/H2O-mediated metal/metal oxide redox reaction. One of the distinctive features of the new battery from conventional storage batteries is the ESU that is physically separated from the electrodes of RSOFC, allowing it to freely expand and contract without impacting the mechanical integrity of the entire battery structure. This feature also allows an easy switch in the chemistry of this battery. The materials selection for ESU is critical to energy capacity, round-trip efficiency and cost effectiveness of the new battery. Me-MeOx redox couples with favorable thermodynamics and kinetics are highly preferable. The preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that Fe-based redox couples can be a promising candidate for operating at both high and low temperatures. Therefore, the Fe-based redox-couple systems have been selected as the baseline for this

  4. Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

  5. Colloidal crystals and water: Perspectives on liquid-solid nanoscale phenomena in wet particulate media.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Morales-Flórez, Víctor; Morales, Miguel; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Solid colloidal ensembles inherently contain water adsorbed from the ambient moisture. This water, confined in the porous network formed by the building submicron spheres, greatly affects the ensemble properties. Inversely, one can benefit from such influence on collective features to explore the water behavior in such nanoconfinements. Recently, novel approaches have been developed to investigate in-depth where and how water is placed in the nanometric pores of self-assembled colloidal crystals. Here, we summarize these advances, along with new ones, that are linked to general interfacial water phenomena like adsorption, capillary forces, and flow. Water-dependent structural properties of the colloidal crystal give clues to the interplay between nanoconfined water and solid fine particles that determines the behavior of ensembles. We elaborate on how the knowledge gained on water in colloidal crystals provides new opportunities for multidisciplinary study of interfacial and nanoconfined liquids and their essential role in the physics of utmost important systems such as particulate media.

  6. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  7. Air and water stable ionic liquids in physical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Endres, Frank; Zein El Abedin, Sherif

    2006-05-14

    Ionic liquids are defined today as liquids which solely consist of cations and anions and which by definition must have a melting point of 100 degrees C or below. Originating from electrochemistry in AlCl(3) based liquids an enormous progress was made during the recent 10 years to synthesize ionic liquids that can be handled under ambient conditions, and today about 300 ionic liquids are already commercially available. Whereas the main interest is still focussed on organic and technical chemistry, various aspects of physical chemistry in ionic liquids are discussed now in literature. In this review article we give a short overview on physicochemical aspects of ionic liquids, such as physical properties of ionic liquids, nanoparticles, nanotubes, batteries, spectroscopy, thermodynamics and catalysis of/in ionic liquids. The focus is set on air and water stable ionic liquids as they will presumably dominate various fields of chemistry in future.

  8. Molecular structure and dynamics of water at the water-air interface studied with surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki; Backus, Ellen H G

    2015-05-04

    Water interfaces provide the platform for many important biological, chemical, and physical processes. The water-air interface is the most common and simple aqueous interface and serves as a model system for water at a hydrophobic surface. Unveiling the microscopic (<1 nm) structure and dynamics of interfacial water at the water-vapor interface is essential for understanding the processes occurring on the water surface. At the water interface the network of very strong intermolecular interactions, hydrogen-bonds, is interrupted and the density of water is reduced. A central question regarding water at interfaces is the extent to which the structure and dynamics of water molecules are influenced by the interruption of the hydrogen-bonded network and thus differ from those of bulk water. Herein, we discuss recent advances in the study of interfacial water at the water-air interface using laser-based surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy.

  9. Performance assessment and transient optimization of multi-stage solid desiccant air conditioning systems with building PV/T integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadalla, Mohamed; Saghafifar, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    One of the popular solar air conditioning technologies is desiccant air conditioning. Nonetheless, single stage desiccant air conditioning systems' coefficient of performance (COP) are relatively low. Therefore, multi-stage solid desiccant air conditioning systems are recommended. In this paper, an integrated double-stage desiccant air conditioning systems and PV/T collector is suggested for hot and humid climates such as the UAE. The results for the PV/T implementation in the double-stage desiccant cooling system are assessed against the PV/T results for a single-stage desiccant air conditioning system. In order to provide a valid comparative evaluation between the single and double stage desiccant air conditioning systems, an identical PV/T module, in terms of dimensions, is incorporated into these systems. The overall required auxiliary air heating is abated by 46.0% from 386.8 MWh to 209.0 MWh by replacing the single stage desiccant air conditioning system with the proposed double stage configuration during June to October. Moreover, the overall averaged solar share during the investigated months for the single and double stage systems are 36.5% and 43.3%.

  10. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  11. Thermodynamics of water-solid interactions in crystalline and amorphous pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Pharmaceutical materials, crystalline and amorphous, sorb water from the atmosphere, which affects critical factors in the development of drugs, such as the selection of drug substance crystal form, compatibility with excipients, dosage form selection, packaging, and product shelf-life. It is common practice to quantify the amount of water that a material sorbs at a given relative humidity (RH), but the results alone provide minimal to no physicochemical insight into water-solid interactions, without which pharmaceutical scientists cannot develop an understanding of their materials, so as to anticipate and circumvent potential problems. This research was conducted to advance the science of pharmaceutical materials by examining the thermodynamics of solids with sorbed water. The compounds studied include nonhygroscopic drugs, a channel hydrate drug, a stoichiometric hydrate excipient, and an amorphous excipient. The water sorption isotherms were measured over a range of temperature to extract the partial molar enthalpy and entropy of sorbed water as well as the same quantities for some of the solids. It was found that water-solid interactions spanned a range of energy and entropy as a function of RH, which was unique to the solid, and which could be valuable in identifying batch-to-batch differences and effects of processing in material performance.

  12. ISSUES IN SIMULATING ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE AND AQUEOUS MONOMETHYLMERCURY SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on two areas relevant to assessing the global fate and bioavailability of mercury: elemental mercury air/water exchange and aqueous environmental monomethylmercury speciation.

  13. Characterization of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.; Spangler, L.E.; Kimball, B.A.; Naftz, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, have been identified as contributing dissolved solids to Flaming Gorge Reservoir. Concentrations of dissolved solids in water resources of agricultural lands near Manila, Utah, ranged from 35 to 7,410 milligrams per liter. The dissolved-solids load in seeps and drains in the study area that discharge to Flaming Gorge Reservoir ranged from less than 0.1 to 113 tons per day. The most substantial source of dissolved solids discharging from the study area to the reservoir was Birch Spring Draw. The mean daily dissolved-solids load near the mouth of Birch Spring Draw was 65 tons per day.The estimated annual dissolved-solids load imported to the study area by Sheep Creek and Peoples Canals is 1,330 and 13,200 tons, respectively. Daily dissolved-solid loads discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the period July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2005, ranged from 72 to 241 tons per day with a mean of 110 tons per day. The estimated annual dissolved-solids load discharging to the reservoir from the study area, less the amount of dissolved solids imported by canals, for the same period was 40,200 tons. Of this 40,200 tons of dissolved solids, about 9,000 tons may be from a regional source that is not associated with agricultural activities. The salt-loading factor is 3,670 milligrams per liter or about 5.0 tons of dissolved solids per acre-foot of deep percolation in Lucerne Valley and 1,620 milligrams per liter or 2.2 tons per acre-foot in South Valley.The variation of δ87Sr with strontium concentration indicates some general patterns that help to define a conceptual model of the processes affecting the concentration of strontium and the δ87Sr isotopic ratio in area waters. As excess irrigation water percolates through soils derived from Mancos Shale, the δ87Sr isotopic ratio (0.21 to 0.69 permil) approaches one that is typical of deep percolation from irrigation on Mancos

  14. Solid Fuel Burning in Steady, Strained, Premixed Flow Fields: The Graphite/Air/Methane System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wu, Ming-Shin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation was conducted on the simultaneous burning of laminar premixed CH4/air flames and solid graphite in a stagnation flow configuration. The graphite and methane were chosen for this model, given that they are practical fuels and their chemical kinetics are considered as the most reliable ones among solid and hydrocarbon fuels, respectively. The simulation was performed by solving the quasi-one-dimensional equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species. The GRI 2.1 scheme was used for the gas-phase kinetics, while the heterogeneous kinetics were described by a six-step mechanism including stable and radical species. The effects of the graphite surface temperature, the gas-phase equivalence ratio, and the aerodynamic strain rate on the graphite burning rate and NO, production and destruction mechanisms were assessed. Results indicate that as the graphite temperature increases, its burning rate as well as the NO, concentration increase. Furthermore, it was found that by increasing the strain rate, the graphite burning rate increases as a result of the augmented supply of the gas-phase reactants towards the surface, while the NO, concentration decreases as a result of the reduced residence time. The effect of the equivalence ratio on both the graphite burning rate and NO, concentration was found to be non-monotonic and strongly dependent on the graphite temperature. Comparisons between results obtained for a graphite and a chemically inert surface revealed that the chemical activity of the graphite surface can result to the reduction of NO through reactions of the CH3, CH2, CH, and N radicals with NO.

  15. Aromatic compound emissions from municipal solid waste landfill: Emission factors and their impact on air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanjun; Lu, Wenjing; Guo, Hanwen; Ming, Zhongyuan; Wang, Chi; Xu, Sai; Liu, Yanting; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-08-01

    Aromatic compounds (ACs) are major components of volatile organic compounds emitted from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The ACs emissions from the working face of a landfill in Beijing were studied from 2014 to 2015 using a modified wind tunnel system. Emission factors (EFs) of fugitive ACs emissions from the working face of the landfill were proposed according to statistical analyses to cope with their uncertainty. And their impacts on air quality were assessed for the first time. Toluene was the dominant AC with an average emission rate of 38.8 ± 43.0 μg m-2 s-1 (at a sweeping velocity of 0.26 m s-1). An increasing trend in AC emission rates was observed from 12:00 to 18:00 and then peaked at 21:00 (314.3 μg m-2 s-1). The probability density functions (PDFs) of AC emission rates could be classified into three distributions: Gaussian, log-normal, and logistic. EFs of ACs from the working face of the landfill were proposed according to the 95th percentile cumulative emission rates and the wind effects on ACs emissions. The annual ozone formation and secondary organic aerosol formation potential caused by AC emissions from landfills in Beijing were estimated to be 8.86 × 105 kg year-1 and 3.46 × 104 kg year-1, respectively. Toluene, m + p-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were the most significant contributors to air pollution. Although ACs pollutions from landfills accounts for less percentage (∼0.1%) compared with other anthropogenic sources, their fugitive emissions which cannot be controlled efficiently deserve more attention and further investigation.

  16. Air-Stable, High-Conduction Solid Electrolytes of Arsenic-Substituted Li4SnS4

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Gayatri; Lin, Zhan; Li, Juchuan; Liu, Zengcai; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolytes show promise for enabling high-energy secondary battery chemistries and solving safety issues associated with conventional lithium batteries. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity and outstanding chemical stability in solid electrolytes is a grand challenge for the synthesis of solid electrolytes. Herein we report the design of aliovalent substitution of Li4SnS4 to achieve high conduction and excellent air stability based on the hard and soft acids and bases theory. The composition of Li3.833Sn0.833As 0.166S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.39 mS/cm 1 at 25 C. Considering the high Li+ transference number, this phase conducts Li+ as well as carbonate-based liquid electrolytes. This research also addresses the compatibility of the sulfide-based solid electrolytes through chemical passivation.

  17. Passive methods for improving air quality in the built environment: A review of porous and solid barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John; Baldauf, Richard; Fuller, Christina H.; Kumar, Prashant; Gill, Laurence W.; McNabola, Aonghus

    2015-11-01

    Protecting the health of growing urban populations from air pollution remains a challenge for planners and requires detailed understanding of air flow and pollutant transport in the built environment. In recent years, the work undertaken on passive methods of reducing air pollution has been examined to address the question: "how can the built environment work to alter natural dispersion patterns to improve air quality for nearby populations?" This review brings together a collective of methods that have demonstrated an ability to influence air flow patterns to reduce personal exposure in the built environment. A number of passive methods exists but, in the context of this paper, are split into two distinct categories: porous and solid barriers. These methods include trees and vegetation (porous) as well as noise barriers, low boundary walls and parked cars (solid); all of which have gained different levels of research momentum over the past decade. Experimental and modelling studies have provided an understanding of the potential for these barriers to improve air quality under varying urban geometrical and meteorological conditions. However, differences in results between these studies and real-world measurements demonstrate the challenges and complexities of simulating pollutant transport in urban areas. These methods provide additional benefits to improving air quality through altering dispersion patterns; avenue trees and vegetation are aesthetically pleasing and provides cooling and shade from direct sunlight. Additionally, real-world case studies are considered an important direction for further verification of these methods in the built environment. Developing design guidelines is an important next stage in promoting passive methods for reducing air pollution and ensuring their integration into future urban planning strategies. In addition, developing channels of communication with urban planners will enhance the development and uptake of design guidelines to

  18. Impact of artificial monolayer application on stored water quality at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, P; Martínez-Alvarez, V; Hancock, N; Gallego-Elvira, B

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation mitigation has the potential to significantly improve water use efficiency, with repeat applications of artificial monolayer formulations the most cost-effective strategy for large water storages. Field investigations of the impact of artificial monolayers on water quality have been limited by wind and wave turbulence, and beaching. Two suspended covers differing in permeability to wind and light were used to attenuate wind turbulence, to favour the maintenance of a condensed monolayer at the air/water interface of a 10 m diameter tank. An octadecanol formulation was applied twice-weekly to one of two covered tanks, while a third clean water tank remained uncovered for the 14-week duration of the trial. Microlayer and subsurface water samples were extracted once a week to distinguish impacts associated with the installation of covers, from the impact of prolonged monolayer application. The monolayer was selectively toxic to some phytoplankton, but the toxicity of hydrocarbons leaching from a replacement liner had a greater impact. Monolayer application did not increase water temperature, humified dissolved organic matter, or the biochemical oxygen demand, and did not reduce dissolved oxygen. The impact of an octadecanol monolayer on water quality and the microlayer may not be as detrimental as previously considered.

  19. Well-construction, water-level, geophysical, and water-quality data for ground-water monitoring wells for Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, C.J.; Mahoney, E.N.; Robinson, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-five wells were installed at 39 sites in the Arnold Air Force Base area in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The wells were installed to provide information on subsurface lithology, aquifer characteristics, ground-water levels, and ground-water quality. Well depths ranged from 11 to 384 feet. Water-quality samples were collected from 60 wells and analyzed for common inorganic ions, trace metals, and volatile organic compounds. The median dissolved-solids concentrations were 60 milligrams per liter in the shallow aquifer, 48 million gallons per liter in the Manchester aquifer, 1,235 milligrams per liter in the Fort Payne aquifer, and 1,712 milligrams per liter in the upper Central Basin aquifer. Caliper, temperature, natural gamma, electric, neutron porosity, gamma-gamma density, and acoustic velocity borehole-geophysical logs were obtained for the six deep wells completed below the Chattanooga Shale. Petrographic and modal analysis were performed on rock samples from each deep well. These six deep wells provide the first information in the study area on hydraulic head and water quality from below the Chattanooga Shale.

  20. Non-thermal plasma for air and water remediation.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Samsudin, Farah Nadia Dayana Binti; Wong, Chiow San; Abu Bakar, Khomsaton; Yap, Seong Ling; Mohd Zin, Mohd Faiz

    2016-09-01

    A modular typed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device is designed and tested for air and water remediation. The module is made of a number of DBD tubes that can be arranged in series or parallel. Each of the DBD tubes comprises inner electrode enclosed with dielectric barrier and arranged as such to provide a gap for the passage of gases. Non-thermal plasma generated in the gap effectively creates gaseous chemical reactions. Its efficacy in the remediation of gas stream containing high NOx, similar to diesel emission and wastewater containing latex, are presented. A six tubes DBD module has successfully removed more than 80% of nitric oxide from the gas stream. In another arrangement, oxygen was fed into a two tubes DBD to generate ozone for treatment of wastewater. Samples of wastewater were collected from a treatment pond of a rubber vulcanization pilot plant. The water pollution load was evaluated by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) values. Preliminary results showed some improvement (about 13%) on the COD after treatment and at the same time had increased the BOD5 by 42%. This results in higher BOD5/COD ratio after ozonation which indicate better biodegradability of the wastewater.

  1. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  2. Using nanoscale amorphous solid water films to create and study deeply supercooled liquid water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bruce

    Molecular beam vapor deposition of water on cryogenic substrates is known to produce amorphous solid films. When heated above their glass transition these films transform into deeply supercooled liquid water. These nanoscale liquid films can be used to study kinetic processes such as diffusion, isotope exchange, crystallization, and solvent mediated reactions in unprecedented detail. This talk will highlight our recent advances in this area. My colleagues Yuntao Xu, Chunqing Yuan, Collin Dibble, R. Scott Smith, Nick Petrik, and Greg Kimmel made important contributions to this work.This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle, operated for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  3. Exterior Distribution of Utility Steam, High Temperature Water (HTW), Chilled Water (CHW), Fuel Gas, and Compressed Air.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    A~r-AIIO 408 NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND ALEXANDRIA VA FIG 13/11 EXTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF UTILITY STEAM. HIGH TEMPERATURE WATER -ETC(U...PUBUC RELEASE JOF EXTERIOR DISTRIBUTION OF O UTILITY STEAM, HIGH 0 TEMPERATURE WATER (HTW), , CHILLED WATER (CHW), FUEL GAS, AND COMPRESSED AIR DESIGN...distribution piping system for supplying utility steam, high temperature water (HTW), chilled water (CRW), cooling or condensing water, fuel gas, and

  4. ARSENIC MOBILITY FROM IRON OXIDE SOLIDS PRODUCED DURING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Rule under the Safe Drinking Water Act will require certain drinking water suppliers to add to or modify their existing treatment in order to comply with the new 10 ppb arsenic standard. One of the treatment options is co-precipitation of arsenic with iron. This tre...

  5. Water-air and soil-air exchange rate of total gaseous mercury measured at background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Laurier; Casimir, Alain

    In order to evaluate and understand the processes of water-air and soil-air exchanges involved at background sites, an intensive field measurement campaign has been achieved during the summer of 1995 using high-time resolution techniques (10 min) at two sites (land and water) in southern Québec (Canada). Mercury flux was measured using a dynamic flux chamber technique coupled with an automatic mercury vapour-phase analyser (namely, Tekran®). The flux chamber shows that the rural grassy site acted primarily as a source of atmospheric mercury, its flux mimicked the solar radiation, with a maximum daytime value of ˜ 8.3 ng m -2 h -1 of TGM. The water surface location (St. Lawrence River site located about 3 km from the land site) shows deposition and evasion fluxes almost in the same order of magnitude (-0.5 vs 1.0 ng m -2 h -1).The latter is influenced to some extent by solar radiation but primarily by the formation of a layer of stable air over the water surface in which some redox reactions might promote evasion processes over the water surface. This process does not appear over the soil surface. As a whole, soil-air exchange rate is about 6-8 fold greater than the water-air exchange.

  6. Nanometre-thick single-crystalline nanosheets grown at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Seo, Jung-Hun; Luo, Guangfu; Starr, Matthew B; Li, Zhaodong; Geng, Dalong; Yin, Xin; Wang, Shaoyang; Fraser, Douglas G; Morgan, Dane; Ma, Zhenqiang; Wang, Xudong

    2016-01-20

    To date, the preparation of free-standing 2D nanomaterials has been largely limited to the exfoliation of van der Waals solids. The lack of a robust mechanism for the bottom-up synthesis of 2D nanomaterials from non-layered materials has become an obstacle to further explore the physical properties and advanced applications of 2D nanomaterials. Here we demonstrate that surfactant monolayers can serve as soft templates guiding the nucleation and growth of 2D nanomaterials in large area beyond the limitation of van der Waals solids. One- to 2-nm-thick, single-crystalline free-standing ZnO nanosheets with sizes up to tens of micrometres are synthesized at the water-air interface. In this process, the packing density of surfactant monolayers adapts to the sub-phase metal ions and guides the epitaxial growth of nanosheets. It is thus named adaptive ionic layer epitaxy (AILE). The electronic properties of ZnO nanosheets and AILE of other materials are also investigated.

  7. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  8. Ground-water quality beneath solid-waste disposal sites at anchorage, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zenone, Chester; Donaldson, D.E.; Grunwaldt, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    Studies at three solid-waste disposal sites in the Anchorage area suggest that differences in local geohydrologic conditions influence ground-water quality. A leachate was detected in ground water within and beneath two sites where the water table is very near land surface and refuse is deposited either at or below the water table in some parts of the filled areas. No leachate was detected in ground water beneath a third site where waste disposal is well above the local water table.

  9. Freezing of Water next to Solid Surfaces Probed Using Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Kurian, Anish; Ge, Liehui; Alizadeh, Azar; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    The control of ice formation next to solid surfaces is important in many technological applications such as de-icing for aircrafts and generation of power using wind turbines. We have studied the water-ice transition next to sapphire surface to understand the freezing transition and nucleation of ice. The infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy is sensitive to the structure and orientation of water molecules next to the solid interface and provides direct information on transition kinetics at the interface. The differences in the nucleation kinetics will be discussed for water in contact with hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

  10. Electrochemical characterization of Fe-air rechargeable oxide battery in planar solid oxide cell stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qingping; Berger, Cornelius M.; Menzler, Norbert H.; Bram, Martin; Blum, Ludger

    2016-12-01

    Iron-air rechargeable oxide batteries (ROB) comprising solid oxide cells (SOC) as energy converters and Fe/metal-oxide redox couples were characterized using planar SOC stacks. The charge and discharge of the battery correspond to the operations in the electrolysis and fuel cell modes, respectively, but with a stagnant atmosphere consisting of hydrogen and steam. A novel method was employed to establish the stagnant atmosphere for battery testing during normal SOC operation without complicated modification to the test bench and stack/battery concept. Manipulation of the gas compositions during battery operation was not necessary, but the influence of the leakage current from the testing system had to be considered. Batteries incorporating Fe2O3/8YSZ, Fe2O3/CaO and Fe2O3/ZrO2 storage materials were characterized at 800 °C. A maximum charge capacity of 30.4 Ah per layer (with an 80 cm2 active cell area) with ∼0.5 mol Fe was reached with a current of 12 A. The charge capacity lost 11% after ∼130 ROB cycles due to the increased agglomeration of active materials and formation of a dense oxide layer on the surface. The round trip efficiencies of the tested batteries were ≤84% due to the large internal resistance. With state-of-the-art cells, the round trip efficiency can be further improved.

  11. Performance/design formulation for a solid polymer based acid electrolyte hydrogen/air fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, S. S.; Fellner, J. P.

    Mathematical development of preliminary performance/design equations for a hydrogen/air, solid polymer acid electrolyte based fuel cell is presented. The development is based on the principles of transport phenomena, intrinsic electrochemical kinetics, and classical thermodynamics. The developed formulation is intended to quantitatively describe the mass fraction profiles of the chemical species, hydrogen and oxygen, in the cell anode and cathode diffusion and electrocatalytic reaction layers as a function of the distance in the proton transport direction at an axial distance parallel to the cell anode or cathode channel flow. Given the cell geometry, chemical species and charge transport, and intrinsic electrochemical kinetic parameters, the developed formulation can be employed to compute the species local mass fluxes and predict the cell anode and cathode cell overvoltages for a desired geometric current density. The presented single cell performance predictive formulation has also been linked to the formulation needed to predict the performance of a stack of a number of identical PEMFCs connected in series.

  12. Chemical stabilization of air pollution control residues from municipal solid waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Bordado, João C M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2010-07-15

    The by-products of the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) generally contain hazardous pollutants, with particular relevance to air pollution control (APC) residues. This waste may be harmful to health and detrimental to the environmental condition, mainly due to soluble salts, toxic heavy metals and trace organic compounds. Solidification/stabilization (S/S) with binders is a common industrial technology for treating such residues, involving however, a significant increase in the final mass that is landfilled. In our work, the chemical stabilization of APC residues by using NaHS x xH(2)O, H(3)PO(4), Na(2)CO(3), C(5)H(10)NNaS(2) x 3 H(2)O, Na(2)O x SiO(2) was investigated, and it was possible to conclude that all these additives lead to an improvement of the stabilization process of the most problematic heavy metals. Indeed, compliance leaching tests showed that after the stabilization treatment the waste becomes non-hazardous with respect to heavy metals. Chromium revealed to be a problematic metal, mainly when H(3)PO(4), Na(2)CO(3) and Na(2)O x SiO(2) were used for stabilization. Nevertheless, soluble phosphates are the most efficient additives for stabilizing the overall metals. The effect of the additives tested on the elements associated with soluble salts (K, Na, Cl(-)) is almost negligible, and therefore, the soluble fraction is hardly reduced without further treatment, such as pre-washing.

  13. Plasma column and nano-powder generation from solid titanium by localized microwaves in air

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Simona; Jerby, Eli Meir, Yehuda; Ashkenazi, Dana; Barkay, Zahava; Mitchell, J. Brian A.; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2015-07-14

    This paper studies the effect of a plasma column ejected from solid titanium by localized microwaves in an ambient air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (titania) are found to be directly synthesized in this plasma column maintained by the microwave energy in the cavity. The process is initiated by a hotspot induced by localized microwaves, which melts the titanium substrate locally. The molten hotspot emits ionized titanium vapors continuously into the stable plasma column, which may last for more than a minute duration. The characterization of the dusty plasma obtained is performed in-situ by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), optical spectroscopy, and microwave reflection analyses. The deposited titania nanoparticles are structurally and morphologically analyzed by ex-situ optical and scanning-electron microscope observations, and also by X-ray diffraction. Using the Boltzmann plot method combined with the SAXS results, the electron temperature and density in the dusty plasma are estimated as ∼0.4 eV and ∼10{sup 19 }m{sup −3}, respectively. The analysis of the plasma product reveals nanoparticles of titania in crystalline phases of anatase, brookite, and rutile. These are spatially arranged in various spherical, cubic, lamellar, and network forms. Several applications are considered for this process of titania nano-powder production.

  14. Static and dynamic contact angles of water droplet on a solid surface using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Do; Ha, Man Yeong; Balachandar, S

    2009-11-01

    The present study investigates the variation of static contact angle of a water droplet in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force and the dynamic contact angles of water droplet moving on a solid surface for different characteristic energies using the molecular dynamics simulation. With increasing characteristic energy, the static contact angle in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force decreases because the hydrophobic surface changes its characteristics to the hydrophilic surface. In order to consider the effect of moving water droplet on the dynamic contact angles, we apply the constant acceleration to an individual oxygen and hydrogen atom. In the presence of a body force, the water droplet changes its shape with larger advancing contact angle than the receding angle. The dynamic contact angles are compared with the static contact angle in order to see the effect of the presence of a body force.

  15. Interfacial characterization of Pluronic PE9400 at biocompatible (air-water and limonene-water) interfaces.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis M; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Ramírez, Pablo; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Muñoz, José

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we provide an accurate characterization of non-ionic triblock copolymer Pluronic PE9400 at the air-water and limonene-water interfaces, comprising a systematic analysis of surface tension isotherms, dynamic curves, dilatational rheology and desorption profiles. The surface pressure isotherms display two different slopes of the Π-c plot suggesting the existence of two adsorption regimes for PE9400 at both interfaces. Application of a theoretical model, which assumes the coexistence of different adsorbed states characterized by their molar areas, allows quantification of the conformational changes occurring at the adsorbed layer, indentifying differences between the conformations adopted at the air-water and the limonene-water interface. The presence of two maxima in the dilatational modulus vs. interfacial pressure importantly corroborates this conformational change from a 2D flat conformation to 3D brush one. Moreover, the dilatational response provides mechanical diferences between the interfacial layers formed at the two interfaces analyzed. Dynamic surface pressure data were transformed into a dimensionless form and fitted to another model which considers the influence of the reorganization process on the adsorption dynamics. Finally, the desorption profiles reveal that Pluronic PE9400 is irreversibly adsorbed at both interfaces regardless of the interfacial conformation and nature of the interface. The systematic characterization presented in this work provides important new findings on the interfacial properties of pluronics which can be applied in the rational development of new products, such as biocompatible limonene-based emulsions and/or microemulsions.

  16. Amphiphilic derivatives of dextran: adsorption at air/water and oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rotureau, E; Leonard, M; Dellacherie, E; Durand, A

    2004-11-01

    Ionic amphiphilic dextran derivatives were synthesized by the attachment of sodium sulfopropyl and phenoxy groups on the native polysaccharide. A family of dextran derivatives was thus obtained with varying hydrophobic content and charge density in the polymer chains. The surface-active properties of polymers were studied at the air-water and dodecane-water interfaces using dynamic surface/interfacial tension measurements. The adsorption was shown to begin in a diffusion-limited regime at low polymer concentrations, that is to say, with the diffusion of macromolecules in the bulk solution. In contrast, at long times the interfacial adsorption is limited by interfacial phenomena: adsorption kinetics or transfer into the adsorbed layer. A semiempirical equation developed by Filippov was shown to correctly fit the experimental curves over the whole time range. The presence of ionic groups in the chains strongly lowers the adsorption kinetics. This effect can be interpreted by electrostatic interactions between the free molecules and the already adsorbed ones. The adsorption kinetics at air-water and oil-water interfaces are compared.

  17. Improvement to Air2Air Technology to Reduce Fresh-Water Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Mortensen

    2011-12-31

    This program was undertaken to enhance the manufacturability, constructability, and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation and Plume Abatement Cooling Tower, giving a validated cost basis and capability. Air2Air{TM} water conservation technology recovers a portion of the traditional cooling tower evaporate. The Condensing Module provides an air-to-air heat exchanger above the wet fill media, extracting the heat from the hot saturated moist air leaving in the cooling tower and condensing water. The rate of evaporate water recovery is typically 10% - 25% annually, depending on the cooling tower location (climate). This program improved the efficiency and cost of the Air2Air{TM} Water Conservation Cooling Tower capability, and led to the first commercial sale of the product, as described.

  18. A comparison of solids collected in sediment traps and automated water samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, L.A.; Rada, R.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment traps are being used in some pollution monitoring programs in the USA to sample suspended solids for contaminant analyses. This monitoring approach assumes that the characteristics of solids obtained in sediment traps are the same as those collected in whole-water sampling devices. We tested this assumption in the upper Mississippi River, based on the inorganic particle-size distribution (determined with a laser particle- analyzer) and volatile matter content of solids (a surrogate for organic matter). Cylindrical sediment traps (aspect ratio 3) were attached to a rigid mooring device and deployed in a flowing side channel in Navigation Pool 7 of the upper Mississippi River. On each side of the mooring device, a trap was situated adjacent to a port of an autosampler that collected raw water samples hourly to form 2-d composite samples. Paired samples (one trap and one raw water, composite sample) were removed from each end of the mooring device at 2-d intervals during the 30-d study period and compared. The relative particle collection efficiency of paired samplers did not vary temporally. Particle-size distributions of inorganic solids from sediment traps and water samples were not significantly different. The volatile matter content of solids was lesser in sediment traps (mean, 9.5%) than in corresponding water samples (mean, 22.7%). This bias may have been partly due to under-collection of phytoplankton (mainly cyanobacteria), which were abundant in the water column during the study. The positioning of water samplers and sediment traps in the mooring device did not influence the particle-size distribution or total solids of samples. We observed a small difference in the amount of organic matter collected by water samplers situated at opposite ends of the mooring device.

  19. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  20. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  1. Observation of the Cyclic Water Hexamer in Solid Parahydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of-the cyclic -water hexamer, "cyc-(HO)&" expect minimal perturbations t6 the dopant’s structure and via its intfrared (IR) absorption in liquid helium ...red by = 15 cmf𔃻 from the absorptions of cyclic water clusters in liquid ihelium drolets [P. Nauta and R.E. Miller, Science 287, 293 (2600)]; this...dynamics, and hydrogen -bond (H-bond) interactions with. in- the resulting absence of permanent electric multipoles contrib- creasingg cluster size; one

  2. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water

    SciTech Connect

    Bahr, S.; Kempter, V.

    2009-06-07

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C{identical_to}N axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  3. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water.

    PubMed

    Bahr, S; Kempter, V

    2009-06-07

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C identical withN axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  4. Interaction of acetonitrile with thin films of solid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, S.; Kempter, V.

    2009-06-01

    Thin films of water were prepared on Ag at 124 K. Their properties were studied with metastable impact electron spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption. The interaction of acetonitrile (ACN) with these films was studied with the abovementioned techniques. From the absence of any infrared activity in the initial adsorption stage, it is concluded that ACN adsorbs linearly and that the C≡N axis is aligned parallel to the water surface (as also found on neat Ag). Initially, the interaction with water surface species involves their dangling OD groups. During the completion of the first adlayer the ACN-ACN lateral interaction becomes of importance as well, and the ACN molecules become tilted with respect to the water surface. ACN shows propensity to stay at the surface after surface adsorption even during annealing up to the onset of desorption. The present results for the ACN-water interaction are compared with available classical molecular dynamics calculations providing the orientation profile for ACN on water as well as the ACN bonding properties.

  5. Special features of high-speed interaction of supercavitating solids in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr; Akinshin, Ruslan; Afanas'eva, Svetlana; Borisenkov, Igor; Burkin, Viktor; Diachkovskii, Aleksei; Korolkov, Leonid; Moiseev, Dmitrii; Khabibullin, Marat

    2016-01-01

    Special features of material behavior of a supercavitating projectile are investigated at various initial velocities of entering water on the basis of the developed stress-strain state model with possibility of destruction of solids when moving in water and interacting with various underwater barriers with the use of consistent methodological approach of mechanics of continuous media. The calculation-experimental method was used to study the modes of motion of supercavitating projectiles at sub- and supersonic velocities in water medium after acceleration in the barrelled accelerator, as well as their interaction with barriers. Issues of stabilization of the supercavitating projectile on the initial flight path in water were studied. Microphotographs of state of solids made of various materials, before and after interaction with water, at subsonic and supersonic velocities were presented. Supersonic velocity of the supercavitating projectile motion in water of 1590 m/s was recorded.

  6. Special features of high-speed interaction of supercavitating solids in water

    SciTech Connect

    Ishchenko, Aleksandr Afanas’eva, Svetlana Burkin, Viktor Diachkovskii, Aleksei Korolkov, Leonid Moiseev, Dmitrii; Khabibullin, Marat; Akinshin, Ruslan Borisenkov, Igor

    2016-01-15

    Special features of material behavior of a supercavitating projectile are investigated at various initial velocities of entering water on the basis of the developed stress-strain state model with possibility of destruction of solids when moving in water and interacting with various underwater barriers with the use of consistent methodological approach of mechanics of continuous media. The calculation-experimental method was used to study the modes of motion of supercavitating projectiles at sub- and supersonic velocities in water medium after acceleration in the barrelled accelerator, as well as their interaction with barriers. Issues of stabilization of the supercavitating projectile on the initial flight path in water were studied. Microphotographs of state of solids made of various materials, before and after interaction with water, at subsonic and supersonic velocities were presented. Supersonic velocity of the supercavitating projectile motion in water of 1590 m/s was recorded.

  7. User's manual for estimation of dissolved-solids concentrations and loads in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebermann, T.D.; Middelburg, R.F.; Irvine, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved solids in surface water are an important indicator of overall water quality. Ordinarily, dissolved-solids concentrations and loads are estimated by indirect methods that are based on periodic chemical analyses. Three computer programs , FLAGIT, DVCOND, and SLOAD, were developed to provide a consistent and accurate method of estimating dissolved-solids concentrations and loads. FLAGIT retrieves daily values of specific conductance and discharge and periodic water quality analyses from the U.S. Geologic Survey 's National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System data base, deletes incomplete data, and flags possible data errors. DVCOND fills in missing daily values of specific conductance, when appropriate, by linear interpolation. Using water quality data, SLOAD computes 3 yr moving regressions of dissolved-solids loads as a function of specific conductance and discharge. SLOAD then applies the regression coefficients to the daily values data to estimate daily dissolved-solids loads that are summed by month and by year. Separate regressions are used to estimate the mass fractions of six major ions. The theoretical basis and underlying assumptions of the procedures are presented, with documentation of the programs and their use. (USGS)

  8. Analysis of haloacetic acids in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools using HS-SPME/GC/ECD.

    PubMed

    Sá, Christopher S A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Pereira, Isabel B

    2012-01-01

    A solid phase microextraction method was used for the analysis of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools (ISPs). The analysis is characterized by derivatization of HAAs to their methyl-esters with dimethyl sulphate, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and gas chromatography - electron capture detector (GC/ECD). High correlation coefficients were obtained for esters mixture calibration lines and detection limits were found to be at the low ppb level. Repeatability was assessed and coefficients of variation varied from 10 to 20%. Reproducibility was also evaluated and coefficients of variation from 15 to 25% were obtained. Analytical results from four Portuguese ISPs showed that the mean concentration of total HAAs (THAAs) in water ranged from 10 ± 2 to 183 ± 28 μg/L in which 55 ± 20% corresponded to trichloroacetic and dichloroacetic acids (TCAA and DCAA). THAAs highest concentrations were directly related to higher ISPs' water organic matter content. In the lack of European specific regulation for water from ISPs and taking into consideration that ingestion is a form of exposure, THAAs concentration values were compared with drinking water maximum contamination level (MCL) of 60 μg/L proposed by the US EPA for the sum of five HAAs. In 35% of water sampling campaigns the sum of MBAA (monobromoacetic acid), MCAA (monochloroacetic acid), DCAA and TCAA exceeded that MCL value. The concentrations obtained for THAAs in the ISPs' atmosphere ranged from 5 ± 1 to 64 ± 10 μg/m(3) (T = 28°C at 5 cm above the water surface) and were proportional to the aerosols' quantity, which was deeply related to indoor air ventilation system.

  9. Determination of nitrate esters in water samples Comparison of efficiency of solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Jezová, Vera; Skládal, Jan; Eisner, Ales; Bajerová, Petra; Ventura, Karel

    2007-12-07

    This paper deals with comparison of efficiency of extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, SPE and solid-phase microextraction, SPME) used for extraction of nitrate esters (ethyleneglycoldinitrate, EGDN and nitroglycerin, NG), representing the first step of the method of quantitative determination of trace concentrations of nitrate esters in water samples. EGDN and NG are subsequently determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). Optimization of SPE and SPME conditions was carried out using model water samples. Seven SPE cartridges were tested and the conditions were optimized (type of sorbent, type and volume of solvent to be used as eluent). For both nitrate esters the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) obtained using SPE/HPLC-UV were 0.23 microg mL(-1) and 0.70 microg mL(-1), respectively. Optimization of SPME conditions: type of SPME fibre (four fibres were tested), type and time of sorption/desorption, temperature of sorption. PDMS/DVB (polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene) fibre coating proved to be suitable for extraction of EGDN and NG. For this fibre the LOD and the LOQ for both nitrate esters were 0.16 microg mL(-1) and 0.50 microg mL(-1), respectively. Optimized methods SPE/HPLC-UV and SPME/HPLC-UV were then used for quantitative determination of nitrate esters content in real water samples from the production of EGDN and NG.

  10. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules.

  11. Nucleation processes of nanobubbles at a solid/water interface

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chung-Kai; Ko, Hsien-Chen; Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigations of hydrophobic/water interfaces often return controversial results, possibly due to the unknown role of gas accumulation at the interfaces. Here, during advanced atomic force microscopy of the initial evolution of gas-containing structures at a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite/water interface, a fluid phase first appeared as a circular wetting layer ~0.3 nm in thickness and was later transformed into a cap-shaped nanostructure (an interfacial nanobubble). Two-dimensional ordered domains were nucleated and grew over time outside or at the perimeter of the fluid regions, eventually confining growth of the fluid regions to the vertical direction. We determined that interfacial nanobubbles and fluid layers have very similar mechanical properties, suggesting low interfacial tension with water and a liquid-like nature, explaining their high stability and their roles in boundary slip and bubble nucleation. These ordered domains may be the interfacial hydrophilic gas hydrates and/or the long-sought chemical surface heterogeneities responsible for contact line pinning and contact angle hysteresis. The gradual nucleation and growth of hydrophilic ordered domains renders the original homogeneous hydrophobic/water interface more heterogeneous over time, which would have great consequence for interfacial properties that affect diverse phenomena, including interactions in water, chemical reactions, and the self-assembly and function of biological molecules. PMID:27090291

  12. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  13. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  14. The Importance of Moving Air-Water Interfaces for Colloid Transport in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the vadose zone, or in unsaturated porous media in general, transport of colloids is usually less pronounced than in groundwater. An important retention mechanism for colloids in unsaturated porous media is attachment to air-water interfaces. However, air-water interfaces can also lead to colloid mobilization and enhanced transport if air-water interfaces are moving, such as during infiltration, imbibition, and drainage. Colloid attachment to air-water interfaces is caused by surface tension forces, and these forces usually exceed other interactions forces; therefore, surface tension forces play a dominant role for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media. In this presentation, experimental and theoretical evidence of surface tension forces acting on colloids will be presented, and the role of moving air-water interfaces will be discussed.

  15. Influence of water depth on the sound generated by air-bubble vibration in the water musical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Yoshito; Nakazono, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a water musical instrument that generates sound by the falling of water drops within resonance tubes. The instrument can give people who hear it the healing effect inherent in the sound of water. The sound produced by falling water drops arises from air- bubble vibrations. To investigate the impact of water depth on the air-bubble vibrations, we conducted experiments at varying values of water pressure and nozzle shape. We found that air-bubble vibration frequency does not change at a water depth of 50 mm or greater. Between 35 and 40 mm, however, the frequency decreases. At water depths of 30 mm or below, the air-bubble vibration frequency increases. In our tests, we varied the nozzle diameter from 2 to 4 mm. In addition, we discovered that the time taken for air-bubble vibration to start after the water drops start falling is constant at water depths of 40 mm or greater, but slower at depths below 40 mm.

  16. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing.

  17. 48 CFR 52.247-52 - Clearance and Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Documentation Requirements-Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. 52.247-52 Section 52.247... and Documentation Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points. As... Requirements—Shipments to DOD Air or Water Terminal Transshipment Points (FEB 2006) All shipments to water...

  18. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the over powering effects of gravity. During his 6-month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R. Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and then the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles was recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS). Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  19. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water.

  20. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  1. Motion of Air Bubbles in Water Subjected to Microgravity Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Kelly, Eric M.; Hrovar, Kenneth; Nelson, Emily S.; Pettit, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) serves as a platform for microgravity research for the foreseeable future. A microgravity environment is one in which the effects of gravity are drastically reduced which then allows physical experiments to be conducted without the overpowering effects of gravity. During his six month stay on the ISS, astronaut Donald R Pettit performed many informal/impromptu science experiments with available equipment. One such experiment focused on the motion of air bubbles in a rectangular container nearly filled with de-ionized water. Bubbles were introduced by shaking and the container was secured in place for several hours while motion of the bubbles were recorded using time-lapse photography. This paper shows correlation between bubble motion and quasi-steady acceleration levels during one such experiment operation. The quasi-steady acceleration vectors were measured by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System. Essentially linear motion was observed in the condition considered here. Dr. Pettit also created other conditions which produced linear and circulating motion, which are the subjects of further study. Initial observations of this bubble motion agree with calculations from many microgravity physical science experiments conducted on Shuttle microgravity science missions. Many crystal-growth furnaces involve heavy metals and high temperatures in which undesired acceleration-driven convection during solidification can adversely affect the crystal. Presented in this paper will be results showing correlation between bubble motion and the quasi-steady acceleration vector.

  2. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Linkous, C.A.; Kopitzke, R.W.

    1995-09-01

    If an electrolyzer could operate at higher temperatures, several benefits would accrue. The first is that the thermodynamic electrical energy requirement to drive the reaction would be reduced. Supplying the total enthalpy of reaction at any temperature involves a combination of electrical and thermal energy inputs. Because of the positive entropy associated with water decomposition, the thermal contribution increases as temperature rises, allowing the free energy requirement to decrease. Thus the open circuit voltage, V{sub oc}, for water splitting drops as temperature rises. At room temperature, V{sub oc} for water decomposition is 1.229 V. At 400{degrees}C, voltage requirement has dropped to 1.1 V; at 1000{degrees}C, it is only 0.92 V. Since electricity is a more expensive form of energy on a btu basis, the more energy taken from the thermal surroundings the better. Moreover, this thermal energy content could be solar-derived. While the cost of solar thermal energy varies in the range of $360-900/peak kilowatt, the installed cost of photovoltaic electricity is in the range of $4,000-5,000/peak kilowatt. Thus if one is compelled to erect an array of photovoltaic panels to generate the e.m.f. necessary to split water, substituting as much area with thermal collectors as possible represents a substantial cost savings.

  3. Verification and Validation of Numerical Models for Air/Water Flow on Coastal and Navigation Fluid-Structure Interaction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M.; Dimakopoulos, A.; DeLataillade, T.

    2015-12-01

    Performance analysis and optimization of coastal and navigation structures is becoming feasible due to recent improvements in numerical methods for multiphase flows and the steady increase in capacity and availability of high performance computing resources. Now that the concept of fully three-dimensional air/water flow modelling for real world engineering analysis is achieving acceptance by the wider engineering community, it is critical to expand careful comparative studies on verification,validation, benchmarking, and uncertainty quantification for the variety of competing numerical methods that are continuing to evolve. Furthermore, uncertainty still remains about the relevance of secondary processes such as surface tension, air compressibility, air entrainment, and solid phase (structure) modelling so that questions about continuum mechanical theory and mathematical analysis of multiphase flow are still required. Two of the most popular and practical numerical approaches for large-scale engineering analysis are the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) and Level Set (LS) approaches. In this work we will present a publically available verification and validation test set for air-water-structure interaction problems as well as computational and physical model results including a hybrid VOF-LS method, traditional VOF methods, and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) results. The test set repository and test problem formats will also be presented in order to facilitate future comparative studies and reproduction of scientific results.

  4. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  5. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  6. Influence of solid noise barriers on near-road and on-road air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Richard W.; Isakov, Vlad; Deshmukh, Parikshit; Venkatram, Akula; Yang, Bo; Zhang, K. Max

    2016-03-01

    Public health concerns regarding adverse health effects for populations spending significant amounts of time near high traffic roadways has increased substantially in recent years. Roadside features, including solid noise barriers, have been investigated as potential methods that can be implemented in a relatively short time period to reduce air pollution exposures from nearby traffic. A field study was conducted to determine the influence of noise barriers on both on-road and downwind pollutant concentrations near a large highway in Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ultrafine particles, and black carbon were measured using a mobile platform and fixed sites along two limited-access stretches of highway that contained a section of noise barrier and a section with no noise barrier at-grade with the surrounding terrain. Results of the study showed that pollutant concentrations behind the roadside barriers were significantly lower relative to those measured in the absence of barriers. The reductions ranged from 50% within 50 m from the barrier to about 30% as far as 300 m from the barrier. Reductions in pollutant concentrations generally began within the first 50 m of the barrier edge; however, concentrations were highly variable due to vehicle activity behind the barrier and along nearby urban arterial roadways. The concentrations on the highway, upwind of the barrier, varied depending on wind direction. Overall, the on-road concentrations in front of the noise barrier were similar to those measured in the absence of the barrier, contradicting previous modeling results that suggested roadside barriers increase pollutant levels on the road. Thus, this study suggests that noise barriers do reduce potential pollutant exposures for populations downwind of the road, and do not likely increase exposures to traffic-related pollutants for vehicle passengers on the highway.

  7. Statistical estimate of mercury removal efficiencies for air pollution control devices of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Kida, Akiko; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2010-10-15

    Although representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for air pollution control devices (APCDs) are important to prepare more reliable atmospheric emission inventories of mercury, they have been still uncertain because they depend sensitively on many factors like the type of APCDs, gas temperature, and mercury speciation. In this study, representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for several types of APCDs of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) were offered using a statistical method. 534 data of mercury removal efficiencies for APCDs used in MSWI were collected. APCDs were categorized as fixed-bed absorber (FA), wet scrubber (WS), electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and fabric filter (FF), and their hybrid systems. Data series of all APCD types had Gaussian log-normality. The average removal efficiency with a 95% confidence interval for each APCD was estimated. The FA, WS, and FF with carbon and/or dry sorbent injection systems had 75% to 82% average removal efficiencies. On the other hand, the ESP with/without dry sorbent injection had lower removal efficiencies of up to 22%. The type of dry sorbent injection in the FF system, dry or semi-dry, did not make more than 1% difference to the removal efficiency. The injection of activated carbon and carbon-containing fly ash in the FF system made less than 3% difference. Estimation errors of removal efficiency were especially high for the ESP. The national average of removal efficiency of APCDs in Japanese MSWI plants was estimated on the basis of incineration capacity. Owing to the replacement of old APCDs for dioxin control, the national average removal efficiency increased from 34.5% in 1991 to 92.5% in 2003. This resulted in an additional reduction of about 0.86Mg emission in 2003. Further study using the methodology in this study to other important emission sources like coal-fired power plants will contribute to better emission inventories.

  8. Fluoride, Nitrate, and Dissolved-Solids Concentrations in Ground Waters of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W. E.; Turney, Gary L.

    1984-01-01

    This study provides basic data on ground-water quality throughout the State. It is intended for uses in planning and management by agencies and individuals who have responsibility for or interest in, public health and welfare. It also provides a basis for directing future studies of ground-water quality toward areas where ground-water quality problems may already exist. The information presented is a compilation of existing data from numerous sources including: the Washington Departments of Ecology and Social and Health Services, the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as many other local, county, state and federal agencies and private corporations. Only data on fluoride, nitrate, and dissolved-solids concentrations in ground water are presented, as these constituents are among those commonly used to determine the suitability of water for drinking or other purposes. They also reflect both natural and man-imposed effects on water quality and are the most readily available water-quality data for the State of Washington. The percentage of wells with fluoride, nitrate, or dissolved-solids concentrations exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Primary and Secondary Drinking Water Regulations were about 1, about 3, and about 3, respectively. Most high concentrations occurred in widely separated wells. Two exceptions were: high concentrations of nitrate and dissolved solids in wells on the Hanford Department of Energy Facility and high concentrations of nitrate in the lower Yakima River basin. (USGS)

  9. Solvent activities of the fluorinated solid polymer electrolyte/water system in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Bae, Young Chan

    We modified the lattice fluid equation-of-state by the introducing Debye-Hückel equation. A thermodynamic model taking into account the specific interaction and ionic strength between the polymer and the solvent is proposed. The proposed model successfully predicts the vapor/liquid equilibria (VLE) of solvents and the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). A generalized lattice fluid model is modified to describe the change of water activity in solid polymer electrolyte (SPE)/water systems. The calculated activity curves using the proposed model agree remarkably well with the experimental data.

  10. Design and Testing of a Lyophilizer for Water Recovery from Solid Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litwiller, Eric; Fisher, John; Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Mixed liquid/solid wastes, including feces, water processor effluents, and food waste, can be lyophilized (freeze-dried) to recover the water they contain and stabilize the solids remain. Previous research has demonstrated the potential benefits of using thermoelectric heat pumps to build a lyophilizer for processing waste in microgravity. These results were used to build a working prototype suitable for ground-based human testing. This paper describes the prototype design and presents the results of functional and performance tests. Equivalent system mass parameters are calculated, and practical issues such as sanitary waste handling in microgravity are addressed.

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Co3 O4 Mesoporous Nanowire Arrays as an Additive-Free Air-Cathode for Flexible Solid-State Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minghao; Wang, Zhengke; Hou, Cheng; Wang, Zilong; Liang, Chaolun; Zhao, Cunyuan; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2017-04-01

    The kinetically sluggish rate of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode side is one of the main bottlenecks of zinc-air batteries (ZABs), and thus the search for an efficient and cost-effective catalyst for ORR is highly pursued. Co3 O4 has received ever-growing interest as a promising ORR catalyst due to the unique advantages of low-cost, earth abundance and decent catalytic activity. However, owing to the poor conductivity as a result of its semiconducting nature, the ORR activity of the Co3 O4 catalyst is still far below the expectation. Herein, we report a controllable N-doping strategy to significantly improve the catalytic activity of Co3 O4 for ORR and demonstrate these N doped Co3 O4 nanowires as an additive-free air-cathode for flexible solid-state zinc-air batteries. The results of experiments and DFT calculations reveal that the catalytic activity is promoted by the N dopant through a combined set of factors, including enhanced electronic conductivity, increased O2 adsorption strength and improved reaction kinetics. Finally, the assembly of all-solid-state ZABs based on the optimized cathode exhibit a high volumetric capacity of 98.1 mAh cm(-3) and outstanding flexibility. The demonstration of such flexible ZABs provides valuable insights that point the way to the redesign of emerging portable electronics.

  12. Water-quality reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A water-quality sampling reconnaissance of the north Dade County solid-waste disposal facility (landfill) near Carol City, Florida, was conducted during 1977-78. The purpose of the reconnaissance was to determine selected quality characteristics of the surface- and ground-water of the landfill and contiguous area; and to assess, generally, if leachate produced by the decomposition of landfill wastes was adversely impacting the downgradient water quality. Sampling results indicated that several water-quality characteristics were present in landfill ground water at significantly higher levels than in ground water upgradient or downgradient from the landfill. Moreover, many of these water-quality characteristics were found at slightly higher levels at down gradient site 5 than at upgradient site 1 which suggested that some downgradient movement of landfill leachate had occurred. For example, chloride and alkalinity in ground water had average concentrations of 20 and 290 mg/L at background wells (site 1), 144 and 610 mg/L at landfill wells (sites 2 and 4), and 29 and 338 mg/L at downgradient wells (site 5). A comparison of the 1977-78 sampling results with the National Primary and Secondary Drinking Water Regulations indicated that levels of iron and color in ground water of the study area frequently exceeded national maximum contaminant levels, dissolved solids, turbidity, lead, and manganese occasionally exceeded regulations. Concentrations of iron and levels of color and turbidity in some surface water samples also exceeded National maximum contaminant levels. (USGS)

  13. Safe drinking water and clean air: an experimental study evaluating the concept of combining household water treatment and indoor air improvement using the Water Disinfection Stove (WADIS).

    PubMed

    Christen, Andri; Navarro, Carlos Morante; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Indoor air pollution and unsafe water remain two of the most important environmental risk factors for the global burden of infectious diseases. Improved stoves and household water treatment (HWT) methods represent two of the most effective interventions to fight respiratory and diarrhoeal illnesses at household level. Since new improved stoves are highly accepted and HWT methods have their drawbacks regarding sustained use, combining the two interventions in one technical solution could result in notable positive convenience and health benefits. A WAter DIsinfection Stove (WADIS) based on a Lorena-stove design with a simple flow-through boiling water-treatment system was developed and tested by a pilot experimental study in rural Bolivia. The results of a post-implementation evaluation of two WADIS and 27 Lorena-stoves indicate high social acceptance rather due to convenience gains of the stove than to perceived health improvements. The high efficacy of the WADIS-water treatment system, with a reduction of microbiological contamination load in the treated water from 87600 thermotolerant coliform colony forming units per 100mL (CFU/100mL) to zero is indicative. The WADIS concept unifies two interventions addressing two important global burdens of disease. WADIS' simple design, relying on locally available materials and low manufacturing costs (approx. 6 US) indicates potential for spontaneous diffusion and scaling up.

  14. Estimation of mean annual effective dose through radon concentration in the water and indoor air of Islamabad and Murree.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Khan, E U; Akhter, P; Khan, F; Waheed, A

    2010-09-01

    Different samples of water, indoor air and soil gas have been collected from Islamabad (33 degrees 38'N, 73 degrees 09'E, altitude of 1760 ft.), the capital of Pakistan and Murree (33 degrees 53'N, 73 degrees 23'E, altitude of 7323 ft.), lying on a geological fault line and are analysed for the estimation of mean effective dose through radon concentrations by using RAD-7, a solid state alpha-detector. The variation of radon concentration in water, indoor air and soil gas in Islamabad region ranges from 25.90-158.40 kBq m(-3), 43.26-97.04 Bq m(-3) and 17.34-72.52 kBq m(-3), having mean values 88.63 kBq m(-3), 70.67 Bq m(-3) and 45.08 kBq m(-3)(,) respectively. It ranges from 1.64-10.20 kBq m(-3), 18.48-42.08 Bq m(-3) and 0.61-3.89 kBq m(-3) with mean values 4.38 kBq m(-3), 28.63 Bq m(-3) and 1.70 kBq m(-3)(,) respectively in Murree and its surroundings. The total mean annual effective doses from water and indoor air of Islamabad and Murree regions are 2.023 and 0.733 mSv a(-1), respectively. These doses are within the recommended limits of the world organisations.

  15. All-solid-state cable-type flexible zinc-air battery.

    PubMed

    Park, Joohyuk; Park, Minjoon; Nam, Gyutae; Lee, Jang-soo; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-02-25

    A cable-type flexible Zn-air battery with a spiral zinc anode, gel polymer electrolyte (GPE), and air cathode coated on a nonprecious metal catalyst is designed in order to extend its application area toward wearable electronic devices.

  16. Moisture sorption kinetics for water-soluble substances. IV: Studies with mixtures of solids.

    PubMed

    Kontny, M J; Zografi, G

    1985-02-01

    This paper extends earlier work from this laboratory concerning the sorption kinetics of water vapor on deliquescent water-soluble substances to mixtures of these solids. A theoretical model, based on heat transport control, excellently predicted a priori the rate of water uptake by a variety of binary mixtures of alkali halides and sugars. The rates for mixtures containing highly water-soluble quaternary ammonium salts, as either one or both of the components, were less successfully predicted as the combined water solubilities of the two components increased. It is concluded that water-soluble deliquescent substances, normally encountered in pharmaceutical dosage forms, rapidly form saturated aqueous solutions in the aqueous film formed as water vapor uptake proceeds, and that the water uptake rate can be predicted a priori from known and experimentally determinable parameters using the heat transport model.

  17. Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces with different wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Tu, Yusong; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2012-11-29

    The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettabilities has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From nonequilibrium MD simulations, we found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonic decrease as intuitively expected, but increased first, and then decreased after it reached a maximum value. The analysis of the simulation trajectory and calculation of the surface water interaction illustrate that the competition between the number of water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on biological surfaces, designing artificial surfaces of ultrafast water evaporating, or preserving water in soil.

  18. Functionalized Polysilsesquioxane-Based Hybrid Silica Solid Amine Sorbents for the Regenerative Removal of CO2 from Air.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Kochukunju Adisser Saraladevi; Deepthi, Thomas; Sadhana, Retnakumari Amma; Benny, K George

    2015-08-19

    Functionalized polysilsesquioxane-based hybrid silica materials are presented as solid amine sorbents for direct CO2 capture from air. The sorbent was synthesized from amine and vinyl functionalized alkoxysilanes by a simple, energy efficient, and cost-effective co-condensation method. The material, containing bound amine functionalities, was found to have a selective CO2 capturing capacity of 1.68 mmol/g from atmospheric air with an adsorption half time of 50 min. This material also showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 2.28 mmol/g in pure CO2 and 1.92 mmol/g in 10% CO2. Desorption started at a temperature as low as 60 °C, and complete desorption occurred at 80 °C. The sorbent exhibited high recycling ability, and 100 cycles of adsorption/desorption were demonstrated in pure CO2 and 50 cycles in ambient air without any loss in efficiency.

  19. Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for NASA's LOX-CH4 Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Abigail C.; Araghi, Koorosh R.; Farmer, Serene C.

    2013-01-01

    Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle used fuel cells as main power source for vehicle and water source for life support and thermal PEM (Gemini) and Alkaline (Apollo, Shuttle) fuel cells were used Ideal for short (less than 3 weeks) missions when the required O2 and H2 can be launched with the vehicle. New missions that might require long-duration stays in orbit or at a habitat, cannot rely on the availability of pure reactants but should also aim to be sun-independent - a problem for which Solid Oxide Fuel Cells might be the answer. Recently, NASA has investigated & developed LOX/CH4-propelled landers (Altair, MORPHEUS). In order to preserve mission flexibility, fuel cells are being studied as a potential power source. Much of NASA's fuel cell development has been focused on creating a dead-headed, non-flow through PEM fuel cells which would weigh less and be more reliable than the existing Alkaline and PEM technology; however, LOX/CH4 as a propellant introduces SOFCs as a power option due to their ability to accept those reactants without much reforming.

  20. Elimination of undesirable water layers in solid contact polymeric ion-selective electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Veder, Jean-Pierre; De Marco, Roland; Clarke, Graeme; Chester, Ryan; Nelson, Andrew; Prince, Kathryn; Pretsch, Ernö; Bakker, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel approach for the production of analytically robust and miniaturized polymeric ion sensors that are vitally important in modern analytical chemistry (e.g., clinical chemistry using single blood droplets, modern biosensors measuring clouds of ions released from nanoparticle tagged biomolecules, lab-on-a-chip applications, etc.). This research has shown that the use of a water repellent polymethyl methacrylate/polydecyl methacrylate (PMMA/PDMA) copolymer as the ion sensing membrane, along with a hydrophobic poly(3-octylthiophene 2,5-diyl) (POT) solid-contact as the ion-to-electron transducer, is an excellent strategy for avoiding the detrimental water layer formed at the buried interface of solid-contact ISEs. Accordingly, it has been necessary to implement a rigorous surface analysis scheme employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), in-situ neutron reflectometry/EIS (NR/EIS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to probe structurally the solid-contact/membrane interface, so as to identify the conditions that eliminate the undesirable water layer in all solid-state polymeric ion sensors. In this work, we provide the first experimental evidence that the PMMA/PDMA copolymer system is susceptible to water “pooling” at the interface in areas surrounding physical imperfections in the solid-contact, with the exposure time for such an event in a PMMA/PDMA copolymer ISE taking nearly twenty times longer than that for a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ISE, and the simultaneous use of a hydrophobic POT solid-contact with a PMMA/PDMA membrane can eliminate totally this water layer problem. PMID:18671410

  1. Adsorption of arsenic from a Nova Scotia groundwater onto water treatment residual solids.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Meaghan K; Gagnon, Graham A

    2010-11-01

    Water treatment residual solids were examined in batch adsorption and column adsorption experiments using a groundwater from Halifax Regional Municipality that had an average arsenic concentration of 43 μg/L (±4.2 μg/L) and a pH of 8.1. The residual solids studied in this paper were from five water treatment plants, four surface water treatment plants that utilized either alum, ferric, or lime in their treatment systems, and one iron removal plant. In batch adsorption experiments, iron-based residual solids and lime-based residual solids pre-formed similarly to GFH, a commercially-available adsorbent, while alum-based residual solids performed poorly. Langmuir isotherm modeling showed that ferric residuals had the highest adsorptive capacity for arsenic (Q(max) = 2230 mg/kg and 42,910 mg/kg), followed by GFH (Q(max) = 640 mg/kg), lime (Q(max) = 160 mg/kg) and alum (Q(max) = <1 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg). Similarly, the maximum arsenic removal was >93% for the ferric and lime residuals and GFH, while the maximum arsenic removal was <49% for the alum residuals under the same conditions. In a column adsorption experiment, ferric residual solids achieved arsenic removal of >26,000 bed volumes before breakthrough past 10 μg As/L, whereas the effluent arsenic concentration from the GFH column was under the method detection limit at 28,000 bed volumes. Overall, ferric and lime water treatment residuals were promising adsorbents for arsenic adsorption from the groundwater, and alum water treatment residuals did not achieve high levels of arsenic adsorption.

  2. Air Pollution Monitoring and Use of Nanotechnology Based Solid State Gas Sensors in Greater Cairo Area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, A. B. A.

    Air pollution is a serious problem in thickly populated and industrialized areas in Egypt, especially in greater Cairo area. Economic growth and industrialization are proceeding at a rapid pace, accompanied by increasing emissions of air polluting sources. Furthermore, though the variety and quantities of polluting sources have increased dramatically, the development of a suitable method for monitoring the pollution causing sources has not followed at the same pace. Environmental impacts of air pollutants have impact on public health, vegetation, material deterioration etc. To prevent or minimize the damage caused by atmospheric pollution, suitable monitoring systems are urgently needed that can rapidly and reliably detect and quantify polluting sources for monitoring by regulating authorities in order to prevent further deterioration of the current pollution levels. Consequently, it is important that the current real-time air quality monitoring system, controlled by the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA), should be adapted or extended to aid in alleviating this problem. Nanotechnology has been applied to several industrial and domestic fields, for example, applications for gas monitoring systems, gas leak detectors in factories, fire and toxic gas detectors, ventilation control, breath alcohol detectors, and the like. Here we report an application example of studying air quality monitoring based on nanotechnology `solid state gas sensors'. So as to carry out air pollution monitoring over an extensive area, a combination of ground measurements through inexpensive sensors and wireless GIS will be used for this purpose. This portable device, comprising solid state gas sensors integrated to a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) linked through Bluetooth communication tools and Global Positioning System (GPS), will allow rapid dissemination of information on pollution levels at multiple sites simultaneously.

  3. Water drop impact onto oil covered solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ningli; Chen, Huanchen; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2016-11-01

    Droplet impact onto an oily surface can be encountered routinely in industrial applications; e.g., in spray cooling. It is not clear from literature what impact an oil film may have on the impact process. In this work, water drop impact onto both hydrophobic (glass) and hydrophilic (OTS) substrates which were covered by oil films (silicone) of different thickness (5um-50um) and viscosity (5cst-100cst) were performed. The effects of drop impact velocity, film thickness, and viscosity of the oil film and wettability of the substrate were studied. Our results show that when the film viscosity and impact velocity is low, the water drop deformed into the usual disk shape after impact, and rebounded from the surface. Such rebound phenomena disappears, when the viscosity of oil becomes very large. With the increase of the impact velocity, crown and splashing appears in the spreading phase. The crown and splashing behavior appears more easily with the increase of film thickness and decrease of its viscosity. It was also found that the substrate wettability can only affect the impact process in cases which drop has a large Webber number (We = 594), and the film's viscosity and thickness are small. This work was support by National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Project Number is 51506084.

  4. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... be enforced by the Commanding General, Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia,...

  5. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... be enforced by the Commanding General, Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia,...

  6. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... be enforced by the Commanding General, Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia,...

  7. 33 CFR 334.330 - Atlantic Ocean and connecting waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... waters in vicinity of Myrtle Island, Va.; Air Force practice bombing, rocket firing, and gunnery range... be enforced by the Commanding General, Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia,...

  8. Household Cooking with Solid Fuels Contributes to Ambient PM2.5 Air Pollution and the Burden of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chafe, Zoë A.; Brauer, Michael; Klimont, Zbigniew; Van Dingenen, Rita; Mehta, Sumi; Rao, Shilpa; Riahi, Keywan; Dentener, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background: Approximately 2.8 billion people cook with solid fuels. Research has focused on the health impacts of indoor exposure to fine particulate pollution. Here, for the 2010 Global Burden of Disease project (GBD 2010), we evaluated the impact of household cooking with solid fuels on regional population-weighted ambient PM2.5 (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm) pollution (APM2.5). Objectives: We estimated the proportion and concentrations of APM2.5 attributable to household cooking with solid fuels (PM2.5-cook) for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 in 170 countries, and associated ill health. Methods: We used an energy supply–driven emissions model (GAINS; Greenhouse Gas and Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) and source-receptor model (TM5-FASST) to estimate the proportion of APM2.5 produced by households and the proportion of household PM2.5 emissions from cooking with solid fuels. We estimated health effects using GBD 2010 data on ill health from APM2.5 exposure. Results: In 2010, household cooking with solid fuels accounted for 12% of APM2.5 globally, varying from 0% of APM2.5 in five higher-income regions to 37% (2.8 μg/m3 of 6.9 μg/m3 total) in southern sub-Saharan Africa. PM2.5-cook constituted > 10% of APM2.5 in seven regions housing 4.4 billion people. South Asia showed the highest regional concentration of APM2.5 from household cooking (8.6 μg/m3). On the basis of GBD 2010, we estimate that exposure to APM2.5 from cooking with solid fuels caused the loss of 370,000 lives and 9.9 million disability-adjusted life years globally in 2010. Conclusions: PM2.5 emissions from household cooking constitute an important portion of APM2.5 concentrations in many places, including India and China. Efforts to improve ambient air quality will be hindered if household cooking conditions are not addressed. Citation: Chafe ZA, Brauer M, Klimont Z, Van Dingenen R, Mehta S, Rao S, Riahi K, Dentener F, Smith KR. 2014. Household cooking with solid fuels contributes to

  9. Metabolism and thermoregulation during fasting in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus, in air and water.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, A; Schmidt, A; Handrich, Y; Woakes, A J; Butler, P J

    2005-09-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rate (Vo(2)) and body temperatures in 10 king penguins in air and water. Vo(2) was measured during rest and at submaximal and maximal exercise before (fed) and after (fasted) an average fasting duration of 14.4 +/- 2.3 days (mean +/- 1 SD, range 10-19 days) in air and water. Concurrently, we measured subcutaneous temperature and temperature of the upper (heart and liver), middle (stomach) and lower (intestine) abdomen. The mean body mass (M(b)) was 13.8 +/- 1.2 kg in fed and 11.0 +/- 0.6 kg in fasted birds. After fasting, resting Vo(2) was 93% higher in water than in air (air: 86.9 +/- 8.8 ml/min; water: 167.3 +/- 36.7 ml/min, P < 0.01), while there was no difference in resting Vo(2) between air and water in fed animals (air: 117.1 +/- 20.0 ml O(2)/min; water: 114.8 +/- 32.7 ml O(2)/min, P > 0.6). In air, Vo(2) decreased with M(b), while it increased with M(b) in water. Body temperature did not change with fasting in air, whereas in water, there were complex changes in the peripheral body temperatures. These latter changes may, therefore, be indicative of a loss in body insulation and of variations in peripheral perfusion. Four animals were given a single meal after fasting and the temperature changes were partly reversed 24 h after refeeding in all body regions except the subcutaneous, indicating a rapid reversal to a prefasting state where body heat loss is minimal. The data emphasize the importance in considering nutritional status when studying king penguins and that the fasting-related physiological changes diverge in air and water.

  10. Biological nitrate removal from water and wastewater by solid-phase denitrification process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlong; Chu, Libing

    2016-11-01

    Nitrate pollution in receiving waters has become a serious issue worldwide. Solid-phase denitrification process is an emerging technology, which has received increasing attention in recent years. It uses biodegradable polymers as both the carbon source and biofilm carrier for denitrifying microorganisms. A vast array of natural and synthetic biopolymers, including woodchips, sawdust, straw, cotton, maize cobs, seaweed, bark, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), polycaprolactone (PCL), polybutylene succinate (PBS) and polylactic acid (PLA), have been widely used for denitrification due to their good performance, low cost and large available quantities. This paper presents an overview on the application of solid-phase denitrification in nitrate removal from drinking water, groundwater, aquaculture wastewater, the secondary effluent and wastewater with low C/N ratio. The types of solid carbon source, the influencing factors, the microbial community of biofilm attached on the biodegradable carriers, the potential adverse effect, and the cost of denitrification process are introduced and evaluated. Woodchips and polycaprolactone are the popular and competitive natural plant-like and synthetic biodegradable polymers used for denitrification, respectively. Most of the denitrifiers reported in solid-phase denitrification affiliated to the family Comamonadaceae in the class Betaproteobacteria. The members of genera Diaphorobacter, Acidovorax and Simplicispira were mostly reported. In future study, more attention should be paid to the simultaneous removal of nitrate and toxic organic contaminants such as pesticide and PPCPs by solid-phase denitrification, to the elucidation of the metabolic and regulatory relationship between decomposition of solid carbon source and denitrification, and to the post-treatment of the municipal secondary effluent. Solid-phase denitrification process is a promising technology for the removal of nitrate from water and wastewater.

  11. Amorphous Solid Water (ASW): Macroscale Environmentally-Neutral Application for Remediation of Hazardous Pollutants using Condensed-Phase Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Strulle, Ronald; Rheinhart, Maximilian

    2012-03-01

    We report macroscale environmentally-neutral use of cryogenic fluids to induce phase transitions from crystalline water-ices to amorphous solid water (ASW). New IP and uses in remediation of oil-spills and hazardous immiscibles from aquatic environments. We display high-resolution images of the transitions from hexagonal to cubic crystalline water-ice, then to hydrophobic ASW. Accretion and encapsulation of viscous pollutants within crystalline water-ice, and sequestration of condensed volatiles (PAH, methane) and low viscosity fluids within the interstitial cavities of ASW are shown and differentiated for: crude oils, diesel (heating) and blended oils, petroleum byproducts, vegetable and mineral oils, lipids, and light immiscible fluids. The effects of PdV work and thermal energy transfers during phase changes are shown, along with the sequestration efficiencies for hexagonal and cubic ice lattices vs. non-crystalline ASW, for a range of pollutant substances. The viability of ASW as a medium for study of quantum criticality phases is also proposed. The process is environmentally-neutral in that only substantially condensed-phase air liquefaction products, e.g. nitrogen in >90% liquid phase are employed as an active agent. The applications are also presented in terms of the scale-up of experiments performed at the nanoscale.

  12. Water-induced correlation between single ions imaged at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Maria; Spijker, Peter; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2014-07-01

    When immersed into water, most solids develop a surface charge, which is neutralized by an accumulation of dissolved counterions at the interface. Although the density distribution of counterions perpendicular to the interface obeys well-established theories, little is known about counterions’ lateral organization at the surface of the solid. Here we show, by using atomic force microscopy and computer simulations, that single hydrated metal ions can spontaneously form ordered structures at the surface of homogeneous solids in aqueous solutions. The structures are laterally stabilized only by water molecules with no need for specific interactions between the surface and the ions. The mechanism, studied here for several systems, is controlled by the hydration landscape of both the surface and the adsorbed ions. The existence of discrete ion domains could play an important role in interfacial phenomena such as charge transfer, crystal growth, nanoscale self-assembly and colloidal stability.

  13. WETAIR: A computer code for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of air-water mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program subroutine, WETAIR, was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of air water mixtures. It determines the thermodynamic state from assigned values of temperature and density, pressure and density, temperature and pressure, pressure and entropy, or pressure and enthalpy. The WETAIR calculates the properties of dry air and water (steam) by interpolating to obtain values from property tables. Then it uses simple mixing laws to calculate the properties of air water mixtures. Properties of mixtures with water contents below 40 percent (by mass) can be calculated at temperatures from 273.2 to 1497 K and pressures to 450 MN/sq m. Dry air properties can be calculated at temperatures as low as 150 K. Water properties can be calculated at temperatures to 1747 K and pressures to 100 MN/sq m. The WETAIR is available in both SFTRAN and FORTRAN.

  14. An analysis of water-to-air heat pump systems for use in government facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fretzs, R. G.

    1980-09-01

    Energy consumption is an important issue for government managers. Examined in this thesis is one source of potential energy savings: a method of heating and cooling buildings. Water-to-air heat pumps are analyzed and cost comparisons to conventional heating/cooling systems (gas, fuel oil, electric resistance, and air-to-air heat pumps) are made. The theory of heat pump technology is presented to show how water source heat pumps achieve improved efficiencies over conventional systems. Sources of and disposal of water to support the systems are discussed. Cost comparisons are presented based on computer simulations and fuel cost graphs. Twenty-one percent of U.S. energy consumption is used to heat and cool buildings. Water-to-air heat pumps provide a 30-50 percent savings over other systems. Therefore, a potential 10 percent savings in total energy consumption exists through the use of water source heat pumps.

  15. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  16. Investigation of Ground Water Pollution at Air Force Plant Number 4, Fort Worth Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    INVESTIGATION L UNWaACTIPEWS OKMOMAM OF WILL U . E FAILING 1500 • , o. i. i8A-96 T, o , - MARKor TOTAL IMPR CORK OEU C Ra.V IL UATtOW GOUND WATER * 13...SSArm op US Army Corps ’ofS Enginee rs of Engineers Fort Worth District Kansas City District INVESTIGATION OF GROUND WATER POLLUTION AT AIR FORCE...Dbtibz~o Ud~mxtm!UCTtq! - INVESTIGATION OF GROUND WATER POLLUTION AT - AIR FORCE PLANT NO. 4 FORT WORTH, TEXAS REPORT TO - UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

  17. Influence of Air Humidity and Water Particles on Dust Control Using Ultrasonic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Nishi, Kentaro; Shindo, Dai; Kawamura, Youhei

    2012-07-01

    The influence of air humidity and water particles on dust control was examined using ultrasonic atomization at 2.4 MHz, an acrylic box (61 L), and four types of ore dust samples: green tuff (4 µm), green tuff (6 µm), kaolin, and silica. It was clearly demonstrated that ultrasonic atomization was effective in raising humidity rapidly. However, at high relative air humidity, the water particles remained stable in the box without changing to water vapor. Ultrasonic atomization was applied to suppress dust dispersion and 40-95% dust reduction was achieved at 83% relative air humidity. Dust dispersion was more effective with ultrasonic atomization than without.

  18. Air-water gas exchange of organochlorine compounds in Lake Baikal, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, L.L.; Kucklick, J.R.; Bidleman, T.F.; Ivanov, G.P.; Chernyak, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    Air and surface water samples were collected at Lake Baikal, Russia, during June 1991 to determine concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. These data were combined with Henry`s law constants to estimate the gas flux rate across the air-water interface of each compound class. Air samples were collected at Lake Baikal and from nearby Irkutsk. Water samples were collected from three mid-lake stations and at the mouth of two major tributaries. Average air concentrations of chlorinated bornanes (14 pg m{sup -3}), chlordanes (4.9 pg m{sup -3}), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) (194 pg m{sup -3}) were similar to global backgound of Arctic levels. However, air concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, and PCBs were closer to those observed in the Great Lakes region. Significantly higher levels of these three compound classes in air over Irkutsk suggests that regional atmospheric transport and deposition may be an important source of these persistent compounds to Lake Baikal. Air-water gas exchange calculations resulted in net depositional flux values for {alpha}-HCH, {gamma}-HCH, DDTs, and chlorinated bornanes at 112, 23, 3.6, and 2.4 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The total net flux of 22 PCB congeners, chlordanes, and HCB was from water to air (volatilization) at 47, 1.8, and 32 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. 50 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Solid-phase microextraction of hydrocarbons from water in a centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. Yu.; Chuikin, A. V.; Velikov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The results of our study of solid-phase microextraction of substances using a centrifuge for determining the microquantities of hydrocarbon impurities in water are presented. The cartridge diameter, sorbent mass, and solvent volume were shown to affect the percent extraction of substances and the analytical signal intensity. The relationship between the cartridge geometry, the sorbent mass, and the solvent volume was considered.

  20. Development of a Solid Phase Extraction Method for Agricultural Pesticides in Large-Volume Water Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method using solid phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the trace determination of a variety of agricultural pesticides and selected transformation products in large-volume high-elevation lake water sa...

  1. AUTOMATED SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION GC/MS FOR ANALYSIS OF SEMIVOLATILES IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented on the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with GC/MS spectrometry for the single-run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of organic compounds. The system uses commercially available automated in-line sampl...

  2. Solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in water samples.

    PubMed

    Castells, P; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2003-01-10

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) was developed as an alternative to liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in water samples. The extraction efficiency of five different commercially available fibres was evaluated and the 100-microm polydimethylsiloxane coating was the most suitable for the absorption of the SCCPs. Optimisation of several SPME parameters, such as extraction time and temperature, ionic strength and desorption time, was performed. Quality parameters were established using Milli-Q, tap water and river water. Linearity ranged between 0.06 and 6 microg l(-1) for spiked Milli-Q water and between 0.6 and 6 microg l(-1) for natural waters. The precision of the SPME-GC-ECD method for the three aqueous matrices was similar and gave relative standard deviations (RSD) between 12 and 14%. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.02 microg l(-1) for Milli-Q water and 0.3 microg l(-1) for both tap water and river water. The optimised SPME-GC-ECD method was successfully applied to the determination of SCCPs in river water samples.

  3. Water-related environmental control requirements at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J C; Johnson, L D

    1980-09-01

    Water use and waste water production, water pollution control technology requirements, and water-related limitations to their design and commercialization are identified at municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion systems. In Part I, a summary of conclusions and recommendations provides concise statements of findings relative to water management and waste water treatment of each of four municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion categories investigated. These include: mass burning, with direct production of steam for use as a supplemental energy source; mechanical processing to produce a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) for co-firing in gas, coal or oil-fired power plants; pyrolysis for production of a burnable oil or gas; and biological conversion of organic wastes to methane. Part II contains a brief description of each waste-to-energy facility visited during the subject survey showing points of water use and wastewater production. One or more facilities of each type were selected for sampling of waste waters and follow-up tests to determine requirements for water-related environmental controls. A comprehensive summary of the results are presented. (MCW)

  4. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  5. 75 FR 11560 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act Notice is hereby given that... violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. at... of water effluent controls, the rerouting of air emissions through control devices, and...

  6. Use Of The Operational Air Quality Monitor (AQM) For In-Flight Water Testing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    A primary requirement for manned spaceflight is Environmental Health which ensures air and water contaminants, acoustic profiles, microbial flora, and radiation exposures within the cabin are maintained to levels needed for crew health and for vehicle system functionality. The reliance on ground analyses of returned samples is a limitation in the current environmental monitoring strategy that will prevent future Exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. This proposal attempts to address this shortcoming by advancing in-flight analyses of water and air. Ground analysis of in-flight, air and water samples typically employ vapor-phase analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify and quantify organic compounds present in the samples. We envision the use of newly-developed direct ionization approaches as the most viable avenue leading towards an integrated analytical platform for the monitoring of water, air, and, potentially bio-samples in the cabin environment. Development of an in-flight instrument capable of analyzing air and water samples would be the logical next step to meeting the environmental monitoring needs of Exploration missions. Currently, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) on-board ISS provides this specific information for a number of target compounds in the air. However, there is a significant subset of common target compounds between air and water. Naturally, the following question arises, "Can the AQM be used for both air and water quality monitoring?" Previous directorate-level IR&D funding led to the development of a water sample introduction method for mass spectrometry using electrothermal vaporization (ETV). This project will focus on the integration of the ETV with a ground-based AQM. The capabilities of this integrated platform will be evaluated using a subset of toxicologically important compounds.

  7. Radiological assessment of water treatment processes in a water treatment plant in Saudi Arabia: Water and sludge radium content, radon air concentrations and dose rates.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaseem, Q Kh; Almasoud, Fahad I; Ababneh, Anas M; Al-Hobaib, A S

    2016-09-01

    There is an increase demand for clean water sources in Saudi Arabia and, yet, renewable water resources are very limited. This has forced the authorities to explore deep groundwater which is known to contain large concentrations of radionuclides, mainly radium isotopes. Lately, there has been an increase in the number of water treatment plants (WTPs) around the country. In this study, a radiological assessment of a WTP in Saudi Arabia was performed. Raw water was found to have total radium activity of 0.23Bq/L, which exceeds the international limit of 0.185Bq/L (5pCi/L). The WTP investigated uses three stages of treatment: flocculation/sedimentation, sand filtration and reverse osmosis. The radium removal efficiency was evaluated for each stage and the respective values were 33%, 22% and 98%. Moreover, the activity of radium in the solid waste generated from the WTP in the sedimentation and sand filtrations stages were measured and found to be 4490 and 6750Bq/kg, respectively, which exceed the national limit of 1000Bq/kg for radioactive waste. A radiological assessment of the air inside the WTP was also performed by measuring the radon concentrations and dose rates and were found in the ranges of 2-18Bq/m(3) and 70-1000nSv/h, respectively. The annual effective dose was calculated and the average values was found to be 0.3mSv which is below the 1mSv limit.

  8. Effect of optimizing supply water temperature and air volume on a VAV system

    SciTech Connect

    Karino, Naoki; Shiba, Takashi; Ito, Koichi; Yokoyama, Ryohei

    1999-07-01

    An optimal planning method is proposed for an air conditioning system composed of heat pump chillers and variable air volume (VAV) units. Supply water temperature, supply air volume, and thickness of heat insulation material are determined optimally so as to minimize the annual total cost of the system in consideration of equipment capacities and annual operation for the cooling load varying through a year. Through a numerical study on the system planned for an office building, influences of supply water/air temperatures and air volume on the system are investigated from the viewpoint of long-term economics. As a result, it is shown that the annual energy charge of the optimal VAV system can be reduced considerably in comparison with that of the optimal constant air volume (CAV) system, and that the effect of the energy conservation of the former system is large enough.

  9. Cationic Gemini surfactant at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Qibin, Chen; Xiaodong, Liang; Shaolei, Wang; Shouhong, Xu; Honglai, Liu; Ying, Hu

    2007-10-15

    The surface properties and structures of a cationic Gemini surfactant with a rigid spacer, p-xylyl-bis(dimethyloctadecylammonium bromide) ([C(18)H(37)(CH(3))(2)N(+)CH(2)C(6)H(4)CH(2)N(+)(CH(3))(2)C(18)H(37)],2Br(-), abbreviated as 18-Ar-18,2Br(-1)), at the air/water interface were investigated. It is found that the surface pressure-molecular area isotherms observed at different temperatures do not exhibit a plateau region but display an unusual "kink" before collapse. The range of the corresponding minimum compressibility and maximum compressibility modulus indicates that the monolayer is in the liquid-expanded state. The monolayers were transferred onto mica and quartz plates by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The structures of monolayers at various surface pressures were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. AFM measurements show that at lower surface pressures, unlike the structures of complex or hybrid films formed by Gemini amphiphiles with DNA, dye, or inorganic materials or the Langmuir film formed by the nonionic Gemini surfactant, in this case network-like labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed. The formation of the structures can be interpreted in terms of the spinodal decomposition mechanism. With the increase of the surface pressure up to 35 mN/m, surface micelles dispersed in the network-like ridges gradually appear which might be caused by both the spinodal decomposition and dewetting. The UV-vis adsorption shows that over the whole range of surface pressures, the molecules form a J-aggregate in LB films, which implies that the spacers construct a pi-pi aromatic stacking. This pi-pi interaction between spacers and the van der Waals interaction between hydrophobic chains lead to the formation of both networks and micelles. The labyrinthine interconnected ridges are formed first because of the rapid evaporation of solvent during the spreading processes; with increasing surface pressure, some of the

  10. Computational Simulation of High-Speed Projectiles in Air, Water, and Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-03

    swimmer systems. The water entry phase of flight is interesting and challenging due to projectile transitioning from flight in air to supercavitating...lethality and cavity generation concerns, with minimizing drag in air being a tertiary consideration. The overall goal of the presented work is to develop...compacted at the nose of the projectile to a voidage of around 0.825 in both cases, and a large cavity filled with air is formed as the granular

  11. Air Stripping Designs and Reactive Water Purification Processes for the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Air stripping designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry's Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Distillation processes are modeled in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support are presented. The advantages to the various designs are summarized with respect to water purity levels, power consumption, and processing rates. An evaluation of reactive distillation and air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  12. Natural radioactivity in drinking underground waters in Upper Silesia and solid wastes produced during treatment.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, Izabela; Chałupnik, Stanisław; Bonczyk, Michal

    2014-11-01

    Content of (226)Ra, (228)Ra and uranium isotopes in waters from subsurface aquifers was studied. The sampling points were chosen for having the elevated natural content of iron and manganese. Measurements of radium were made by LSC, while uranium was measured by alpha spectrometry. Waste sludge was measured by gamma spectrometry and three-stage BCR sequential extraction was performed. Radon activity concentration in the air at water treatment plants was determined and dose adsorbed by staff was calculated.

  13. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.; Straub, John E.

    2014-11-01

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  14. Preparation of semi-solid aluminum alloy slurry poured through a water-cooled serpentine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng-Zhou; Mao, Wei-Min; Wu, Zong-Chuang

    2012-01-01

    A water-cooled serpentine channel pouring process was invented to produce semi-solid A356 aluminum alloy slurry for rheocasting, and the effects of pouring temperature and circulating cooling water flux on the microstructure of the slurry were investigated. The results show that at the pouring temperature of 640-680°C and the circulating cooling water flux of 0.9 m3/h, the semi-solid A356 aluminum alloy slurry with spherical primary α(Al) grains can be obtained, whose shape factors are between 0.78 and 0.86 and the grain diameter can reach 48-68 μm. When the pouring temperatures are at 660-680°C, only a very thin solidified shell remains inside the serpentine channel and can be removed easily. When the serpentine channel is cooled with circulating water, the microstructure of the semi-solid slurry can be improved, and the serpentine channel is quickly cooled to room temperature after the completion of one pouring. In terms of the productivity of the special equipment, the water-cooled serpentine channel is economical and efficient.

  15. Investigating the solid-liquid phase transition of water nanofilms using the generalized replica exchange method

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qing; Kim, Jaegil; Straub, John E.; Farrell, James D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-11-14

    The generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM) was applied to study a solid-liquid phase transition in a nanoconfined bilayer water system using the monatomic water (mW) model. Exploiting optimally designed non-Boltzmann sampling weights with replica exchanges, gREM enables an effective sampling of configurations that are metastable or unstable in the canonical ensemble via successive unimodal energy distributions across phase transition regions, often characterized by S-loop or backbending in the statistical temperature. Extensive gREM simulations combined with Statistical Temperature Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (ST-WHAM) for nanoconfined mW water at various densities provide a comprehensive characterization of diverse thermodynamic and structural properties intrinsic to phase transitions. Graph representation of minimized structures of bilayer water systems determined by the basin-hopping global optimization revealed heterogeneous ice structures composed of pentagons, hexagons, and heptagons, consistent with an increasingly ordered solid phase with decreasing density. Apparent crossover from a first-order solid-liquid transition to a continuous one in nanoconfined mW water with increasing density of the system was observed in terms of a diminishing S-loop in the statistical temperature, smooth variation of internal energies and heat capacities, and a characteristic variation of lateral radial distribution functions, and transverse density profiles across transition regions.

  16. Development of amorphous solid dispersion formulations of a poorly water-soluble drug, MK-0364.

    PubMed

    Sotthivirat, S; McKelvey, C; Moser, J; Rege, B; Xu, W; Zhang, D

    2013-08-16

    The goal of this study was to demonstrate that MK-0364 solid dispersions can be developed as a means to increase the solubility and bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble drug, MK-0364. The potential solid dispersions would enable an oral solid dosage form as a monotherapy or combination product of MK-0364. Preliminary screening included sample preparation via a solvent casting method, physical characterization, and in vitro dissolution testing. Lead formulations were subsequently manufactured using hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray-drying (SD). All HME (without polyvinyl pyrrolidone) and SD formulations exhibit characteristics of a single phase glass including an amorphous halo when analyzed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), a single glass transition temperature (Tg) measured with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and supersaturation when dissolved in dissolution media. The oral absorption of MK-0364 from selected HME and SD formulations in monkeys results in marginally greater exposure with a consistently longer Tmax relative to a liquid filled capsule reference. Based on the processability, physical characterization, in vitro dissolution, and animal pharmacokinetic results, copovidone- and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS)-based solid dispersion formulations are viable product concepts. The physical stability of both the solid dispersion formulations was also evaluated for 54 weeks under different conditions. The copovidone-based solid dispersion requires protection from moisture.

  17. Driving Students and Parents to Cleaner Air: An Interview with Michelle Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    After spending three years as a kindergarten teacher and one as a reading specialist, Michelle Waters recently became the education outreach coordinator for the Georgia-based Clean Air Campaign. In that role, she has helped roll out a comprehensive Better Air Schools initiative to 20 Atlanta-area elementary schools. The program includes a…

  18. It's Alive!: Students Observe Air-Water Interface Samples Rich with Organisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an experiment, designed by Cindy Henk, manager of the Socolofsky Microscopy Center at Louisiana State University (LSU), that involved collecting and viewing microorganisms in the air-water interface. The experiment was participated by Leesville High School microbiology students. The students found that the air-water…

  19. The transfer of carbon fibers through a commercial aircraft water separator and air cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The fraction of carbon fibers passing through a water separator and an air filter was determined in order to estimate the proportion of fibers outside a closed aircraft that are transmitted to the electronics through the air conditioning system. When both devices were used together and only fibers 3 mm or larger were considered, a transfer function of .001 was obtained.

  20. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air using a desiccant

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method can be considered as four phases: (1) adsorbing water from air into a desiccant, (2) isolating the water-laden desiccant from the air source, (3) desorbing water as vapor from the desiccant into a chamber, and (4) isolating the desiccant from the chamber, and compressing the vapor in the chamber to form liquid condensate. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. Careful design of the dead volumes and pressure balances can minimize the energy required. The dried air can be exchanged for fresh moist air and the process repeated. An apparatus comprises a first chamber in fluid communication with a desiccant, and having ports to intake moist air and exhaust dried air. The apparatus also comprises a second chamber in fluid communication with the desiccant. The second chamber allows variable internal pressure, and has a port for removal of liquid condensate. Each chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with the desiccant. The first chamber can be configured to be isolated or in communication with a course of moist air. Various arrangements of valves, pistons, and chambers are described.

  1. Moisture content, processing yield, and surface color of broiler carcasses chilled by water, air, or evaporative air.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J Y; Janardhanan, K K; Booren, A M; Karcher, D M; Kang, I

    2011-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of water chilling (WC), air chilling (AC), and evaporative air chilling (EAC) on the moisture content, processing yield, surface color, and visual appearance of broiler carcasses. For the WC treatment, 1 group of birds was hard scalded and submersed into ice slush, whereas for AC, 1 group of birds was soft scalded and exposed to blowing air (1.0 m/s at 0°C) and for EAC, or 1 group of birds was soft scalded and exposed to blowing air and a cold water spray (every 5 min). During chilling, carcass temperature was reduced most effectively by WC (55 min), followed by EAC (120 min) and AC (155 min). After chilling, both WC and EAC carcasses picked up moisture at 4.6 and 1.0% of their weights, respectively, whereas AC carcasses lost 1.5% of their weight. On cutting at 5 h postmortem, WC carcasses showed the highest (2.5%), EAC showed the second highest (0.4%), and AC showed the least (0.3%) moisture loss. After 24 h of storage, almost 83% of the absorbed water in the WC carcass parts was released as purge, whereas EAC and AC carcasses maintained weights close to the prechilled weights. In an instrumental color evaluation and a visual evaluation by panelists, AC carcasses showed a darker appearance, a more yellow color, and more surface discoloration compared with WC or EAC carcasses.

  2. Free-Lagrange simulations of the expansion and jetting collapse of air bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turangan, C. K.; Jamaluddin, A. R.; Ball, G. J.; Leighton, T. G.

    A free-Lagrange numerical method is implemented to simulate the axisymmetric jetting collapse of air bubbles in water. This is performed for both lithotripter shock-induced collapses of initially stable bubbles, and for free-running cases where the bubble initially contains an overpressure. The code is validated using two test problems (shock-induced bubble collapse using a step shock, and shock10 MPa tensile waves, interacts with a bubble of initial radius 0.04 mm located in a free field (case 1) and near a rigid boundary (case 2). The interaction of the shock with the bubble causes it to involute and a liquid jet is formed that achieves a velocity exceeding 1.2 km s1 for case 2. The impact of the jet on the downstream wall of the bubble generates a blast wave with peak overpressure exceeding 1 GPa and 1.75 GPa for cases 1 and 2, respectively. The results show that the simulation technique retains sharply resolved gas/liquid interfaces regardless of the degree of geometric deformation, and reveal details of the dynamics of bubble collapse. The effects of compressibility are included for both liquid and gas phases, whereas stress distributions can be predicted within elastic-plastic solid surfaces (both planar and notched) in proximity to cavitation events. There is a movie with the online version of the paper.

  3. Indefinitely stable iron(IV) cage complexes formed in water by air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tomyn, Stefania; Shylin, Sergii I.; Bykov, Dmytro; Ksenofontov, Vadim; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Bon, Volodymyr; Fritsky, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    In nature, iron, the fourth most abundant element of the Earth's crust, occurs in its stable forms either as the native metal or in its compounds in the +2 or +3 (low-valent) oxidation states. High-valent iron (+4, +5, +6) compounds are not formed spontaneously at ambient conditions, and the ones obtained synthetically appear to be unstable in polar organic solvents, especially aqueous solutions, and this is what limits their studies and use. Here we describe unprecedented iron(IV) hexahydrazide clathrochelate complexes that are assembled in alkaline aqueous media from iron(III) salts, oxalodihydrazide and formaldehyde in the course of a metal-templated reaction accompanied by air oxidation. The complexes can exist indefinitely at ambient conditions without any sign of decomposition in water, nonaqueous solutions and in the solid state. We anticipate that our findings may open a way to aqueous solution and polynuclear high-valent iron chemistry that remains underexplored and presents an important challenge. PMID:28102364

  4. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR/WATER EXCHANGE PARTNERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evasion of elemental mercury from aquatic systems can significantly deplete net mercury accumulation resulting from atmospheric deposition, the current ability to model elemental mercury air/water exchange is limited by uncertainties in our understanding of all gaseous a...

  5. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  6. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  7. The Clean Air and Clean Water Acts: The "Fifth" and "Eighth" Most Significant Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Laurel A.

    1991-01-01

    The history and impact of this federal legislation are discussed. An assessment of the progress of federal legislation in these areas is presented. Key issues for federal legislation regarding water and air quality are identified. (CW)

  8. Solid Waste Assessment Testing. Installation Restoration Program. Stage 3. McClellan Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-30

    area is approximately 530 feet by 100 feet by 15 feet deep and was used as a solid waste landfill . It is covered by natural vegetation and some...site area is 405 feet by 80 feet by 6 feet deep, and was previously used as a solid waste landfill . Currently, a large portion of this site is being...774 (see Figure 5-6). The site area is 610 feet by 90 feet by 12 feet deep, and was previously used as a solid waste landfill . A large portion I of

  9. Ice as a water-equivalent solid medium for brachytherapy dosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Song, Haijun; Chen, Zhe; Yue, Ning; Wu, Qingrong; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-04-01

    Precise positioning of source and dosimeters is essential in the experimental determination of dosimetric characteristics of brachytherapy sources. Various near-water equivalent solid phantoms have been used to achieve the necessary precision in the positioning. However, the uncertainties in their chemical compositions may lead to non-negligible uncertainties in the determined doses. It is proposed here that ice may be used as an alternative to the conventional solid phantoms, since its chemical composition is identical to water while the positioning advantage associated with solid phantoms is retained. In this work, the feasibility of using ice as a solid phantom for brachytherapy dosimetry is investigated. Ice-to-water conversion factors are calculated at distances of 0.2-10 cm from the source, for six high- and low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources and mono-energetic photons between 10 keV to 2.0 MeV. Practical issues and challenges associated with measuring dose in an ice phantom are discussed.

  10. Filtration of contaminated suspended solids for the treatment of surface water.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Catherine N; Davarpanah, Neginmalak; Fukue, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2009-02-01

    As few technologies exist worldwide for the treatment of contaminated surface water, a new approach is currently under development consisting of an in situ water treatment system based on a floating filtration process for adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals. Laboratory filtration tests were performed for the removal of contaminated suspended solids (SS) from surface water. SS, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and organic carbon (OC) were monitored. Of the four filters (two non-woven geotextiles, a woven geotextile and a sand filter) evaluated, filter 1 (a non-woven geotextile) was the most effective for removal % of the total suspended solids. The results demonstrated excellent efficiency by filter No. 1, for reducing turbidity by 93-98%, as well as SS by up to 98.9% and COD by 65-71% for three sites with initial turbidities of 70, 20, and 120 NTU, respectively. The level of heavy metal removal was 98.9% due the heavy metal content of the suspended solids (60 mg kg(-1) of Cu, 90 mg kg (-1) of Ni, 130 mg kg(-1) of Zn, 200 mg kg(-1) of Cr, and 80 mg kg(-1) of Pb). The development of this technology could potentially protect the public and aquatic plants and animals from dangerous contaminants such as heavy metals adsorbed onto the suspended solids.

  11. The use of new GAFCHROMIC EBT film for {sup 125}I seed dosimetry in Solid Water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Medich, David; Munro, John III

    2008-08-15

    Radiochromic film dosimetry has been extensively used for intravascular brachytherapy applications for near field within 1 cm from the sources. With the recent introduction of new model of radiochromic films, GAFCHROMIC EBT, with higher sensitivity than earlier models, it is promising to extend the distances out to 5 cm for low dose rate (LDR) source dosimetry. In this study, the use of new model GAFCHROMIC EBT film for {sup 125}I seed dosimetry in Solid Water was evaluated for radial distances from 0.06 cm out to 5 cm. A multiple film technique was employed for four {sup 125}I seeds (Implant Sciences model 3500) with NIST traceable air kerma strengths. Each experimental film was positioned in contact with a {sup 125}I seed in a Solid Water phantom. The products of the air kerma strength and exposure time ranged from 8 to 3158 U-h, with the initial air kerma strength of 6 U in a series of 25 experiments. A set of 25 calibration films each was sequentially exposed to one {sup 125}I seed at about 0.58 cm distance for doses from 0.1 to 33 Gy. A CCD camera based microdensitometer, with interchangeable green (520 nm) and red (665 nm) light boxes, was used to scan all the films with 0.2 mm pixel resolution. The dose to each {sup 125}I calibration film center was calculated using the air kerma strength of the seed (incorporating decay), exposure time, distance from seed center to film center, and TG43U1S1 recommended dosimetric parameters. Based on the established calibration curve, dose conversion from net optical density was achieved for each light source. The dose rate constant was determined as 0.991 cGy U{sup -1} h{sup -1} ({+-}6.9%) and 1.014 cGy U{sup -1} h{sup -1} ({+-}6.8%) from films scanned using green and red light sources, respectively. The difference between these two values was within the uncertainty of the measurement. Radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function were also determined. The results obtained using the two light sources corroborated each

  12. Proton conducting membranes for high temperature fuel cells with solid state water free membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin S. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A water free, proton conducting membrane for use in a fuel cell is fabricated as a highly conducting sheet of converted solid state organic amine salt, such as converted acid salt of triethylenediamine with two quaternized tertiary nitrogen atoms, combined with a nanoparticulate oxide and a stable binder combined with the converted solid state organic amine salt to form a polymeric electrolyte membrane. In one embodiment the membrane is derived from triethylenediamine sulfate, hydrogen phosphate or trifiate, an oxoanion with at least one ionizable hydrogen, organic tertiary amine bisulfate, polymeric quaternized amine bisulfate or phosphate, or polymeric organic compounds with quaternizable nitrogen combined with Nafion to form an intimate network with ionic interactions.

  13. The Mechanism of the Crystallizing Action of Solids on the Supercooled Water Aerosols,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-30

    energetic mixing into it unavoidabl y fall the air bubbles, wh ich, floating , they carry alo ~g with themselves the droplets of water, causing their...reagents. For tes t ing of last/latter position, we were conduc ted se vera l preliminary experiments. In the first of them , was hydrophiliz ed

  14. Influence of forced air volume on water evaporation during sewage sludge bio-drying.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Chen, Tong-Bin; Gao, Ding; Zheng, Guo-Di; Liu, Hong-Tao; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Mechanical aeration is critical to sewage sludge bio-drying, and the actual water loss caused by aeration can be better understood from investigations of the relationship between aeration and water evaporation from the sewage sludge bio-drying pile based on in situ measurements. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of forced air volume on the evaporation of water from a sewage sludge bio-drying pile. Dewatered sewage sludge was bio-dried using control technology for bio-drying, during which time the temperature, superficial air velocity and water evaporation were measured and calculated. The results indicated that the peak air velocity and water evaporation occurred in the thermophilic phase and second temperature-increasing phase, with the highest values of 0.063 ± 0.027 m s(-1) and 28.9 kg ton(-1) matrix d(-1), respectively, being observed on day 4. Air velocity above the pile during aeration was 43-100% higher than when there was no aeration, and there was a significantly positive correlation between air volume and water evaporation from day 1 to 15. The order of daily means of water evaporation was thermophilic phase > second temperature-increasing phase > temperature-increasing phase > cooling phase. Forced aeration controlled the pile temperature and improved evaporation, making it the key factor influencing water loss during the process of sewage sludge bio-drying.

  15. Ground performance of air conditioning and water recycle system for a Space Plant Box.

    PubMed

    Tani, A; Okuma, T; Goto, E; Kitaya, Y; Saito, T; Takahashi, H

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from 5 Japanese universities have developed a plant growth facility (Space Plant Box) for seed to seed experiments under microgravity. The breadboard model of the Space Plant Box was fabricated by assembling subsystems developed for microgravity. The subsystems include air conditioning and water recycle system, air circulation system, water and nutrient delivery system, lighting system and plant monitoring system. The air conditioning and water recycle system is simply composed of a single heat exchanger, two fans and hydrophilic fibrous strings. The strings allow water movement from the cooler fin in the Cooling Box to root supporting materials in the Plant Growth Chamber driven by water potential deficit. Relative humidity in the Plant Growth Chamber can be changed over a wide range by controlling the ratio of latent heat exchange to sensible heat exchange on the cooling fin of the heat exchanger. The transpiration rate was successfully measured by circulating air inside the Plant Growth Chamber only. Most water was recycled and a small amount of water needed to be added from the outside. The simple, air conditioning and water recycle system for the Space Plant Box showed good performance through a barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) growth experiment.

  16. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  17. Influence of Solid Noise Barriers on Near-Road and On-Road Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health concerns regarding adverse health effects for populations spending significant amounts of time near high traffic roadways has increased substantially in recent years. Roadside features, including solid noise barriers, have been investigated as potential methods to ...

  18. Difference in water accumulation patterns between solid and closed hollow obturators under a thermal cycle.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Akito; Sakurai, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    Water accumulation in the hollow space of a maxillary obturator is a continuing problem, and it is unclear whether the porosity of acrylic resin is involved in the mechanism. The purposes of the study were to evaluate the effect of a hollow space in the resin obturator on water sorption under a thermal cycle and to determine factors associated with water accumulation in the obturator. Twenty solid spheres (30-mm diameter) and 40 hemispheres (30-mm diameter, 1.5 mm thickness) were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Closed hollow specimens consisted of 2 hemispheres joined with autopolymerizing resin. Ten solid and 10 closed hollow specimens were immersed in distilled water, whereas the other specimens were stored at 100% relative humidity. Each specimen was thermocycled (5°C-37°C) with a dwell time of 12 hours and weighed every 12 hours for 180 days. Of the 20 closed hollow specimens, 16 showed no water accumulation (8 in distilled water, 8 at 100% humidity). The weight of these specimens became saturated by day 90, with increases from the initial weight of 1.41% at 5°C and 1.36% at 37°C. By day 180, the weights of the solid specimens had increased by 0.96% at 5°C and 0.94% at 37°C. Weight fluctuation associated with temperature was observed for both types of specimens and for all storage conditions. It is concluded that water accumulation inside a closed hollow obturator is not directly related to the water absorption properties of the acrylic resin but is related to thermal damage of the obturator.

  19. Capillary forces between sediment particles and an air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Lapin, Sergey; Flury, Markus

    2012-04-17

    In the vadose zone, air-water interfaces play an important role in particle fate and transport, as particles can attach to the air-water interfaces by action of capillary forces. This attachment can either retard or enhance the movement of particles, depending on whether the air-water interfaces are stationary or mobile. Here we use three standard PTFE particles (sphere, circular cylinder, and tent) and seven natural mineral particles (basalt, granite, hematite, magnetite, mica, milky quartz, and clear quartz) to quantify the capillary forces between an air-water interface and the different particles. Capillary forces were determined experimentally using tensiometry, and theoretically assuming volume-equivalent spherical, ellipsoidal, and circular cylinder shapes. We experimentally distinguished between the maximum capillary force and the snap-off force when the air-water interface detaches from the particle. Theoretical and experimental values of capillary forces were of similar order of magnitude. The sphere gave the smallest theoretical capillary force, and the circular cylinder had the largest force due to pinning of the air-water interface. Pinning was less pronounced for natural particles when compared to the circular cylinder. Ellipsoids gave the best agreement with measured forces, suggesting that this shape can provide a reasonable estimation of capillary forces for many natural particles.

  20. Ground-water quality, water year 1995, and statistical analysis of ground-water-quality data, water years 1994-95, at the Chromic Acid Pit site, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Roybal, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chromic Acid Pit site is an inactive waste disposal site that is regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The 2.2-cubic-yard cement-lined pit was operated from 1980 to 1983 by a contractor to the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss. The pit, located on the Fort Bliss military reservation in El Paso, Texas, was used for disposal and evaporation of chromic acid waste generated from chrome plating operations. The site was closed in 1989, and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission issued permit number HW-50296 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency number TX4213720101), which approved and implemented post-closure care for the Chromic Acid Pit site. In accordance with an approved post-closure plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is cooperating with the U.S. Army in monitoring and evaluating ground-water quality at the site. One upgradient ground-water monitoring well (MW1) and two downgradient ground-water monitoring wells (MW2 and MW3), installed adjacent to the chromic acid pit, are monitored on a quarterly basis. Ground-water sampling of these wells by the U.S. Geological Survey began in December 1993. The ground-water level, measured in a production well located approximately 1,700 feet southeast of the Chromic Acid Pit site, has declined about 29.43 feet from 1982 to 1995. Depth to water at the Chromic Acid Pit site in September 1995 was 284.2 to 286.5 feet below land surface; ground-water flow at the water table is assumed to be toward the southeast. Ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells at the Chromic Acid Pit site during water year 1995 contained dissolved- solids concentrations of 481 to 516 milligrams per liter. Total chromium concentrations detected above the laboratory reporting limit ranged from 0.0061 to 0.030 milligram per liter; dissolved chromium concentrations ranged from 0.0040 to 0.010 milligram per liter. Nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 2.8 milligrams per

  1. International Space Station Common Cabin Air Assembly Water Separator On-Orbit Operation, Failure, and Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balistreri, Steven F., Jr.; Shaw, Laura A.; Laliberte, Yvon

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control the temperature and humidity of an environment or habitat is critical for human survival. These factors are important to maintaining human health and comfort, as well as maintaining mechanical and electrical equipment in good working order to support the human and to accomplish mission objectives. The temperature and humidity of the International Space Station (ISS) United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) cabin air is controlled by the Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). The CCAA consists of a fan, a condensing heat exchanger (CHX), an air/water separator, temperature and liquid sensors, and electrical controlling hardware and software. The Water Separator (WS) pulls in air and water from the CHX, and centrifugally separates the mixture, sending the water to the condensate bus and the air back into the CHX outlet airstream. Two distinct early failures of the CCAA Water Separator in the Quest Airlock forced operational changes and brought about the re-design of the Water Separator to improve the useful life via modification kits. The on-orbit operational environment of the Airlock presented challenges that were not foreseen with the original design of the Water Separator. Operational changes were instituted to prolong the life of the third installed WS, while waiting for newly designed Water Separators to be delivered on-orbit. The modification kit design involved several different components of the Water Separator, including the innovative use of a fabrication technique to build the impellers used in Water Separators out of titanium instead of aluminum. The technique allowed for the cost effective production of the low quantity build. This paper will describe the failures of the Water Separators in the Quest Airlock, the operational constraints that were implemented to prolong the life of the installed Water Separators throughout the USOS, and the innovative re-design of the CCAA Water Separator.

  2. Investigation of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells for air-independent UUV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moton, Jennie Mariko

    Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) will benefit greatly from high energy density (> 500 Wh/L) power systems utilizing high-energy-density fuels and air-independent oxidizers. Current battery-based systems have limited energy densities (< 400 Wh/L), which motivate development of alternative power systems such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). SOFC-based power systems have the potential to achieve the required UUV energy densities, and the current study explores how SOFCs based on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolytes with operating temperatures of 650°C and lower may operate in the unique environments of a promising UUV power plant. The plant would contain a H 2O2 decomposition reactor to supply humidified O2 to the SOFC cathode and exothermic aluminum/H2O combustor to provide heated humidified H2 fuel to the anode. To characterize low-temperature SOFC performance with these unique O2 and H2 source, SOFC button cells based on nickel/GDC (Gd0.1Ce0.9O 1.95) anodes, GDC electrolytes, and lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ or LSCF)/GDC cathodes were fabricated and tested for performance and stability with humidity on both the anode and the cathode. Cells were also tested with various reactant concentrations of H2 and O2 to simulate gas depletion down the channel of an SOFC stack. Results showed that anode performance depended primarily on fuel concentration and less on the concentration of the associated increase in product H2O. O 2 depletion with humidified cathode flows also caused significant loss in cell current density at a given voltage. With the humidified flows in either the anode or cathode, stability tests of the button cells at 650 °C showed stable voltage is maintained at low operating current (0.17 A/cm2) at up to 50 % by mole H2O, but at higher current densities (0.34 A/cm2), irreversible voltage degradation occurred at rates of 0.8-3.7 mV/hour depending on exposure time. From these button cell results, estimated average

  3. Integrating air quality, water and climate concerns into China's energy strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei

    As the world's top carbon emitter, China also suffers from serious air pollution and increasingly severe water stress. My dissertation focuses on a variety of energy strategies in China and examines potential synergies and tradeoffs between air quality, water conservation and carbon mitigation objectives. It includes four analytical chapters. Chapter 2 and 3 examines the air quality and climate implications of a variety policy options in the near term and at the 2030 time horizon, respectively. Based on an integrated assessment using regional air pollution model and epidemiological evidence, I find that improving industrial energy efficiency is the most effective near-term strategy to curb air pollution and carbon emissions, while electrifying end-use sectors (e.g. vehicles and residential stoves) with decarbonized electricity will likely become the favorable co-control strategy in 2030. These two chapters hence provide a scientific basis for policymakers in China to coordinate air pollution and carbon mitigation strategies. Chapter 4 and 5 then examines the role of electricity transmission, as a critical element of the electrification strategy, in the nexus of air pollution, water stress and carbon emissions. Chapter 4 evaluates the potential air quality and climate benefits of long-distance electricity transmission in China in the near term. I find that transmitting a hybrid mix of renewable and coal power can be a cost-effective energy transfer strategy to curb air pollution impacts and carbon emissions, because it not only utilizes zero-carbon renewable resources in the west, but also displaces coal power generation and associated air pollution impacts in highly populated eastern regions. Chapter 5 studies the potential tradeoffs in the transmission system designs to achieve air quality or water conservation benefits from a decarbonized generation system. Since air pollution and water stress are severe in eastern and northern China respectively, I find that an

  4. Solid phase extraction for the speciation and preconcentration of inorganic selenium in water samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Herrero Latorre, C; Barciela García, J; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R M

    2013-12-04

    Selenium is an essential element for the normal cellular function of living organisms. However, selenium is toxic at concentrations of only three to five times higher than the essential concentration. The inorganic forms (mainly selenite and selenate) present in environmental water generally exhibit higher toxicity (up to 40 times) than organic forms. Therefore, the determination of low levels of different inorganic selenium species in water is an analytical challenge. Solid-phase extraction has been used as a separation and/or preconcentration technique prior to the determination of selenium species due to the need for accurate measurements for Se species in water at extremely low levels. The present paper provides a critical review of the published methods for inorganic selenium speciation in water samples using solid phase extraction as a preconcentration procedure. On the basis of more than 75 references, the different speciation strategies used for this task have been highlighted and classified. The solid-phase extraction sorbents and the performance and analytical characteristics of the developed methods for Se speciation are also discussed.

  5. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water.

    PubMed

    Perry, C C; Faradzhev, N S; Madey, T E; Fairbrother, D H

    2007-05-28

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons.

  6. Optimization of suspended solids removal from coal-ash-laden waste waters. Master's project

    SciTech Connect

    Schafran, G.

    1991-06-14

    Wastewater resulting from the drawing down of ash from coal-fired boilers contains a significantly high concentration of suspended solids requiring treatment prior to release into sanitation lines for treatment at municipal wastewater treatment plants. As an example, the steam plant at the Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek in Norfolk, Virginia is experiencing high surcharges from the Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD) for the high concentration of suspended solids in their wastewater. At present, there are no mechanisms in place to pre-treat this wastewater prior to its discharge into HRSD. The purpose of this project is to analyze the effectiveness of various coagulant aids in the removal of suspended solids from the ash-laden wastewater. In addition, the effectiveness of an anionic polymer in response to changes in pH, velocity gradients of flocculation, and various top/bottom ash water mixtures was analyzed.

  7. Major Upgrades to the AIRS Version-6 Water Vapor Profile Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This research is a continuation of part of what was shown at the last AIRS Science Team Meeting and the AIRS 2015 NetMeeting. AIRS Version 6 was finalized in late 2012 and is now operational. Version 6 contained many significant improvements in retrieval methodology compared to Version 5. Version 6 retrieval methodology used for the water vapor profile q(p) and ozone profile O3(p) retrievals is basically unchanged from Version 5, or even from Version 4. Subsequent research has made significant improvements in both water vapor and O3 profiles compared to Version 6.

  8. Potable water recovery for spacecraft application by electrolytic pretreatment/air evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    A process for the recovery of potable water from urine using electrolytic pretreatment followed by distillation in a closed-cycle air evaporator has been developed and tested. Both the electrolytic pretreatment unit and the air evaporation unit are six-person, flight-concept prototype, automated units. Significantly extended wick lifetimes have been achieved in the air evaporation unit using electrolytically pretreated, as opposed to chemically pretreated, urine feed. Parametric test data are presented on product water quality, wick life, process power, maintenance requirements, and expendable requirements.

  9. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  10. Water treatment: Air stripping. December 1981-July 1989 (Citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for December 1981-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including ground-water decontamination and waste-water purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water-treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in ground-water and soil cleanup. Other water treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 74 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  11. A laboratory simulation of toluene cleanup by air sparging of water-saturated sands.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J W; DeBoer, M J; Lake, K L

    2000-02-25

    Laboratory air sparging experiments were performed in narrow acrylic tanks to evaluate the cleanup of toluene in water-saturated sands. Air flow channels in the sediment were identified by way of a colorimetric visualization technique, which allowed pore water samples to be collected at a known horizontal distance from an air channel. Pore water was sampled at periodic intervals during sparging experiments and analyzed by gas chromatography to yield toluene concentration vs. time data. Results indicate that channelized air flow is effective in reducing toluene concentrations in the range of 36-3 ppm, within 2 to 5 days, at least up to 185 mm from an active air channel. While relatively rapid, these toluene reduction times are longer than previously published data, from similar type experiments. The discrepancy is likely a function of air delivery flow rate and proximity of sampling sites to active air channels. Data from the current investigation were used to attempt an estimate of effective diffusion coefficients (D*) for toluene in clean, well-characterized sands in which the concentration gradient was imposed by sparge air. Calculated D* values range from 2. 98x10(-8) m(2)/s to 5.74x10(-9) m(2)/s, and are significantly faster than previously published values of toluene diffusion in clay soils. However, the values are also slightly greater than diffusion coefficients for toluene in aqueous solutions, indicating that the calculations more likely estimate coefficients of hydrodynamic dispersion (D(L)).

  12. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weight ratio of 1:1 of indomethacin and lactose were ground using a high speed vibrating ball mill. Particle size was determined by electron microscopy, the reduction of crystallinity was determined by calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy was used to find evidence of any interactions between the drug and the carrier and the determination of apparent solubility allowed for the corroboration of changes in solubility. Before grinding, scanning electron microscopy showed the drug and lactose to have an average particle size of around 50 and 30 μm, respectively. After high speed grinding, indomethacin and the mixture had a reduced average particle size of around 5 and 2 μm, respectively, showing a morphological change. The ground mixture produced a solid dispersion that had a loss of crystallinity that reached 81% after 30 min of grinding while the drug solubility of indomethacin within the solid dispersion increased by 2.76 fold as compared to the pure drug. Drug activation due to hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group of the drug and the hydroxyl group of lactose as well as the decrease in crystallinity of the solid dispersion and the reduction of the particle size led to a better water solubility of indomethacin. PMID:23798775

  13. Impacts of Solid Noise Barriers and Roadside Vegetation on ?Near-Road Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health concerns for populations spending time near high traffic roadways has increased substantially in recent years. Air quality measurements indicate high pollutant concentrations near these large roads. However, roadside features have been shown to substantially affec...

  14. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives.

  15. Oxygen and Air Nanobubble Water Solution Promote the Growth of Plants, Fishes, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives. PMID:23755221

  16. Critical air/water blow-down in safety valves at low qualities.

    PubMed

    Moncalvo, D; Friedel, L

    2011-02-28

    Critical air/water blow-downs in safety valves for qualities from 0.01 to 0.113 and mass flow rates from 1.5 up to 4.3 kg/s have been observed in our test facility. These critical blow-downs are characterized by a large void fraction and by an intense mixing of the phases both in the valve body and in the outlet pipe. A qualitative estimation of the flow pattern in the outlet pipe using the map of Taitel and Dukler suggests that these air/water flows are intermittent flows--presumably slug flows--evolving to annular flows for qualities above 0.1. Intermittent flows are also predicted for critical air/water and air/glycerine flows taken from the literature for the same safety valve at slightly larger relieving pressures.

  17. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  18. Patrick Air Force Base Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Chromic and HF Acids 1,1,2-Trichloroethane Mecuric Nitrate Lithium Chloride/Cd/Cr/Pb/Se Alodine rinsewater (RW) Color photofixers Ammonium Hydroxide...Photographic/Ag Mercury batteries Lithium batteries Mercury solids 3-3 The hazardous waste is completely enclosed within the facility and is therefore not...dibrornide) 10102484 84-74-2 Dibutyl phthalate 7758954 Lead chloride 25321-22-6 Dichlorobenzene (mixed 13814965 Lead fluoborate isomers) 7783462 Lead

  19. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  20. Pure water injection into porous rock with superheated steam and salt in a solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montegrossi, G.; Tsypkin, G.; Calore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Most of geothermal fields require injection of fluid into the hot rock to maintain pressure and productivity. The presence of solid salt in porous space may cause an unexpected change in the characteristics of the reservoir and produced fluids, and dramatically affect the profitability of the project. We consider an injection problem of pure water into high temperature geothermal reservoir, saturated with superheated vapour and solid salt. Pure water moves away from injection point and dissolves solid salt. When salty water reaches the low-pressure hot domain, water evaporation occurs and, consequently, salt precipitates. We develop a simplified analytical model of the process and derive the similarity solutions for a 1-D semi-infinite reservoir. These solutions are multi-valued and describe the reduction in permeability and porosity due to salt precipitation at the leading boiling front. If the parameters of the system exceed critical values, then similarity solution ceases to exist. We identify this mathematical behaviour with reservoir sealing in the physical system. The TOUGH2-EWASG code has been used to verify this hypothesis and investigate the precipitate formation for an idealized bounded 1-D geothermal system of a length of 500 m with water injection at one extreme and fluid extraction at the other one. Both boundaries are kept at constant pressure and temperature. The result for the semi-infinite numerical model show that the monotonic grow of the solid salt saturation to reach asymptotic similarity solution generally occurs over a very large length starting from the injection point. Reservoir sealing occurs if solid salt at the initial state occupies a considerable part of the porous space. Numerical experiments for the bounded 500 m system demonstrate that a small amount of salt is enough to get reservoir sealing. Generally, salt tend to accumulate near the production well, and salt plug forms at the elements adjacent to the extraction point. This type

  1. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed.

  2. Influence of water uptake, gel network, and disintegration time on prednisone release from encapsulated solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Darío; Salomon, Claudio J

    2010-01-01

    Prednisone is considered the glucocorticoid of choice for anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant effects. However, its very low aqueous solubility can compromise oral bioavailability. Changes in the dissolution of a prednisone-PEG 6000 solid dispersion into capsule were investigated by addition of pregelatinized starch. Physical state of prednisone:PEG 6000 was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Capsule formulations containing prednisone-PEG 6000 and pregelatinized starch showed superior dissolution properties (> 95% in 60 min) when compared with reference capsules without disintegrant (< 45% in 60 min). Water uptake and disintegration time were directly correlated with pregelatinized starch amount. The morphology of prednisone-PEG 6000 particles with disintegrant was analyzed by SEM, showing a novel surface structure. Thus, solid dispersions of a poorly water soluble drug combined with a disintegrant were confirmed as a valid approach to the improvement of drug dissolution.

  3. Explosive ordnance detection in land and water environments with solid phase extraction/ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Phelan, James M.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Reber, Steven; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1999-08-01

    The qualitative and quantitative determination of nitroaromatic compounds such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in water and soil has applications to environmental remediation and the detection of buried military ordnance. Recent results of laboratory and field test have shown that trace level concentrations of these compounds can be detected in water, soil, and solid gas samples taken from the vicinity of submerged or buried ordnance using specialized sampling and signal enhancement techniques. Solid phase micro-extraction methods have been combined with Ion Mobility Spectroscopy to provide rapid, sub-parts-per-billion analysis of these compounds. In this paper, we will describe the gas. These sampling systems, when combined with field-portable IMS, are being developed as a means of classifying buried or submerged objects as explosive ordnance.

  4. 20 Years of Air-Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jantunen, Liisa M; Wong, Fiona; Gawor, Anya; Kylin, Henrik; Helm, Paul A; Stern, Gary A; Strachan, William M J; Burniston, Deborah A; Bidleman, Terry F

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report the time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993 and 2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs and toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, and ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF), and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB and quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT, and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF and DAC), and most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC + CC) and TC/(TC + CC + TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC + CC + TN) increased. TN/(TC + CC + TN) also increased in air and slightly, but not significantly, in water. These changes suggest selective removal of more labile TC and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water-air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR > 1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs but net deposition (FR < 1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure and evaluate the effectiveness of international protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

  5. Simulation of solid oxide iron-air battery: Effects of heat and mass transfer on charge/discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A time-dependent 2-D numerical simulation was performed on a solid oxide iron-air battery (SOIAB) to reveal the fundamental characteristics of this new system. The SOIAB is a rechargeable battery consisting of a solid oxide electrochemical cell (SOEC) and iron as a redox metal. A simple battery configuration was employed assuming a system with a small capacity. A simulation model for a unit element was developed considering heat and mass transfer in the system, taking both electrochemical and redox reactions into account. The numerical results showed the spatial and temporal changes in the temperature field in the charge and discharge operations, which were due to the combined effects of heat generation/absorption by the electrochemical and redox reactions and heat exchange with the air supplied through convective heat transfer. As the reaction rates are functions of the local temperature, the predicted results show the importance of considering the heat transfer phenomena in this system. It was also found that the active reaction region in the redox metal evolves with time. The nonuniform distribution of iron utilization is affected by the effective gas diffusion coefficients in the porous redox metal, and consequently the change in the current density distribution in the SOEC.

  6. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of contact angle hysteresis on a patterned solid/air composite surface.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bin; Yang, Xiaozhen

    2006-02-28

    We have studied two types of topological substrates--the continuous solid substrates (CSS) and the discontinuous solid substrates (DSS)--by using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for a better understanding of the contact angle hysteresis on two such substrates. After the validation of DPD in the system, we found that DSS has a different distribution of the metastable states from that of CSS and that DSS has relatively larger contact angle hysteresis at lower temperature. Obtained results also show that CSS is more suitable for making an ultrahydrophobic or ultralyophobic surface than DSS from the point of view of dynamic wettability.

  7. Laboratory investigation of aluminum solubility and solid-phase properties following alum treatment of lake waters.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Jacob; Anderson, Michael A; Graham, Robert C

    2005-10-01

    Water samples from two southern California lakes adversely affected by internal nutrient loading were treated with a 20 mg/L dose of Al3+ in laboratory studies to examine Al solubility and solid-phase speciation over time. Alum [Al2(SO4)3 . 18 H2O] applications to water samples from Big Bear Lake and Lake Elsinore resulted in a rapid initial decrease in pH and alkalinity followed by a gradual recovery in pH over several weeks. Dissolved Al concentrations increased following treatment, reaching a maximum of 2.54 mg/L after 17 days in Lake Elsinore water and 0.91 mg/L after 48 days in Big Bear Lake water; concentrations in both waters then decreased to <0.25 mg/L after 150 days. The solid phase was periodically collected and analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric analysis (DSC-TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and surface area analyses to investigate the nature of the reaction products and crystallinity development over time. Poorly ordered, X-ray amorphous solid phases transformed over time to relatively well-ordered gibbsite, with strong diffraction peaks at 4.8 and 4.3 A. XRD also indicated the formation of a second (possibly aluminosilicate) crystalline phase after 150 days in Lake Elsinore water. Surface areas also decreased over time as crystals reordered to form gibbsite/microcrystalline gibbsite species. DSC-TGA results suggested that the initially formed amorphous Al(OH)3 underwent transformation to >45% gibbsite. These results were supported by geochemical modeling using Visual MINTEQ, with Al solubility putatively controlled by amorphous Al(OH)3 shortly after treatment and approaching that of microcrystalline gibbsite after about 150 days. These findings indicate that Al(OH)3 formed after alum treatment undergoes significant chemical and mineralogical changes that may alter its effectiveness as a reactive barrier to phosphorus release from lake sediments.

  8. Evaluation of Vertically Resolved Water Winds from AIRS using Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Dobkowski, Edwin C.; Gregorich, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of wind velocity as a function of altitude is key to weather forecast improvements. The ability of hyperspectral sounders in principle to measure vertically resolved water winds, which has long been recognized, has been tested with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. AIRS retrievals of total column water above 300 mb have been correlated with the radiosonde upper-tropospheric wind velocity and moisture data. The excellent correlation is illustrated with results obtained from hurricane Katrina and from the western United States. AIRS is a hyperspectral infrared sounder in low Earth orbit. It was launched in May 2002. We illustrate the use of AIRS data for the measurement of upper tropospheric water by using the 2387/cm CO2 R-branch channel and the 1551/cm water vapor channel. The 2387/cm channel measures the temperature at 300 mb totally independent of water vapor. The weighting function of the 1551/cm channel peaks at 300 mb only under moist conditions; the peak shifts downward (higher temperature) for less water and upward (lower temperature) for more water. The difference between the brightness temperatures bt2387 and bt1551 cancels the local several degree weather related variability of the temperature and measures the component due to the water vapor at 300 mb.

  9. Calibration of Dissolved Noble Gas Mass Spectrometric Measurements by an Air-Water Equilibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, Darren; Matsumoto, Takuya; Jaklitsch, Manfred; Han, Liang-Feng; Klaus, Philipp; Wassenaar, Leonard; Aggarwal, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Precise measurements by mass spectrometry of dissolved noble gases (He, Ar, Ne, Kr, Xe) in water samples require careful calibration against laboratory standards with known concentrations. Currently, air pipettes are used for day-to-day calibrations, making estimation of overall analytical uncertainties for dissolved noble gas measurements in water difficult. Air equilibrated water (AEW) is often used as a matrix-equivalent laboratory standard for dissolved gases in groundwater, because of the well-known and constant fractions of noble gases in the atmosphere. AEW standards, however, are only useful if the temperature and pressure of the gas-water equilibrium can be controlled and measured precisely (i.e., to better than 0.5%); contamination and partial sample degassing must also be prevented during sampling. Here we present the details of a new custom air-water equilibration system which consists of an insulated 600 liter tank filled with deionized water, held isothermally at a precise target temperature (<0.05 °C) through the use of a heat exchanger. The temperature and total dissolved gas of the water in the tank are monitored continually, as are atmospheric pressure and air temperature in the laboratory. Different noble gas concentration standards can be reliably produced by accurately controlling the water temperature of the equilibration system. Equilibration characteristics and reproducibility of this system for production of copper tubes containing known amounts of noble gases will be presented.

  10. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  11. Measurement of drinking water contaminants by solid phase microextraction initially quantified in source water samples by the USGS.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Robert; Yang, Ill; Lippincott, Robert Lee; Murphy, Eileen; Buckley, Brian

    2008-04-15

    Two adsorbent solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers, 70 microm Carbowax divinylbenzene (CW/DVB) and 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), were selected for the analysis of several target analytes (phenols, phosphates, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated pesticides) identified by the USGS in surface waters. Detection limits for standards ranged from 0.1 to 1 ng/mL for the CW/ DVB fiber and 0.1 to 2 ng/mL for the PDMS/DVB fiber for 20 of the analytes. The remaining analytes were not extracted because their polarity precluded their partition to the solid phase of the SPMEfiber. Groundwater and treated water samples collected from wells in northern New Jersey were then sampled for the USGS analytes by the SPME method as well as a modified version of EPA 525.5 using C-18 bonded solid phase extraction columns. Nine of the USGS analytes-bisphenol A, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, butylated hydroxytoluene, butlyated hydroxyanisole, diethyltoulamide, diethyl phthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and triphenyl phosphate-were detected in groundwater samples using the CW/ DVB fiber.

  12. Dynamic behavior of water droplets on solid surfaces with pillar-type nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woog-Jin; Ha, Man Yeong; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Ambrosia, Matthew

    2012-03-27

    In the present study, we investigated the static and dynamic behavior of water droplets on solid surfaces featuring pillar-type nanostructures by using molecular dynamics simulations. We carried out the computation in two stages. As a result of the first computational stage, an initial water cube reached an equilibrium state at which the water droplet showed different shapes depending on the height and the lateral and gap dimensions of the pillars. In the second computational stage, we applied a constant body force to the static water droplet obtained from the first computational stage and evaluated the dynamic behavior of the water droplet as it slid along the pillar-type surface. The dynamic behavior of the water droplet, which could be classified into three different groups, depended on the static state of the water droplet, the pillar characteristics (e.g., height and the lateral and gap dimensions of the pillars), and the magnitude of the applied body force. We obtained the advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding contact angle hysteresis of the water droplets, which helped classify the water droplets into the three different groups.

  13. Updated Solid Water trade mark sign to water conversion factors for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Awan, Shahid B.; Thompson, Nathan S.; Dini, Sharifeh A.

    2006-11-15

    Dosimetric characteristics of brachytherapy sources are normally determined in water using a Monte Carlo simulation technique and in water equivalent phantom material using both experimental and Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The consensuses of these results are then calculated for clinical applications by converting experimental data obtained in water equivalent material to water using a conversion factor. These conversion factors are normally determined as a ratio of the Monte Carlo-simulated dose rate constant in liquid water to the dose rate constant in a water-equivalent phantom material. However, it has been noted that conversion factors utilized by some investigators have been derived using incorrect phantom material composition and incorrect cross-sectional data information. The impact of errors associated with the cross-sectional data and chemical composition of the phantom material used in dosimetric evaluation of brachytherapy sources has been investigated in this project. Results of these investigations have shown that the use of Solid Water trade mark sign with 1.7% calcium content, as compared to the 2.3% value stated by the manufacturer, may lead to 5% and 9% differences in conversion factors for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively.

  14. Automated solid-phase extraction of herbicides from water for gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    An automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) method was developed for the pre-concentration of chloroacetanilide and triazine herbicides, and two triazine metabolites from 100-ml water samples. Breakthrough experiments for the C18 SPE cartridge show that the two triazine metabolites are not fully retained and that increasing flow-rate decreases their retention. Standard curve r2 values of 0.998-1.000 for each compound were consistently obtained and a quantitation level of 0.05 ??g/l was achieved for each compound tested. More than 10,000 surface and ground water samples have been analyzed by this method.

  15. Municipal solid waste management health risk assessment from air emissions for China by applying life cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Nitivattananon, Vilas; Li, Peng

    2015-05-01

    This study is to quantify and objectively evaluate the extent of environmental health risks from three waste treatment options suggested by the national municipal solid waste management enhancing strategy (No [2011] 9 of the State Council, promulgated on 19 April 2011), which includes sanitary landfill, waste-to-energy incineration and compost, together with the material recovery facility through a case study in Zhangqiu City of China. It addresses potential chronic health risks from air emissions to residential receptors in the impacted area. It combines field survey, analogue survey, design documents and life cycle inventory methods in defining the source strength of chemicals of potential concern. The modelling of life cycle inventory and air dispersion is via integrated waste management(IWM)-2 and Screening Air Dispersion Model (Version 3.0) (SCREEN3). The health risk assessment is in accordance with United States Environmental Protection Agency guidance Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS), Volume I: Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part F, Supplemental Guidance for Inhalation Risk Assessment). The exposure concentration is based on long-term exposure to the maximum ground level contaminant in air under the 'reasonable worst situation' emissions and then directly compared with reference for concentration and unit risk factor/cancer slope factor derived from the national air quality standard (for a conventional pollutant) and toxicological studies (for a specific pollutant). Results from this study suggest that the option of compost with material recovery facility treatment may pose less negative health impacts than other options; the sensitivity analysis shows that the landfill integrated waste management collection rate has a great influence on the impact results. Further investigation is needed to validate or challenge the findings of this study.

  16. Easily regenerable solid adsorbents based on polyamines for carbon dioxide capture from the air.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Zhang, Hang; Czaun, Miklos; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A; Narayanan, S R

    2014-05-01

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  17. Easily Regenerable Solid Adsorbents Based on Polyamines for Carbon Dioxide Capture from the Air

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppert, A; Zhang, H; Czaun, M; May, RB; Prakash, GKS; Olah, GA; Narayanan, SR

    2014-03-18

    Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, particle size, and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from a closed environment, such as a submarine or space vehicles, is essential for life support. The supply of CO2-free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes, while, at the same time, provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

  18. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  19. Fluid flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical investigations on flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger. The working fluids are air and water. To achieve fully developed conditions, the heat exchanger was built with additional lengths before and after the test section. The inner and outer tube was made from copper and Plexiglas, respectively. The experiments are conducted in the range of air flow Reynolds number for various cases with different water flow rate and water inlet temperature. Correlations for the Nusselt number and friction factor are presented according to experimental data. Also the commercial code ANSYS 15 is used for numerical simulation. Results show that the Nusselt number is an increasing function of Reynolds number and Prandtl number which are calculated at bulk temperature.

  20. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results.

  1. Solid/liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2015-05-14

    We have studied the low-temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Using the results from our experiments, we have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/succinic acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We also compared our results to the predictions of the extended AIM aerosol thermodynamics model (E-AIM) and found good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however, differences were found with respect to succinic acid solubility temperatures. We also compared the results of this study with those of previous studies that we have published on ammonium sulfate/dicarboxylic acid/water systems.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  3. Numerical study of coupled transfer of heat and mass between air and water inside a geothermal water cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Bourouni, Karim; Thameur Chaibi, Mohamed

    2006-11-01

    In the south of Tunisia, geothermal water is used to irrigate cultures. Since its temperature is very high (70 C), geothermal water is cooled by cooling towers. These towers are sized empirically and present many operating problems such as excessive energy consumption, big loss of vapour and low cooling efficiency. The aim of our work is modelling the coupled heat and mass transfer between air and water inside the cooling tower. The most important results obtained are that the evaporative potential is dominating the convective one in the cooling process. That's why the cooling is more efficient in summer than in hibernal period when humidity of ambient air reaches high values. In other hand, the negative convective phenomenon is illustrated. In fact, at the bottom of the tower, water temperature reaches the air one; the two fluids begin to cooling simultaneously. Air is cooled by convection and water by evaporation. We demonstrate also that there is no point in putting fans in working during cold weather. We studied also the effect of the variation of heat transfer coefficient on the efficiency of cooling.

  4. Air-drying beds reduce the quantities of antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons in residual municipal wastewater solids.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tucker R; Sadowsky, Michael J; LaPara, Timothy M

    2013-09-03

    This study investigated whether air-drying beds reduce antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) concentrations in residual municipal wastewater solids. Three laboratory-scale drying beds were operated for a period of nearly 100 days. Real-time PCR was used to quantify 16S rRNA genes, 16S rRNA genes specific to fecal bacteria (AllBac) and human fecal bacteria (HF183), the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intI1), and five ARGs representing a cross-section of antibiotic classes and resistance mechanisms (erm(B), sul1, tet(A), tet(W), and tet(X)). Air-drying beds were capable of reducing all gene target concentrations by 1 to 5 orders of magnitude, and the nature of this reduction was consistent with both a net decrease in the number of bacterial cells and a lack of selection within the microbial community. Half-lives varied between 1.5 d (HF183) and 5.4 d (tet(X)) during the first 20 d of treatment. After the first 20 d of treatment, however, half-lives varied between 8.6 d (tet(X)) and 19.3 d (AllBac), and 16S rRNA gene, intI1, and sul1 concentrations did not change (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that air-drying beds can reduce ARG and intI1 concentrations in residual municipal wastewater solids within timeframes typical of operating practices.

  5. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  6. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  7. Freezing point depression of water in phospholipid membranes: a solid-state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kuk; Kwon, Byung Soo; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-12-02

    Lipid-water interaction plays an important role in the properties of lipid bilayers, cryoprotectants, and membrane-associated peptides and proteins. The temperature at which water bound to lipid bilayers freezes is lower than that of free water. Here, we report a solid-state NMR investigation on the freezing point depression of water in phospholipid bilayers in the presence and absence of cholesterol. Deuterium NMR spectra at different temperatures ranging from -75 to + 10 degrees C were obtained from fully (2)H2O-hydrated POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine) multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), prepared with and without cholesterol, to determine the freezing temperature of water and the effect of cholesterol on the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. Our 2H NMR experiments reveal the motional behavior of unfrozen water molecules in POPC bilayers even at temperatures significantly below 0 degrees C and show that the presence of cholesterol further lowered the freezing temperature of water in POPC bilayers. These results suggest that in the presence of cholesterol the fluidity and dynamics of lipid bilayers can be retained even at very low temperatures as exist in the liquid crystalline phase of the lipid. Therefore, bilayer samples prepared with a cryoprotectant like cholesterol should enable the performance of multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments to investigate the structure, dynamics, and topology of membrane proteins at a very low temperature with enhanced sample stability and possibly a better sensitivity. Phosphorus-31 NMR data suggest that lipid bilayers can be aligned at low temperatures, while 15N NMR experiments demonstrate that such aligned samples can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of is 15N chemical shift spectra of a 37-residue human antimicrobial peptide, LL-37.

  8. Water from air: An overlooked source of moisture in arid and semiarid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Theresa; Morrissey, Ember M; Reed, Sasha C.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Water drives the functioning of Earth’s arid and semiarid lands. Drylands can obtain water from sources other than precipitation, yet little is known about how non-rainfall water inputs influence dryland communities and their activity. In particular, water vapor adsorption – movement of atmospheric water vapor into soil when soil air is drier than the overlying air – likely occurs often in drylands, yet its effects on ecosystem processes are not known. By adding 18O-enriched water vapor to the atmosphere of a closed system, we documented the conversion of water vapor to soil liquid water across a temperature range typical of arid ecosystems. This phenomenon rapidly increased soil moisture and stimulated microbial carbon (C) cycling, and the flux of water vapor to soil had a stronger impact than temperature on microbial activity. In a semiarid grassland, we also observed that non-rainfall water inputs stimulated microbial activity and C cycling. Together these data suggest that, during rain-free periods, atmospheric moisture in drylands may significantly contribute to variation in soil water content, thereby influencing ecosystem processes. The simple physical process of adsorption of water vapor to soil particles, forming liquid water, represents an overlooked but potentially important contributor to C cycling in drylands.

  9. Modeled Sources, Transport, and Accumulation of Dissolved Solids in Water Resources of the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anning, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Information on important source areas for dissolved solids in streams of the southwestern United States, the relative share of deliveries of dissolved solids to streams from natural and human sources, and the potential for salt accumulation in soil or groundwater was developed using a SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes model. Predicted area-normalized reach-catchment delivery rates of dissolved solids to streams ranged from <10(kg/year)/km2 for catchments with little or no natural or human-related solute sources in them to 563,000(kg/year)/km2 for catchments that were almost entirely cultivated land. For the region as a whole, geologic units contributed 44% of the dissolved-solids deliveries to streams and the remaining 56% of the deliveries came from the release of solutes through irrigation of cultivated and pasture lands, which comprise only 2.5% of the land area. Dissolved-solids accumulation is manifested as precipitated salts in the soil or underlying sediments, and (or) dissolved salts in soil-pore or sediment-pore water, or groundwater, and therefore represents a potential for aquifer contamination. Accumulation rates were <10,000(kg/year)/km2 for many hydrologic accounting units (large river basins), but were more than 40,000(kg/year)/km2 for the Middle Gila, Lower Gila-Agua Fria, Lower Gila, Lower Bear, Great Salt Lake accounting units, and 247,000(kg/year)/km2 for the Salton Sea accounting unit. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. The study of droplet-laden turbulent air-flow over waved water surface by direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, Oleg A.; Troitskaya, Yuliya I.; Zilitinkevich, Sergej S.

    2016-04-01

    The detailed knowledge of the interaction of wind with surface water waves is necessary for correct parameterization of turbulent exchange at the air-sea interface in prognostic models. At sufficiently strong winds, sea-spray-generated droplets interfere with the wind-waves interaction. The results of field experiments and laboratory measurements (Andreas et al., JGR 2010) show that mass fraction of air-borne spume water droplets increases with the wind speed and their impact on the carrier air-flow may become significant. Phenomenological models of droplet-laden marine atmospheric boundary layer (Kudryavtsev & Makin, Bound.-Layer Met. 2011) predict that droplets significantly increase the wind velocity and suppress the turbulent air stress. The results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent particle-laden Couette flow over a flat surface show that inertial particles may significantly reduce the carrier flow vertical momentum flux (Richter & Sullivan, GRL 2013). The results also show that in the range of droplet sizes typically found near the air-sea interface, particle inertial effects are significant and dominate any particle-induced stratification effects. However, so far there has been no attempt to perform DNS of a droplet-laden air-flow over waved water surface. In this report, we present results of DNS of droplet-laden, turbulent Couette air-flow over waved water surface. The carrier, turbulent Couette-flow configuration in DNS is similar to that used in previous numerical studies (Sullivan et al., JFM 2000, Shen et al., JFM 2010, Druzhinin et al., JGR 2012). Discrete droplets are considered as non-deformable solid spheres and tracked in a Lagrangian framework, and their impact on the carrier flow is modeled with the use of a point-force approximation. The droplets parameters in DNS are matched to the typical known spume-droplets parameters in laboratory and field experiments. The DNS results show that both gravitational settling of droplets and

  11. Health risk assessment of air emissions from a municipal solid waste incineration plant--a case study.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, Federico; Intini, Gianluca; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Stellacci, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    A health risk assessment of long-term emissions of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic air pollutants has been carried out for the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) of the city of Taranto, Italy. Ground level air concentrations and soil deposition of carcinogenic (Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins/Furans and Cd) and non-carcinogenic (Pb and Hg) pollutants have been estimated using a well documented atmospheric dispersion model. Health risk values for air inhalation, dermal contact, soil and food ingestion have been calculated based on a combination of these concentrations and a matrix of environmental exposure factors. Exposure of the surrounding population has been addressed for different release scenarios based on four pollutants, four exposure pathways and two receptor groups (children and adults). Spatial risk distribution and cancer excess cases projected from plant emissions have been compared with background mortality records. Estimated results based on the MSWI emissions show: (1) individual risks well below maximum acceptable levels, (2) very small incremental cancer risk compared with background level.

  12. Water quality at and adjacent to the south Dade County solid-waste disposal facility, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A water-quality reconnaissance was conducted at the south Dade County solid-waste landfill near Goulds, Florida, from December 1977 through August 1978. The landfill is located directly on the unconfined Biscayne aquifer, which, in the study area, is affected by saltwater intrusion. Water samples collected from six monitor well sites at two depths and four surface-water sites were analyzed to determine the chemical, physical, and biological conditions of the ground water and surface water of the study area. Results indicated that water quality beneath the landfill was highly variable with location and depth. Leachate was generally more evident in the shallow wells and during the dry-season sampling, but was greatly diluted and dispersed in the deep wells and during the wet season. High concentrations of contaminants were generated primarily in areas of the landfill with the most recent waste deposits. Chloride (limited to the shallow wells and the dry season), alkalinity, ammonia, iron, manganese, lead, phosphorus, and organic nitrogen indicate leachate contamination of the aquifer. Water-quality characteristics in the surface waters were generally only slightly above background levels. (USGS)

  13. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  14. Hydrogeology and water quality near a solid- and hazardous-waste landfill, Northwood, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Roche, J.T.; Breen, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogeology and water quality of ground water and selected streams were evaluated near a landfill in northwestern Ohio. The landfill is used for codisposal of solid and hazardous waste. Water-level and geologic data were collected from 36 wells and 3 surface-water sites during the period November 1983 to November 1985. Water-quality samples were collected from 18 wells and 3 surface-water sites this during this same period. The primary aquifers in the area are the Greenfield Dolomite and underlying Lockport Dolomite of Silurian age. These bedrock carbonates are overlain by two clay tills of Wisconsin age. The tills are capped by a glacial lake clay. The tills generally are saturated, but do not yield sufficient water to be considered an aquifer. Two wells in the study area yield water, in part, from discontinuous deposits of outwash sand and gravel at the lower till-bedrock interface. Regional ground-water flow is from southwest to northeast; local flow is influenced by a ground-water mound centered under the northernmost cells of the landfill. Water levels in wells penetrating refuse within the landfill and the presence of leachate seeps indicate that the refuse is saturated. Head relations among the landfill, till, and dolomite aquifer indicate a vertical component of flow downward from the landfill to the dolomite aquifer. Water levels near the landfill fluctuate as much as 14 feet per year, in contrast to fluctuations of less than 3 feet per year in wells upgradient landfill. Ground waters from wells completed in the dolomite aquifer and glacial till were found to have major-iron concentrations controlled, in large part, by reaction with calcite, dolomite, and other minerals in the aquifer. Only minor departures from equilibrium mineral saturation were noted for ground water, except in wells affected by cement/grout contamination. Molal ratios of calcuim:magnesium in ground water suggest a similar chemical evolution of waters throughout the dolomite aquifer in

  15. Introducing high-quality planar defects into colloidal crystals via self-assembly at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kuo; Demeyer, Pieter-Jan; Zhou, Xingping; Kruglova, Olga; Verellen, Niels; Moshchalkov, Victor V.; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile method for fabrication of colloidal crystals containing a planar defect by using PS@SiO2 core-shell spheres as building blocks. A monolayer of solid spheres was embedded in core-shell colloidal crystals serving as the defect layer, which formed by means of self-assembly at the air/water interface. Compared with previous methods, this fabrication method results in pronounced passbands in the band gaps of the colloidal photonic crystal. The FWHM of the obtained passband is only ~16nm, which is narrower than the previously reported results. The influence of the defect layer thickness on the optical properties of these sandwiched structures was also investigated. No high-cost processes or specific equipment is needed in our approach. Inverse opals with planar defects can be obtained via calcination of the PS cores, without the need of infiltration. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulations performed using the FDTD method.

  16. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-10-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw, the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  17. Effect of particle shape on capillary forces acting on particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Flury, Markus

    2013-06-25

    The capillary forces exerted by moving air-water interfaces can dislodge particles from stationary surfaces. The magnitude of the capillary forces depends on particle shape, orientation, and surface properties, such as contact angle and roughness. The objective was to quantify, both experimentally and theoretically, capillary force variations as an air-water interface moves over the particles. We measured capillary forces as a function of position, i.e., force-position curves, on particles of different shape by using force tensiometry. The particles (5 mm nominal size) were made of polyacrylate and were fabricated using a 3D printer. Experimental measurements were compared with theoretical calculations. We found that force-position curves could be classified into in three categories according to particle shapes: (1) curves for particles with round cross sections, such as spheroidal particles, (2) curves for particles with fixed cross sections, such cylindrical or cubical particles, and (3) curves for particles with tapering cross sections, such as prismatic or tetrahedral particles. Spheroidal particles showed a continuously varying capillary force. Cylindrical or cubical particles showed pronounced pinning of the air-water interface line at edges. The pinning led to an increased capillary force, which was relaxed when the interface snapped off from the edges. Particles with tapering cross section did not show pinning and showed reduced capillary forces as the air-water interface line perimeter and displacement cross section continuously decrease when the air-water interface moved over the particles.

  18. Reactive Distillation and Air Stripping Processes for Water Recycling and Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Reactive distillation designs are considered to reduce the presence of volatile organic compounds in the purified water. Reactive distillation integrates a reactor with a distillation column. A review of the literature in this field has revealed a variety of functional reactive columns in industry. Wastewater may be purified by a combination of a reactor and a distiller (e.g., the EWRS or VPCAR concepts) or, in principle, through a design which integrates the reactor with the distiller. A review of the literature in reactive distillation has identified some different designs in such combinations of reactor and distiller. An evaluation of reactive distillation and reactive air stripping is presented with regards to the reduction of volatile organic compounds in the contaminated water and air. Among the methods presented, an architecture is presented for the evaluation of the simultaneous oxidation of organics in air and water. These and other designs are presented in light of potential improvements in power consumptions and air and water purities for architectures which include catalytic activity integrated into the water processor. In particular, catalytic oxidation of organics may be useful as a tool to remove contaminants that more traditional distillation and/or air stripping columns may not remove. A review of the current leading edge at the commercial level and at the research frontier in catalytically active materials is presented. Themes and directions from the engineering developments in catalyst design are presented conceptually in light of developments in the nanoscale chemistry of a variety of catalyst materials.

  19. A model to predict the removal of oxygen from air using a zirconia solid electrolyte membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Glazer, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A finite difference mathematical model has been developed to predict the removal of oxygen from air using a zirconia separation cell. The model predicts the electrical and mass transfer processes in circular disk cells with either axial or radial current flow in the electrodes and in tubular cells with axial current flow in the electrodes. Representative results are presented and discussed.

  20. Effect of Indoor air pollution from biomass and solid fuel combustion on symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia in Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, S; Yamamoto, S

    2015-01-01

    Available evidence concerning the association between indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass and solid fuel combustion and preeclampsia/eclampsia is not available in developing countries. We investigated the association between exposure to IAP from biomass and solid fuel combustion and symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia in Indian women by analyzing cross-sectional data from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005–2006). Self-reported symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia during pregnancy such as convulsions (not from fever), swelling of legs, body or face, excessive fatigue or vision difficulty during daylight, were obtained from 39 657 women aged 15–49 years who had a live birth in the previous 5 years. Effects of exposure to cooking smoke, ascertained by type of fuel used for cooking on preeclampsia/eclampsia risk, were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for various confounders. Results indicate that women living in households using biomass and solid fuels have two times higher likelihood of reporting preeclampsia/eclampsia symptoms than do those living in households using cleaner fuels (OR = 2.21; 95%: 1.26–3.87; P = 0.006), even after controlling for the effects of a number of potentially confounding factors. This study is the first to empirically estimate the associations of IAP from biomass and solid fuel combustion and reported symptoms suggestive of preeclampsia/eclampsia in a large nationally representative sample of Indian women and we observed increased risk. These findings have important program and policy implications for countries such as India, where large proportions of the population rely on polluting biomass fuels for cooking and space heating. More epidemiological research with detailed exposure assessments and clinical measures of preeclampsia/eclampsia is needed in a developing country setting to validate these findings. PMID:25039812

  1. Effect of indoor air pollution from biomass and solid fuel combustion on symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia in Indian women.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S; Yamamoto, S

    2015-06-01

    Available evidence concerning the association between indoor air pollution (IAP) from biomass and solid fuel combustion and preeclampsia/eclampsia is not available in developing countries. We investigated the association between exposure to IAP from biomass and solid fuel combustion and symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia in Indian women by analyzing cross-sectional data from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-2006). Self-reported symptoms of preeclampsia/eclampsia during pregnancy such as convulsions (not from fever), swelling of legs, body or face, excessive fatigue or vision difficulty during daylight, were obtained from 39,657 women aged 15-49 years who had a live birth in the previous 5 years. Effects of exposure to cooking smoke, ascertained by type of fuel used for cooking on preeclampsia/eclampsia risk, were estimated using logistic regression after adjusting for various confounders. Results indicate that women living in households using biomass and solid fuels have two times higher likelihood of reporting preeclampsia/eclampsia symptoms than do those living in households using cleaner fuels (OR = 2.21; 95%: 1.26-3.87; P = 0.006), even after controlling for the effects of a number of potentially confounding factors. This study is the first to empirically estimate the associations of IAP from biomass and solid fuel combustion and reported symptoms suggestive of preeclampsia/eclampsia in a large nationally representative sample of Indian women and we observed increased risk. These findings have important program and policy implications for countries such as India, where large proportions of the population rely on polluting biomass fuels for cooking and space heating. More epidemiological research with detailed exposure assessments and clinical measures of preeclampsia/eclampsia is needed in a developing country setting to validate these findings.

  2. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2 mm in thickness.

  3. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis preprototype subsystem. [oxygen production for life support systems on space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and controls developed for an electrolysis demonstration unit for use with the life sciences payload program and in NASA's regenerative life support evaluation program are described. Components discussed include: the electrolysis module; power conditioner; phase separator-pump and hydrogen differential regulator; pressure regulation of O2, He, and N2; air-cooled heat exchanger; water accumulator; fluid flow sight gage assembly; catalytic O2/H2 sensor; gas flow sensors; low voltage power supply; 100 Amp DC contactor assembly; and the water purifier design.

  4. Air-Water Exchange of Legacy and Emerging Organic Pollutants across the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, R.; Ruge, Z.; Khairy, M.; Muir, D.; Helm, P.

    2014-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are transported to great water bodies via long-range atmospheric transport and released from the surface water as air concentrations continue to diminish. As the largest fresh water bodies in North America, the Great Lakes have both the potential to accumulate and serve as a secondary source of persistent bioaccumulative toxins. OCP and PCB concentrations were sampled at 30+ sites across Lake Superior, Ontario and Erie in the summer of 2011. Polyethylene passive samplers (PEs) were simultaneously deployed in surface water and near surface atmosphere to determine air-water gaseous exchange of OCPs and PCBs. In Lake Superior, surface water and atmospheric concentrations were dominated by α-HCH (average 250 pg/L and 4.2 pg/m3, respectively), followed by HCB (average 17 pg/L and 89 pg/m3, respectively). Air-water exchange varied greatly between sites and individual OCPs, however α-endosulfan was consistently deposited into the surface water (average 19 pg/m2/day). PCBs in the air and water were characterized by penta- and hexachlorobiphenyls with distribution along the coast correlated with proximity to developed areas. Air-water exchange gradients generally yielded net volatilization of PCBs out of Lake Superior. Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin and chlordanes were significantly higher (p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression that incorporated meteorological, landuse and population data was used to explain variability in the atmospheric concentrations. Results indicated that landuse (urban and/or cropland) greatly explained the variability in the data. Freely dissolved concentrations of OCPs (water quality guidelines for the protection of human health from the consumption of fish. Spatial distributions of

  5. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  6. Enforcement under the 1990 CAAA: Hot air or hot water?

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisch, J.

    1998-06-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) have caused varying degrees of anxiety in facility and environmental managers. How worried should they be? One area of special concern is Title VII, Provisions Relating to Enforcement, which has led to field citations, new civil penalties, provisions for citizen suits and, of most concern, the new criminal provision. The CAAA include strong new enforcement authority, which allows the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take swift and strong action against violators. The Agency can issue tickets up to $5,000 per violation, penalties up to $25,000 per day for administrative penalties and $250,000 and up to five years in prison for criminal violations. Sources that maintain compliance with air pollution regulations and maintain accurate records and documentation have nothing to fear from these new regulations. However, sources that violate federal requirements, falsify records or knowingly create risks to the environment or human health can look forward to aggressive enforcement by EPA. This article briefly discusses the new provisions, whom they affect, how one may be able to minimize the potential liabilities and what to do if the EPA begins an enforcement action.

  7. Indoor Air Pollution and Health in Ghana: Self-Reported Exposure to Unprocessed Solid Fuel Smoke.

    PubMed

    Armah, Frederick A; Odoi, Justice O; Luginaah, Isaac

    2015-06-01

    Most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa including Ghana still depend extensively on unprocessed solid cooking fuels with many people exposed on a daily basis to harmful emissions and other health risks. In this study, using complementary log-log multivariate models, we estimated the health effects of exposure to smoke from unprocessed wood in four regions of Ghana while controlling for socio-environmental and socio-demographic factors. The results show that the distribution of self-reported exposure to smoke was highest among participants in the Northern region, rural dwellers, the 25-49 age groups, individuals with no education, and married women. As expected, exposure to smoke was higher in crowded households and in communities without basic social amenities. Region, residential locality, housing quality (type of roofing, floor and exterior materials), self-reported housing condition, and access to toilet facilities were associated with self-reported exposure to solid fuel smoke. Participants living in urban areas were less likely (OR = 0.82, ρ ≤ 0.01) to be exposed to solid fuel smoke compared to their rural counterparts. An inverse relationship between self-reported housing condition and exposure to solid fuel smoke was observed and persisted even after adjustments were made for confounding variables in the demographic model. In Ghana, the cost and intermittent shortages of liquefied petroleum gas and other alternative fuel sources hold implications for the willingness of the poor to shift to their use. Thus, the poorest rural populations with nearly no cash income and electricity, but with access to wood and/or agricultural waste, are unlikely to move to clean fuels or use significantly improved stoves without large subsidies, which are usually not sustainable. However, there appears to be large populations between these extremes that can be targeted by efforts to introduce improved stoves.

  8. Characterization of solids in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor defueling water

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. O.

    1987-12-01

    Because of the impact of poor water clarity on defueling operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station, a study was undertaken to characterize suspended particulates in the reactor defueling water. The examination included cascade filtration through Nuclepore filters of progressively smaller pore sizes, using three water samples obtained at different times and after varying degrees of clarification. The solids collected on the filters were examined with a scanning electron microscope and analyzed with energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. A wide variety of solids was observed, and 26 elements were detected. These included all the materials expected from the reactor system (uranium, zirconium, silver, cadmium, indium, iron, chromium, and nickel), chemicals and zeolites used to decontaminate the water (aluminum, silicon, sodium), common impurities (potassium, chlorine, sulfur, magnesium, calcium, and others), as well as some unexpected metals (molybdenum, manganese, bromine, and lead). There was also evidence for the presence of organic material. A diverse assortment of particles with widely varying surface properties was found to be present.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF SEQUENTIAL AND ENZYMATIC EXTRACTION OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SOLIDS WITH ICP-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sequential extraction approach was utilized to estimate the distribution of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] on iron oxide/hydroxide solids obtained from drinking water distribution systems. The arsenic (As) associated with these solids can be segregated into three oper...

  10. Comparison between Synthesized Lead Particles and Lead Solids Formed on Surfaces in Real Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to compare the properties of lead solids formed during bench-scale precipitation experiments to solids found on lead pipe removed from real drinking water distribution systems and metal coupons used in pilot scale corrosion testing. Specifically, so...

  11. Evaluation of increases in dissolved solids in ground water, Stovepipe Wells Hotel, Death Valley National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buono, Anthony; Packard, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Increases in dissolved solids have been monitored in two observation wells near Stovepipe Wells Hotel, Death Valley National Monument, California. One of the hotel 's supply wells delivers water to a reverse-osmosis treatment plant that produces the area 's potable water supply. Should water with increased dissolved solids reach the supply well, the costs of production of potable water will increase. The reverse-osmosis plant supply well is located about 0.4 mile south of one of the wells where increases have been monitored, and 0.8 mile southwest of the well where the most significant increases have been monitored. The direction of local ground-water movement is eastward, which reduces the probability of the supply well being affected. Honey mesquite, a phreatophyte located about 1.5 miles downgradient from the well where the most significant increases have been monitored, might be adversely affected should water with increased dissolved solids extend that far. Available data and data collected during this investigation do not indicate the source of the dissolved-solids increases. Continued ground-water-quality monitoring of existing wells and the installation of additional wells for water-quality monitoring would be necessary before the area affected by the increases, and the source and direction of movement of the water with increased dissolved solids, can be determined. (USGS)

  12. Hydrogeology, simulated ground-water flow, and ground-water quality, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dumouchelle, D.H.; Schalk, C.W.; Rowe, G.L.; De Roche, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Ground water is the primary source of water in the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base area. The aquifer consists of glacial sands and gravels that fill a buried bedrock-valley system. Consolidated rocks in the area consist of poorly permeable Ordovician shale of the Richmondian stage, in the upland areas, the Brassfield Limestone of Silurian age. The valleys are filled with glacial sediments of Wisconsinan age consisting of clay-rich tills and coarse-grained outwash deposits. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity of the shales based on results of displacement/recovery tests range from 0.0016 to 12 feet per day; estimates for the glacial sediments range from less than 1 foot per day to more than 1,000 feet per day. Ground water flow from the uplands towards the valleys and the major rivers in the region, the Great Miami and the Mad Rivers. Hydraulic-head data indicate that ground water flows between the bedrock and unconsolidated deposits. Data from a gain/loss study of the Mad River System and hydrographs from nearby wells reveal that the reach of the river next to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a ground-water discharge area. A steady-state, three-dimensional ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in the region. The model contains three layers and encompasses about 100 square miles centered on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Ground water enters the modeled area primarily by river leakage and underflow at the model boundary. Ground water exits the modeled area primarily by flow through the valleys at the model boundaries and through production wells. A model sensitivity analysis involving systematic changes in values of hydrologic parameters in the model indicates that the model is most sensitive to decreases in riverbed conductance and vertical conductance between the upper two layers. The analysis also indicates that the contribution of water to the buried-valley aquifer from the bedrock that forms the valley walls is about 2 to 4

  13. Liquid Steel at Low Pressure: Experimental Investigation of a Downward Water Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumfart, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the continuous casting of steel controlling the steel flow rate to the mould is critical because a well-defined flow field at the mould level is essential for a good quality of the cast product. The stopper rod is a commonly used device to control this flow rate. Agglomeration of solid material near the stopper rod can lead to a reduced cross section and thus to a decreased casting speed or even total blockage (“clogging”). The mechanisms causing clogging are still not fully understood. Single phase considerations of the flow in the region of the stopper rod result in a low or even negative pressure at the smallest cross section. This can cause degassing of dissolved gases from the melt, evaporation of alloys and entrainment of air through the porous refractory material. It can be shown that the degassing process in liquid steel is taking place mainly at the stopper rod tip and its surrounding. The steel flow around the stopper rod tip is highly turbulent. In addition refractory material has a low wettability to liquid steel. So the first step to understand the flow situation and transport phenomena which occur near the stopper is to understand the behaviour of this two phase (steel, gas) flow. To simulate the flow situation near the stopper rod tip, water experiments are conducted using a convergent divergent nozzle with three different wall materials and three different contact angles respectively. These experiments show the high impact of the wettability of the wall material on the actual flow structure at a constant gas flow rate.

  14. New Computational Approach to Determine Liquid-Solid Phase Equilibria of Water Confined to Slit Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshihiro; Bai, Jaeil; Yasuoka, Kenji; Mitsutake, Ayori; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2013-08-13

    We devise a new computational approach to compute solid-liquid phase equilibria of confined fluids. Specifically, we extend the multibaric-multithermal ensemble method with an anisotropic pressure control to achieve the solid-liquid phase equilibrium for confined water inside slit nanopores (with slit width h ranging from 5.4 Å to 7.2 Å). A unique feature of this multibaric-multithermal ensemble is that the freezing points of confined water can be determined from the heat-capacity peaks. The new approach has been applied to compute the freezing point of two monolayer ices, namely, a high-density flat rhombic monolayer ice (HD-fRMI) and a high-density puckered rhombic monolayer ice (HD-pRMI) observed in our simulation. We find that the liquid-to-solid transition temperature (or the freezing point) of HD-pRMI is dependent on the slit width h, whereas that of HD-fRMI is nearly independent of the h.

  15. Phase separation kinetics in amorphous solid dispersions upon exposure to water.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel fluorescence technique employing environment-sensitive fluorescent probes to study phase separation kinetics in hydrated matrices of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) following storage at high humidity and during dissolution. The initial miscibility of the ASDs was confirmed using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fluorescence spectroscopy, as an independent primary technique, was used together with conventional confirmatory techniques including DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence microscopy, and IR spectroscopy to study phase separation phenomena. By monitoring the emission characteristics of the environment-sensitive fluorescent probes, it was possible to successfully monitor amorphous-amorphous phase separation (AAPS) as a function of time in probucol-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and ritonavir-PVP ASDs after exposure to water. In contrast, a ritonavir-hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) ASD, did not show AAPS and was used as a control to demonstrate the capability of the newly developed fluorescence method to differentiate systems that showed no phase separation following exposure to water versus those that did. The results from the fluorescence studies were in good agreement with results obtained using various other complementary techniques. Thus, fluorescence spectroscopy can be utilized as a fast and efficient tool to detect and monitor the kinetics of phase transformations in amorphous solid dispersions during hydration and will help provide mechanistic insight into the stability and dissolution behavior of amorphous solid dispersions.

  16. Formation of water-soluble metal cyanide complexes from solid minerals by Pseudomonas plecoglossicida.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Mohammad A; Brandl, Helmut

    2006-06-01

    A few Pseudomonas species are able to form hydrocyanic acid (HCN), particularly when grown under glycine-rich conditions. In the presence of metals, cyanide can form water-soluble metal complexes of high chemical stability. We studied the possibility to mobilize metals as cyanide complexes from solid minerals using HCN-forming microorganisms. Pseudomonas plecoglossicida was cultivated in the presence of copper- and nickel-containing solid minerals. On powdered elemental nickel, fast HCN generation within the first 12 h of incubation was observed and water-soluble tetracyanaonickelate was formed. Cuprite, tenorite, chrysocolla, malachite, bornite, turquoise, millerite, pentlandite as well as shredded electronic scrap was also subjected to a biological treatment. Maximum concentrations of cyanide-complexed copper corresponded to a solubilization of 42% and 27% when P. plecoglossicida was grown in the presence of cuprite or tenorite, respectively. Crystal system, metal oxidation state and mineral hydrophobicity might have a significant influence on metal mobilization. However, it was not possible to allocate metal mobilization to a single mineral property. Cyanide-complexed gold was detected during growth on manually cut circuit boards. Maximum dicyanoaurate concentration corresponded to a 68.5% dissolution of the total gold added. These findings represent a novel type of microbial mobilization of nickel and copper from solid minerals based on the ability of certain microbes to form HCN.

  17. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  18. Novel water-air circulation quenching process for AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liyun; Zheng, Dawei; Zhao, Lixin; Wang, Lihui; Zhang, Kai

    2013-11-01

    AISI 4140 steel is usually used after quenching and tempering. During the heat treatment process in industry production, there are some problems, such as quenching cracks, related to water-cooling and low hardness due to oil quenching. A water-air circulation quenching process can solve the problems of quenching cracks with water and the high cost quenching with oil, which is flammable, unsafe and not enough to obtain the required hardness. The control of the water-cooling and air-cooling time is a key factor in the process. This paper focuses on the quenching temperature, water-air cycle time and cycle index to prevent cracking for AISI 4140 steel. The optimum heat treatment parameters to achieve a good match of the strength and toughness of AISI 4140 steel were obtained by repeated adjustment of the water-air circulation quenching process parameters. The tensile strength, Charpy impact energy at -10 °C and hardness of the heat treated AISI 4140 steel after quenching and tempering were approximately 1098 MPa, 67.5 J and 316 HB, respectively.

  19. Autonomous Mobile Platform for Monitoring Air Emissions from Industrial and Municipal Waste Water Ponds.

    PubMed

    Fu, Long; Huda, Quamrul; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Lucas; Hashisho, Zaher

    2017-02-02

    Significant amounts of volatile organic compounds and greenhouse gases are generated from wastewater lagoons and tailings ponds in Alberta. Accurate measurements of these air pollutants and greenhouse gases are needed to support management and regulatory decisions. A mobile platform was developed to measure air emissions from tailings pond in the oil sands region of Alberta. The mobile platform was tested in 2015 in a municipal wastewater treatment lagoon. With a flux chamber and a CO2/CH4 sensor on board, the mobile platform was able to measure CO2 and CH4 emissions over two days at two different locations in the pond. Flux emission rates of CO2 and CH4 that were measured over the study period suggest the presence of aerobic and anaerobic zones in the wastewater treatment lagoon. The study demonstrated the capabilities of the mobile platform in measuring fugitive air emissions and identified the potential for the applications in air and water quality monitoring programs. Implications The Mobile Platform demonstrated in this study has the ability to measure greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fugitive sources such as municipal wastewater lagoons. This technology can be used to measure emission fluxes from tailings pond with better detection of spatial and temporal variations of fugitive emissions. Additional air and water sampling equipment could be added to the mobile platform for a broad range of air and water quality studies in the oil sands region of Alberta.

  20. Behavior of pH-sensitive core shell particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mark D'Souza; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon

    2012-03-20

    In this article, the adsorption of latex core-responsive polymer-shell nanoparticles at the air-water interface is investigated using a Langmuir trough. Phase transition isotherms are used to explore their responsive behavior at the interface as a function of changes in the pH of the subphase. By adjusting the pH of the water prior to particle deposition, we probe the effect of the stabilizing polymer wetting by the water subphase on the stability of these particles at the air-water interface. In addition, by initially compressing a stable film of adsorbed particles and then subsequently changing the pH of the subphase we study desorption of these particles into the water phase.