Science.gov

Sample records for air water vapor

  1. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  2. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  3. Hurricane Isabel, Amount of Atmospheric Water Vapor Observed By AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    These false-color images show the amount of atmospheric water vapor observed by AIRS two weeks prior to the passage of Hurricane Isabel, and then when it was a Category 5 storm. The region shown includes parts of South America and the West Indies. Puerto Rico is the large island below the upper left corner.

    Total water vapor represents the depth of a layer if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to condense and fall to the surface. The color bar on the right sides of the plots give the thickness of this layer in millimeters (mm). The first image, from August 28, shows typical tropical water vapor amounts over the ocean: between roughly 25 and 50 mm, or 1 to 2 inches. The highest values of roughly 80 mm, seen as a red blob over South America, corresponds to intense thunderstorms. Thunderstorms pull in water vapor from surrounding regions and concentrate it, with much of it then falling as rain.

    Figure 1 shows total water during the passage of Hurricane Isabel on September 13. The storm is apparent: the ring of moderate values surrounding a very strong maximum of 100 mm. Total water of more than 80 mm is unusual, and these values correspond to the intense thunderstorms contained within Isabel. The thunderstorms--and the large values of total water--are fed by evaporation from the ocean in the hurricane's high winds. The water vapor near the center of the storm does not remain there long, since hurricane rain rates as high 50 mm (2 inches) per hour imply rapid cycling of the water we observe. Away from the storm the amount of total water vapor is rather low, associated with fair weather where air that ascended near the storm's eye returns to earth, having dropped its moisture as rain. Also seen in the second images are two small regions of about 70 mm of total water over south America. These are yet more thunderstorms, though likely much more benign than those in Isabel.

    The

  4. Water Vapor Storage Change in the Canopy-Air Space of a Tall Deciduous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, C.; Dragoni, D.; Schmid, H.

    2005-05-01

    The ability of weather and climate models to predict humidity, cloud formation and precipitation critically depends on the exchange of water vapor between vegetation and the atmosphere. The canopy air-space in tall forests is deep enough to act as a buffer volume that is depleted at times of well developed turbulent mixing, and gets recharged in conditions of poor mixing. Recent studies have attributed biases in modeled vapor exchange to the misrepresentation or neglect of this mechanism. At the Morgan-Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site (Indiana, USA), water vapor exchange and the vapor storage change in the canopy air-space has been observed for the last six years. The objective of this work is to calculate vapor storage change fluxes in the canopy air-space from time increments of concentration profiles from data collected in 2003. We relate vapor storage change fluxes to measured environmental forcing quanitites, such as net radiation, ambient vapor pressure deficit, dew-point temperature depression, stability, and friction velocity to interpret the observed seasonal and daily patterns. Also, changes in water vapor storage rates are compared with measured latent heat fluxes to determine how the total forest-atmosphere vapor exchange is affected by the recharging and depletion of water vapor throughout the canopy air-space.

  5. A novel membrane device for the removal of water vapor and water droplets from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Mccray, Scott B.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kliss, Mark

    1992-01-01

    One of the key challenges facing NASA engineers is the development of systems for separating liquids and gases in microgravity environments. In this paper, a novel membrane-based phase separator is described. This device, known as a water recovery heat exchanger (WRHEX), overcomes the inherent deficiencies of current phase-separation technology. Specifically, the WRHEX cools and removes water vapor or water droplets from feed-air streams without the use of a vacuum or centrifugal force. As is shown in this paper, only a low-power air blower and a small stream of recirculated cool water is required for WRHEX operation. This paper presents the results of tests using this novel membrane device over a wide range of operating conditions. The data show that the WRHEX produces a dry air stream containing no entrained or liquid water - even when the feed air contains water droplets or mist. An analysis of the operation of the WRHEX is presented.

  6. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  7. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  8. Major Upgrades to the AIRS Version-6 Water Vapor Profile Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2015-01-01

    This research is a continuation of part of what was shown at the last AIRS Science Team Meeting and the AIRS 2015 NetMeeting. AIRS Version 6 was finalized in late 2012 and is now operational. Version 6 contained many significant improvements in retrieval methodology compared to Version 5. Version 6 retrieval methodology used for the water vapor profile q(p) and ozone profile O3(p) retrievals is basically unchanged from Version 5, or even from Version 4. Subsequent research has made significant improvements in both water vapor and O3 profiles compared to Version 6.

  9. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  10. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; ...

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  11. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  12. Evaluating the impact of ambient benzene vapor concentrations on product water from Condensation Water From Air technology.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Katherine M; Gellasch, Christopher A; Dusenbury, James S; Timmes, Thomas C; Hughes, Thomas M

    2017-07-15

    Globally, drinking water resources are diminishing in both quantity and quality. This situation has renewed interest in Condensation Water From Air (CWFA) technology, which utilizes water vapor in the air to produce water for both potable and non-potable purposes. However, there are currently insufficient data available to determine the relationship between air contaminants and the rate at which they are transferred from the air into CWFA untreated product water. This study implemented a novel experimental method utilizing an environmental test chamber to evaluate how air quality and temperature affects CWFA untreated product water quality in order to collect data that will inform the type of water treatment required to protect human health. This study found that temperature and benzene air concentration affected the untreated product water from a CWFA system. Benzene vapor concentrations representing a polluted outdoor environment resulted in benzene product water concentrations between 15% and 23% of the USEPA drinking water limit of 5μg/l. In contrast, product water benzene concentrations representing an indoor industrial environment were between 1.4 and 2.4 times higher than the drinking water limit. Lower condenser coil temperatures were correlated with an increased concentration of benzene in the product water. Environmental health professionals and engineers can integrate the results of this assessment to predict benzene concentrations in the product water and take appropriate health protective measures.

  13. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  14. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Water vapor isotopic composition of a stratospheric air intrusion: Measurements from the Chajnantor Plateau, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galewsky, Joseph; Samuels-Crow, Kimberly

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of water vapor isotopic composition in stratospheric air intrusions can be used to constrain the dilution of the intrusion as it mixes into the middle troposphere. The intrusion studied here occurred on 17 and 18 August 2012 with measurements obtained at an altitude of 5 km in the Chilean Andes at the Atacama Large Millimeter Array astronomical observatory on the Chajnantor Plateau. Surface ozone concentrations rose 16 ppb in 6 h and were associated with a potential vorticity intrusion on the 330 K isentropic surface. A simulated stratospheric ozone tracer reaching Chajnantor also supports the interpretation of a stratospheric intrusion. Beginning around 18:00 UTC on 17 August, the mixing ratio dropped from 3000 ppmv to 430 ppmv as the water vapor δD values dropped from -153‰ to -438‰ over 13 h while the δ18O values dropped from -20‰ to -63‰. The average mixing ratio, δD, and δ18O values during August 2012 were measured to be 1500 ppmv, -250‰, and -34‰, respectively. The minimum water vapor concentration during the intrusion was in the driest 5% of measurements made during that month, while the minimum δD and δ18O values were within the lowest 0.5% of measurements made during that month. Simple two-component models of mixing between stratospheric or upper tropospheric air with boundary layer air fail to reproduce observations, but a three-component mixing model, in which the stratospheric intrusion mixes with an upper tropospheric background air mass, as it mixes with boundary layer air on Chajnantor, matches the observations.

  16. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; Leonard, D. N.; Elsentriecy, H. H.; Unocic, K. A.; Anovitz, L. M.; Cakmak, E.; Keiser, J. R.; Song, G. L.; Davis, B.

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  17. Nanosecond Glow and Spark Discharges in Ambient Air and in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe; Rusterholtz, Diane; Sainct, Florent; Xu, Da; Lacoste, Deanna; Stancu, Gabi; Pai, David

    2013-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges are one of the most energy efficient ways to produce active species in atmospheric pressure gases. In both air and water vapor, three discharge regimes can be obtained: 1) corona, with light emission just around the anode, 2) glow, corresponding to a diffuse nonequilibrium plasma, and 3) spark, characterized by higher temperatures and higher active species densities. The glow regime was initially obtained in air preheated at 2000 K. Based on a model defining the transition between glow and spark, we recently succeeded in obtaining a stable glow in ambient air at 300 K, using a judicious combination of electrode geometry, pulse duration, pulse frequency, and applied voltage. We will present these results and describe the characteristics of the discharge obtained in room air. The spark regime was also studied. NRP sparks induce ultrafast gas heating (about 1000 K in 20 ns) and high oxygen dissociation (up to 50% dissociation of O2) . This phenomenon can be explained by a two-step process involving the excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by exothermic dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. The characteristics of NRP discharges in water vapor will also be discussed. This work is supported by the ANR PREPA program (grant number ANR-09-BLAN-0043).

  18. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  19. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  20. Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

  1. Operation of a breadboard liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor system for removing carbon dioxide and water vapor from air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Scott B.; Ray, Rod; Newbold, David D.; Millard, Douglas L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Foerg, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Processes to remove and recover carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor from air are essential for successful long-duration space missions. This paper presents results of a developmental program focused on the use of a liquid-sorbent/membrane-contactor (LSMC) system for removal of CO2 and water vapor from air. In this system, air from the spacecraft cabin atmosphere is circulated through one side of a hollow-fiber membrane contactor. On the other side of the membrane contactor is flowed a liquid sorbent, which absorbs the CO2 and water vapor from the feed air. The liquid sorbent is then heated to desorb the CO2 and water vapor. The CO2 is subsequently removed from the system as a concentrated gas stream, whereas the water vapor is condensed, producing a water stream. A breadboard system based on this technology was designed and constructed. Tests showed that the LSMC breadboard system can produce a CO2 stream and a liquid-water stream. Details are presented on the operation of the system, as well as the effects on performance of variations in feed conditions.

  2. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  3. Water Vapor and Temperature Measurements within the GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) was established in 2008 in recognition of the importance of reference-quality observations of atmospheric column properties, in particular temperature and water vapor, from the surface into the stratosphere to enhance the monitoring and understanding of climate variability and change. The GRUAN Task Team on Radiosondes provides guidelines for GRUAN on how to obtain the best possible reference quality data from radiosoundings. "Reference quality" here means that a data product (1) is traceable to an accepted standard (generally to the SI unit), (2) provides a comprehensive, vertically resolved uncertainty analysis, (3) is properly documented (e.g. in peer-reviewed publications) and is validated (e.g. through intercomparisons). In the presentation, an overview is given on the developments within the GRUAN community to establish reference quality observations using radiosondes. In particular, a review is made on the most recent radiosonde intercomparison at Yangjiang, China in 2010 by the World Meteorological Organization, focusing on the temperature and water vapor measurements and lessons for GRUAN.

  4. Heat treatment's effects on hydroxyapatite powders in water vapor and air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, A.; Baştan, F. E.; Erdoǧan, G.; Üstel, F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is the main chemical constituent of bone tissue (~70%) as well as HA which is a calcium phosphate based ceramic material forms inorganic tissue of bone and tooth as hard tissues is used in production of prosthesis for synthetic bone, fractured and broken bone restoration, coating of metallic biomaterials and dental applications because of its bio compatibility. It is known that Hydroxyapatite decomposes with high heat energy after heat treatment. Therefore hydroxyapatite powders that heated in water vapor will less decomposed phases and lower amorphous phase content than in air atmosphere. In this study high purity hydroxyapatite powders were heat treated with open atmosphere furnace and water vapor atmosphere with 900, 1000, 1200 °C. Morphology of same powder size used in this process by SEM analyzed. Chemical structures of synthesized coatings have been examined by XRD. The determination of particle size and morphological structure of has been characterized by Particle Sizer, and SEM analysis, respectively. Weight change of sample was recorded by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) during heating and cooling.

  5. Water vapor and air transport through ponds with floating aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Kirzhner, F; Zimmels, Y

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the evaporation rate in the purification of wastewater by aquatic plants with aeration. Evaporation of surface water is important in dewatering processes. In particular, this is true in arid climates, where evaporation rates are high. Aeration is known to enhance the wastewater purification process, but it increases concurrently the water evaporation rates. Evaporation and evapotranspiration rates were tested under field and laboratory conditions. Batch experiments were performed to study the levels of evaporation and evapotranspiration in free-water-surface, aquatic-plant systems. The experiments verified that, in these systems, the rate of evaporation increased as a result of aeration in the presence and absence of the aquatic plants. The evaporation rates resulting from aeration were found to be significant in the water balance governing the purification process. A preliminary model for description of the effect of rising air bubbles on the transport of water vapors was formulated. It is shown that aeration may account for a significant part of water losses that include surface evaporation.

  6. Short circuit of water vapor and polluted air to the global stratosphere by convective transport over the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Hu, Yuanlong; Wright, Jonathon S; Jiang, Jonathan H; Dickinson, Robert E; Chen, Mingxuan; Filipiak, Mark; Read, William G; Waters, Joe W; Wu, Dong L

    2006-04-11

    During boreal summer, much of the water vapor and CO entering the global tropical stratosphere is transported over the Asian monsoon/Tibetan Plateau (TP) region. Studies have suggested that most of this transport is carried out either by tropical convection over the South Asian monsoon region or by extratropical convection over southern China. By using measurements from the newly available National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder, along with observations from the Aqua and Tropical Rainfall-Measuring Mission satellites, we establish that the TP provides the main pathway for cross-tropopause transport in this region. Tropospheric moist convection driven by elevated surface heating over the TP is deeper and detrains more water vapor, CO, and ice at the tropopause than over the monsoon area. Warmer tropopause temperatures and slower-falling, smaller cirrus cloud particles in less saturated ambient air at the tropopause also allow more water vapor to travel into the lower stratosphere over the TP, effectively short-circuiting the slower ascent of water vapor across the cold tropical tropopause over the monsoon area. Air that is high in water vapor and CO over the Asian monsoon/TP region enters the lower stratosphere primarily over the TP, and it is then transported toward the Asian monsoon area and disperses into the large-scale upward motion of the global stratospheric circulation. Thus, hydration of the global stratosphere could be especially sensitive to changes of convection over the TP.

  7. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Trends for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena F.

    2010-01-01

    Mainly due to their global nature, satellite observations can provide a very useful basis for GCM validations. In particular, satellite sounders such as AIRS provide 3-D spatial information (most useful for GCMs), so the question arises: can we use AIRS datasets for climate variability assessments? We show that the recent (September 2002 February 2010) CERES-observed negative trend in OLR of approx.-0.1 W/sq m/yr averaged over the globe is found in the AIRS OLR data as well. Most importantly, even minute details (down to 1 x 1 degree GCM-scale resolution) of spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS-retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over this time period are essentially the same. The correspondence can be seen even in the very large spatial variations of these trends with local values ranging from -2.6 W/sq m/yr to +3.0 W/sq m/yr in the tropics, for example. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate, and indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of other AIRS derived products as well. These products show that global and regional anomalies and trends of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over the last 7+ years are strongly influenced by EI-Nino-La Nina cycles . We have created climate parameter anomaly datasets using AIRS retrievals which can be compared directly with coupled GCM climate variability assessments. Moreover, interrelationships of these anomalies and trends should also be similar between the observed and GCM-generated datasets, and, in cases of discrepancies, GCM parameterizations could be improved based on the relationships observed in the data. First, we assess spatial "trends" of variability of climatic parameter anomalies [since anomalies relative to the seasonal cycle are good proxies of

  8. Effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy under an artificial lighting condition.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Y; Shibuya, T; Kozai, T; Kubota, C

    1998-01-01

    In order to characterize environmental variables inside a plant canopy under artificial lighting in the CELSS, we investigated the effects of light intensity and air velocity on air temperature, water vapor pressure, and CO2 concentration inside a plant canopy. Under a PPF of 500 micromoles m-2 s-1, air temperature was 2-3 degrees C higher, water vapor pressure was 0.6 kPa higher, and CO2 concentration was 25-35 micromoles mol-1 lower at heights ranging from 0 to 30 mm below the canopy than at a height 60 mm above the canopy. Increasing the PPF increased air temperature and water vapor pressure and decreased CO2 concentration inside the canopy. The air temperature was lower and the CO2 concentration was higher inside the canopy at an air velocity of 0.3 m s-1 than at an air velocity of 0.1 m s-1. The environmental variables inside the canopy under a high light intensity were characterized by higher air temperature, higher vapor pressure, and lower CO2 concentration than those outside the canopy.

  9. Cell for electrolysis of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celino, V. A.; Roebelen, G.

    1972-01-01

    Electrolytic cells regenerate oxygen from the water vapor in the air of closed-loop life-support system and remove water vapor from air circulated through them. Water is converted into oxygen and hydrogen; the oxygen is returned to the air, the hydrogen is vented or used elsewhere.

  10. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-05

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause.

  11. Increasing the Upper Temperature Oxidation Limit of Alumina Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Unocic, Kinga A; Lance, Michael J; Santella, Michael L; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Walker, Larry R

    2011-01-01

    A family of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels is under development for use in aggressive oxidizing conditions from {approx}600-900 C. These alloys exhibit promising mechanical properties but oxidation resistance in air with water vapor environments is currently limited to {approx}800 C due to a transition from external protective alumina scale formation to internal oxidation of aluminum with increasing temperature. The oxidation behavior of a series of AFA alloys was systematically studied as a function of Cr, Si, Al, C, and B additions in an effort to provide a basis to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit. Oxidation exposures were conducted in air with 10% water vapor environments from 800-1000 C, with post oxidation characterization of the 900 C exposed samples by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSLS). Increased levels of Al, C, and B additions were found to increase the upper-temperature oxidation limit in air with water vapor to between 950 and 1000 C. These findings are discussed in terms of alloy microstructure and possible gettering of hydrogen from water vapor at second phase carbide and boride precipitates.

  12. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  13. Ion Content of Moist Atmospheric Air and the Molecular Structure of Water Vapor Thus Inferred

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Nucleation 04 02 Water VaporP Hydrogen~bonding, Evaporation. 20 05 I Ions , Eletrical Conductivity Infrared.(-R) ASTRACT (Continue on reverse If necessary... eletrical charges are liberated by evaporating water. Fard a! . :;44 that jets of escaping wet steam can produce strong Inc t w n jO 1:o92, Lenard 22...I to the right as the ions are swept away in the vapor, forcing neutral clusters to be dissociated at a faster rate in an attempt to maintain the

  14. Three-dimensional tropospheric water vapor in coupled climate models compared with observations from the AIRS satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, David W.; Barnett, Tim P.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Gleckler, Peter J.

    2006-11-01

    Changes in the distribution of water vapor in response to anthropogenic forcing will be a major factor determining the warming the Earth experiences over the next century, so it is important to validate climate models' distribution of water vapor. In this work the three-dimensional distribution of specific humidity in state-of-the-art climate models is compared to measurements from the AIRS satellite system. We find the majority of models have a pattern of drier than observed conditions (by 10-25%) in the tropics below 800 hPa, but 25-100% too moist conditions between 300 and 600 hPa, especially in the extra-tropics. Analysis of the accuracy and sampling biases of the AIRS measurements suggests that these differences are due to systematic model errors, which might affect the model-estimated range of climate warming anticipated over the next century.

  15. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  16. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  17. AIRS Water Vapor and Cloud Products Validate and Explain Recent Negative Global and Tropical OLR Trends Observed by CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over the time period September 2002 February 2010. This time period is marked by a substantial decreasing OLR trend on the order of -0.1 W/m2/yr averaged over the globe. There are very large spatial variations of these trends however, with local values ranging from -2.6 W/m2/yr to +3.0 W/m2/yr in the tropics. The spatial patterns of the AIRS and CERES trends are in essentially perfect agreement with each other, as are the anomaly time series averaged over different spatial regions. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate. The agreement of anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed from AIRS derived products also indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of the AIRS derived products as well. We used the anomalies and trends of AIRS derived water vapor and cloud products to explain why global OLR has had a large negative trend over the time period September 2002 through February 2010. Tropical OLR began to decrease significantly at the onset of a strong La Nina in mid-2007. AIRS products show that cloudiness and mid-tropospheric water vapor began to increase in the region 5degN - 20degS latitude extending eastward from 150degW - 30 E longitude at that time, with a corresponding very large drop in OLR in this region. Late 2009 is characterized by a strong El-Nino, with a corresponding change in sign of observed anomalies of mid-tropospheric water vapor, cloud cover, and OLR in this region, as we] l as that of OLR anomalies in the tropics and globally. Monthly mean anomalies of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over this region are all shown to be highly correlated in time with those of an El Nino

  18. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapor on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P. P.; Nechev, P.

    2013-12-01

    A physical experiment, in which atmospheric air is enclosed in two interconnecting 4.8-metre high insulated PVC columns, consistently gives results showing that the condensation of water vapor, precipitated by means of refrigeration coils, gives rise to detectable air movements, with air speeds of up to 0.1 m/s. Once the compressor, sited well away from the two columns, is shut down, heavy drops of precipitated water are obtained which funnel into a flask for collection and measurement. The results in kg.m-2 (mm) from the 20 m3 volume of enclosed air accord well (>90%) with the physical calculations based on water vapor as an ideal gas. Air flow, resulting from the highly localized condensation, is measured through the movement of light-weight gauzes and an anemometer. It has a circulation time of some two minutes, such that both columns show cooling and a significant reduction in specific humidity from 0.01 to 0.005 (kg water vapor to kg dry air, r) with a drop in relative humidity of up to 40 per cent. Air flow is minimal during the control, non-refrigeration period of the experiment but becomes substantial within a minute of the compressor being switched on. The negative partial pressure change peaks at as much as 0.4 Pa/s during the first 30 minutes but reduces to approx. 0.08 Pa/s during the latter part of the 110 minute- long experiment. Airflow displays an inverse relationship to the partial pressure change, initially rising rapidly and then reducing before returning to zero once refrigeration has been switched off. Inverse correlations of up to 0.8 or higher between the partial pressure reduction and the airflow are obtained routinely. Semi-aquatic vegetation from the nearby marshland enhances precipitation, suggesting that evapotranspiration adds significantly to humidity. Without vegetation the condensation rate is 0.06 to 0.07 millimol.m-3.s-1 on average compared with 0.11 when vegetation is present. Cooling, by some 2°C, combined with a reduction in

  19. Estimating sampling biases and measurement uncertainties of AIRS/AMSU-A temperature and water vapor observations using MERRA reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Savtchenko, Andrey; Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric; Yung, Yuk L.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Fishbein, Evan; Won, Young-In

    2014-03-01

    We use MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research Applications) temperature and water vapor data to estimate the sampling biases of climatologies derived from the AIRS/AMSU-A (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) suite of instruments. We separate the total sampling bias into temporal and instrumental components. The temporal component is caused by the AIRS/AMSU-A orbit and swath that are not able to sample all of time and space. The instrumental component is caused by scenes that prevent successful retrievals. The temporal sampling biases are generally smaller than the instrumental sampling biases except in regions with large diurnal variations, such as the boundary layer, where the temporal sampling biases of temperature can be ± 2 K and water vapor can be 10% wet. The instrumental sampling biases are the main contributor to the total sampling biases and are mainly caused by clouds. They are up to 2 K cold and > 30% dry over midlatitude storm tracks and tropical deep convective cloudy regions and up to 20% wet over stratus regions. However, other factors such as surface emissivity and temperature can also influence the instrumental sampling bias over deserts where the biases can be up to 1 K cold and 10% wet. Some instrumental sampling biases can vary seasonally and/or diurnally. We also estimate the combined measurement uncertainties of temperature and water vapor from AIRS/AMSU-A and MERRA by comparing similarly sampled climatologies from both data sets. The measurement differences are often larger than the sampling biases and have longitudinal variations.

  20. Estimating Sampling Biases and Measurement Uncertainties of AIRS-AMSU-A Temperature and Water Vapor Observations Using MERRA Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas J.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric; Yung, Yuk L.; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce; Fishbein, Evan; Won, Young-In

    2014-01-01

    We use MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research Applications) temperature and water vapor data to estimate the sampling biases of climatologies derived from the AIRS/AMSU-A (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) suite of instruments. We separate the total sampling bias into temporal and instrumental components. The temporal component is caused by the AIRS/AMSU-A orbit and swath that are not able to sample all of time and space. The instrumental component is caused by scenes that prevent successful retrievals. The temporal sampling biases are generally smaller than the instrumental sampling biases except in regions with large diurnal variations, such as the boundary layer, where the temporal sampling biases of temperature can be +/- 2 K and water vapor can be 10% wet. The instrumental sampling biases are the main contributor to the total sampling biases and are mainly caused by clouds. They are up to 2 K cold and greater than 30% dry over mid-latitude storm tracks and tropical deep convective cloudy regions and up to 20% wet over stratus regions. However, other factors such as surface emissivity and temperature can also influence the instrumental sampling bias over deserts where the biases can be up to 1 K cold and 10% wet. Some instrumental sampling biases can vary seasonally and/or diurnally. We also estimate the combined measurement uncertainties of temperature and water vapor from AIRS/AMSU-A and MERRA by comparing similarly sampled climatologies from both data sets. The measurement differences are often larger than the sampling biases and have longitudinal variations.

  1. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges.

  2. The atmospheric water vapor line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, M.; Sharp, Z. D.; Gutzler, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    We have measured the hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of atmospheric water vapor periodically across the American Southwest through most of 2007. Samples were primarily collected over Albuquerque, NM on the roof of the 3-story UNM geology building on a near-daily basis with occasional sampling in southern Arizona and southern Texas. Water vapor was captured by pumping ~60 to ~600 liters of air (amount depending on dew point) through a cold trap, producing ~1mL of water. Precipitation samples were also collected in Albuquerque throughout the year and analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition. Isotopic compositions of both vapor and precipitation were determined by CO2 equilibration for oxygen and chromium reduction for hydrogen, with resulting gasses analyzed on a mass spectrometer. Nearly all water vapor samples lie parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) but with a deuterium excess of ~17 (δD = 8δO + 17). This is true regardless of relative humidity, dew point, location, time of day, or season. Precipitation samples fall to the right of the GMWL with a slope of ~5. Within our dataset we have identified 10 pairs of vapor and precipitation samples that were collected within 24 hours. Half of these sample pairs have values consistent with equilibrium conditions at ground temperature, while the other half are not in equilibrium at any temperature. Simple modeling of nonequilibrium fractionation processes suggests that the array of precipitation samples can be derived from the array of vapor samples by equilibrium condensation followed by partial evaporation of falling raindrops. Our data suggests that atmospheric water vapor has a relatively constant deuterium excess value regardless of moisture source, degree of rainout, and/or evapotranspiration contributions.

  3. Major Upgrades to the AIRS Version-6 Water Vapor Profile Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Lee, Jae N.

    2015-01-01

    Additional changes in Version-6.19 include all previous updates made to the q(p) retrieval since Version-6: Modified Neural-Net q0(p) guess above the tropopause Linearly tapers the neural net guess to match climatology at 70 mb, not at the top of the atmosphereChanged the 11 trapezoid q(p) perturbation functions used in Version-6 so as to match the 24 functions used in T(p) retrieval step. These modifications resulted in improved water vapor profiles in Version-6.19 compared to Version-6.Version-6.19 is tested for all of August 2013 and August 2014, as well for select other days. Before finalized and operational in 2016, the V-6.19 can be acquired upon request for limited time intervals.

  4. Simultaneous water vapor and dry air optical path length measurements and compensation with the large binocular telescope interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Hinz, P.; Downey, E.; Böhm, M.; Danchi, W. C.; Durney, O.; Ertel, S.; Hill, J. M.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Montoya, M.; Pott, J.-U.; Skemer, A.; Spalding, E.; Stone, J.; Vaz, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer uses a near-infrared camera to measure the optical path length variations between the two AO-corrected apertures and provide high-angular resolution observations for all its science channels (1.5-13 microns). There is however a wavelength dependent component to the atmospheric turbulence, which can introduce optical path length errors when observing at a wavelength different from that of the fringe sensing camera. Water vapor in particular is highly dispersive and its effect must be taken into account for high-precision infrared interferometric observations as described previously for VLTI/MIDI or the Keck Interferometer Nuller. In this paper, we describe the new sensing approach that has been developed at the LBT to measure and monitor the optical path length fluctuations due to dry air and water vapor separately. After reviewing the current performance of the system for dry air seeing compensation, we present simultaneous H-, K-, and N-band observations that illustrate the feasibility of our feedforward approach to stabilize the path length fluctuations seen by the LBTI nuller.

  5. The effect of air permeability and water vapor permeability of cleanroom clothing on physiological responses and wear comfort.

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Hung; Chen, Wan-Ping; Wang, Mao-Jiun J

    2014-01-01

    The function of cleanroom clothing is to protect the product from contamination by people, and to dissipate electrostatic discharge. People in the cleanroom work environment often complain about the discomforts associated with the wearing of cleanroom clothing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of air permeability and water vapor permeability of cleanroom clothing on the subject's physiological and subjective responses. Five male and five female subjects participated in this study. The experimental goal was to simulate the operator's regular tasks in a semiconductor manufacturing cleanroom. Each subject completed three treatment combinations with three different cleanroom clothing types. A three-factor experiment was designed (significance level p = 0.05). The independent variables included gender, cleanroom clothing, and duration. The dependent measures included heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, micro-climate relative humidity, micro-climate temperature, and subjective responses. A total of 40 min was involved for each treatment condition. The results indicate that skin temperature, micro-climate temperature and micro-climate relative humidity were lower while wearing cleanroom clothing with high air permeability and high water vapor permeability. The significant gender difference was found in skin temperature. As the task time increased, the micro-climate temperature also increased but the micro-climate relative humidity decreased at first and then increased. In addition, the physiological responses showed significant positive correlations with the subjective perception of clothing comfort. The findings of this study may provide useful information for cleanroom clothing design and selection.

  6. Using continuous measurements of near-surface atmospheric water vapor isotopes to document snow-air interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Winkler, Renato; Satow, Kazuhide; Prie, Frederic; Bayou, Nicolas; Brun, Eric; Cuffey, Kurt; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Dumont, Marie; Guillevic, Myriam; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Landais, Amaelle; Popp, Trevor; Risi, Camille; Steffen, Konrad; Stenni, Barbara; Sveinbjornsdottir, Arny

    2014-05-01

    Water stable isotope data from Greenland ice cores provide key paleoclimatic information. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, a monitoring of the isotopic composition δ18O and δD at several height levels (up to 13 meter) of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and snow in the first 0.5 cm from the surface has been conducted during three summers (2010-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. We observe a clear diurnal cycle in both the value and gradient of the isotopic composition of the water vapor above the snow surface. The diurnal amplitude in δD is found to be ~15‰. The diurnal isotopic composition follows the absolute humidity cycle. This indicates a large flux of vapor from the snow surface to the atmosphere during the daily warming and reverse flux during the daily cooling. The isotopic measurements of the flux of water vapor above the snow give new insights into the post depositional processes of the isotopic composition of the snow. During nine 1-5 days periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in-between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near-surface vapor isotopic composition. This is consistent with an estimated 60% mass turnover of surface snow per day driven by snow

  7. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  8. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  9. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  10. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  11. Water vaporization on Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    A'Hearn, Michael F.; Feldman, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A search is presently conducted for OH generated by the photodissociation of atmospheric water vapor in long-exposure IUE spectra of the region around Ceres. A statistically significant detection of OH is noted in an exposure off the northern limb of Ceres after perihelion. The amount of OH is consistent with a polar cap that might be replenished during winter by subsurface percolation, but which dissipates in summer.

  12. A passive integrative sampler for mercury vapor in air and neutral mercury species in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Petty, J.D.; May, T.W.; Huckins, J.N.

    2000-01-01

    A passive integrative mercury sampler (PIMS) based on a sealed polymeric membrane was effective for the collection and preconcentration of Hg0. Because the Hg is both oxidized and stabilized in the PIMS, sampling intervals of weeks to months are possible. The effective air sampling rate for a 15 x 2.5 cm device was about 21-equivalents/day (0.002 m3/day) and the detection limit for 4-week sampling was about 2 ng/m3 for conventional ICP-MS determination without clean-room preparation. Sampling precision was ??? 5% RSD for laboratory exposures, and 5-10% RSD for field exposures. These results suggest that the PIMS could be useful for screening assessments of Hg contamination and exposure in the environment, the laboratory, and the workplace. The PIMS approach may be particularly useful for applications requiring unattended sampling for extended periods at remote locations. Preliminary results indicate that sampling for dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) and potentially other neutral mercury species from water is also feasible. Rigorous validation of the sampler performance is currently in progress. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.A passive integrative mercury sampler (PIMS) based on a sealed polymeric membrane was effective for the collection and preconcentration of Hg0. Because the Hg is both oxidized and stabilized in the PIMS, sampling intervals of weeks to months are possible. The effective air sampling rate for a 15??2.5 cm device was about 21-equivalents/day (0.002 m3/day) and the detection limit for 4-week sampling was about 2 ng/m3 for conventional ICP-MS determination without clean-room preparation. Sampling precision was ???5% RSD for laboratory exposures, and 5-10% RSD for field exposures. These results suggest that the PIMS could be useful for screening assessments of Hg contamination and exposure in the environment, the laboratory, and the workplace. The PIMS approach may be particularly useful for applications requiring unattended sampling for extended

  13. Growth behavior of LiMn2O4 particles formed by solid-state reactions in air and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Naito, Makio

    2016-11-01

    Morphology control of particles formed during conventional solid-state reactions without any additives is a challenging task. Here, we propose a new strategy to control the morphology of LiMn2O4 particles based on water vapor-induced growth of particles during solid-state reactions. We have investigated the synthesis and microstructural evolution of LiMn2O4 particles in air and water vapor atmospheres as model reactions; LiMn2O4 is used as a low-cost cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. By using spherical MnCO3 precursor impregnated with LiOH, LiMn2O4 spheres with a hollow structure were obtained in air, while angulated particles with micrometer sizes were formed in water vapor. The pore structure of the particles synthesized in water vapor was found to be affected at temperatures below 700 °C. We also show that the solid-state reaction in water vapor is a simple and valuable method for the large-scale production of particles, where the shape, size, and microstructure can be controlled.

  14. Effects of air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit on storage of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the optimum air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for the storage of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, 3-day-old mated females were stored at air temperatures of 0, 5, 10, or 15 °C and VPDs of 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 kPa for 10, 20, or 30 days. At 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, 83 % of females survived after 30 days of storage; this percentage was the highest among all conditions. VPDs of 0.3 and 0.5 kPa regardless of air temperature, and an air temperature of 0 °C regardless of VPD were detrimental to the survival of the females during storage. Since the highest survival was observed at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, the effect of the storage duration on the post-storage quality of the stored females and their progeny was investigated at 25 °C to evaluate the effectiveness of the storage condition. The oviposition ability of the stored females, hatchability, and sex ratio of their progeny were not affected even when the storage duration was extended to 30 days. Although a slight decrease in the survival during the immature stages of progeny was observed when the storage duration was ≥20 days, the population growth of N. californicus may not be affected when individuals stored in these conditions are applied to greenhouses and agricultural fields. The results indicate that mated N. californicus females can be stored at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa VPD for at least 30 days.

  15. Water vapor radiometry research and development phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Chavez, M. C.; Yamane, N. L.; Barbier, K. M.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the research and development phase for eight dual-channel water vapor radiometers constructed for the Crustal Dynamics Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, and for the NASA Deep Space Network. These instruments were developed to demonstrate that the variable path delay imposed on microwave radio transmissions by atmospheric water vapor can be calibrated, particularly as this phenomenon affects very long baseline interferometry measurement systems. Water vapor radiometry technology can also be used in systems that involve moist air meteorology and propagation studies.

  16. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; González Abad, G.; Miller, C. Chan

    2014-06-01

    There are distinct spectral features of water vapor in the wavelength range covered by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) visible channel. Although these features are much weaker than those at longer wavelengths, they can be exploited to retrieve useful information about water vapor. They have an advantage in that their small optical depth leads to fairly simple interpretation as measurements of the total water vapor column density. We have used the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) OMI operational retrieval algorithm to derive the slant column density (SCD) of water vapor using the 430-480 nm spectral region after extensive optimization. We convert from SCD to vertical column density (VCD) using the air mass factor (AMF), which is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and assimilated water vapor profiles. Our Level 2 product includes not only water vapor VCD but also the associated scattering weights and AMF. In the tropics, our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of 1.3 × 1023 molecules cm-2 and a median relative uncertainty of about 11%, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm that uses a narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is about 1.2 × 1023 molecules cm-2. We have examined the sensitivities of SCD and AMF to various parameters and compared our results with those from the GlobVapour product, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET).

  17. CO2 DIAL measurements of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Margolis, Jack S.; Brothers, Alan M.; Tratt, David M.

    1987-01-01

    CO2 lidars have heretofore been used to measure water vapor concentrations primarily using the 10R(20) line at 10.247 microns, which has a strong overlap with a water vapor absorption line. This paper discusses the use of that line as well as other CO2 laser lines for which the absorption coefficients are weaker. The literature on measurement of water vapor absorption coefficients using CO2 lasers is reviewed, and the results from four laboratories are shown to be generally consistent with each other after they are normalized to the same partial pressure, temperature, and ethylene absorption coefficent for the 10P(14) CO2 laser line; however, the agreement with the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory's HITRAN and FASCOD 2 spectral data tapes is not good either for the water vapor absorption lines or for the water vapor continuum. Demonstration measurements of atmospheric water vapor have been conducted using the Mobile Atmospheric Pollutant Mapping System, a dual CO2 lidar system using heterodyne detection. Results are discussed for measurements using three sets of laser line pairs covering a wide range of water vapor partial pressures.

  18. Water vapor recovery from plant growth chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. J.; Newbold, D. D.; Colton, R. H.; Mccray, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is investigating the use of plant growth chambers (PGCs) for space missions and for bases on the moon and Mars. Key to successful development of PGCs is a system to recover and reuse the water vapor that is transpired from the leaves of the plants. A design is presented for a simple, reliable, membrane-based system that allows the recovery, purification, and reuse of the transpired water vapor through control of temperature and humidity levels in PGCs. The system is based on two membrane technologies: (1) dehumidification membrane modules to remove water vapor from the air, and (2) membrane contactors to return water vapor to the PGC (and, in doing so, to control the humidity and temperature within the PGC). The membrane-based system promises to provide an ideal, stable growth environment for a variety of plants, through a design that minimizes energy usage, volume, and mass, while maximizing simplicity and reliability.

  19. SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R.; Roellig, T. L.; Yuen, L.; Shiroyama, B.; Meyer, A.; Devincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The SOFIA Water Vapor Monitor (WVM) is a heterodyne radiometer designed to determine the integrated amount of water vapor along the telescope line of sight and directly to the zenith. The basic technique that was chosen for the WVM uses radiometric measurements of the center and wings of the 183.3 GHz rotational line of water to measure the water vapor. The WVM reports its measured water vapor levels to the aircraft Mission Controls and Communication System (MCCS) while the SOFIA observatory is in normal operation at flight altitude. The water vapor measurements are also available to other scientific instruments aboard the observatory. The electrical, mechanical and software design of the WVM are discussed.

  20. Water-vapor line broadening and shifting by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon in the 720-nm wavelength region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic measurements of H2O vapor in the 720-nm wavelength region were conducted to investigate the broadening and shifting of H2O lines by air, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. For each of the buffer gases under study, a linear relationship was found between the widths and the shifts, with the broader lines having the smaller pressure shifts. The pressure shifts measured compared favorably with theoretical values reported by Bykov et al. (1988). The temperature-dependence exponents for air-broadening were found to be J-dependent, with the lower-J lines having the higher exponents.

  1. Macroscopic modeling of heat and water vapor transfer with phase change in dry snow based on an upscaling method: Influence of air convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calonne, N.; Geindreau, C.; Flin, F.

    2015-12-01

    At the microscopic scale, i.e., pore scale, dry snow metamorphism is mainly driven by the heat and water vapor transfer and the sublimation-deposition process at the ice-air interface. Up to now, the description of these phenomena at the macroscopic scale, i.e., snow layer scale, in the snowpack models has been proposed in a phenomenological way. Here we used an upscaling method, namely, the homogenization of multiple-scale expansions, to derive theoretically the macroscopic equivalent modeling of heat and vapor transfer through a snow layer from the physics at the pore scale. The physical phenomena under consideration are steady state air flow, heat transfer by conduction and convection, water vapor transfer by diffusion and convection, and phase change (sublimation and deposition). We derived three different macroscopic models depending on the intensity of the air flow considered at the pore scale, i.e., on the order of magnitude of the pore Reynolds number and the Péclet numbers: (A) pure diffusion, (B) diffusion and moderate convection (Darcy's law), and (C) strong convection (nonlinear flow). The formulation of the models includes the exact expression of the macroscopic properties (effective thermal conductivity, effective vapor diffusion coefficient, and intrinsic permeability) and of the macroscopic source terms of heat and vapor arising from the phase change at the pore scale. Such definitions can be used to compute macroscopic snow properties from 3-D descriptions of snow microstructures. Finally, we illustrated the precision and the robustness of the proposed macroscopic models through 2-D numerical simulations.

  2. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Miller, C. Chan

    2014-01-01

    There are distinct spectral features of water vapor in the wavelength range covered by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) visible channel. Although these features are much weaker than those at longer wavelengths, they can be exploited to retrieve useful information about water vapor. They have an advantage in that their small optical depth leads to fairly simple interpretation as measurements of the total water vapor column density. We have used the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO)'s OMI operational retrieval algorithm to derive the Slant Column Density (SCD) of water vapor from OMI measurements using the 430-480 nm spectral region after extensive optimization of retrieval windows and parameters. The Air Mass Factor (AMF) is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and monthly mean water vapor profiles from the GEOS-5 assimilation products. We convert from SCD to Vertical Column Density (VCD) using the AMF and generate associated retrieval averaging kernels and shape factors. Our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of ~ 1.3 × 1023 molecule cm-2 and a median relative uncertainty of ~ 11% in the tropics, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm but using narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is ~ 1.2 × 1023 molecule cm-2. We have also explored the sensitivities to various parameters and compared our results with those from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET).

  3. Clouds and Water Vapor in the Climate System and Radiative Transfer in Clear Air and Cirrus Clouds in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James G.; DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Strow, L. Larrabee

    2002-01-01

    Research supported under this grant was aimed at attacking unanswered scientific questions that lie at the intersection of radiation, dynamics, chemistry, and climate. Considerable emphasis was placed on scientific collaboration and the innovative development of instruments required to address these issues. Specific questions include water vapor distribution in the tropical troposphere, atmospheric radiation, thin cirrus clouds, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and correlative science with satellite observations.

  4. Process for recovering organic vapors from air

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for recovering and concentrating organic vapor from a feed stream of air having an organic vapor content of no more than 20,000 ppm by volume. A thin semipermeable membrane is provided which has a feed side and a permeate side, a selectivity for organic vapor over air of at least 50, as measured by the ratio of organic vapor permeability to nitrogen permeability, and a permeability of organic vapor of at least 3.times.10.sup.-7 cm.sup.3 (STP) cm/cm.sup.2 sec.cm Hg. The feed stream is passed across the feed side of the thin semipermeable membrane while providing a pressure on the permeate side which is lower than the feed side by creating a partial vacuum on the permeate side so that organic vapor passes preferentially through the membrane to form an organic vapor depleted air stream on the feed side and an organic vapor enriched stream on the permeate side. The organic vapor which has passed through the membrane is compressed and condensed to recover the vapor as a liquid.

  5. Comparison of field soil vapor results with laboratory ground water and soil results at a former air force rocket engine test cell, Chanute Air Force Base, IL

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, G.J. ); Bailey, W.M.; Madaj, A.J. III

    1993-10-01

    A soil vapor survey utilizing 276 survey points was performed at the site to help determine the areal extent of soil and ground-water contamination. Survey results indicated a VOC anomaly approximately four acres in size present at the eastern end of the site. Historical information supported the soil vapor results in that the eastern portion of the site was the most active during engine testing activities. The most common and abundant VOC identified was TCE. The highest TCE concentration detected was 12.8 ppm. Forty subsurface soil samples were collected from the anomaly area. The most common VOC detected was again TCE at a maximum concentration of 84 [mu]g/kg. Fourteen temporary monitoring wells and 13 permanent wells were installed and sampled to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination. One well was installed in the source area to determine the maximum contaminant concentrations. TCE was again the most common VOC detected with a maximum concentration of 4000 [mu]g/1. Isoconcentration maps for VOCs in the three media (soil vapor, ground water, and soil) all overlay very closely indicating a distinct anomaly at the eastern end of the site. Field soil vapor results are supported by laboratory analytical results for soil and ground water in terms of compounds detected and location of anomaly.

  6. GROUND WATER SAMPLING OF VOCS IN THE WATER/CAPILLARY FRINGE AREA FOR VAPOR INTRUSION ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion has recently been considered a major pathway for increased indoor air contamination from certain volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). The recent Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document states that ground water samples should be obtained from the u...

  7. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  8. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  9. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1973-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft has been developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on NASA and USAF aircraft. Water vapor measurements were conducted up to 40,000 feet with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 feet.

  10. Aircraft water vapor measurements utilizing an aluminum oxide hygrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.

    1974-01-01

    A hygrometer for water vapor measurements from an aircraft was developed. An aluminum oxide hygrometer mounted in an aircraft Rosemount air temperature scoop was flown on the NASA Convair 990 and on a USAF B-57 aircraft. Water vapor measurements from the Convair 990 were conducted up to 40,000 ft with penetration into the stratosphere. Good agreement was obtained with simultaneously flown remote sounders of water vapor. During transcontinental flights the hygrometer demonstrated adequate response to measure the natural variability of water vapor near the tropopause. Rapid response was demonstrated in pursuit of the jet wake of an F-104 at 35,000 ft.

  11. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  12. Condensation of water vapor in the gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, V. G.; Makarieva, A. M.; Nefiodov, A. V.

    2012-10-15

    Physical peculiarities of water vapor condensation under conditions of hydrostatic equilibrium are considered. The power of stationary dynamic air fluxes and the vertical temperature distribution caused by condensation on large horizontal scales are estimated.

  13. Vertical Water Vapor Distribution at Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The Phoenix SSI camera data along with radiative transfer modeling are used to retrieve the vertical water vapor profile. Preliminary results indicate that water vapor is often confined near the surface.

  14. Water vapor in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to a study of the conditions and evolution of the planet formation region in young circumstellar disks, by means of spectroscopic observations of molecular gas emission. The main focus of this work is the infrared spectrum of water (H2O), which provides thousands of emission lines tracing the warm and dense gas inward of the water snow line in disks. The analysis includes also emission from some organic molecules that trace the carbon chemistry, C2H2, HCN, and CO2, as well as emission from OH that is connected to the formation and destruction of the water molecule. Two are the main directions explored in this work, for which we used spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope (IRS) and the Very Large Telescope (VISIR and X-shooter). The first is to investigate how variable accretion phenomena occurring during the T Tauri phase affect the molecular environments in the planet formation region of disks. By monitoring T Tauri stars in different phases of accretion, we found that outbursts can remarkably affect their mid-infrared molecular emission. We propose a scenario where accretion flares trigger a recession of the water snow line, increasing water emission from the disk, when the accretion luminosity keeps higher over long enough timescales for the thermal structure of the disk to change (at least a few weeks, as observed in the strongly variable EX Lupi). In addition, enhanced UV radiation is found to produce OH from photodissociation of water in the disk. Organic molecules instead disappear during a strong outburst, and we are currently investigating the long-term evolution of these effects. A second direction was taken to tackle another fundamental problem: the origin of water vapor in inner disks. Some models predict that water is produced by evaporation of icy solids migrating inward of the snow line. One way to probe this scenario is by measuring the abundance of water vapor in the inner disk, and compare it to the oxygen abundance

  15. Water Vapor Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    1999-01-01

    The response of water vapor to climate change is investigated through a series of model studies with varying latitudinal temperature gradients, mean temperatures, and ultimately, actual climate change configurations. Questions to be addressed include: what role does varying convection have in water vapor feedback; do Hadley Circulation differences result in differences in water vapor in the upper troposphere; and, does increased eddy energy result in greater eddy vertical transport of water vapor in varying climate regimes?

  16. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    A total of 18 different membranes were procured, characterized, and tested in a modified bench-scale vapor diffusion water reclamation unit. Four membranes were selected for further studies involving membrane fouling. Emphasis was placed on the problem of flux decline due to membrane fouling. This is discussed in greater details under "Summary and Discussion on Membrane Fouling Studies" presented in pages 47-51. The system was also investigated for low temperature application on wash-water where the permeated water is not recovered but vented into space vacuum.

  17. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  18. Internal Water Vapor Photoacoustic Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Water vapor absorption is ubiquitous in the infrared wavelength range where photoacoustic trace gas detectors operate. This technique allows for discontinuous wavelength tuning by temperature-jumping a laser diode from one range to another within a time span suitable for photoacoustic calibration. The use of an internal calibration eliminates the need for external calibrated reference gases. Commercial applications include an improvement of photoacoustic spectrometers in all fields of use.

  19. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  20. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  1. A global assessment of NASA AIRS v6 and EUMETSAT IASI v6 precipitable water vapor using ground-based GPS SuomiNet stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Jacola; Knuteson, Robert; August, Thomas; Hultberg, Tim; Ackerman, Steve; Revercomb, Hank

    2016-08-01

    Satellite remote sensing of precipitable water vapor (PWV) is essential for monitoring moisture in real time for weather applications, as well as tracking the long-term changes in PWV for climate change trend detection. This study assesses the accuracies of the current satellite observing system, specifically the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) v6 PWV product and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellite Studies (EUMETSAT) Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) v6 PWV product, using ground-based SuomiNet Global Positioning System (GPS) network as truth. Elevation-corrected collocated matchups to each SuomiNet GPS station in North America and around the world were created, and results were broken down by station, ARM region, climate zone, and latitude zone. The greatest difference, exceeding 5%, between IASI and AIRS retrievals occurred in the tropics. Generally, IASI and AIRS fall within a 5% error in the PWV range of 20-40 mm (a mean bias less than 2 mm), with a wet bias for extremely low PWV values (less than 5 mm) and a dry bias for extremely high PWV values (greater than 50 mm). The operational IR satellite products are able to capture the mean PWV but degrade in the extreme dry and wet regimes.

  2. Preparation of high-quality colloidal mask for nanosphere lithography by a combination of air/water interface self-assembly and solvent vapor annealing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Geng, Chong; Zheng, Lu; Ma, Zhaohui; Tan, Tianya; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yan, Qingfeng; Shen, Dezhong

    2012-08-28

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) has been regarded as an inexpensive, inherently parallel, high-throughput, materials-general approach to the fabrication of nanoparticle arrays. However, the order of the resulting nanoparticle array is essentially dependent on the quality of the colloidal monolayer mask. Furthermore, the lateral feature size of the nanoparticles created using NSL is coupled with the diameter of the colloidal spheres, which makes it inconvenient for studying the size-dependent properties of nanoparticles. In this work, we demonstrate a facile approach to the fabrication of a large-area, transferrable, high-quality latex colloidal mask for nanosphere lithography. The approach is based on a combination of the air/water interface self-assembly method and the solvent-vapor-annealing technique. It enables the fabrication of colloidal masks with a higher crystalline integrity compared to those produced by other strategies. By manipulating the diameter of the colloidal spheres and precisely tuning the solvent-vapor-annealing process, flexible control of the size, shape, and spacing of the interstice in a colloidal mask can be realized, which may facilitate the broad use of NSL in studying the size-, shape-, and period-dependent optical, magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties of nanomaterials.

  3. Water vapor diffusion membrane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    An application of the water vapor diffusion technique is examined whereby the permeated water vapor is vented to space vacuum to alleviate on-board waste storage and provide supplemental cooling. The work reported herein deals primarily with the vapor diffusion-heat rejection (VD-HR) as it applies to the Space Shuttle. A stack configuration was selected, designed and fabricated. An asymmetric cellulose acetate membrane, used in reverse osmosis application was selected and a special spacer was designed to enhance mixing and promote mass transfer. A skid-mount unit was assembled from components used in the bench unit although no attempt was made to render it flight-suitable. The operating conditions of the VD-HR were examined and defined and a 60-day continuous test was carried out. The membranes performed very well throughout the test; no membrane rupture and no unusual flux decay was observed. In addition, a tentative design for a flight-suitable VD-HR unit was made.

  4. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry; Jensen, Eric; Sachse, Glenn; Podolske, James; Schoeberl, Mark; Browell, Edward; Ismail, Syed; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld is import-an: for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper Troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large, even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. These tended to coincide with regions of low temperatures, though some cases suggest water vapor enhancements due to troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. The goal of this work is to understand the importance of processes in and at the edge of the arctic stratospheric middleworld in determining water vapor at these levels. Specifically, is water vapor at these levels determined largely by the descent of air from above, or are clouds both within and at the edge of the stratospheric middleworld potentially important? How important is troposphere-to-stratosphere transport of air in determining stratospheric middleworld water vapor content? To this end, we will first examine the minimum saturation mixing ratios along theta/EPV tubes during the SOLVE winter and compare these with DC-8 water vapor observations. This will be a rough indicator of how high relative humidities can get, and the likelihood of cirrus cloud formation in various parts of the stratospheric middleworld. We will then examine saturation mixing ratios along both diabatic and adiabatic trajectories, comparing these values with actual aircraft water vapor observations, both in situ and remote. Finally, we will attempt to actually predict water vapor using minimum saturation mixing ratios along trajectories, cloud injection (derived from satellite imagery) along

  5. Water vapor, whence comest thou.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    During a 14-hour period on Mar. 7, 1971, the Apollo 14 ALSEP suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) observed an intense, prolonged series of bursts of 48.6-eV ions at the lunar surface. The SIDE mass analyzer showed the mass per unit charge of these ions to be characteristic of water vapor if singly ionized. The event was also observed by the SIDE total ion detectors (TIDs) at the Apollo 14 site and at Apollo 12 (located 183 km to the west). The TID data from SIDE 14 indicate that the energy spectrum was narrower than the 20-eV interval between energy channels. Ion spectra due to the LM exhaust gases are shown to be readily identified by the SIDE and are distinctly different in character from the spectra obtained on March 7. Detailed consideration of other possible sources of water, including the Apollo 14 CSM, leads to the conclusion that the water vapor did not come from a man-made source. Also, it is estimated that the event may have involved a quantity of water much greater than that which has been artificially introduced into the lunar environment. Consequently, it appears to be of lunar origin.

  6. Vapor pressure of water nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2014-03-26

    Classical thermodynamics is assumed to be valid up to a certain length-scale, below which the discontinuous nature of matter becomes manifest. In particular, this must be the case for the description of the vapor pressure based on the Kelvin equation. However, the legitimacy of this equation in the nanoscopic regime can not be simply established, because the determination of the vapor pressure of very small droplets poses a challenge both for experiments and simulations. In this article we make use of a grand canonical screening approach recently proposed to compute the vapor pressures of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations. This scheme is applied to water droplets, to show that the applicability of the Kelvin equation extends to unexpectedly small lengths, of only 1 nm, where the inhomogeneities in the density of matter occur within spatial lengths of the same order of magnitude as the size of the object. While in principle this appears to violate the main assumptions underlying thermodynamics, the density profiles reveal, however, that structures of this size are still homogeneous in the nanosecond time-scale. Only when the inhomogeneity in the density persists through the temporal average, as it is the case for clusters of 40 particles or less, do the macroscopic thermodynamics and the molecular descriptions depart from each other.

  7. Venus Balloons using Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izutsu, N.; Yajima, N.; Honda, H.; Imamura, T.

    We propose an inflatable balloon using water vapor for the lifting gas, which is liquid in the transportation stage before entry into the high temperature atmosphere. The envelope of the balloon has an outer layer for gas barrier (a high-temperature resistant film) and an inner layer for liquid water keeping. In the descent stage using a parachute, water widely held just inside the balloon envelope can be quickly vaporized by a lot of heat flux from the surrounding high-temperature atmosphere owing to the large surface area of the balloon. As neither gas containers nor heat exchangers are necessary, we can construct a simple, lightweight and small size Venus balloon probe system. Tentative floating altitude is 35 km below the thick clouds in the Venusian atmosphere. Selection of balloon shape and material for balloon envelope are discussed in consideration of the Venusian environment such as high-temperature, high-pressure, and sulfuric acid. Balloon deployment and inflation sequence is numerically simulated. In case of the total floating mass of 10 kg at the altitude of 35 km, the volume and mass of the balloon is 1.5 cubic meters, and 3.5 kg, respectively. The shape of the balloon is chosen to be cylindrical with a small diameter. The mass of li fting gas can be determined as 4.3 kg and the remaining 2.2 kg becomes the payload mass. The mass of the total balloon system is also just 10 kg excluding the entry capsule.

  8. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  9. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  10. Measurements and Calculations of the Halfwidth of Two Rotational Transitions of Water Vapor Perturbed by N 2, O 2, and Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmont, Jean-Marcel; Priem, Dominique; Wlodarczak, Georges; Gamache, Robert R.

    1999-02-01

    In this paper we report the results of both an experimental and theoretical study of the halfwidths of two transitions of water vapor. Measurements on the lines of the H216O and H218O isotopomers located at 325.1 and 203.4 GHz, respectively, were carried out in the temperature range 300-393 K, with N2and O2as perturbing gases. The foreign-broadening coefficients and their temperature-dependence parameters were determined assuming a Voigt profile and the usual temperature dependence for the halfwidth. The retrieved values are compared to values calculated using the complex semiclassical formalism of Robert and Bonamy. The assumed intermolecular potential is a combination of electrostatic and atom-atom components. This last contribution is defined as the sum of pairwise Lennard-Jones 6-12 interactions between the atoms of H2O and the atoms of the perturbing molecules expanded to eighth order. Also calculated are the pressure-induced shifts of the spectral lines for temperatures from 200 to 400 K. Calculated and experimental results are in good agreement, within ±3.2%, except for the N2-broadening temperature coefficients, for which there are discrepancies as high as 23%. Air-broadening parameters are determined following the classical relation: γ (air) = 0.79γ (N2) + 0.21γ (O2).

  11. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Time-series for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    The ROBUST nature (biases are not as important as previous GCM-evaluations suggest) of the AIRS-observations-generated ARC-maps and ATs as well as their interrelations suggest that they could be a useful tool to select CGCMs which may be considered the reliable, i.e., to be trusted even for longer-term climate drift/change predictions (even on the regional scale). Get monthly gridded CGCM time-series of atmospheric variables coinciding with the timeframe of the AIRS analyses for at least 5-6 years and do the actual evaluations of ARC-maps and ATs for the coinciding time periods.

  12. Eyeing the Sky's Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, and many like it, are one way NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is measuring trace amounts of water vapor in the atmosphere over far-northern Mars. Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) uses solar filters, or filters designed to image the sun, to make these images. The camera is aimed at the sky for long exposures.

    SSI took this image as a test on June 9, 2008, which was the Phoenix mission's 15th Martian day, or sol, since landing, at 5:20 p.m. local solar time. The camera was pointed about 38 degrees above the horizon. The white dots in the sky are detector dark current that will be removed during image processing and analysis.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space

  13. A Lithium Vapor Box similarity experiment employing water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ja; Jagoe, C.; Goldston, Rj; Jaworski, Ma

    2016-10-01

    Handling high power loads and heat flux in the divertor is a major challenge for fusion power plants. A detached plasma will likely be required. However, hydrogenic and impurity puffing experiments show that detached operation leads easily to X-point MARFEs, impure plasmas, degradation in confinement, and lower helium pressure at the exhaust. The concept of the Lithium Vapor Box Divertor is to use local evaporation and strong differential pumping through condensation to localize the gas-phase material that absorbs the plasma heat flux, and so avoid those difficulties. In order to design such a box first the vapor without plasma must be simulated. The density of vapor required can be estimated using the SOL power, major radius, poloidal box length, and cooling energy per lithium atom. For an NSTX-U-sized machine, the Knudsen number Kn spans 0.01 to 1, the transitional flow regime. This regime cannot handled by fluid codes or collisionless Monte Carlo codes, but can be handled by Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes. To validate a DSMC model, we plan to build a vapor box test stand employing more-convenient water vapor instead of lithium vapor as the working fluid. Transport of vapor between the chambers at -50C will be measured and compared to the model. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  15. Effect of air pressure differential on vapor flow through sample building walls

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.E. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    Laboratory scale experiments were performed on two small sample composite walls of typical building construction to determine the approximate opposing air pressure difference required to stop or significantly reduce the transmission of water vapor due to a water vapor pressure difference. The experiments used wall section samples between two controlled atmosphere chambers. One chamber was held at a temperature and humidity condition approximating that of a typical summer day, while the other chamber was controlled at a condition typical of indoor conditioned space. Vapor transmission data through the wall samples were obtained over a range of vapor pressure differentials and opposing air pressure differentials. The results show that increasing opposing air pressure differences decrease water vapor transmission, as expected, and relatively small opposing air pressure differentials are required for wall materials of small vapor permeability and large air permeability. The opposing air pressure that stopped or significantly reduced the flow of water vapor through the wall sample was determined experimentally and also compared to air pressures as predicted by an analytical model.

  16. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  17. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  18. Development and Validation of a Novel Gas Analyzer for Simultaneous Measurements of Methane, Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in Ambient Air at 20 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, M.; Owano, T.; Fellers, R.; Dong, F.; Baer, D.

    2008-12-01

    Methane has increased significantly with human population levels. Pre-1750 ice core data indicates that pre- industrialization levels were about 700 ppbv, while current levels are over 1750 ppbv. In current budget estimates of atmospheric methane, major contributors include both natural (wetlands) and anthropogenic sources (energy, landfills, ruminants, biomass burning, rice agriculture). The strengths of these sources vary spatially and temporally. Estimates of emissions from wetlands are also uncertain due to the extreme variability of these ecosystems. Because methane lifetime is relatively long (8.4 years), atmospheric variations in concentration are small and accuracy in measurement is important for understanding spatial and temporal variability. Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane rose sharply in 2007. Global CO2 climbed by 0.6 percent, or 19 billion tons, in 2007. Methane increased by 27 million tons after nearly a decade with little or no increase. Atmospheric CO2 levels currently stand at 385 ppmv, or about 38 percent higher than pre- industrial levels and the rise in CO2 concentrations has been accelerating since the 1980s when annual increases were around 1.5 ppm per year. Last year the increase was 2.4 ppm. We report on the development, application and independent performance characterization of a novel gas analyzer based on cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy. The Analyzer provides simultaneous measurements of methane, carbon dioxide and water vapor in ambient air in the field for applications that require high data rates (eddy correlation flux), wide dynamic range (e.g., chamber flux and other applications with concentrations that are ten times typical ambient levels or higher) and highest accuracy (atmospheric monitoring stations). The Analyzer provides continuous measurements at data rates up to 20 Hz and with replicate precision of 1 ppbv for methane (1 second measurement time), 0.2 ppmv for carbon dioxide (1 second

  19. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  20. Water vapor retrieval over many surface types

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

  1. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  2. Gravity sensitivity of a resistojet water vaporizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl

    1993-01-01

    A laboratory model of a water vaporizer for resistojet applications was designed, fabricated, and steady and transient characteristics were measured. Vaporizer operation was not impacted by rotation about a horizontal axis normal to its own. The vaporizer was operated under low and high accelerations aboard a jet aircraft for periods up to 25 s at flow rates ranging from 159(10)(exp -6) to 230(10)(exp -6) kg/s. Slight changes in inlet and outlet pressures and some heat exchanger temperatures were observed during the low-gravity tests. However, the results of these tests indicated probable compatibility of the vaporizer design tested with a low-gravity environment.

  3. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Padolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Richard, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE III-Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999/2000 winter season. Aircraft-based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements were analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to-stratosphere exchange extends into the Arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases with altitude most rapidly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of above 5ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350 ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early spring, temperatures at the troposphere are cold enough so that 5-10% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during this period, dynamical processes near the Arctic tropopause can dehydrate air and keep the Arctic tropopause region very dry during early spring.

  4. Removal of Sarin Aerosol and Vapor by Water Sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.

    1998-09-01

    Falling water drops can collect particles and soluble or reactive vapor from the gas through which they fall. Rain is known to remove particles and vapors by the process of rainout. Water sprays can be used to remove radioactive aerosol from the atmosphere of a nuclear reactor containment building. There is a potential for water sprays to be used as a mitigation technique to remove chemical or bio- logical agents from the air. This paper is a quick-look at water spray removal. It is not definitive but rather provides a reasonable basic model for particle and gas removal and presents an example calcu- lation of sarin removal from a BART station. This work ~ a starting point and the results indicate that further modeling and exploration of additional mechanisms for particle and vapor removal may prove beneficial.

  5. AVIRIS Spectrometer Maps Total Water Vapor Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Alley, Ronald E.; Vane, Gregg A.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Gary, Bruce L.

    1992-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) processes maps of vertical-column abundances of water vapor in atmosphere with good precision and spatial resolution. Maps provide information for meteorology, climatology, and agriculture.

  6. Water vapor - Stratospheric injection by thunderstorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Lojko, M. S.; Petersen, E. V.

    1971-01-01

    Infrared radiometric inference measurements of the mass of water vapor injected into the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere by a number of plains thunderstorms show an average threefold increase over the fair weather background mass of water vapor. These airborne measurements, made from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Convair 990 jet laboratory, extended over a sample size much larger than that possible by balloon and other techniques.

  7. Water vapor absorption of carbon dioxide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.; Margolis, J. S.; Rosengren, L.-G.

    1976-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector or spectrophone has been used to perform detailed measurements of the absorptivity of mixtures of water vapor in air. A (C-12) (O-16)2 laser was used as the source, and measurements were made at forty-nine different wavelengths from 9.2 to 10.7 microns. The details of the optoacoustic detector and its calibration are presented, along with a discussion of its performance characteristics. The results of the measurements of water vapor absorption show that the continuum absorption in the wavelength range covered is 5-10% lower than previous measurements.

  8. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Naphthalene Vapor on Water Surface

    PubMed

    Smolík; Schwarz

    1997-01-15

    The evaporation of a water drop into a ternary gaseous mixture of air, steam, and naphthalene vapor was investigated. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical prediction based on a numerical solution of coupled boundary layer equations for heat and mass transfer from a drop moving in ternary gas. In the experiments the naphthalene vapor condensed on the water drop as a supercooled liquid even at temperatures far below the melting point of naphthalene. The condensation on drop surface is discussed in terms of classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation on smooth surfaces.

  9. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  10. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    DOEpatents

    Kebabian, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma.

  11. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  12. Vacuum distillation/vapor filtration water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honegger, R. J.; Neveril, R. B.; Remus, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration (VD/VF) water recovery system are considered. As a functional model, the system converts urine and condensates waste water from six men to potable water on a steady-state basis. The system is designed for 180-day operating durations and for function on the ground, on zero-g aircraft, and in orbit. Preparatory tasks are summarized for conducting low gravity tests of a vacuum distillation/vapor filtration system for recovering water from urine.

  13. The vertical distribution of Mars water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of observations made from the Viking 1 Orbiter indicates that the water vapor over the Viking 1 landing site is uniformly mixed with the atmosphere and not concentrated near the surface. The analysis incorporates the effects of atmospheric scattering and explains why previous earth-based observations showed a strong diurnal variation in water content. It also explains the lack of an early morning fog and removes the necessity of daily exchange of large amounts of water between the surface and the atmosphere. A water vapor volume mixing ratio of 1.5 x 10 to the -4th is inferred for the Viking 1 site in late summer.

  14. Distribution of Water Vapor in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Snell, Ronald L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Hollenbach, David J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li, Di; Neufeld, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C2H, 13CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N2H+. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to A V< 15 mag, the ratio of H2O to C18O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large A V. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as 13CO or C18O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  15. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  16. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in...

  19. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hipskino, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999-2000 winter season. Aircraft based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements are analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the arctic lower-most stratosphere, and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to- stratosphere exchange extends into the arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases idly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of about 5 ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20\\% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early Spring temperatures at the tropopause are cold enough so that 5-10\\% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100\\%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during, this period the arctic tropopause can play an important role in maintaining a very dry upper troposphere during early Spring.

  20. Water Vapor Isotopic Fractionation and Strat/trop Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jucks, K. W.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.

    We will present atmospheric observations of the isotopic fractionation for water vapor as observed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory far-infrared spectrometer (FIRS-2). The stratospheric observations are corrected with a photochemical model to account for methane oxidation to determine the "entry level" isotopic fractionation of water in the stratosphere. These values are then compared to a simple Rayleigh frac- tionation model that includes estimations of convection, radiative heating, and mixing to infer relative contributions to stratosphere/troposphere exchange. The observations of water vapor fractionation are most consistent with a model that mixes air uplifted from roughly 11 km with significantly more air that has been dehydrated by convec- tion to an effective temperature that is much cooler than the tropopause temperature. The water vapor mixing ratio in the stratosphere results from a combination of radia- tive heating, recirculation of stratospheric air, and deep convection that supplies the air to the upper tropical troposphere. We believe that these types of observations could be a powerful tool for constraining circulation models.

  1. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  2. Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor DIAL Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; DeYoung, Russell J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The remote sensing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method to perform such measurement from aircraft and space. This thesis describes a new advanced detection system, which incorporates major improvements regarding sensitivity and size. These improvements include a low noise advanced avalanche photodiode detector, a custom analog circuit, a 14-bit digitizer, a microcontroller for on board averaging and finally a fast computer interface. This thesis describes the design and validation of this new water vapor DIAL detection system which was integrated onto a small Printed Circuit Board (PCB) with minimal weight and power consumption. Comparing its measurements to an existing DIAL system for aerosol and water vapor profiling validated the detection system.

  3. Monolithic microwave integrated circuit water vapor radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukamto, L. M.; Cooley, T. W.; Janssen, M. A.; Parks, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) is under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). WVR's are used to remotely sense water vapor and cloud liquid water in the atmosphere and are valuable for meteorological applications as well as for determination of signal path delays due to water vapor in the atmosphere. The high cost and large size of existing WVR instruments motivate the development of miniature MMIC WVR's, which have great potential for low cost mass production. The miniaturization of WVR components allows large scale deployment of WVR's for Earth environment and meteorological applications. Small WVR's can also result in improved thermal stability, resulting in improved calibration stability. Described here is the design and fabrication of a 31.4 GHz MMIC radiometer as one channel of a thermally stable WVR as a means of assessing MMIC technology feasibility.

  4. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  5. TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION AND AIR SPARGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air sparging, also called "in situ air stripping and in situ volatilization" injects air into the saturated zone to strip away volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dissolved in groundwater and adsorbed to soil. hese volatile contaminants transfer in a vapor phase to the unsaturated ...

  6. Distribution of tropical tropospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a conceptual model for tropical convection and observational data for water vapor, the maintenance of the vertical distribution of the tropical tropospheric water vapor is discussed. While deep convection induces large-scale subsidence that constrains the turbulent downgradient mixing to within the convective boundary layer and effectively dries the troposphere through downward advection, it also pumps hydrometeors into the upper troposphere, whose subsequent evaporation appears to be the major source of moisture for the large-scale subsiding motion. The development of upper-level clouds and precipitation from these clouds may also act to dry the outflow, thus explaining the low relative humidity near the tropopause. A one-dimensional model is developed to simulate the mean vertical structure of water vapor in the tropical troposphere. It is also shown that the horizontal variation of water vapor in the tropical troposphere above the trade-wind boundary layer can be explained by the variation of a moisture source that is proportional to the amount of upper-level clouds. Implications for the nature of water vapor feedback in global warming are discussed.

  7. Water dimer equilibrium constant of saturated vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomuzh, N. P.; Mahlaichuk, V. N.; Khrapatyi, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    The value and temperature dependence of the dimerization constant for saturated water vapor are determined. A general expression that links the second virial coefficient and the dimerization constant is obtained. It is shown that the attraction between water monomers and dimers is fundamental, especially at T > 350 K. The range of application for the obtained results is determined.

  8. Detection and Measurement of Charge in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Positive charge is found in newly formed water vapor. Two detection and two measurement experiments are presented. The detection experiments are simple; their purpose is only to show the existence of charge in water vapor. The first of these experiments places one exposed end of an insulated wire in the vapor space of a flask, which holds boiling water. The other end of this wire is connected to the input high of an electrometer. The input low, in all of the presented experiments, is grounded. The second experiment detects charge by capacitive induction. It uses a beaker with gold leaves gilded on its outside surface. When water boils inside the beaker, the vapor charge is detected by the gold layer without contacting the water or vapor. The two measurement experiments have sensors made of conducting fabric. The fabric is used to cover the opening of a flask, which holds boiling water, to collect the charge in the escaping vapor. These two experiments differ by the number of fabric layers --- four in one and six in the other. The results obtained from these two experiments are essentially the same, within the margin of error, 0.734 & 0.733 nC per gram of vapor. Since the added two layers of the six-layer sensor do not collect more charge than the four-layer sensor, the four-layer sensor must have collected all available charge. The escaping vapor exits into a chamber, which has only a small area opening connecting to the atmosphere. This chamber prevents direct contact between the sensor and the ambient air, which is necessary because air is found to affect the readings from the sensor. Readings taken in the surrounding area in all four experiments show no accumulation of negative charge. These experiments identify a source for the atmospheric electricity in a laboratory environment other than that has been discussed in the literature. However, they also raise the question about the missing negative charge that would be predicted by charge balance or the

  9. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass ...prescription bottles , and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author)

  10. Review of Various Air Sampling Methods for Solvent Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maykoski, R. T.

    Vapors of trichloroethylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, and butyl cellosolve in air were collected using Scotchpac and Tedlar bags, glass prescription bottles, and charcoal adsorption tubes. Efficiencies of collection are reported. (Author/RH)

  11. Sediment-air equilibrium partitioning of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic compounds. Part 1. Method development and water vapor sorption isotherm.

    PubMed

    de Seze, G; Valsaraj, K T; Reible, D D; Thibodeaux, L J

    2000-05-15

    Contaminated sediments that become exposed to air as a result of dredging and disposal in confined disposal facilities are potential sources of air pollution. A critical parameter to develop emission estimation models is the equilibrium partition coefficient of contaminants, between sediment and air. In this first of two articles, we present a method, based on gas saturation in a flowing stream, to study both the adsorption of water and semi-volatile organic compounds on a sediment from the Campus Lake, Baton Rouge, LA, USA. The experimental set-up was used to determine the adsorption isotherm for water partitioning between sediment and pore-air. A detailed characterization of the sediment surface area and pore volume was used to develop an adsorption-condensation model for predicting water sorption on sediment. The model was used to estimate the importance of water adsorption on mineral surfaces and condensation in pores. This information serves, in the accompanying second article in the series, as the basis for the modeling of the partitioning of phenanthrene, and dibenzofuran.

  12. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  13. Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Approaches

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed a technology transfer document regarding management and treatment of vapor intrusion into building structures. This document describes the range of mitigation technologies available.

  14. Using GPS radio occultations to infer the water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, Panagiotis; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Ao, Chi O.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2016-11-01

    The air refractive index at L-band frequencies depends on the air's water vapor content and density. Exploiting this relationship, we derive for the first time a theoretical model to infer the specific humidity response to surface temperature variations, dq/dTs, given knowledge of how the air refractive index and temperature vary with surface temperature. We validate this model by using 1.2-1.6 GHz Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS RO) observations from 2007 to 2010 at 250 hPa, where the water vapor feedback on surface warming is strongest. The dq/dTs estimation from GPS RO observations shows excellent agreement with previously published results and the responses estimated by using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications data sets. Because of their high sensitivity to fractional changes in water vapor, current and future GPS RO observations show great promise in monitoring climate feedback and their trends.

  15. Water Vapor in an Unexpected Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    The protoplanetary disk around DoAr 44 is fairly ordinary in most ways. But a recent study has found that this disk contains water vapor in its inner regions the first such discovery for a disk of its type.Drying Out DisksDoAr 44 is a transitional disk: a type of protoplanetary disk that has been at least partially cleared of small dust grains in the inner regions of the disk. This process is thought to happen as a result of dynamical interactions with a protoplanet embedded in the disk; the planet clears out a gap as it orbits.A schematic of the differences between a full protoplanetary disk, a pre-transitional disk, and a transitional disk. [Catherine Espaillat] Classical protoplanetary disks surrounding young, low-mass stars often contain water vapor, but transitional disks are typically dry no water vapor is detected from the disk inner regions. This is probably because water vapor is easily dissociated by far-UV radiation from the young, hot star. Once the dust is cleared out from the inner regions of the disk, the water vapor is no longer shielded from the UV radiation, so the disk dries out.Enter the exception: DoAr 44. The disk in this system doesnt have a fully cleared inner region, which labels it pre-transitional. Its composed of an inner ring out to 2 AU, a cleared gap between 2 and 36 AU, and then the outer disk. What makes DoAr 44 unusual, however, is that its the only disk with a large inner gap known to harbor detectable quantities of water vapor. The authors of this study ask a key question: where is this water vapor located?Unusual SystemLed by Colette Salyk (NOAO and Vassar College), the authors examined the system using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a visiting instrument on the Gemini North telescope. They discovered that the water vapor emission originates from about 0.3 AU the inner disk region, where terrestrial-type planets may well be forming.Both dust-shielding and water self-shielding seem to have protected this water

  16. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the

  17. Advanced Detector and Waveform Digitizer for Water Vapor DIAL Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1998-01-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor has become a major requirement for understanding moist-air processes. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is a technique best suited for the measurement of atmospheric water vapor. NASA Langley Research Center is continually developing improved DIAL systems. One aspect of current development is focused on the enhancement of a DIAL receiver by applying state-of-the-art technology in building a new compact detection system that will be placed directly on the DIAL receiver telescope. The newly developed detection system has the capability of being digitally interfaced with a simple personal computer, using a discrete input/output interface. This has the potential of transmitting digital data over relatively long distances instead of analog signals, which greatly reduces measurement noise. In this paper, we discuss some results from the new compact water vapor DIAL detection system which includes a silicon based avalanche photodiode (APD) detector, a 14-bit, 10-MHz waveform digitizer, a microcontroller and other auxiliary electronics. All of which are contained on a small printed-circuit-board. This will significantly reduce the weight and volume over the current CAMAC system and eventually will be used in a water vapor DIAL system on an unpiloted atmospheric vehicle (UAV) aircraft, or alternatively on an orbiting spacecraft.

  18. Tunable lasers for water vapor measurements and other lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. W.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable dye laser suitable for differential absorption (DIAL) measurements of water vapor in the troposphere was constructed. A multi-pass absorption cell for calibration was also constructed for use in atmospheric DIAL measurements of water vapor.

  19. Air/Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    After 18 years of research into air/water pollution at Stennis Space Center, Dr. B. C. Wolverton formed his own company, Wolverton Environmental Services, Inc., to provide technology and consultation in air and water treatment. Common houseplants are used to absorb potentially harmful materials from bathrooms and kitchens. The plants are fertilized, air is purified, and wastewater is converted to clean water. More than 100 U.S. communities have adopted Wolverton's earlier water hyacinth and artificial marsh applications. Catfish farmers are currently evaluating the artificial marsh technology as a purification system.

  20. THz remote sensing for water vapor and cloud observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Ochiai, Satoshi; Mendrok, Jana; Baron, Philippe; Seta, Takamasa; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa

    Terahertz (THz) region (0.1-20 THz; 3.3-650 cm-1 ) plays important role for the Earth's radiation budget, for example, 1) Up to 75% of atmospheric OLR is beyond 650 cm-1 (19.5 THz). 2) Up to 50% of basic greenhouse effect, mainly due to the water vapor, is in THz/Far-IR. 3) Clear-sky cooling of free troposphere occurs in THz/far-IR. 4) Upper tropospheric H2O radiative feedback occurs THz/far-IR. Atmospheric radiation in THz-wave region is characterised by the emission from water vapour. In other word, THz radiation is favorable frequency for the remote sensing observation of water vapor. Furthermore, THz-wave might be powerful method to observe ice cloud because of the sensitivity of ice cloud in this frequency, example, the average size of the ice cloud -100micron is consistent to 3THz. Despite the importance for water vapor and ice cloud observation, there are not many observation so far, and still poor knowledge in the atmosphere. Main reason was the lack of the THz technology for the remote sensing observation in this frequency region. We are developing an NICT THz-wave remote sensing system to observe planetary atmosphere. Three researches are currently in progress: 1) Development of the THz-wave radiative transfer model both for clear and cloudy sky including laboratory experiment. 2) Feasibility study for satellite system 3) Development of the ground-based observation system for the demonstration in the city air. We will present the recent status of the THz remote sensing project in NICT, particularly the feasibility study for the water vapor and cloud observation system in THz-wave region from ground-based, air-borne, and satellite born system.

  1. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device...

  2. Quality and Control of Water Vapor Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from the geostationary satellites such as GOES, Meteosat, and GMS provides synoptic views of dynamical events on a continual basis. Because the imagery represents a non-linear combination of mid- and upper-tropospheric thermodynamic parameters (three-dimensional variations in temperature and humidity), video loops of these image products provide enlightening views of regional flow fields, the movement of tropical and extratropical storm systems, the transfer of moisture between hemispheres and from the tropics to the mid- latitudes, and the dominance of high pressure systems over particular regions of the Earth. Despite the obvious larger scale features, the water vapor imagery contains significant image variability down to the single 8 km GOES pixel. These features can be quantitatively identified and tracked from one time to the next using various image processing techniques. Merrill et al. (1991), Hayden and Schmidt (1992), and Laurent (1993) have documented the operational procedures and capabilities of NOAA and ESOC to produce cloud and water vapor winds. These techniques employ standard correlation and template matching approaches to wind tracking and use qualitative and quantitative procedures to eliminate bad wind vectors from the wind data set. Techniques have also been developed to improve the quality of the operational winds though robust editing procedures (Hayden and Veldon 1991). These quality and control approaches have limitations, are often subjective, and constrain wind variability to be consistent with model derived wind fields. This paper describes research focused on the refinement of objective quality and control parameters for water vapor wind vector data sets. New quality and control measures are developed and employed to provide a more robust wind data set for climate analysis, data assimilation studies, as well as operational weather forecasting. The parameters are applicable to cloud-tracked winds as well with minor

  3. AIRS Water Vapor and Cloud Products Validate and Explain Recent Short Term Decreases in Global and Tropical OLR as Observed by CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    A strong equatorial SST cooling occurred from 160E westward to 120W during the period of September 2002 through August 2010, surrounded by a weaker warming ring to the west. This is the result of a transition from a strong El Nino in late 2002 to a strong La Nina in 2008. Late 2009 is characterized by the beginning of another El Nino. Average rates of change (ARC's) in 500mb specific humidity and cloud cover are in phase with those in the Sea surface temperature (SST). In the El Nino and surrounding region causing outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), to decrease significantly near the dateline and increase in the vicinity of Indonesia. Tropical OLR ARC's in these two areas cancel each other to first order. The negative zonal mean tropical OLR ARC from a drop in equatorial OLR in region 1 from 140W to 40E. This results from increasing water vapor and cloud cover in this area during La Nina with the reverse holding during El Nino.

  4. Broad band airborne water vapor radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Peter M.

    An infrared radiometer with a pass band of 280 to 520 cm-1 (35.7 to 19.2 µm) is employed on the NASA Ames Research Center U-2 and C-141A aircraft in the measurement of water vapor burden in the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Coincidentally with altitude changes the water vapor mass mixing ratio is also inferred by observing the change in optical depth over a known vertical distance. Data from the December 1980 U-2 Water Vapor Exchange Experiment over the Panama Canal Zone adds to the concept that overshooting cumulonimbus towers “moisten” the lower stratosphere. The average mass mixing ratio in close proximity to or above such towers ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 parts per million above 18 km while the average background mass mixing ratio is only 2.9 parts per million. Generally the lowest background mixing ratios, averaging 2.6 parts per million occurred in the 18 to 21 km layer. For the same levels background Panama mass mixing ratios averaged from 1.0 to 3.0 parts per million higher than in middle latitudes.

  5. Triple isotope composition of oxygen in atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Ryu; Barkan, Eugeni; Abe, Osamu; Luz, Boaz

    2010-02-01

    Recently, an excess of 17O (17O-excess) has been demonstrated in meteoric water and ice cores. Based on theory and experiments, it has been suggested that this excess originates from evaporation of ocean water into under-saturated air. However, there has never been direct demonstration of this excess in marine vapor. Here, we present results of the first measurements of δ17O and δ18O in vapor samples collected over the South Indian and the Southern Oceans. Our data show the existence of 17O-excess in marine vapor and also clear negative correlation between 17O-excess and relative humidity. Thus, 17O-excess is useful for constraining oceanic humidity in hydrological and climatic models. Using the obtained values of 17O-excess, we estimated the fractionation factor between H218O and H216O for diffusion in air above the ocean (18αdiff). The new estimation of 18αdiff (1.008) is larger than the widely accepted value in hydrological studies.

  6. Water vapor interactions with polycrystalline titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, A.; Shamir, N.; Volterra, V.; Mintz, M. H.

    1999-02-01

    The initial interactions of water vapor with polycrystalline titanium surfaces were studied at room temperature. Measurements of water vapor surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analysis system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry (DRS), Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The kinetics of accommodation of the water dissociation fragments (H, O and OH) displayed a complex behavior depending not only on the exposure dose but also on the exposure pressure. For a given exposure dose the efficiency of chemisorption increased with increasing exposure pressure. DRS measurements indicated the occurrence of clustered hydroxyl moieties with tilted O-H bonds formed even at very low surface coverage. A model which assumes two parallel routes of chemisorption, by direct collisions (Langmuir type) and by a precursor state is proposed to account for the observed behavior. The oxidation efficiency of water seemed to be much lower than that of oxygen. No Ti 4+ states were detected even at high water exposure values. It is likely that hydroxyl species play an important role in the reduced oxidation efficiency of water.

  7. Water Vapor Effects on Silica-Forming Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Silica-forming ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 are proposed for applications in combustion environments. These environments contain water vapor as a product of combustion. Oxidation of silica-formers is more rapid in water vapor than in oxygen. Parabolic oxidation rates increase with the water vapor partial pressure with a power law exponent value close to one. Molecular water vapor is therefore the mobile species in silica. Rapid oxidation rates and large amounts of gases generated during the oxidation reaction in high water vapor pressures may result in bubble formation in the silica and nonprotective scale formation. It is also shown that silica reacts with water vapor to form Si(OH)4(g). Silica volatility has been modeled using a laminar flow boundary layer controlled reaction equation. Silica volatility depends on the partial pressure of water vapor, the total pressure, and the gas velocity. Simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions have been modeled with paralinear kinetics.

  8. Performance testing and analysis of vertical ambient air vaporizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. S.; Singh, V. N.; Shah, M. I.; Acharya, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient air vaporizers are used to regasify cryogenic liquids at extremely low temperature (below -153°C). Frost formation occurs on it due to large temperature difference between ambient air and cryogenic fluid. Frosting induces additional load on equipment and reduces its heat transfer effectiveness. Hence, mechanical and thermal design of vaporizers account for frosting. An experimental set-up has been designed and effects of flow rate and ground clearance on the performance of ambient air vaporizers are evaluated. The flow rate is increased from the rated capacity of 500 Nm3/h to 640 Nm3/h and ground clearance is reduced from 500 mm to 175 mm. The above variations reduce the time duration for which gaseous nitrogen is delivered at temperature higher than 10.1°C (desired). Hence duty cycle reduces from eight hours to five hours. The other factors affecting performance such as fin configuration, fluid type, fluid pressure, intermittent flow nature and climatic conditions are assumed to be constant over the test duration. The decrement in outlet gas temperature (from 38 °C to 10.1°C) with corresponding increment in frost thickness leads to deterioration of performance of ambient air vaporizers.

  9. Transient water vapor at Europa's south pole.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lorenz; Saur, Joachim; Retherford, Kurt D; Strobel, Darrell F; Feldman, Paul D; McGrath, Melissa A; Nimmo, Francis

    2014-01-10

    In November and December 2012, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaged Europa's ultraviolet emissions in the search for vapor plume activity. We report statistically significant coincident surpluses of hydrogen Lyman-α and oxygen OI 130.4-nanometer emissions above the southern hemisphere in December 2012. These emissions were persistently found in the same area over the 7 hours of the observation, suggesting atmospheric inhomogeneity; they are consistent with two 200-km-high plumes of water vapor with line-of-sight column densities of about 10(20) per square meter. Nondetection in November 2012 and in previous HST images from 1999 suggests varying plume activity that might depend on changing surface stresses based on Europa's orbital phases. The plume was present when Europa was near apocenter and was not detected close to its pericenter, in agreement with tidal modeling predictions.

  10. Daytime Raman lidar measurements of water vapor during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Goldsmith, J.E.M.

    1998-04-01

    Because of the importance of water vapor, the ARM program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its CART (Cloud And Radiation Testbed) site. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. These IOPs provided an excellent opportunity to compare measurements from other systems with those made by the CART Raman lidar. This paper addresses primarily the daytime water vapor measurements made by the lidar system during the second of these IOPs.

  11. Effects of vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature on total column water vapor retrieval error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Jielun

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a test of the physically based total column water vapor retrieval algorithm of Wentz (1992) for sensitivity to realistic vertical distributions of temperature and water vapor. The ECMWF monthly averaged temperature and humidity fields are used to simulate the spatial pattern of systematic retrieval error of total column water vapor due to this sensitivity. The estimated systematic error is within 0.1 g/sq cm over about 70 percent of the global ocean area; systematic errors greater than 0.3 g/sq cm are expected to exist only over a few well-defined regions, about 3 percent of the global oceans, assuming that the global mean value is unbiased.

  12. Fossil Fuel Combustion Fingerprint in High-Resolution Urban Water Vapor Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, G.; Good, S. P.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing energy consumption and rapid urbanization have many important and poorly understood consequences for the hydrologic cycle in urban and suburban areas. Wide use of fossil fuels for transportation and heating releases isotopically distinctive water vapor that contributes to the overall water vapor budget in varying, usually unknown, concentrations. The use of long term, high resolution isotopic measurements can help determine different sources and proportions of water vapor at various time scales. We present two months of high-resolution water vapor isotope measurements coupled with CO2 concentrations and co-located meteorological observations from December 2013 - January 2014 in Salt Lake City, UT. Periods of atmospheric stagnation (cold-air inversions) show a buildup of CO2 from baseline values of 420 ppm to as high as 600 ppm and an associated decrease in water vapor deuterium-excess values from a baseline of approx. 10‰ to values as low as -10‰ (where d = δ2H - 8*δ18O, in per mil units). We suggest that the strong relationship between CO2and d during inversion periods is driven by the build-up of fossil fuel combustion-derived water vapor with very low d values (≤ -150‰). Based on our measurements of its isotopic composition, combustion-derived water vapor could contribute as much as 15% to the total water vapor budget during inversion periods. We present evidence of this effect at both the multi-day scale and the diurnal scale, where periods of increased automobile use and home heating can be identified. This study provides the first isotopic evidence that accumulation of water of combustion can be identified in boundary layer water vapor, suggests that an appreciable fraction of boundary layer vapor can be derived from combustion under certain atmospheric conditions, and indicates that the distinctive d values of combustion-derived vapor may be a useful tracer for this component of the atmospheric water budget in other urban regions.

  13. Energy and water vapor transport in a turbulent stratified environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallana, Luca; de Santi, Francesca; Iovieno, Michele; Richiardone, Renzo; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations about the transport of kinetic energy and unsaturated water vapor across a thin layer which separates two decaying turbulent flows with different energy. This interface lies in a shearless stratified environment modeled by means of Boussinesq's approximation. Water vapor is treated as a passive scalar (Kumar et al. 2014). Initial conditions have Fr2 between 0.64 and 64 (stable case) and between -3.2 and -19 (unstable case) and Reλ = 250 . Dry air is in the lower half of the domain and has a higher turbulent energy, seven times higher than the energy of moist air in the upper half. In the early stage of evolution, as long as | F r2 | > 1 , stratification plays a minor role and the flows follows closely neutral stratification mixing. As the buoyancy terms grows, Fr2 ~ O (1) , the mixing process deeply changes. A stable stratification generates a separation layer which blocks the entrainment of dry air into the moist one, characterized by a relative increment of the turbulent dissipation rate compared to the local turbulent energy. On the contrary, an unstable stratification sligthy enhances the entrainment. Growth-decay of energy and mixing layer thichness are discussed and compared with laboratory and numerical experiments.

  14. Water vapor and methane in the upper stratosphere - An examination of some of the Nimbus 7 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Anthony R.; Robinson, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The zonal mean volume mixing ratios of water vapor and methane from January to May, 1979, derived from the Nimbus-7 limb IR monitor of the stratosphere and from stratosphere and mesosphere sounder experiments are investigated. The water vapor mixing ratio of air that enters the stratosphere from the troposphere and the yield of water vapor from photochemical oxidation of methane in the stratosphere are examined. The water vapor yield averaged between 1.5 and 2.0, although variability with time and level was relatively large. It is suggested that water vapor yield increases with height in the 16- to 3-mbar range. The average water vapor mixing ratio fo air entering the stratosphere during the study period was about 3.25 X 10 to the -6th.

  15. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  16. Investigation of the CARS spectrum of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, J. A.; Hall, R. J.; Eckbreth, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    The dependence of the coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) spectrum of water vapor on temperature has been measured and compared with CARS spectral model calculations to permit diagnostics of this important combustion product. Measurements have been made in a methane-air flame at 1700 K and in a heated cell, maintained at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 310 K and 710 K. The agreement between measured and calculated spectra is very good. The importance of assumed Raman linewidth is shown to be critical to the calculation of spectral features near the band head of measured spectra.

  17. Observation system simulation experiments using water vapor isotope information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kei; Miyoshi, Takemasa; Kanamitsu, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of water vapor isotopes (δ18O and δD) have dramatically increased in recent years with the availability of new spectroscopic technology. To utilize these data more efficiently, this study first developed a new data assimilation system using a local transform ensemble Kalman filter (LETKF) and the Isotope-incorporated Global Spectral Model (IsoGSM). An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) was then conducted. The OSSE used a synthetic data set of vapor isotope measurements, mimicking Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)-retrieved δD from the mid-troposphere, SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY)-retrieved δD from the water vapor column, and the virtual Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP)-like surface vapor isotope (both δD and δ18O) monitoring network. For TES and SCIAMACHY, we assumed a similar spatiotemporal coverage as that of the real data sets. For the virtual GNIP-like network, we assumed ~200 sites worldwide and 6-hourly measurements. An OSSE with 20 ensemble members was then conducted for January 2006. The results showed a significant improvement in not only the vapor isotopic field but also meteorological fields, such as wind speed, temperature, surface pressure, and humidity, when compared with a test with no observations. For surface air temperature, the global root mean square error has dropped by 10%, with 40-60% of the decrease occurring in the east-southeast Asia where the concentration of observations is relatively higher. When there is a conventional radiosonde network, the improvement gained by adding isotopic measurements was small but positive for all variables.

  18. Monitoring the water vapor isotopic composition in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveinbjornsdottir, A. E.; Steen-Larsen, H.; Jonsson, T.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Water stable isotopes have during many decades been used as climate proxies and indicators for variations in the hydrological cycle. However we are to a great extent still using simple empirical relationships without any deeper theoretical understanding. In order to properly relate changes in the climate and hydrological cycle to changes in the observed stable water isotopic signal we must understand the underlying physical processes. Furthermore it is a challenge for General Climate Models to adequately represent the isotopes in the hydrological cycle because of lack of in-situ measurements of the atmospheric water-vapor composition in the source regions. During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (from Los Gatos Research) in a lighthouse on the South Coast of Iceland (63.83 N 21.47W) with the plan to be operational for several years. The purpose of this installation was through monitoring of the water vapor isotopic composition to understand the physical processes governing the isotopic composition of the water vapor evaporated from the ocean as well as the processes of mixing between the free troposphere and marine boundary layer. Because of the remoteness of the monitoring site and simple topography we are able to isolate the 'fingerprint' on the isotopic signal in the water vapor from respectively the ocean and the interior highland leading to a near perfect case-study area. Using back-trajectories we find a strong influence of the origin of the air masses on the measured isotopic composition. The mixing of the marine-boundary layer is found to strongly influence the measured isotopic composition. The second order isotopic parameter, d-excess, is found to depend on both the isotopic composition as well as the relative humidity as prescribed by theories for evaporation from an ocean. The site likely represents a major source region for the moisture that later falls as snow on parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet. This leads to

  19. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in Water Vapor Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2003-01-01

    T-300 carbon fibers (BP Amoco Chemicals, Greenville, SC) are a common reinforcement for silicon carbide composite materials, and carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites (C/SiC) are proposed for use in space propulsion applications. It has been shown that the time to failure for C/SiC in stressed oxidation tests is directly correlated with the fiber oxidation rate (ref. 1). To date, most of the testing of these fibers and composites has been conducted in oxygen or air environments; however, many components for space propulsion, such as turbopumps, combustors, and thrusters, are expected to operate in hydrogen and water vapor (H2/H2O) environments with very low oxygen contents. The oxidation rate of carbon fibers in conditions representative of space propulsion environments is, therefore, critical for predicting component lifetimes for real applications. This report describes experimental results that demonstrate that, under some conditions, lower oxidation rates of carbon fibers are observed in water vapor and H2/H2O environments than are found in oxygen or air. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the weight loss of the fibers was studied as a function of water pressure, temperature, and gas velocity. The rate of carbon fiber oxidation was determined, and the reaction mechanism was identified.

  20. Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) using water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, K.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of water vapor isotopes (δ18O and δD) have been drastically increased these years with new technology, i.e., spectroscopic instruments both satellite-onboard and ground-based (in-situ) to improve our understanding of the hydrologic cycle in the atmosphere and land surface. To more efficiently utilize these data, this study first developed a new data assimilation system with Local Transform Ensemble Kalman Filter (LETKF) and Isotope-incorporated Global Spectral Model (IsoGSM). Then an observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) was conducted. This OSSE uses a mock dataset of vapor isotope measurements, namely TES/Aura retrieved δD at mid-troposphere, SCIAMACHY/Envisat retrieved δD at vapor column, and virtual GNIP-like vapor isotope (both δD and δ18O) monitoring network. We used historical retrieval numbers for TES and SCIAMACHY measurements, which are 15,000 and 10,000 data in January 2006. For virtual GNIP-like network, we assumed about 200 sites over the world, and 6-hourly measurement at 2m from surface. The accuracy of the measurements are 10‰ and 100‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively, including the uncertainty associated with representativeness of the data in space and time. Then the OSSE with 20 ensemble member was conducted for January 2006. The results are indeed remarkable. It showed significant improvement in not only vapor isotopic field but also meteorological fields, such as wind speed, temperature, surface pressure and humidity, comparing with a test without any observation. For surface air temperature, the global RMSE has dropped 10%, in which as large as 40-60% decrease is observed in east-southeast Asia area where the observation concentration is relatively higher. Most of the variables showed consistently similar feature. These results clearly show that the vapor isotope measurement definitely help to improve our understanding of hydrologic cycle through constraining with the data assimilation. RMSE of 6-hourly data for 2

  1. Air exchange rates and alternative vapor entry pathways to inform vapor intrusion exposure risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Willett, Evan J; Shirazi, Elham; Pennell, Kelly G

    2016-11-12

    Vapor intrusion (VI) is a term used to describe indoor air (IA) contamination that occurs due to the migration of chemical vapors in the soil and groundwater. The overall vapor transport process depends on several factors such as contaminant source characteristics, subsurface conditions, building characteristics, and general site conditions. However, the classic VI conceptual model does not adequately account for the physics of airflow around and inside a building and does not account for chemical emissions from alternative "preferential" pathways (e.g. sewers and other utility connections) into IA spaces. This mini-review provides information about recent research related to building air exchange rates (AERs) and alternative pathways to improve the accuracy of VI exposure risk assessment practices. First, results from a recently published AER study for residential homes across the United States (US) are presented and compared to AERs recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The comparison shows considerable differences in AERs when season, location, building age, and other factors are considered. These differences could directly impact VI assessments by influencing IA concentration measurements. Second, a conceptual model for sewer gas entry into buildings is presented and a summary of published field studies is reported. The results of the field studies suggest that alternative pathways for vapors to enter indoor spaces warrant consideration. Ultimately, the information presented in this mini-review can be incorporated into a multiple-lines-of-evidence approach for assessing site-specific VI exposure risks.

  2. Oxidation of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + 20v/0 SiC (HS), ZrB2 + 20v/0 SiC (ZS), and ZrB2 + 30v/0 C + 14v/0 SiC (ZCS) have been investigated for use as potential aeropropulsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90 percent) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 h at temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluated as a baseline for comparison. Weight change, X-ray diffraction analyses, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results are compared with tests ran in a stagnant air furnace at temperatures of 1327 C for 100 min, and with high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C at 6 atm for 50 h. Low velocity water vapor does not make a significant contribution to the oxidation rates of UHTCs when compared to stagnant air. The parabolic rate constants at 1300 C, range from 0.29 to 16.0 mg(sup 2)cm(sup 4)/h for HS and ZCS, respectively, with ZS results between these two values. Comparison of results for UHTCs tested in the furnace in 90 percent water vapor with HPBR results was difficult due to significant sample loss caused by spallation in the increased velocity of the HPBR. Total recession measurements are also reported for the two test environments.

  3. Column atmospheric water vapor retrievals from airborne imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1989-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts were derived from spectral data collected by the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The quantitative derivation is made by curve fitting observed spectra with calculated spectra in the 1.14- and 0.94-micron water-vapor band absorption regions with a nonlinear least-squares technique. The precision of the retrieved column water vapor is approximately 5 percent. The derived column water vapor amounts are independent of the absolute surface reflectance. Curve fitting of spectra near 1 micron from areas covered with vegetation indicates that both the amount of atmospheric water vapor and the moisture content of vegetation can be retrieved simultaneously. It should be possible to measure column water vapor over land areas from satellite altitude with the proposed high-resolution imaging spectrometer or even the moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer.

  4. The diel cycle of water vapor in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of small-scale (~100 km) atmospheric circulation in west Greenland which is dominated by interactions of marine and continental air masses. Water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios measured continuously over a 25 day period in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland were used to monitor the convergence of easterly katabatic winds and westerly sea breezes that form a front between the dry, isotopically depleted, glacial air mass and the moist, isotopically enriched, marine air mass. During the latter 16 days of the measurement period, an interval with no large-scale synoptic interference, the inland penetration of the sea breeze controlled the largest day-to-day humidity and vapor isotopic variations. Kangerlussuaq experienced sea breezes in the afternoon on 9 days, consistent with the long-term average of such occurrences on 56% of days in July and August. The inland position of the sea breeze front is controlled by the katabatic wind strength, which is stronger during times of reduced cloud coverage and/or higher-pressure gradient between the coast and the Greenland ice sheet. The position and movement of the front will likely respond to changes in the general atmospheric circulation and regional radiation balance resulting from global warming, which will, in turn, impact the local hydrological cycle and ecosystem processes.

  5. Water vapor measurements by Raman lidar during the ARM 1997 water vapor intensive observation period

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Whiteman, D.N.; Schwemmer, G.K.; Evans, K.D. |; Melfi, S.H.; Goldsmith, J.E.

    1998-04-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, as it is the most active infrared absorber and emitter of radiation, and it also plays an important role in energy transport and cloud formation. Accurate, high resolution measurements of this variable are critical in order to improve the understanding of these processes and thus their ability to model them. Because of the importance of water vapor, the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program initiated a series of three intensive operating periods (IOPs) at its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site in northern Oklahoma. The goal of these IOPs is to improve and validate the state-of-the-art capabilities in measuring water vapor. To date, two of the planned three IOPs have occurred: the first was in September of 1996, with an emphasis on the lowest kilometer, while the second was conducted from September--October 1997 with a focus on both the upper troposphere and lowest kilometer. The ARM CART site is the home of several different water vapor measurement systems. These systems include a Raman lidar, a microwave radiometer, a radiosonde launch site, and an instrumented tower. During these IOPs, additional instrumentation was brought to the site to augment the normal measurements in the attempt to characterize the CART instruments and to address the need to improve water vapor measurement capabilities. Some of the instruments brought to the CART site include a scanning Raman lidar system from NASA/GSFC, additional microwave radiometers from NOAA/ETL, a chilled mirror that was flown on a tethersonde and kite system, and dewpoint hygrometer instruments flow on the North Dakota Citation. This paper will focus on the Raman lidar intercomparisons from the second IOP.

  6. Modeling Extremely Deep Convection over North America as a Source of Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. S.; Clapp, C.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    We have run the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) at scales that numerically resolve convection over a broad swath of the north central U.S. Our intentions were to simulate convective events that generated stratospheric water vapor plumes observed during the SEAC4RS mission, to quantify the amount of water vapor injected into the stratosphere by extremely deep convection, and to investigate ARW as a potential tool to forecast multi-decadal trends in extremely deep convection over North America. We have run ARW for five and a half days beginning at 12 UTC on 26 August 2013 on a 3-km horizontal grid with 50 vertical levels. We used MERRA for the initial conditions and boundary conditions because of its skill in reanalysis of water vapor. ARW was able to simulate many of the fundamental features of deep convection over North America, including specific events. We have shown that the convection simulated by ARW bears many of the features of mesoscale convective systems, including the flow of cold air over warm moist air, cold downdrafts and gust fronts, mid-level inflow, and wedges reminiscent of squall lines. The source of water vapor for the convection is low-level eastward transport into the ARW domain. Convection is initiated where local maxima in equivalent potential temperature of surface air form. Convection regularly penetrates to the level of neutral buoyancy of the surface air and can even influence the concentration of water vapor above. A few convective events inject water vapor above the 400 K potential temperature surface. Surprisingly, deep convective events can also desiccate the upper air, even in the stratosphere. There is clear evidence of convection generating ducted internal gravity waves that propagate upstream to trigger more deep convection. We will present a quantification of the amount of water vapor injected into the stratosphere by extremely deep convection, the causes of desiccation, and the mechanisms

  7. Titanium Dioxide Volatility in High Temperature Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QynhGiao N.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) containing materials are of high interest to the aerospace industry due to its high temperature capability, strength, and light weight. As with most metals an exterior oxide layer naturally exists in environments that contain oxygen (i.e. air). At high temperatures, water vapor plays a key role in the volatility of materials including oxide surfaces. This study will evaluate cold pressed titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder pellets at a temperature range of 1400 C - 1200 C in water containing environments to determine the volatile hydroxyl species using the transpiration method. The water content ranged from 0-76 mole% and the oxygen content range was 0-100 mole % during the 20-250 hour exposure times. Preliminary results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor at these temperatures and the following reaction is the primary volatile equation for all three temperatures: TiO2 (s) + H2O (g) = TiO(OH)2 (g).

  8. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Stratospheric Middleworld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Podolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: Water vapor in the winter arctic stratospheric middleworld (that part of the stratosphere with potential temperatures lower than the tropical tropopause) is important for two reasons: (1) the arctic middleworld is a source of air for the upper troposphere because of the generally downward motion, and thus its water vapor content helps determine upper tropospheric water, a critical part of the earth's radiation budget; and (2) under appropriate conditions, relative humidities will be large even to the point of stratospheric cirrus cloud formation, leading to the production of active chlorine species that could destroy ozone. On a number of occasions during SOLVE, clouds were observed in the stratospheric middleworld by the DC-8 aircraft. The relationship between ozone and CO from aircraft measurements taken during the early, middle and late part of the winter of 1999-2000 show that recent mixing with tropospheric air extends up to ozone values of about 350-450 ppbv. Above that level, the relationship suggests stratospheric air with minimal tropospheric influence. The transition is quite abrupt, particularly in early spring. Trajectory analyses are consistent with these relationships, with a significant drop-off in the percentage of trajectories with tropospheric PV values in their 10-day history as in-situ ozone increases above 400 ppbv. The water distribution is affected by these mixing characteristics, and by cloud formation. Significant cloud formation along trajectories occurs up to ozone values of about 400 ppbv during the early spring, with small, but nonzero probabilities extending to 550 ppbv. Cloud formation in the stratospheric middleworld is minimal during early and midwinter. Also important is the fact that, during early spring 30% of the trajectories near the tropopause (ozone values less than 200 ppbv) have minimum saturation mixing ratios less than 5 ppmv. Such parcels can mix out into the troposphere and could lead to very dry conditions in

  9. Interaction of gases with lunar materials. [surface properties of lunar fines, especially on exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties of lunar fines were investigated. Results indicate that, for the most part, these properties are independent of the chemical composition and location of the samples on the lunar surface. The leaching of channels and pores by adsorbed water vapor is a distinguishing feature of their surface chemistry. The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, severely impedes the leaching process. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains. The characteristics of Apollo 17 orange fines were evaluated and compared with those of other samples. The interconnecting channels produced by water vapor adsorption were found to be wider than usual for other types of fines. Damage tracks caused by heavy cosmic ray nuclei and an unusually high halogen content might provide for stronger etching conditions upon exposure to water vapor.

  10. Evaluation of the Water Vapor Transport over the Yellow River Basin in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jiawei; Feng, Jinming

    2014-05-01

    Temperature, precipitation and water vapor transport in China, particularly in the Yellow River Basin simulated by the 16 models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) were evaluated for the period 1979-2005. Results suggest that most CMIP5 models are able to capture the climatological distribution patterns and inter-annual variations of surface air temperature, but with cold bias. Most models reproduce the spatial distribution pattern of warming trends identical with observations. Models tend to overestimate precipitation with relative biases ranging from 4.59 % to 61.46 %. Compared with observations, most models simulate more precipitation over the east of Tibetan Plateau and less in southeastern coastal regions. The spatial distribution of precipitation trends displayed in the observations cannot be well simulated by most models. The underestimation of temperature and the overestimation of precipitation simulated by some models over the east of Tibetan Plateau may be related to the anomalously strong western Pacific subtropical high and sufficient water vapor transport from Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean. In terms of the Yellow River Basin, modeled water vapor mainly flows in from eastern boundary and out from the western boundary. Water vapor also flows in through the southern boundary, but with smaller intensity. Owing to the overestimation of water vapor convergence, some models tend to exaggerate the climatological precipitation. Additionally, we found that the summer water vapor budget and precipitation keep pace with each other, which is well reflected by the FIO-ESM model. Models can also reproduce this relation in the lower reaches, with the total water vapor budget correlated strongly with water vapor transport from eastern, western and southern boundaries, indicating that water vapor budget and even the precipitation are strongly influenced by the water vapor transport from Indian Ocean and western

  11. Water vapor permeabilities through polymers: diffusivities from experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seethamraju, Sindhu; Chandrashekarapura Ramamurthy, Praveen; Madras, Giridhar

    2014-09-01

    This study experimentally determines water vapor permeabilities, which are subsequently correlated with the diffusivities obtained from simulations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for determining the diffusion of water vapor in various polymeric systems such as polyethylene, polypropylene, poly (vinyl alcohol), poly (vinyl acetate), poly (vinyl butyral), poly (vinylidene chloride), poly (vinyl chloride) and poly (methyl methacrylate). Cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) based methodology has been used to determine the water vapor transmission rates. These values were then used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for water vapor through these polymers. A comparative analysis is provided for diffusivities calculated from CRDS and MD based results by correlating the free volumes.

  12. Water Vapor Remote Sensing Techniques: Radiometry and Solar Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somieski, A.; Buerki, B.; Cocard, M.; Geiger, A.; Kahle, H.-G.

    The high variability of atmospheric water vapor content plays an important role in space geodesy, climatology and meteorology. Water vapor has a strong influence on transatmospheric satellite signals, the Earth's climate and thus the weather forecasting. Several remote sensing techniques have been developed for the determination of inte- grated precipitable water vapor (IPWV). The Geodesy and Geodynamics Lab (GGL) utilizes the methods of Water Vapor Radiometry and Solar Spectrometry to quantify the amount of tropospheric water vapor and its temporal variations. The Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR) measures the radiation intensity of the atmosphere in a frequency band ranging from 20 to 32 GHz. The Solar Atmospheric MOnitoring Spectrome- ter (SAMOS) of GGL is designed for high-resolution measurements of water vapor absorption lines using solar radiation. In the framework of the ESCOMPTE (ExpÊrience sur Site pour COntraindre les Mod- Éles de Pollution atmosphÊrique et de Transport d'Emissions) field campaign these instruments have been operated near Marseille in 2001. They have aquired a long time series of integrated precipitable water vapor content (IPWV). The accuracy of IPWV measured by WVR and SAMOS is 1 kg/m2. Furthermore meteorological data from radiosondes were used to calculate the IPWV in order to provide comparisons with the results of WVR and SAMOS. The methods of Water Vapor Radiometry and So- lar Spectrometry will be discussed and first preliminary results retrieved from WVR, SAMOS and radiosondes during the ESCOMPTE field campaign will be presented.

  13. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  14. Holographic studies of the vapor explosion of vaporizing water-in-fuel emulsion droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Hess, C. F.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Holographic studies were performed which examined the fragmentation process during vapor explosion of a water-in-fuel (hexadecane/water) emulsion droplet. Holograms were taken at 700 to 1000 microseconds after the vapor explosion. Photographs of the reconstructed holograms reveal a wide range of fragment droplet sizes created during the explosion process. Fragment droplet diameters range from below 10 microns to over 100 microns. It is estimated that between ten thousand and a million fragment droplets can result from this extremely violent vapor explosion process. This enhanced atomization is thus expected to have a pronounced effect on vaporization processes which are present during combustion of emulsified fuels.

  15. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures.

  16. Impacts of Changes of Indoor Air Pressure and Air Exchange Rate in Vapor Intrusion Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rui; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    There has, in recent years, been increasing interest in understanding the transport processes of relevance in vapor intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings on contaminated sites. These studies have included fate and transport modeling. Most such models have simplified the prediction of indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations by employing a steady state assumption, which often results in difficulties in reconciling these results with field measurements. This paper focuses on two major factors that may be subject to significant transients in vapor intrusion situations, including the indoor air pressure and the air exchange rate in the subject building. A three-dimensional finite element model was employed with consideration of daily and seasonal variations in these factors. From the results, the variations of indoor air pressure and air exchange rate are seen to contribute to significant variations in indoor air contaminant vapor concentrations. Depending upon the assumptions regarding the variations in these parameters, the results are only sometimes consistent with the reports of several orders of magnitude in indoor air concentration variations from field studies. The results point to the need to examine more carefully the interplay of these factors in order to quantitatively understand the variations in potential indoor air exposures. PMID:28090133

  17. Advanced Water Vapor Lidar Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1998-01-01

    In the present water vapor lidar system, the detected signal is sent over long cables to a waveform digitizer in a CAMAC crate. This has the disadvantage of transmitting analog signals for a relatively long distance, which is subjected to pickup noise, leading to a decrease in the signal to noise ratio. Generally, errors in the measurement of water vapor with the DIAL method arise from both random and systematic sources. Systematic errors in DIAL measurements are caused by both atmospheric and instrumentation effects. The selection of the on-line alexandrite laser with a narrow linewidth, suitable intensity and high spectral purity, and its operation at the center of the water vapor lines, ensures minimum influence in the DIAL measurement that are caused by the laser spectral distribution and avoid system overloads. Random errors are caused by noise in the detected signal. Variability of the photon statistics in the lidar return signal, noise resulting from detector dark current, and noise in the background signal are the main sources of random error. This type of error can be minimized by maximizing the signal to noise ratio. The increase in the signal to noise ratio can be achieved by several ways. One way is to increase the laser pulse energy, by increasing its amplitude or the pulse repetition rate. Another way, is to use a detector system with higher quantum efficiency and lower noise, on the other hand, the selection of a narrow band optical filter that rejects most of the day background light and retains high optical efficiency is an important issue. Following acquisition of the lidar data, we minimize random errors in the DIAL measurement by averaging the data, but this will result in the reduction of the vertical and horizontal resolutions. Thus, a trade off is necessary to achieve a balance between the spatial resolution and the measurement precision. Therefore, the main goal of this research effort is to increase the signal to noise ratio by a factor of

  18. MoSi 2 Oxidation in 670-1498 K Water Vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Sooby Wood, Elizabeth; Parker, Stephen S.; Nelson, Andrew T.; ...

    2016-03-08

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) has well documented oxidation resistance at high temperature (T > 1273 K) in dry O2 containing atmospheres due to the formation of a passive SiO2 surface layer. But, its behavior under atmospheres where water vapor is the dominant species has received far less attention. Oxidation testing of MoSi2 was performed at temperatures ranging from 670–1498 K in both 75% water vapor and synthetic air (Ar-O2, 80%–20%) containing atmospheres. Here the thermogravimetric and microscopy data describing these phenomena are presented. Over the temperature range investigated, MoSi2 displays more mass gain in water vapor than in air. The oxidationmore » kinetics observed in water vapor differ from that of the air samples. Two volatile oxides, MoO2(OH)2 and Si(OH)4, are thought to be the species responsible for the varied kinetics, at 670–877 K and at 1498 K, respectively. Finally, we observed an increase in oxidation (140–300 mg/cm2) from 980–1084 K in water vapor, where passivation is observed in air.« less

  19. MoSi 2 Oxidation in 670-1498 K Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Sooby Wood, Elizabeth; Parker, Stephen S.; Nelson, Andrew T.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Butt, D.

    2016-03-08

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) has well documented oxidation resistance at high temperature (T > 1273 K) in dry O2 containing atmospheres due to the formation of a passive SiO2 surface layer. But, its behavior under atmospheres where water vapor is the dominant species has received far less attention. Oxidation testing of MoSi2 was performed at temperatures ranging from 670–1498 K in both 75% water vapor and synthetic air (Ar-O2, 80%–20%) containing atmospheres. Here the thermogravimetric and microscopy data describing these phenomena are presented. Over the temperature range investigated, MoSi2 displays more mass gain in water vapor than in air. The oxidation kinetics observed in water vapor differ from that of the air samples. Two volatile oxides, MoO2(OH)2 and Si(OH)4, are thought to be the species responsible for the varied kinetics, at 670–877 K and at 1498 K, respectively. Finally, we observed an increase in oxidation (140–300 mg/cm2) from 980–1084 K in water vapor, where passivation is observed in air.

  20. Measurement of atmospheric precipitable water using a solar radiometer. [water vapor absorption effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Dillinger, A. E.; Mcallum, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described and tested that allows the determination of atmospheric precipitable water from two measurements of solar intensity: one in a water-vapor absorption band and another in a nearby spectral region unaffected by water vapor.

  1. Vapor Transport Modeling of Continental Water Isotope Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritch, A. J.; Caves, J. K.; Ibarra, D. E.; Winnick, M. J.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes have been widely used to reconstruct past climatic conditions and topographic histories of mountain belts. However, many studies do not account for the influences of evapotranspiration and vapor recycling on downstream meteoric water isotopic compositions. Here we present a case study of the modern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range to illustrate the value of using process-based models across larger spatial scales to reconstruct the conditions driving local- to regional-scale water isotopic compositions. We use a one-dimensional reactive vapor transport model, driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) high-resolution North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset, to simulate the isotopic composition of modern meteoric waters (δ18O and δD) along storm tracks across the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range. Storm track pathways are generated using NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory's Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, we couple the vapor transport model with a soil moisture model to simulate depth profiles of the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonate along our storm tracks. We show that, given reasonable estimates of the modern partitioning between evaporation and transpiration, our model output is in agreement with modern isotopic data both from compilations of published meteoric water samples and from newly collected soil carbonate samples along a transect across the northern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range (~38-42° N). These results demonstrate that our modeling approach can be used to analyze the relative contributions of climate and topography to observed isotopic gradients. Future studies can apply this modeling framework to isotopes preserved in the geologic record to provide a quantitative means of understanding the paleoclimatic influences on spatial isotopic distributions.

  2. Water Vapor Enhancement in Prescribed Fire Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, C. M.; Clements, C. B.; Potter, B. E.; Strenfel, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    In situ radiosonde measurements were obtained during multiple prescribed fires at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center at Ichauway, Georgia in March and July of 2008. Data were obtained from prescribed fires conducted in longleaf pine ecosystems. After significant smoke generation was observed, radiosondes were launched downwind of the fire front and rose directly into the smoke plumes. Radiosondes were also launched before each burn to obtain ambient background conditions. This provided a unique dataset of smoke plume moisture to determine how moisture enhancement from fire smoke alters the dynamics of the smoke plume. Preliminary analysis of results show moisture enhancement occurred in all smoke plumes with relative humidity values increasing by 10 to 30 percent and water vapor mixing ratios increasing by 1 to 4 g kg-1. Understanding the moisture enhancement in prescribed fire smoke plumes will help determine the convective dynamics that occur in major wildland fires and convection columns.

  3. Reduction of Legionella spp. in water and in soil by a citrus plant extract vapor.

    PubMed

    Laird, Katie; Kurzbach, Elena; Score, Jodie; Tejpal, Jyoti; Chi Tangyie, George; Phillips, Carol

    2014-10-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by Legionella spp., organisms often isolated from environmental sources, including soil and water. Legionella spp. are capable of replicating intracellularly within free-living protozoa, and once this has occurred, Legionella is particularly resistant to disinfectants. Citrus essential oil (EO) vapors are effective antimicrobials against a range of microorganisms, with reductions of 5 log cells ml(-1) on a variety of surfaces. The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of a citrus EO vapor against Legionella spp. in water and in soil systems. Reductions of viable cells of Legionella pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii, and an intra-amoebal culture of Legionella pneumophila (water system only) were assessed in soil and in water after exposure to a citrus EO vapor at concentrations ranging from 3.75 mg/liter air to 15g/liter air. Antimicrobial efficacy via different delivery systems (passive and active sintering of the vapor) was determined in water, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the antimicrobial components (linalool, citral, and β-pinene) was conducted. There was up to a 5-log cells ml(-1) reduction in Legionella spp. in soil after exposure to the citrus EO vapors (15 mg/liter air). The most susceptible strain in water was L. pneumophila, with a 4-log cells ml(-1) reduction after 24 h via sintering (15 g/liter air). Sintering the vapor through water increased the presence of the antimicrobial components, with a 61% increase of linalool. Therefore, the appropriate method of delivery of an antimicrobial citrus EO vapor may go some way in controlling Legionella spp. from environmental sources.

  4. Reduction of Legionella spp. in Water and in Soil by a Citrus Plant Extract Vapor

    PubMed Central

    Kurzbach, Elena; Score, Jodie; Tejpal, Jyoti; Chi Tangyie, George; Phillips, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by Legionella spp., organisms often isolated from environmental sources, including soil and water. Legionella spp. are capable of replicating intracellularly within free-living protozoa, and once this has occurred, Legionella is particularly resistant to disinfectants. Citrus essential oil (EO) vapors are effective antimicrobials against a range of microorganisms, with reductions of 5 log cells ml−1 on a variety of surfaces. The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of a citrus EO vapor against Legionella spp. in water and in soil systems. Reductions of viable cells of Legionella pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii, and an intra-amoebal culture of Legionella pneumophila (water system only) were assessed in soil and in water after exposure to a citrus EO vapor at concentrations ranging from 3.75 mg/liter air to 15g/liter air. Antimicrobial efficacy via different delivery systems (passive and active sintering of the vapor) was determined in water, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the antimicrobial components (linalool, citral, and β-pinene) was conducted. There was up to a 5-log cells ml−1 reduction in Legionella spp. in soil after exposure to the citrus EO vapors (15 mg/liter air). The most susceptible strain in water was L. pneumophila, with a 4-log cells ml−1 reduction after 24 h via sintering (15 g/liter air). Sintering the vapor through water increased the presence of the antimicrobial components, with a 61% increase of linalool. Therefore, the appropriate method of delivery of an antimicrobial citrus EO vapor may go some way in controlling Legionella spp. from environmental sources. PMID:25063652

  5. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  6. Operating a radio-frequency plasma source on water vapor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sonca V T; Foster, John E; Gallimore, Alec D

    2009-08-01

    A magnetically enhanced radio-frequency (rf) plasma source operating on water vapor has an extensive list of potential applications. In this work, the use of a rf plasma source to dissociate water vapor for hydrogen production is investigated. This paper describes a rf plasma source operated on water vapor and characterizes its plasma properties using a Langmuir probe, a residual gas analyzer, and a spectrometer. The plasma source operated first on argon and then on water vapor at operating pressures just over 300 mtorr. Argon and water vapor plasma number densities differ significantly. In the electropositive argon plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i) approximately = n(e), where n(i) is the positive ion density. But in the electronegative water plasma, quasineutrality requires n(i+) = n(i-) + n(e). The positive ion density and electron density of the water vapor plasma are approximately one and two orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of argon plasma. These results suggest that attachment and dissociative attachment are present in electronegative water vapor plasma. The electron temperature for this water vapor plasma source is between 1.5 and 4 eV. Without an applied axial magnetic field, hydrogen production increases linearly with rf power. With an axial magnetic field, hydrogen production jumps to a maximum value at 500 W and then saturates with rf power. The presence of the applied axial magnetic field is therefore shown to enhance hydrogen production.

  7. Water Vapor Desorption Characteristics of Honeycomb Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto; Okamoto, Tamio; Seo, Jeong-Kyun

    This paper describes the water vapor desorption characteristics of honeycomb shape type sorbent element containing new organic sorbent of the bridged complex of sodium polyacrylate. The transient experiments in which the dry air was passed into the honeycomb type sorbent element sorbed water vapor were carried out under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. The obtained data for desorption process were compared with those for sorption process. Finally, Sherwood number of mass transfer of the organic sorbent for desorption process was derived in terms of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  8. MODELING THE EFFECT OF WATER VAPOR ON THE INTERFACIAL BEHAVIOR OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE AIR IN CONTACT WITH Fe20Cr SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; Cole, David R

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to provide an atomistic view, via molecular dynamic simulation, of the contrasting interfacial behavior between high temperature dry- and (10-40 vol%) wet-air in contact with stainless steels as represented by Fe20Cr. It was found that H2O preferentially adsorbs and displaces oxygen at the metal/fluid interface. Comparison of these findings with experimental studies reported in the literature is discussed. Keywords: Fe-Cr alloys, metal-fluid interfacial behavior, wet-air, molecular simulation

  9. SPADE H2O measurements and the seasonal cycle of statospheric water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintsa, Eric J.; Weinstock, Elliot M.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Anderson, James G.; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present measurements of lower statospheric water vapor obtained during the Stratospheric Phototchemistry, Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) mission with a new high precision, fast response, Lyman-alpha hygrometer. The H2O data show a distinct seasonal cycle. For air that recently entered the statosphere, data collected during the fall show much more water vapor than data from the spring. Fast quasi-horizontal mixing causes compact relationships between water and N2O to be established on relatively short time scales. The measurements are consistent with horizontal mixing times of a few months or less. Vertical mixing appears to cause the seasonal variations in water vapor to propagate up to levels corresponding to air that has been in the stratosphere approximately one year.

  10. Is There Evidence of Convectively Injected Water Vapor in the Lowermost Stratosphere Over Boulder, Colorado?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Davis, S. M.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson et al. (2012) reported the frequent presence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere over North America during summertime, based on aircraft measurements. They asserted that enhanced catalytic ozone destruction within these wet stratospheric air parcels presents a concern for UV dosages in populated areas, especially if the frequency of deep convective events increases. Schwartz et al.(2013) analyzed 8 years of more widespread Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor over North America and concluded that anomalously wet (>8 ppm) air parcels were present only 2.5% of the time during July and August. However, given the 3-km vertical resolution of MLS water vapor retrievals in the lowermost stratosphere, thin wet layers deposited by overshooting convection may be present but not readily detectable by MLS. Since 1980 the balloon-borne NOAA frost point hygrometer (FPH) has produced nearly 400 high quality water vapor profiles over Boulder, Colorado, at 5-m vertical resolution from the surface to the middle stratosphere. The 34-year record of high-resolution FPH profiles obtained over Boulder during summer months is evaluated for evidence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere. A number of approaches are used to assess the contributions of deep convection to the Boulder stratospheric water vapor record. The results are compared to those based on MLS profiles over Boulder and the differences are discussed. Anderson, J. G., D. M. Wilmouth, J. B. Smith, and D. S. Sayres (2012), UV dosage levels in summer: Increased risk of ozone loss from convectively injected water vapor, Science, 337(6096), 835-839, doi:10.1126/science.1222978. Schwartz, M. J., W. G. Read, M. L. Santee, N. J. Livesey, L. Froidevaux, A. Lambert, and G. L. Manney (2013), Convectively injected water vapor in the North American summer lowermost stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2316-2321, doi:10

  11. Putting Water Vapor Feedback Back On It's Feet (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. L.; Cai, M.; Stackhouse, P. W.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2009-12-01

    Authors: Stephens, Graeme L., Ming Cai, Paul Stackhouse, and Tristan L'Ecuyer It has been understood for some time that changes to the strength of the greenhouse effect are fundamental to our understanding of global warming. The role of the positive water vapor feedback that occurs through the connections between temperature, water vapor, and emission of infrared radiation has also been equally understood for some time. Recently, debate about the magnitude of this feedback has mostly focused on the role of changes to tiny amounts of water vapor high in the troposphere on atmospheric emission and it's now perceived by many that the water vapor climate feedback is entirely defined by changes to upper tropospheric water vapor through its influence on the outgoing longwave radiation. This talk will demonstrate this isn't entirely correct and will demonstrate the fundamental importance of the downward longwave radiation to the surfaces as the driving force of the water vapor feedback. Our current state of knowledge of the DLR will be reviewed by comparing various data sources that have been used to create global composites of this quantity, including new data from the A-Train. The role of DLR in climate change through the water vapor feedback and it's control of global precipitation is also discussed highlighting it's relation to low level water vapor.

  12. Water Vapor Monitoring at the Roque de LOS Muchachos Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Kidger, M.; del Rosario, J. C.; Trancho, G.

    1997-12-01

    We present the first results from a long-term campaign of water vapor monitoring at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain). This observatory is situated on a volcanic peak, on the small island of La Palma. Although its altitude is relatively low (2400 meters), our initial site-testing, taken for site selection for the Spanish 10m telescope project, shows that a significant fraction of nights have water vapor column of 1mm, or lower, with values of 2mm and lower being relatively common, even in summer. The water vapor column can be stable at under 1mm for several nights, with only minimal variations. We contrast the results obtained using an infrared radiometer (on loan from Kitt Peak National Observatory), with those obtained using the 940nm water vapor line and comment briefly on plans for future automatic monitoring of water vapor at the observatory.

  13. Confirmation of Europa's water vapor plume activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2013-10-01

    STIS spectral UV images of Jupiter's satellite Europa obtained during HST Cycle 20 revealed atomic H and O auroral emissions in intensity ratios which uniquely identify the source as electron impact excitation of water molecules above Europa's south pole and hypothesized to be associated with water vapor plumes as reported in Roth et al., Science, 2014. The plumes were detected when Europa was at apocenter on December 30/31, 2012. Two other sets of STIS observations when Europa was near pericenter did not show plume emission within the sensitivity of STIS. The plume variability is predicted to be correlated with Europa's distance from Jupiter in the observed way. However, the one plume detection at apocenter and the two non-detections near pericenter require confirmation. Therefore we request two visits of 5 orbits each to observe Europa at orbital positions of the predicted maximum plume activity {similar to the December 2012 STIS Europa visit} to provide confirmation of the initial STIS discovery and to consolidate the predicted geophysical variability pattern.

  14. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent rotor. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the rotor block. Overall transfer coefficients were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was examined that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer coefficient was not constant. It seems that both film fluid and diffusion resistance govern the coefficients in the block, and the influence of air flow on the time averaged coefficients is estimated by a considering the laminar forced convection from a flat plate. There is little difference of the coefficient between adsorption and desorption process. The correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  15. Latitudinal change in precipitation and water vapor isotopes over Southern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, P.

    2015-12-01

    The evaporation process over ocean is primary source of water vapor in the hydrological cycle. The Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) dataset of rainwater and water vapor isotopes are predominantly based on continental observations, with very limited observation available from the oceanic area. Stable isotope ratios in precipitation provide valuable means to understand the process of evaporation and transport of water vapor. This is further extended in the study of past changes in climate from the isotopic composition of ice core. In this study we present latitudinal variability of water vapor and rainwater isotopic composition and compared it with factors like physical condition of sea surface water from near equator (1°S) to the polar front (56°S) during the summer time expedition of the year 2013. The water vapor and rainwater isotopes showed a sharp depletion in isotopes while progressively move southward from the tropical regions (i.e. >30°S), which follows the pattern recorded in the surface ocean water isotopic composition. From the tropics to the southern latitudes, the water vapor d18O varied between -11.8‰ to -14.7‰ while dD variation ranges between -77.7‰ to -122.2‰. Using the data we estimated the expected water vapor isotopic composition under kinetic as well as equilibrium process. Our observation suggests that the water vapor isotopic compositions are in equilibrium with the sea water in majority of cases. At one point of observation, where trajectory of air parcel originated from the continental region, we observed a large deviation from the existing trend of latitudinal variability. The deduced rainwater composition adopting equilibrium model showed a consistent pattern with observed values at the tropical region, while role of kinetic process become dominant on progressive shift towards the southern latitudes. We will draw comparison of our observation with other data available in the literature together with isotope

  16. Influence of air velocity on the habit of ice crystal growth from the vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Hallett, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of air velocity on the growth behavior of ice crystals growing from water vapor was investigated at temperatures between 0 and -35 C and at supersaturation levels ranging from 2 to 40 percent, using a laboratory chamber in which it was possible to make these variations. It was found that crystal growth was most sensitive to changes in the air velocity at temperatures near -4 C and -15 C where, near water saturation, the introduction of only a 5 cm/s air velocity induced skeletal transitions (columns to needles near -4 C and plates to dendrites near -15 C). The experiments provide conditions which simulate growth of ice crystals in the atmosphere, where crystal growth takes place at or somewhat below water saturation.

  17. Injection of lightning-produced NOx, water vapor, wildfire emissions, and stratospheric air to the UT/LS as observed from DC3 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Scheibe, M.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schlager, H.; Pucik, T.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Heimerl, K.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Honomichl, S.; Ridley, B. A.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Betten, D. P.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Schwartz, M. J.; Barth, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    During the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment in summer 2012, airborne measurements were performed in the anvil inflow/outflow of thunderstorms over the Central U.S. by three research aircraft. A general overview of Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)-Falcon in situ measurements (CO, O3, SO2, CH4, NO, NOx, and black carbon) is presented. In addition, a joint flight on 29 May 2012 in a convective line of isolated supercell storms over Oklahoma is described based on Falcon, National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research Gulfstream-V (NSF/NCAR-GV), and NASA-DC8 trace species in situ and lidar measurements. During DC3 some of the largest and most destructive wildfires in New Mexico and Colorado state's history were burning, which strongly influenced air quality in the DC3 thunderstorm inflow and outflow region. Lofted biomass burning (BB) plumes were frequently observed in the mid- and upper troposphere (UT) in the vicinity of deep convection. The impact of lightning-produced NOx (LNOx) and BB emissions was analyzed on the basis of mean vertical profiles and tracer-tracer correlations (CO-NOx and O3-NO). On a regular basis DC3 thunderstorms penetrated the tropopause and injected large amounts of LNOx into the lower stratosphere (LS). Inside convection, low O3 air (~80 nmol mol-1) from the lower troposphere was rapidly transported to the UT/LS region. Simultaneously, O3-rich stratospheric air masses (~100-200 nmol mol-1) were present around and below the thunderstorm outflow and enhanced UT-O3 mixing ratios significantly. A 10 year global climatology of H2O data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder confirmed that the Central U.S. is a preferred region for convective injection into the LS.

  18. Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    4/11/2012 1 Quantitative Passive Diffusive Sampling for Assessing Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Todd McAlary and Hester Groenevelt, Geosyntec... Intrusion to Indoor Air 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...10-6 risk (ppb) Vapour pressure (atm) Water solubility (g/l) 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 110 400 0.16 1.33 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene

  19. Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1999-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore

  20. Influence of liquid water and water vapor on antimisting kerosene (AMK)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarolouki, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the compatibility of liquid water and water vapor with antimisting kerosenes (AMK) containing polymer additive FM-9 developed by Imperial Chemical Industries. This effort consists of the determination of water solubility in AMK, influence of water on restoration (degradation) of AMK, and effect of water on standard AMK quality control methods. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: (1) the uptake of water in AMK critically depends upon the degree of agitation and can be as high as 1300 ppm at 20 C, (2) more than 250 to 300 ppm of water in AMK causes an insoluble second phase to form. The amount of this second phase depends on fuel temperature, agitation, degree of restoration (degradation) and the water content of the fuel, (3) laboratory scale experiments indicate precipitate formation when water vapor comes in contact with cold fuel surfaces at a much lower level of water (125 to 150 ppm), (4) precipitate formation is very pronounced in these experiments where humid air is percolated through a cold fuel (-20 C), (5) laboratory tests further indicate that water droplet settling time is markedly reduced in AMK as compared to jet A, (6) limited low temperature testing down to -30 C under laboratory conditions indicates the formation of stable, transparent gels.

  1. Observed Increase of TTL Temperature and Water Vapor in Polluted Couds over Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, J.; Read, William G.; Massie, Steven T.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Colarco, Peter; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2011-06-01

    Aerosols can affect cloud particle size and lifetime, which impacts precipitation, radiation and climate. Previous studies1-4 suggested that reduced ice cloud particle size and fall speed due to the influence of aerosols may increase evaporation of ice crystals and/or cloud radiative heating in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), leading to higher water vapor abundance in air entering the stratosphere. Observational substantiation of such processes is still lacking. Here, we analyze new observations from multiple NASA satellites to show the imprint of pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. We focus our analysis on the highly-polluted South and East Asia region during boreal summer. We find that "polluted" ice clouds have smaller ice effective radius than "clean" clouds. In the TTL, the polluted clouds are associated with warmer temperature and higher specific humidity than the clean clouds. The water vapor difference between the polluted and clean clouds cannot be explained by other meteorological factors, such as updraft and detrainment strength. Therefore, the observed higher water vapor entry value into the stratosphere in the polluted clouds than in the clean clouds is likely a manifestation of aerosol pollution influence on stratospheric water vapor. Given the radiative and chemical importance of stratospheric water vapor, the increasing emission of aerosols over Asia may have profound impacts on stratospheric chemistry and global energy balance and water cycle.

  2. The Reaction Kinetics of LiD with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M; Dinh, L N; Calef, D F

    2003-04-01

    The interaction of LiD with water vapor in the partial pressure range of 10{sup -7} Torr to 20 Torr has been investigated. The reaction probability of water with pure LiD cleaved in an ultra high vacuum environment was obtained using the modulated molecular beam technique. This probability was 0.11 and independent of LiD surface temperature suggesting a negligible activation energy for the reaction in agreement with quantum chemical calculations. The value gradually reduced, however, to .007 as the surface concentration of oxygen containing product (LiOH), which was monitored in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy on the reaction zone, approached full coverage. As the hydroxide film grew beyond a monolayer, the phase lag of hydrogen product increased from zero to 20 degrees and the reaction probability reduced further until it approached our detection limit ({approx} 10{sup -4}). This phase lag was attributed to a diffusion limited process in this regime. In separate experiments, the film growth has been studied in nitrogen atmosphere with 100% relative humidity using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and in air with 50% relative humidity utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For exposures to environment with high water concentrations and for micrometer thick films, the reaction probability reduced to 4 x 10{sup -7} and was independent of exposure time, The lattice diffusion through the film was no longer controlling the transport of water to the LiD/LiOH interface. Microcracks generated in the film to release stress provided easier pathways to the interface. A modified microscope, capable of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation, was employed to investigate the surface morphology of LiOH.H{sub 2}O grown on LiOH at high water vapor partial pressures and the kinetics of this growth.

  3. Injection of Lightning-Produced NOx, Water Vapor, Wildfire Emissions, and Stratospheric Air to the UT/LS as Observed from DC3 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Scheibe, M.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Honomichl, S.; Ridley, B. A.; Hair, J. W.; Schwartz, M. J.; Rappenglück, B.; Pickering, K. E.; Cummings, K.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Heimerl, K.; Pucik, T.; Fütterer, D.; Ackermann, L.; Betten, D.; Butler, C. F.; Barth, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    In summer 2012 the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign investigated a number of severe thunderstorms over the Central U.S. and their impact on the upper tropospheric (UT) - lower stratospheric (LS) composition and chemistry. In addition, during DC3 some of the largest and most destructive wildfires in New Mexico and Colorado state history were burning, influencing the air quality in the DC3 thunderstorm inflow and outflow region. Besides three instrumented aircraft platforms measuring a variety of trace species in-situ and remotely (e.g. CO, O3, SO2, NOx, VOC, CN, and black carbon), dense networks of ground-based instruments (e.g. radar and lightning) complemented the airborne measurements. Satellite measurements (e.g. GOES, MODIS, and GOME-2) and model forecasts (e.g. WRF-Chem and FLEXPART) were used to monitor the rapid development of the thunderstorms (which frequently developed huge anvils with overshooting tops) and the spread of smoke plumes in the vicinity of the storms. In-situ probing of fresh and aged (12-24 h) anvil outflows showed injection of lightning-produced NOx and wildfire emissions into the UTLS. Vertical cross sections of lidar and Doppler radar measurements supported these observations and gave detailed information on dynamical processes within and in the vicinity of the storms. Besides very strong updrafts in the storm core, surrounding downdrafts caused a direct in-mixing of O3-rich LS air masses into the boundaries of the anvil outflow. The wrapping of O3-rich LS air masses around and below the anvil outflow was also a prominent feature in several storms. The in-situ probing of the aged anvil outflow showed a pronounced influence on the UT composition and chemistry with average O3 enhancements in the range of 20-50 nmol mol-1 and evidence of new particle formation. A 10-year global climatology of H2O data from Aura-MLS confirms that the Central U.S. is a preferred region for convective injection into the LS.

  4. Injection of Lightning-Produced NOx, Water Vapor, Wildfire Emissions, and Stratospheric Air to the UT/LS as Observed from DC3 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Scheibe, M.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schlager, H.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Honomichl, S.; Ridley, B. A.; Hair, J. W.; Schwartz, M. J.; Rappenglück, B.; Pickering, K. E.; Cummings, K.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Heimerl, K.; Pucik, T.; Fütterer, D.; Ackermann, L.; Betten, D.; Butler, C. F.; Barth, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    In summer 2012 the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign investigated a number of severe thunderstorms over the Central U.S. and their impact on the upper tropospheric (UT) - lower stratospheric (LS) composition and chemistry. In addition, during DC3 some of the largest and most destructive wildfires in New Mexico and Colorado state history were burning, influencing the air quality in the DC3 thunderstorm inflow and outflow region. Besides three instrumented aircraft platforms measuring a variety of trace species in-situ and remotely (e.g. CO, O3, SO2, NOx, VOC, CN, and black carbon), dense networks of ground-based instruments (e.g. radar and lightning) complemented the airborne measurements. Satellite measurements (e.g. GOES, MODIS, and GOME-2) and model forecasts (e.g. WRF-Chem and FLEXPART) were used to monitor the rapid development of the thunderstorms (which frequently developed huge anvils with overshooting tops) and the spread of smoke plumes in the vicinity of the storms. In-situ probing of fresh and aged (12-24 h) anvil outflows showed injection of lightning-produced NOx and wildfire emissions into the UTLS. Vertical cross sections of lidar and Doppler radar measurements supported these observations and gave detailed information on dynamical processes within and in the vicinity of the storms. Besides very strong updrafts in the storm core, surrounding downdrafts caused a direct in-mixing of O3-rich LS air masses into the boundaries of the anvil outflow. The wrapping of O3-rich LS air masses around and below the anvil outflow was also a prominent feature in several storms. The in-situ probing of the aged anvil outflow showed a pronounced influence on the UT composition and chemistry with average O3 enhancements in the range of 20-50 nmol mol-1 and evidence of new particle formation. A 10-year global climatology of H2O data from Aura-MLS confirms that the Central U.S. is a preferred region for convective injection into the LS.

  5. DSMC simulation of Europa water vapor plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. J.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.

    2016-10-01

    A computational investigation of the physics of water vapor plumes on Europa was performed with a focus on characteristics relevant to observation and spacecraft mission operations. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to model the plume expansion assuming a supersonic vent source. The structure of the plume was determined, including the number density, temperature, and velocity fields. The possibility of ice grain growth above the vent was considered and deemed probable for large (diameter > ∼20 m) vents at certain Mach numbers. Additionally, preexisting grains of three diameters (0.1, 1, 50 μm) were included and their trajectories examined. A preliminary study of photodissociation of H2O into OH and H was performed to demonstrate the behavior of daughter species. A set of vent parameters was evaluated including Mach number (Mach 2, 3, 5), reduced temperature as a proxy for flow energy loss to the region surrounding the vent, and mass flow rate. Plume behavior was relatively insensitive to these factors, with the notable exception of mass flow rate. With an assumed mass flow rate of ∼1000 kg/s, a canopy shock occurred and a maximum integrated line of sight column density of ∼1020 H2O molecules/m2 was calculated, comparing favorably with observation (Roth et al., 2014a).

  6. Back-trajectory Analyses of Water Vapor in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Y.; Asanuma, J.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of precipitation sources is indispensable for prediction of extreme events as droughts and flood [Dirmeyer and Brubaker, 1999]. In this paper, the transport pathways of water vapor that precipitates in northern Mongolia were identified using back-trajectory analyses in order to find out factors causing such events in arid/semi-arid area. First, a back-trajectory model of atmospheric water vapor was developed. An air parcel is placed on an isentropic plane over the target site at each time of precipitation. Then, back trajectories was calculated with a kinematic method following the implicit technique [Merrill et al., 1986; Merrill, 1989]. Each of the air parcels was tagged with the precipitation time and the altitude, and then tracked back in time for 5 days on the isentropic surface. Japanese 25-year Reanalysis/JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JRA-25/JCDAS) of Japan Meteorological Agency [Onogi et al., 2007] was used for 3D field of meteorological variables for the calculation. As a validation, the model was compared with two others, namely, Meteorological Data Explorer of the Center for Global Environmental Reserch (METEX/CGER) [Zeng et al., 2003], and the trajectory model of the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) [Tomikawa and Sato, 2005]. The comparison found that model results are fairly robust within 5 days from the computational start, i.e., the end of the trajectory, regardless of different datasets and different schemes employed in these models. Then, the back-trajectory model was applied to the observed precipitation at the target site, a surface station in northern Mongolia called Kherlenbayan-Ulaan(KBU), where highly accurate and temporarily dense precipitation measurements are available. Back trajectory lines were calculated for each of the observed precipitation during the warm season of the years 2003 to 2009, on the isentropic surfaces of 300K, 310K and 320K where the highest value of water vapor is observed. The results show

  7. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710... Operating Requirements § 154.1710 Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. When a vessel is carrying acetaldehyde, butadiene, ethylene oxide, or vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that air is: (a)...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1710 - Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. 154.1710... Operating Requirements § 154.1710 Exclusion of air from cargo tank vapor spaces. When a vessel is carrying acetaldehyde, butadiene, ethylene oxide, or vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that air is: (a)...

  9. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  10. Climate and Ozone Response to Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.

    2001-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor abundance affects ozone, surface climate, and stratospheric temperatures. From 30-50 km altitude, temperatures show global decreases of 3-6 K over recent decades. These may be a proxy for water vapor increases, as the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model reproduces these trends only when stratospheric water vapor is allowed to increase. Observations suggest that stratospheric water vapor is indeed increasing, however, measurements are extremely limited in either spatial coverage or duration. The model results suggest that the observed changes may be part of a global, long-term trend. Furthermore, the required water vapor change is too large to be accounted for by increased production within the stratosphere, suggesting that ongoing climate change may be altering tropospheric input. The calculated stratospheric water vapor increase contributes an additional approximately equals 24% (approximately equals 0.2 W/m(exp 2)) to the global warming from well-mixed greenhouse gases over the past two decades. Observed ozone depletion is also better reproduced when destruction due to increased water vapor is included. If the trend continues, it could increase future global warming and impede stratospheric ozone recovery.

  11. Effect of Water Vapor Absorption on Measurements of Atmospheric Nitrate Radical by LP-DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-wen; Liu, Wen-qing; Xie, Pin-hua; Yang, Yi-jun; Chen, De-bao; Li, Zheng

    2008-10-01

    During the measurement of atmospheric nitrate radical by long-path differential optical absorption spec-troscopy, water vapor strong absorption could affect the measurement of nitrate radical and detection limits of system. Under the tropospheric condition, the optical density of water vapor absorption is non-linearly dependent on column density. An effective method was developed to eliminate the effect of water vapor absorption. Reference spectra of water vapor based on the daytime atmospheric absorption spectra, when fitted together with change of cross section with water vapor column densities, gave a more accurate fitting of water vapor absorptions, thus its effect on the measurements of nitrate radical could be restricted to a minimum and detection limits of system reached 3.6 ppt. The modified method was applied during an intensive field campaign in the Pearl River Delta, China. The NO3 concentration in polluted air masses varied from 3.6 ppt to 82.5 ppt with an average level of 23.6±1.8 ppt.

  12. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  13. CHMWTR: A Plasma Chemistry Code for Water Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    required to drive the discharge at the velocity v. II. OVERVIEW OF WATER PLASMA CHEMISTRY Upon photo-ionization by a mJ class ultra-short pulse laser...is unlimited. Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified UU 21 Daniel F. Gordon (202) 767-5036 Electrical discharge Water vapor The CHMWTR code tracks the...electrical discharges in water vapor, and describes a computer code designed to model such discharges . The code is called CHMWTR, in analogy with the NRL

  14. Combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation systems. [Volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Baker, R.W.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Kaschemekat, J.; Olsen, R.P.; Rose, M.E.; Segelke, S.V.

    1992-11-01

    Air stripping is an economical and efficient method of removing dissolved volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater. Air strippers, however, produce a vent air stream, which must meet the local air quality limits. If the VOC content exceeds the limits, direct discharge is not possible; therefore, a carbon adsorption VOC capture system is used to treat the vent air. This treatment step adds a cost of at least $50/lb of VOC captured. In this program, a combined air stripper/membrane vapor separation system was constructed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The membrane system captures VOCs from the stripper vent stream at a projected cost of $15/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 5 ppmw, and $75/lb VOC for a water VOC content of 1 ppmw. The VOCs are recovered as a small, concentrated liquid fraction for disposal or solvent recycling. The concept has been demonstrated in experiments with a system capable of handling up to 150,000 gpd of water. The existing demonstration system is available for field tests at a DOE facility or remediation site. Replacement of the current short air stripping tower (effective height 3 m) with a taller tower is recommended to improve VOC removal.

  15. Spectrophone Measurement of the Water Vapor Continuum at DF Laser Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    afA’afthar^re^ enc " ^^ ^ ^ ^’ ’^ ™ ^ity The water vapor absorption for the DF laser frequencies consists of three components - selective absorption...Rome Air Development Center. (AD 778949) (RADC-TR-74-89) Bell, A.G., Proc. Am. Assoc. Advanced Scie . 29_, (1880), p. 115. Bell, A.G., Phil

  16. The vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of kerosene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin-Hu; Wang, Su; Zhang, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Lian-Jie; Fan, Bing-Cheng; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Cui, Ji-Ping

    2014-08-01

    In ground tests of hypersonic scramjet, the high-enthalpy airstream produced by burning hydrocarbon fuels often contains contaminants of water vapor and carbon dioxide. The contaminants may change the ignition characteristics of fuels between ground tests and real flights. In order to properly assess the influence of the contaminants on ignition characteristics of hydrocarbon fuels, the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the ignition delay times of China RP-3 kerosene was studied behind reflected shock waves in a preheated shock tube. Experiments were conducted over a wider temperature range of 800-1 500K, at a pressure of 0.3 MPa, equivalence ratios of 0.5 and 1, and oxygen concentration of 20%. Ignition delay times were determined from the onset of the excited radical OH emission together with the pressure profile. Ignition delay times were measured for four cases: (1) clean gas, (2) gas vitiated with 10% and 20% water vapor in mole, (3) gas vitiated with 10% carbon dioxide in mole, and (4) gas vitiated with 10% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide, 20% water vapor and 10% carbon dioxide in mole. The results show that carbon dioxide produces an inhibiting effect at temperatures below 1 300 K when ϕ = 0.5, whereas water vapor appears to accelerate the ignition process below a critical temperature of about 1 000 K when ϕ = 0.5. When both water vapor and carbon dioxide exist together, a minor inhibiting effect is observed at ϕ = 0.5, while no effect is found at ϕ = 1.0. The results are also discussed preliminary by considering both the combustion reaction mechanism and the thermophysics properties of the fuel mixtures. The current measurements demonstrate vitiation effects of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the autoignition characteristics of China RP-3 kerosene at air-like O2 concentration. It is important to account for such effects when data are extrapolated from ground testing to real flight conditions.

  17. Electron deposition in water vapor, with atmospheric applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivero, J. J.; Stagat, R. W.; Green, A. E. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the consequences of electron impact on water vapor in terms of the microscopic details of excitation, dissociation, ionization, and combinations of these processes. Basic electron-impact cross-section data are assembled in many forms and are incorporated into semianalytic functions suitable for analysis with digital computers. Energy deposition in water vapor is discussed, and the energy loss function is presented, along with the 'electron volts per ion pair' and the efficiencies of energy loss in various processes. Several applications of electron and water-vapor interactions in the atmospheric sciences are considered, in particular, H2O comets, aurora and airglow, and lightning.

  18. Water vapor absorption in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute absorption rates of pure water vapor and mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen have been measured in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz. The dependence on pressure as well as temperature has been obtained. The experimental data are compared with several theoretical or empirical models, and satisfactory agreement is obtained with the models involving a continuum; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution based upon recent theoretical developments gives good results. The temperature dependence is stronger than that proposed in a commonly used atmospheric transmission model.

  19. Mars: Water Vapor Observations from the Viking Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, C. B.; Davies, D. W.; Holland, A. L.; Laporte, D. D.; Doms, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    The global distribution of the water vapor has been mapped at low resolution throughout the period from the northern summer solstice to the following equinox. During this seasonal period the water vapor underwent a gradual redistribution, the latitude of maximum column abundance moving from the northern polar area to the equatorial latitudes. The total global vapor content remained approximately constant at the equivalent of about 1.3 cu km of ice. The various data obtained indicate that the residual polar caps are composed of water ice.

  20. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; Haynes, James A.; Weldon, R. G.; England, R. D.

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.

  1. Long-term oxidation of candidate cast iron and stainless steel exhaust system alloys from 650 to 800 °C in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Michael P.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan .; ...

    2014-08-29

    Here, the oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 °C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 °C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 °C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remainedmore » adherent from 700-800 °C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 °C compared to 650-700 °C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  2. A laboratory study examining the impact of linen use on low-air-loss support surface heat and water vapor transmission rates.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Rachel; Lachenbruch, Charlie; VanGilder, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    Layers of linens are frequently placed under patients to manage moisture and/or assist with positioning immobile patients, including persons placed on a therapeutic surface because they are at risk for developing pressure ulcers. Because skin microclimate is believed to affect pressure ulcer risk, some therapeutic surfaces are designed to manage skin temperature and humidity (microclimate management). The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of linens and underpads on a low-air-loss (LAL) surface's ability to disperse heat and evaporate moisture. Underpads and transfer sheet combinations (grouped by three common linen functions: immobility, moisture management, and immobility and moisture management) were tested using the sweating guarded hot plate method, which allows for the measurement of the evaporative capacity (g H2O/m2*hour) and the total rate of heat withdrawal (Watts/m2) associated with nine different linen configurations placed on the support surface. Total heat withdrawal and evaporative capacity of the LAL surface with a fitted sheet only was used for comparison (P <0.05) Compared with fitted sheet only, heat withdrawal was significantly reduced by five of eight combinations, and evaporative moisture reduction was significantly reduced by six of eight linen combinations (P <0.05). All combinations that included plastic-containing underpads significantly reduced the surface's ability to dissipate heat and evaporate moisture, and use of the maximum number of layers (nine) reduced heat withdrawal to the level of a static, nonLAL surface. The results of this study suggest that putting additional linens or underpads on LAL surfaces may adversely affect skin temperature and moisture, thereby reducing the pressure ulcer prevention potential of these surfaces. Additional studies to examine the effect of linens and underpads as well as microclimate management strategies on pressure ulcer risk are needed.

  3. Electrification in Hurricanes over the Tropical Americas: Implication for Stratospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna V.; Chronis, Themis G.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Miller, Timothy L.

    2007-01-01

    hurricanes analyzed in this study showed that lightning activity is negatively correlated with minimum infrared brightness temperature and positively correlated with 100-mb water vapor. An examination of the maxima in water vapor observed over the hurricane not only shows larger magnitudes, but also larger differences between water vapor averages and water vapor maxima over the hurricane as lightning activity increases. Trajectory calculations are performed using the Flextra model in order to investigate the fate of the moister air masses found in the TTL.

  4. Chemical reaction between water vapor and stressed glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soga, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hanada, T.; Kunugi, M.

    1979-01-01

    The crack velocity in soda-lime silicate glass was determined at room temperature at water-vapor pressures of 10 to 0.04 torr using the double torsion technique. A precracked glass specimen (70 x 16 x 1.6 mm) was placed in a vacuum chamber containing a four-point bending test apparatus. The plotted experimental results show that the crack propagation curve in water agrees fairly well with that of Wiederhorn (1967). Attention is given to the effect of water vapor pressure on crack velocity at K(I) = 550,000 N/m to the 3/2 power, with (Wiederhorn's data) or without N2 present. The plotted results reveal that the present crack velocity is about two orders of magnitude higher than that of Wiederhorn at high water-vapor conditions, but the difference decreases as the water-vapor concentration diminishes or the crack velocity slows down.

  5. Microwave-swing adsorption to capture and recover vapors from air streams with activated carbon fiber cloth.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Rood, Mark; Botich, Leon

    2005-09-01

    Adsorption with regeneration is a desirable means to control the emissions of organic vapors such as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air streams as it allows for capture, recovery, and reuse of those VOCs/HAPS. Integration of activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorbent with microwave regeneration provides promise as a new adsorption/ regeneration technology. This research investigates the feasibility of using microwaves to regenerate ACFC as part of a process for capture and recovery of organic vapors from gas streams. A bench-scale fixed-bed microwave-swing adsorption (MSA) system was built and tested for adsorption of water vapor, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC) from an airstream and then recovery of those vapors with microwave regeneration. The electromagnetic heating behavior of dry and vapor-saturated ACFC was also characterized. The MSA system successfully adsorbed organic vapors from the airstreams, allowed for rapid regeneration of the ACFC cartridge, and recovered the water and organic vapors as liquids.

  6. NASA Experiment on Tropospheric-Stratospheric Water Vapor Transport in the Intertropical Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The following six papers report preliminary results obtained from a field experiment designed to study the role of tropical cumulo-nimbus clouds in the transfer of water vapor from the troposphere to the stratosphere over the region of Panama. The measurements were made utilizing special NOAA enhanced IR satellite images, radiosonde-ozonesondes and a NASA U-2 aircraft carrying. nine experiments. The experiments were provided by a group of NASA, NOAA, industry, and university scientists. Measurements included atmospheric humidity, air and cloud top temperatures, atmospheric tracer constituents, cloud particle characteristics and cloud morphology. The aircraft made a total of eleven flights from August 30 through September 18, 1980, from Howard Air Force Base, Panama; the pilots obtained horizontal and vertical profiles in and near convectively active regions and flew around and over cumulo-nimbus towers and through the extended anvils in the stratosphere. Cumulo-nimbus clouds in the tropics appear to play an important role in upward water vapor transport and may represent the principal source influencing the stratospheric water vapor budget. The clouds provide strong vertical circulation in the troposphere, mixing surface air and its trace materials (water vapor, CFM's sulfur compounds, etc.) quickly up to the tropopause. It is usually assumed that large scale mean motions or eddy scale motions transport the trace materials through the tropopause and into the stratosphere where they are further dispersed and react with other stratospheric constituents. The important step between the troposphere and stratosphere for water vapor appears to depend upon the processes occurring at or near the tropopause at the tops of the cumulo-nimbus towers. Several processes have been sugested: (1) The highest towers penetrate the tropopause and carry water in the form of small ice particles directly into the stratosphere. (2) Water vapor from the tops of the cumulonimbus clouds is

  7. Concomitant adsorption and desorption of organic vapor in dry and humid air streams using microwave and direct electrothermal swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hashisho, Zaher; Emamipour, Hamidreza; Rood, Mark J; Hay, K James; Kim, Byung J; Thurston, Deborah

    2008-12-15

    Industrial gas streams can contain highly variable organic vapor concentrations that need to be processed before they are emitted to the atmosphere. Fluctuations in organic vapor concentrations make it more difficult to operate a biofilter when compared to a constant vapor concentration. Hence, there is a need to stabilize the concentration of rapidly fluctuating gas streams for optimum operation of biofilters. This paper describes new concomitant adsorption desorption (CAD) systems used with variable organic vapor concentration gas streams to provide the same gas stream, but at a user-selected constant vapor concentration that can then be more readily processed by a secondary air pollution control device such as a biofilter. The systems adsorb organic vapor from gas streams and simultaneously heat the adsorbent using microwave or direct electrothermal energy to desorb the organic vapor at a user-selected set-point concentration. Both systems depicted a high degree of concentration stabilization with a mean relative deviation between set-point and stabilized concentration of 0.3-0.4%. The direct electrothermal CAD system was also evaluated to treat a humid gas stream (relative humidity = 85%) that contained a variable organic vapor concentration. The high humidity did not interfere with CAD operation as water vapor did not adsorb but penetrated through the adsorbent These results are important because they demonstrate the ability of CAD to effectively dampen concentration fluctuation in gas streams.

  8. Measurement of Trace Water Vapor in a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Product Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wormhoudt, Joda; Shorter, Joanne H.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Freedman, Andrew; Campbell, Melissa; Chang, Clarence T.; Smith, Frederick D.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) uses regenerable adsorption technology to remove carbon dioxide (COP) from cabin air. Product water vapor measurements from a CDRA test bed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center were made using a tunable infrared diode laser differential absorption spectrometer (TILDAS) provided by NASA Glenn Research Center. The TILDAS instrument exceeded all the test specifications, including sensitivity, dynamic range, time response, and unattended operation. During the COP desorption phase, water vapor concentrations as low as 5 ppmv were observed near the peak of CO2 evolution, rising to levels of approx. 40 ppmv at the end of a cycle. Periods of high water concentration (>100 ppmv) were detected and shown to be caused by an experimental artifact. Measured values of total water vapor evolved during a single desorption cycle were as low as 1 mg.

  9. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multispectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/sq m, which compared to the 4 W/sq m magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/sq m estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude

  10. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  11. Active Raman sounding of the earth's water vapor field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Whiteman, David N.; Demoz, Belay B.; Farley, Robert W.; Wessel, John E.

    2005-01-01

    The typically weak cross-sections characteristic of Raman processes has historically limited their use in atmospheric remote sensing to nighttime application. However, with advances in instrumentation and techniques, it is now possible to apply Raman lidar to the monitoring of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the diurnal cycle. Upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric measurements of water vapor using Raman lidar are also possible but are limited to nighttime and require long integration times. However, boundary layer studies of water vapor variability can now be performed with high temporal and spatial resolution. This paper will review the current state-of-the-art of Raman lidar for high-resolution measurements of the atmospheric water vapor, aerosol and cloud fields. In particular, we describe the use of Raman lidar for mapping the vertical distribution and variability of atmospheric water vapor, aerosols and clouds throughout the evolution of dynamic meteorological events. The ability of Raman lidar to detect and characterize water in the region of the tropopause and the importance of high-altitude water vapor for climate-related studies and meteorological satellite performance are discussed.

  12. Comparison of the water vapor and aerosol profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, I. E.; Arshinov, M. Yu.; Balin, Yu. S.; Belan, B. D.; Voronin, B. A.; Kokhanenko, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of the contents of water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere measured by means of different instruments was performed based on the results of the comprehensive aerosol experiment carried out at the Institute of Atmospheric optics in May 2012. The data obtained using remote (lidar) and contact (balloon) methods were used. They are capable of obtaining the vertical profiles of the measured parameters with high spatial resolution. Lidar measurements of the water vapor content in the boundary layer of the atmosphere by Raman method have shown very good agreement with the data of measurements by balloon. Simultaneous lidar measurements of backscattering and mixing ratio of water vapor in the atmosphere give significant positive correlation of the contents of water vapor and aerosol in the layers.

  13. Performance Modeling of an Airborne Raman Water Vapor Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Schwemmer, G.; Berkoff, T.; Plotkin, H.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2000-01-01

    A sophisticated Raman lidar numerical model had been developed. The model has been used to simulate the performance of two ground-based Raman water vapor lidar systems. After tuning the model using these ground-based measurements, the model is used to simulate the water vapor measurement capability of an airborne Raman lidar under both day-and night-time conditions for a wide range of water vapor conditions. The results indicate that, under many circumstances, the daytime measurements possess comparable resolution to an existing airborne differential absorption water vapor lidar while the nighttime measurement have higher resolution. In addition, a Raman lidar is capable of measurements not possible using a differential absorption system.

  14. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  15. SERDP and ESTCP Workshop on Vapor Intrusion into Indoor Air from Contaminated Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    mitigating radon and volatile organic compound (VOC) subsurface vapor intrusion. These projects have determined that vapor concentrations can be highly...Validation of More Cost-Effective Methods for Mitigating Radon and VOC Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Todd McAlary Geosyntec 1045 Morning

  16. Calibrated In Situ Measurement of UT/LS Water Vapor Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A.; Gao, R.; Watts, L. A.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable disagreement among in situ water vapor measurements by different instruments at the low part per million (ppm) mixing ratios found in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). These discrepancies contribute to uncertainty in our understanding of the microphysics related to cirrus cloud particle nucleation and growth and affect our ability to determine the effect of climate changes on the radiatively important feedback from UT/LS water vapor. To address the discrepancies observed in measured UT/LS water vapor, a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for the fast, precise, and accurate measurement of water vapor at low mixing ratios. The instrument utilizes a radioactive α particle source to ionize a flow of sample air drawn into the instrument. A cascade of ion-molecule reactions results in the production of protonated water ions proportional to the water vapor mixing ratio that are then detected by the mass spectrometer. The multi-step nature of the ionization mechanism results in a non-linear sensitivity to water vapor, necessitating calibration across the full range of values to be measured. To accomplish this calibration, we have developed a novel calibration scheme using catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to produce well-defined water vapor mixing ratios that can be introduced into the instrument inlet during flight. The CIMS instrument was deployed for the first time aboard the NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft during the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) mission in March and April 2011. The sensitivity of the instrument to water vapor was calibrated every ~45 minutes in flight from < 1 to 150 ppm. Analysis of in-flight data demonstrates a typical sensitivity of 2000 Hz/ppm at 4.5 ppm with a signal to noise ratio (2 σ) > 50 for a 1 second measurement. The instrument and its calibration system performed successfully in

  17. CRISM Observations of Water Vapor and Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, R. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra returned by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, [1]) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) contain the clear spectral signature of several atmospheric gases including carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). Here we describe the seasonal and spatial mapping of water vapor and carbon dioxide for one full Martian year using CRISM spectra.

  18. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  19. Materials, methods and devices to detect and quantify water vapor concentrations in an atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Allendorf, Mark D; Robinson, Alex L

    2014-12-09

    We have demonstrated that a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor coated with a nanoporous framework material (NFM) film can perform ultrasensitive water vapor detection at concentrations in air from 0.05 to 12,000 ppmv at 1 atmosphere pressure. The method is extendable to other MEMS-based sensors, such as microcantilevers, or to quartz crystal microbalance sensors. We identify a specific NFM that provides high sensitivity and selectivity to water vapor. However, our approach is generalizable to detection of other species using NFM to provide sensitivity and selectivity.

  20. Effects of water vapor on the high temperature oxidation of alumina-forming coatings and nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris-Sida, Monica C.

    Oxidation studies were performed at 1100°C, 900°C and 700°C in dry, air and air containing fixed partial pressures of water vapor on specimens of Ni base superalloys and coatings on these alloys that form alpha-alumina scales under oxidizing conditions. The materials studied included Rene N5, PWA1484, CMSX4, diffusion aluminide coatings (with or without Pt addition) on Rene N5, Thermal Barrier Coatings on Rene N5, and a Ni-8wt%Cr-6wt%Al model. All of these alloys and metallic coatings are normally alpha-alumina-formers under oxidization conditions. The observed important effects of water vapor include: (1) Increased severity of cracking and spalling of alpha-alumina scales in wet environments especially for those systems with alumina only moderately adherent in dry air; (2) Water vapor affects the nucleation and growth of alpha-alumina scales---the growth rate of alpha-alumina is increased in water vapor conditions; (3) Thicker oxides form during oxidation in wet air than dry air. The transient oxidation phenomenon is affected by the presence of water vapor due to more rapid growth of NiO during the transient period. The selective oxidation of aluminum is inhibited in water vapor conditions, even more adverse effects of water vapor are observed as the oxidation temperature is lowered; (4) Spinel phase forms on top of the alumina scales during long term oxidation. Current results indicate that nickel diffusion at alumina grain boundaries significantly contributes to the formation of new spinel phase at the oxide/gas interface and water vapor is found to enhance this process. Mechanisms for these observations are proposed.

  1. Profiling of Atmospheric Water Vapor with MIR and LASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Racette, P.; Triesly, M. E.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Chang, L. A.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the first and the only simultaneous measurements of water vapor by MIR (Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer) and LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sounding Experiment) on board the same ER-2 aircraft. Water vapor is one of the most important constituents in the Earth's atmosphere, as its spatial and temporal variations affect a wide spectrum of meteorological phenomena ranging from the formation of clouds to the development of severe storms. Its concentration, as measured in terms of relative humidity, determines the extinction coefficient of atmospheric aerosol particles and therefore visibility. These considerations point to the need for effective and frequent measurements of the atmospheric water vapor. The MIR and LASE instruments provide measurements of water vapor profiles with two markedly different techniques. LASE can give water vapor profiles with excellent vertical resolution under clear condition, while MIR can retrieve water vapor profiles with a crude vertical resolution even under a moderate cloud cover. Additionally, millimeter-wave measurements are relatively simple and provide better spatial coverage.

  2. Dissolution kinetics of volatile organic compound vapors in water: An integrated experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Pérez Guerrero, Jesús S.; Raoof, Amir; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we performed batch experiments to investigate the dissolution kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene vapors in water at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The batch systems consisted of a water reservoir and a connected headspace, the latter containing a small glass cylinder filled with pure volatile organic compound (VOC). Results showed that air phase concentrations of both TCE and toluene increased relatively quickly to their maximum values and then became constant. We considered subsequent dissolution into both stirred and unstirred water reservoirs. Results of the stirred experiments showed a quick increase in the VOC concentrations with time up to their solubility limit in water. VOC vapor dissolution was found to be independent of pH. In contrast, salinity had a significant effect on the solubility of TCE and toluene vapors. VOC evaporation and vapor dissolution in the stirred water reservoirs followed first-order rate processes. Observed data could be described well using both simplified analytical solutions, which decoupled the VOC dynamics in the air and water phases, as well as using more complete coupled solutions. However, the estimated evaporation (ke) and dissolution (kd) rate constants differed by up to 70% between the coupled and uncoupled formulations. We also numerically investigated the effects of fluid withdrawal from the small water reservoir due to sampling. While decoupling the VOC air and water phase mass transfer processes produced unreliable estimates of kd, the effects of fluid withdrawal on the estimated rate constants were found to be less important. The unstirred experiments showed a much slower increase in the dissolved VOC concentrations versus time. Molecular diffusion of the VOCs within the aqueous phase became then the limiting factor for mass transfer from air to water. Fluid withdrawal during sampling likely caused some minor convection within the reservoir, which was simulated by increasing the

  3. Measurement of Vapor Flow As an Important Source of Water in Dry Land Eco-Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; He, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Hishida, K.

    2014-12-01

    When the temperature of land surface is lower than that of air and deeper soils, water vapor gathers toward the ground surface where dew maybe formed depending on the prevailing dew point and wind speed. Some plants are able to absorb the dew and vapor flow while the soil can readily absorb both. Certain animals such as desert beetles and ants harvest the dew or fog for daily survival. Recently, it is also realized that the dew and vapor flow can be a life-saving amount of water for plant survival at the driest seasons of the year in arid and semi-arid regions. Researches are conducted to quantify the amount of near-surface vapor flow in arid and semi-arid regions in China and USA. Quantitative leaf water absorption and desorption functions were derived based on laboratory experiments. Results show that plant leaves absorb and release water at different speeds depending on species and varieties. The "ideal" native plants in the dry climates can quickly absorb water and slowly release it. This water-holding capacity of plant is characterized by the absorption and desorption functions derived for plant physiology and water balance studies. Field studies are conducted to measure the dynamic vapor flow movements from the atmosphere and the groundwater table to soil surface. Results show that dew is usually formed on soil and plant surfaces during the daily hours when the temperature gradients are inverted toward the soil surface. The amount of dew harvested using gravels on the soil surface was enough to support water melon agriculture on deserts. The vapor flow can be effectively intercepted by artificially seeded plants in semi-arid regions forming new forests. New studies are attempted to quantify the role of vapor flow for the survival of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  4. Projected Regime Shift in Arctic Cloud and Water Vapor Feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Miller, James R.; Francis, Jennifer; Russel, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than any other large-scale region on Earth. A variety of positive feedback mechanisms are responsible for the amplification, most of which are linked with changes in snow and ice cover, surface temperature (T(sub s)), atmospheric water vapor (WV), and cloud properties. As greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere, air temperature and water vapor content also increase, leading to a warmer surface and ice loss, which further enhance evaporation and WV. Many details of these interrelated feedbacks are poorly understood, yet are essential for understanding the pace and regional variations in future Arctic change. We use a global climate model (Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Atmosphere-Ocean Model) to examine several components of these feedbacks, how they vary by season, and how they are projected to change through the 21st century. One positive feedback begins with an increase in T(sub s) that produces an increase in WV, which in turn increases the downward longwave flux (DLF) and T(sub s), leading to further evaporation. Another associates the expected increases in cloud cover and optical thickness with increasing DLF and T(sub s). We examine the sensitivities between DLF and other climate variables in these feedbacks and find that they are strongest in the non-summer seasons, leading to the largest amplification in Ts during these months. Later in the 21st century, however, DLF becomes less sensitive to changes in WV and cloud optical thickness, as they cause the atmosphere to emit longwave radiation more nearly as a black body. This regime shift in sensitivity implies that the amplified pace of Arctic change relative to the northern hemisphere could relax in the future.

  5. Water Vapor-Mediated Volatilization of High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschter, Peter J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2013-07-01

    Volatilization in water vapor-containing atmospheres is an important and often unexpected mechanism of degradation of high-temperature materials during processing and in service. Thermodynamic properties data sets for key (oxy)hydroxide vapor product species that are responsible for material transport and damage are often uncertain or unavailable. Estimation, quantum chemistry calculation, and measurement methods for thermodynamic properties of these species are reviewed, and data judged to be reliable are tabulated and referenced. Applications of water vapor-mediated volatilization include component and coating recession in turbine engines, oxidation/volatilization of ferritic steels in steam boilers, chromium poisoning in solid-oxide fuel cells, vanadium transport in hot corrosion and degradation of hydrocracking catalysts, Na loss from Na β"-Al2O3 tubes, and environmental release of radioactive isotopes in a nuclear reactor accident or waste incineration. The significance of water vapor-mediated volatilization in these applications is described.

  6. Biases in Total Precipitable Water Vapor Climatologies from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2006-01-01

    We examine differences in total precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) experiments sharing the Aqua spacecraft platform. Both systems provide estimates of PWV over water surfaces. We compare AIRS and AMSR-E PWV to constrain AIRS retrieval uncertainties as functions of AIRS retrieved infrared cloud fraction. PWV differences between the two instruments vary only weakly with infrared cloud fraction up to about 70%. Maps of AIRS-AMSR-E PWV differences vary with location and season. Observational biases, when both instruments observe identical scenes, are generally less than 5%. Exceptions are in cold air outbreaks where AIRS is biased moist by 10-20% or 10-60% (depending on retrieval processing) and at high latitudes in winter where AIRS is dry by 5-10%. Sampling biases, from different sampling characteristics of AIRS and AMSR-E, vary in sign and magnitude. AIRS sampling is dry by up to 30% in most high-latitude regions but moist by 5-15% in subtropical stratus cloud belts. Over the northwest Pacific, AIRS samples conditions more moist than AMSR-E by a much as 60%. We hypothesize that both wet and dry sampling biases are due to the effects of clouds on the AIRS retrieval methodology. The sign and magnitude of these biases depend upon the types of cloud present and on the relationship between clouds and PWV. These results for PWV imply that climatologies of height-resolved water vapor from AIRS must take into consideration local meteorological processes affecting AIRS sampling.

  7. Measurements of an Intrusion of Water Vapor into the High Arctic and its Effect on Wintertime Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, G. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Lesins, G. B.; Thackray, C. P.; Perro, C. W.; Duck, T. J.; Drummond, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas, yet little is known about it in the High Arctic during winter due to a historic lack of measurements and difficulties associated with satellite retrievals. With cold temperatures and a very stable boundary layer, the water vapor mixing ratio peaks around only 0.3 g kg-1. Any influxes of moist air from more moderate latitudes are thus likely to have a significant impact on Arctic tropospheric processes and the radiation budget. With lidar and accompanying radiometer measurements at Eureka (79°59'N, 85°56'W) we present one highly dynamic instance of such an intrusion from the winter of 2009/10. Measurements with the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar, shown in the figure, display distinct and seperate wet and dry air parcels during the case study. Two significant influxes of moist air (mixing ratio peaking at 1.2 g kg-1) are observed while aerosol profiles show associated cloud and precipitation. An animated map of precipitable water measured by the Microwave Humidity Sounder will be presented that shows the moist air originating over the Bering Sea and sweeping north-east into the Arctic, reaching Eureka on Feburary 9. Radiometer measurements of downwelling radiation during this time period show that the influx of water vapor alone caused a 13% increase in longwave radiation at the surface. A radiative transfer model (SBDART) has been used to isolate the effect of the water vapor, temperature, and cloud cover variations associated with this intrusion, on the overall radiation flux. Only the single event will be presented in detail however longer term data sets of water vapor indicate that such intrusions happen once or twice a month each winter. With such significant influxes of water vapor it is possible that these intrusions significantly affect the average wintertime radiation budget. Lidar measurements of water vapor mixing ratio over Eureka showing two

  8. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  9. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  10. Modeling of a water vapor selective membrane unit to increase the energy efficiency of humidity harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmair, D.; Metz, S. J.; de Lange, H. C.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Air humidity is a promising source of clean and safe drinking water. However, in conventional systems a lot of energy is wasted on the production of cold air, rather than the condensation of water vapor. This study examines the possibility of using a hollow fiber membrane module to make this process more energy efficient, by separating the vapor from other gases, prior to the cooling process with the help of selective membranes. The water vapor concentration within a fiber has been modeled using a random walker approach, and the membrane permeability has been implemented as a re-bounce probability for simulation particles interacting with the membrane. Considering the additional work requirement for driving a feed flow through the membrane section and the computed water vapor permeation it could be shown that the energy demand per unit water is lowest for slow flow speeds and favors short and thin fibers. The total energy requirement was estimated to be less than half of the conventional one. Comparison with other CFD simulations and a real life module has shown a good level of agreement, indicating that a membrane section could improve the energy efficiency of humidity harvesting significantly.

  11. A Robust Retrieval of Water Vapor Column In Dry Arctic Conditions Using the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiedron, P.; Michalsky, J.; Schmid, B.; Slater, D.; Berndt, J.; Harrison, L.; Racette, P.; Westwater, E.; Han, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A method to retrieve water vapor column using the 940-nm water vapor absorption band in dry Arctic conditions is presented. The retrievals with this method are stable with respect to uncertainties in instrument radiometric calibration, air pressure, solar source function, and aerosols. The water vapor column was retrieved with this method using spectra obtained with the rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) that was deployed during an intensive observation period near Barrow, Alaska, in March 1999. A line-by-line radiative transfer model was used to compute water vapor transmittance. The retrievals with this method are compared with retrievals obtained from three independent measurements with microwave radiometers. All four measurements show the same pattern of temporal variations. The RSS results agree most closely with retrievals obtained with the millimeter-wave imaging radiometer (MIR) at its 183 GHz +/- 7 double-side band channel. Their correlation over a period of 7 days when water vapor column varied between 0.75 mm and 3.6 mm (according to RSS) is 0.968 with MIR readings 0.12 mm higher on average.

  12. Electrical, optical, and material characterizations of blue InGaN light emitting diodes submitted to reverse-bias stress in water vapor condition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsiang Chu, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Yun-Ti; Chen, Chian-You; Shei, Shih-Chang

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, we investigate degradation of InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) under reverse-bias operations in water vapor and dry air. To examine failure origins, electrical characterizations including current-voltage, breakdown current profiles, optical measurement, and multiple material analyses were performed. Our findings indicate that the diffusion of indium atoms in water vapor can expedite degradation. Investigation of reverse-bias stress can help provide insight into the effects of water vapor on LEDs.

  13. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  14. Improved waste water vapor compression distillation technology. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.; Nuccio, P. P.; Reveley, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    The vapor compression distillation process is a method of recovering potable water from crewman urine in a manned spacecraft or space station. A description is presented of the research and development approach to the solution of the various problems encountered with previous vapor compression distillation units. The design solutions considered are incorporated in the preliminary design of a vapor compression distillation subsystem. The new design concepts are available for integration in the next generation of support systems and, particularly, the regenerative life support evaluation intended for project Spacelab.

  15. Sevoflurane Contamination: Water Accumulation in Sevoflurane Vaporizers Can Allow Bacterial Growth in the Vaporizer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Arthur W

    2016-06-15

    Sevoflurane vaporizers (GE Tec 7) were difficult to fill with "slow flow" and a need to "burp." Evaluation of the bottle of sevoflurane (AbbVie Ultane) demonstrated a contaminant. Four of the facilities' 13 sevoflurane vaporizers had the contaminant. Unopened sevoflurane bottles did not have evidence of contamination. The contaminant was found to be water at pH 6.0 growing Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gas chromatography revealed the production of multiple metabolites of sevoflurane, including primarily urea and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (83% and 9.6% of volatiles) in addition to multiple other organic molecules. Sevoflurane contains water that can accumulate in vaporizers allowing bacterial growth.

  16. Vaporization behavior of lithium oxide: Effect of water vapor in helium carrier gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetenbaum, M.; Johnson, C. E.

    1984-04-01

    The effect of water vapor in a helium carrier gas on the vaporization behavior of lithium oxide has been investigated in the temperature range 1023 to 1273 K. Based on the reaction Li 2O(s)+H 2O(g) → 2LiOH(g), the results of this study yield second and third law heats of reaction of 79.0 ± 3 and 82.1 ± 1 kcal/mol. Moisture significantly enhances the volatility of lithium oxide. The pronounced effect of water vapor on the volatilization of Li 2O (as LiOH) is important in understanding the behavior of a Li 2O solid breeding blanket in anticipated fusion reactor environments.

  17. Water vapor weathering of Taurus-Littrow orange soil - A pore-structure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadenhead, D. A.; Mikhail, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A pore-volume analysis was performed on water vapor adsorption data previously obtained on a fresh sample of Taurus-Littrow orange soil, and the analysis was repeated on the same sample after its exposure to moist air for a period of approximately six months. The results indicate that exposure of an outgassed sample to high relative pressures of water vapor can result in the formation of substantial micropore structure, the precise amount being dependent on the sample pretreatment, particularly the outgassing temperature. Micropore formation is explained in terms of water penetration into surface defects. In contrast, long-term exposure to moist air at low relative pressures appears to reverse the process with the elimination of micropores and enlargement of mesopores possibly through surface diffusion of metastable adsorbent material. The results are considered with reference to the storage of lunar samples.

  18. Scalable Production Method for Graphene Oxide Water Vapor Separation Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Wei; Gotthold, David W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT

    Membranes for selective water vapor separation were assembled from graphene oxide suspension using techniques compatible with high volume industrial production. The large-diameter graphene oxide flake suspensions were synthesized from graphite materials via relatively efficient chemical oxidation steps with attention paid to maintaining flake size and achieving high graphene oxide concentrations. Graphene oxide membranes produced using scalable casting methods exhibited water vapor flux and water/nitrogen selectivity performance meeting or exceeding that of membranes produced using vacuum-assisted laboratory techniques. (PNNL-SA-117497)

  19. Enhanced water vapor in Asian dust layer: Entrainment processes and implication for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Jiyoung; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Jefferson, Anne; Choi, Suk-Jin; Cha, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Anderson, Theodore L.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Weber, Rodney J.

    The entrainment process of water vapor into the dust layer during Asian dust events and the effect of water vapor associated with the Asian dust layer (ADL) on aerosol hygroscopic properties are investigated. The entrainment processes of water vapor into the ADL is examined by using a PSU/NCAR MM5 together with the backward trajectory model, radiosonde data, and remotely sensed aerosol vertical distribution data. Two dust events in the spring of 1998 and 2001 are examined in detail. The results reveal that the water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) derived by the MM5 fits in well with the WVMR observed by radiosonde, and is well coincident with the aerosol extinction coefficient ( σep) measured by the micro-pulse lidar. The temporal evolution of the vertical distributions of WVMR and σep exhibited similar features. On the basis of a well simulation of the enhanced water vapor within the dust layer by the MM5, we trace the dust storms to examine the entrainment mechanism. The enhancement of WVMR within the ADL was initiated over the mountainous areas. The relatively moist air mass in the well-developed mixing layer over the mountainous areas is advected upward from the boundary layer by an ascending motion. However, a large portion of the water vapor within the ADL is enhanced over the edge of a highland and the plains in China. This is well supported by the simulated WVMR and the wind vectors. Aircraft-based in situ measurements of the chemical and optical properties of aerosol enable a quantitative estimation of the effect of the enhanced WVMR on the aerosol hygroscopic properties. The submicron aerosol accompanied by the dust storm caused an increase of aerosol scattering through water uptakes during the transport. This increase could be explained by the chemical fact that water-soluble submicron pollution aerosols are enriched in the ADL.

  20. Shape Evolution of Metal Nanoparticles in Water Vapor Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beien; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Chunlei; Gao, Yi

    2016-04-13

    The structures of the metal nanoparticles are crucial for their catalytic activities. How to understand and even control the shape evolution of nanoparticles under reaction condition is a big challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. It has been proved that many reactive gases hold the capability of changing the structures and properties of metal nanoparticles. One interesting question is whether water vapor, such a ubiquitous environment, could induce the shape evolution of metal nanoparticles. So far this question has not received enough attention yet. In this work, we developed a model based on the density functional theory, the Wulff construction, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to explore the shape of metal nanoparticle at given temperature and water vapor pressure. By this model, we show clearly that water vapor could notably increase the fraction of (110) facets and decrease that of (111) facets for 3-8 nm Cu nanoparticles, which is perfectly consistent with the experimental observations. Further investigations indicate the water vapor has different effects on the different metal species (Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd). This work not only helps to understand the water vapor effect on the structures of metal nanoparticles but also proposes a simple but effective model to predict the shape of nanoparticles in certain environment.

  1. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  2. Proposed reference model for middle atmosphere water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Munro, R.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; McCormick, M. P.; Russell, J. M.

    Several new and significant satellite data sets on middle atmosphere water vapor have been produced recently. They include data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) and the Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) experiment. The SAGE II data provide an estimate of interannual variability of water vapor in the stratosphere. The SAMS data are appropriate for the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. We combine these two data sets with those from the Nimbus-7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment to update the COSPAR interim reference model for water vapor. Water vapor profiles from the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment, ground-based microwave, and in situ balloon and aircraft measurements have been used to check the quality of the satellite data sets. The updated reference model is given as a function of latitude and pressure altitude and now covers all four seasons. Tabulations are included for these seasonal water vapor mixing ratios (in ppmv) and their estimated errors (in percent).

  3. Carbon and water vapor fluxes of different ecosystems in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on exchange of energy, carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) for major terrestrial ecosystems is vital to quantify carbon and water balances on a large-scale. It is also necessary to develop, test, and improve crop models and satellite-based production efficiency and evapotranspira...

  4. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  5. Accurate predictions for the production of vaporized water

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, E.; Montel, F.

    1995-12-31

    The production of water vaporized in the gas phase is controlled by the local conditions around the wellbore. The pressure gradient applied to the formation creates a sharp increase of the molar water content in the hydrocarbon phase approaching the well; this leads to a drop in the pore water saturation around the wellbore. The extent of the dehydrated zone which is formed is the key controlling the bottom-hole content of vaporized water. The maximum water content in the hydrocarbon phase at a given pressure, temperature and salinity is corrected by capillarity or adsorption phenomena depending on the actual water saturation. Describing the mass transfer of the water between the hydrocarbon phases and the aqueous phase into the tubing gives a clear idea of vaporization effects on the formation of scales. Field example are presented for gas fields with temperatures ranging between 140{degrees}C and 180{degrees}C, where water vaporization effects are significant. Conditions for salt plugging in the tubing are predicted.

  6. SWAS observations of water vapor in the Venus mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Bergin, Edwin A.; Patten, Brian M.

    2007-06-01

    We present the first detections of the ground-state H 216O ( 1-1) rotational transition (at 556.9 GHz) and the 13CO (5-4) rotational transition from the atmosphere of Venus, measured with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). The observed spectral features of these submillimeter transitions originate primarily from the 70-100 km altitude range, within the Venus mesosphere. Observations were obtained in December 2002, and January, March, and July 2004, coarsely sampling one Venus diurnal period as seen from Earth. The measured water vapor absorption line depth shows large variability among the four observing periods, with strong detections of the line in December 2002 and July 2004, and no detections in January and March 2004. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters was performed using a multi-transition inversion algorithm, combining simultaneous retrievals of temperature, carbon monoxide, and water profiles under imposed constraints. Analysis of the SWAS spectra resulted in measurements or upper limits for the globally averaged mesospheric water vapor abundance for each of the four observation periods, finding variability over at least two orders of magnitude. The results are consistent with both temporal and diurnal variability, but with short-term fluctuations clearly dominating. These results are fully consistent with the long-term study of mesospheric water vapor from millimeter and submillimeter observations of HDO [Sandor, B.J., Clancy, R.T., 2005. Icarus 177, 129-143]. The December 2002 observations detected very rapid change in the mesospheric water abundance. Over five days, a deep water absorption feature consistent with a water vapor abundance of 4.5±1.5 parts per million suddenly gave way to a significantly shallower absorption, implying a decrease in the water vapor abundance by a factor of nearly 50 in less that 48 h. In 2004, similar changes in the water vapor abundance were measured between the March and July SWAS observing periods, but

  7. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Callow, Diane Schafer; Marron, Lisa C.; Salton, Jonathan R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  8. Method and apparatus for extracting water from air

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

  9. Isotopic Controls of Rainwater and Water Vapor on Mangrove Leaf Water and Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, N.; Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of sedimentary mangrove lipid biomarkers can be used as a proxy of past salinity and water isotopes. This approach is based on the observation that apparent 2H/1H fractionation between surface water and mangrove lipids increases with surface water salinity in six species of mangroves with different salt management strategies growing at sites spanning a range of relative humidities throughout Australia and Micronesia. In order to more robustly apply mangrove lipid δ2H as a paleoclimate proxy, we investigated the cause of the correlation between apparent 2H fractionation and salinity. We present results from two related experiments that assessed controls on isotopes of mangrove leaf water, the direct source of hydrogen in lipids: (1) Measurements of natural δ2H in precipitation, surface water, and mangrove tissue water from a series of lakes with varying salinity and water isotope composition in Palau, and (2) measurements of mangrove tissue water and treatment water from a controlled simulation in which mangroves were treated with artificial rain of varying isotopic composition. Rainwater 2H/1H fluctuations of 30‰ over a one-month period explain up to 65% of the variance in leaf water δ2H for Bruguiera gymnorhiza mangroves from Palau despite lake water isotope differences among sites of up to 35‰. This indicates that in humid tropical settings, leaf water isotopes are more closely related to those of precipitation and water vapor than to those of lake surface water, explaining the observed change in apparent fractionation in B. gymnorhiza lipids with salinity. The relationship between leaf water and rainwater isotopes may be due to either equilibration of leaf water with water vapor in the nearly saturated air or direct foliar uptake of rain and/or dew. Foliar uptake is an important water source for many plants, but has not been documented in mangroves. We tested the capacity for mangroves to perform this function by

  10. A NORMETEX MODEL 15 M3/HR WATER VAPOR PUMPING TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-12-20

    Tests were performed using a Model 15 m{sup 3}/hr Normetex vacuum pump to determine if pump performance degraded after pumping a humid gas stream. An air feed stream containing 30% water vapor was introduced into the pump for 365 hours with the outlet pressure of the pump near the condensation conditions of the water. Performance of the pump was tested before and after the water vapor pumping test and indicated no loss in performance of the pump. The pump also appeared to tolerate small amounts of condensed water of short duration without increased noise, vibration, or other adverse indications. The Normetex pump was backed by a dual-head diaphragm pump which was affected by the condensation of water and produced some drift in operating conditions during the test.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  12. Analysis of the global ISCCP TOVS water vapor climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmeyer, Ian L.; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1994-01-01

    A climatological examination of the global water vapor field based on a multiyear period of successfull satellite-based observations is presented. Results from the multiyear global ISCCP TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) water vapor dataset as operationally produced by NESDIS and ISCCP are shown. The methods employed for the retrieval of precipitable water content (PWC) utilize infrared measurements collected by the TOVS instrument package flown aboard the NOAA series of operational polar-orbiting satellites. Strengths of this dataset include the nearly global daily coverage, availability for a multiyear period, operational internal quality checks, and its description of important features in the mean state of the atmosphere. Weaknesses of this PWC dataset include that the infrared sensors are unable to collect data in cloudy regions, the retrievals are strongly biased toward a land-based radiosonde first-guess dataset, and the description of high spatial and temporal variability is inadequate. Primary consequences of these factors are seen in the underestimation of ITCZ water vapor maxima, and underestimation of midlatitude water vapor mean and standard deviation values where transient atmospheric phenomena contribute significantly toward time means. A comparison of TOVS analyses to SSM/I data over ocean for the month of July 1988 shows fair agreement in the magnitude and distribution of the monthly mean values, but the TOVS fields exhibit much less temporal and spatial variability on a daily basis in comparison to the SSM/I analyses. The emphasis of this paper is on the presentation and documentation of an early satellite-based water vapor climatology, and description of factors that prevent a more accurate representation of the global water vapor field.

  13. Validation of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's OMI Water Vapor Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.

    2015-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive validation of SAO's OMI water vapor product. The SAO OMI water vapor slant column is retrieved using the 430 - 480 nm wavelength range. In addition to water vapor, the retrieval considers O3, NO2, liquid water, O4, C2H2O2, the Ring effect, water ring, 3rd order polynomial, common mode and under-sampling. The slant column is converted to vertical column using AMF. AMF is calculated using GEOS-Chem water vapor profile shape, OMCLDO2 cloud information and OMLER surface albedo information. We validate our product using NCAR's GPS network data over the world and RSS's gridded microwave data over the ocean. We also compare our product with the total precipitable water derived from the AERONET ground-based sun photometer data, the GlobVapour gridded product, and other datasets. We investigate the influence of sub-grid scale variability and filtering criteria on the comparison. We study the influence of clouds, aerosols and a priori profiles on the retrieval. We also assess the long-term performance and stability of our product and seek ways to improve it.

  14. Tracing Water Vapor and Ice During Dust Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Ciesla, Fred J.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-12-01

    The processes that govern the evolution of dust and water (in the form of vapor or ice) in protoplanetary disks are intimately connected. We have developed a model that simulates dust coagulation, dust dynamics (settling, turbulent mixing), vapor diffusion, and condensation/sublimation of volatiles onto grains in a vertical column of a protoplanetary disk. We employ the model to study how dust growth and dynamics influence the vertical distribution of water vapor and water ice in the region just outside the radial snowline. Our main finding is that coagulation (boosted by the enhanced stickiness of icy grains) and the ensuing vertical settling of solids results in water vapor being depleted, but not totally removed, from the region above the snowline on a timescale commensurate with the vertical turbulent mixing timescale. Depending on the strength of the turbulence and the temperature, the depletion can reach factors of up to ∼50 in the disk atmosphere. In our isothermal column, this vapor depletion results in the vertical snowline moving closer to the midplane (by up to 2 gas scale heights) and the gas-phase {{C}}/{{O}} ratio above the vertical snowline increasing. Our findings illustrate the importance of dynamical effects and the need for understanding coevolutionary dynamics of gas and solids in planet-forming environments.

  15. The response of stratospheric water vapor to a changing climate: Insights from in situ water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Maryann Racine

    Stratospheric water vapor plays an important role in the Earth system, both through its role in stratospheric ozone destruction and as a greenhouse gas contributing to radiative forcing of the climate. Highly accurate water vapor measurements are critical to understanding how stratospheric water vapor concentrations will respond to a changing climate. However, the past disagreement among water vapor instruments on the order of 1-2 ppmv hinders understanding of the mechanisms which control stratospheric humidity, and the reliable detection of water vapor trends. In response to these issues, we present a new dual axis water vapor instrument that combines the heritage Harvard Lyman-alpha hygrometer with the newly developed Harvard Herriott Hygrometer (HHH). The Lyman-alpha instrument utilizes ultraviolet photo-fragment fluorescence detection, and its accuracy has been demonstrated though rigorous laboratory calibrations and in situ diagnostic procedures. HHH employs a tunable diode near-IR laser to measure water vapor via direct absorption in a Herriott cell; it demonstrated in-flight precision of 0.1 ppmv (1-sec) with accuracy of 5%±0.5 ppmv. We describe these two measurement techniques in detail along with our methodology for calibration and details of the measurement uncertainties. We also examine the recent flight comparison of the two instruments with several other in situ hygrometers during the 2011 MACPEX campaign, in which five independent instruments agreed to within 0.7 ppmv, a significant improvement over past comparisons. Water vapor measurements in combination with simultaneous in situ measurements of O3, CO, CO2, HDO, and HCl are also used to investigate transport in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Data from the winter 2006 CR-AVE campaign and the summer 2007 TC4 campaign are analyzed in a one-dimensional mixing model to explore the seasonal importance of transport within the TTL via slow upward ascent, convective injection, and isentropic

  16. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  17. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  18. Water vapor - The wet blanket of microwave interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The various techniques that utilize microwave interferometry could be employed to determine distances of several thousand kilometers with an accuracy of 1 cm or 2 cm. Such measurements would be useful to obtain new knowledge of earth dynamics, greater insight into fundamental astronomical constants, and the ability to accurately navigate a spacecraft in interplanetary flight. There is, however, a basic problem, related to the presence of tropospheric water vapor, which has to be overcome before such measurements can be realized. Differing amounts of water vapor over the interferometer stations cause errors in the differential time of arrival which is the principal observable quantity. Approaches for overcoming this problem are considered, taking into account requirements for water vapor calibration to support interferometric techniques.

  19. Water vapor in the lower stratosphere measured from aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Guenther, B.; Dunn, P.

    1976-01-01

    Water vapor in the lower stratosphere was measured in situ by two aluminum oxide hygrometers mounted on the nose of an RB57 aircraft. Data were taken nearly continuously from January to May 1974 from an altitude of approximately 11 km to 19 km as the aircraft flew between 70 deg N and 50 deg S over the land areas in the Western Hemisphere. Pseudomeridional cross sections of water vapor and temperature are derived from the flight data and show mixing ratios predominantly between 2 and 4 micron gm/gm with an extreme range of 1 to 8 micron gm/gm. Measurement precision is estimated by comparing the simultaneously measured values from the two flight hygrometer systems. Accuracy is estimated to be about + or - 40 percent at 19 km. A height-averaged latitudinal cross section of water vapor shows symmetry of wet and dry zones.

  20. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m(3) and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an "Imminent Hazard" condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed.

  1. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D.; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M.; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m3 and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an “Imminent Hazard” condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed. PMID:23950637

  2. In Situ Observations of Water Vapor and Cirrus IWC in the Pacific TTL During ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Bui, T. V.; Woods, S.

    2014-12-01

    Despite its very low mixing ratios relative to the troposphere, water vapor in the lower stratosphere (LS) plays a significant role in Earth's radiative balance and climate system and is an important constituent in stratospheric chemistry. The low H2O content of air entering the LS is established to first order by dehydration processes controlled by the cold temperatures of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Cirrus clouds occur with high frequency and large spatial extent in the TTL, and those occurring near the thermal tropopause facilitate the final dehydration of stratosphere-bound air parcels. Uncertainties in aspects of the nucleation and growth of cirrus cloud particles and the sparseness of in situ water vapor and cirrus cloud observations with sufficient spatial resolution limit our ability to fully describe the final stages of the dehydration process before air enters the LS in the tropics. The NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) measurement campaign has yielded more than 140 hours of sampling from the Global Hawk UAS in the Pacific TTL during deployments in 2013 and 2014, including more than 30 hours sampling TTL cirrus. The high spatial and temporal resolution in situ measurements of water vapor and cirrus cloud properties made during ATTREX provide an outstanding dataset by which to characterize the Pacific TTL environment and evaluate our current understanding of the dynamical and microphysical processes that result in the dehydration of stratosphere-bound air in this region. Here we present a statistical analysis of the ATTREX water vapor, relative humidity and cirrus cloud crystal number and ice water content (IWC) data in order to investigate cirrus cloud formation and resulting potential for dehydration.

  3. Water vapor measurements in- and outside cirrus with the novel water vapor mass spectrometer AIMS-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Schlage, Romy; Voigt, Christiane; Jurkat, Tina; Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Zöger, Martin; Schäfler, Andreas; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Water vapor plays a crucial role for the earth's climate both directly via its radiative properties and indirectly due to its ability to form clouds. However, accurate measurements of especially low water vapor concentrations prevalent in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are difficult and exhibit large discrepancies between different instruments and methods. In order to address this issue and to provide a comprehensive water vapor data set necessary to gather a complete picture of cloud formation processes, four state-of-the-art hygrometers including the novel water vapor mass spectrometer AIMS-H2O were deployed on the DLR research aircraft HALO during the ML-Cirrus campaign in March/April 2014 over Europe. Here, we present first water vapor measurements of AIMS-H2O on HALO. The instrument performance is validated by intercomparison with the fluorescence hygrometer FISH and the laser hygrometer SHARC, both also mounted in the aircraft. This intercomparison shows good agreement between the instruments from low stratospheric mixing ratios up to higher H2O concentrations at upper tropospheric conditions. Gathering data from over 24 flight hours, no significant offsets between the instruments were found (mean of relative deviation

  4. Investigation of water vapor motion winds from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, Christopher S.; Nieman, Steven J.; Wanzong, Steven

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor imagery from geostationary satellites has been available for over a decade. These data are used extensively by operational analysts and forecasters, mainly in a qualitative mode (Weldon and Holmes 1991). In addition to qualitative applications, motions deduced in animated water vapor imagery can be used to infer wind fields in cloudless regimes, thereby augmenting the information provided by cloud-drift wind vectors. Early attempts at quantifying the data by tracking features in water vapor imagery met with modest success (Stewart et al. 1985; Hayden and Stewart 1987). More recently, automated techniques have been developed and refined, and have resulted in upper-level wind observations comparable in quality to current operational cloud-tracked winds (Laurent 1993). In a recent study by Velden et al. (1993) it was demonstrated that wind sets derived from Meteosat-3 (M-3) water vapor imagery can provide important environmental wind information in data void areas surrounding tropical cyclones, and can positively impact objective track forecasts. M-3 was repositioned to 75W by the European Space Agency in 1992 in order to provide complete coverage of the Atlantic Ocean. Data from this satellite are being transmitted to the U.S. for operational use. Compared with the current GOES-7 (G-7) satellite (positioned near 112W), the M-3 water vapor channel contains a superior horizontal resolution (5 km vs. 16 km ). In this paper, we examine wind sets derived using automated procedures from both GOES-7 and Meteosat-3 full disk water vapor imagery in order to assess this data as a potentially important source of large-scale wind information. As part of a product demonstration wind sets were produced twice a day at CIMSS during a six-week period in March and April (1994). These data sets are assessed in terms of geographic coverage, statistical accuracy, and meteorological impact through preliminary results of numerical model forecast studies.

  5. A critical review of measurements of water vapor absorption in the 840 to 1100 cm(-1) spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1987-01-01

    A set of eleven measurements of the water vapor continuum absorption in the 840 to 1100 sq cm spectral region is reviewed and compared with spectral models maintained by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory. The measurements were made in four different ways: spectrometer with a White cell, CO2 laser with a White cell, CO2 laser with a spectrophone, and broadband radiation source over a long atmospheric path. Where possible, the data were selected at a water vapor partial pressure of ten torr buffered to 760 torr with N2 or synthetic air and a temperature of between 296 and 300 K. The intercomparison of the data leads to several observations and conclusions. First, there are four sets of laboratory data taken with nitrogen as the buffer gas which generally agree well mutually and with AFGL's HITRAN code. Second, there is one set of laboratory data that shows that using air as the buffer gas gives a few percent decrease in the water vapor continuum compared with using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Third, the atmospheric long-path measurements for water vapor partial pressure below about 12 torr are roughly grouped within 20 percent of the HITRAN values. Fourth, there are three sets of spectrophone data for water vapor in synthetic air which are significantly higher than any of the other measurements. This discrepancy is attributed to the effects of impurity gases in the cell.

  6. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption.

  7. Profiling atmospheric water vapor using a fiber laser lidar system.

    PubMed

    De Young, Russell J; Barnes, Norman P

    2010-02-01

    A compact, lightweight, and efficient fiber laser lidar system has been developed to measure water vapor profiles in the lower atmosphere of Earth or Mars. The line narrowed laser consist of a Tm:germanate fiber pumped by two 792 nm diode arrays. The fiber laser transmits approximately 0.5 mJ Q- switched pulses at 5 Hz and can be tuned to water vapor lines near 1.94 microm with linewidth of approximately 20 pm. A lightweight lidar receiver telescope was constructed of carbon epoxy fiber with a 30 cm Fresnel lens and an advanced HgCdTe APD detector. This system has made preliminary atmospheric measurements.

  8. Spectroscopy underlying microwave remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, M. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a spectroscopist's view on the problem of recovery of the atmosphere humidity profile using modern microwave radiometers. Fundamental equations, including the description of their limitations, related to modeling of atmospheric water vapor absorption are given. A review of all reported to date experimental studies aimed at obtaining corresponding numerical parameters is presented. Best estimates of these parameters related to the Voigt (Lorentz, Gross, Van Vleck - Weisskopf and other equivalent) profile based modeling of the 22- and 183-GHz water vapor diagnostic lines and to non-resonance absorption as well as corresponding uncertainties are made on the basis of their comparative analysis.

  9. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  10. Role of Deep Convection in Establishing the Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Tropical Transition Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jamison A.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.

    2006-01-01

    The transport of H2O and HDO within deep convection is investigated with 3-D large eddy simulations (LES) using bin microphysics. The lofting and sublimation of HDO-rich ice invalidate the Rayleigh fractionation model of isotopologue distribution within deep convection. Bootstrapping the correlation of the ratio of HDO to H2O (deltaD) to water vapor mixing ratio (q(sub v)) through a sequence of convective events produced non-Rayleigh correlations resembling observations. These results support two mechanisms for stratospheric entry. Deep convection can inject air with water vapor of stratospheric character directly into the tropical transition layer (TTL). Alternatively, moister air detraining from convection may be dehydrated via cirrus formation n the TTL to produce stratospheric water vapor. Significant production of subsaturated air in the TTL via convective dehydration is not observed in these simulations, nor is it necessary to resolve the stratospheric isotope paradox.

  11. Tropical convective onset statistics and establishing causality in the water vapor-precipitation relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelin, J. D.; Kuo, Y. H.; Schiro, K. A.; Langenbrunner, B.; Mechoso, C. R.; Sahany, S.; Bernstein, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work by various authors has pointed to the role of humidity in the lower free troposphere in affecting the onset of deep convection in the tropics. Empirical relations between column water vapor and the onset of precipitation have been inferred to be related to this. Evidence includes deep-convective conditional instability calculations for entraining plumes, in which the lower free-tropospheric environment affects the onset of deep convection due to the impact on buoyancy of turbulent entrainment of dry versus moist air. Tropical Western Pacific in situ observations, and tropical ocean basin satellite retrievals in comparison to climate model diagnostics each indicate that substantial entrainment is required to explain the observed relationship. In situ observations from the GoAmazon field campaign confirm that the basic relationship holds over tropical land much as it does over tropical ocean (although with greater additional sensitivity to boundary layer variations and to freezing processes). The relationship between deep convection and water vapor is, however, a two-way street, with convection moistening the free troposphere. One might thus argue that there has not yet been a smoking gun in terms of establishing the causality of the precipitation-water vapor relationship. Parameter perturbation experiments in the coupled Community Earth System Model show that when the deep convective scheme has low values of entrainment, the set of statistics associated with the transition to deep convection are radically altered, and the observed pickup of precipitation with column water vapor is no longer seen. In addition to cementing the dominant direction of causality in the fast timescale precipitation-column water vapor relationship, the results point to impacts of this mechanism on the climatology. Because at low entrainment the convection can fire before the lower troposphere is moistened, the climatology of water vapor remains lower than observed. These

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING PROTOCOL TO SUPPORT ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to develop a methodology for sub-slab sampling to support the EPA guidance and vapor intrusion investigations after vapor intrusion has been established at a site. Methodologies for sub-slab air sampling are currently lacking in ref...

  13. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION USING INDOOR AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method for evaluating vapor intrusion using indoor and sub-slab air measurement and at the same time directly assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion in 15 homes and one business near the former R...

  14. Non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope effect observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying

    Twenty-seven precipitation samples from Chicago, IL and northwest part of Indiana were collected from 2003 to 2005. Twenty-five water vapor samples were collected at Alert, Canada (82° 30'N, 62° 19'W) from 2002 to 2005 by Lin Huang and her co-workers. Seven ice core samples from Dasuopu glacier, Chinese Himalayas (28° 23' N, 85° 43'W) were drilled by Lonnie G. Thompson and prepared by Mary E. Davis. Sample of Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation (SLAP) is available in the laboratory. Water samples were reacted with bromine pentafluoride to produce oxygen, which were then purified through molecular sieve and measured by Delta E gas source mass spectrometer. A lambda(MDF) = 0.529 +/- 0.003 (2sigma) for water is determined from measurement of local precipitation samples. No significant oxygen isotopic anomaly is found in SLAP and in ice core samples from Dasuopu glacier, Chinese Himalayas. Delta17O(CLP), oxygen isotopic anomaly relative to Chicago local precipitation, of -0.009‰ to 0.167‰ with a mean of 0.076‰ and a 2sigma standard error of 0.016‰ is observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada. About half of these Delta17O(CLP) data exhibit statistically significant excesses. Stacked seasonal trend of Delta17O(CLP) observed at Alert, Canada points to a maximum in late spring when the intrusion of stratospheric air is at its maximum and the height of Arctic tropopause is the lowest. However, no significant oxygen isotopic anomalies are found in ice core samples from Dasuopu and in SLAP. The positive excesses in Delta17O(CLP) seen in tropospheric water vapor at Alert, Canada could be explained by the transfer of positive oxygen isotopic anomalies through O3 → NOx → HOx → H2O chain in the stratosphere, and the subsequent mixing of this anomalous stratospheric water with tropospheric water vapor at Alert, Canada where the tropopause is low and where downward mixing of stratospheric air with tropospheric air takes place. The positive oxygen isotopic

  15. Oxidation and Volatilization of Silica-Formers in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At high temperatures SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica scale. Silica scales also react with water vapor to form a volatile Si(OH)4 species. These simultaneous reactions, one forming silica and the other removing silica, are described by paralinear kinetics. A steady state, in which these reactions occur at the same rate, is eventually achieved, After steady state is achieved, the oxide found on the surface is a constant thickness and recession of the underlying material occurs at a linear rate. The steady state oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the steady state recession rate can all be described in terms of the rate constants for the oxidation and volatilization reactions. In addition, the oxide thickness, the time to achieve steady state, and the recession rate can also be determined from parameters that describe a water vapor-containing environment. Accordingly, maps have been developed to show these steady state conditions as a function of reaction rate constants, pressure, and gas velocity. These maps can be used to predict the behavior of silica formers in water-vapor containing environments such as combustion environments. Finally, these maps are used to explore the limits of the paralinear oxidation model for SiC and Si3N4

  16. Water-Vapor Raman Lidar System Reaches Higher Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    A Raman lidar system for measuring the vertical distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is located at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) in California. Raman lidar systems for obtaining vertical water-vapor profiles in the troposphere have been in use for some time. The TMF system incorporates a number of improvements over prior such systems that enable extension of the altitude range of measurements through the tropopause into the lower stratosphere. One major obstacle to extension of the altitude range is the fact that the mixing ratio of water vapor in the tropopause and the lower stratosphere is so low that Raman lidar measurements in this region are limited by noise. Therefore, the design of the TMF system incorporates several features intended to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. These features include (1) the use of 355-nm-wavelength laser pulses having an energy (0.9 J per pulse) that is high relative to the laser-pulse energy levels of prior such systems, (2) a telescope having a large aperture (91 cm in diameter) and a narrow field of view (angular width .0.6 mrad), and (3) narrow-bandpass (wavelength bandwidth 0.6 nm) filters for the water-vapor Raman spectral channels. In addition to the large-aperture telescope, three telescopes having apertures 7.5 cm in diameter are used to collect returns from low altitudes.

  17. DETERMINING HOW VAPOR PHASE MTBE REACHES GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Region 2 and ORD have funded a RARE project for FY 2005/2006 to evaluate the prospects that MTBE (and other fuel components) in vapors that escape from an underground storage tank (UST) can find its way to ground water produced by monitoring wells at a gasoline filling statio...

  18. Characterization of Advanced Avalanche Photodiodes for Water Vapor Lidar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Halama, Gary E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2000-01-01

    Development of advanced differential absorption lidar (DIAL) receivers is very important to increase the accuracy of atmospheric water vapor measurements. A major component of such receivers is the optical detector. In the near-infrared wavelength range avalanche photodiodes (APD's) are the best choice for higher signal-to-noise ratio, where there are many water vapor absorption lines. In this study, characterization experiments were performed to evaluate a group of silicon-based APD's. The APD's have different structures representative of different manufacturers. The experiments include setups to calibrate these devices, as well as characterization of the effects of voltage bias and temperature on the responsivity, surface scans, noise measurements, and frequency response measurements. For each experiment, the setup, procedure, data analysis, and results are given and discussed. This research was done to choose a suitable APD detector for the development of an advanced atmospheric water vapor differential absorption lidar detection system operating either at 720, 820, or 940 nm. The results point out the benefits of using the super low ionization ratio (SLIK) structure APD for its lower noise-equivalent power, which was found to be on the order of 2 to 4 fW/Hz(sup (1/2)), with an appropriate optical system and electronics. The water vapor detection systems signal-to-noise ratio will increase by a factor of 10.

  19. Visualization of Atmospheric Water Vapor Data for SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, Mou-Liang; Chu, W. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop visualization tools to study the water vapor dynamics using the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 (SAGE 11) water vapor data. During the past years, we completed the development of a visualization tool called EZSAGE, and various Gridded Water Vapor plots, tools deployed on the web to provide users with new insight into the water vapor dynamics. Results and experiences from this project, including papers, tutorials and reviews were published on the main Web page. Additional publishing effort has been initiated to package EZSAGE software for CD production and distribution. There have been some major personnel changes since Fall, 1998. Dr. Mou-Liang Kung, a Professor of Computer Science assumed the PI position vacated by Dr. Waldo Rodriguez who was on leave. However, former PI, Dr. Rodriguez continued to serve as a research adviser to this project to assure smooth transition and project completion. Typically in each semester, five student research assistants were hired and trained. Weekly group meetings were held to discuss problems, progress, new research direction, and activity planning. Other small group meetings were also held regularly for different objectives of this project. All student research assistants were required to submit reports for conference submission.

  20. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Saturn's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, G. L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Carlson, R. C.; Jennings, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained numerous spectra of Saturn at varying spectral and spatial resolutions since Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2004. Emission lines due to water vapor in Saturn's stratosphere were first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Feuchtgruber et al 1997) and subsequently confirmed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (Rergin et al 2000). CIRS has detected water and the data permit the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Saturn. Emission lines of H2O on Saturn are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus. large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. Zonally averaged nadir spectra were produced every 10 degrees of latitude. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 5.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v4 band centered at 1304 cm(exp -1). The origin of water vapor is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing water ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of oxygen originates either from the Saturn system (from the rings or perhaps from Enceladus) or from the interplanetary medium. Connerney (1986) proposed a mechanism to transport water from the inner edge of the B-ring along magnetic field lines to specific latitudes (50N and 44S) on Saturn. Prange et al (2006) interpreted a minimum in the abundance of acetylene from ultraviolet spectra near 41S on Saturn as possibly due to an enhanced influx of water. Existing CIRS far-IR spectra are at relatively low spatial resolution, but observations at closer range planned for the extended mission will be able to test the "ring rain" mechanism by searching for localized water vapor enhancement at midlatitudes.

  1. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote sources of water for precipitation, based on the implementation of passive constituent tracers of water vapor (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. In this case, the major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In this approach, each WVT is associated with an evaporative source region, and tracks the water until it precipitates from the atmosphere. By assuming that the regional water is well mixed with water from other sources, the physical processes that act on the WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be computed within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. Furthermore, estimates of precipitation recycling can be compared with bulk diagnostic approaches. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional tracers, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic 2 regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In

  2. a Study of Gnss Water Vapor Reconstruction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, A. G.; Bento, F.; Crocker, P.; Fernandes, R. M.; Adams, D. K.; Miranda, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) observations are nowadays a well-established tool to measure the water vapor content in the atmosphere. This gas plays a major role in many processes concerning physics, thermodynamics and dynamics of the atmosphere. The knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the lower atmosphere (troposphere) is crucial for accurate quantitative prediction of precipitation and better understanding of many atmospheric processes like deep convective events. Major advantages of the use of GNSS observations are all-weather system, continuous unattended operation, high temporal resolution and an ever-increasing number of stations. The present work focuses on the study of the geometry and dynamics of moist convection, shallow and deep, through the use of 4D images of the atmosphere water vapor field, obtained from high-density GPS networks (i.e. tomographic inversion). For this, the SWART (SEGAL GNSS WAter Vapor ReconsTruction Image Software), a software package for GNSS water vapor reconstruction, has been developed. This package currently consists of four C++ programs. The C++ programs gather the necessary information to calculate the slant delays and to generate a file with the reconstructed image. The output consists in 2D slices of the 3D water vapor image in latitude, longitude or altitude. SWART is based on LOFTT_K (LOgiciel Français de Tomographie Troposphérique version Kalman) (Champollion 2005). We present the results of the comparison with LOFTT_K to validate SWART together with several tests covering diverse grid sizes and different number of receivers for the same water vapor image reconstruction. It is also analyzed the importance of the initial values for the image reconstruction. All these tests were realized with synthetic data, except for the grid area, which is from Marseilles, France. Finally, we present the current status of the analysis being carrying out for a dense network in Belem, Brazil

  3. Correcting Tritium Concentrations in Water Vapor Monitored with Silica Gel

    SciTech Connect

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1999-01-19

    A correction is needed to calculate the concentration of airborne tritium oxide when dried silica gel is used as the collector. This tracer study with tritiated water shows that the concentration of tritium in the water desorbed from silica gel is lower than in the adsorbed water by a fraction that increases with the amount of adsorbed water. The hypothesis was tested that the tritium in adsorbed tritiated water is diluted by isotopic exchange with non-tritiated water and hydroxyl groups in the silica gel collector. The extent of dilution was measured from 4 percent to 14 percent adsorbed water, which is typical of moisture on field collectors for monitoring airborne tritium oxide. For this entire range of percent adsorbed water, the inferred percent exchangeable water in the silica gel under study was 6.3 +/- 0.1 percent. This value compares to the silica gel weight loss of 5.3 percent by heating to 1,050 degrees C. An explanation of the difference is proposed. The contribution of the HTO/H2O vapor pressure isotope effect was considered in calculating isotopic exchange. A curve is presented for correcting the measured tritium concentration in the distillate from the silica gel as a function of the amount of adsorbed water. The tritium tracer procedure is recommended for determining the percent exchangeable water in other silica gels to correct tritium measurements of water vapor collected by them.

  4. Adsorption of N-hexane, methanol and water vapor and binary mixtures of N-hexane/water vapor on super activated carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Jesus Antonio

    Recent times have seen a large rise in the utilization of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) within a wide variety of industries due to their unique properties. Consequently, the fabrication, application and disposal of ENMs will inevitably lead to their release to the environment. Once ENMs are in the environment, they may undergo atmospheric transformations, such the sorption of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) or water vapor. These transformed ENMs may then affect the general public through inhalation -- or other pathways of exposure -- and those employed by the ever-growing nanotechnology sector are of particular vulnerability. As a result, it is important to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of a common carbon-based ENM under the presence of HAPs or water vapor which may adsorb onto them. This study investigated the unary and binary gas-phase adsorption of n-hexane, methanol and water vapor on super activated carbon nanoparticles (SACNPs) with a bench-scale adsorption system. Removal efficiencies, breakthrough tests, throughput ratios, adsorption capacities and kinetics modeling were completed to assess the adsorption behavior of the SACNPs.

  5. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  6. Alexandrite laser transmitter development for airborne water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas H.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Higdon, Noah S.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    In the DIAL technique, the water vapor concentration profile is determined by analyzing the lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned 'on' and 'off' a water vapor absorption line. Desired characteristics of the on-line transmitted laser beam include: pulse energy greater than or equal to 100 mJ, high-resolution tuning capability (uncertainty less than 0.25 pm), good spectral stability (jitter less than 0.5 pm about the mean), and high spectral purity (greater than 99 percent). The off-line laser is generally detuned less than 100 pm away from the water vapor line. Its spectral requirements are much less stringent. In our past research, we developed and demonstrated the airborne DIAL technique for water vapor measurements in the 720-nm spectral region using a system based on an alexandrite laser as the transmitter for the on-line wavelength and a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser for the off-line wavelength. This off-line laser has been replaced by a second alexandrite laser. Diode lasers are used to injection seed both lasers for frequency and linewidth control. This eliminates the need for the two intracavity etalons utilized in our previous alexandrite laser and thereby greatly reduces the risk of optical damage. Consequently, the transmitted pulse energy can be substantially increased, resulting in greater measurement range, higher data density, and increased measurement precision. In this paper, we describe the diode injection seed source, the two alexandrite lasers, and the device used to line lock the on-line seed source to the water vapor absorption feature.

  7. Columnar water vapor retrievals from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Turner, David D.; Cairns, Brian; Oinas, Valdar; Lacis, Andrew A.; Gutman, S.; Westwater, Ed R.; Smirnov, A.; Eilers, J.

    2009-01-26

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) measures direct and diffuse irradiances in the visible and near IR spectral range. In addition to characteristics of atmospheric aerosols, MFRSR data also allow retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV) column amounts, which are determined from the direct normal irradiances in the 940 nm spectral channel. The HITRAN 2004 spectral database was used in our retrievals to model the water vapor absorption. We present a detailed error analysis describing the influence of uncertainties in instrument calibration and spectral response, as well as those in available spectral databases, on the retrieval results. The results of our PWV retrievals from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operated by the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were compared with correlative standard measurements by Microwave Radiometers (MWRs) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) water vapor sensor, as well as with retrievals from other solar radiometers (AERONET’s CIMEL, AATS-6). Some of these data are routinely available at the SGP’s Central Facility, however, we also used measurements from a wider array of instrumentation deployed at this site during the Water Vapor Intensive Observation Period (WVIOP2000) in September – October 2000. The WVIOP data show better agreement between different solar radiometers or between different microwave radiometers (both groups showing relative biases within 4%) than between these two groups of instruments, with MWRs values being consistently higher (up to 14%) than those from solar instruments. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using MFRSR network data for creation of 2D datasets comparable with the MODIS satellite water vapor product.

  8. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo; Minoura, Tsuyoshi

    1995-05-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  9. Fixation of nitrogen in the presence of water vapor

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, Paul

    1984-01-01

    A process for the fixation of nitrogen is disclosed which comprises combining a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, metal oxide and water vapor, initially heating the combination to initiate a reaction which forms nitrate, but at a temperature and pressure range below the dissociation pressure of the nitrate. With or without the water component, the yield of fixed nitrogen is increased by the use of a Linde Molecular Sieve Catalyst.

  10. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Saturn's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Jennings, D. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained numerous spectra of Saturn at varying spectral and spatial resolutions since Saturn Orbit Insertion in 2001. Emission lines due to water vapor in Saturn's stratosphere were first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory [1] and subsequently confirmed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite [2], CIRS has detected water and the data permit the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Saturn. Emission lines of H2O on Saturn are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus, large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. long integrations at the full 0.5/cm spectral resolution were performed at targeted latitudes on Saturn. High emission angles were chosen to enhance stratospheric emission. Over the course of the prime and extended mission a set of observations has been built up spaced roughly every 10 degrees of latitude. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 5.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v'4 band centered at 1501/cm. The origin of water vapor is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing eater ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of oxygen originates either from the Saturn system (from the rings or perhaps from Enceladus) or from the interplanetary medium. Connerney [3] proposed a mechanism to transport water from the inner edge of the B-ring along magnetic field lines to specific latitudes (50N and 44S) on Saturn. Prange et al [4] interpreted a minimum in the abundance of acetylene from ultraviolet spectra gear 41S on Saturn as possibly due to an enhanced influx of water. We will be able to test the "ring rain" mechanism by searching, for localized water vapor enhancement at mid-latitudes. Our results may be used to constrain photochemical models of Saturn's stratosphere [5].

  11. Adsorption of Water Vapor on a Graphitized Carbon Black.

    PubMed

    Easton; Machin

    2000-11-01

    Absorption isotherms for water vapor on a highly graphitized carbon black, Sterling FT-G (2700), have been determined at 280.15 and 295.15 K. Interparticle capillary condensation with extensive hysteresis is observed but capillary condensation (adsorption) occurs under metastable, supersaturation conditions. Contact angles for water adsorbed on this carbon black are calculated and two models for capillary condensation are discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Use of a novel new irrigation system to observe and model water vapor flow through dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M.

    2013-12-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapor flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapor pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapor flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorption rather than capillarity, vapor flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapor pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapor pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapor flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapor phase. Experiments using this system therefore provide a rare opportunity to observe vapor flows initiating from a subsurface source without significant injection of heat. A model was developed to simulate water flow through the soil in liquid and vapor phase. In this model it was assumed that the two phases were in equilibrium. The equilibrium relationship was defined by a new mathematical expression that was developed to fit experimental data collected to characterize the sorption isotherm of three soils (sand, saline sand and top soil). The osmotic potential of the saline sand was defined as a function of water content using a continuous mathematical expression. The model was then calibrated to fit the data from laboratory experiments, in which the vapor flow into and out of the soil were quantified. The model successfully reproduced experimental observations of the total water flux, relative humidity and water content distribution in three soil types. This suggests that the model, including the proposed

  13. Reaction of LiD with water vapor: thermogravimetric and scanning electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balooch, M; Dinh, L N; LeMay, J D

    2000-09-14

    The kinetics of hydroxide film growth on LiD have been studied by the thermogravimetric method in nitrogen saturated with water vapor and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of samples that have been exposed to air with 50% relative humidity. The reaction probability is estimated to be 4 x 10{sup -7} for LiD exposed to ambient air with 50% relative humidity, suggesting that the diffusion through the hydroxide film is not the limiting step on the overall process at high moisture levels. The rate of growth is drastically reduced when the temperature is increased to 60 C.

  14. The Influence of Summertime Convection Over Southeast Asia on Water Vapor in the Tropical Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. S.; Fu, R.; Fueglistaler, S.; Liu, Y. S.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contributions of Southeast Asian convective source regions during boreal summer to water vapor in the tropical stratosphere are examined using Lagrangian trajectories. Convective sources are identified using global observations of infrared brightness temperature at high space and time resolution, and water vapor transport is simulated using advection-condensation. Trajectory simulations are driven by three different reanalysis data sets, GMAO MERRA, ERA-Interim, and NCEP/NCAR, to establish points of consistency and evaluate the sensitivity of the results to differences in the underlying meteorological fields. All ensembles indicate that Southeast Asia is a prominent boreal summer source of tropospheric air to the tropical stratosphere. Three convective source domains are identified within Southeast Asia: the Bay of Bengal and South Asian subcontinent (MON), the South China and Philippine Seas (SCS), and the Tibetan Plateau and South Slope of the Himalayas (TIB). Water vapor transport into the stratosphere from these three domains exhibits systematic differences that are related to differences in the bulk characteristics of transport. We find air emanating from SCS to be driest, from MON slightly moister, and from TIB moistest. Analysis of pathways shows that air detrained from convection over TIB is most likely to bypass the region of minimum absolute saturation mixing ratio over the equatorial western Pacific; however, the impact of this bypass mechanism on mean water vapor in the tropical stratosphere at 68 hPa is small 0.1 ppmv). This result contrasts with previously published hypotheses, and it highlights the challenge of properly quantifying fluxes of atmospheric humidity.

  15. Green Remediation Best Management Practices: Soil Vapor Extraction & Air Sparging

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Historically, approximately one-quarter of Superfund source control projects have involved soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sorbed to soil in the unsaturated (vadose) zone.

  16. ADVANCES IN INDOOR AIR VAPOR INTRUSION: GUIDANCE AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ongoing efforts between the Office of Research and Development and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response have included technical guidance support, field demonstration activities, data analysis, and technology transfer activities in evaluating the impacts of vapor intru...

  17. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, K.K.; Proffitt, M.H. ); Chan, K.R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R. ); Strahan, S.E. ); Wilson, J.C. ); Kley, D. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report results of total water, and water vapor measurements made in the upper troposphere and stratosphere during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) Tropical mission over Darwin, Australia. Measurements were made from an ER-2 aircraft by lyman-[alpha] hygrometers. The average lower stratosphere water vapor was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv), at a potential temperature of 375 K. This level is lower than the 3 to 4 ppmv water vapor level typical of the stratosphere.

  18. Preliminary endurance tests of water vaporizers for resistojet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, W. Earl; Macrae, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Three water vaporizers designed for resistojet applications were built and tested for periods up to 500 h and 250 thermal cycles. Two of the vaporizers were not sensitive to orientation with respect to gravity, an indication of likely compatibility with low-gravity environments. Some temperatures and pressures in the third were impacted by orientation, although operation was always stable. The pressure drop across the sand-filled version increased by 147 percent in 38 h and 19 thermal cycles. Bonding of the sand granules in the downstream end of the heat exchanger was the suspected cause of failure of this vaporizer. Pressure drops across the two sintered stainless steel-filled versions were more gradual. One, with a pore size of 60 microns, showed an 80 percent increase in 500 h and 250 thermal cycles and another, with a 10 microns poresize, showed a 29 percent increase in 350 h and 175 thermal cycles. Testing of the latter metal-filled vaporizer was ongoing as of this writing. Oxidation of the porous metal packing materials in these vaporizers, with subsequent deposition of oxide particles within the pores, was believed to have caused the observed increases in pressure drops.

  19. Absorptivity of water vapor for 10.6 micron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugh, E. R.; Krech, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is called to recent measurements of the absorptivity of water vapor to 10.6-micron laser radiation made using shock-heated H2O/H2 and H2O/Ar mixtures and a probe CO2 laser. It is noted that these measurements give values about a factor of 2 lower than Ludwig's (1971) low resolution values. It is also argued that Fowler's (1981) high values are not likely to be caused by excited water molecules. It is shown that very intense laser radiation would be required to obtain any appreciable vibrational nonequilibrium. Within the narrow spectral range of 944-948/cm, no significant variation in absorption coefficient (suitably normalized) is observed as a function of laser line, water vapor concentration, total pressure, or diluent gas.

  20. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  1. DIURNAL CYCLE OF PRECIPITABLE WATER VAPOR OVER SPAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Bennouna, Yasmine; de Frutos, A. M.

    2011-05-20

    Despite the importance of the diurnal cycle of precipitable water vapor (PWV), its knowledge is very limited due to the lack of data with sufficient temporal resolution. Currently, from GPS receivers, PWV can be obtained with high temporal resolution in all weather conditions for all hours of the day. In this study we have calculated the diurnal cycle of PWV for ten GPS stations over Spain. The minimum value is reached approximately at the same time at all the stations, ~0400-0500 UTC, whereas the maximum is reached in the second half of the day, but with a larger dispersion of its occurrence between stations. The amplitude of the cycle ranges between 0.72 mm and 1.78 mm. The highest values are recorded at the stations on the Mediterranean coast, with a doubling of the values of the stations on the Atlantic coast or inland. The amplitude of the PWV cycle, relative to the annual mean value, ranges between 8.8 % on the Mediterranean coast and 3.6 % on the Atlantic coast. Two distinctly different seasonal diurnal cycles have been identified, one in winter and other in summer, with spring and autumn being only transition states. The winter cycle is quite similar at all locations, whereas in summer, local effects are felt strongly, making the diurnal cycle quite different between stations. The amplitude of the summer cycle is 1.69 mm, it is almost double the winter one (0.93 mm). Analogous to the annual cycles, the seasonal cycles of the different stations are more similar during the night and early morning hours than during the afternoon. The observed features of the PWV diurnal cycle are explained in a qualitative way on the basis of the air temperature, the transport of moisture by local winds, and the turbulent vertical mixing.

  2. CRISM Limb Observations of Aerosols and Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, M.J.; Clancy, R.T.; Seelos, F.; Murchie, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Here we describe preliminary work on the retrieval of vertical profiles of aerosols and water vapor from the CRISM limb observations. The first full set of CRISM limb observations was taken in July 2009, with subsequent limb observations planned once every two months. Each set of limb observations contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude. Radiative transfer modeling taking account of aerosol scattering in the limb-viewing geometry is used to model the observations. The retrievals show the height to which dust and water vapor extend and the location and height of water ice clouds. Results from the First set of CRISM limb observations (July 2009, Ls=300) show dust aerosol well-mixed to about three scale heights above the surface with thin water ice clouds above the dust near the equator and at mid-northern latitudes. Water vapor is concentrated at high southern latitudes.

  3. Rapid Variability of Water Vapor Abundance in the Venus Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, Mark A.; Melnick, G. J.; Tolls, V.; Bergin, E. A.; Patten, B. M.

    2006-09-01

    We present the first detections of the water vapor ground-state rotational transition (at 556.9 GHz) and the 13CO(5-4) rotational transition (at 550.9 GHz) from the atmosphere of Venus, obtained with the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). These submillimeter transitions originate primarily from the 70-100 km altitude range, within the Venus mesosphere. Observations were obtained in December 2002, and January, March, and July 2004, coarsely sampling one Venus diurnal period as seen from Earth. Complementary observations of the 12CO(2-1) rotational transition (at 230.5 GHz) were obtained concurrently with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to help constrain global atmospheric parameters. The water vapor absorption line depth shows large variability among the four observing periods, with strong detections of the water line in December 2002 and July 2004, and no detections in January and March of 2004. Using a multi-transition inversion algorithm (combining temperature, carbon monoxide, and water profile retrieval under some constraints), we retrieved or found upper limits for the globally averaged mesospheric water vapor abundance for each period, finding variability over at least two orders of magnitude. The results are consistent with both temporal and diurnal variability, but with short-term fluctuations clearly dominating. The observations from December 2002 detected very rapid changes in water vapor abundance. Over five days, a deep ground-state water absorption feature consistent with a water abundance of 4.5±1.5 ppm suddenly gave way to a significantly shallower absorption, implying a decrease in the water abundance by a factor of nearly 50 in less than 48 hours. In 2004 similar changes in water vapor abundance are seen between the March and July SWAS observing periods, but variability on timescales of less than a week was not detected. M.A.G. gratefully acknowledges support from NASA contract NAG5-7946. G.J.M., V.T., E.A.B, and B.M.P. were supported by

  4. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of surface evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote geographic sources of surface evaporation for precipitation, based on the implementation of three-dimensional constituent tracers of regional water vapor sources (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. The major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In the WVT approach, each tracer is associated with an evaporative source region for a prognostic three-dimensional variable that represents a partial amount of the total atmospheric water vapor. The physical processes that act on a WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be predicted within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional sources, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In most North American continental regions, the local source of precipitation is

  5. Enhancing our Understanding of the Arctic Atmospheric Hydrological Cycle using Observations from an International Arctic Water Vapor Isotope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Werner, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the role of water vapor and clouds in positive feedback mechanisms, water vapor is a key player in the future of Arctic climate. Ecosystems and human societies are vulnerable to climate change through even minor changes in precipitation patterns, including the occurrence of extreme events. It is therefore essential to monitor, understand and model correctly the mechanisms of transport of moisture, at the regional scale. Water isotopes - the relative abundance of heavy and light water in the atmosphere - hold the key to understanding the physical processes influencing future Arctic climate. Water isotope observations in the atmosphere are a modern analog to the Rosetta Stone for understanding the processes involved in evaporation, moisture transport, cloud formation and to track moisture origin. Indeed, technological progress now allows continuous, in situ or remote sensing monitoring of water isotopic composition. In parallel, a growing number of atmospheric circulation models are equipped with the explicit modeling of water stable isotopes, allowing evaluation at the process scale. We present here data obtained through national or bi-national initiatives from stations onboard an icebreaker and land based stations in Greenland, Iceland, Svalbard, and Siberia - together forming an emerging international Arctic water vapor isotope network. Using water tagging and back trajectories we show water vapor of Arctic origin to have a high d-excess fingerprint. This show the potential of using water vapor isotopes as tracer for changes in the Arctic hydrological cycle. Using the network of monitoring stations we quantify using the isotopes advection of air masses and the key processes affecting the water vapor en-route between stations. We have successfully used the obtained atmospheric water vapor isotope observations to benchmark isotope-enabled general circulation models. This comparison allows us to address key processes of the atmospheric hydrological cycle for

  6. Tm:germanate Fiber Laser for Planetary Water Vapor Atmospheric Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; De Young, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The atmospheric profiling of water vapor is necessary for finding life on Mars and weather on Earth. The design and performance of a water vapor lidar based on a Tm:germanate fiber laser is presented.

  7. An insight into the western Pacific wintertime moisture sources using dual water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangarajan, Ravi; Laskar, Amzad H.; Bhattacharya, Sourendra K.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2017-04-01

    Continuous measurements of isotopic ratios in atmospheric water vapor in a western Pacific region (Taipei, Taiwan) in two winters (2011 and 2012) were made and analyzed to understand the moisture source characteristics. In wintertime, the so-called East Asian Monsoon dominates, largely affecting the climate and meteorology of this region. Being located in the subtropical region, Taipei provides an ideal opportunity for studying interactions between high latitude cold and dry continental air masses and low to mid-latitude warm and wet oceanic air. Indeed, the dual isotope function, d-excess shows the presence of two distinct moisture sources, contributing to the winter vapor isotope variability. Undoubtedly, the dominant moisture source is the high latitude continental cold air masses reaching Taipei with d-excess values of >20‰. Alongside, wet and warm air masses characterized by strong air-sea interaction from the surrounding oceans, possessing d-excess value of ∼10‰ also play a role. The interactions of these two distinct air masses cause the d-excess values to change by as much as ∼20‰ in a few days. Multiple regression analysis shows that source moisture composition and water vapor mixing ratio combined control over 60% of the observed variability. We developed a box model to show that both high and low d-excess events in the winter are primarily controlled by the humidity deficit over the ocean. The information obtained in this study could be used in interpreting the paleoclimate proxies within the East Asian region.

  8. Oxygen isotope anomaly observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada and the implication for the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Clayton, Robert N; Huang, Lin; Nakamura, Noboru; Lyons, James R

    2013-09-24

    To identify the possible anomalous oxygen isotope signature in stratospheric water predicted by model studies, 25 water vapor samples were collected in 2003-2005 at Alert station, Canada (82°30'N), where there is downward transport of stratospheric air to the polar troposphere, and were analyzed for δ(17)O and δ(18)O relative to Chicago local precipitation (CLP). The latter was chosen as a reference because the relatively large evaporative moisture source should erase any possible oxygen isotope anomaly from the stratosphere. A mass-dependent fractionation coefficient for meteoric waters, λMDF(H2O) = 0.529 ± 0.003 [2σ standard error (SE)], was determined from 27 CLP samples collected in 2003-2005. An oxygen isotopic anomaly of Δ(17)O = 76 ± 16 ppm (2σ SE) was found in water vapor samples from Alert relative to CLP. We propose that the positive oxygen isotope anomalies observed at Alert originated from stratospheric ozone, were transferred to water in the stratosphere, and subsequently mixed with tropospheric water at high latitudes as the stratospheric air descended into the troposphere. On the basis of this ground signal, the average Δ(17)O in stratospheric water vapor predicted by a steady-state box model is ∼40‰. Seven ice core samples (1930-1991) from Dasuopu glacier (Himalayas, China) and Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation did not show an obvious oxygen isotope anomaly, and Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water exhibited a negative Δ(17)O relative to CLP. Six Alert snow samples collected in March 2011 and measured at Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif sur Yvette, France, had (17)Oexcess of 45 ± 5 ppm (2σ SE) relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water.

  9. Stable Calibration of Raman Lidar Water-Vapor Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Iain S.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been devised to ensure stable, long-term calibration of Raman lidar measurements that are used to determine the altitude-dependent mixing ratio of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Because the lidar measurements yield a quantity proportional to the mixing ratio, rather than the mixing ratio itself, calibration is necessary to obtain the factor of proportionality. The present method involves the use of calibration data from two sources: (1) absolute calibration data from in situ radiosonde measurements made during occasional campaigns and (2) partial calibration data obtained by use, on a regular schedule, of a lamp that emits in a known spectrum determined in laboratory calibration measurements. In this method, data from the first radiosonde campaign are used to calculate a campaign-averaged absolute lidar calibration factor (t(sub 1)) and the corresponding campaign-averaged ration (L(sub 1)) between lamp irradiances at the water-vapor and nitrogen wavelengths. Depending on the scenario considered, this ratio can be assumed to be either constant over a long time (L=L(sub 1)) or drifting slowly with time. The absolutely calibrated water-vapor mixing ratio (q) obtained from the ith routine off-campaign lidar measurement is given by q(sub 1)=P(sub 1)/t(sub 1)=LP(sub 1)/P(sup prime)(sub 1) where P(sub 1) is water-vapor/nitrogen measurement signal ration, t(sub 1) is the unknown and unneeded overall efficiency ratio of the lidar receiver during the ith routine off-campaign measurement run, and P(sup prime)(sub 1) is the water-vapor/nitrogen signal ratio obtained during the lamp run associated with the ith routine off-campaign measurement run. If L is assumed constant, then the lidar calibration is routinely obtained without the need for new radiosonde data. In this case, one uses L=L(sub 1) = P(sup prime)(sub 1)/t(sub 1), where P(sub 1)(sup prime) is the water-vapor/nitrogen signal ratio obtained during the lamp run associated

  10. Validation and update of OMI Total Column Water Vapor product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqun; Gonzalez Abad, Gonzalo; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly

    2016-09-01

    The collection 3 Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Total Column Water Vapor (TCWV) data generated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's (SAO) algorithm version 1.0 and archived at the Aura Validation Data Center (AVDC) are compared with NCAR's ground-based GPS data, AERONET's sun-photometer data, and Remote Sensing System's (RSS) SSMIS data. Results show that the OMI data track the seasonal and interannual variability of TCWV for a wide range of climate regimes. During the period from 2005 to 2009, the mean OMI-GPS over land is -0.3 mm and the mean OMI-AERONET over land is 0 mm. For July 2005, the mean OMI-SSMIS over the ocean is -4.3 mm. The better agreement over land than over the ocean is corroborated by the smaller fitting residuals over land and suggests that liquid water is a key factor for the fitting quality over the ocean in the version 1.0 retrieval algorithm. We find that the influence of liquid water is reduced using a shorter optimized retrieval window of 427.7-465 nm. As a result, the TCWV retrieved with the new algorithm increases significantly over the ocean and only slightly over land. We have also made several updates to the air mass factor (AMF) calculation. The updated version 2.1 retrieval algorithm improves the land/ocean consistency and the overall quality of the OMI TCWV data set. The version 2.1 OMI data largely eliminate the low bias of the version 1.0 OMI data over the ocean and are 1.5 mm higher than RSS's "clear" sky SSMIS data in July 2005. Over the ocean, the mean of version 2.1 OMI-GlobVapour is 1 mm for July 2005 and 0 mm for January 2005. Over land, the version 2.1 OMI data are about 1 mm higher than GlobVapour when TCWV < 15 mm and about 1 mm lower when TCWV > 15 mm.

  11. Simulations of Water Vapor in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Nebuda, Sharon; Verter, Frances; Rood, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    A detailed study of the water vapor budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere of the "Finite Volume CCM3" (FVCCM3) model is presented. The model is based on a combination of a finite-volume dynamical core (developed by Lin and Rood) and the physical package from Version 3 of the Community Climate Model (CCM3, developed at NCAR). The model was used with a horizontal resolution of 2 by 2.5 degrees and 55 levels, with the upper boundary at 0.0lhPa and a vertical resolution of about 1.2km near the tropopause. Most results presented are from a 17-year simulation performed for the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. It is shown that the model simulates a realistic thermal structure in the tropical tropopause region and that water vapor distributions are in qualitative accord with observations (which are uncertain). The longitudinal structure of the tropical atmosphere is slightly too asymmetric, compared to reasonable estimates of the truth. The processes leading to the horizontal and vertical transport of water vapor in the tropopause region are analyzed in detail. Special attention is given to the realism of horizontal transport events (the ability of the model to retain sharply defined features) and to the role of localized vertical motions in transporting air (and water vapor) between the troposphere and stratosphere. It is shown that the vertical transport of water vapor in the tropical lower stratosphere occurs at about the same rate as that observed, while in many other models this vertical transport is too fast.

  12. Water vapor permeability of the rigid-shelled gecko egg.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robin M

    2012-07-01

    The vast majority of squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) produce parchment-shelled eggs that absorb water during incubation, and thus increase in mass, volume, and surface area. In contrast, females from a single monophyletic lineage of gekkotan lizards produce rigid-shelled eggs. These eggs are functionally comparable to those of birds, that is, at oviposition, eggs contain all the water needed for development, and their mass decreases during incubation via the diffusion of water vapor through the shell. I determined patterns of water loss and shell permeability to water vapor from oviposition to hatching for the rigid-shelled eggs of the gekkonid Chrondrodactylus turneri and compared permeability of C. turneri eggs to those of birds and other squamates. Chrondrodactylus turneri eggs incubated at 28.5°C and 40% relative humidity (RH) decreased in mass by 14% over the course of a 68-day incubation period. The rate of water loss varied during incubation; egg mass decreased rapidly during the first 8 days of incubation, declined at a low constant rate during the next 35 days, and then decreased rapidly during the final 25 days of incubation. Overall permeability was 0.17 mg/day/kPa/cm(2) . Percent water loss of rigid-shelled gecko eggs during incubation is similar to that exhibited by birds, but water vapor permeability is about one-third that of bird eggs and several orders of magnitude lower than that of parchment-shelled squamate eggs. In general, the water economy of their eggs may be associated with the adaptive radiation of the rigid-shelled sphaerodactylid, phyllodactylid, and gekkonid geckos.

  13. Fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate in hard vacuum and water vapor. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Compact specimens of 25 mm thick aluminum alloy plate were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Crack growth rates were determined at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz in hard vacuum and laboratory air, and in mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. A significant effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth rates was observed at the lowest water vapor pressure tested. Crack rates changed little for pressures up to 1.03 kPa, but abruptly accelerated at higher pressures. At low stress intensity factor ranges, cracking rates at the lowest and highest water vapor pressure tested were, respectively, two and five times higher than rates in vacuum. Although a frequency was observed in laboratory air, cracking rates in water vapor and vacuum are insensitive to a ten-fold change in frequency. Surfaces of specimens tested in water vapor and vacuum exhibited different amounts of residual deformation. Reduced deformation on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in water vapor suggests embrittlement of the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip as a result of environmental interaction.

  14. Development of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    The activities involved in the design, development, and test of a preprototype vapor compression distillation water recovery subsystem are described. This subsystem, part of a larger regenerative life support evaluation system, is designed to recover usable water from urine, urinal rinse water, and concentrated shower and laundry brine collected from three space vehicle crewmen for a period of 180 days without resupply. Details of preliminary design and testing as well as component developments are included. Trade studies, considerations leading to concept selections, problems encountered, and test data are also presented. The rework of existing hardware, subsystem development including computer programs, assembly verification, and comprehensive baseline test results are discussed.

  15. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  16. THE BACTERICIDAL ACTION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL VAPOR ON MICROORGANISMS SUSPENDED IN AIR. I

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, O. H.; Bigg, Edward; Puck, Theodore T.; Miller, Benjamin F.

    1942-01-01

    It has been found that propylene glycol vapor dispersed into the air of an enclosed space produces a marked and rapid bactericidal effect on microorganisms introduced into such an atmosphere in droplet form. Concentrations of 1 gm. of propylene glycol vapor in two to four million cc. of air produced immediate and complete sterilization of air into which pneumococci, streptococci, staphylococci, H. influenzae, and other microorganisms as well as influenza virus had been sprayed. With lesser concentrations of propylene glycol, rapid and marked reduction in the number of air-borne bacteria occurred, but complete sterilization of the air required a certain interval of time. Pronounced effects on both pneumococci and hemolytic streptococci were observed when concentrations as low as 1 gm. of glycol to fifty million cc. of air were employed. Numerous control tests showed that failure of the glycol-treated microorganisms to grow on the agar plates was due to actual death of the bacteria. The means by which propylene glycol vapor produces its effect on droplet-borne bacteria is discussed and data relating the bactericidal properties of propylene glycol in vitro to the lethal action of its vapor is presented. Atmospheres containing propylene glycol vapor are invisible, odorless, and non-irritating. This glycol is essentially non-toxic when given orally and intravenously. Tests on possible deleterious effects of breathing propylene glycol containing atmospheres over long periods of time are being carried out. PMID:19871209

  17. A summary of meteorological requirements for water vapor data and possible space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The accuracy of water vapor measurement required by modelers and forecasters at a number of scales of motion is discussed. Direct and indirect methods for operational use in obtaining atmospheric water vapor data are reviewed along with meteorological applications of water vapor data obtained by a space shuttle laboratory lidar system.

  18. Effects of Satellite Spectral Resolution and Atmospheric Water Vapor on Retrieval of Near-Ground Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-28

    alternate low-level water vapor profile was considered. This " dry " water vapor profile (dashed in Fig. I) was specified to be equal to the "basic...the dry water vapor profile for the night situation. As expected, the unresolvable perturbations of surface temperature were smaller for the dry

  19. Water vapor d2H dynamics over China derived from SCIAMACHY satellite measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates water vapor isotopic patterns and controls over China using high-quality water vapor delta2H data retrieved from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) observations. The results show that water vapor delta2H values on both annual and...

  20. A water vapor Raman lidar as part of the Swiss meteorology service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinoev, T.; Arshinov, Y.; Bobrovnikov, S.; Ristori, P.; Calpini, B.; van den Bergh, H.; Parlange, M. B.; Simeonov, V.

    2009-09-01

    Vertical water vapor profiles with high time resolution are necessary for improved numerical weather prediction (NWP). Meteorological services rely, in part, on NWP models for short to mid-term weather forecasting. Typically vertical water vapor profiles are acquired from twice a day radiosonde observations which have time resolution insufficient to resolve rapidly changing meteorological phenomena. New operational instruments with near real-time sampling of the water vapor field are needed. Raman LIDARs can provide vertical humidity profiles within the troposphere with time and range resolution suitable for NWP model assimilation and validation. That is why in 2004 the Swiss meteo-service (MeteoSwiss), the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), initiated a project to build an automated Raman lidar for day and night vertical profiling of tropospheric water vapor and aerosol properties. Currently RALMO (Raman Lidar for meteorological observations) is operational at MeteoSwiss aerological station at Payerne. It is fully automated, self-contained, eye-safe instrument for day and night-time vertical profiling of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, and extinction within the troposphere. The lidar profiles of water vapor mixing ratio have vertical resolution from 15 m (boundary layer) to 100-450 m (free troposphere) and time resolution of 2 min (boundary layer) to 30 min (free troposphere). The range resolved aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are measured with similar resolution. The lidar operational range is from ~50 m to 5 km during daytime (detection limit of 0.2 g/kg), and from ~50 m to 10 km night-time. LabView based software allows continuous fully automated operation. Automated data treatment software reads the accumulated lidar data, derives vertical profiles of water vapor mixing ratio (grams per kilogram of dry air) estimates statistical error, and stores the result

  1. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40{degrees}C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54{degrees}C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  2. Removal of gasoline vapors from air streams by biofiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, W.A.; Kant, W.D.; Colwell, F.S.; Singleton, B.; Lee, B.D.; Andrews, G.F.; Espinosa, A.M.; Johnson, E.G.

    1993-03-01

    Research was performed to develop a biofilter for the biodegradation of gasoline vapors. The overall goal of this effort was to provide information necessary for the design, construction, and operation of a commercial gasoline vapor biofilter. Experimental results indicated that relatively high amounts of gasoline vapor adsorption occur during initial exposure of the biofilter bed medium to gasoline vapors. Biological removal occurs over a 22 to 40[degrees]C temperature range with removal being completely inhibited at 54[degrees]C. The addition of fertilizer to the relatively fresh bed medium used did not increase the rates of gasoline removal in short term experiments. Microbiological analyses indicated that high levels of gasoline degrading microbes are naturally present in the bed medium and that additional inoculation with hydrocarbon degrading cultures does not appreciably increase gasoline removal rates. At lower gasoline concentrations, the vapor removal rates were considerably lower than those at higher gasoline concentrations. This implies that system designs facilitating gasoline transport to the micro-organisms could substantially increase gasoline removal rates at lower gasoline vapor concentrations. Test results from a field scale prototype biofiltration system showed volumetric productivity (i.e., average rate of gasoline degradation per unit bed volume) values that were consistent with those obtained with laboratory column biofilters at similar inlet gasoline concentrations. In addition, total benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal over the operating conditions employed was 50 to 55%. Removal of benzene was approximately 10 to 15% and removal of the other members of the BTEX group was much higher, typically >80%.

  3. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor Utilizing Robotic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Ngoc; DeYoung, Russell J.; Prasad, Coorg R.; Laufer, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    A new unpiloted air vehicle (UAV) based water vapor DIAL system will be described. This system is expected to offer lower operating costs, longer test duration and severe weather capabilities. A new high-efficiency, compact, light weight, diode-pumped, tunable Cr:LiSAF laser will be developed to meet the UAV payload weight and size limitations and its constraints in cooling capacity, physical size and payload. Similarly, a new receiver system using a single mirror telescope and an avalanche photo diode (APD) will be developed. Projected UAV parameters are expected to allow operation at altitudes up to 20 km, endurance of 24 hrs and speed of 400 km/hr. At these conditions measurements of water vapor at an uncertainty of 2-10% with a vertical resolution of 200 m and horizontal resolution of 10 km will be possible.

  4. Air-water centrifugal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    A sealed cylindrical container is filled with air and water. The container rotation and the axial gradient of temperature induce the steady axisymmetric meridional circulation of both fluids due to the thermal buoyancy and surface-tension (Marangoni) effects. If the temperature gradient is small, the water circulation is one-cellular while the air circulation can be one- or two-cellular depending on water fraction Wf. The numerical simulations are performed for the cylinder length-to-radius ratio l = 1 and l = 4. The l = 4 results and the analytical solution for l → ∞ agree in the cylinder's middle part. As the temperature gradient increases, the water circulation becomes one-, two-, or three-cellular depending on Wf. The results are of fundamental interest and can be applied for bioreactors.

  5. Water vapor analysis with use of sunphotometry and radiosoundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakszys, Paulina; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomek; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Strzalkowska, Agata; Markuszewski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    Information about vertically integrated content of water vapor in the atmosphere and type, composition and concentration of aerosols is relevant in many types of atmospheric studies. Such information is required to understand mechanisms of global climate and its further modeling (Smirnov et al., 2000). This work is devoted to the description of a basic technique of analysis and comparing the derivation of Columnar Water Vapor (CWV) from different instruments, such as a radiosonde and a sunphotometer. The measurements were carried out using Microtops II Ozone Monitor & Sunphotometer during the cruises onboard the R/V Oceania (13 cruises) and from one cruise onboard of the SY TASK in the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were collected for the NASA program Maritime Aerosol Network. Data collected with the DiGICORA III Radiosonde (RS92) come from the webpage of the University of Wyoming, Department of Atmospheric Science. The first instrument, sunphotometer, allows us to collect data on days that are cloud-free. The Microtops II is capable of measuring the total ozone column, total precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical depth at 1020 nm (Morys et al. 2001; Ichoku et al., 2002). Each of these parameters is automatically derived. Data collected by Microtops have been processed with the pre- and post-field calibration and automatic cloud clearing. Precipitable water vapor in the column was derived from the 936nm channel. Detailed data description is available on the AERONET webpage. In radiousoundings the total precipitable water is the water that occurs in a vertical column of a unit cross-sectional area between any two specified levels, commonly expressed as from the earth's surface to the 'top' of the atmosphere. The Integrated Precipitable Water Vapor (IPWV) is the height of liquid water that would result from the condensation of all water vapor in a column. The study of one cruise (29 March - 20 April) shows that 241 Microtops measurements were made, each of

  6. IR spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Yu N; Petrova, T M; Solodov, A M; Solodov, A A

    2010-12-06

    The absorption spectrum of the water vapor, confined in the nanoporous silica aerogel, was measured within 5000-5600 cm(-1) with the IFS 125 HR Fourier spectrometer. It has been shown, that tight confinement of the molecules by the nanoporous size leads to the strong lines broadening and shift. For water vapor lines, the HWHM of confined molecules are on the average 23 times larger than those for free molecules. The shift values are in the range from -0.03 cm(-1) to 0.09 cm(-1). Some spectral lines have negative shift. The data on the half-widths and center shifts for some strongest H(2)O lines have been presented.

  7. An automated dynamic water vapor permeation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Phillip; Kendrick, Cyrus; Rivin, Donald; Charmchii, Majid; Sicuranza, Linda

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an automated apparatus developed to measure the transport of water vapor through materials under a variety of conditions. The apparatus is more convenient to use than the traditional test methods for textiles and clothing materials, and allows one to use a wider variety of test conditions to investigate the concentration-dependent and nonlinear transport behavior of many of the semipermeable membrane laminates which are now available. The dynamic moisture permeation cell (DMPC) has been automated to permit multiple setpoint testing under computer control, and to facilitate investigation of transient phenomena. Results generated with the DMPC are in agreement with and of comparable accuracy to those from the ISO 11092 (sweating guarded hot plate) method of measuring water vapor permeability.

  8. Diode laser based water vapor DIAL using modulated pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Phong Le Hoai; Abo, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a diode laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for measuring lower-tropospheric water vapor profile using the modulated pulse technique. The transmitter is based on single-mode diode laser and tapered semiconductor optical amplifier with a peak power of 10W around 800nm absorption band, and the receiver telescope diameter is 35cm. The selected wavelengths are compared to referenced wavelengths in terms of random error and systematic errors. The key component of modulated pulse technique, a macropulse, is generated with a repetition rate of 10 kHz, and the modulation within the macropulse is coded according to a pseudorandom sequence with 100ns chip width. As a result, we evaluate both single pulse modulation and pseudorandom coded pulse modulation technique. The water vapor profiles conducted from these modulation techniques are compared to the real observation data in summer in Japan.

  9. A new passive sampler for collecting atmospheric tritiated water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bin; Chen, Bo; Zhuo, Weihai; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2017-04-01

    A new passive sampler was developed for collecting environmental tritiated water vapor. The construction of the sampler was improved according to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in which the influence on vapor collection by the turbulence inside the sampler was considered. Through changes in temperature from 5 °C to 35 °C and relative humidity from 45% to 90%, the new sampler revealed stable performance of the sampling rate. Compared with the previous samplers, the new sampler significantly lowered the effect of wind speed. Using the adsorption kinetic curve of the sampler provided in the co-comparison experiments, the quantitative relationship between the mass of adsorbed water and the cumulative absolute humidity exposure was established. Field applications in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant show that the data obtained by the new samplers is consistent with the active measurement. The sampler was preliminarily proven to be reliable and flexible for field investigation of HTO in the atmosphere.

  10. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  11. Phoenix Water Vapor Measurements using the SSI Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamppari, Leslie; Lemmon, Mark T.

    2016-10-01

    The Phoenix and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft participated together in an observation campaign that was a coordinated effort to study the Martian atmosphere. These coordinated observations were designed to provide near-simultaneous observations of the same column of atmosphere over the Phoenix lander. Seasonal coverage was obtained at Ls=5-10° resolution and diurnal coverage was obtained as often as possible and with as many times of day as possible. One key aspect of this observation set was the means to compare the amount of water measured in the whole column (via the MRO Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM; Murchie et al., 2007) and the Phoenix Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) with that measured at the surface (via the Phoenix Thermal and Electrical Conductivity probe (TECP; Zent et al., 2008) which contained a humidity sensor). This comparison, along with the Phoenix LIDAR observations of the depth to which aerosols are mixed (Whiteway et al., 2008, 2009), provides clues to the water vapor mixing ratio profile. Tamppari et al. (2009) showed that examination of a subset of these coordinated observations indicate that the water vapor is not well mixed in the atmosphere up to a cloud condensation height at the Phoenix location during northern summer, and results indicated that a large amount of water must be confined to the lowest 0.5-1 km. This is contrary to the typical assumption that water vapor is "well-mixed."Following a similar approach to Titov et al. (2000), we use the Phoenix SSI camera [Lemmon et al., 2008] filters to detect water vapor: LA = 930.7 nm (broad), R4 = 935.5 nm (narrow), and R5 = 935.7 nm (narrow). We developed a hybrid DISORT-spherical model (DISORT model, Stamnes et al. 1988) to model the expected absorption due to a prescribed water vapor content and profile, to search for matches to the observations. Improvements to the model have been made and recent analysis using this model and comparisons to

  12. The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schiller, C.; Ebert, V.; Krämer, M.; Peter, T.; Amarouche, N.; Avallone, L. M.; Bauer, R.; Bozóki, Z.; Christensen, L. E.; Davis, S. M.; Durry, G.; Dyroff, C.; Herman, R. L.; Hunsmann, S.; Khaykin, S. M.; Mackrodt, P.; Meyer, J.; Smith, J. B.; Spelten, N.; Troy, R. F.; Vömel, H.; Wagner, S.; Wienhold, F. G.

    2014-04-01

    The AquaVIT-1 Intercomparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor Measurement Techniques was conducted at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in October 2007. The overall objective was to intercompare state-of-the-art and prototype atmospheric hygrometers with each other and with independent humidity standards under controlled conditions. This activity was conducted as a blind intercomparison with coordination by selected referees. The effort was motivated by persistent discrepancies found in atmospheric measurements involving multiple instruments operating on research aircraft and balloon platforms, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor reaches its lowest atmospheric values (less than 10 ppm). With the AIDA chamber volume of 84 m3, multiple instruments analyzed air with a common water vapor mixing ratio, either by extracting air into instrument flow systems, locating instruments inside the chamber, or sampling the chamber volume optically. The intercomparison was successfully conducted over 10 days during which pressure, temperature, and mixing ratio were systematically varied (50 to 500 hPa, 185 to 243 K, and 0.3 to 152 ppm). In the absence of an accepted reference instrument, the reference value was taken to be the ensemble mean of a core subset of the measurements. For these core instruments, the agreement between 10 and 150 ppm of water vapor is considered good with variation about the reference value of about ±10% (±1σ). In the region of most interest between 1 and 10 ppm, the core subset agreement is fair with variation about the reference value of ±20% (±1σ). The upper limit of precision was also derived for each instrument from the reported data. These results indicate that the core instruments, in general, have intrinsic skill to determine unknown water vapor mixing ratios with an accuracy of at least ±20%. The implication for atmospheric measurements is

  13. Estimation of precipitable water vapor at GPS sites in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali Idrissi, A.; Ouazar, D.; Bock, O.; Fadil, A.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of water vapor in both time and space is essential for understanding weather and global climate change. This study presents the results of precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates from GPS data for three continuously operating GPS stations in Morocco (Rabat, Tetouan, and Ifrane) for the period 2001 to 2007. The conversion of atmospheric delays to integrated water vapor was carried out using interpolated surface meteorological parameters derived from the global numerical weather model analysis from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The surface pressure extracted from the NCEP model was compared with observations provided from the synoptic network of the Moroccan Meteorological Agency (DMN). Good agreement was found between the two data sets with a bias of less than 1hPa. We compared the GPS derived PWV with the nearest radiosondes at the Rabat and Tetouan stations. The results show overall good agreement between the two data sets (mean difference < 2.5Kg/m2). The NCEP PWV compared well with GPS observations with a mean difference of less than 2.5 Kg/m2 and a standard deviation of less than 3.5 Kg/m2, confirming the potential of ground based GPS to provide an accurate and continuous description of water vapor field variations. The study showed by means of GPS, radiosondes and both NCEP model, a clear seasonal cycle of PWV with the highest values recorded during June, July, August, and September, peaking at 29 Kg/m2. The highest seasonal modulations seen at the 3 GPS stations were linked to large-scale atmospheric circulation.

  14. Extratropical influence of upper tropospheric water vapor on Greenhouse warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Hu, Hua

    1997-01-01

    Despite its small quantity, the importance of upper tropospheric water vapor is its ability to trap the longwave radiation emitted from the Earth's surface, namely the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is defined quantitatively as the difference between the longwave flux emitted by the Earth's surface and the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) flux emitted from the top of the atmosphere (TOA) (Raval and Ramanathan 1989).

  15. Interpolating atmospheric water vapor delay by incorporating terrain elevation information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. B.; Li, Z. W.; Ding, X. L.; Zhu, J. J.

    2011-09-01

    In radio signal-based observing systems, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), the water vapor in the atmosphere will cause delays during the signal transmission. Such delays vary significantly with terrain elevation. In the case when atmospheric delays are to be eliminated from the measured raw signals, spatial interpolators may be needed. By taking advantage of available terrain elevation information during spatial interpolation process, the accuracy of the atmospheric delay mapping can be considerably improved. This paper first reviews three elevation-dependent water vapor interpolation models, i.e., the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator in combination with the water vapor Height Scaling Model (BLUE + HSM), the Best Linear Unbiased Estimator coupled with the Elevation-dependent Covariance Model (BLUE + ECM), and the Simple Kriging with varying local means based on the Baby semi-empirical model (SKlm + Baby for short). A revision to the SKlm + Baby model is then presented, where the Onn water vapor delay model is adopted to substitute the inaccurate Baby semi-empirical model (SKlm + Onn for short). Experiments with the zenith wet delays obtained through the GPS observations from the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) demonstrate that the SKlm + Onn model outperforms the other three. The RMS of SKlm + Onn is only 0.55 cm, while those of BLUE + HSM, BLUE + ECM and SKlm + Baby amount to 1.11, 1.49 and 0.77 cm, respectively. The proposed SKlm + Onn model therefore represents an improvement of 29-63% over the other known models.

  16. Water vapor variance measurements using a Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K.; Melfi, S. H.; Ferrare, R.; Whiteman, D.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the importance of atmospheric water vapor variance, we have analyzed data from the NASA/Goddard Raman lidar to obtain temporal scales of water vapor mixing ratio as a function of altitude over observation periods extending to 12 hours. The ground-based lidar measures water vapor mixing ration from near the earth's surface to an altitude of 9-10 km. Moisture profiles are acquired once every minute with 75 m vertical resolution. Data at each 75 meter altitude level can be displayed as a function of time from the beginning to the end of an observation period. These time sequences have been spectrally analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. An example of such a temporal spectrum obtained between 00:22 and 10:29 UT on December 6, 1991 is shown in the figure. The curve shown on the figure represents the spectral average of data from 11 height levels centered on an altitude of 1 km (1 plus or minus .375 km). The spectra shows a decrease in energy density with frequency which generally follows a -5/3 power law over the spectral interval 3x10 (exp -5) to 4x10 (exp -3) Hz. The flattening of the spectrum for frequencies greater than 6x10 (exp -3) Hz is most likely a measure of instrumental noise. Spectra like that shown in the figure are calculated for other altitudes and show changes in spectral features with height. Spectral analysis versus height have been performed for several observation periods which demonstrate changes in water vapor mixing ratio spectral character from one observation period to the next. The combination of these temporal spectra with independent measurements of winds aloft provide an opportunity to infer spatial scales of moisture variance.

  17. Water vapor, water-ice clouds, and dust in the North Polar Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, Leslie K.; Smith, Michael D.; Bass, Deborah S.; Hale, Amy S.

    2006-01-01

    The behavior of water vapor, water-ice and dust in the Martian atmosphere is important for understanding the overall Martian climate system, which is characterized by three main cycles: water, including water-ice, dust, and CO2. Understanding these cycles will lend insight into the behavior of the atmospheric dynamics, the atmosphere's ability to transport dust, water-ice, and vapor to different parts of the planet, and how that ability changes as a function of dust and water-ice loading.

  18. Mars atmospheric water vapor abundance: 1996-1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Hunten, D. M.; Doose, L. R.; Hill, R. E.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of martian atmospheric water vapor made throughout Ls = 18.0°-146.4° (October 3, 1996-July 12, 1997) show changes in Mars humidity on hourly, daily, and seasonal time scales. Because our observing program during the 1996-1997 Mars apparition did not include concomitant measurement of nearby CO 2 bands, high northern latitude data were corrected for dust and aerosol extinction assuming an optical depth of 0.8, consistent with ground-based and HST imaging of northern dust storms. All other measurements with airmass greater than 3.5 were corrected using a total optical depth of 0.5. Three dominant results from this data set are as follows: (1) pre- and post-opposition measurements made with the slit crossing many hours of local time on Mars' Earth-facing disk show a distinct diurnal pattern with highest abundances around and slightly after noon with low abundances in the late afternoon, (2) measurements of water vapor over the Mars Pathfinder landing site (Carl Sagan Memorial Station) on July 12, 1997, found 21 ppt μm in the spatial sector centered near 19° latitude, 36° longitude while abundances around the site varied from as low as 6 to as high as 28 ppt μm, and (3) water vapor abundance is patchy on hourly and daily time scales but follows the usual seasonal trends.

  19. Combustion of a single magnesium particle in water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Ya; Xia, Zhi-Xun; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xu; Hu, Jian-Xin

    2015-09-01

    The combustion of magnesium particles in water vapor is of interest for underwater propulsion and hydrogen production. In this work, the combustion process of a single magnesium particle in water vapor is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Combustion experiments are conducted in a combustor filled with motionless water vapor. Condensation of gas-phase magnesia on the particle surface is confirmed and gas-phase combustion flame characteristics are observed. With the help of an optical filter and a neutral optical attenuator, flame structures are captured and determined. Flame temperature profiles are measured by an infrared thermometer. Combustion residue is a porous oxide shell of disordered magnesia crystal, which may impose a certain influence on the diffusivity of gas phases. A simplified one-dimensional, spherically symmetric, quasi-steady combustion model is then developed. In this model, the condensation of gas-phase magnesia on the particle surface and its influence on the combustion process are included, and the Stefan problem on the particle surface is also taken into consideration. With the combustion model, the parameters of flame temperature, flame diameter, and the burning time of the particle are solved analytically under the experimental conditions. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and modeling results is demonstrated, and several features to improve the model are identified. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51406231).

  20. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  1. Water vapor intrusions into the High Arctic during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Lesins, G.; Thackray, C. P.; Perro, C.; Nott, G. J.; Duck, T. J.; Damoah, R.; Drummond, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    The meridional transport of water vapor into the High Arctic, accompanied by dry enthalpy and clouds, impacts the surface radiative forcing. The evolution of one such moist intrusion over 9-11 February 2010 is presented. The event is analyzed using a unique blend of measurements including a new pan-Arctic retrieval of column water vapor from the Microwave Humidity Sounders, water vapor profiles from a Raman lidar and a ground-based microwave radiometer at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), in Eureka (80°N, 86°W), on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. A radiation model reveals the intrusion is associated with a 17 W m-2 average increase in downwelling longwave irradiance. Optically thin clouds, as observed by the lidar, contribute a further 20 W m-2 to the downwelling longwave irradiance at their peak. Intrusion events are shown to be a regular occurrence in the Arctic winter with implications for the understanding of the mechanisms driving Arctic Amplification.

  2. Calibration of Atmospherically Induced Delay Fluctuations Due to Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, George; Jacobs, Christopher; Keihm, Steve; Lanyi, Gabor; Naudet, Charles; Riley, Abraham; Rosenberger, Hans; Tanner, Alan

    2000-01-01

    We have completed a new generation of water vapor radiometers (WVR), the A- series, in order to support radio science experiments with the Cassini spacecraft. These new instruments sense three frequencies in the vicinity of the 22 GHz emission line of atmospheric water vapor within a 1 degree beamwidth from a clear aperture antenna that is co-pointed with the radio telescope down to 10 degree elevation. The radiometer electronics features almost an order of magnitude improvement in temperature stability compared with earlier WVR designs. For many radio science experiments, the error budget is likely to be dominated by path delay fluctuations due to variable atmospheric water vapor along the line-of-sight to the spacecraft. In order to demonstrate the performance of these new WVRs we are attempting to calibrate the delay fluctuations as seen by a radio interferometer operating over a 21 km baseline with a WVR near each antenna. The characteristics of these new WVRs will be described and the results of our preliminary analysis will be presented indicating an accuracy of 0.2 to 0.5 mm in tracking path delay fluctuations over time scales of 10 to 10,000 seconds.

  3. Solar radiation and water vapor pressure to forecast chickenpox epidemics.

    PubMed

    Hervás, D; Hervás-Masip, J; Nicolau, A; Reina, J; Hervás, J A

    2015-03-01

    The clear seasonality of varicella infections in temperate regions suggests the influence of meteorologic conditions. However, there are very few data on this association. The aim of this study was to determine the seasonal pattern of varicella infections on the Mediterranean island of Mallorca (Spain), and its association with meteorologic conditions and schooling. Data on the number of cases of varicella were obtained from the Network of Epidemiologic Surveillance, which is composed of primary care physicians who notify varicella cases on a compulsory basis. From 1995 to 2012, varicella cases were correlated to temperature, humidity, rainfall, water vapor pressure, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and solar radiation using regression and time-series models. The influence of schooling was also analyzed. A total of 68,379 cases of varicella were notified during the study period. Cases occurred all year round, with a peak incidence in June. Varicella cases increased with the decrease in water vapor pressure and/or the increase of solar radiation, 3 and 4 weeks prior to reporting, respectively. An inverse association was also observed between varicella cases and school holidays. Using these variables, the best fitting autoregressive moving average with exogenous variables (ARMAX) model could predict 95 % of varicella cases. In conclusion, varicella in our region had a clear seasonality, which was mainly determined by solar radiation and water vapor pressure.

  4. Evaluation of water vapor Raman lidar signals from clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Fujii, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Raman lidar is commonly used for measurement of water vapor profiles in the lower atmosphere. However, the treatment of the Raman lidar signals from clouds is not well established. A simplified model taking multiple scattering into account is proposed. The model results in a difference of two exponential functions, one which represents the extinction of laser light inside the cloud, and another which represents the effect of multiple scattering. The model was applied to measurement results using a Raman lidar system consisting of a laser wavelength of 280 nm and detection channels for Raman scattering from water vapor and atmospheric nitrogen. When a cloud was present in the field of view of the lidar, the water vapor Raman scattering signal increased from almost zero at the cloud base to a maximum at a penetration distance of about 50 m, whereas the nitrogen Raman scattering signal decreased monotonously beyond the cloud base. This behavior could be explained by the model, and the measured signals could be adequately reproduced by setting the decay constant of one exponential function equal to the attenuation coefficient of the nitrogen Raman scattering signal, and optimizing the decay constant of the other exponential function. Comparison of measurement results and calculation results based on the model showed that the model is mainly applicable to optically thick clouds, for which the attenuation coefficient is larger than 0.02 m-1.

  5. Use of Oriented Spray Nozzles to Set the Vapor-Air Flow in Rotary Motion in the Superspray Space of the Evaporative Chimney-Type Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrego, K. V.; Davydenko, V. F.; Koznacheev, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper considers the problem of upgrading the thermal efficiency of chimney-type evaporative cooling towers due to the rotary motion of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space. To set the vapor-air flow in rotary motion, we propose to use the momentum of the sprayed water. It has been shown that the existing parameters of spray nozzles permit setting up to 30% of the water flow momentum in translatory motion, which is enough for changing considerably the aerodynamics of the vapor-air flow in the superspray space and improving the operation of the cooling tower. The optimal angle of axial inclination of the spray cone has been estimated. Recommendations are given and problems have been posed for engineering realization of the proposed technologies in a chimney-type cooling tower.

  6. In search of water vapor on Jupiter: Laboratory measurements of the microwave properties of water vapor under simulated jovian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Steffes, Paul G.

    2011-03-01

    Detection and measurement of atmospheric water vapor in the deep jovian atmosphere using microwave radiometry has been discussed extensively by Janssen et al. (Janssen, M.A., Hofstadter, M.D., Gulkis, S., Ingersoll, A.P., Allison, M., Bolton, S.J., Levin, S.M., Kamp, L.W. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 447-453.) and de Pater et al. (de Pater, I., Deboer, D., Marley, M., Freedman, R., Young, R. [2005]. Icarus 173 (2), 425-447). The NASA Juno mission will include a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve water vapor abundances from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see, e.g., Matousek, S. [2005]. The Juno new frontiers mission. Tech. Rep. IAC-05-A3.2.A.04, California Institute of Technology). In order to accurately interpret data from such observations, nearly 2000 laboratory measurements of the microwave opacity of H2O vapor in a H2/He atmosphere have been conducted in the 5-21 cm wavelength range (1.4-6 GHz) at pressures from 30 mbars to 101 bars and at temperatures from 330 to 525 K. The mole fraction of H2O (at maximum pressure) ranged from 0.19% to 3.6% with some additional measurements of pure H2O. These results have enabled development of the first model for the opacity of gaseous H2O in a H2/He atmosphere under jovian conditions developed from actual laboratory data. The new model is based on a terrestrial model of Rosenkranz et al. (Rosenkranz, P.W. [1998]. Radio Science 33, 919-928), with substantial modifications to reflect the effects of jovian conditions. The new model for water vapor opacity dramatically outperforms previous models and will provide reliable results for temperatures from 300 to 525 K, at pressures up to 100 bars and at frequencies up to 6 GHz. These results will significantly reduce the uncertainties in the retrieval of jovian atmospheric water vapor abundances from the microwave radiometric measurements from the upcoming NASA Juno mission, as well as provide a clearer

  7. Design and performance of a trickling air biofilter for chlorobenzene and o-dichlorobenzene vapors.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y S; Bartha, R

    1994-01-01

    From contaminated industrial sludge, two stable multistrain microbial enrichments (consortia) that were capable of rapidly utilizing chlorobenzene and o-dichlorobenzene, respectively, were obtained. These consortia were characterized as to their species composition, tolerance range, and activity maxima in order to establish and maintain the required operational parameters during their use in biofilters for the removal of chlorobenzene contaminants from air. The consortia were immobilized on a porous perlite support packed into filter columns. Metered airstreams containing the contaminant vapors were partially humidified and passed through these columns. The vapor concentrations prior to and after biofiltration were measured by gas chromatography. Liquid was circulated concurrently with the air, and the device was operated in the trickling air biofilter mode. The experimental arrangement allowed the independent variation of liquid flow, airflow, and solvent vapor concentrations. Bench-scale trickling air biofilters removed monochlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, and their mixtures at rates of up to 300 g of solvent vapor h(-1) m(-3) filter volume. High liquid recirculation rates and automated pH control were critical for stable filtration performance. When the accumulating NaCl was periodically diluted, the trickling air biofilters continued to remove chlorobenzenes for several months with no loss of activity. The demonstrated high performance and stability of the described trickling air biofilters favor their use in industrial-scale air pollution control. PMID:8085815

  8. Portable Cathode-Air Vapor-Feed Electrochemical Medical Oxygen Concentrator (OC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Missions on the International Space Station and future space exploration will present significant challenges to crew health care capabilities, particularly in the efficient utilization of onboard oxygen resources. Exploration vehicles will require lightweight, compact, and portable oxygen concentrators that can provide medical-grade oxygen from the ambient cabin air. Current pressure-swing adsorption OCs are heavy and bulky, require significant start-up periods, operate in narrow temperature ranges, and require a liquid water feed. Lynntech, Inc., has developed an electrochemical OC that operates with a cathode-air vapor feed, eliminating the need for a bulky onboard water supply. Lynntech's OC is smaller and lighter than conventional pressure-swing OCs, is capable of instant start-up, and operates over a temperature range of 5-80 C. Accomplished through a unique nanocomposite proton exchange membrane and catalyst technology, the unit delivers 4 standard liters per minute of humidified oxygen at 60 percent concentration. The technology enables both ambient-pressure operating devices for portable applications and pressurized (up to 3,600 psi) OC devices for stationary applications.

  9. Molecular dynamics of the water liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the equilibrium interface between liquid water and its vapor at 325 K are presented. For the TIP4P model of water intermolecular pair potentials, the average surface dipole density points from the vapor to the liquid. The most common orientations of water molecules have the C2 nu molecular axis roughly parallel to the interface. The distributions are quite broad and therefore compatible with the intermolecular correlations characteristic of bulk liquid water. All near-neighbor pairs in the outermost interfacial layers are hydrogen bonded according to the common definition adopted here. The orientational preferences of water molecules near a free surface differ from those near rigidly planar walls which can be interpreted in terms of patterns found in hexagonal ice 1. The mean electric field in the interfacial region is parallel to the mean polarization which indicates that attention cannot be limited to dipolar charge distributions in macroscopic descriptions of the electrical properties of this interface. The value of the surface tension obtained is 132 +/- 46 dyn/cm, significantly different from the value for experimental water of 68 dyn/cm at 325 K.

  10. Condensation of water vapor: Experimental determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. M.; Vrtala, A.; Rudolf, R.; Wagner, P. E.; Riipinen, I.; Vesala, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Viisanen, Y.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental determinations of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients αm and αt for condensation of water vapor in air have been conducted covering a temperature range from about 250 to 290 K. For the first time, both coefficients have been determined directly and simultaneously. To this end, growth of water droplets in air has been observed at different total gas pressures ranging from about 1000 down to 100 hPa. Monodispersed seed particles have been used as condensation nuclei. After addition of water vapor with well-defined partial vapor pressure, supersaturation was achieved by adiabatic expansion in an expansion chamber. Most experiments reported in the present paper were performed at vapor saturation ratios ranging from 1.30 to 1.50. Monodispersed Ag particles with a diameter of 9 nm have been used as condensation nuclei, and for humidification a diffusion humidifier was applied. One experiment was performed at the saturation ratio of 1.02, which resembles conditions observed in the Earth's lower atmosphere. In this experiment, monodispersed DEHS particles with a diameter of 80 nm were used as condensation nuclei, and water vapor was generated by quantitative evaporation of a liquid jet. Droplet growth was monitored using the CAMS method. For determination of the accommodation coefficients, experimental droplet growth curves were compared to corresponding theoretical curves. Quantitative comparison was performed by varying the respective accommodation coefficient and the starting time of droplet growth in a two-parameter best fit procedure. Considering the uncertainty with respect to the starting time of droplet growth and the uncertainties of the experimental water vapor supersaturation, corresponding maximum errors have been determined. From the results obtained it can be stated that αt is larger than 0.85 over the whole considered temperature range. For 250-270 K, values of αm below 0.8 are excluded, and for higher temperatures up to 290 K we can

  11. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  12. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-13

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  13. The Observed Relationship Between Water Vapor and Ozone in the Tropical Tropopause Saturation Layer and the Influence of Meridional Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Douglass, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine balloonsonde observations of water vapor and ozone from three Ticosonde campaigns over San Jose, Costa Rica [10 N, 84 W] during northern summer and a fourth during northern winter. The data from the summer campaigns show that the uppermost portion of the tropical tropopause layer between 360 and 380 K, which we term the tropopause saturation layer or TSL, is characterized by water vapor mixing ratios from proximately 3 to 15 ppmv and ozone from approximately 50 ppbv to 250 ppbv. In contrast, the atmospheric water vapor tape recorder at 380 K and above displays a more restricted 4-7 ppmv range in water vapor mixing ratio. From this perspective, most of the parcels in the TSL fall into two classes - those that need only additional radiative heating to rise into the tape recorder and those requiring some combination of additional dehydration and mixing with drier air. A substantial fraction of the latter class have ozone mixing ratios greater than 150 ppbv, and with water vapor greater than 7 ppmv this air may well have been transported into the tropics from the middle latitudes in conjunction with high-amplitude equatorial waves. We examine this possibility with both trajectory analysis and transport diagnostics based on HIRDLS ozone data. We apply the same approach to study the winter season. Here a very different regime obtains as the ozone-water vapor scatter diagram of the sonde data shows the stratosphere and troposphere to be clearly demarcated with little evidence of mixing in of middle latitude air parcels.

  14. First UV Satellite Observations of Mesospheric Water Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-21

    Figure 4. We then use a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm that includes the Rayleigh scattered back- Table 4. OH(1,1) g Factors at 200 Ka N0 P11...microwave limb sounder middle atmosphere water vapor and nitrous oxide measurements, J. Geo- phys. Res., 112, D24S36, doi:10.1029/2007JD008724. Lee, L...nitric acid and water in the vacuum ultraviolet: Vibrational and rotational distributions of OH2S+, J. Chem. Phys., 72, 6642–6650. Papagiannakopoulos, P

  15. Water from air: An overlooked source of moisture in arid and semiarid regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, Theresa; Morrissey, Ember M; Reed, Sasha C.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Schwartz, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Water drives the functioning of Earth’s arid and semiarid lands. Drylands can obtain water from sources other than precipitation, yet little is known about how non-rainfall water inputs influence dryland communities and their activity. In particular, water vapor adsorption – movement of atmospheric water vapor into soil when soil air is drier than the overlying air – likely occurs often in drylands, yet its effects on ecosystem processes are not known. By adding 18O-enriched water vapor to the atmosphere of a closed system, we documented the conversion of water vapor to soil liquid water across a temperature range typical of arid ecosystems. This phenomenon rapidly increased soil moisture and stimulated microbial carbon (C) cycling, and the flux of water vapor to soil had a stronger impact than temperature on microbial activity. In a semiarid grassland, we also observed that non-rainfall water inputs stimulated microbial activity and C cycling. Together these data suggest that, during rain-free periods, atmospheric moisture in drylands may significantly contribute to variation in soil water content, thereby influencing ecosystem processes. The simple physical process of adsorption of water vapor to soil particles, forming liquid water, represents an overlooked but potentially important contributor to C cycling in drylands.

  16. Water Vapor Profiling From CoSSIR Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Chang, L. A.; Monosmith, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Previous millimeter-wave radiometry for water vapor profiling, by either airborne or satellite sensors, has been limited to frequencies less than or equal to 183 GHz. The retrievals are generally limited to an altitude range of 0-10 km. The additional measurements at the frequencies of 380.2 plus or minus 0.8, 380.2 plus or minus 1.8, 380.2 plus or minus 3.3, and 380.2 plus or minus 6.2 GHz provided by the new airborne Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) can extend this profiling capability up to an altitude of about 15 km. Furthermore, the retrievals can be performed over both land and water surfaces in the tropics without much difficulty. These properties are demonstrated by recent CoSSIR measurements on board the NASA WB-57 aircraft during CR-AVE in January 2006. Retrievals of water vapor mixing ratio were performed at eight altitude levels of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 km from CoSSIR data sets acquired at observational angles of 0 and 53.4 degrees, and the results were compared with other available measurements from the same aircraft and near-concurrent satellites. A comparison of the variations of mixing ratios retrieved from CoSSIR and those derived from the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) in the aircraft vicinity, along the path of the transit flight on January 14, 2006, appears to show some connection, although the measurements were referring to different altitudes. A very good agreement was found between the collocated values of total precipitable water derived from the CoSSIR-retrieved water vapor profiles and those estimated from TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager)

  17. Characterization of upper troposphere water vapor measurements during AFWEX using LASE.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, I.; Kooi, S.; Brasseur, L. H.; Brackett, V. G.; Clayton, M.; Barrick, J.; Bosenberg, J.; Diskin, G.; Goldsmith, J.; Lesht, B.; Podolske, J.; Sachse, G.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Turner, D.; Whitemann, D.

    2002-07-15

    Water vapor profiles from NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system acquired during the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) are used to characterize upper troposphere (UT) water vapor measured by ground-based Raman lidars, radiosondes, and in situ aircraft sensors. Initial comparisons showed the average Vaisala radiosonde measurements to be 5-15% drier than the average LASE, Raman lidar, and DC-8 in situ diode laser hygrometer measurements. They show that corrections to the Raman lidar and Vaisala measurements significantly reduce these differences. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from the LASE water vapor profiles agrees within 3% on average with PWV derived from the ARM ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR). The agreement among the LASE, Raman lidar, and MWR measurements demonstrates how the LASE measurements can be used to characterize both profile and column water vapor measurements and that ARM Raman lidar, when calibrated using the MWR PWV, can provide accurate UT water vapor measurements.

  18. An inexpensive and stable LED Sun photometer for measuring the water vapor column over South Texas from 1990 to 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, Forrest M.

    2002-07-01

    A Sun photometer that uses near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as spectrally-selective photodetectors has measured total column water vapor in South Texas since February 1990. The 12 years of solar noon observations to date are correlated with upper air soundings at Del Rio, Texas (r2 = 0.75), and highly correlated with measurements by a Microtops II filter Sun photometer (r2 = 0.94). LEDs are inexpensive and have far better long term stability than the interference filters in conventional Sun photometers. The LED Sun photometer therefore provides an inexpensive, stable and portable means for measuring column water vapor.

  19. Effect of Salt Additives to Water on the Severity of Vapor Explosions and on the Collapse of Vapor Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takahiro; Furuya, Masahiro

    We proposed ultra rapid solidification and atomization technique, CANOPUS (Cooling and Atomizing based on NOble Process Utilizing Steam explosion), using small-scale vapor explosions to make an amorphous metal. The CANOPUS method is suitable for rapid cooling and atomization process, which utilizing sustainable small-scale vapor explosions. In order to apply the CANOPUS method to a high melting point metal, it is necessary to make a small-scale vapor explosion occur at a high temperature of the molten metal. Small-scale experiment is conducted to develop the vapor explosion promotor in which spontaneous vapor explosion can occur at a high temperature of a molten metal. Spontaneous vapor explosion do not occur when water at 80°C is used as a coolant. However, spontaneous vapor explosion occurs when water at 80°C with salt additives is used as a coolant. Specifically, lithium chloride solution generates spontaneous vapor explosions at the highest temperature of the molten tin in the experiment. In order to clarify the triggering mechanism of the spontaneous vapor explosion when the promotor is used as a coolant, a high-temperature solid stainless steel sphere is immersed into a coolant. The interfacial temperature of the stainless steel sphere is measured, and the behavior of a vapor film around the stainless steel sphere is observed with a digital video camera. As a result, salt additives resulted in an increase of quench temperature in all salt solutions. The quenching curves of each coolant indicate that the salt additives improve the film boiling heat transfer. The improvement of the film boiling heat transfer causes an unstable formation of the vapor film and a rise of the quench temperature. It is clarified that the salt additives to water promotes a vapor film collapse. Comparing two experiments, the quench temperature of each solution is in close agreement with the upper limit of the molten tin temperature that causes spontaneous vapor explosion. This

  20. Inferring water vapor amounts with solar spectral irradiance: Measurements, modeling, and comparisons with in situ water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere from ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, D. W.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical TRopopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew six science missions on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft from NASA Dryden, California to the Pacific tropics to sample the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS) during February and March of 2013. After transit to the tropics, the aircraft performed a series of vertical profiles from the cruising altitude of about 18 km down to 14 km sampling the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A science focus of ATTREX is to examine water vapor and its transport through the TTL. The extremely cold temperatures found in the TTL act to limit the transport of water vapor from the troposphere to stratosphere, making this region critical to the water vapor budget of the stratosphere. Here we investigate the use of the strong water bands centered at 1400 and 1900 nm in the telluric solar spectrum to infer the small water vapor amounts through the TTL. Measurements of spectral irradiance from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) at the top and bottom of the aircraft profiles are used to produce transmission spectra. These are compared with atmospheric radiative transfer calculations of transmission through the layer. The measured water vapor profile from the NOAA water vapor instrument, as well as temperature and pressure, were used in the modeling, providing a rare opportunity to compare water vapor amount inferred from solar transmittance to in situ measurements. Prospects for the use of these bands for determining the total column water vapor amount from the UTLS to the top of the atmosphere from aircraft are also discussed.

  1. Oxidation of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, QuynhGiao N.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Raymond C.

    2003-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTCs) including HfB2 + SiC (20% by volume), ZrB2 + SiC (20% by volume) and ZrB2 + SiC (14% by volume) + C (30% by volume) have historically been evaluated as reusable thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles. This study investigates UHTCs for use as potential combustion and aeropropulsion engine materials. These materials were oxidized in water vapor (90%) using a cyclic vertical furnace at 1 atm. The total exposure time was 10 hours at temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 C. CVD SiC was also evaluated as a baseline comparison. Weight change measurements, X-ray diffraction analyses, surface and cross-sectional SEM and EDS were performed. These results will be compared with tests ran in static air at temperatures of 1327, 1627, and 1927 C. Oxidation comparisons will also be made to the study by Tripp. A small number of high pressure burner rig (HPBR) results at 1100 and 1300 C will also be discussed. Specific weight changes at all three temperatures along with the SIC results are shown. SiC weight change is negligible at such short duration times. HB2 + SiC (HS) performed the best out of all the tested UHTCS for all exposure temperatures. ZrB2 + Sic (ZS) results indicate a slightly lower oxidation rate than that of ZrBl + SiC + C (ZCS) at 1200 and 1400 C, but a clear distinction can not be made based on the limited number of tested samples. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross-sections of all the UHTCs were evaluated. A representative area for HS is presented at 1400 C for 26 hours which was the composition with the least amount of oxidation. A continuous SiO2 scale is present in the outer most edge of the surface. An image of ZCS is presented at 1400 C for 10 hours, which shows the most degradation of all the compositions studied. Here, the oxide surface is a mixture of ZrSiO4, ZrO2 and SO2.

  2. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.; Chan, K. R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, E.; Wilson, J. C.; Kley, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric and upper tropospheric cloud water plus water vapor (total water) and water vapor were made with two Lyman alpha hygrometers as part of the STEP tropical experiment. The in situ measurements were made in the Darwin, Australia, area in January and February of 1987 on an ER-2 aircraft. Average stratospheric water vapor at a potential temperature of 375 K (the average value of Theta at the tropopause) was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv). This water mixing ratio is below the 3.0 to 4.0 ppmv necessary to be consistent with the observed upper stratospheric dryness. Saturation with respect to ice and the potential for dehydration was observed up to Theta = 402 K.

  3. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results.

  4. Column atmospheric water vapor and vegetation liquid water retrievals from Airborne Imaging Spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-03-01

    High spatial resolution column atmospheric water vapor amounts were derived from spectral data collected by the airborne visible-infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS), which covers the spectral region from 0.4 to 2.5 μm in 10-nm bands and has a ground instantaneous field of view of 20×20 m from an altitude of 20 km. The quantitative derivation is made by curve fitting observed spectra with calculated spectra in the 1.14-μm and 0.94-μm water vapor band absorption regions using an atmospheric model, a narrowband spectral model, and a nonlinear least squares fitting technique. The derivation makes use of the facts that (1) the reflectances of many ground targets vary approximately linearly with wavelength in the 0.94- and 1.14-μm water vapor band absorption regions, (2) the scattered radiation near 1 μm is small compared with the directly reflected radiation when the atmospheric aerosol concentrations are low, and (3) the scattered radiation in the lower part of the atmosphere is subjected to the water vapor absorption. The technique is directly applicable for retrieving column water vapor amounts from AVIRIS spectra measured on clear days with visibilities 20 km or greater. The precision of the retrieved column water vapor amounts from several data sets is 5% or better. Based on the analyses of an AVIRIS data set that was acquired within an hour of radiosonde launch, it appears that the accuracy approaches the precision. The derived column water vapor amounts are independent of the absolute surface reflectances. It now appears feasible to derive high spatial resolution column water vapor amounts over land areas from satellite altitude with the proposed high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS). Curve fitting of spectra near 1 μm from areas covered with vegetation, using an atmospheric model and a simplified vegetation reflectance model, indicates that both the amount of atmospheric water vapor and the moisture content of vegetation can be retrieved

  5. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  6. Projections of Horizontal Water Vapor Transport across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    With a warming Earth's atmosphere, the global water cycle is expected to intensify, a process that is likely to yield changes in the frequency and intensity of hydrological extremes. To quantify such changes over Europe, most previous research has been based upon precipitation scenarios. However, seldom has the horizontal water vapor transport (integrated vapor transport IVT) been investigated, a key variable responsible for heavy precipitation events and one that links water source and sink regions. It is hence the aim of this study to assess the projections of IVT across Europe. The Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) is the source of the climate model projections. The historical simulations (1979-2005) and two emissions scenarios (2073-2099), or representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) from 22 global circulation models were retrieved and evaluated. In particular, at model grid points across Europe the mean, standard deviation, and the 95th percentile of IVT were calculated for December, January, and February (Boreal winter); and for June, July, and August (Austral winter). The CMIP5 historical multi-model mean closely resembles the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis. In the future under the two emissions scenarios, the IVT increases in magnitude, with the highest percentage changes occurring in the extreme emissions (RCP8.5) scenario; for example, multi-model mean IVT increases of 30% are found in the domain. An evaluation of the low-altitude moisture and winds indicates that higher atmospheric water vapor content is the primary cause of these projected changes.

  7. WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Nisini, B.; Sandell, G.; Williams, J. P.; Testi, L.; Woitke, P.

    2013-03-20

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

  8. Cassini/CIRS Observations of Water Vapor in Titan's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Achterberg, R. K.; Anderson, C. M.; Samuelson, R. E.; Carlson, R. C.; Jennings, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini spacecraft has obtained spectra of Titan during most of the 44 flybys of the Cassini prime mission. Water vapor on Titan was first detected using whole-disk observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al 1998, Astron. Astrophys. 336, L85-L89). CIRS data permlt the retrieval of the latitudinal variation of water on Titan and some limited information on its vertical profile. Emission lines of H2O on Titan are very weak in the CIRS data. Thus, large spectral averages as well as improvements in calibration are necessary to detect water vapor. Water abundances were retrieved in nadir spectra at 55 South, the Equator, and at 19 North. Limb spectra of the Equator were also modeled to constrain the vertical distribution of water. Stratospheric temperatures in the 0.5 - 4.0 mbar range were obtained by inverting spectra of CH4 in the v4 band centered at 1304/cm. The temperature in the lower stratosphere (4 - 20 mbar) was derived from fitting pure rotation lines of CH4 between 80 and 160/cm. The origin of H2O and CO2 is believed to be from the ablation of micrometeorites containing water ice, followed by photochemistry. This external source of water originates either within the Saturn system or from the interplanetary medium. Recently, Horst et al (J. Geophys. Res. 2008, in press) developed a photochemical model of Titan in which there are two external sources of oxygen. Oxygen ions (probably from Enceladus) precipitate into Titan's atmosphere to form CO at very high altitudes (1100 km). Water ice ablation at lower altitudes (700 km) forms H2O and subsequent chemistry produces CO2. CIRS measurements of CO, CO2, and now of H2O will provide valuable constraints to these photochemical models and - improve our understanding of oxygen chemistry on Titan.

  9. Trapping of water vapor from an atmosphere by condensed silicate matter formed by high-temperature pulse vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Dikov, Yu. P.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Wlotzka, F.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of planetary atmospheres is thought to be the result of bombardment of a growing planet by massive planetesimals. According to some models, the accumulation of released water vapor and/or carbon dioxide can result in the formation of a dense and hot primordial atmosphere. Among source and sink processes of atmospheric water vapor the formation of hydroxides was considered mainly as rehydration of dehydrated minerals (foresterite and enstatite). From our point of view, the formation of hydroxides is not limited to rehydration. Condensation of small silicate particles in a spreading vapor cloud and their interaction with a wet atmosphere can also result in the origin of hydrated phases which have no genetic connections with initial water bearing minerals. We present results of two experiments of a simulated interaction of condensed silicate matter which originated during vaporization of dry clinopyroxene in a wet helium atmosphere.

  10. Geodesy by radio interferometry - Water vapor radiometry for estimation of the wet delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgered, G.; Davis, J. L.; Herring, T. A.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1991-01-01

    An important source of error in VLBI estimates of baseline length is unmodeled variations of the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere along the propagation path of the radio signals. This paper presents and discusses the method of using data from a water vapor radiomete (WVR) to correct for the propagation delay caused by atmospheric water vapor, the major cause of these variations. Data from different WVRs are compared with estimated propagation delays obtained by Kalman filtering of the VLBI data themselves. The consequences of using either WVR data or Kalman filtering to correct for atmospheric propagation delay at the Onsala VLBI site are investigated by studying the repeatability of estimated baseline lengths from Onsala to several other sites. The repeatability obtained for baseline length estimates shows that the methods of water vapor radiometry and Kalman filtering offer comparable accuracies when applied to VLBI observations obtained in the climate of the Swedish west coast. For the most frequently measured baseline in this study, the use of WVR data yielded a 13 percent smaller weighted-root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length estimates compared to the use of a Kalman filter. It is also clear that the 'best' minimum elevationi angle for VLBI observations depends on the accuracy of the determinations of the total propagation delay to be used, since the error in this delay increases with increasing air mass.

  11. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Feltz, W. F.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote sensors as well as traditional in situ radiosonde measurements. Remote sensing technologies include an automated Raman lidar and an automated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), which are able to retrieve water vapor profiles operationally through the lower troposphere throughout the diurnal cycle. Comparisons of these two water vapor remote sensing methods to each other and to radiosondes over an 8-month period are presented and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and limitations of each method. Additionally, the AERI is able to retrieve profiles of temperature while the Raman lidar is able to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles operationally. These data, coupled with hourly wind profiles from a 915-MHz wind profiler, provide complete specification of the state of the atmosphere in noncloudy skies. Several case studies illustrate the utility of these high temporal resolution measurements in the characterization of mesoscale features within a 3-day time period in which passage of a dryline, warm air advection, and cold front occurred.

  12. Deposition and adsorption of the air pollutant HNO 3 vapor to soil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, Pamela E.; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej

    Deposition of nitric acid (HNO 3) vapor to soils has been evaluated in three experimental settings: (1) continuously stirred tank reactors with the pollutant added to clean air, (2) open-top chambers at high ambient levels of pollution with and without filtration reducing particulate nitrate levels, (3) two field sites with high or low pollution loads in the coastal sage plant community of southern California. The results from experiment (1) indicated that the amount of extractable NO 3- from isolated sand, silt and clay fractions increased with atmospheric concentration and duration of exposure. After 32 days, the highest absorption of HNO 3 was determined for clay, followed by silt and sand. While the sand and silt fractions showed a tendency to saturate, the clay samples did not after 32 days of exposure under highly polluted conditions. Absorption of HNO 3 occurred mainly in the top 1 mm layer of the soil samples and the presence of water increased HNO 3 absorption by about 2-fold. Experiment (2) indicated that the presence of coarse particulate NO 3- could effectively block absorption sites of soils for HNO 3 vapor. Experiment (3) showed that soil samples collected from open sites had about 2.5 more extractable NO 3- as compared to samples collected from beneath shrub canopies. The difference in NO 3- occurred only in the upper 1-2 cm as no significant differences in NO 3- concentrations were found in the 2-5 cm soil layers. Extractable NO 3- from surface soils collected from a low-pollution site ranged between 1 and 8 μg NO 3-N g -1, compared to a maximum of 42 μg NO 3-N g -1 for soils collected from a highly polluted site. Highly significant relationship between HNO 3 vapor doses and its accumulation in the upper layers of soils indicates that carefully prepared soil samples (especially clay fraction) may be useful as passive samplers for evaluation of ambient concentrations of HNO 3 vapor.

  13. Numerical modeling of water-vapor transport during pre-storm and COHMEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djuric, Dusan

    1986-01-01

    Initial conditions are designed for numerical simulation of mesocale processes in the atmosphere using the Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS) model. These initial conditions represent an idealized baroclinic wave in which the transport of water vapor can be simulated. The constructed atmosphere has two homogeneous air masses, polar front, polar jet stream and a stratosphere. All these simulate the basic structure of the earth's atmosphere. The hydrostatic and geostrophic balances make it possible to evaluate mutually consistent fields of wind and of the height of isobaric surfaces.

  14. Lagrangian transport of water vapor and CFCs in a coupled Chemistry Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Charlotte; Müller, Rolf; Hoffmann, Lars; Konopka, Paul; Plöger, Felix; Grooß, Jens-Uwe

    2013-04-01

    We describe the implementation of a Lagrangian transport core in a chemistry climate model (CCM). Thereby we address the common problem of properly representing trace gas distributions in a classical Eulerian framework with a fixed model grid, particularly in regions with strong trace gas gradients. A prominent example is stratospheric water vapor, which is an important driver of surface climate change on decadal scales. In this case, the transport representation is particularly important in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), where tropospheric air enters into the stratosphere. We have coupled the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) with the ECHAM-MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model (EMAC). The latter includes the ECHAM5 climate model, and the MESSy interface, which allows for flexible coupling and switching between different submodels. The chemistry transport model CLaMS provides a fully Lagrangian transport representation to calculate constituent transport for an ensemble of air parcels that move along trajectories. To facilitate the calculation of long time-series a simplified chemistry scheme was implemented. Various studies show that the CLaMS model is particularly suited to properly represent dynamics and chemistry in the UT/LS region. The analysis of mean age of stratospheric air gives insight into the different transport characteristics of the Eulerian and the Lagrangian transport schemes. Mean age of air, calculated in both frameworks, is compared regarding the representation of important processes, i.e. descent in the polar vortex, upwelling in the tropical pipe, and isentropic in-mixing in subtropical regions. We also compared the zonal mean distributions and photochemical lifetimes of CFC-11 and CFC-12 with climatologies from different satellite experiments (ACE-FTS, HIRDLS, and MIPAS). CLaMS stratospheric water vapor distributions show remarkable differences compared to the stratospheric water vapor simulated by ECHAM, especially in

  15. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  16. Analysis of water vapor LIDAR measurements during the MAP campaign: evidence of sub-structures of stratospheric intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aulerio, P.; Fierli, F.; Congeduti, F.; Redaelli, G.

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents two case studies of transport of dry air in the free troposphere measured by a ground based Raman LIDAR in the Northern-Italy, during the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP). Two observations characterized by the presence of anomalously dry layers, below 6 km height, were analyzed using Lagrangian techniques. These events are related to upper-tropospheric, high Potential Vorticity (PV) streamers crossing the Alpine region. These are interpreted as small-scale features of stratospheric intrusions associated with the PV ridge during its phase of dissipation. One of the measurements also shows the presence of two distinct dehydrated structures associated with the same event. The water vapor concentration also suggests dilution processes of dry stratospheric air in the troposphere. Lagrangian simulations allowed to successfully reproduce the observed water vapor distribution and the air parcel histories confirmed the stratospheric origin of the dry layers.

  17. The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.-S.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schiller, C.; Ebert, V.; Krämer, M.; Peter, T.; Amarouche, N.; Avallone, L. M.; Bauer, R.; Bozóki, Z.; Christensen, L. E.; Davis, S. M.; Durry, G.; Dyroff, C.; Herman, R. L.; Hunsmann, S.; Khaykin, S. M.; Mackrodt, P.; Meyer, J.; Smith, J. B.; Spelten, N.; Troy, R. F.; Vömel, H.; Wagner, S.; Wienhold, F. G.

    2014-09-01

    The AquaVIT-1 intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor measurement techniques was conducted at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, in October 2007. The overall objective was to intercompare state-of-the-art and prototype atmospheric hygrometers with each other and with independent humidity standards under controlled conditions. This activity was conducted as a blind intercomparison with coordination by selected referees. The effort was motivated by persistent discrepancies found in atmospheric measurements involving multiple instruments operating on research aircraft and balloon platforms, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, where water vapor reaches its lowest atmospheric values (less than 10 ppm). With the AIDA chamber volume of 84 m3, multiple instruments analyzed air with a common water vapor mixing ratio, by extracting air into instrument flow systems, by locating instruments inside the chamber, or by sampling the chamber volume optically. The intercomparison was successfully conducted over 10 days during which pressure, temperature, and mixing ratio were systematically varied (50 to 500 hPa, 185 to 243 K, and 0.3 to 152 ppm). In the absence of an accepted reference instrument, the absolute accuracy of the instruments was not established. To evaluate the intercomparison, the reference value was taken to be the ensemble mean of a core subset of the measurements. For these core instruments, the agreement between 10 and 150 ppm of water vapor is considered good with variation about the reference value of about ±10% (±1σ). In the region of most interest between 1 and 10 ppm, the core subset agreement is fair with variation about the reference value of ±20% (±1σ). The upper limit of precision was also derived for each instrument from the reported data. The implication for atmospheric measurements is that the

  18. An optical water vapor sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. Berkoff; Paul L. Kebabian; Robert A. McClatchy; Charles E. Kolb; Andrew Freedman

    1998-12-01

    The water vapor sensor developed by Aerodyne Research, based on the optical absorption of light at {approximately}935 nm, has been successfully demonstrated on board the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Gulfstream-1 research aircraft during the Department of Energy's ARM Intensive Operations Period in August 1998. Data taken during this field campaign show excellent agreement with a chilled mirror and Lyman-alpha hygrometers and measurements confirm the ability to measure rapid, absolute water vapor fluctuations with a high degree of instrument stability and accuracy, with a noise level as low 10 ppmv (1 Hz measurement bandwidth). The construction of this small, lightweight sensor contains several unique elements which result in several significant advantages when compared to other techniques. First, the low power consumption Argon discharge lamp provides an optical beam at a fixed wavelength without a need for temperature or precision current control. The multi-pass absorption cell developed for this instrument provides a compact, low cost method that can survive deployment in the field. Fiber-optic cables, which are used to convey to light between the absorption cell, light source, and detection modules enable remote placement of the absorption cell from the opto-electronics module. Finally, the sensor does not use any moving parts which removes a significant source of potential malfunction. The result is an instrument which maintained its calibration throughout the field measurement campaign, and was not affected by high vibration and large uncontrolled temperature excursions. We believe that the development of an accurate, fast response water vapor monitor described in this report will open up new avenues of aerial-vehicle-based atmospheric research which have been relatively unexplored due to the lack of suitable low-cost, light-weight instrumentation.

  19. NIST New Humidity Standard for Water Vapor Measurements in Troposphere and Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, P.

    2012-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) realizes, maintains, and disseminates the national measurement standards for humidity and that for many years it has provided industry, government and academia a service for the calibration of water vapor-measuring instruments. NIST has developed a precision humidity standard, based on the principle of divided flow, for producing air of known mixing ratios in the range 0.5 ppm to 1050 ppm by volume with a maximum expanded uncertainty (coverage factor k=2, corresponding to approximately 95% confidence level) of 0.26 % of the value. This high accuracy is accomplished by combining precise flow element standards with high purity mass flow controllers. Specific mixing ratios at the desired volumetric flow rate are determined by activating the appropriate valves via a computer-controlled multiplexer. The wet gas stream is produced by operating a standard saturator maintained at a constant temperature 1 °C and pressure 0.3 MPa in order to achieve a combined uncertainty of 0.1 % of 2214 ppm by volume in water vapor concentration. The new NIST standard can be used to calibrate various hygrometers currently used for atmospheric water vapor measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, such as atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer (APIMS), chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), infrared optical hygrometer, chilled-mirror frost-point hygrometer, Lyman-alpha hygrometer and microwave refractometer. A laboratory calibration provides essentially the Type B standard uncertainty of the mean value measured by a hygrometer as mentioned above. Type A evaluation of standard uncertainty, which characterize the dispersion of the observed values about their mean, is then combined to determine the expanded uncertainty of a measurand. It is essential that field instruments receive basic calibration under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. NIST calibrations may help resolve the long

  20. Correction for water vapor in the measurement of atmospheric trace gases.

    PubMed

    Butenhoff, C L; Khalil, M A K

    2002-06-01

    The presence of water vapor in a sample of air reduces the concentration of a trace gas measured from the sample. We present a methodology to correct for this effect for those cases when the concentration of the trace gas has already been measured from a wet sample. The conversion or correction factor that takes the wet mole fraction to a dry mole fraction is determined by the mixing ratio of water vapor inside the sampling canister. For those samples where the water vapor is saturated inside the canister, the water vapor mixing ratio is largely determined by laboratory conditions; for the unsaturated samples, the mixing ratio is determined by station conditions. If the meteorology at the sampling station is known, the equations presented here can be used directly to calculate the appropriate correction factor. For convenience, we use climatological data to derive average monthly correction factors for seven common global sampling sites: Barrow, AK, US (71 degrees N, 157degrees W); Cape Meares, OR, US (45 degrees N, 124 degrees W); Mauna Loa, HI, US (19 degrees N, 155 degrees W); Ragged Point, Barbados (13 degrees N, 59 degrees W); American Samoa (14 degrees S, 171 degrees W); Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia (41 degrees S, 145 degrees E); South Pole (90 degrees S). These factors adjust wet mole fractions upwards within a range of 0.002% for the South Pole to over 0.8% for saturated sites. We apply the correction factors to wet nitrous oxide (N2O) mole fractions. The corrected data are more consistent with our understanding of N2O sources.

  1. Remote measurements of ozone, water vapor and liquid water content, and vertical profiles of temperature in the lower troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Gary, B. L.; Shumate, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Several advanced atmospheric remote sensing systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory were demonstrated under various field conditions to determine how useful they would be for general use by the California Air Resources Board and local air quality districts. One of the instruments reported on is the Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS). It has a pair of carbon dioxide lasers with a transmitter and receiver and can be flown in an aircraft to measure the column abundance of such gases as ozone. From an aircraft, it can be used to rapidly survey a large region. The LAS is usually operated from an aircraft, although it can also be used at a fixed location on the ground. Some tests were performed with the LAS to measure ozone over a 2-km horizontal path. Another system reported on is the Microwave Atmospheric Remote Sensing System (MARS). It is tuned to microwave emissions from water vapor, liquid water, and oxygen molecules (for atmospheric temperature). It can measure water vapor and liquid water in the line-of-sight, and can measure the vertical temperature profile.

  2. Mesoscale Modeling of Water Vapor and Dust in Valles Marineris: Atmospheric Influences on Recurring Slope Lineae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, C. W. S.; Rafkin, S. C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extensive recurring slope lineae (RSL) activity has been detected in Valles Marineris on Mars and coincides with regions where water ice fogs appear [1]. The origin of the water driving RSL flow is not well understood, but observational evidence suggests atmospheric processes play a crucial role [2]. Provided the atmospheric vapor concentration is high enough, water ice fogs can form overnight if the surface temperature cools below the condensation temperature. Correlations between dust storms and flow rates suggest that atmospheric dust opacity, and its influence on air temperature, also has a significant effect on RSL activity. We investigate planetary boundary layer processes that govern the hydrological cycle and dust cycle on Mars using a mesoscale atmospheric model to simulate the distribution of water and dust with respect to regional atmospheric circulations. Our simulations in Valles Marineris show a curious temperature structure, where the inside of the canyon appears warmer relative to the plateaus immediately outside. For a well-mixed atmosphere, this temperature structure indicates that when the atmosphere inside the canyon is saturated and fog is present within Valles Marineris, fog and low-lying clouds should also be present on the cooler surrounding plateaus as well. However, images taken with the Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) show instances where water ice fog appeared exclusively inside the canyon. These results have important implications for the origin and concentration of water vapor in Valles Marineris, with possible connections to RSL. The potential temperatures from our simulations show a high level of stability inside the canyon produced dynamically by sinking air. However, afternoon updrafts along the canyon walls indicate that over time, water vapor within the chasm would escape along the sides of the canyon. Again, this suggests a local source or mechanism to concentrate water vapor is needed to explain the fog

  3. Monitoring the water vapor isotopic composition in the temperate North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Sveinbjörnsdottir, A. E.; Jónsson, T. H.; Johnsen, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    Water stable isotopes have during many decades been used as climate proxies and indicators for variations in the hydrological cycle. However we are to a great extent still using simple empirical relationships without any deeper theoretical understanding. In order to properly relate changes in the climate and hydrological cycle to changes in the observed stable water isotopic signal we must understand the underlying physical processes. Furthermore it is a challenge for General Climate Models to adequately represent the isotopes in the hydrological cycle because of lack of in-situ measurements of the atmospheric water-vapor composition in the source regions. During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (from Los Gatos Research) in a lighthouse on the South Coast of Iceland (63.83 N 21.47W) with the plan to be operational for several years. The purpose of this installation was through monitoring of the water vapor isotopic composition to understand the physical processes governing the isotopic composition of the water vapor evaporated from the ocean as well as the processes of mixing between the free troposphere and marine boundary layer. Because of the remoteness of the monitoring site and simple topography we are able to isolate the 'fingerprint' on the isotopic signal in the water vapor from respectively the ocean and the interior highland leading to a near perfect case-study area. Using back-trajectories we find a strong influence of the origin of the air masses on the measured isotopic composition. The mixing of the marine-boundary layer is found to strongly influence the measured isotopic composition. The second order isotopic parameter, d-excess, is contrary to theory and previous observations found not to depend on the relative humidity. However we do find a good correlation between the d-excess and the measured isotopic composition. We speculate that the lack of correlation between d-excess and relative humidity can be

  4. Monitoring the water vapor isotopic composition in the temperate North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveinbjörnsdottir, Arny E.; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Jonsson, Thorsteinn; Johnsen, Sigfus J.

    2013-04-01

    Water stable isotopes have during many decades been used as climate proxies and indicators for variations in the hydrological cycle. However we are to a great extent still using simple empirical relationships without any deeper theoretical understanding. In order to properly relate changes in the climate and hydrological cycle to changes in the observed stable water isotopic signal we must understand the underlying physical processes. Furthermore it is a challenge for General Climate Models to adequately represent the isotopes in the hydrological cycle because of lack of in-situ measurements of the atmospheric water-vapor composition in the source regions. During the fall of 2010 we installed an autonomous water vapor spectroscopy laser (from Los Gatos Research) in a lighthouse on the South Coast of Iceland (63.83 N 21.47W) with the plan to be operational for several years. The purpose of this installation was through monitoring of the water vapor isotopic composition to understand the physical processes governing the isotopic composition of the water vapor evaporated from the ocean as well as the processes of mixing between the free troposphere and marine boundary layer. Because of the remoteness of the monitoring site and simple topography we are able to isolate the 'fingerprint' on the isotopic signal in the water vapor from respectively the ocean and the interior highland leading to a near perfect case-study area. Using back-trajectories we find a strong influence of the origin of the air masses on the measured isotopic composition. The mixing of the marine-boundary layer is found to strongly influence the measured isotopic composition. The second order isotopic parameter, d-excess, is contrary to theory and previous observations found not to depend on the relative humidity. However we do find a good correlation between the d-excess and the measured isotopic composition. We speculate that the lack of correlation between d-excess and relative humidity can be

  5. Nd:Glass-Raman laser for water vapor dial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kagann, R. H.; Petheram, J. C.; Rosenberg, A.

    1986-01-01

    A tunable solid-state Raman shifted laser which was used in a water vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system at 9400 A is described. The DIAL transmitter is based on a tunable glass laser operating at 1.06 microns, a hydrogen Raman cell to shift the radiation to 1.88 microns, and a frequency doubling crystal. The results of measurements which characterize the output of the laser with respect to optimization of optical configuration and of Raman parameters were reported. The DIAL system was also described and preliminary atmospheric returns shown.

  6. Atmospheric Water Vapor: A Nemesis for Millimeter Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide, for example, nucleates with water vapor to form sulfuric acid primary particles in large numbers (as high as 1015 m- 3 ), which are...electro- polished stainless steel (SS 304) cavity (3440 cm3 and 1265 cm2 , S/V = 0.37 cm-1 ) evacuated for > 24 hours to 10-4 torr and subjected to... electropolished -1.50 30 150 400 HMDSa silanizing -1.35 27 190 750 Parylene C (Union Carbine) -1.60 32 140 580 Silicone SR240 (GE) -2.10 42 200 550 Teflon REPI20

  7. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Singh, U. N.; Cotnoir, L. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Higdon, N. S.; Browell, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, narrowband (about 0.03/cm) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths was generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), using the narrow linewidth (about 0.02/cm) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20 percent and 35 percent, when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. The linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures, and the inferred collisional broadening coefficients, agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  8. Observations of atmospheric water vapor with the SAGE 2 instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Jack C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.

    1988-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) is discussed. The SAGE 2 instrument was a multichannel spectrometer that inferred the vertical distribution of water vapor, aerosols, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone by measuring the extinction of solar radiation at spacecraft sunrise/sunset. At altitudes above 20 km, the SAGE 2 and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) data are in close agreement. The discrepancies below this altitude may be attributed to differences in the instruments' field of view and time of data acquisition.

  9. Interactions of Water Vapor with Oxides at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Opila, Elizabeth; Copland, Evan; Myers, Dwight

    2003-01-01

    Many volatile metal hydroxides form by reaction of the corresponding metal oxide with water vapor. These reactions are important in a number of high temperature corrosion processes. Experimental methods for studying the thermodynamics of metal hydroxides include: gas leak Knudsen cell mass spectrometry, free jet sampling mass spectrometry, transpiration and hydrogen-oxygen flame studies. The available experimental information is reviewed and the most stable metal hydroxide species are correlated with position in the periodic table. Current studies in our laboratory on the Si-O-H system are discussed.

  10. Airborne water vapor DIAL research: System development and field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Chyba, Thomas H.; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurement of water vapor (H2O) and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. The airborne H2O DIAL system was flight tested aboard the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Electra aircraft in three separate field deployments between 1989 and 1991. Atmospheric measurements were made under a variety of atmospheric conditions during the flight tests, and several modifications were implemented during this development period to improve system operation. A brief description of the system and major modifications will be presented, and the most significant atmospheric observations will be described.

  11. Paralinear Oxidation of CVD SiC in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Hann, Raiford E., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of CVD SiC were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in a 50% H2O/50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s for temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Paralinear weight change kinetics were observed as the water vapor oxidized the SiC and simultaneously volatilized the silica scale. The long-term degradation rate of SiC is determined by the volatility of the silica scale. Rapid SiC surface recession rates were estimated from these data for actual aircraft engine combustor conditions.

  12. An alexandrite regenerative amplifier for water vapor and temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thro, P.-Y.; Boesenberg, J.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is a powerful method for determining meteorological parameters, but it requires high quality of the laser source: high energy, very narrow bandwidth, high wavelength stability, and spectral purity. Although many efforts have been made to improve the lasers in view of these aspects, a satisfactory solution has not been demonstrated up to now. We describe a regenerative amplifier, using a Ti:sapphire laser as master oscillator and an alexandrite laser as slave amplifier, which is expected to meet the requirements for water vapor concentration and temperature measurements.

  13. Observations of atmospheric water vapor with the SAGE 2 instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jack C.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) is discussed. The SAGE 2 instrument was a multichannel spectrometer that inferred the vertical distribution of water vapor, aerosols, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone by measuring the extinction of solar radiation at spacecraft sunrise/sunset. At altitudes above 20 km, the SAGE 2 and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) data are in close agreement. The discrepancies below this altitude may be attributed to differences in the instruments' field of view and time of data acquisition.

  14. Final Report for ARM Project Measuring 4-D Water Vapor Fields with GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, John

    2006-02-06

    Water vapor is a primary element in the Earth’s climate system. Atmospheric water vapor is central to cloud processes, radiation transfer, and the hydrological cycle. Using funding from Department of Energy (DOE) grant DE-FG03-02ER63327, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) developed new observational techniques to measure atmospheric water vapor and applied these techniques to measure four dimensional water vapor fields throughout the United States Southern Great Plains region. This report summarizes the development of a new observation from ground based Global Positioning System (GPS) stations called Slant Water Vapor (SW) and it’s utilization in retrieving four dimensional water vapor fields. The SW observation represents the integrated amount of water vapor between a GPS station and a transmitting satellite. SW observations provide improved temporal and spatial sampling of the atmosphere when compared to column-integrated quantities such as preciptitable water vapor (PW). Under funding from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, GPS networks in the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region were deployed to retrieve SW to improve the characterization of water vapor throughout the region. These observations were used to estimate four dimensional water vapor fields using tomographic approaches and through assimilation into the MM5 numerical weather model.

  15. The Use of Water Vapor for Detecting Environments that Lead to Convectively Produced Heavy Precipitation and Flash Floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, Rod; Vicente, Gilberto; Hodges, Mike

    2000-01-01

    This Tech Report summarizes years of study and experiences on using GOES Water vapor (6.7 micron and precipitable water) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) derived Precipitable Water (PNAI) for detecting environments favorable for convectively produced flash floods. An emphasis is on the moisture. upper air flow, and equivalent potential temperature (Theta(sub e)) patterns that lead to devastating flood events. The 15 minute 6.7 micron water vapor imagery is essential for tracking middle to upper tropospheric disturbances that produce upward vertical motion and initiate flash flood producing systems. Water vapor imagery at 6.7 micron is also used to detect surges of upper level moisture (called tropical water vapor plumes) that have been associated with extremely heavy rainfall. Since the water vapor readily depicts lifting mechanisms and upper level moisture, water vapor imagery is often an excellent source of data for recognizing patterns of heavy precipitation and flash floods. In order to analyze the depth of the moisture, the PW aspects of the troposphere must be measured. The collocation (or nearby location) of high values ofP\\V and instability are antecedent conditions prior to the flash flood or heavy rainfall events. Knowledge of PW magnitudes have been used as thresholds for impending flash flood events, PW trends are essential in flash flood prediction. Conceptual models and water vapor products are used to study some of the characteristics of convective systems that occurred over the United States of America (USA) during the summer of 1997 and the 1997-1998 El Nino. P\\V plumes were associated with most of the \\vest coast heavy precipitation events examined during the winter season of 1997 - 1998, In another study, conducted during the summer season of 1997. results showed that the collocation of water vapor (6.7 micron) and P\\N' plumes possessed higher correlations with predicted

  16. Purple Crow Lidar Vibrational Raman water vapor mixing ratio and temperature measurements in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) measurements of the vibrational Raman-shifted backscatter from water vapor and nitrogen molecules allows height profiles of water vapor mixing ratio to be measured from 500 m to up into the lower stratosphere from the Delaware Observatory near London, Canada. In addition, the Raman nitrogen measurements allow the determination of temperature profiles from about 10 km to 40 km altitude. External calibration of these measurements is necessary to compensate for instrumental effects, uncertainties in our knowledge of the relevant molecular cross sections, and atmospheric transmission. A comparison of the PCL derived water vapor concentration and temperature profiles with routine radiosonde measurements from Detroit and Buffalo on 37 and 141 nights respectively, was undertaken to provide this calibration, which showed mean temperature differences over all flights for altitudes above 9 km of about 0.5 K, with agreement for water vapor below 7 km to within ±12%. Comparisons of the cold point temperature with the coincident water vapor measurements will be presented to investigate the transport of air from the tropics to midlatitudes.

  17. Hydrogen isotope composition of dry season atmospheric water vapor on Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Galewsky, J.; Hardy, D. R.; Braun, C.

    2011-12-01

    In-situ measurements of modern meteorological conditions at Quelccaya Ice Cap's summit, including the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor, may aid in the interpretation of the 1500-year, annually resolved ice-core record available from the site (Thompson et al., 2003). Betweeen July 7 and July 9, 2011, we collected 11 samples of atmospheric water vapor from the summit of Quelccaya and analyzed the hydrogen isotopic composition on a Finnegan MAT-252 mass spectrometer using the method of Strong et al 2007. δD values ranged from -134% to -168%, and specific humidity ranged from 1.5 to 3 g/kg. The isotopic composition of tropical Andean ice cores has been variously interpreted in terms of simple Rayleigh distillation models, in which water evaporates from the tropical Atlantic and condenses as it moves upslope (Grootes et al., 1989; Pierrehumbert, 1999), or in terms of the condensation temperature (Thompson et al., 2003). The joint distribution of water vapor concentrations and δD values in our dataset cannot be explained by a simple upslope Rayleigh distillation model. Such a model predicts higher water-vapor concentrations and lower δD values than those measured during the sampling period. We hypothesize that the joint distribution of water vapor mixing ratio and isotopic composition can be explained by large-scale mixing of air parcels that were last saturated in the upper tropical troposphere. Such mixing necessarily leads to parcels that have higher delta values than would be expected for the simple Rayleigh distillation to the observed mixing ratio. Local effects of snow sublimation may exert additional controls over the water-vapor mixing ratio and delta values. Further monitoring during both the wet and dry seasons may clarify the relationship between large-scale water-vapor transport and the snow and ice preserved on Quelccaya. References Friedman, I. (1953) Deuterium content of natural waters and other substances, Geoch. et Cosmochim. Acta, 4

  18. Adsorption of water vapor by poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt: isothermal and isobaric adsorption equilibria.

    PubMed

    Toribio, F; Bellat, J P; Nguyen, P H; Dupont, M

    2004-12-15

    Air conditioning and dehumidifying systems based on sorption on solids are of great interest, especially in humid climates, because they allow reduction of thermal loads and use of chlorofluorocarbons. Previous studies have shown that hydrophilic polymers such as sulfonic polymers can have very high performance in water adsorption from air. The aim of this study was to characterize the water vapor adsorption properties of fully sulfonated and monosulfonated poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt, and to elucidate the mechanism of adsorption on these materials. Adsorption isotherms have been determined by TGA between 298 and 317 K for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 45 hPa. They have type II of the IUPAC classification and a small hysteresis loop between adsorption and desorption processes was observed only for the monosulfonated sample. Water content is up to 80% weight at 80% relative humidity. Adsorption isotherms have been well fitted with the FHH model. Adsorption-desorption isobars have been determined by TGA under 37 hPa in the temperature range 298-373 K. They show that these polymers can be completely regenerated by heating at 313 K under humidified air. No degradation of the adsorption properties has been observed after several regenerations. Adsorption enthalpies and entropies have been deduced from the Clapeyron equation and from DSC measurements. A good agreement was found. A mechanism of adsorption is proposed considering two kinds of adsorbate: bounded water in electrostatic interaction with functional groups and free water resulting from condensation.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR-TO-LEAF VAPOR PHASE TRANSFER FACTOR FOR DIOXINS AND FURANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of an experiment in which grass was grown in a greenhouse and outdoors, and in soils of different concentration levels of dioxins and furans, were used in a modeling exercise to derive an air-to-leaf vapor phase transfer factor. The purpose of the experiment was to under...

  20. THE BACTERICIDAL ACTION OF PROPYLENE GLYCOL VAPOR ON MICROORGANISMS SUSPENDED IN AIR

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Theodore T.; Robertson, O. H.; Lemon, Henry M.

    1943-01-01

    A study of the conditions which affect the bactericidal action of propylene glycol vapor on air-suspended microorganisms has been carried out. The killing process was found to be more effective when both the total number of air-borne droplets and the number of organisms in the bacterial suspension are small. A temperature below 80°F. and an atmospheric relative humidity between 45 and 70 per cent were found to constitute the most favorable conditions for the lethal action of the vapor. Experiments were performed to test the bactericidal efficiency of propylene glycol vapor in both small and large enclosed spaces. These studies revealed that equally marked bactericidal action is obtained when propylene glycol is dispersed in an 800 cubic foot room as occurs in chambers of 2 cubic foot capacity. The susceptibility to vapor action of bacteria re-suspended in saliva was just as great as when broth was used as the suspending medium. Both partially and completely dehydrated bacteria also succumbed to the effects of the vapor. However, when unsterile dust collected from inhabited rooms was dispersed into the air, little reduction of the natural microbic population contained in this material was observed. Data are presented showing the minimum glycol concentration necessary for effective bactericidal action on various microorganisms. Pneumococci were killed by amounts of propylene glycol as low as 1 gm. in 20 million cc. of air. Concentrations of 1 to 5 million to 1 to 10 million were required to produce the same degree of killing of streptococci and staphylococci. The observations here reported add further support to the previously proposed conception of the mechanism of the lethal action of propylene glycol vapor, namely, that a bactericidal concentration of the glycol accumulates in the bacterial droplet as a result of contact with and absorption of glycol molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:19871337

  1. THE ROLE OF AQUEOUS THIN FILM EVAPORATIVE COOLING ON RATES OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AIR-WATER EXCHANGE UNDER TEMPERATURE DISEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technical conununity has only recently addressed the role of atmospheric temperature variations on rates of air-water vapor phase toxicant exchange. The technical literature has documented that: 1) day time rates of elemental mercury vapor phase air-water exchange can exceed ...

  2. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1990-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T (sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  3. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  4. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system.

  5. The evolution of water vapor in the atmosphere of Venus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Gross, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the feasibility of loss of water vapor from the Venus atmosphere, assuming H2O as the sole initial constituent. A steady-state model is constructed, and the photochemistry establishes the distribution of important products in the upper atmosphere. Calculations of exospheric temperatures yield values as high as 100,000 K. Such large temperatures result from the large abundance of atomic hydrogen in the exosphere, and imply a dynamic outflow of all constituents from the upper region of the atmosphere. Such an outflow would cause the escape of all hydrogen and some of the oxygen resulting from dissociation of H2O. Little loss of CO2 would result, due to its low abundance in the upper region, permitting its accumulation to the present observed value. It is concluded that if Venus formed from the same mix of materials as the earth, much tectonic activity and fairly rapid outgassing must have occurred during the early phase of its history to account for the loss of water vapor.

  6. Water Vapor and the Dynamics of Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tapio; O'Gorman, Paul A.; Levine, Xavier J.

    2010-07-01

    Water vapor is not only Earth's dominant greenhouse gas. Through the release of latent heat when it condenses, it also plays an active role in dynamic processes that shape the global circulation of the atmosphere and thus climate. Here we present an overview of how latent heat release affects atmosphere dynamics in a broad range of climates, ranging from extremely cold to extremely warm. Contrary to widely held beliefs, atmospheric circulation statistics can change nonmonotonically with global-mean surface temperature, in part because of dynamic effects of water vapor. For example, the strengths of the tropical Hadley circulation and of zonally asymmetric tropical circulations, as well as the kinetic energy of extratropical baroclinic eddies, can be lower than they presently are both in much warmer climates and in much colder climates. We discuss how latent heat release is implicated in such circulation changes, particularly through its effect on the atmospheric static stability, and we illustrate the circulation changes through simulations with an idealized general circulation model. This allows us to explore a continuum of climates, to constrain macroscopic laws governing this climatic continuum, and to place past and possible future climate changes in a broader context.

  7. Continuous on-line water vapor isotope measurements in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, Janek; Romanini, Daniele; Holmen, Kim; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Meijer, Harro; Kerstel, Erik

    2010-05-01

    In the context of a globally warming climate it is crucial to study the climate variability in the past and to understand the underlying mechanisms (1). Precipitation deposited on the polar ice caps provides a means to retrieve information on temperature changes (through the paleo-temperature dependence of the isotopic composition of the ice) and atmospheric composition (of gas stored in bubbles in the ice) on time scales from one to almost one million years, with sub-annual resolution in the most recent centuries. However, it is now widely recognized that the calibration of the paleo-thermometer is highly problematic. For this reason attempts to model the global water cycle, including the isotope signals, are ongoing with the aim of providing a more physical basis of the isotope - temperature relation. Currently, there is a large divergence in the results obtained by different modeling strategies. The missing link in these model studies is their forcing by experimental data on the pre-deposition isotopic composition of the vapor phase compartment of the hydrological cycle. We propose to measure the isotopic composition of moisture carried towards and deposited on Antarctica, in order to constrain the numerical models. In this context we are developing a modified, more sensitive and precise, version of a laser water vapor isotope spectrometer, originally designed for stratospheric studies (2, 3). This instrument, which will first be operated at the Norwegian station of Troll in Queen Maud Land, will enable the continuous, online measurement of all three stable isotope ratios of atmospheric water vapor. So far, such data is non-existent. Our data should improve the validity of the models and improve the understanding of the physical mechanisms at the basis of the isotope thermometer. This in turn will lead to an increased confidence in the predictions of (general circulation) models concerning climate variability. (1) International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 4

  8. Preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem. [recovering potable water from wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, G. S.; Wynveen, R. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-person capacity preprototype vapor compression distillation subsystem for recovering potable water from wastewater aboard spacecraft was designed, assembled, and tested. The major components of the subsystem are: (1) a distillation unit which includes a compressor, centrifuge, central shaft, and outer shell; (2) a purge pump; (3) a liquids pump; (4) a post-treat cartridge; (5) a recycle/filter tank; (6) an evaporator high liquid level sensor; and (7) the product water conductivity monitor. A computer based control monitor instrumentation carries out operating mode change sequences, monitors and displays subsystem parameters, maintains intramode controls, and stores and displays fault detection information. The mechanical hardware occupies 0.467 m3, requires 171 W of electrical power, and has a dry weight of 143 kg. The subsystem recovers potable water at a rate of 1.59 kg/hr, which is equivalent to a duty cycle of approximately 30% for a crew of three. The product water has no foul taste or odor. Continued development of the subsystem is recommended for reclaiming water for human consumption as well as for flash evaporator heat rejection, urinal flushing, washing, and other on-board water requirements.

  9. Numerical modeling of water injection into vapor-dominatedgeothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-11-06

    Water injection has been recognized as a powerful techniquefor enhancing energy recovery from vapor-dominated geothermal systemssuch as The Geysers. In addition to increasing reservoir pressures,production well flow rates, and long-term sustainability of steamproduction, injection has also been shown to reduce concentrations ofnon-condensible gases (NCGs) in produced steam. The latter effectimproves energy conversion efficiency and reduces corrosion problems inwellbores and surface lines.This report reviews thermodynamic andhydrogeologic conditions and mechanisms that play an important role inreservoir response to water injection. An existing general-purposereservoir simulator has been enhanced to allow modeling of injectioneffects in heterogeneous fractured reservoirs in three dimensions,including effects of non-condensible gases of different solubility.Illustrative applications demonstrate fluid flow and heat transfermechanisms that are considered crucial for developing approaches to insitu abatement of NCGs.

  10. A case study of natural variability of water vapor content in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobson, E.; Keernik, H.

    2012-12-01

    Water vapor is the most essential component of the Earth's atmosphere. It is contributing about 60 % of the natural greenhouse effect, being the resource for precipitation in the lower troposphere and playing a critical role in many chemical reactions. Therefore, its quantity must be known precisely to understand, associate and forecast meteorological processes. On the other hand, temporal as well as spatial variability of water vapor occur such a fine scales, that resolving it adequately presuppose observing systems with high sampling resolution in space and time. Regular radiosondes with 12 h or 24 h sampling interval are not sufficient for detecting fast changes neither in the humidity profiles nor in the water vapor total content. During three days (10th-12th August 2010) total of 24 radiosoundings with interval 3 h were made in Toravere, Estonia (58°15' N, 26°27' E), using GRAW DFM-06 radiosondes. Column-integrated water vapor content, known as precipitable water, varied during the campaign from 24 mm to 36 mm. The temporal variation of specific humidity was surprisingly uniform, up to 2 g/kg within any layer in the profile below 6 km. It is noteworthy, as the average values varied even one magnitude - from 12 g/kg at the ground level to 1 g/kg at 6000 m. These changes in the humidity content in the whole profile can be explained only with exchanges of the air masses. In addition to the radiosondes data, NCEP-CFSR vertical profile data of specific humidity and temperature for the Baltic Sea region (here defined as region 52° - 68° N, 12° - 32° E) was used with temporal and spatial resolution of 6 h and 0.5 degrees, respectively. For the overlapping period, NCEP-CFSR followed the measured profiles reasonably well, giving us some justice to use this model for the whole period and region. The region average of precipitable water was 22.8 mm, though local extreme values varied through the summer even one magnitude - from 4.5 mm to 51 mm. The average

  11. Characterization of Upper Troposphere Water Vapor Measurements during AFWEX using LASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Kooi, S.; Brasseur, L. H.; Brackett, V. G.; Clayton, M.; Barrick, J.; Linne, H.; Lammert, A.

    2002-01-01

    Water vapor profiles from NASA's Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system acquired during the ARM/FIRE Water Vapor Experiment (AFWEX) are used to characterize upper troposphere water vapor (UTWV) measured by ground-based Raman lidars, radiosondes, and in situ aircraft sensors. Initial comparisons showed the average Vaisala radiosonde measurements to be 5-15% drier than the average LASE, Raman lidar, and DC-8 in situ diode laser hygrometer measurements. We show that corrections to the Raman lidar and Vaisala measurements significantly reduce these differences. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from the LASE water vapor profiles agrees within 3% on average with PWV derived from the ARM ground-based microwave radiometer (MWR). The agreement among the LASE, Raman lidar, and MWR measurements demonstrates how the LASE measurements can be used to characterize both profile and column water vapor measurements and that ARM Raman lidar, when calibrated using the MWR PWV, can provide accurate UTWV measurements.

  12. Alumina Volatility in Water Vapor at Elevated Temperatures: Application to Combustion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2003-01-01

    The volatility of alumina in high temperature water vapor was determined by measuring weight loss of sapphire coupons at temperatures between 1250 and 1500 C, water vapor partial pressures between 0.15 and 0.68 atm in oxygen, at one atmosphere total pressure, and a gas velocity of 4.4 centimeters per second. The variation of the volatility with water vapor partial pressure was consistent with Al(OH)3(g) formation. The enthalpy of reaction to form Al(OH)3(g) from alumina and water vapor was found to be 210 plus or minus 20 kJ/mol. Surface rearrangement of ground sapphire surfaces increased with water vapor partial pressure, temperature and volatility rate. Recession rates of alumina due to volatility were determined as a function of water vapor partial pressure and temperature to evaluate limits for use of alumina in long term applications in combustion environments.

  13. Raman lidar profiling of atmospheric water vapor: Simultaneous measurements with two collocated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Bisson, Scott E.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith D.; Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Raman lidar is a leading candidate for providing the detailed space- and time-resolved measurements of water vapor needed by a variety of atmospheric studies. Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric water vapor are described using two collocated Raman lidar systems. These lidar systems, developed at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Sandia National Laboratories, acquired approximately 12 hours of simultaneous water vapor data during three nights in November 1992 while the systems were collocated at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Although these lidar systems differ substantially in their design, measured water vapor profiles agreeed within 0.15 g/kg between altitudes of 1 and 5 km. Comparisons with coincident radiosondes showed all instruments agreed within 0.2 g/kg in this same altitude range. Both lidars also clearly showed the advection of water vapor in the middle troposphere and the pronounced increase in water vapor in the nocturnal boundary layer that occurred during one night.

  14. UV Dosage Levels in Summer: Increased Risk of Ozone Loss from Convectively Injected Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated water vapor concentrations from convective injection have now been observed repeatedly in the lower stratosphere over the United States during the summer. Because both temperature and water vapor concentration set the threshold conditions for initiating the heterogeneous reactions that activate inorganic chlorine, the observed presence of high water vapor can fundamentally change the chemistry of the lower stratosphere by shifting inorganic chlorine into the catalytically active free-radical form, ClO. As a result, significant ozone losses may follow convective injection of water vapor into the stratosphere. The chemical system is highly sensitive to temperature, pressure, aerosol surface area, available inorganic chlorine, and concentration and duration of elevated water vapor. Were the intensity and frequency of convective injection of water vapor to increase as a result of climate forcing by the continued addition of carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere, increased risk of ozone loss and associated increases in ultraviolet dosage would follow.

  15. New explicit equations for the accurate calculation of the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.; Coen, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The traditional explicit growth equation has been widely used to calculate the growth and evaporation of hydrometeors by the diffusion of water vapor. This paper reexamines the assumptions underlying the traditional equation and shows that large errors (10-30 percent in some cases) result if it is used carelessly. More accurate explicit equations are derived by approximating the saturation vapor-density difference as a quadratic rather than a linear function of the temperature difference between the particle and ambient air. These new equations, which reduce the error to less than a few percent, merit inclusion in a broad range of atmospheric models.

  16. Water Vapor Transport Over the Tropical Oceans During ENSO as Diagnosed from TRMM and SSM/I Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Smith, Eric A.; Sohn, Byung-Ju

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, large-scale water vapor transport [div Q] has been derived directly from circulation statistics in which transport processes are often depicted by mean and eddy motions. Thus detailed and accurate calculations of moisture transport terms over the globe are required. Notably, the lack of systematically spaced conventional measurements of meteorological variables over oceans has hindered understanding of the distribution and transport of water vapor. This motivates the use of indirect calculation methods in which horizontal divergence of water vapor is balanced by the evaporation minus precipitation, assuming the rate of changes of precipitable water and condensates is small over a sufficiently long time period. In order to obtain the water vapor transport, we need evaporation rate minus precipitation (E-P). Focussing on the differences in water vapor transport between El Nino and La Nina periods and their influences on atmospheric circulations, we study January, February, and March of 1998 and 1999 periods which represent El Nino and La Nina respectively. SSM/I-derived precipitation and evaporation rate from SSM/I wind and total precipitable water, in conjunction with NCEP SST and surface air temperature, are used for the calculation of the transport potential function. For the retrieval of evaporation we use a stability-dependent aerodynamic bulk scheme developed by Chou (1993). It was tested against aircraft covariance fluxes measured during cold air outbreaks over the North Atlantic Ocean. Chou et al. (1997) reported that the SSM/I retrieved latent heat flux over the western Pacific warm pool area were found to be comparable with daily mean fluxes of a ship measurements during TOGA/COARE.

  17. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  18. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  19. Water Vapor Radiometer for ALMA: Optical Design and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, S.; Emrich, A.; Peacocke, T.

    2010-03-01

    Atacama Large Millimeter wave Array (ALMA) is being built at a high altitude Atacama Desert in Chile. It will consist of 50 12m telescopes with heterodyne instruments to cover a large frequency range from about 30GHz to nearly 1THz. In order to facilitate the interferometer mode of operation all receivers have to be phase synchronized. It will be accomplished by phase locking of all local oscillators from a single reference source. However, a noticeable part of the phase error is caused as the signal propagates through the Earth atmosphere. Since this effect originates from the fluctuations of water vapors, it can be accounted for by carefully measuring the spectral width of one of water vapor resonance absorption lines. This will be done with a submillimeter heterodyne radiometer, Water Vapor Radiometer (WVR). WVR will measure the sky brightness temperature in the beam path of every telescope across the 183GHz water line with a spectral resolution of about 1GHz. Accuracy of the calculated optical delay is determined by the combination of the radiometric accuracy of the WVR and of the errors originated in the WVR illumination of the telescope. We will describe major challenges in the design of the WVR to comply with the stringent requirements set to the WVR. Several approaches to simulate the quasioptical waveguide which brings the signal from the telescope's subreflector to the mixer horn, were used: fundamental mode Gaussian beam propagation, combined ray tracing with diffraction effects (using package ZEMAX), and a full vector electromagnetic simulations (using GRASP). The computational time increases rapidly from the first method to the last one. We have found that ZEMAX results are quite close to the one from GRASP, however obtained with nearly instant computation, which allows multiple iterations during system optimization. The beam pattern of the WVR and of WVR with the optical Relay (used to bring the signal from the telescope's main axis to the WVR input

  20. Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor at Syowa Station, Antarctica in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Naohiko; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Nakamura, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Balloon-borne observations of lower stratospheric water vapor were conducted with the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer (CFH) in July, September, and November 2013 at Syowa Station (69.0oS, 39.6oE) in the Antarctic. High-precision and high vertical resolution data of water vapor concentration up to an altitude of about 28 km were obtained successfully except for a contamination in the observation of July 2013. A comparison between the CFH and coincident satellite (i.e., Aura/MLS) observations showed a good agreement within their uncertainty. A position of Syowa Station relative to the stratospheric polar vortex edge varied depending on both the observation date and altitude. Temperature and pressure histories of the observed air parcels were examined by 10-day backward trajectories. These analyses clearly demonstrated that most air parcels observed in the lower stratosphere above Syowa Station experienced final dehydration inside the polar vortex. On the other hand, a clear signature of rehydration or incomplete dehydration was also observed around a 25 hPa pressure level in the observation of July 2013.

  1. COLD WATER VAPOR IN THE BARNARD 5 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Wirström, E. S.; Persson, C. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Cordiner, M. A.; Buckle, J. V.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-06-20

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold (∼10 K) water vapor has been detected—L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work—likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H{sub 2}O (J = 1{sub 10}-1{sub 01}) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  2. Cold Water Vapor in the Barnard 5 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstrom, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.; Persson, C. M.; Buckle, J. V.; Cordiner, M. A.; Takakuwa, S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than 30 yr of investigations, the nature of gas-grain interactions at low temperatures remains an unresolved issue in astrochemistry. Water ice is the dominant ice found in cold molecular clouds; however, there is only one region where cold ((is) approximately 10 K) water vapor has been detected-L1544. This study aims to shed light on ice desorption mechanisms under cold cloud conditions by expanding the sample. The clumpy distribution of methanol in dark clouds testifies to transient desorption processes at work-likely to also disrupt water ice mantles. Therefore, the Herschel HIFI instrument was used to search for cold water in a small sample of prominent methanol emission peaks. We report detections of the ground-state transition of o-H2O (J = 110-101) at 556.9360 GHz toward two positions in the cold molecular cloud, Barnard 5. The relative abundances of methanol and water gas support a desorption mechanism which disrupts the outer ice mantle layers, rather than causing complete mantle removal.

  3. Airborne water vapor DIAL system and measurements of water and aerosol profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, Noah S.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    The Lidar Applications Group at NASA Langley Research Center has developed a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols from an aircraft. The airborne H2O DIAL system is designed for extended flights to perform mesoscale investigations of H2O and aerosol distributions. This DIAL system utilizes a Nd:YAG-laser-pumped dye laser as the off-line transmitter and a narrowband, tunable Alexandrite laser as the on-line transmitter. The dye laser has an oscillator/amplifier configuration which incorporates a grating and prism in the oscillator cavity to narrow the output linewidth to approximately 15 pm. This linewidth can be maintained over the wavelength range of 725 to 730 nm, and it is sufficiently narrow to satisfy the off-line spectral requirements. In the Alexandrite laser, three intracavity tuning elements combine to produce an output linewidth of 1.1 pm. These spectral devices include a five-plate birefringent tuner, a 1-mm thick solid etalon and a 1-cm air-spaced etalon. A wavelength stability of +/- 0.35 pm is achieved by active feedback control of the two Fabry-Perot etalons using a frequency stabilized He-Ne laser as a wavelength reference. The three tuning elements can be synchronously scanned over a 150 pm range with microprocessor-based scanning electronics. Other aspects of the DIAL system are discussed.

  4. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-25

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  5. Prediction of water vapor transport rates across polyvinylchloride packaging systems using a novel radiotracer method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.W.; Mulski, M.J.; Kuu, W.Y. )

    1990-09-01

    A radiotracer method is used to study the transport properties of water vapor in polyvinylchloride (PVC), a plastic commonly used in the packaging of parenteral solutions. Water vapor transport across a PVC film appears to be Fickian in nature. Using the steady-state solution of Fick's second law and the permeability coefficient of water vapor across the PVC film obtained using the described method, the predicted water vapor transport rate (WVTR) for a parenteral solution packaged in PVC is in reasonable agreement with actual WVTR as determined by weight loss under precisely controlled conditions.

  6. Comparison of lidar water vapor measurements using Raman scatter at 266 nm and 532 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Balsiger, F.; Philbrick, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    The performance of the Lidar Atmospheric Profile Sensor (LAPS) instrument for measurements of water vapor in the lower troposphere has been investigated. LAPS is an automated lidar system that measures water vapor from the vibrational Raman backscatter in the visible and in the ultraviolet wavelength range. The authors present a comparison of water vapor profiles measured with the lidar and balloon sondes as well as measured with the two lidar channels. With the UV channels it is possible to infer ozone profiles in the boundary layer. Data are presented that reveal the high variability of the water vapor in the boundary layer.

  7. The annual cycle of stratospheric water vapor in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mote, Philip W.

    1995-01-01

    The application of general circulation models (GCM's) to stratospheric chemistry and transport both permits and requires a thorough investigation of stratospheric water vapor. The National Center for Atmospheric Research has redesigned its GCM, the Community Climate Model (CCM2), to enable studies of the chemistry and transport of tracers including water vapor; the importance of water vapor to the climate and chemistry of the stratosphere requires that it be better understood in the atmosphere and well represented in the model. In this study, methane is carried as a tracer and converted to water; this simple chemistry provides an adequate representation of the upper stratospheric water vapor source. The cold temperature bias in the winter polar stratosphere, which the CCM2 shares with other GCM's, produces excessive dehydration in the southern hemisphere, but this dry bias can be ameliorated by setting a minimum vapor pressure. The CCM2's water vapor distribution and seasonality compare favorably with observations in many respects, though seasonal variations including the upper stratospheric semiannual oscillation are generally too small. Southern polar dehydration affects midlatitude water vapor mixing ratios by a few tenths of a part per million, mostly after the demise of the vortex. The annual cycle of water vapor in the tropical and northern midlatitude lower stratosphere is dominated by drying at the tropical tropopause. Water vapor has a longer adjustment time than methane and had not reached equilibrium at the end of the 9 years simulated here.

  8. Water vapor toward starless cores: The Herschel view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, P.; Keto, E.; Pagani, L.; Aikawa, Y.; Yıldız, U. A.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Tafalla, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Nisini, B.; Codella, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bachiller, R.; Baudry, A.; Benedettini, M.; Benz, A. O.; Bjerkeli, P.; Blake, G. A.; Bontemps, S.; Braine, J.; Bruderer, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Daniel, F.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Dominik, C.; Doty, S. D.; Encrenaz, P.; Fich, M.; Fuente, A.; Gaier, T.; Giannini, T.; Goicoechea, J. R.; de Graauw, Th.; Helmich, F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Herpin, F.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Jackson, B.; Jacq, T.; Javadi, H.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Kester, D.; Kristensen, L. E.; Laauwen, W.; Larsson, B.; Lis, D.; Liseau, R.; Luinge, W.; Marseille, M.; McCoey, C.; Megej, A.; Melnick, G.; Neufeld, D.; Olberg, M.; Parise, B.; Pearson, J. C.; Plume, R.; Risacher, C.; Santiago-García, J.; Saraceno, P.; Shipman, R.; Siegel, P.; van Kempen, T. A.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2010-10-01

    Aims: Previous studies by the satellites SWAS and Odin provided stringent upper limits on the gas phase water abundance of dark clouds (x(H2O) < 7 × 10-9). We investigate the chemistry of water vapor in starless cores beyond the previous upper limits using the highly improved angular resolution and sensitivity of Herschel and measure the abundance of water vapor during evolutionary stages just preceding star formation. Methods: High spectral resolution observations of the fundamental ortho water (o-H2O) transition (557 GHz) were carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared onboard Herschel toward two starless cores: Barnard 68 (hereafter B68), a Bok globule, and LDN 1544 (L1544), a prestellar core embedded in the Taurus molecular cloud complex. Detailed radiative transfer and chemical codes were used to analyze the data. Results: The RMS in the brightness temperature measured for the B68 and L1544 spectra is 2.0 and 2.2 mK, respectively, in a velocity bin of 0.59 km s-1. The continuum level is 3.5 ± 0.2 mK in B68 and 11.4 ± 0.4 mK in L1544. No significant feature is detected in B68 and the 3σ upper limit is consistent with a column density of o-H2O N(o-H2O) < 2.5 × 1013 cm-2, or a fractional abundance x(o-H2O) < 1.3 × 10-9, more than an order of magnitude lower than the SWAS upper limit on this source. The L1544 spectrum shows an absorption feature at a 5σ level from which we obtain the first value of the o-H2O column density ever measured in dark clouds: N(o-H2O) = (8 ± 4) × 1012 cm-2. The corresponding fractional abundance is x(o-H2O) ≃ 5 × 10-9 at radii >7000 AU and ≃2 × 10-10 toward the center. The radiative transfer analysis shows that this is consistent with a x(o-H2O) profile peaking at ≃10-8, 0.1 pc away from the core center, where both freeze-out and photodissociation are negligible. Conclusions: Herschel has provided the first measurement of water vapor in dark regions. Column densities of o-H2O are low, but prestellar

  9. Low-level water vapor fields from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) split window channels at 11 and 12 microns. [visible infrared spin scan radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L.; Robinson, W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of high-resolution water vapor fields were derived from the 11 and 12 micron channels of the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on GOES-5. The low-level tropospheric moisture content was separated from the surface and atmospheric radiances by using the differential adsorption across the 'split window' along with the average air temperature from imbedded radiosondes. Fields of precipitable water are presented in a time sequence of five false color images taken over the United States at 3-hour intervals. Vivid subsynoptic and mesoscale patterns evolve at 15 km horizontal resolution over the 12-hour observing period. Convective cloud formations develop from several areas of enhanced low-level water vapor, especially where the vertical water vapor gradient relatively strong. Independent verification at radiosonde sites indicates fairly good absolute accuracy, and the spatial and temporal continuity of the water vapor features indicates very good relative accuracy. Residual errors are dominated by radiometer noise and unresolved clouds.

  10. Resistance of Citrus Fruit to Mass Transport of Water Vapor and Other Gases 1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yehoshua, Shimshon; Burg, Stanley P.; Young, Roger

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) to ethylene, O2, CO2, and H2O mass transport was investigated anatomically with scanning electron microscope and physiologically by gas exchange measurements at steady state. The resistance of untreated fruit to water vapor is far less than to ethylene, CO2 and O2. Waxing partially or completely plugs stomatal pores and forms an intermittent cracked layer over the surface of fruit, restricting transport of ethylene, O2, and CO2, but not of water; whereas individual sealing of fruit with high density polyethylene films reduces water transport by 90% without substantially inhibiting gas exchange. Stomata of harvested citrus fruits are essentially closed. However, ethylene, O2 and CO2 still diffuse mainly through the residual stomatal opening where the relative transport resistance (approximately 6,000 seconds per centimeter) depends on the relative diffusivity of each gas in air. Water moves preferentially by a different pathway, probably through a liquid aqueous phase in the cuticle where water conductance is 60-fold greater. Other gases are constrained from using this pathway because their diffusivity in liquid water is 104-fold less than in air. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16664527

  11. Atmospheric control on isotopic composition and d-excess in water vapor over ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Naixin

    For decades, stable isotopes of water have been used as proxies to infer the variation of the hydrological cycle. However, it is still not clear how various atmospheric processes quantitatively control kinetic fractionation during evaporation over the ocean. Understanding kinetic fractionation is important in that the interpretation of the isotopic composition record preserved in ice cores and precipitation relies in part on the isotopic information at the moisture source. In addition, the isotopic composition of vapor contains information about variation of atmospheric processes such as turbulence and change in moisture source region which is useful for studying meteorological processes and climate change. In this study the isotopic composition of water vapor in the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the ocean was investigated using a combination of a newly developed marine boundary layer (MBL) model and observational data. The new model has a more realistic MBL structure than previous models and includes new features such as vertical advection of air and diffusion coefficients that vary continuously in the vertical direction. A robust linear relationship between deltaD and delta18O was found in observational oceanic water vapor data and the model can well capture the characteristics of this relationship. The individual role of atmospheric processes or variables on deltaD, delta18O and d-excess was quantitatively investigated and an overview of the combined effect of all the meteorological processes is provided. In particular, we emphasize that the properties of subsiding air (such as its mixing ratio and isotopic values) are crucial to the isotopic composition of surface water vapor. Relative humidity has been used to represent the moisture deficit that drives evaporative isotopic fluxes, however, we argue that it has serious limitations in explaining d-excess variation as latitude varies. We introduce a new quantity Gd=SST-Td, the difference between the sea

  12. Compact Water Vapor Exchanger for Regenerative Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Anderson, Molly; Hodgson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and environmental control systems for future exploration spacecraft must meet challenging requirements for efficient operation and conservation of resources. Regenerative CO2 removal systems are attractive for these missions because they do not use consumable CO2 absorbers. However, these systems also absorb and vent water to space along with carbon dioxide. This paper describes an innovative device designed to minimize water lost from regenerative CO2 control systems. Design studies and proof-of-concept testing have shown the feasibility of a compact, efficient membrane water vapor exchanger (WVX) that will conserve water while meeting challenging requirements for operation on future spacecraft. Compared to conventional WVX designs, the innovative membrane WVX described here has the potential for high water recovery efficiency, compact size, and very low pressure losses. The key innovation is a method for maintaining highly uniform flow channels in a WVX core built from water-permeable membranes. The proof-of-concept WVX incorporates all the key design features of a prototypical unit, except that it is relatively small scale (1/23 relative to a unit sized for a crew of six) and some components were fabricated using non-prototypical methods. The proof-of-concept WVX achieved over 90% water recovery efficiency in a compact core in good agreement with analysis models. Furthermore the overall pressure drop is very small (less than 0.5 in. H2O, total for both flow streams) and meets requirements for service in environmental control and life support systems on future spacecraft. These results show that the WVX provides very uniform flow through flow channels for both the humid and dry streams. Measurements also show that CO2 diffusion through the water-permeable membranes will have negligible effect on the CO2 partial pressure in the spacecraft atmosphere.

  13. Controls on Synoptic Scale Variability in Atmospheric Water Vapor Stable Isotopologues from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, J. V.; Galewsky, J.; Noone, D. C.; Worden, J.; Johnson, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Havaiki campaign, 9 October to 6 November, 2008, included continuous (6 seconds) in-situ measurement of water vapor stable isotopic ratios at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii. δD correlates with water vapor mixing ratios, and is characterized by both diurnal fluctuations and synoptic scale variability. Daily fluctuations are related to day-time lifting and night-time compression of the trade inversion. We focus on the synoptic variability of night-time δD values, which is more representative of the free troposphere. To do so, we determined last saturation conditions for air at MLO using both Lagrangian back-trajectory and Eulerian GCM-based techniques. Last saturation of air at MLO occurs primarily in the extra-tropical middle-upper troposphere, along mid-latitude baroclinic zones, and secondarily near Hawaii within mesoscale convective systems. Synoptic-scale periods of lower (elevated) δD values at MLO correspond to extra-tropical (near-Hawaii) last saturation. To assess the influence of mixing on water vapor δD at MLO, we reconstructed Havaiki humidity and δD values from both our Lagrangian and Eulerian last saturation model results. The Eulerian based reconstructions, which account for mixing, better represent the observed Havaiki δD values. The Lagrangian approach does not account for mixing and overestimates the observed variability. These results suggest that mixing plays a critical role in setting the water vapor δD of sub-saturated air in the subtropical free tropopshere. To weigh the influences that large-scale circulation or the pre-saturation water vapor δD values have on the observed synoptic variability of δD at MLO, we conducted δD reconstruction experiments. First, we held constant the pre-saturation water vapor δD, varied the last saturation distributions, and were able to reproduce the observed synoptic variability. In the second experiment, we held last saturation distributions constant, varied the pre-saturation

  14. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Water Vapor Retrievals Using Global Positioning System: Case Study in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Jihye; Park, Kwan-Dong; Kim, Dusik; Ha, Jihyun

    2011-12-01

    The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) sensor loaded on the Aqua satellite observes the global vertical structure of atmosphere and enables verification of the water vapor distribution over the entire area of South Korea. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of the accuracy of the total precipitable water (TPW) provided as the AIRS level 2 standard retrieval product by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) over the South Korean area using the global positioning system (GPS) TPW data. The analysis TPW for the period of one year in 2008 showed that the accuracy of the data produced by the combination of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit sensor with the AIRS sensor to correct the effect of clouds (AIRS-X) was higher than that of the AIRS IR-only data (AIRS-I). The annual means of the root mean square error with reference to the GPS data were 5.2 kg/m2 and 4.3 kg/m2 for AIRS-I and AIRS-X, respectively. The accuracy of AIRS-X was higher in summer than in winter while measurement values of AIRS-I and AIRS-X were lower than those of GPS TPW to some extent.

  15. A numerical study of heat and water vapor transfer in MDCT-based human airway models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) thermo-fluid model is developed to study regional distributions of temperature and water vapor in three multi-detector row computed-tomography-based human airways with minute ventilations of 6, 15 and 30 L/min. A one-dimensional (1D) model is also solved to provide necessary initial and boundary conditions for the 3D model. Both 3D and 1D predicted temperature distributions agree well with available in vivo measurement data. On inspiration, the 3D cold high-speed air stream is split at the bifurcation to form secondary flows, with its cold regions biased toward the inner wall. The cold air flowing along the wall is warmed up more rapidly than the air in the lumen center. The repeated splitting pattern of air streams caused by bifurcations acts as an effective mechanism for rapid heat and mass transfer in 3D. This provides a key difference from the 1D model, where heating relies largely on diffusion in the radial direction, thus significantly affecting gradient-dependent variables, such as energy flux and water loss rate. We then propose the correlations for respective heat and mass transfer in the airways of up to 6 generations: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], where Nu is the Nusselt number, Sh is the Sherwood number, Re is the branch Reynolds number, D a is the airway equivalent diameter, and [Formula: see text] is the tracheal equivalent diameter.

  16. Europa's Water Vapor Plumes: Systematically Constraining their Abundance and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of transient water vapor plumes near Europa's south pole (Roth et al. 2014) has important implications for the search for life in our Solar System. Europa's subsurface water ocean is thought to provide all the ingredients needed for a habitable environment. The plumes might enable direct sampling of Europa's subsurface constituents and provide insights into the chemistry, mobility, and extent of the liquid water environments. In STIS spectral images obtained in Dec. 2012, the intensity ratios of atomic H and O auroral emissions uniquely identify the source as electron impact excitation of water molecules. However, a confirmation of the initial detection has not yet been achieved, and non-detections from four out of five previous such visits suggest a complex and possibly episodic variation in plume activity. We have identified five potential variability sources for plume activity and detectability and propose a focused program to systematically constrain Europa's plumes and their variability pattern. Our constraints for the plume activity on Europa are vital inputs for key programmatic decisions regarding NASA's next large mission to Europa.

  17. Analysis of water vapor LIDAR measurements during the MAP campaign: evidence of sub-structures of stratospheric intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aulerio, P.; Fierli, F.; Congeduti, F.; Redaelli, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents case studies of dehydration in the free troposphere measured by a ground based Raman LIDAR in the Northern-Italy, during the Mesoscale Alpine Programme (MAP). Two observations characterized by the presence of anomalously dry layers, below 6 km height, were analyzed using Lagrangian techniques. These events are related to upper-tropospheric, high Potential Vorticity streamers crossing the Alpine region and are interpreted as small-scale features of stratospheric intrusions associated to the PV ridge during its breakout phase. One of the measurements also shows the presence of two distinct dehydrated structures associated to the same event. The water vapor concentration also suggests dilution processes of dry stratospheric air in the troposphere. Lagrangian simulations allowed to successfully reproduce the observed water vapor distribution and the air parcel histories confirmed the stratospheric origin of the dry layers.

  18. Sampling Impacts on the NVAP-M Global Water Vapor Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Forsythe, J. M.; Cronk, H. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a fundamental ingredient both for regulating climate as a greenhouse gas and as a necessary precursor for high impact weather events such as heavy precipitation. Water vapor concentration varies geographically because of its close linkage with surface temperature and as a component of synoptic and mesoscale weather systems. Satellite observations provide the only means to quantify the global occurrence and variability of water vapor. In common with other long-term climate data records such as clouds and precipitation, intercalibrating and blending diverse measurements of water vapor to create a consistent record through time is a challenge. The NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program supported the development of the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP-M) dataset. The dataset was released to the science community in 2013 via the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple satellite infrared and microwave sources of atmospheric water vapor along with surface data to form global gridded fields of total and layered precipitable water vapor. NVAP-M spans 22 years (1988-2009) of data. The challenges in creating this multisensor, multidecadal satellite-driven climate data record are illustrative of challenges for all satellite climate data records. While advances in sensor intercalibration and retrieval algorithms have improved the quality of the global water vapor climate data record, uncertainties arise due to sampling biases of the input sensors. These biases are particularly evident on a regional scale, in cloudy regions or over desert surfaces. The changing mixture of sensors with varying sensitivity to clear/cloudy, land/ocean and even day/night conditions can lead to different results on trends and variability of water vapor. We explore this variability via the NVAP-M data set. Connections and collaborations

  19. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  20. A Simple Experiment for Determining Vapor Pressure and Enthalpy of Vaporization of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Gerald S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, calculations, and sample results are described for a freshman chemistry experiment in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation is introduced as a means of describing the variation of vapor pressure with temperature and for determining enthalpy of vaporization. (Author/SK)

  1. Trend Analysis of GPS Precipitable Water Vapor Above South Korea Over the Last 10 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Dong-Hyo; Cho, Jungho

    2010-09-01

    We analyzed global positioning system (GPS)-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV) trends of the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 5 stations (Seoul, Daejeon, Mokpo, Milyang, Sokcho) where Korea Meteorological Administration meteorological data can be obtained at the same place. In the least squares analysis, the GPS PWV time series showed consistent positive trends (0.11 mm/year) over South Korea from 2000 to 2009. The annual increase of GPS PWV was comparable with the 0.17 mm/year and 0.02 mm/year from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Earth Observing Laboratory and Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder, respectively. For seasonal analysis, the increasing tendency was found by 0.05 mm/year, 0.16 mm/year, 0.04 mm/year in spring (March-May), summer (June-August) and winter (December-February), respectively. However, a negative trend (-0.14 mm/year) was seen in autumn (September-November). We examined the relationship between GPS PWV and temperature which is the one of the climatic elements. Two elements trends increased during the same period and the correlation coefficient was about 0.8. Also, we found the temperature rise has increased more GPS PWV and observed a stronger positive trend in summer than in winter. This is characterized by hot humid summer and cold dry winter of Korea climate and depending on the amount of water vapor the air contains at a certain temperature. In addition, it is assumed that GPS PWV positive trend is caused by increasing amount of saturated water vapor due to temperature rise in the Korean Peninsula. In the future, we plan to verify GPS PWV effectiveness as a tool to monitor changes in precipitable water through cause analysis of seasonal trends and indepth/ long-term comparative analysis between GPS PWV and other climatic elements.

  2. Water-Vapor-Barrier Coatings for Polyurethane Foams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    Water-Vapor Transmission-Rate Determination The ASTM C355 -64 desiccant method was followed, except for the design of the test dishes. For the...0.06 4 12.0 0.06 Av 14.4 + 2.9 0.07 ± 0.01 1 22.9 0.11 2 22.3 0.10 3 27.7 0.13 Av 24.3 + 3.0 0.11 ± 0.02 49 4H 20 62 3 7 *By ASTM C355 -64... C355 -64 desiccant method; nominal thickness of plain foam specimen, 0.810 in. these coatings applied to the foam. All the coatings made

  3. Solar Mesosphere Explorer observations of stratospheric and mesospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Rusch, David W.; Barth, Charles A.; Lawrence, George M.; Olivero, John J.; Clancy, R. Todd; Sanders, Ryan W.; Knapp, Barry G.

    It is noted that while the SME (Solar Mesosphere Explorer) data is consistent with the earlier LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) results, its interpretation is complicated by aerosol contamination, particularly at altitudes below 35 km. This contamination arose from several volcanic eruptions, including that of El Chichon. Analyses are reported of a subset of data from the SME satellite, concentrating primarily on the period January through March 1982 so as to avoid contamination from the El Chichon volcanic aerosol. The SME observations of water vapor between 20 and 60 km were inverted for the first three months of 1982 as well as for selected additional periods. Reasonable results are obtained at locations where no contamination by aerosol is suspected.

  4. A solution to water vapor in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, Blair B.; Bruce, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    As cryogenic wind tunnels are utilized, problems associated with the low temperature environment are being discovered and solved. Recently, water vapor contamination was discovered in the National Transonic Facility, and the source was shown to be the internal insulation which is a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam. After an extensive study of the absorptivity characteristics of the NTF thermal insulation, the most practical solution to the problem was shown to be the maintaining of a dry environment in the circuit at all times. Utilizing a high aspect ratio transport model, it was shown that the moisture contamination effects on the supercritical wing pressure distributions were within the accuracy of setting test conditions and as such were considered negligible for this model.

  5. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  6. Pacific sea-surface temperature, convective intensity, and atmospheric water vapor ?D over tropical Andean glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels-Crow, K. E.; Galewsky, J.; Hardy, D. R.; Sharp, Z. D.; Worden, J.; Braun, C.

    2013-12-01

    Modern meteorological measurements and water-vapor isotopologues provide insights into whether oxygen isotope ratios (δ18Oice) in tropical Andean glaciers reflect changes in tropical air temperatures (e.g. Thompson et al., 2003) or changes in upwind precipitation (e.g. Hoffmann, 2003). We evaluate processes that control δ18Oice at Quelccaya, Huascaran, and Sajama glaciers using hydrogen isotope ratios in water vapor (δDvapor) and water vapor concentration (q) measured from space by the Tropical Emission Spectrometer (TES) and from the surface in July 2011 using techniques described by Strong et al. [2007] and Johnson et al. [2011]. δDvapor measured by TES is lower in austral summer (DJF) than austral winter (JJA), which is consistent with seasonal variations in δ18Oice at tropical Andean glaciers. DJF δDvapor is up to 250‰ lower than predicted by simple upslope Rayleigh fractionation at the measured q, but JJA δDvapor is 20‰ to 80‰ higher than predicted by the Rayleigh model at the measured q. The relationship of q and δDvapor suggests that convective intensity influences the isotopic composition of water vapor in DJF while large-scale advective mixing controls δDvapor in JJA. Other researchers have linked convective intensity in tropical South America to Pacific sea-surface temperature (SST) at a 3 to 5 month lag and to contemporaneous SST in the Tropical North Atlantic, South Pacific and South Atlantic Convergence Zones. We find high correlation coefficients between SST in Niño regions 3 and 3.4 and TES δDvapor at lags of 3 to 5 months and contemporaneous SST in the Tropical North Atlantic and South Atlantic and Pacific Convergence Zones, suggesting that convective intensity in tropical South America controls δDvapor at the Andean glaciers. Because oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios in meteoric water vary linearly, it is likely tropical Andean ice records past convective intensity as opposed to air temperature or q. References: Hoffmann, G

  7. Analysis of satellite-derived ozone and water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Research under this grant has involved analyses of satellite-derived measurements of water vapor and total ozone. Upper tropospheric water vapor data from the Nimbus 7 temperature-humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) 6.7 micron channel were analyzed by Fourier transformation to provide wavenumber spectra for a case of an upper level system over Europe. The power law spectrum for horizontal scales from 60 to several hundred km suggests that when convective cloud energy sources are not present, the enstrophy-cascading process (with variance proportional to the minus three power of wavenumber) may hold to much smaller scales than previously thought. Several investigations of the middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) were also conducted. Slow atmospheric oscillations with periods of 1-2 months were investigated in total ozone measurements and in ionospheric data. Using one-point correlation maps and total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) data, strong statistical evidence was found for the planetary-scale oscillations at these periods. A dipole-like pattern in the tropical equatorial Indian ocean-western Pacific region was documented, along with wavetrain-like patterns emanating into the extratropics. While attempting to follow the oscillations upward above stratosphere, oscillations were studied in ionospheric data (D-region radio wave absorption, in the upper mesosphere, around 80-90 km altitude). Cross-spectral analyses with solar flux data revealed that much of the observed 1-2 month variance in the ionospheric D-region was well correlated to solar variations. Further research has involved investigations of the photochemical lifetime of greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. Using Nimbus 7 satellite data, a new analysis technique was employed to determine the lifetime of these gases in situ in the upper stratosphere. The lifetimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical estimates.