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Sample records for air-electrode interfacial resistance

  1. Interfacial material for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  2. Final Project Report for "Interfacial Thermal Resistance of Carbon Nanotubes”

    SciTech Connect

    Cumings, John

    2016-04-15

    This report describes an ongoing project to comprehensively study the interfacial thermal boundary resistance (Kapitza resistance) of carbon nanotubes. It includes a list of publications, personnel supported, the overall approach, accomplishments and future plans.

  3. Bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörissen, Ludwig

    A selective review on the materials and construction principles used for bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes is given. The discussion emphasizes the catalytically active materials used for the construction of these electrodes, which are a key component in electrically rechargeable air breathing electrochemical systems. Whereas, in acid electrolytes normally noble metal catalysts must be used, there is a possibility to use less expensive transition metal oxides in alkaline electrolytes. Typical transition metal oxides have the perovskite, pyrochlore and spinel structure.

  4. Note: extraction of temperature-dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min

    2011-11-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules.

  5. Experimental study of cylindrical air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viitanen, M.; Lamminen, J.; Lampinen, M. J.

    1991-11-01

    The electrodes studied here are cylindrical and prepared to be placed inside the inner surface of a sintered brass tube, which is nickel-plated. Previously we have reported on the preparation of flat air electrodes and also on long run tests carried out with these electrodes. The electrode material was prepared by the so-called wet method to obtain a carbon dough which is easy to handle. The material preparation remains the same, but owing to the different geometrical shape, the preparation of the electrode itself is quite different. We have studied here the long-term performance of these new cylindrical air electrodes and at the same time measured the carbonate content of the electrolyte. We have also analyzed by comparative methods which property of the electrode lowers the performance after a fairly long period.

  6. Phonon impedance matching: minimizing interfacial thermal resistance of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Zhang, Jingjie; Ghosh, Avik

    2014-03-01

    The challenge to minimize interfacial thermal resistance is to allow a broad band spectrum of phonons, with non-linear dispersion and well defined translational and rotational symmetries, to cross the interface. We explain how to minimize this resistance using a frequency dependent broadening matrix that generalizes the notion of acoustic impedance to the whole phonon spectrum including symmetries. We show how to ``match'' two given materials by joining them with a single atomic layer, with a multilayer material and with a graded superlattice. Atomic layer ``matching'' requires a layer with a mass close to the arithmetic mean (or spring constant close to the harmonic mean) to favor high frequency phonon transmission. For multilayer ``matching,'' we want a material with a broadening close to the geometric mean to maximize transmission peaks. For graded superlattices, a continuous sequence of geometric means translates to an exponentially varying broadening that generates a wide-band antireflection coating for both the coherent and incoherent limits. Our results are supported by ``first principles'' calculations of thermal conductance for GaAs / Gax Al1 - x As / AlAs thin films using the Non-Equilibrium Greens Function formalism coupled with Density Functional Perturbation Theory. NSF-CAREER (QMHP 1028883), NSF-IDR (CBET 1134311), XSEDE.

  7. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  8. Effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance for all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takehisa; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Motoyama, Munekazu; West, William C.; Iriyama, Yasutoshi

    2016-09-01

    Sintering processes yield a mutual diffusion region at the electrode/solid electrolyte interface, which is considered as a crucial problem for developing large-sized all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries with high power density. This work focuses on the interface between LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) and NASICON-structured Li+ conductive glass ceramics solid electrolyte (Li2Osbnd Al2O3sbnd SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd TiO2sbnd GeO2: LATP sheet (AG-01)), and investigates the effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance at the NMC/LATP sheet. Thin films of NMC were fabricated on the LATP sheets at 700 °C or 900 °C as a model system. We found that the thickness of the mutual diffusion region was almost the same, ca. 30 nm, in these two samples, but the NMC film prepared at 900 °C had three orders of magnitude larger interfacial resistance than the NMC film prepared at 700 °C. Around the interface between the NMC film prepared at 900 °C and the LATP sheet, Co in the NMC accumulates as a reduced valence and lithium-free impurity crystalline phase will be also formed. These two problems must contribute to drastic increasing of interfacial resistance. Formation of de-lithiated NMC around the interface and its thermal instability at higher temperature may be considerable reason to induce these problems.

  9. Stability and Normal Zone Propagation Speed in YBCO Coated Conductors with Increased Interfacial Resistance (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2085 STABILITY AND NORMAL ZONE PROPAGATION SPEED IN YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS WITH INCREASED INTERFACIAL RESISTANCE...August 2006 – 25 August 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STABILITY AND NORMAL ZONE PROPAGATION SPEED IN YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS WITH INCREASED INTERFACIAL...reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT We will discuss how stability and speed of normal zone propagation in YBCO

  10. New flange correction formula applied to interfacial resistance measurements of ohmic contacts to GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo; Hannaman, David J.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-two-dimensional analytical model is developed to account for vertical and horizontal current flow in and adjacent to a square ohmic contact between a metal and a thin semiconducting strip which is wider than the contact. The model includes side taps to the contact area for voltage probing and relates the 'apparent' interfacial resistivity to the (true) interfacial resistivity, the sheet resistance of the semiconducting layer, the contact size, and the width of the 'flange' around the contact. This relation is checked against numerical simulations. With the help of the model, interfacial resistivities of ohmic contacts to GaAs were extracted and found independent of contact size in the range of 1.5-10 microns.

  11. An excellent candidate for largely reducing interfacial thermal resistance: a nano-confined mass graded interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing extremely low interfacial thermal resistance has long been the task of many researchers in the area of nano-scale heat transfer, in particular pertaining to improve heat dissipation performance in electronic cooling. While it is well known and documented that confining a macroscopic third layer between two dissimilar materials usually increases the overall interfacial thermal resistance, no research has realized the fundamental decrease in resistance so far. By performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the overall interfacial thermal resistance can be reduced by 6 fold by confining mass graded materials with thickness of the order of nanometers. As comparison we also studied the thermal transport across the perfectly abrupt interface and the widely used alloyed (rough) interface, which shows an opposing and significantly large increase in the overall thermal resistance. With the help of frequency dependent interfacial thermal conductance and wave packet dynamics simulation, different mechanisms governing the heat transfer across these three types of interfaces are identified. It is found that for the rough interface there are two different regimes of interfacial heat transfer, which originates from the competition between phonon scattering and the thickness of the interface. The mechanism of dramatically improved interfacial heat transfer across the nano-confined mass graded interface resides in the minor phonon reflection when the phonons first reach the mass graded area and the rare occurrence of phonon scattering in the subsequent interior region. The phonons are found to be gradually truncated by the geometric interfaces and can travel through the mass graded layer with a high transmission coefficient, benefited from the small mass mismatch between two neighboring layers in the interfacial region. Our findings provide deep insight into the phonon transport across nano-confined mass graded layers and also offer significant

  12. Finite-size effects on molecular dynamics interfacial thermal-resistance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the role of finite size effects on the determination of interfacial thermal resistance between two solids characterized by high phonon mean free paths. In particular, we will show that a direct, heat source-sink method leads to strong size effect, associated with ballistic phonon transport to and from, and specular reflections at the simulation domain boundary. Lack of proper account for these effects can lead to incorrect predictions about the role of interfacial bonding and structure on interfacial thermal resistance. We also show that the finite size effect can be dramatically reduced by introduction of rough external boundaries leading to diffuse phonon scattering, as explicitly demonstrated by phonon wave-packet simulations. Finally, we demonstrate that when careful considerations are given to the effects associated with the finite heat capacity of the simulation domains and phonon scattering from the external surfaces, a size-independent interfacial resistance can be properly extracted from the time integral of the correlation function of heat power across the interface. Our work demonstrates that reliable and consistent values of the interfacial thermal resistance can be obtained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods with a relatively small computational cost.

  13. Structure of the interfacial layer in blends of elastomers with different polarities and ozone resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livanova, N. M.; Popov, A. A.; Shershnev, V. A.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2014-05-01

    The effects of isomers of butadiene units, the ratio of comonomers in ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymers, and the degree of isotacticity of propylene units on the intensity of interfacial interaction in blends and ozone resistence of covulcanisates with butadiene-nitrile rubbers have been analyzed.

  14. Method of making an air electrode material having controlled sinterability

    DOEpatents

    Vasilow, Theodore R.; Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1994-01-01

    A tubular, porous ceramic electrode structure (3) is made from the sintered admixture of doped lanthanum manganite and an additive containing cerium where a solid electrolyte (4), substantially surrounds the air electrode, and a porous outer fuel electrode (7) substantially surrounds the electrolyte, to form a fuel cell (1).

  15. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  16. Method of making an air electrode material having controlled sinterability

    DOEpatents

    Vasilow, T.R.; Kuo, L.J.H.; Ruka, R.J.

    1994-08-30

    A tubular, porous ceramic electrode structure is made from the sintered admixture of doped lanthanum manganite and an additive containing cerium where a solid electrolyte, substantially surrounds the air electrode, and a porous outer fuel electrode substantially surrounds the electrolyte, to form a fuel cell. 2 figs.

  17. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.; Ruka, R.J.; Singhal, S.C.

    1999-08-03

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO{sub 3}. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell. 3 figs.

  18. Air electrode composition for solid oxide fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode composition for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The air electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode composition comprises a mixed lanthanide in combination with rare earth and alkaline earth dopants. The B-site of the composition comprises Mn in combination with dopants such as Mg, Al, Cr and Ni. The mixed lanthanide comprises La, Ce, Pr and, optionally, Nd. The rare earth A-site dopants preferably comprise La, Nd or a combination thereof, while the alkaline earth A-site dopant preferably comprises Ca. The use of a mixed lanthanide substantially reduces raw material costs in comparison with compositions made from high purity lanthanum starting materials. The amount of the A-site and B-site dopants is controlled in order to provide an air electrode composition having a coefficient of thermal expansion which closely matches that of the other components of the solid oxide fuel cell.

  19. On the interfacial fracture resistance of resin-bonded zirconia and glass-infiltrated graded zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Herzl; Kaizer, Marina; Chughtai, Asima; Tong, Hui; Tanaka, Carina; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective A major limiting factor for the widespread use of zirconia in prosthetic dentistry is its poor resin-cement bonding capabilities. We show that this deficiency can be overcome by infiltrating the zirconia cementation surface with glass. Current methods for assessing the fracture resistance of resin-ceramic bonds are marred by uneven stress distribution at the interface, which may result in erroneous interfacial fracture resistance values. We have applied a wedge-loaded double-cantilever-beam testing approach to accurately measure the interfacial fracture resistance of adhesively bonded zirconia-based restorative materials. Methods The interfacial fracture energy GC was determined for adhesively bonded zirconia, graded zirconia and feldspathic ceramic bars. The bonding surfaces were subjected to sandblasting or acid etching treatments. Baseline GC was measured for bonded specimens subjected to 7 days hydration at 37 °C. Long-term GC was determined for specimens exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between 5 and 55 °C followed by 2-month aging at 37 °C in water. The test data were interpreted with the aid of a 2D finite element fracture analysis. Results The baseline and long-term GC for graded zirconia was 2–3 and 8 times that for zirconia, respectively. More significantly, both the baseline and long-term GC of graded zirconia were similar to those for feldspathic ceramic. Significance The interfacial fracture energy of feldspathic ceramic and graded zirconia was controlled by the fracture energy of the resin cement while that of zirconia by the interface. GC for the graded zirconia was as large as for feldspathic ceramic, making it an attractive material for use in dentistry. PMID:26365987

  20. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  1. Migration of interfacial oxygen ions modulated resistive switching in oxide-based memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Gao, S.; Zeng, F.; Tang, G. S.; Li, S. Z.; Song, C.; Fu, H. D.; Pan, F.

    2013-07-01

    Oxides-based resistive switching memory induced by oxygen ions migration is attractive for future nonvolatile memories. Numerous works had focused their attentions on the sandwiched oxide materials for depressing the characteristic variations, but the comprehensive studies of the dependence of electrodes on the migration behavior of oxygen ions are overshadowed. Here, we investigated the interaction of various metals (Ni, Co, Al, Ti, Zr, and Hf) with oxygen atoms at the metal/Ta2O5 interface under electric stress and explored the effect of top electrode on the characteristic variations of Ta2O5-based memory device. It is demonstrated that chemically inert electrodes (Ni and Co) lead to the scattering switching characteristics and destructive gas bubbles, while the highly chemically active metals (Hf and Zr) formed a thick and dense interfacial intermediate oxide layer at the metal/Ta2O5 interface, which also degraded the resistive switching behavior. The relatively chemically active metals (Al and Ti) can absorb oxygen ions from the Ta2O5 film and avoid forming the problematic interfacial layer, which is benefit to the formation of oxygen vacancies composed conduction filaments in Ta2O5 film thus exhibit the minimum variations of switching characteristics. The clarification of oxygen ions migration behavior at the interface can lead further optimization of resistive switching performance in Ta2O5-based memory device and guide the rule of electrode selection for other oxide-based resistive switching memories.

  2. Interfacial thermal resistance and thermal rectification in carbon nanotube film-copper systems.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zheng; Liu, Danyang; Zhang, Guang; Li, Qingwei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2017-03-02

    Thermal rectification occurring at interfaces is an important research area, which contains deep fundamental physics and has extensive application prospects. In general, the measurement of interfacial thermal rectification is based on measuring interfacial thermal resistance (ITR). However, ITRs measured via conventional methods cannot avoid extra thermal resistance asymmetry due to the contact between the sample and the thermometer. In this study, we employed a non-contact infrared thermal imager to monitor the temperature of super-aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) films and obtain the ITRs between the CNT films and copper. The ITRs along the CNT-copper direction and the reverse direction are in the ranges of 2.2-3.6 cm(2) K W(-1) and 9.6-11.9 cm(2) K W(-1), respectively. The obvious difference in the ITRs of the two directions shows a significant thermal rectification effect, and the rectifying coefficient ranges between 0.57 and 0.68. The remarkable rectification factor is extremely promising for the manufacture of thermal transistors with a copper/CNT/copper structure and further thermal logic devices. Moreover, our method could be extended to other 2-dimensional materials, such as graphene and MoS2, for further explorations.

  3. Two-point concrete resistivity measurements: interfacial phenomena at the electrode-concrete contact zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarter, W. J.; Taha, H. M.; Suryanto, B.; Starrs, G.

    2015-08-01

    Ac impedance spectroscopy measurements are used to critically examine the end-to-end (two-point) testing technique employed in evaluating the bulk electrical resistivity of concrete. In particular, this paper focusses on the interfacial contact region between the electrode and specimen and the influence of contacting medium and measurement frequency on the impedance response. Two-point and four-point electrode configurations were compared and modelling of the impedance response was undertaken to identify and quantify the contribution of the electrode-specimen contact region on the measured impedance. Measurements are presented in both Bode and Nyquist formats to aid interpretation. Concretes mixes conforming to BSEN206-1 and BS8500-1 were investigated which included concretes containing the supplementary cementitious materials fly ash and ground granulated blast-furnace slag. A measurement protocol is presented for the end-to-end technique in terms of test frequency and electrode-specimen contacting medium in order to minimize electrode-specimen interfacial effect and ensure correct measurement of bulk resistivity.

  4. Hybrid Polymer/Garnet Electrolyte with a Small Interfacial Resistance for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yutao; Xu, Biyi; Xu, Henghui; Duan, Huanan; Lü, Xujie; Xin, Sen; Zhou, Weidong; Xue, Leigang; Fu, Gengtao; Manthiram, Arumugam; Goodenough, John B

    2017-01-16

    Li7 La3 Zr2 O12 -based Li-rich garnets react with water and carbon dioxide in air to form a Li-ion insulating Li2 CO3 layer on the surface of the garnet particles, which results in a large interfacial resistance for Li-ion transfer. Here, we introduce LiF to garnet Li6.5 La3 Zr1.5 Ta0.5 O12 (LLZT) to increase the stability of the garnet electrolyte against moist air; the garnet LLZT-2 wt % LiF (LLZT-2LiF) has less Li2 CO3 on the surface and shows a small interfacial resistance with Li metal, a solid polymer electrolyte, and organic-liquid electrolytes. An all-solid-state Li/polymer/LLZT-2LiF/LiFePO4 battery has a high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life; a Li-S cell with the LLZT-2LiF electrolyte as a separator, which blocks the polysulfide transport towards the Li-metal, also has high Coulombic efficiency and kept 93 % of its capacity after 100 cycles.

  5. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  6. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-10-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases.

  7. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-10-10

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases.

  8. On the early and developed stages of surface condensation: competition mechanism between interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the early and developed stages of surface condensation. We find that the liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfacial thermal resistances depend on the properties of solid and fluid, which are time-independent, while the condensate bulk thermal resistance depends on the condensate thickness, which is time-dependent. There exists intrinsic competition between the interfacial and condensate bulk thermal resistances in timeline and the resultant total thermal resistance determines the condensation intensity for a given vapor-solid temperature difference. We reveal the competition mechanism that the interfacial thermal resistance dominates at the onset of condensation and holds afterwards while the condensate bulk thermal resistance gradually takes over with condensate thickness growing. The weaker the solid-liquid bonding, the later the takeover occurs. This competition mechanism suggests that only when the condensate bulk thermal resistance is reduced after it takes over the domination can the condensation be effectively intensified. We propose a unified theoretical model for the thermal resistance analysis by making dropwise condensation equivalent to filmwise condensation. We further find that near a critical point (contact angle being ca. 153°) the bulk thermal resistance has the least opportunity to take over the domination while away from it the probability increases. PMID:27721397

  9. Intrinsic and interfacial effect of electrode metals on the resistive switching behaviors of zinc oxide films.

    PubMed

    Xue, W H; Xiao, W; Shang, J; Chen, X X; Zhu, X J; Pan, L; Tan, H W; Zhang, W B; Ji, Z H; Liu, G; Xu, X-H; Ding, J; Li, R-W

    2014-10-24

    Exploring the role of electrode metals on the resistive switching properties of metal electrode/oxide/metal electrode sandwiched structures provides not only essential information to understand the underlying switching mechanism of the devices, but also useful guidelines for the optimization of the switching performance. A systematic study has been performed to investigate the influence of electrodes on the resistive switching characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) films in this contribution, in terms of both the intrinsic and interfacial effects. It has been found that the low-resistance state resistances (Ω(LRS)) of all the investigated devices are below 50 Ω, which can be attributed to the formation of highly conductive channels throughout the ZnO films. On the other hand, the high-resistance state resistances (Ω(HRS)) depend on the electronegativity and ionic size of the employed electrode metals. Devices with electrode metals of high electronegativity and large ionic size possess high Ω(HRS) values, while those with electrode metals of low electronegativity and small ionic size carry low Ω(HRS) values. A similar trend of the set voltages has also been observed, while the reset voltages are all distributed in a narrow range close to ±0.5 V. Moreover, the forming voltages of the switching devices strongly depend on the roughness of the metal/ZnO and/or ZnO/metal interface. The present work provides essential information for better understanding the switching mechanism of zinc oxide based devices, and benefits the rational selection of proper electrode metals for the device performance optimization.

  10. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; More, Karren L.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1999-04-22

    A ceramic-matrix composite having a multilayered interfacial coating adapted to protect the reinforcing fibers from long-term oxidation, while allowing these to bridge the wake of advancing cracks in the matrix, is provided by selectively mismatching materials within adjacent layers of the interfacial coating, the materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion so that a low toughness interface region is created to promote crack deflection either within an interior layer of the mismatched interfacial coating or between adjacent layers of the mismatched interfacial coating.

  11. Interfacial behavior of resistive switching in ITO-PVK-Al WORM memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcher, T. J.; Woon, K. L.; Wong, W. S.; Chanlek, N.; Nakajima, H.; Saisopa, T.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the mechanism of resistive switching in a memory device is fundamental in order to improve device performance. The mechanism of current switching in a basic organic write-once read-many (WORM) memory device is investigated by determining the energy level alignments of indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and aluminum (Al) using x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, current-voltage characterization and Auger depth profiling. The current switching mechanism was determined to be controlled by the interface between the ITO and the PVK. The electric field applied across the device causes the ITO from the uneven surface of the anode to form metallic filaments through the PVK, causing a shorting effect within the device leading to increased conduction. This was found to be independent of the PVK thickness, although the switch-on voltage was non-linearly dependent on the thickness. The formation of these filaments also caused the destruction of the interfacial dipole at the PVK-Al interface.

  12. Individual surface-engineered microorganisms as robust Pickering interfacial biocatalysts for resistance-minimized phase-transfer bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Ji, Haiwei; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-04-13

    A powerful strategy for long-term and diffusional-resistance-minimized whole-cell biocatalysis in biphasic systems is reported where individually encapsulated bacteria are employed as robust and recyclable Pickering interfacial biocatalysts. By individually immobilizing bacterial cells and optimizing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of the encapsulating magnetic mineral shells, the encased bacteria became interfacially active and locate at the Pickering emulsion interfaces, leading to dramatically enhanced bioconversion performances by minimizing internal and external diffusional resistances. Moreover, in situ product separation and biocatalyst recovery was readily achieved using a remote magnetic field. Importantly, the mineral shell effectively protected the entire cell from long-term organic-solvent stress, as shown by the reusability of the biocatalysts for up to 30 cycles, while retaining high stereoselective catalytic activities, cell viabilities, and proliferative abilities.

  13. Reversible air electrodes integrated with an anion-exchange membrane for secondary air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoko; Yao, Masaru; Siroma, Zyun; Senoh, Hiroshi; Ioroi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Kazuaki

    Reversible air electrodes integrated with a polymer electrolyte membrane have been proposed for use in rechargeable metal-air batteries or unitized regenerative fuel cells to reduce the impact of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Reversible air electrodes were prepared with an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) as a polymer electrolyte membrane and platinum-based catalysts. The AEM at the interface between the alkaline electrolyte and the air electrode layer plays major roles in AEM-type air electrodes as follows: it blocks (a) the permeation of cations in the alkaline electrolyte into the air electrode layer to prevent carbonate precipitation, (b) penetration of the alkaline solution itself, and (c) neutralization of the alkaline electrolyte by carbon dioxide, all of which prevent performance degradation of oxygen reactions. Catalysts for decreasing the overvoltage of oxygen reactions were also investigated with the AEM-type air electrode, and the overall efficiency was improved due to a remarkable decrease in the potential for the oxygen evolution reaction with Pt-Ir catalysts.

  14. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  15. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  16. Stability in alkaline aqueous electrolyte of air electrode protected with fluorinated interpenetrating polymer network membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Messaoudi, Houssam; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    We developed original anion exchange membranes to protect air electrodes operating in aqueous lithium-air battery configuration, i.e. supplied with atmospheric air and in concentrated aqueous lithium hydroxide. These protective membranes have an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture combining a hydrogenated cationic polyelectrolyte network based on poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) and a fluorinated neutral network based on perfluoropolyether (Fluorolink® MD700). Two phases, each one rich in one of the polymer, are co-continuous in the materials. This morphology allows combining their properties according to the weight proportions of each polymer. Thus, PECH/Fluorolink IPNs show ionic conductivity varying from 1 to 2 mS cm-1, water uptake from 30 to 90 wt.% and anionic transport number from 0.65 to 0.80 when the PECH proportion varies from 40 to 90 wt.%. These membranes have been systematically assembled on air electrodes. Air electrode protected with PECH/Fluorolink 70/30 IPN shows outstanding stability higher than 1000 h, i.e. a 20-fold increase in the lifetime of the non-modified electrode. This efficient membrane/air electrode assembly is promising for development of alkaline electrolyte based storage or production energy systems, such as metal air batteries or alkaline fuel cells.

  17. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Kuo, L.; Li, B.

    1999-06-29

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO[sub 3]. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La[sub w]Ca[sub x]Ln[sub y]Ce[sub z]MnO[sub 3], wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics. 10 figs.

  18. Lanthanum manganite-based air electrode for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Kuo, Lewis; Li, Baozhen

    1999-01-01

    An air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell is disclosed. The electrode material is based on lanthanum manganite having a perovskite-like crystal structure ABO.sub.3. The A-site of the air electrode material preferably comprises La, Ca, Ce and at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd. The B-site of the electrode material comprises Mn with substantially no dopants. The ratio of A:B is preferably slightly above 1. A preferred air electrode composition is of the formula La.sub.w Ca.sub.x Ln.sub.y Ce.sub.z MnO.sub.3, wherein Ln comprises at least one lanthanide selected from Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Y and Nd, w is from about 0.55 to about 0.56, x is from about 0.255 to about 0.265, y is from about 0.175 to about 0.185, and z is from about 0.005 to about 0.02. The air electrode material possesses advantageous chemical and electrical properties as well as favorable thermal expansion and thermal cycle shrinkage characteristics.

  19. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, D.; Banerjee, R.; Srinivasan, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β1-Mg3Nd precipitates, that grow along <110>Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces– {112}β1/{100}Mg and {111}β1/{110}Mg– that are commensurate with β1/hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112}β1/{100}Mg interfaces, and predict that β1 grows along <110>Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111}β1/{110}Mg. Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β1-like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces.

  20. Influences of interfacial resistances on gas transport through carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Newsome, David A; Sholl, David S

    2006-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have significant promise as gas separation membranes. Gas permeation through nanopores involves mass transfer resistances from molecules entering and leaving pores (so-called surface resistances) and diffusion within the pores. We use molecular simulations to give the first estimates of surface resistances for gas transport through nanotubes. For CH4 transport through (20,0) carbon nanotubes at 300 K, surface resistances are small for nanotubes 5-10 mum in length but can be significant for shorter nanotubes.

  1. Role of interfacial layer on complementary resistive switching in the TiN/HfO{sub x}/TiN resistive memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. Z.; Ang, D. S. Gu, C. J.; Yew, K. S.; Wang, X. P.; Lo, G. Q.

    2014-12-01

    The role of the bottom interfacial layer (IL) in enabling stable complementary resistive switching (CRS) in the TiN/HfO{sub x}/IL/TiN resistive memory device is revealed. Stable CRS is obtained for the TiN/HfO{sub x}/IL/TiN device, where a bottom IL comprising Hf and Ti sub-oxides resulted from the oxidation of TiN during the initial stages of atomic-layer deposition of HfO{sub x} layer. In the TiN/HfO{sub x}/Pt device, where formation of the bottom IL is suppressed by the inert Pt metal, no CRS is observed. Oxygen-ion exchange between IL and the conductive path in HfO{sub x} layer is proposed to have caused the complementary bipolar switching behavior observed in the TiN/HfO{sub x}/IL/TiN device.

  2. Carbon-based air electrodes carrying MnO 2 in zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zidong; Huang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Shengtao; Tan, Jun

    Catalysts prepared from the carbon black impregnated with manganous nitrate solution and then heated at temperature from 270°C to 450°C were investigated. It was found that the impregnated catalysts heated at temperature of 340°C exhibited the best catalytic activity for oxygen reduction in alkaline electrolyte. It was also found that the XRD spectra of pyrolytic MnO 2 from manganous nitrate over 340°C were different from those below 340°C. The enhanced catalysis of air electrodes was ascribed to the formation of MnO 2 crystal with d-value of 2.72 Å as the impregnated-catalysts was heated at temperature of 340°C. The other factors in preparation of air electrodes were also discussed.

  3. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, D; Banerjee, R; Srinivasan, S G

    2017-01-17

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β1-Mg3Nd precipitates, that grow along 〈110〉Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces- {112}β1/{100}Mg and {111}β1/{110}Mg- that are commensurate with β1/hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112}β1/{100}Mg interfaces, and predict that β1 grows along 〈110〉Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111}β1/{110}Mg. Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β1-like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces.

  4. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, D.; Banerjee, R.; Srinivasan, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β1-Mg3Nd precipitates, that grow along 〈110〉Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces– {112}β1/{100}Mg and {111}β1/{110}Mg– that are commensurate with β1/hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112}β1/{100}Mg interfaces, and predict that β1 grows along 〈110〉Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111}β1/{110}Mg. Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β1-like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces. PMID:28094302

  5. Investigations of interface spin asymmetry and interfacial resistance in FexCo100-x/Ag interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. W.; Jin, Z.; Shiokawa, Y.; Sahashi, M.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetotransport parameters of FexCo100-x/Ag interfaces: interface specific resistance (ARF/N), extended interface resistance (AR*F/N), and spin scattering asymmetry (γ). We also investigated the dependence of interfacial parameters on the giant magnetoresistance effect with CPP geometry. For measuring these parameters, we prepared magnetic multilayers and pseudo spin valves (PSVs), combining the ferromagnetic (F) alloys Fe, Co, Fe50Co50, and Fe30Co70 with the nonmagnetic (N) metal Ag. In all cases, the largest ARF/N value was found to be ˜0.68 mΩ μm2 with an enhanced AR*F/N value of ˜1.9 mΩ μm2 for a (001)-oriented Fe/Ag interface, which suggests that spin-up and spin-down electrons on the Fermi surface have very different transmission probabilities. Such an interface can act as a spin filter through which only one type of electrons can pass.

  6. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    This invention relates to a rechargeable battery or fuel cell. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel air electrode comprising a new carbon electrode support material and a method of making same. 3 figs.

  7. Contact resistance improvement using interfacial silver nanoparticles in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; He, Jian; Song, Yang; Li, Wei; Zaslavsky, A.; Paine, D. C.

    2014-09-01

    We describe an approach to reduce the contact resistance at compositional conducting/semiconducting indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) homojunctions used for contacts in thin film transistors (TFTs). By introducing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) at the homojunction interface between the conducting IZO electrodes and the amorphous IZO channel, we reduce the specific contact resistance, obtained by transmission line model measurements, down to ∼10{sup −2 }Ω cm{sup 2}, ∼3 orders of magnitude lower than either NP-free homojunction contacts or solid Ag metal contacts. The resulting back-gated TFTs with Ag NP contacts exhibit good field effect mobility of ∼27 cm{sup 2}/V s and an on/off ratio >10{sup 7}. We attribute the improved contact resistance to electric field concentration by the Ag NPs.

  8. Alkaline-resistant titanium dioxide thin film displaying visible-light-induced superhydrophilicity initiated by interfacial electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Tsuyoshi; Ni, Lei; Irie, Hiroshi

    2013-04-16

    We synthesized a three-layer-type photocatalytic structure (TiO2/Cu(II)SiO2/SiO2), consisting of TiO2 on Cu(II)-grafted SiO2, which was deposited on a SiO2-coated glass substrate, and investigated its visible-light absorption and hydrophilic properties. Water contact angle measurements revealed visible-light-induced superhydrophilicity at the film surface that was initiated by interfacial electron transfer (IFET) at the interface of TiO2 and Cu(II)SiO2. Monitoring the oxidation state of Pb(2+) ions confirmed that the IFET-initiated holes diffused to the TiO2 surface, where they likely contributed to the hydrophilic conversion. We also demonstrated that layer-structured TiO2/Cu(II)SiO2/SiO2 was stable under alkaline conditions. Thus, we successfully synthesized alkaline-resistant TiO2 that displays visible-light-induced superhydrophilicity.

  9. Novel configuration of bifunctional air electrodes for rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Chien, Yu-Ju; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-05-01

    A novel configuration of two electrodes containing electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) pressed into a bifunctional air electrode is designed for rechargeable Zn-air batteries. MOC/25BC carbon paper (MOC consisting of α-MnO2 and XC-72 carbon black) and Fe0.1Ni0.9Co2O4/Ti mesh on this air electrode mainly serve as the cathode for the ORR and the anode for the OER, respectively. The morphology and physicochemical properties of Fe0.1Ni0.9Co2O4 are investigated through scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical studies comprise linear sweep voltammetry, rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry, and the full-cell charge-discharge-cycling test. The discharge peak power density of the Zn-air battery with the unique air electrode reaches 88.8 mW cm-2 at 133.6 mA cm-2 and 0.66 V in an alkaline electrolyte under an ambient atmosphere. After 100 charge-discharge cycles at 10 mA cm-2, an increase of 0.3 V between charge and discharge cell voltages is observed. The deep charge-discharge curve (10 h in each step) indicates that the cell voltages of discharge (1.3 V) and charge (1.97 V) remain constant throughout the process. The performance of the proposed rechargeable Zn-air battery is superior to that of most other similar batteries reported in recent studies.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J.L.

    1992-09-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, a' is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, b' is from 0.3 to 0.5 and c' is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y[sub 1[minus]a]Q[sub a]MnO[sub 3], where Q is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and a' is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y[sub 1[minus]b]Ca[sub b]Cr[sub 1[minus]c]Al[sub c]O[sub 3], where b' is from 0.1 to 0.6 and c' is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1[minus]d)ZrO[sub 2]-(d)Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] where d' is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO[sub 2], where X' is an elemental metal. 5 figs.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cells, and air electrode and electrical interconnection materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Bates, J. Lambert

    1992-01-01

    In one aspect of the invention, an air electrode material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8. Preferably, "a" is from 0.4 to 0.7. In another aspect of the invention, an electrical interconnection material for a solid oxide fuel cell comprises Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0 to 9.3. Preferably, "b" is from 0.3 to 0.5 and "c" is from 0.05 to 0.1. A composite solid oxide electrochemical fuel cell incorporating these materials comprises: a solid oxide air electrode and an adjacent solid oxide electrical interconnection which commonly include the cation Y, the air electrode comprising Y.sub.1-a Q.sub.a MnO.sub.3, where "Q" is selected from the group consisting of Ca and Sr or mixtures thereof and "a" is from 0.1 to 0.8, the electrical interconnection comprising Y.sub.1-b Ca.sub.b Cr.sub.1-c Al.sub.c O.sub.3, where "b" is from 0.1 to 0.6 and "c" is from 0.0 to 0.3; a yttrium stabilized solid electrolyte comprising (1-d)ZrO.sub.2 -(d)Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 where "d" is from 0.06 to 0.5; and a solid fuel electrode comprising X-ZrO.sub.2, where "X" is an elemental metal.

  12. The Effect of Interfacial Dipoles on the Metal-Double Interlayers-Semiconductor Structure and Their Application in Contact Resistivity Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Woo; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Gwang-Sik; Choi, Changhwan; Choi, Rino; Yu, Hyun-Yong

    2016-12-28

    We demonstrate the contact resistance reduction for III-V semiconductor-based electrical and optical devices using the interfacial dipole effect of ultrathin double interlayers in a metal-interlayers-semiconductor (M-I-S) structure. An M-I-S structure blocks metal-induced gap states (MIGS) to a sufficient degree to alleviate Fermi level pinning caused by MIGS, resulting in contact resistance reduction. In addition, the ZnO/TiO2 interlayers of an M-I-S structure induce an interfacial dipole effect that produces Schottky barrier height (ΦB) reduction, which reduces the specific contact resistivity (ρc) of the metal/n-type III-V semiconductor contact. As a result, the Ti/ZnO(0.5 nm)/TiO2(0.5 nm)/n-GaAs metal-double interlayers-semiconductor (M-DI-S) structure achieved a ρc of 2.51 × 10(-5) Ω·cm(2), which exhibited an ∼42 000× reduction and an ∼40× reduction compared to the Ti/n-GaAs metal-semiconductor (M-S) contact and the Ti/TiO2(0.5 nm)/n-GaAs M-I-S structure, respectively. The interfacial dipole at the ZnO/TiO2 interface was determined to be approximately -0.104 eV, which induced a decrease in the effective work function of Ti and, therefore, reduced ΦB. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the M-DI-S structure also confirmed the existence of the interfacial dipole. On the basis of these results, the M-DI-S structure offers a promising nonalloyed Ohmic contact scheme for the development of III-V semiconductor-based applications.

  13. Interrelationships among Grain Size, Surface Composition, Air Stability, and Interfacial Resistance of Al-Substituted Li7La3Zr2O12 Solid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Wu, Cheng Hao; Jarry, Angelique; Chen, Wei; Ye, Yifan; Zhu, Junfa; Kostecki, Robert; Persson, Kristin; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Chen, Guoying; Doeff, Marca

    2015-08-19

    The interfacial resistances of symmetrical lithium cells containing Al-substituted Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO) solid electrolytes are sensitive to their microstructures and histories of exposure to air. Air exposure of LLZO samples with large grain sizes (∼150 μm) results in dramatically increased interfacial impedances in cells containing them, compared to those with pristine large-grained samples. In contrast, a much smaller difference is seen between cells with small-grained (∼20 μm) pristine and air-exposed LLZO samples. A combination of soft X-ray absorption (sXAS) and Raman spectroscopy, with probing depths ranging from nanometer to micrometer scales, revealed that the small-grained LLZO pellets are more air-stable than large-grained ones, forming far less surface Li2CO3 under both short- and long-term exposure conditions. Surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates that the better chemical stability of the small-grained LLZO is related to differences in the distribution of Al and Li at sample surfaces. Density functional theory calculations show that LLZO can react via two different pathways to form Li2CO3. The first, more rapid, pathway involves a reaction with moisture in air to form LiOH, which subsequently absorbs CO2 to form Li2CO3. The second, slower, pathway involves direct reaction with CO2 and is favored when surface lithium contents are lower, as with the small-grained samples. These observations have important implications for the operation of solid-state lithium batteries containing LLZO because the results suggest that the interfacial impedances of these devices is critically dependent upon specific characteristics of the solid electrolyte and how it is prepared.

  14. PEDOT:PSS as multi-functional composite material for enhanced Li-air-battery air electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dae Ho; Yoon, Seon Hye; Ryu, Kwang-Sun; Park, Yong Joon

    2016-01-01

    We propose PEDOT:PSS as a multi-functional composite material for an enhanced Li-air-battery air electrode. The PEDOT:PSS layer was coated on the surface of carbon (graphene) using simple method. A electrode containing PEDOT:PSS-coated graphene (PEDOT electrode) could be prepared without binder (such as PVDF) because of high adhesion of PEDOT:PSS. PEDOT electrode presented considerable discharge and charge capacity at all current densities. These results shows that PEDOT:PSS acts as a redox reaction matrix and conducting binder in the air electrode. Moreover, after cycling, the accumulation of reaction products due to side reaction in the electrode was significantly reduced through the use of PEDOT:PSS. This implies that PEDOT:PSS coating layer can suppress the undesirable side reactions between the carbon and electrolyte (and/or Li2O2), which causes enhanced Li-air cell cyclic performance. PMID:26813852

  15. Effective thermal conductivity of metal and non-metal particulate composites with interfacial thermal resistance at high volume fraction of nano to macro-sized spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Faroughi, Salah Aldin; Huber, Christian

    2015-02-07

    In this study, we propose a theoretical model to compute the effective thermal conductivity of metal and dielectric spherical particle reinforced composites with interfacial thermal resistance. We consider a wide range of filler volume fraction with sizes ranging from nano- to macro-scale. The model, based on the differential effective medium theory, accounts for particle interactions through two sets of volume fraction corrections. The first correction accounts for a finite volume of composite and the second correction introduces a self-crowding factor that allows us to develop an accurate model for particle interaction even for high volume fraction of fillers. The model is examined to other published models, experiments, and numerical simulations for different types of composites. We observe an excellent agreement between the model and published datasets over a wide range of particle volume fractions and material properties of the composite constituents.

  16. CNT Sheet Air Electrode for the Development of Ultra-High Cell Capacity in Lithium-Air Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Akihiro; Ito, Kimihiko; Kubo, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries (LABs) are expected to provide a cell with a much higher capacity than ever attained before, but their prototype cells present a limited areal cell capacity of no more than 10 mAh cm−2, mainly due to the limitation of their air electrodes. Here, we demonstrate the use of flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets as a promising air electrode for developing ultra-high capacity in LAB cells, achieving areal cell capacities of up to 30 mAh cm−2, which is approximately 15 times higher than the capacity of cells with lithium-ion battery (LiB) technology (~2 mAh cm−2). During discharge, the CNT sheet electrode experienced enormous swelling to a thickness of a few millimeters because of the discharge product deposition of lithium peroxide (Li2O2), but the sheet was fully recovered after being fully charged. This behavior results from the CNT sheet characteristics of the flexible and fibrous conductive network and suggests that the CNT sheet is an effective air electrode material for developing a commercially available LAB cell with an ultra-high cell capacity. PMID:28378746

  17. Investigations of interface spin asymmetry and interfacial resistance in Fe{sub x}Co{sub 100−x}/Ag interface

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J. W. Jin, Z.; Shiokawa, Y.; Sahashi, M.

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetotransport parameters of Fe{sub x}Co{sub 100−x}/Ag interfaces: interface specific resistance (AR{sub F/N}), extended interface resistance (AR{sup *}{sub F/N}), and spin scattering asymmetry (γ). We also investigated the dependence of interfacial parameters on the giant magnetoresistance effect with CPP geometry. For measuring these parameters, we prepared magnetic multilayers and pseudo spin valves (PSVs), combining the ferromagnetic (F) alloys Fe, Co, Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50}, and Fe{sub 30}Co{sub 70} with the nonmagnetic (N) metal Ag. In all cases, the largest AR{sub F/N} value was found to be ∼0.68 mΩ μm{sup 2} with an enhanced AR{sup *}{sub F/N} value of ∼1.9 mΩ μm{sup 2} for a (001)-oriented Fe/Ag interface, which suggests that spin-up and spin-down electrons on the Fermi surface have very different transmission probabilities. Such an interface can act as a spin filter through which only one type of electrons can pass.

  18. Layered perovskite oxide: a reversible air electrode for oxygen evolution/reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Takahashi, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Haruyuki; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Takano, Hiroshi; Ohguri, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Motofumi; Murota, Tadatoshi; Uosaki, Kohei; Ueda, Wataru

    2013-07-31

    For the development of a rechargeable metal-air battery, which is expected to become one of the most widely used batteries in the future, slow kinetics of discharging and charging reactions at the air electrode, i.e., oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), respectively, are the most critical problems. Here we report that Ruddlesden-Popper-type layered perovskite, RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 (n = 3), functions as a reversible air electrode catalyst for both ORR and OER at an equilibrium potential of 1.23 V with almost no overpotentials. The function of RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 as an ORR catalyst was confirmed by using an alkaline fuel cell composed of Pd/LaSr3Fe3O10-2x(OH)2x·H2O/RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 as an open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.23 V was obtained. RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 also catalyzed OER at an equilibrium potential of 1.23 V with almost no overpotentials. Reversible ORR and OER are achieved because of the easily removable oxygen present in RP-LaSr3Fe3O10. Thus, RP-LaSr3Fe3O10 minimizes efficiency losses caused by reactions during charging and discharging at the air electrode and can be considered to be the ORR/OER electrocatalyst for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  19. Bi-functional air electrodes for metal-air batteries. Final report, September 15, 1993--December 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Swette, L.L.; Manoukian, M.; LaConti, A.B.

    1995-12-01

    The program was directed to the need for development of bifunctional air electrodes for Zn-Air batteries for the consumer market. The Zn-Air system, widely used as a primary cell for hearing-aid batteries and as a remote-site power source in industrial applications, has the advantage of high energy density, since it consumes oxygen from the ambient air utilizing a thin, efficient fuel-cell-type gas-diffusion electrode, and is comparatively low in cost. The disadvantages of the current technology are a relatively low rate capability, and the lack of simple reversibility. {open_quotes}Secondary{close_quotes} Zn-Air cells require a third electrode for oxygen evolution or mechanical replacement of the Zinc anodes; thus the development of a bifunctional air electrode (i.e., an electrode that can alternately consume and evolve oxygen) would be a significant advance in Zn-Air cell technology. Evaluations of two carbon-free non-noble metal perovskite-type catalyst systems, La{sub 1-x}CA{sub x}CoO{sub 3} as bifunctional catalysts for potential application in Zn-air batteries were carried out. The technical objectives were to develop higher-surface-area materials and to fabricate reversible electrodes by modifying the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of the catalyst-binder structures.

  20. Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel carbonaceous electrode support material is disclosed characterized by a corrosion rate of 0.03 wt. %/hour or less when measured a5 550 millivolts vs. a Hg/HgO electrode in a 30 wt. % KOH electrolyte a5 30.degree. C. The electrode support material comprises a preselected carbon black material which has been heat-treated by heating the material to a temperature of from about 2500.degree. to about 3000.degree. C. over a period of from about 1 to about 5 hours in an inert atmosphere and then maintaining the preselected carbon black material at this temperature for a period of at least about 1 hour, and preferably about 2 hours, in the inert atmosphere. A carbonaceous electrode suitable for use as an air electrode in a metal-air cell may be made from the electrode support material by shaping and forming it into a catalyst support and then impregnating it with a catalytically active material capable of catalyzing the reaction with oxygen at the air electrode of metal-air cell.

  1. High performance air electrode for solid oxide regenerative fuel cells fabricated by infiltration of nano-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-il; Kim, Jeonghee; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Je, Hae-June; Lee, Hae-Weon; Song, Huesup; Yoon, Kyung Joong

    2014-03-01

    A high performance air electrode fabricated by infiltration of highly active nano-catalysts into a porous scaffold is demonstrated for high-temperature solid oxide regenerative fuel cells (SORFCs). The nitrate precursor solution for Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3 (SSC) catalyst is impregnated into a porous La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF)-gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) composite backbone, and extremely fine SSC nano-particles are uniformly synthesized by in-situ crystallization at the initial stage of SORFC operation via homogeneous nucleation induced by urea decomposition. The SSC nano-catalysts are in the size range of 40-80 nm and stable against coarsening upon the SORFC operation at 750 °C. The electrochemical performance is significantly improved by incorporation of SSC nano-catalysts in both power generation and hydrogen production modes. Systematic analysis on the impedance spectra reveals that the surface modification of the air electrode with nano-catalysts remarkably accelerates the chemical surface exchange reactions for both O2 reduction and O2- oxidation, which are the major limiting processes for SORFC performance.

  2. Assemblies of protective anion exchange membrane on air electrode for its efficient operation in aqueous alkaline electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline metal-air batteries represent promising energy storage devices when supplied with atmospheric air. However, under this condition, the air electrode shows a very short life time (i.e. 50 h of operation in 5 M LiOH at -10 mA cm-2), mainly due to the precipitation of carbonates inside the electrode porosity. The air electrode can then be protected by an anion exchange membrane on the electrolyte side. In this paper, we demonstrate that the efficiency of this protective membrane depends on the assembly method on the electrode. When a modified poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) network is synthesized directly on the electrode, the polymer seeps inside the electrode porosity, and a suitable interface inducing negligible additional polarization in comparison with classical pressure-assembled membranes is obtained. This protected electrode shows improved stability of up to 160 h of operation in 5 M LiOH. This performance is improved to 350 h by adjusting the conductivity and the ionic exchange capacity. Finally, the interest of interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture compared to a single network is confirmed. Indeed, an electrode protected with a PECH/poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) IPN is stable for 650 h in 5 M LiOH. In addition, degradation process becomes reversible since the assembly can be regenerated, which is not possible for the bare electrode.

  3. The Role of Air-Electrode Structure on the Incorporation of Immiscible PFCs in Nonaqueous Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Balaish, Moran; Ein-Eli, Yair

    2017-03-22

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are considered advantageous additives to nonaqueous Li-O2 battery due to their superior oxygen solubility and diffusivity compared to common battery electrolytes. Up to now, the main focus was concentrated on PFCs-electrolyte investigation; however, no special attention was granted to the role of carbon structure in the PFCs-Li-O2 system. In our current research, immiscible PFCs, rather than miscible fluorinated ethers, were added to activated carbon class air electrode due to their higher susceptibility toward O2(•-) attack and to their ability to shift the reaction from two-phase to an artificial three-phase reaction zone. The results showed superior battery performance upon PFCs addition at lower current density (0.05 mA cm(-2)) but unexpectedly failed to do so at higher current density (0.1 and 0.2 mA cm(-2)), where oxygen transport limitation is best illustrated. The last was a direct result of liquid-liquid displacement phenomenon occurring when the two immiscible liquids were introduced into the porous carbon medium. The investigation and role of carbon structure on the mechanism upon PFCs addition to Li-O2 system are suggested based on electrochemical characterization, wettability behavior studies, and the physical adsorption technique. Finally, we suggest an optimum air-electrode structure enabling the incorporation of immiscible PFCs in a nonaqueous Li-O2 battery.

  4. Interfacial Properties of Polyethylene Glycol/Vinyltriethoxysilane (PEG/VTES) Copolymers and their Application to Stain Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yin-Chun; Su, Shuenn-Kung; Lin, Ya-Wun; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Huang, Kuo-Shien

    2012-05-01

    In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) were used in different proportions to produce a series of PEG-VTES copolymers. The copolymer molecular structures were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. In addition, their surface activities were evaluated by evaluating the surface tension, contact angle, and foaming properties. The results showed that these surfactants exhibited excellent surface activities and wetting power, as well as low foaming. Consequently, the application of a series of PEG/VTES copolymers can make cotton fabrics stain resistant.

  5. Performance and cycle life of carbon- and conductive-based air electrodes for rechargeable Zn-air battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellapandi Velraj, Samgopiraj

    The development of high-performance, cyclically stable bifunctional air electrodes are critical to the commercial deployment of rechargeable Zn-air batteries. The carbon material predominantly used as support material in the air electrodes due to its higher surface area and good electrical conductivity suffers from corrosion at high oxygen evolution overpotentials. This study addresses the carbon corrosion issues and suggests alternate materials to replace the carbon as support in the air electrode. In this study, Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-delta with good electrochemical performance and cyclic lifetime was identified as an alternative catalyst material to the commonly used La0.4Ca 0.6CoO3 catalyst for the carbon-based bifunctional electrodes. Also, a comprehensive study on the effects of catalyst morphology, testing conditions on the cycle life as well as the relevant degradation mechanism for the carbon-based electrode was conducted in this dissertation. The cyclic life of the carbon-based electrodes was strongly dependent on the carbon support material, while the degradation mechanisms were entirely controlled by the catalyst particle size/morphology. Some testing conditions like resting time and electrolyte concentration did not change the cyclic life or degradation mechanism of the carbon-based electrode. The current density used for cyclic testing was found to dictate the degradation mechanism leading to the electrode failure. An alternate way to circumvent the carbon corrosion is to replace the carbon support with a suitable electrically-conductive ceramic material. In this dissertation, LaNi0.9Mn0.1O3, LaNi 0.8Co0.2O3, and NiCo2O4 were synthesized and evaluated as prospective support materials due to their good electrical conductivity and their ability to act as the catalyst needed for the bifunctional electrode. The carbon-free electrodes had remarkably higher catalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) when compared to the carbon-based electrode. However

  6. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  7. Curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2014-03-01

    Nucleation is often accompanied by heat transfer between the surroundings and a nucleus of a new phase. The interface between two phases gives an additional resistance to this transfer. For small nuclei the interfacial curvature is high, which affects not only equilibrium quantities such as surface tension, but also the transport properties. In particular, high curvature affects the interfacial resistance to heat and mass transfer. We develop a framework for determining the curvature dependence of the interfacial heat and mass transfer resistances. We determine the interfacial resistances as a function of a curvature. The analysis is performed for a bubble of a one-component fluid and may be extended to various nuclei of multicomponent systems. The curvature dependence of the interfacial resistances is important in modeling transport processes in multiphase systems.

  8. Single- and Two-Phase Diversion Cross-Flows Between Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannels - Data on Flow Resistance and Interfacial Friction Coefficients for the Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuya Higuchi; Akimaro Kawahara; Michio Sadatomi; Hiroyuki Kudo

    2006-07-01

    Single- and two-phase diversion cross-flows arising from the pressure difference between tight lattice subchannels are our concern in this study. In order to obtain a correlation of the diversion cross-flow, we conducted adiabatic experiments using a vertical multiple-channel with two subchannels simplifying the triangle tight lattice rod bundle for air-water flows at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, data were obtained on the axial variations in the pressure difference between the subchannels, the ratio of flow rate in one subchannel to the whole channel, the void fraction in each subchannel for slug-churn and annular flows in two-phase flow case. These data were analyzed by use of a lateral momentum equation based on a two-fluid model to determine both the cross-flow resistance coefficient between liquid phase and channel wall and the gas-liquid interfacial friction coefficient. The resulting coefficients have been correlated in a way similar to that developed for square lattice subchannel case by Kano et al. (2002); the cross-flow resistance coefficient data can be well correlated with a ratio of the lateral velocity due to the cross-flow to the axial one irrespective of single- and two-phase flows; the interfacial friction coefficient data were well correlated with a Reynolds number, which is based on the relative velocity between gas and liquid cross-flows as the characteristic velocity. (authors)

  9. Achieving high capacity in bulk-type solid-state lithium ion battery based on Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 electrolyte: Interfacial resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Yaoyu; Shen, Yang; Zhao, Shi-Xi; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2016-08-01

    A bulk-type all-solid-state lithium ion battery based on Ta-doped Li6.75La3Zr1.75Ta0.25O12 (LLZ-Ta) is prepared by a simple solid state process with high capacity of 279.0 μAh cm-2 at 80 °C. However, severe polarization is discovered during charging/discharging cycles at room temperature (RT) for battery with a higher active cathode loading. Large interfacial resistance due to the poor contact at the interfaces between cathode and LLZ-Ta solid electrolyte and at the interfaces within the composite cathode layer is proven to be the main reason for the poor electrochemical performance of the battery at RT. The polarization could be suppressed at elevated temperature, which is attributed to the decreased interfacial resistance as indicated by the results of impedance measurements and gives rise to much enhanced performance of the all-solid-state battery.

  10. Electrochemical properties of lithium air batteries with Pt100-xRux (0 ≤ x ≤ 100) electrocatalysts for air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Yuhki; Sakamoto, Shuhei; Nohara, Masaya; Hayashi, Masahiko; Nakamura, Jiro; Komatsu, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Electrochemical properties of lithium air secondary battery cells with Pt100-xRux (0 ≤ x ≤ 100) electrocatalysts, prepared by the formic acid reduction method and loaded into air electrodes were examined in 1 mol/l LiTFSA/TEGDME electrolyte solution. Among the cells, the one with the Pt10Ru90 (x = 90)/carbon sample showed the largest discharge capacity of 1014 mAh/g and the lowest average charge voltage of 3.74 V. In addition, the x = 90 sample showed comparatively good cycle stability with discharge capacity of over 800 mAh/g at the 8th cycle. As a result, x = 90 was confirmed to be the optimized composition as the electrocatalyst for the air electrode.

  11. A Metal-Free, Free-Standing, Macroporous Graphene@g-C₃N₄ Composite Air Electrode for High-Energy Lithium Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen-Bin; Chou, Shu-Lei; Wang, Jia-Zhao; Zhai, Yu-Chun; Liu, Hua-Kun

    2015-06-01

    The nonaqueous lithium oxygen battery is a promising candidate as a next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially high energy density (up to 2-3 kW kg(-1)), exceeding that of any other existing energy storage system for storing sustainable and clean energy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the consumption of nonrenewable fossil fuels. To achieve high energy density, long cycling stability, and low cost, the air electrode structure and the electrocatalysts play important roles. Here, a metal-free, free-standing macroporous graphene@graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) composite air cathode is first reported, in which the g-C3N4 nanosheets can act as efficient electrocatalysts, and the macroporous graphene nanosheets can provide space for Li2O2 to deposit and also promote the electron transfer. The electrochemical results on the graphene@g-C3N4 composite air electrode show a 0.48 V lower charging plateau and a 0.13 V higher discharging plateau than those of pure graphene air electrode, with a discharge capacity of nearly 17300 mA h g(-1)(composite) . Excellent cycling performance, with terminal voltage higher than 2.4 V after 105 cycles at 1000 mA h g(-1)(composite) capacity, can also be achieved. Therefore, this hybrid material is a promising candidate for use as a high energy, long-cycle-life, and low-cost cathode material for lithium oxygen batteries.

  12. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  13. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  14. In Situ-Grown ZnCo2O4 on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Air Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium–Oxygen Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Wu; Yan, Pengfei; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Cao, Ruiguo; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-10-12

    Although lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have great potential to be used as one of the next generation energy storage systems due to their ultrahigh theoretical specific energy, there are still many significant barriers before their practical applications. These barriers include electrolyte and electrode instability, poor ORR/OER efficiency and cycling capability, etc. Development of a highly efficient catalyst will not only enhance ORR/OER efficiency, it may also improve the stability of electrolyte because the reduced charge voltage. Here we report the synthesis of nano-sheet-assembled ZnCo2O4 spheres/single walled carbon nanotubes (ZCO/SWCNTs) composites as high performance air electrode materials for Li-O2 batteries. The ZCO catalyzed SWCNTs electrodes delivered high discharge capacities, decreased the onset of oxygen evolution reaction by 0.9 V during charge processes, and led to more stable cycling stability. These results indicate that ZCO/SWCNTs composite can be used as highly efficient air electrode for oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. The highly enhanced catalytic activity by uniformly dispersed ZnCo2O4 catalyst on nanostructured electrodes is expected to inspire

  15. Spin scattering asymmetric coefficients and enhanced specific interfacial resistance of fully epitaxial current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance spin valves using alternate monatomic layered [Fe/Co]n and a Ag spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. W.; Shiozaki, R.; Doi, M.; Sahashi, M.

    2011-04-01

    Using current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) measurement, we have evaluated the bulk and interface spin scattering asymmetric coefficients, βF and γF/N and the specific interfacial resistance, AR*F/N, for exchange-biased spin-valves consisting of artificially ordered B2 structure Fe50Co50 and Ag spacer layer. Artificially epitaxial ordered Fe50Co50 superlattices have been successfully fabricated on MgO (001) substrate by alternate monatomic layer (AML) deposition at a substrate temperature of 75 °C. The structural properties of the full epitaxial trilayer, AML[Fe/Co]n/Ag/AML[Fe/Co]n, on the Ag electrode have been confirmed by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and transmission electron diffraction microscopy. A considerably large resistance-area product change and MR ratio (ΔRA > 3 mΩμm2 and MR ratio ˜5%) were confirmed even at thin AML[Fe/Co]n layer at room temperature (RT) in our spin-valve elements. The estimated values of βF and γF/N were 0.80 and 0.84 ± 0.02, respectively, from the Valet-Fert theory analysis of ΔRA as a function of thickness of the ferromagnetic layer (3, 4, and 5 nm) on the basis of the two-current model.

  16. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  17. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  18. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  19. Interfacial supersaturation, secondary nucleation, and crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Clifford Y.; Wu, Jenn-Fang; Rousseau, Ronald W.

    1992-02-01

    A theory describing the source of nuclei in secondary nucleation is presented and used to rationalize experimental data from the literature, some of which had appeared to be conflicting. The theory rests on a model in which an adsorption layer consisting of clusters of growth units of varying size is formed on the surface of growing crystals. The existence of the layer is related to the two-resistance model of crystal growth; by varying system conditions, the relative importance of the two resistances is altered and thereby changes the interfacial supersaturation even though overall supersaturation remains constant. Interracial supersaturation and contact energy determine kinetics in a system dominated by contact nucleation.

  20. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  1. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Mechanobiology of interfacial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Preziosi, L.; Maugin, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    A multiscale analysis integrating biomechanics and mechanobiology is today required for deciphering the crosstalk between biochemistry, geometry and elasticity in living materials. In this paper we derive a unified thermomechanical theory coupling growth processes with mass transport phenomena across boundaries and/or material interfaces. Inside a living system made by two contiguous bodies with varying volumes, an interfacial growth mechanism is considered to force fast but continuous variations of the physical fields inside a narrow volume across the material interface. Such a phenomenon is modelled deriving homogenized surface fields on a growing non-material discontinuity, possibly including a singular edge line. A number of balance laws is derived for imposing the conservation of the thermomechanical properties of the biological system. From thermodynamical arguments we find that the normal displacement of the non-material interface is governed by the jump of a new form of material mechanical-energy flux, also involving the kinetic energies and the mass fluxes. Furthermore, the configurational balance indicates that the surface Eshelby tensor is the tangential stress measure driving the material inhomogeneities on the non-material interface. Accordingly, stress-dependent evolution laws for bulk and interfacial growth processes are derived for both volume and surface fields. The proposed thermomechanical theory is finally applied to three biological system models. The first two examples are focused on stress-free growth problems, concerning the morphogenesis of animal horns and of seashells. The third application finally deals with the stress-driven surface evolution of avascular tumours with heterogeneous structures. The results demonstrate that the proposed theory can successfully model those biological systems where growth and mass transport phenomena interact at different length-scales. Coupling biological, mechanical and geometrical factors, the proposed

  3. Binder-Free and Carbon-Free 3D Porous Air Electrode for Li-O2 Batteries with High Efficiency, High Capacity, and Long Life.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen-Bin; Gao, Xuan-Wen; Shi, Dong-Qi; Chou, Shu-Lei; Wang, Jia-Zhao; Liu, Hua-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Pt-Gd alloy polycrystalline thin film is deposited on 3D nickel foam by pulsed laser deposition method serving as a whole binder/carbon-free air electrode, showing great catalytic activity enhancement as an efficient bifunctional catalyst for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions in lithium oxygen batteries. The porous structure can facilitate rapid O2 and electrolyte diffusion, as well as forming a continuous conductive network throughout the whole energy conversion process. It shows a favorable cycle performance in the full discharge/charge model, owing to the high catalytic activity of the Pt-Gd alloy composite and 3D porous nickel foam structure. Specially, excellent cycling performance under capacity limited mode is also demonstrated, in which the terminal discharge voltage is higher than 2.5 V and the terminal charge voltage is lower than 3.7 V after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2) . Therefore, this electrocatalyst is a promising bifunctional electrocatalyst for lithium oxygen batteries and this depositing high-efficient electrocatalyst on porous substrate with polycrystalline thin film by pulsed laser deposition is also a promising technique in the future lithium oxygen batteries research.

  4. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Interfacial phase-change memory.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R E; Fons, P; Kolobov, A V; Fukaya, T; Krbal, M; Yagi, T; Tominaga, J

    2011-07-03

    Phase-change memory technology relies on the electrical and optical properties of certain materials changing substantially when the atomic structure of the material is altered by heating or some other excitation process. For example, switching the composite Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) alloy from its covalently bonded amorphous phase to its resonantly bonded metastable cubic crystalline phase decreases the resistivity by three orders of magnitude, and also increases reflectivity across the visible spectrum. Moreover, phase-change memory based on GST is scalable, and is therefore a candidate to replace Flash memory for non-volatile data storage applications. The energy needed to switch between the two phases depends on the intrinsic properties of the phase-change material and the device architecture; this energy is usually supplied by laser or electrical pulses. The switching energy for GST can be reduced by limiting the movement of the atoms to a single dimension, thus substantially reducing the entropic losses associated with the phase-change process. In particular, aligning the c-axis of a hexagonal Sb(2)Te(3) layer and the 〈111〉 direction of a cubic GeTe layer in a superlattice structure creates a material in which Ge atoms can switch between octahedral sites and lower-coordination sites at the interface of the superlattice layers. Here we demonstrate GeTe/Sb(2)Te(3) interfacial phase-change memory (IPCM) data storage devices with reduced switching energies, improved write-erase cycle lifetimes and faster switching speeds.

  7. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    DOE PAGES

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; ...

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface.more » The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical

  8. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2001-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  10. Internal structure and interfacial area in two-phase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial transfer terms and the importance of the interfacial area concentration are reviewed first with respect to the two-fluid model formulation of two-phase flow systems. Then the available measurement techniques for interfacial area are reviewed. At present, it appears that various methods such as the chemical, light attenuation, photographic, ultrasound attenuation and probe techniques have a number of limitations. Among these measurement techniques, however, the local probe method using one or more double sensors seems to have the greatest potential in terns of accuracy and wider applicability in various two-phase flow patterns. From the brief review of existing interfacial area modeling methods, it is concluded that the conventional approaches might not be sufficient, and new directions are indicated. Recent experimental results on local interfacial structural characteristics of horizontal bubbly two-phase flow and internal flow structure development are presented. More specifically, experimental results on local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size, bubble interface velocity and bubble frequency are documented in detail. Finally, a theoretical model predicting the mean bubble size and interfacial area concentration is proposed. The theoretically predicted bubble size and interfacial area concentration are found to agree reasonably well with those measured by using a double-sensor resistivity technique.

  11. Internal structure and interfacial area in two-phase flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.

    1991-12-31

    The interfacial transfer terms and the importance of the interfacial area concentration are reviewed first with respect to the two-fluid model formulation of two-phase flow systems. Then the available measurement techniques for interfacial area are reviewed. At present, it appears that various methods such as the chemical, light attenuation, photographic, ultrasound attenuation and probe techniques have a number of limitations. Among these measurement techniques, however, the local probe method using one or more double sensors seems to have the greatest potential in terns of accuracy and wider applicability in various two-phase flow patterns. From the brief review of existing interfacial area modeling methods, it is concluded that the conventional approaches might not be sufficient, and new directions are indicated. Recent experimental results on local interfacial structural characteristics of horizontal bubbly two-phase flow and internal flow structure development are presented. More specifically, experimental results on local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size, bubble interface velocity and bubble frequency are documented in detail. Finally, a theoretical model predicting the mean bubble size and interfacial area concentration is proposed. The theoretically predicted bubble size and interfacial area concentration are found to agree reasonably well with those measured by using a double-sensor resistivity technique.

  12. Design principles of interfacial thermal conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    We explore fundamental principles to design the thermal conductance across solid interfaces by changing the composition and disorder of an intermediate matching layer. In absence of phonon-phonon interactions, the layer addition involves two competing effects that influence the conductance. The layer can act as an impedance matching 'bridge' to increase the mode-averaged phonon transmission. However, it also reduces the relevant modes that conserve their momenta transverse to the interface, so that the net result depends on features such as the overlap of conserving modes and the dispersivity of the transverse subbands. Moving into the interacting anharmonic regime, we find that the added layer aids conductance when the decreased resistances at the contact-layer boundaries compensate for the layer resistance. In fact, we show that the maximum conductance corresponds to an exact matching of the two separate contact-layer resistances. For instance, if we vary just the atomic mass across layers, then maximum conductance happens when the intervening layer mass is the geometric mean of the contact masses. We conjecture that the best interfacial layer is one that is compositionally graded into many geometric means - in other words, an exponential variation in thermal impedance.

  13. Mechanics of interfacial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Abkarian, Manouk; Mahadevan, L; Stone, Howard A

    2006-11-21

    Recent experiments and simulations have demonstrated that particle-covered fluid/fluid interfaces can exist in stable nonspherical shapes as a result of the steric jamming of the interfacially trapped particles. The jamming confers the interface with solidlike properties. We provide an experimental and theoretical characterization of the mechanical properties of these armored objects, with attention given to the two-dimensional granular state of the interface. Small inhomogeneous stresses produce a plastic response, while homogeneous stresses produce a weak elastic response. Shear-driven particle-scale rearrangements explain the basic threshold needed to obtain the near-perfect plastic deformation that is observed. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous stress state of the interface is exhibited experimentally by using surfactants to destabilize the particles on the surface. Since the interfacially trapped particles retain their individual characteristics, armored interfaces can be recognized as a kind of composite material with distinct chemical, structural, and mechanical properties.

  14. Elastocapillary-mediated interfacial assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    Particles confined to an interface are present in a large number of industrial applications and ubiquitous in cellular biophysics. Interactions mediated by the interface, such as capillary effects in the presence of surface tension, give rise to rafts and aggregates whose structure is ultimately determined by geometric characteristics of these adsorbed particles. A common strategy for assembling interfacial structures relies on exploiting these interactions by tuning particle anisotropy, either by constructing rigid particles with heterogeneous wetting properties or fabricating particles that have a naturally anisotropic shape. Less explored, however, is the scenario where the interface causes the particles to deform. In this talk I will discuss the implications for interfacial assembly using elastocapillary-mediated interactions. The competition between surface energy and elasticity can wrinkle and buckle adsorbed soft particles, leading to complicated (but programmable) aggregates.

  15. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  16. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W. D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of concurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5 percent. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 approximately 1000 sq m/cu m, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200 per s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  17. Tuning anomalous Hall effect in perpendicular multilayers with different oxygen environment by interfacial ionic migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Sun, Q. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Peng, W. L.; Wang, F. M.; Pan, Y. D.; Ding, L.; Yu, G. H.

    2017-02-01

    Interfacial oxygen migration and its induced anomalous Hall effect are reported in perpendicular multilayers with different interfacial oxygen-coordinated. Saturation Hall resistance RAH for Pt/Co/MgO/Pt and Pt/Co/Al2O3/Pt multilayers is 3.66 Ω and 4.34 Ω in as-deposited state, respectively. After annealing at 400 °C, RAH value reaches 4.82 Ω and 6.67 Ω, which is 32% and 54% larger than that in as-deposited samples, respectively. Especially, the increment value ΔRAH in Pt/Co/Al2O3/Pt multilayers is 101% larger than that in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt film. Interfacial structural analysis shows such differentΔRAH in two samples originates from distinct oxygen migration behavior induced different interfacial oxygen-coordinated.

  18. Organic photovoltaic devices with the bilayer cathode interfacial structure of pyromellitic dianhydride and lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Eunkyoung; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Kim, Hyoungsub; Chae, Heeyeop; Yi, Junsin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we fabricated and characterized an organic photovoltaic (OPV) device with a pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA)/lithium fluoride (LiF) cathode interfacial layer between poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl)(P3HT)+[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and Al. Compared to the OPV device with a LiF-only cathode interfacial layer having a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.7%, the OPV device with the bilayer cathode interfacial structure [PMDA (0.3 nm)/LiF (0.7 nm)] exhibited a reduced resistance and a PCE value enhanced to 3.9% under an illumination condition of 100 mW cm-2 (AM1.5). The observed improvement of the OPV characteristics was attributed to the reduced leakage current of the device by the bilayer cathode interfacial layer.

  19. Measuring Interfacial Tension Between Immiscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser; Balasubramaniam, R.; Delsignore, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Glass capillary tube technique measures interfacial tension between two immiscible liquids. Yields useful data over fairly wide range of interfacial tensions, both for pairs of liquids having equal densities and pairs of liquids having unequal densities. Data on interfacial tensions important in diverse industrial chemical applications, including enhanced extraction of oil; printing; processing foods; and manufacture of paper, emulsions, foams, aerosols, detergents, gel encapsulants, coating materials, fertilizers, pesticides, and cosmetics.

  20. Interfacial Control of Creep Deformation in Ultrafine Lamellar TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M

    2002-11-26

    Solute effect on the creep resistance of two-phase lamellar TiAl with an ultrafine microstructure creep-deformed in a low-stress (LS) creep regime [where a linear creep behavior was observed] has been investigated. The resulted deformation substructure and in-situ TEM experiment revealed that interface sliding by the motion of pre-existing interfacial dislocations is the predominant deformation mechanism in LS creep regime. Solute segregation at lamellar interfaces and interfacial precipitation caused by the solute segregation result in a beneficial effect on the creep resistance of ultrafine lamellar TiAl in LS creep regime.

  1. Sinusoidal Forcing of Interfacial Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Fayaz; Raghunandan, Aditya; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Fluid transport, in vivo, is accomplished via pumping mechanisms of the heart and lungs, which results in biological fluids being subjected to oscillatory shear. Flow is known to influence biological macromolecules, but predicting the effect of shear is incomplete without also accounting for the influence of complex interfaces ubiquitous throughout the body. Here, we investigated the oscillatory response of the structure of aqueous interfacial films using a cylindrical knife edge viscometer. Vitamin K1 was used as a model monolayer because its behaviour has been thoroughly quantified and it doesn't show any measurable hysteresis. The monolayer was subjected to sinusoidal forcing under varied conditions of surface concentrations, periodic frequencies, and knife edge amplitudes. Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) data was collected using Brewster Angle Microscopy(BAM), revealing the influence of oscillatory interfacial shear stress on the monolayer. Insights were gained as to how the velocity profile dampens at specific distances from the knife edge contact depending on the amplitude, frequency, and concentration of Vitamin K1. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  3. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, Jhih-Min

    2009-02-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle "corona" thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  4. Interfacial Layer Optimization in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litofsky, Joshua; Lafalce, Evan; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-03-01

    Organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) based on benchmark π - conjugated polymer polythiophene and electron acceptor PCBM are made up of a sandwich-like structure of multifunctional layers. Interfacial layers (IL) facilitate charge transport between the charge generation layer and the electrodes and enhance charge extraction. Optimizing the IL thus provides one mean of maximizing the efficiency of OPVs. Various electron transport layers such as ZnO and LiF were used, and hole transport layers included PEDOT:PSS and V2O5. Two different device architectures were explored: conventional structure with ITO serving as an anode and inverted structure when ITO acts as a cathode. Using various deposition techniques, we worked to optimize IL thickness and film formation methods. By analyzing device shunt and series resistances using a standard diode equation, we were able to identify the optimal parameters for device performance. The combination of thin IL with electrodes of appropriate work function yielded much better results compared to the control device with no IL. We can use these results and techniques to further optimize future OPV devices based on other novel material systems. This work was supported by the NSF REU grant # DMR-1263066: REU Site in Applied Physics at USF.

  5. Tailored interfacial rheology for gastric stable adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Scheuble, N; Geue, T; Windhab, E J; Fischer, P

    2014-08-11

    Human lipid digestion begins at the interface of oil and water by interfacial adsorption of lipases. Tailoring the available surface area for lipase activity can lead to specific lipid sensing in the body, thus, tailored satiety hormone release. In this study we present biopolymer layers at the MCT-oil/water interface with different stabilities under human gastric environment (37 °C, pH 2, pepsin). Physicochemical changes and enzymatic degradation of interfacial layers were monitored online by interfacial shear rheology. We show the weakening of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) layers at body temperature and acidification and their hydrolysis by pepsin. If sufficient concentrations of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) are given to an existing β-lg layer, this weakening is buffered and the proteolysis delayed. A synergistic, composite layer is formed by adding methylated NCC to the β-lg layer. This layer thermogels at body temperature and resists hydrolysis by pepsin. Coexistence of these two emulsifiers at the air/water interface is evidenced by neutron reflectometry measurements, where morphological information are extracted. The utilized layers and their analysis provide knowledge of physicochemical changes during in vitro digestion of interfaces, which promote functional food formulations.

  6. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  7. Interfacial adhesion - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Banerjea, Amitava; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along with recommendations for future progress and needs.

  8. Interfacial adhesion: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Finley, Clarence W.; Banerjea, Amitava

    1988-01-01

    Adhesion, the binding of different materials at an interface, is of general interest to many branches of technology, e.g., microelectronics, tribology, manufacturing, construction, etc. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of such diverse interfaces. In addition, experimental techniques generally have practical objectives, such as the achievement of sufficient strength to sustain mechanical or thermal effects and/or have the proper electronic properties. In addition, the theoretical description of binding at interfaces is quite limited, and a proper data base for such theoretical analysis does not exist. This presentation will review both experimental and theoretical aspects of adhesion in nonpolymer materials. The objective will be to delineate the critical parameters needed, governing adhesion testing along with an outline of testing objectives. A distinction will be made between practical and fundamental objectives. Examples are given where interfacial bonding may govern experimental consideration. The present status of theory is presented along wiith recommendations for future progress and needs.

  9. Annealing-induced interfacial toughening using a molecular nanolayer.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Darshan D; Lane, Michael; Zhou, Yu; Singh, Amit P; Nayak, Saroj; Tisch, Ulrike; Eizenberg, Moshe; Ramanath, Ganapathiraman

    2007-05-17

    Self-assembled molecular nanolayers (MNLs) composed of short organic chains and terminated with desired functional groups are attractive for modifying surface properties for a variety of applications. For example, organosilane MNLs are used as lubricants, in nanolithography, for corrosion protection and in the crystallization of biominerals. Recent work has explored uses of MNLs at thin-film interfaces, both as active components in molecular devices, and as passive layers, inhibiting interfacial diffusion, promoting adhesion and toughening brittle nanoporous structures. The relatively low stability of MNLs on surfaces at temperatures above 350-400 degrees C (refs 12, 13), as a result of desorption or degradation, limits the use of surface MNLs in high-temperature applications. Here we harness MNLs at thin-film interfaces at temperatures higher than the MNL desorption temperature to fortify copper-dielectric interfaces relevant to wiring in micro- and nano-electronic devices. Annealing Cu/MNL/SiO2 structures at 400-700 degrees C results in interfaces that are five times tougher than pristine Cu/SiO2 structures, yielding values exceeding approximately 20 J m(-2). Previously, similarly high toughness values have only been obtained using micrometre-thick interfacial layers. Electron spectroscopy of fracture surfaces and density functional theory modelling of molecular stretching and fracture show that toughening arises from thermally activated interfacial siloxane bridging that enables the MNL to be strongly linked to both the adjacent layers at the interface, and suppresses MNL desorption. We anticipate that our findings will open up opportunities for molecular-level tailoring of a variety of interfacial properties, at processing temperatures higher than previously envisaged, for applications where microlayers are not a viable option-such as in nanodevices or in thermally resistant molecular-inorganic hybrid devices.

  10. Nanomechanical Sensing of Biological Interfacial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wenjian

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. Cellulase is an enzyme capable of converting insoluble cellulose into soluble sugars. Cellulosic biofuel produced from such fermentable simple sugars is a promising substitute as an energy source. However, its economic feasibility is limited by the low efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase. Cellulose is insoluble and resistant to enzymatic degradation, not only because the beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds are strong covalent bonds, but also because cellulose microfibrils are packed into tightly bound, crystalline lattices. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulase involves three steps--initial binding, decrystallization, and hydrolytic cleavage. Currently, the mechanism for the decrystallization has not yet been elucidated, though it is speculated to be the rate-limiting step of the overall enzymatic activity. The major technical challenge limiting the understanding of the decrystallization is the lack of an effective experimental approach capable of examining the decrystallization, an interfacial enzymatic activity on solid substrates. The work presented develops a nanomechanical sensing approach to investigate both the decrystallization and enzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cellulose. The first experimental evidence of the decrystallization is obtained by comparing the results from native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase. Surface topography has been applied to examine the activities of native cellulase and non-hydrolytic cellulase on cellulose substrate. The study demonstrates additional experimental evidence of the decrystallization in the hydrolysis of cellulose. By combining simulation and monitoring technology, the current study also investigates the structural changes of cellulose at a molecular level. In particular, the study employs cellulose nanoparticles with a bilayer structure on mica sheets. By comparing results from a molecular dynamic simulation and the distance

  11. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  12. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  13. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  14. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  15. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  16. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  17. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  18. Interfacial area transport in bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; Revankar, S.T.

    1997-12-31

    In order to close the two-fluid model for two-phase flow analyses, the interfacial area concentration needs to be modeled as a constitutive relation. In this study, the focus was on the investigation of the interfacial area concentration transport phenomena, both theoretically and experimentally. The interfacial area concentration transport equation for air-water bubbly up-flow in a vertical pipe was developed, and the models for the source and sink terms were provided. The necessary parameters for the experimental studies were identified, including the local time-averaged void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interfacial velocity, liquid velocity and turbulent intensity. Experiments were performed with air-water mixture at atmospheric pressure. Double-sensor conductivity probe and hot-film probe were employed to measure the identified parameters. With these experimental data, the preliminary model evaluation was carried out for the simplest form of the developed interfacial area transport equation, i.e., the one-dimensional transport equation.

  19. Air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated soils: Evaluation of interfacial domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2002-10-01

    A gas-phase miscible-displacement method, using decane as an interfacial tracer, was used to measure air-water interfacial areas for a sand with water contents ranging from ˜2% to 20%. The expected trend of decreasing interfacial areas with increasing water contents was observed. The maximum estimated interfacial area of 19,500 cm-1 appears reasonable given it is smaller than the measured surface area of the porous medium (60,888 cm-1). Comparison of the experimental data presented herein with literature data provided further insight into the characterization of the air-water interface in unsaturated porous media. Specifically, comparison of interfacial areas measured using gas-phase versus aqueous-phase methods indicates that the gas-phase method generally yields larger interfacial areas than the aqueous-phase methods, even when accounting for differences in water content and physical properties of the porous media. The observations are consistent with proposed differences in interfacial accessibility of the aqueous- and gas-phase tracers. Evaluation of the data in light of functional interfacial domains, described herein, yields the hypothesis that aqueous interfacial tracers measure primarily air-water interfaces formed by "capillary water," while gas-phase tracers measure air-water interfaces formed by both capillary and surface-adsorbed (film) water. The gas- and aqueous-phase methods may each provide interfacial area information that is more relevant to specific problems of interest. For example, gas-phase interfacial area measurements may be most relevant to contaminant transport in unsaturated systems, where retention at the air-water interface may be significant. Conversely, the aqueous-phase methods may yield information with direct bearing on multiphase flow processes that are dominated by capillary-phase behavior.

  20. Hanle magnetoresistance: The role of edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Zhang, X.; Wan, C. H.; Tao, B. S.; Huang, L.; Kong, W. J.; Han, X. F.

    2016-11-01

    We report the Hanle magnetoresistance (HMR) due to the spin precession of edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current. Because of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), an electric current is accompanied by a transverse spin current, which builds up the spin accumulation at surfaces of Pt and the spin current across the YIG/Pt interface. Once a magnetic field is applied, the precession of spins will decrease the edge spin accumulation and interfacial spin current, which leads to an increased resistance of Pt via ISHE. Spin relaxation governs the HMR from edge spin accumulation, while spin diffusion and spin conversion play important roles in the HMR from interfacial spin current. This work provides another method to investigate the spin-orbit coupling by electrical measurement.

  1. Interfacial and near interfacial crack growth phenomena in metal bonded alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, Jamie Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Metal/ceramic interfaces can be found in many engineering applications including microelectronic packaging, multi-layered films, coatings, joints, and composite materials. In order to design reliable engineering systems that contain metal/ceramic interfaces, a comprehensive understanding of interfacial and near interfacial failure mechanisms is necessary.

  2. Structural and microstructural characterization and properties of new phases in the Nd-Sr-Co-(Fe/Mn)-O system as air-electrodes in SOFCs.

    PubMed

    Boulahya, K; Muñoz Gil, D; Hassan, M; García Martin, S; Amador, U

    2017-01-24

    New oxides of the (NdSr)n+1MO3n+1 (M = Co and Mn or Fe) series are reported. Compounds of composition NdSrCo0.75Fe0.25O4.10, NdSrCo0.75Mn0.25O4.08 and Nd0.5Sr1.5Co0.75Mn0.25O3.86 are the n = 1 members of the Ruddlesden-Popper homologous series (K2NiF4 structural type) as determined by X-ray diffraction and different transmission electron microscopy techniques. Their crystal structure consists of connected (Co-Fe/Mn)O6 octahedra blocks separated by (Nd/Sr)O rock-salt like layers along the c-axis. Interstitial oxygen atoms or anion vacancies are induced depending on composition. Oxides with interstitial oxygen show good performances as intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) cathode. The area-specific resistance values of electrodes made of these oxides at 973 K in air are 0.18 Ω cm(2) for NdSrCo0.75Fe0.25O4.10 and NdSrCo0.75Mn0.25O4.08 (comparable to the one of the state-of-the-art materials proposed as cathodes in IT-SOFC), and 1.38 Ω cm(2) for Nd0.5Sr1.5Co0.75Mn0.25O3.86.

  3. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  4. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  5. On the hierarchy of interfacial dislocation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Olson, G. B.

    1985-04-01

    Many different types of dislocations have been defined in dislocation models for grain boundaries and interphase boundaries. It is emphasized that there is no unique dislocation model for a boundary, and that the formal dislocation content depends upon the choice of the lattice correspondence relating the adjoining lattices. However, it is concluded that no problems of real physical significance arise from this lack of uniqueness. “Best≓, or most useful, descriptions often exist, and these are discussed. A hierarchy consisting of four different types of interfacial dislocations may be distinguished, which is useful in describing the dislocation content of interfaces. These entities are termed: (1) primary interfacial dislocations; (2) secondary interfacial dislocations; (3) coherency interfacial dislocations; and (4) translational interfacial dislocations. While there may be a lack of agreement on terminology in the literature, it is believed that these dislocation types are distinguishable and play unique roles in useful dislocation models for interfaces. Detailed descriptions of these dislocation types are given, and actual examples in real interfaces are presented. It is concluded that dislocation descriptions of interface structures become of purely formal significance in the limit of fully incoherent interfaces since the cores are then delocalized. The utility of various dislocation descriptions therefore depends on the degree to which various types of local coherency exist.

  6. Interfacial Engineering of Silicon Carbide Nanowire/Cellulose Microcrystal Paper toward High Thermal Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yimin; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Pan, Guiran; Sun, Jiajia; Hu, Jiantao; Huang, Yun; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-11-16

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of electronic devices toward higher speed and better performance. However, high interfacial thermal resistance between fillers and matrix or between fillers and fillers has been one of the primary bottlenecks for the effective thermal conduction in polymer composites. Herein, we report on engineering interfacial structure of silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal paper by generating silver nanostructures. We show that silver nanoparticle-deposited silicon carbide nanowires as fillers can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of the matrix. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the resultant composite paper reaches as high as 34.0 W/m K, which is one order magnitude higher than that of conventional polymer composites. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity with theoretical models qualitatively demonstrates that silver nanoparticles bring the lower interfacial thermal resistances both at silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal and silicon carbide nanowire/silicon carbide nanowire interfaces. This interfacial engineering approach provides a powerful tool for sophisticated fabrication of high-performance thermal-management materials.

  7. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O(2-) migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm(-2) at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  8. Interfacial Shear Rheology of Coffee Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Läuger, Jörg; Heyer, Patrick

    2008-07-01

    Both oscillatory and rotational measurements on the film formation process and on interfacial rheological properties of the final film of coffee samples with different concentrations are presented. As higher the concentration as faster the film formation process is, whereas the concentration does not have a large effect on the visco-elastic properties of the final films. Two geometries, a biconical geometry and a Du Noüy ring have been employed. The presented results show that interfacial shear rheology allows detailed investigations on coffee films. Although with a Du Noüy ring it is possible to measure the qualitative behavior and relative differences only the biconical geometry is sensitive enough to test weak films and to reveal real absolute values for the interfacial shear rheological quantities.

  9. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  10. Drop impact on liquid film: dynamics of interfacial gas layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Law, Chung K.; Sun, Chao

    2016-11-01

    Drop impacting liquid film is commonly observed in many processes including inkjet printing and thermal sprays. Owing to the resistance from the interfacial gas layer trapped between the drop and film surface, impact may not always result in coalescence; and as such investigating the behavior of the interfacial gas layer is important to understand the transition between bouncing and merging outcomes. The gas layer is, however, not easily optically accessible due to its microscopic scale and curved interfaces. We report the measurement of this critical gas layer thickness between two liquid surfaces using high-speed color interferometry capable of measuring micron and submicron thicknesses. The complete gas layer dynamics for the bouncing cases can be divided into two stages: the approaching stage when the drop squeezes the gas layer at the beginning of the impact, and the rebounding stage when the drop retracts and rebounds from the liquid film. The approaching stage is found to be similar across wide range of conditions studied. However, for the rebounding stage, with increase of liquid film thickness, the evolution of gas layer changes dramatically, displaying a non-monotonic behavior. Such dynamics is analyzed in lights of various competing timescales.

  11. Influence of interfacial rheology on stabilization of the tear film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamla, M. Saad; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2014-11-01

    The tear film that protecting the ocular surface is a complex, thin film comprised of a collection of proteins and lipids that come together to provide a number of important functions. Of particular interest in this presentation is meibum, an insoluble layer that is spread from glands lining our eyelids. Past work has focussed on the role of this layer in reducing evaporation, although conflicting evidence on its ability to reduce evaporative loss has been published. We present here the beneficial effects that are derived through the interfacial viscoelasticity of the meibomian lipid film. This is a duplex film is comprised of a rich mixture of phospholipids, long chain fatty esters, and cholesterol esters. Using interfacial rheology measurements, meibum has been shown to be highly viscoelastic. By measuring the drainage and dewetting dynamics of thin aqueous films from hemispherical surfaces where those films are laden with insoluble layers of lipids at controlled surface pressure, we offer evidence that these layers strongly stabilize the films because of their ability to support surface shearing stresses. This alternative view of the role of meibum can help explain the origin of meibomian gland dysfunction, or dry eye disease, where improper compositions of this lipid mixture do not offer the proper mechanical resistance to breakage and dewetting of the tear film.

  12. Interfacial Polymerization on Dynamic Complex Colloids: Creating Stabilized Janus Droplets.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Savagatrup, Suchol; Zarzar, Lauren D; Swager, Timothy M

    2017-03-01

    Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets, are becoming increasingly important in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, the fabrication of microcapsules for drug delivery, chemical sensing, E-paper display technologies, and optics. Because fluid Janus droplets are often sensitive to external perturbation, such as unexpected changes in the concentration of the surfactants or surface-active biomolecules in the environment, stabilizing their morphology is critical for many real-world applications. To endow Janus droplets with resistance to external chemical perturbations, we demonstrate a general and robust method of creating polymeric hemispherical shells via interfacial free-radical polymerization on the Janus droplets. The polymeric hemispherical shells were characterized by optical and fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. By comparing phase diagrams of a regular Janus droplet and a Janus droplet with the hemispherical shell, we show that the formation of the hemispherical shell nearly doubles the range of the Janus morphology and maintains the Janus morphology upon a certain degree of external perturbation (e.g., adding hydrocarbon-water or fluorocarbon-water surfactants). We attribute the increased stability of the Janus droplets to (1) the surfactant nature of polymeric shell formed and (2) increase in interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon due to polymer shell formation. This finding opens the door of utilizing these stabilized Janus droplets in a demanding environment.

  13. Mephisto: Interfacial Destabilization in Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favier, J. J.; Malmejac, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The destabilizing mechanisms at a solidification interface were studied to obtain information on the kinetics and morphologies in the transient and steady state, and to separate the influences of liquid phase instabilities from interfacial instabilities. A differential seebeck voltage measurements technique was developed to provide a continuous record of the solid-liquid interface temperature as the solidification rate is varied to determine the kinetic coefficients. Signal processing and noise suppression techniques allow nonovolt precision which corresponds to mK accuracy for the interfacial temperature.

  14. Thickness scaling effect on interfacial barrier and electrical contact to two-dimensional MoS2 layers.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Lin; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Nakaharai, Shu; Lin, Yen-Fu; Yamamoto, Mahito; Duan, Xiangfeng; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-12-23

    Understanding the interfacial electrical properties between metallic electrodes and low-dimensional semiconductors is essential for both fundamental science and practical applications. Here we report the observation of thickness reduction induced crossover of electrical contact at Au/MoS2 interfaces. For MoS2 thicker than 5 layers, the contact resistivity slightly decreases with reducing MoS2 thickness. By contrast, the contact resistivity sharply increases with reducing MoS2 thickness below 5 layers, mainly governed by the quantum confinement effect. We find that the interfacial potential barrier can be finely tailored from 0.3 to 0.6 eV by merely varying MoS2 thickness. A full evolution diagram of energy level alignment is also drawn to elucidate the thickness scaling effect. The finding of tailoring interfacial properties with channel thickness represents a useful approach controlling the metal/semiconductor interfaces which may result in conceptually innovative functionalities.

  15. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  16. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, A. E.; Sinha, S. K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Smith, D. J.

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  17. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  18. Electrocatalysts for bifunctional oxygen/air electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, V.; Iliev, P.; Petrov, K.; Vitanov, T.; Zhecheva, E.; Stoyanova, R.; Valov, I.; Stoychev, D.

    Oxygen reduction and evolution have been studied with respect to the development of bifunctional air/oxygen electrode (BFE). Three groups of catalysts have been prepared: (i) Cu xCo 3- xO 4 by thermal decomposition of mixed nitrate and carbonate precursors; (ii) thin films of Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O were deposited by vacuum co-evaporation of Co, Ni and TeO 2 and (iii) Co xO v/ZrO 2 films were obtained by electrochemical deposition. The electrochemical behavior of the chemically synthesized catalysts was studied on classical bilayered gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs), where the catalyst is in form of powder. The GDE catalyzed with vacuum deposited catalysts was prepared by direct deposition of the catalyst on gas-supplying layer, thus creating a ready-to-use gas diffusion electrode. Catalysts prepared electrochemically were first deposited on Ni foam and than pressed onto the gas-supplying layer. Different catalysts deposited on classical and originally designed GDEs were compared by their electrochemical performances. Cu 0.3Co 2.7O 4 deposited on a classical bilayered GDE with loading of 50 mg cm -2 exhibits stable current-voltage characteristics after 200 charge-discharge cycles in a real metal hydride-air battery. The electrochemically and vacuum deposited Co xO v/ZrO 2, Co-Ni-Te-O and Co-Te-O films exhibit much higher mass activity compared to Cu 0.2Co 2.8O 4 for both oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. The difference is that the loading of electrochemically and vacuum deposited films is 0.06 mg cm -2 only, which is a substantial advantage from a practical viewpoint.

  19. Electrochemical evaluation of the p-Si/conducting polymer interfacial properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Distefano, S.; Moacanin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of the contact resistance and interfacial properties of a p-Si/conducting polymer interface for solar cell applications. The electronic character of the polymer/semiconductor function is determined by studying the electrochemical behavior of both poly(isothianapthene) (PITN) and polypyrrole (PP) in an acetonitrile solution on p-silicon electrodes. The results obtained indicate that while PITN is intrinsically more conductive than PP, neither passivates surface states nor forms ohmic contact.

  20. Toughening mechanisms in interfacially modified HDPE/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Taguet, Aurélie; Bureau, Martin N; Huneault, Michel A; Favis, Basil D

    2014-12-19

    The mechanical behavior of polymer blends containing 80 wt% of HDPE and 20 wt% of TPS and compatibilized with HDPE-g-MA grafted copolymer was investigated. Unmodified HDPE/TPS blends exhibit high fracture resistance, however, the interfacial modification of those blends by addition of HDPE-g-MA leads to a dramatic drop in fracture resistance. The compatibilization of HDPE/TPS blends increases the surface area of TPS particles by decreasing their size. It was postulated that the addition of HDPE-g-MA induces a reaction between maleic anhydride and hydroxyl groups of the glycerol leading to a decrease of the glycerol content in the TPS phase. This phenomenon increases the stiffness of the modified TPS particles and stiffer TPS particles leading to an important reduction in toughness and plastic deformation, as measured by the EWF method. It is shown that the main toughening mechanism in HDPE/TPS blends is shear-yielding. This article demonstrates that stiff, low diameter TPS particles reduce shear band formation and consequently decrease the resistance to crack propagation.

  1. Water adsorption in interfacial silane layers by neutron reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; McNamara, W.F.; Domeier, L.; Wong, A.P.Y.; Wu, W.L.

    1997-03-01

    It is well known that water plays an important role in the degradation of adhesive strength between a wide variety of materials. It is also well established that silane coupling agents can provide excellent bond durability in aqueous environments. However, the detrimental effects of interfacial water are not limited to adhesive failure. The present study was motivated by concerns in the printed circuit board industry regarding the loss of electrical resistance, as well as adhesive failure, which may arise from water at epoxy/silane/E-glass interphases. The commercial silane finish used in this study provides excellent adhesive strength between epoxy and E-glass, and remarkable bond durability even after extensive conditioning in boiling water or a pressure cooker. However, circuit boards with this finish do not perform well in insulation resistance testing following such conditioning. The goal of this work is to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanism by which water interacts with a resin/silane interphase, with a focus on the consequences for both electrical resistance and adhesion. The present report focuses on the measurement of profiles of adsorbed moisture by neutron reflection.

  2. Modeling of Interfacial Modification Effects on Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of functionalization of carbon nanotubes on the thermal conductivity of nanocomposites has been studied using a multi-scale modeling approach. These results predict that grafting linear hydrocarbon chains to the surface of a single wall carbon nanotube with covalent chemical bonds should result in a significant increase in the thermal conductivity of these nanocomposites. This is due to the decrease in the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the single wall carbon nanotube and the surrounding polymer matrix upon chemical functionalization. The nanocomposites studied here consist of single wall carbon nanotubes in a bulk poly(ethylene vinyl acetate) matrix. The nanotubes are functionalized by end-grafting linear hydrocarbon chains of varying length to the surface of the nanotube. The effect which this functionalization has on the interfacial thermal resistance is studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Interfacial thermal resistance values are calculated for a range of chemical grafting densities and with several chain lengths. These results are subsequently used in an analytical model to predict the resulting effect on the bulk thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite.

  3. Interfacial strength of Resilon and gutta-percha to intraradicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Gesi, Andrea; Raffaelli, Ornella; Goracci, Cecilia; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R; Ferrari, Marco

    2005-11-01

    Strengthening of Resilon-filled roots via an adhesive interface should be reflected by improvement in the interfacial strength and dislocation resistance between the root fillings and intraradicular dentin. This study compared the interfacial strengths of Resilon/Epiphany and gutta-percha/AH Plus using a thin-slice push-out test design. Failure modes of root slices after push-out testing were examined with environmental scanning electron microscopy. The gutta-percha group exhibited significantly higher interfacial strength than the Resilon group, when premature failures that occurred in Resilon root slices were included in the statistical analysis. The gutta-percha root slices failed exclusively along the gutta-percha/sealer interface. The Resilon root slices failed predominantly along the sealer/dentin interface with recognizable, fractured resin tags. Detachment of the Resilon from the Epiphany sealer was also surprisingly observed in some specimens. The similarly low interfacial strengths achieved with both types of root filling challenges the concept of strengthening root-filled teeth with the new endodontic material.

  4. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015)JCTPAH0021-999110.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  7. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  8. Effect of CaF2 on Interfacial Phenomena of High Alumina Refractories with Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshy, Pramod; Gupta, Sushil; Sahajwalla, Veena; Edwards, Phil

    2008-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interfacial phenomena between Al-alloy and industrial grade high alumina refractories containing varying contents of CaF2 at 1250 °C. Interfacial reaction products and phases formed in the heat-treated refractory samples were characterized using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively, while interfacial phenomena including dynamic wetting behavior were analyzed using the sessile drop technique. Refractories containing less than 5 wt pct CaF2 showed good resistance to reactions with the molten alloy, due to the dominance of corundum, and the presence of anorthite at the interface. However, with a further increase in the additive content, a glassy matrix of anorthite with CaF2 was formed. Formation of this phase significantly increased the intensity of reactions resulting in the buildup of an interfacial layer. The study thus revealed the strong catalytic effect of CaF2 on reactions of high alumina refractories with Al-alloy.

  9. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  10. Ordered mesoporous materials based on interfacial assembly and engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yue, Qin; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-04

    Ordered mesoporous materials have inspired prominent research interest due to their unique properties and functionalities and potential applications in adsorption, separation, catalysis, sensors, drug delivery, energy conversion and storage, and so on. Thanks to continuous efforts over the past two decades, great achievements have been made in the synthesis and structural characterization of mesoporous materials. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in preparing ordered mesoporous materials from the viewpoint of interfacial assembly and engineering. Five interfacial assembly and synthesis are comprehensively highlighted, including liquid-solid interfacial assembly, gas-liquid interfacial assembly, liquid-liquid interfacial assembly, gas-solid interfacial synthesis, and solid-solid interfacial synthesis, basics about their synthesis pathways, princples and interface engineering strategies.

  11. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  12. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  13. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  14. Interfacial thermodynamics of micro heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.W. ); Peterson, G.P. )

    1995-02-01

    Successful analysis and modeling of micro heat pipes requires a complete understanding of the vapor-liquid interface. A thermodynamic model of the vapor-liquid interface in micro heat pipes has been formulated that includes axial pressure and temperature differences, changes in local interfacial curvature, Marangoni effects, and the disjoining pressure. Relationships were developed for the interfacial mass flux in an extended meniscus, the heat transfer rate in the intrinsic meniscus, the 'thermocapillary' heat-pipe limitation, as well as the nonevaporating superheated liquid film thickness that exists between adjacent menisci and occurs during liquid dry out in the evaporator. These relationships can be used to define quantitative restrictions and/or requirements necessary for proper operation of micro heat pipes. They also provide fundamental insight into the critical mechanisms required for proper heat pipe operation. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The contact area dependent interfacial thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenhan; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Jian

    2015-12-15

    The effects of the contact area on the interfacial thermal conductance σ are investigated using the atomic Green’s function method. Different from the prediction of the heat diffusion transport model, we obtain an interesting result that the interfacial thermal conductance per unit area Λ is positively dependent on the contact area as the area varies from a few atoms to several square nanometers. Through calculating the phonon transmission function, it is uncovered that the phonon transmission per unit area increases with the increased contact area. This is attributed to that each atom has more neighboring atoms in the counterpart of the interface with the increased contact area, which provides more channels for phonon transport.

  16. Frontiers of interfacial water research :workshop report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2005-10-01

    Water is the critical natural resource of the new century. Significant improvements in traditional water treatment processes require novel approaches based on a fundamental understanding of nanoscale and atomic interactions at interfaces between aqueous solution and materials. To better understand these critical issues and to promote an open dialog among leading international experts in water-related specialties, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored a workshop on April 24-26, 2005 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The ''Frontiers of Interfacial Water Research Workshop'' provided attendees with a critical review of water technologies and emphasized the new advances in surface and interfacial microscopy, spectroscopy, diffraction, and computer simulation needed for the development of new materials for water treatment.

  17. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  18. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  19. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  20. Magnetoelectric Coupling Induced by Interfacial Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bin; Song, Cheng; Mao, Haijun; Wu, Huaqiang; Li, Fan; Peng, Jingjing; Wang, Guangyue; Zeng, Fei; Pan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Reversible orbital reconstruction driven by ferroelectric polarization modulates the magnetic performance of model ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures without onerous limitations. Mn-d(x2-y2) orbital occupancy and related interfacial exotic magnetic states are enhanced and weakened by negative and positive electric fields, respectively, filling the missing member-orbital in the mechanism of magnetoelectric coupling and advancing the application of orbitals to microelectronics.

  1. Investigation of interfacial rheology & foam stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn M.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-05-01

    The rheology at gas-liquid interfaces strongly influences the stability and dynamics of foams and emulsions. Several experimental techniques are employed to characterize the rheology at liquid-gas interfaces with an emphasis on the non-Newtonian behavior of surfactant-laden interfaces. The focus is to relate the interfacial rheology to the foamability and foam stability of various aqueous systems. An interfacial stress rheometer (ISR) is used to measure the steady and dynamic rheology by applying an external magnetic field to actuate a magnetic needle suspended at the interface. Results are compared with those from a double wall ring attachment to a rotational rheometer (TA Instruments AR-G2). Micro-interfacial rheology (MIR) is also performed using optical tweezers to manipulate suspended microparticle probes at the interface to investigate the steady and dynamic rheology. Additionally, a surface dilatational rheometer (SDR) is used to periodically oscillate the volume of a pendant drop or buoyant bubble. Applying the Young-Laplace equation to the drop shape, a time-dependent surface tension can be calculated and used to determine the effective dilatational viscosity of an interface. Using the ISR, double wall ring, SDR, and MIR, a wide range of sensitivity in surface forces (fN to nN) can be explored as each experimental method has different sensitivities. Measurements will be compared to foam stability.

  2. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  3. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  4. Interfacial Studies of Sized Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shahrul, S. N.; Hartini, M. N.; Hilmi, E. A.; Nizam, A.

    2010-03-11

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of sizing treatment on carbon fiber in respect of interfacial adhesion in composite materials, Epolam registered 2025. Fortafil unsized carbon fiber was used to performed the experiment. The fiber was commercially surface treated and it was a polyacrylonitrile based carbon fiber with 3000 filament per strand. Epicure registered 3370 was used as basic sizing chemical and dissolved in two types of solvent, ethanol and acetone for the comparison purpose. The single pull out test has been used to determine the influence of sizing on carbon fiber. The morphology of carbon fiber was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The apparent interfacial strength IFSS values determined by pull out test for the Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sized carbon fiber pointed to a good interfacial behaviour compared to the Epicure registered 3370/acetone sized carbon fiber. The Epicure registered 3370/ethanol sizing agent was found to be effective in promoting adhesion because of the chemical reactions between the sizing and Epolam registered 2025 during the curing process. From this work, it showed that sized carbon fiber using Epicure registered 3370 with addition of ethanol give higher mechanical properties of carbon fiber in terms of shear strength and also provided a good adhesion between fiber and matrix compared to the sizing chemical that contain acetone as a solvent.

  5. Interfacial tension and interfacial profiles: an equation-of-state approach.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2003-11-15

    A quasi-thermodynamic approach of inhomogeneous systems is used for modeling the fluid-fluid interface. It is based on the recently introduced QCHB (quasi-chemical hydrogen bonding) equation-of-state model of fluids and their mixtures, which is used for the estimation of the Helmholtz free energy density difference, Deltapsi(0), between the system with interface and another system of the same constitution but without interface. Consistent expressions for the interfacial tension and interfacial profiles for various properties are presented. The interfacial tension is proportional to the integral of Deltapsi(0) along the full height of the system, the proportionality constant being equal to 1, when no density gradient contributions are taken into consideration, 2, when the Cahn-Hilliard approximation is adopted, and 4, when the full density gradient contributions are taken into consideration. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between experimental and calculated surface tensions. Extension of the approach to mixtures is examined along with the associated problems for the numerical calculations of the interfacial profiles. A new equation is derived for the chemical potentials in the interfacial region, which facilitates very much the calculation of the composition profiles across the interface.

  6. Bioinspired design and interfacial failure of biomedical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbar, Nima

    The deformation mechanism of nacre as a model biological material is studied in this project. A numerical model is presented which consists of tensile pillars, shear pillars, asperities and aragonite platelets. It has been shown that the tensile pillars are the main elements that control the global stiffness of the nacre structure. Meanwhile, ultimate strength of the nacre structure is controlled by asperities and their behavior and the ratio of L/2D which is itself a function of the geometry of the platelets. Protein/shear pillars provide the glue which holds the assembly of entire system together, particularly in the direction normal to the platelets main axis. This dissertation also presents the results of a combined theoretical/computational and experimental effort to develop crack resistant dental multilayers that are inspired by the functionally graded dento-enamel junction (DEJ) structure that occurs between dentin and enamel in natural teeth. The complex structures of natural teeth and ceramic crowns are idealized using at layered configurations. The potential effects of occlusal contact are then modeled using finite element simulations of Hertzian contact. The resulting stress distributions are compared for a range of possible bioinspired, functionally graded architecture. The computed stress distributions show that the highest stress concentrations in the top ceramic layer of crown structures are reduced significantly by the use of bioinspired functionally graded architectures. The reduced stresses are shown to be associated with significant improvements (30%) in the pop-in loads over a wide range of clinically-relevant loading rates. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of bioinspired dental ceramic crown structures. The results of a combined experimental and computational study of mixed mode fracture in glass/cement and zirconia/cement interfaces that are relevant to dental restorations is also presented. The interfacial fracture

  7. Control of Metal/graphite Interfacial Energy Through the Interfacial Segregation of Alloying Additions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Utpal

    Equilibrium segregation of Ni to the interface of a solid Pb/graphite and Au/graphite was studied using a solid state wetting approach and the crater edge profiling technique on a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). All experiments were performed under ultra high vacuum (UHV) to reduce the effects due to surface adsorption of impurities. For the Pb/graphite system, increasing amounts of Ni ranging from 0 to 0.2wt% Ni added to Pb were found to systematically lower the contact angle for samples equilibrated at 285 ^circC. No significant surface segregation of Ni was observed at the Pb surface. The reduction of the contact angle was therefore attributed entirely to the lowering of the interfacial energy by interfacial adsorption of Ni. The interfacial energy and interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of bulk Ni content. The presence of excess Ni at the interface was also determined using the crater edge profiling technique on the SAM for various bulk concentrations of Ni in Pb. The temperature dependence of the segregation process was also studied using the solid state wetting approach. The contact angle of Pb(Ni)/graphite was found to vary as a function of temperature for a given Ni content. No temperature dependence was observed in the case of pure Pb/graphite. The change in interfacial energy and the interfacial Ni concentration were obtained as a function of temperature from thermodynamic considerations, and from that the enthalpy and the entropy of interfacial segregation were determined. For the Au/graphite system at 850^circC, addition of 15at%Ni to Au caused a reduction of contact angle by 7.8^circ with accompanying reduction in interfacial energy. Ni was found to segregate to both the free Au surface as well as to the Au/graphite interface. In addition C was also found to segregate to the Au surface thus lowering the surface energy. The modified surface energy was considered in the determination of the interfacial energy and interfacial Ni

  8. Effects of cathode electrolyte interfacial (CEI) layer on long term cycling of all-solid-state thin-film batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziying; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Xin, Huolin L.; Han, Lili; Grillon, Nathanael; Guy-Bouyssou, Delphine; Bouyssou, Emilien; Proust, Marina; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-05-30

    All-solid-state lithium-ion batteries have the potential to not only push the current limits of energy density by utilizing Li metal, but also improve safety by avoiding flammable organic electrolyte. However, understanding the role of solid electrolyte – electrode interfaces will be critical to improve performance. In this paper, we conducted long term cycling on commercially available lithium cobalt oxide (LCO)/lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON)/lithium (Li) cells at elevated temperature to investigate the interfacial phenomena that lead to capacity decay. STEM-EELS analysis of samples revealed a previously unreported disordered layer between the LCO cathode and LiPON electrolyte. This electrochemically inactive layer grew in thickness leading to loss of capacity and increase of interfacial resistance when cycled at 80 °C. Finally, the stabilization of this layer through interfacial engineering is crucial to improve the long term performance of thin-film batteries especially under thermal stress.

  9. Effects of cathode electrolyte interfacial (CEI) layer on long term cycling of all-solid-state thin-film batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziying; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Xin, Huolin L.; Han, Lili; Grillon, Nathanael; Guy-Bouyssou, Delphine; Bouyssou, Emilien; Proust, Marina; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2016-08-01

    All-solid-state lithium-ion batteries have the potential to not only push the current limits of energy density by utilizing Li metal, but also improve safety by avoiding flammable organic electrolyte. However, understanding the role of solid electrolyte - electrode interfaces will be critical to improve performance. In this study, we conducted long term cycling on commercially available lithium cobalt oxide (LCO)/lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON)/lithium (Li) cells at elevated temperature to investigate the interfacial phenomena that lead to capacity decay. STEM-EELS analysis of samples revealed a previously unreported disordered layer between the LCO cathode and LiPON electrolyte. This electrochemically inactive layer grew in thickness leading to loss of capacity and increase of interfacial resistance when cycled at 80 °C. The stabilization of this layer through interfacial engineering is crucial to improve the long term performance of thin-film batteries especially under thermal stress.

  10. Interfacial inhibitors of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2005-07-01

    This essay develops the paradigm of "Interfacial Inhibitors" (Pommier and Cherfils, TiPS, 2005, 28: 136) for inhibitory drugs beside orthosteric (competitive or non-competitive) and allosteric inhibitors. Interfacial inhibitors bind with high selectivity to a binding site involving two or more macromolecules within macromolecular complexes undergoing conformational changes. Interfacial binding traps (generally reversibly) a transition state of the complex, resulting in kinetic inactivation. The exemplary case of interfacial inhibitor of protein-DNA interface is camptothecin and its clinical derivatives. We will also provide examples generalizing the interfacial inhibitor concept to inhibitors of topoisomerase II (anthracyclines, ellipticines, epipodophyllotoxins), gyrase (quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin), RNA polymerases (alpha-amanitin and actinomycin D), and ribosomes (antibiotics such as streptomycin, hygromycin B, tetracycline, kirromycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and possibly cycloheximide). We discuss the implications of the interfacial inhibitor concept for drug discovery.

  11. Interfacial magnetic anisotropy of Co90Zr10 on Pt layer.

    PubMed

    Kil, Joon Pyo; Bae, Gi Yeol; Suh, Dong Ik; Choi, Won Joon; Noh, Jae Sung; Park, Wanjun

    2014-11-01

    Spin Transfer Torque (STT) is of great interest in data writing scheme for the Magneto-resistive Random Access Memory (MRAM) using Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ). Scalability for high density memory requires ferromagnetic electrodes having the perpendicular magnetic easy axis. We investigated CoZr as the ferromagnetic electrode. It is observed that interfacial magnetic anisotropy is preferred perpendicular to the plane with thickness dependence on the interfaces with Pt layer. The anisotropy energy (K(u)) with thickness dependence shows a change of magnetic-easy-axis direction from perpendicular to in-plane around 1.2 nm of CoZr. The interfacial anisotropy (K(i)) as the directly related parameters to switching and thermal stability, are estimated as 1.64 erg/cm2 from CoZr/Pt multilayered system.

  12. Hemp-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites: Optimization of Processing and Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Renhui; Ren, Xiaofeng; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Li, Kaichang

    2011-02-25

    The processing variables for making hemp-fiber-reinforced unsaturated polyester (UPE) composites were optimized through orthogonal experiments. It was found that the usage of initiator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, had the most significant effect on the tensile strength of the composites. The treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of 1, 6-diisocyanatohexane (DIH) and 2-hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) significantly increased tensile strength, flexural modulus of rupture and flexural modulus of elasticity, and water resistance of the resulting hemp-UPE composites. FTIR spectra revealed that DIH and HEA were covalently bonded to hemp fibers. Scanning electronic microscopy graphs of the fractured hemp-UPE composites demonstrated that treatment of hemp fibers with a combination of DIH and HEA greatly improved the interfacial adhesion between hemp fibers and UPE. The mechanism of improving the interfacial adhesion is proposed.

  13. Interfacial microstructure between Sn-3Ag-xBi alloy and Cu substrate with or without electrolytic Ni plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chi-Won; Lee, Jung-Goo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Mori, Hirotaro

    2003-02-01

    The microstructure of the interfacial phase of Sn-3Ag-xBi alloy on a Cu substrate with or without electrolytic Ni plating was evaluated. Bismuth additions into Sn-Ag alloys do not affect interfacial phase formations. Without plating, η-Cu6Sn5/ɛ-Cu3Sn interfacial phases developed as reaction products in the as-soldered condition. The η-phase Cu6Sn5 with a hexagonal close-packed structure grows about 1-µm scallops. The ɛ-phase Cu3Sn with an orthorhombic structure forms with small 100-nm grains between η-Cu6Sn5 and Cu. For Ni plating, a Ni3Sn4 layer of monoclinic structure formed as the primary reaction product, and a thin η-Ni3Sn2 layer of hexagonal close-packed structure forms between the Ni3Sn4 and Ni layer. In the Ni layer, Ni-Sn compound particles of nanosize distribute by Sn diffusion into Ni. On the total thickness of interfacial reaction layers, Sn-3Ag-6Bi joints are thicker by about 0.9 µm for the joint without Ni plating and 0.18 µm for the joint with Ni plating than Sn-3Ag joints, respectively. The thickening of interfacial reaction layers can affect the mechanical properties of strength and fatigue resistance.

  14. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  15. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; ...

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) withmore » highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.« less

  16. Formation of molten metal films during metal-on-metal slip under extreme interfacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Nai-Shang; Okada, Makoto; Prakash, Vikas

    2004-09-01

    The present paper describes results of plate-impact pressure-shear friction experiments conducted to study time-resolved growth of molten metal films during dry metal-on-metal slip under extreme interfacial conditions. By employing tribo-pairs comprising hard tool-steel against relatively low melt-point metals such as 7075-T6 aluminum alloys, interfacial friction stress ranging from 100 to 400 MPa and slip speeds of approximately 100 m/ s have been generated. These relatively high levels of friction stress combined with high slip-speeds generate conditions conducive for interfacial temperatures to approach the melting point of the lower melt point metal (Al alloy) comprising the tribo-pair. A Lagrangian finite element code is developed to understand the evolution of the thermo-mechanical fields and their relationship to the observed slip response. The code accounts for dynamic effects, heat conduction, contact with friction, and full thermo-mechanical coupling. At temperatures below the melting point the material is described as an isotropic thermally softening elastic-viscoplastic solid. For material elements with temperatures in excess of the melt point a purely Newtonian fluid constitutive model is employed. The results of the hybrid experimental-computational study provides new insights into the thermoelastic-plastic interactions during high speed metal-on-metal slip under extreme interfacial conditions. During the early part of frictional slip the coefficient of kinetic friction is observed to decrease with increasing slip velocity. During the later part transition in interfacial slip occurs from dry metal-on-metal sliding to the formation of molten Al films at the tribo-pair interface. Under these conditions the interfacial resistance approaches the shear strength of the molten aluminum alloy under normal pressures of approximately 1- 3 GPa and shear strain rates of ˜10 7 s-1. The results of the study indicate that under these extreme conditions molten

  17. Functionalization enhancement on interfacial shear strength between graphene and polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yikuang; Duan, Fangli; Mu, Xiaojing

    2016-11-01

    Pull-out processes were simulated to investigate the interfacial mechanical properties between the functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) and polyethylene (PE) matrix by using molecular dynamics simulation with ReaxFF reactive force field. The interfacial structure of polymer and the interfacial interaction in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems were also analyzed to reveal the enhancement mechanism of interfacial shear strength. We observed the insertion of functional groups into polymer layer in the equilibrium FGS/PE systems. During the pull-out process, some interfacial chains were attached on the FGS and pulled out from the polymer matrix. The behavior of these pulled out chains was further analyzed to clarify the different traction action of functional groups applied on them. The results show that the traction effect of functional groups on the pulled-out chains is agreement with their enhancement influence on the interfacial shear strength of the FGS/PE systems. They both are basically dominated by the size of functional groups, suggesting the enhancement mechanism of mechanical interlocking. However, interfacial binding strength also exhibits an obvious influence on the interfacial shear properties of the hybrid system. Our simulation show that geometric constrains at the interface is the principal contributor to the enhancement of interfacial shear strength in the FGS/PE systems, which could be further strengthened by the wrinkled morphology of graphene in experiments.

  18. Direct handling of sharp interfacial energy for microstructural evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hernández–Rivera, Efraín; Tikare, Veena; Noirot, Laurence; ...

    2014-08-24

    In this study, we introduce a simplification to the previously demonstrated hybrid Potts–phase field (hPPF), which relates interfacial energies to microstructural sharp interfaces. The model defines interfacial energy by a Potts-like discrete interface approach of counting unlike neighbors, which we use to compute local curvature. The model is compared to the hPPF by studying interfacial characteristics and grain growth behavior. The models give virtually identical results, while the new model allows the simulator more direct control of interfacial energy.

  19. Interfacial properties of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Borodin, Oleg; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2008-06-01

    The liquid-vapor interfacial properties of semifluorinated linear alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1(CH2)m-1CH3 are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The chemical composition and the conformation of the molecules at the interface are identified and correlated with the interfacial energies. A modified form of the Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom (OPLS-AA) force field of Jorgensen and co-workers [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 106, 6638 (1984); 118, 11225 (1996); J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 4118 (2001)], which includes specific dihedral terms for H-F blocks-and corrections to the H-F nonbonded interaction, is used together with a new version of the exp-6 force field developed in this work. Both force fields yield good agreement with the available experimental liquid density and surface tension data as well as each other over significant temperature ranges and for a variety of chain lengths and compositions. The interfacial regions of semifluorinated alkanes are found to be rich in fluorinated groups compared to hydrogenated groups, an effect that decreases with increasing temperature but is independent of the fractional length of the fluorinated segments. The proliferation of fluorine at the surface substantially lowers the surface tension of the diblock copolymers, yielding values near those of perfluorinated alkanes and distinct from those of protonated alkanes of the same chain length. With decreasing temperatures within the liquid state, chains are found to preferentially align perpendicular to the interface, as previously seen.

  20. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  1. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  2. Dynamic interfacial behavior of viscoelastic aqueous hyaluronic acid: effects of molecular weight, concentration and interfacial velocity.

    PubMed

    Vorvolakos, Katherine; Coburn, James C; Saylor, David M

    2014-04-07

    An aqueous hyaluronic acid (HA(aq)) pericellular coat, when mediating the tactile aspect of cellular contact inhibition, has three tasks: interface formation, mechanical signal transmission and interface separation. To quantify the interfacial adhesive behavior of HA(aq), we induce simultaneous interface formation and separation between HA(aq) and a model hydrophobic, hysteretic Si-SAM surface. While surface tension γ remains essentially constant, interface formation and separation depend greatly on concentration (5 ≤ C ≤ 30 mg mL(-1)), molecular weight (6 ≤ MW ≤ 2000 kDa) and interfacial velocity (0 ≤ V ≤ 3 mm s(-1)), each of which affect shear elastic and loss moduli G′ and G′′, respectively. Viscoelasticity dictates the mode of interfacial motion: wetting-dewetting, capillary necking, or rolling. Wetting-dewetting is quantified using advancing and receding contact angles θ(A) and θ(R), and the hysteresis between them, yielding data landscapes for each C above the [MW, V] plane. The landscape sizes, shapes, and curvatures disclose the interplay, between surface tension and viscoelasticity, which governs interfacial dynamics. Gel point coordinates modulus G and angular frequency ω appear to predict wetting-dewetting (G < 75 ω0.2), capillary necking (75 ω0.2 < G < 200 ω0.075) or rolling (G > 200ω0.075). Dominantly dissipative HA(aq) sticks to itself and distorts irreversibly before separating, while dominantly elastic HA(aq) makes contact and separates with only minor, reversible distortion. We propose the dimensionless number (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), varying from 10(-5) to 10(3) in this work, as a tool to predict the mode of interface formation-separation by relating interfacial kinetics with bulk viscoelasticity. Cellular contact inhibition may be thus aided or compromised by physiological or interventional shifts in [C, MW, V], and thus in (G′V)/(ω(r)γ), which affect both mechanotransduction and interfacial dynamics. These observations

  3. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST MEASUREMENTS OF NAPL-WATER INTERFACIAL AREAS

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations. PMID:23678204

  4. Model colloid system for interfacial sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of nanometer scale molecules, such as proteins at interfaces, is usually determined through measurements of surface coverage. Their small size limits the ability to directly observe individual molecule behavior. To better understand the behavior of nanometer size molecules and the effect on interfacial kinetics, we use micron size colloids with a weak interfacial interaction potential as a model system. Thus, the interaction strength is comparable to many nanoscale systems (less than 10 kBT). The colloid-interface interaction potential is tuned using a combination of depletion, electrostatic, and gravitational forces. The colloids transition between an entropically trapped adsorbed state and a desorbed state through Brownian motion. Observations are made using an LED-based Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) setup. The observed adsorption and desorption rates are compared theoretical predictions based on the measured interaction potential and near wall particle diffusivity. This experimental system also allows for the study of more complex dynamics such as nonspherical colloids and collective effects at higher concentrations.

  5. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  6. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  7. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; ...

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can bemore » greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μB/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.« less

  8. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; Freeland, John W.; Nichols, John; Guo, Er-Jia; Lee, Shinbuhm; Ward, T. Zac; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-11-01

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface's magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. Here, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZ r0.2T i0.8O3/L a0.8S r0.2Mn O3(PZT /LSMO ) ] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0 μB/f .u . , a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. These compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.

  9. Review of interfacial layer's effect on thermal conductivity in nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotia, Ankit; Borkakoti, Sheeba; Deval, Piyush; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar

    2017-01-01

    An ordered liquid layer around the particle-liquid interface is called as interfacial layer. It has been observed that interfacial layer is an essential parameter for determining the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The review attempts to summarize the prominent articles related to interfacial layer effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. First section of the paper discusses about various experimental approaches used to describe the effect of interfacial layer. Second section deals with about the mathematical models and assumed values regarding the thickness of interfacial layer by several authors. A review of previous works featuring mathematical investigations and experimental approaches seem to be suggesting that, interfacial layer have dominating effect on the effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids. Third section of the paper deals with various mathematical models available in open literature for interfacial layer thermal conductivity. In the last section, models for effective thermal conductivity of the nanofluids considering the interfacial layer and percentage deviations in the predictions of mathematical models have been discussed.

  10. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/ZnO (0001) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Quan; Shen, Jiang; Qian, Ping; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2014-12-01

    Systematic approaches are presented to extract the interfacial potentials from the ab initio adhesive energy of the interface system by using the Chen—Möbius inversion method. We focus on the interface structure of the metal (111)/ZnO (0001) in this work. The interfacial potentials of Ag—Zn and Ag—O are obtained. These potentials can be used to solve some problems about Ag/ZnO interfacial structure. Three metastable interfacial structures are investigated in order to check these potentials. Using the interfacial potentials we study the procedure of interface fracture in the Ag/ZnO (0001) interface and discuss the change of the energy, stress, and atomic structures in tensile process. The result indicates that the exact misfit dislocation reduces the total energy and softens the fracture process. Meanwhile, the formation and mobility of the vacancy near the interface are observed.

  11. Interfacial area, velocity and void fraction in two-phase slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.; Riznic, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The internal flow structure of air-water plug/slug flow in a 50.3 mm dia transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a four-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 0.55 to 2.20 m/s and 0.27 to 2.20 m/s, respectively, and area-averaged void fractions ranged from about 10 to 70%. The local distributions of void fractions, interfacial area concentration and interface velocity were measured. Contributions from small spherical bubbles and large elongated slug bubbles toward the total void fraction and interfacial area concentration were differentiated. It was observed that the small bubble void contribution to the overall void fraction was small indicating that the large slug bubble void fraction was a dominant factor in determining the total void fraction. However, the small bubble interfacial area contribution was significant in the lower and upper portions of the pipe cross sections.

  12. Electrical properties of the amorphous interfacial layer between Al electrodes and epitaxial NiO films

    SciTech Connect

    Hyuck Jang, Jae; Kwon, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Miyoung; Ran Lee, Seung; Char, Kookrin

    2012-04-23

    The amorphous interfacial layer (a-IL) between Al electrode and epitaxial NiO films were studied using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Two distinct properties were found in the a-IL, i.e., a lower metallic and an upper insulating layer. EELS results revealed that the metallic Ni atoms were responsible for the conducting nature of the lower oxide amorphous layer. The resistance behavior of Al/a-IL/epi-NiO was changed from a high to a low resistance state after forming process. The resistance change could be explained by the formation of a nanocrystalline metal alloy in the insulating amorphous layer.

  13. Interfacial phase competition induced Kondo-like effect in manganite-insulator composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ling-Fang; Wu, Ling-Zhi; Dong, Shuai

    2016-12-01

    A Kondo-like effect, namely, the upturn of resistivity at low temperatures, is observed in perovskite manganite when nonmagnetic insulators are doped as secondary phase. In this paper, the low-temperature resistivity upturn effect has been argued to originate from interfacial magnetic phase reconstruction. Heisenberg spin lattices have been simulated using the Monte Carlo method to reveal phase competition around secondary phase boundary, namely, manganite-insulator boundary that behaves with a weak antiferromagnetic tendency. Moreover, the resistor network model based on double-exchange conductive mechanism reproduces the low-temperature resistivity upturn effect. Our work provides a reasonable physical mechanism to understand the novel transport behaviors in microstructures of correlated electron systems.

  14. Interfacial effects on dielectric properties of polymer-particle nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddabattuni, Sasidhar Veeranjaneyulu

    Dielectric materials that are capable of efficiently storing large amounts of electrical energy are desirable for many electronic and power devices. Since the electrical energy density in a dielectric material is limited to epsilonVb2/2, where is the dielectric permittivity of the material and Vb is the breakdown strength, increased permittivity and breakdown strength are required for large energy storage density. Interfacial effects can influence the dielectric properties, especially dielectric breakdown resistance in polymer-particle nanocomposites. Several functional organophosphates were used to modify the surface of titania and barium titanate nanofiller particles in order to achieve covalent interface when interacted with polymer and to study the influence the electronic nature of filler surfaces on dielectric properties, in particular the breakdown resistance. Surface modified powders were analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dielectric composite films obtained by incorporating surface modified powders in epoxy thermosetting polymer were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), impedance spectroscopy, and dielectric breakdown strength measurements. At 30 vol-% filler concentration, a calculated energy density of ˜8 J/cm3 was observed for titania based composites and ˜8.3 J/cm3 for barium titanate based composites involving electron scavenging interface with minimal dielectric losses compared to pure polymer. Covalent interface composites yielded energy density of ˜7.5 J/cm3 for barium titanate based composites at 30 vol.-%. The data indicate that improved dispersion, breakdown strengths and energy densities resulted when electron-poor functional groups were located at the particle surfaces even compared to covalent interface.

  15. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  16. Attempt to control the interfacial strength

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Subramanian, R.

    1997-11-01

    Composites consisting of a B2 iron aluminide matrix and 40 vol.% of TiB{sub 2} particles were processed by liquid phase sintering. In order to encourage segregation of B or Ti at the FeAl/TiB{sub 2} interfaces, the iron aluminide matrix was microalloyed with B or Ti, respectively. Additions of Ti degraded the mechanical properties. However, for composites microalloyed with B, room temperature flexure tests show slight increases in the maximum strength (from 1250 to 1380 MPa) and the fracture toughness. Interfacial segregation of B may have contributed to this result. Significantly improved processing of the composites would be required in order to verify the effect of B conclusively. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data.

    PubMed

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm(2) of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal-ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET.

  18. An interfacial stress sensor for biomechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara-Rajan, K.; Bestick, A.; Rowe, G. I.; Klute, G. K.; Ledoux, W. R.; Wang, H. C.; Mamishev, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor that measures interfacial forces in prostheses and is promising for other biomedical applications. These sensors can be integrated into prosthetic devices to measure both normal and shear stress simultaneously, allowing for the study of prosthetic limb fit, and ultimately for the ability to better adapt prosthetics to individual users. A sensing cell with a 1.0 cm2 spatial resolution and a measurement range of 0-220 kPa of shear and 0-2 MPa of pressure was constructed. The cell was load tested and found to be capable of isolating the applied shear and pressure forces. This paper discusses the construction of the prototype, the mechanical and electrode design, fabrication and characterization. The work presented is aimed at creating a class of adaptive prosthetic interfaces using a capacitive sensor.

  19. Liquid-liquid interfacial nanoparticle assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Emrick, Todd S.; Russell, Thomas P.; Dinsmore, Anthony; Skaff, Habib; Lin, Yao

    2008-12-30

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles at the interface between two fluids, and methods to control such self-assembly process, e.g., the surface density of particles assembling at the interface; to utilize the assembled nanoparticles and their ligands in fabrication of capsules, where the elastic properties of the capsules can be varied from soft to tough; to develop capsules with well-defined porosities for ultimate use as delivery systems; and to develop chemistries whereby multiple ligands or ligands with multiple functionalities can be attached to the nanoparticles to promote the interfacial segregation and assembly of the nanoparticles. Certain embodiments use cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, since the photoluminescence of the particles provides a convenient means by which the spatial location and organization of the particles can be probed. However, the systems and methodologies presented here are general and can, with suitable modification of the chemistries, be adapted to any type of nanoparticle.

  20. Interfacial Widths of Conjugated Polymer Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    NCSU; UC Berkeley; UCSB; Advanced Light Source; Garcia, Andres; Yan, Hongping; Sohn, Karen E.; Hexemer, Alexander; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kramer, Edward J.; Ade, Harald

    2009-08-13

    The interfaces of conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE)/poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) bilayers cast from differential solvents are shown by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) to be very smooth and sharp. The chemical interdiffusion due to casting is limited to less than 0.6 nm, and the interface created is thus nearly 'molecularly' sharp. These results demonstrate for the first time and with high precision that the nonpolar MEH-PPV layer is not much disturbed by casting the CPE layer from a polar solvent. A baseline is established for understanding the role of interfacial structure in determining the performance of CPE-based polymer light-emitting diodes. More broadly, we anticipate further applications of RSoXR as an important tool in achieving a deeper understanding of other multilayer organic optoelectronic devices, including multilayer photovoltaic devices.

  1. Interfacial Modifiers for Enhanced Stability and Reduced Degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ina T.; Oyster, Tricia M.; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily B.; French, Roger H.; Peshek, Timothy J.

    2016-11-21

    Transparent conductive oxide (TCO) degradation is a known failure mode in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices through mechanisms such as resistivity increase and delamination. Here we apply thin interfacial modifiers to aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) to mitigate damp heat induced degradation of electrical performance. Additionally, we demonstrate that these modifiers can be applied to the AZO front contact of a Cu(In, Ga)Se2 device without significantly degrading the device performance, a promising step towards improving the lifetime performance.

  2. Dynamics of deeply supercooled interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Jan; Cerveny, Silvina

    2015-01-28

    In this review we discuss the relaxation dynamics of glassy and deeply supercooled water in different types of systems. We compare the dynamics of such interfacial water in ordinary aqueous solutions, hard confinements and biological soft materials. In all these types of systems the dielectric relaxation time of the main water process exhibits a dynamic crossover from a high-temperature non-Arrhenius temperature dependence to a low-temperature Arrhenius behavior. Moreover, at large enough water content the low-temperature process is universal and exhibits the same temperature behavior in all types of systems. However, the physical nature of the dynamic crossover is somewhat different for the different types of systems. In ordinary aqueous solutions it is not even a proper dynamic crossover, since the water relaxation decouples from the cooperative α-relaxation of the solution slightly above the glass transition in the same way as all secondary (β) relaxations of glass-forming materials. In hard confinements, the physical origin of the dynamic crossover is not fully clear, but it seems to occur when the cooperative main relaxation of water at high temperatures reaches a temperature where the volume required for its cooperative motion exceeds the size of the geometrically-confined water cluster. Due to this confinement effect the α-like main relaxation of the confined water seems to transform to a more local β-relaxation with decreasing temperature. Since this low-temperature β-relaxation is universal for all systems at high water content it is possible that it can be considered as an intrinsic β-relaxation of supercooled water, including supercooled bulk water. This possibility, together with other findings for deeply supercooled interfacial water, suggests that the most accepted relaxation scenarios for supercooled bulk water have to be altered.

  3. Enhancing interfacial magnetization with a ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Tricia L.; Herklotz, Andreas; Lauter, Valeria; Freeland, John W.; Nichols, John; Guo, Er-Jia; Lee, Shinbuhm; Ward, T. Zac; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-11-21

    Ferroelectric control of interfacial magnetism has attracted much attention. However, the coupling of these two functionalities has not been understood well at the atomic scale. The lack of scientific progress is mainly due to the limited characterization methods by which the interface’s magnetic properties can be probed at an atomic level. In this paper, we use polarized neutron reflectometry to probe the evolution of the magnetic moment at interfaces in ferroelectric/strongly correlated oxide [PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/La0.8Sr0.2MnO3(PZT/LSMO)] heterostructures. We find that the magnetization at the surfaces and interfaces of our LSMO films without PZT are always deteriorated and such magnetic deterioration can be greatly improved by interfacing with a strongly polar PZT film. Magnetoelectric coupling of magnetism and ferroelectric polarization was observed within a couple of nanometers of the interface via an increase in the LSMO surface magnetization to 4.0μB/f.u., a value nearly 70% higher than the surface magnetization of our LSMO film without interfacing with a ferroelectric layer. We attribute this behavior to hole depletion driven by the ferroelectric polarization. Finally, these compelling results not only probe the presence of nanoscale magnetic suppression and its control by ferroelectrics, but also emphasize the importance of utilizing probing techniques that can distinguish between bulk and interfacial phenomena.

  4. Thermal Resistance of Transferred-Silicon-Nanomembrane Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, D P; Aksamija, Z; Rath, A; Voyles, P M; Lagally, M G; Eriksson, M A

    2015-12-18

    We report measurements of the interfacial thermal resistance between mechanically joined single crystals of silicon, the results of which are up to a factor of 5 times lower than any previously reported thermal resistances of mechanically created interfaces. Detailed characterization of the interfaces is presented, as well as a theoretical model incorporating the critical properties determining the interfacial thermal resistance in the experiments. The results demonstrate that van der Waals interfaces can have very low thermal resistance, with important implications for membrane-based micro- and nanoelectronics.

  5. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  6. Tunable interfacial properties of epitaxial graphene on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Min; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Chendong; Hu, Hao; Yang, Rong; Lu, Hongliang; Cai, Jinming; Du, Shixuan; Liu, Feng; Gao, H.-J.

    2010-02-01

    We report on tuning interfacial properties of epitaxially-grown graphenes with different kinds of metal substrates based on scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations. Three kinds of metal substrates, Ni(111), Pt(111), and Ru(0001), show different interactions with the epitaxially grown graphene at the interfaces. The different interfacial interaction making graphene n-type and p-type doped, leads to the polarity change of the thermoelectric property of the graphene/metal systems. These findings may give further insights to the interfacial interactions in the graphene/metal systems and promote the use of graphene-based heterostructures in devices.

  7. Interfacial micromechanics in fibrous composites: design, evaluation, and models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhenkun; Li, Xuan; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances of interfacial micromechanics in fiber reinforced composites using micro-Raman spectroscopy are given. The faced mechanical problems for interface design in fibrous composites are elaborated from three optimization ways: material, interface, and computation. Some reasons are depicted that the interfacial evaluation methods are difficult to guarantee the integrity, repeatability, and consistency. Micro-Raman study on the fiber interface failure behavior and the main interface mechanical problems in fibrous composites are summarized, including interfacial stress transfer, strength criterion of interface debonding and failure, fiber bridging, frictional slip, slip transition, and friction reloading. The theoretical models of above interface mechanical problems are given.

  8. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  9. Microcapsule Buckling Triggered by Compression-Induced Interfacial Phase Change.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew Roy; Parker, Richard M; Groombridge, Alexander S; Maestro, Armando; Coulston, Roger J; Hegemann, Jonas; Kierfeld, Jan; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2016-10-04

    There is an emerging trend towards the fabrication of microcapsules at liquid interfaces. In order to control the parameters of such capsules, the interfacial processes governing their formation must be understood. Here, poly(vinyl alcohol) films are assembled at the interface of water-in-oil microfluidic droplets. The polymer is cross-linked using cucurbit[8]uril ternary supramolecular complexes. It is shown that compression-induced phase change causes the onset of buckling in the interfacial film. On evaporative compression, the interfacial film both increases in density and thickens, until it reaches a critical density and a phase change occurs. We show that this increase in density can be simply related to the film Poisson ratio and area compression. This description captures fundamentals of many compressive interfacial phase changes and can also explain the observation of a fixed thickness-to-radius ratio at buckling, (T/R)buck.

  10. Engineering Interfacial Silicon Dioxide for Improved Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Silicon Photoanode Water Splitting Performance.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Peter F; Scheuermann, Andrew G; Hurley, Paul K; Chidsey, Christopher E D; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-05-25

    Silicon photoanodes protected by atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 show promise as components of water splitting devices that may enable the large-scale production of solar fuels and chemicals. Minimizing the resistance of the oxide corrosion protection layer is essential for fabricating efficient devices with good fill factor. Recent literature reports have shown that the interfacial SiO2 layer, interposed between the protective ALD-TiO2 and the Si anode, acts as a tunnel oxide that limits hole conduction from the photoabsorbing substrate to the surface oxygen evolution catalyst. Herein, we report a significant reduction of bilayer resistance, achieved by forming stable, ultrathin (<1.3 nm) SiO2 layers, allowing fabrication of water splitting photoanodes with hole conductances near the maximum achievable with the given catalyst and Si substrate. Three methods for controlling the SiO2 interlayer thickness on the Si(100) surface for ALD-TiO2 protected anodes were employed: (1) TiO2 deposition directly on an HF-etched Si(100) surface, (2) TiO2 deposition after SiO2 atomic layer deposition on an HF-etched Si(100) surface, and (3) oxygen scavenging, post-TiO2 deposition to decompose the SiO2 layer using a Ti overlayer. Each of these methods provides a progressively superior means of reliably thinning the interfacial SiO2 layer, enabling the fabrication of efficient and stable water oxidation silicon anodes.

  11. Velocity-strengthening friction significantly affects interfacial dynamics, strength and dissipation.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim A; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-01-19

    Frictional interfaces abound in natural and man-made systems, yet their dynamics are not well-understood. Recent extensive experimental data have revealed that velocity-strengthening friction, where the steady-state frictional resistance increases with sliding velocity over some range, is a generic feature of such interfaces. This physical behavior has very recently been linked to slow stick-slip motion. Here we elucidate the importance of velocity-strengthening friction by theoretically studying three variants of a realistic friction model, all featuring identical logarithmic velocity-weakening friction at small sliding velocities, but differ in their higher velocity behaviors. By quantifying energy partition (e.g. radiation and dissipation), the selection of interfacial rupture fronts and rupture arrest, we show that the presence or absence of strengthening significantly affects the global interfacial resistance and the energy release during frictional instabilities. Furthermore, we show that different forms of strengthening may result in events of similar magnitude, yet with dramatically different dissipation and radiation rates. This happens because the events are mediated by rupture fronts with vastly different propagation velocities, where stronger velocity-strengthening friction promotes slower rupture. These theoretical results may have significant implications on our understanding of frictional dynamics.

  12. Interfacial phenomena in hard-rod fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shundyak, K. Y.

    2004-05-01

    This thesis addresses questions of interfacial ordering in hard-rod fluids at coexistence of the isotropic and nematic phases and in their contact with simple model substrates. It is organized as follows. Chapter II provides some background information about the relation between the statistical mechanical and thermodynamical level of descriptions of bulk hard-rod fluids, as well as introduces the asymptotically exact Onsager model, and some basic facts of interfacial thermodynamics. Chapter III represents studies of the simplest free IN interface in a fluid of monodisperse Onsager hard rods. For the analysis of this system we develop an efficient perturbative method to determine the (biaxial) one-particle distribution function in inhomogeneous systems. Studies of the free planar isotropic-nematic interfaces are continued in Chapter IV, where they are considered in binary mixtures of hard rods. For sufficiently different particle shapes the bulk phase diagrams of these mixtures exhibit a triple point, where an isotropic (I) phase coexists with two nematic phases (N1 and N2) of different composition. For all explored mixtures we find that upon approach of the triple point the IN2 interface shows complete wetting by an intervening N1 film. We compute the surface tension of isotropic-nematic interfaces, and find a remarkable increase with fractionation. These studies are complemented by an analysis of bulk phase behavior and interfacial properties of nonadditive binary mixtures of thin and thick hard rods in Chapter V. The formulation of this model was motivated by recent experiments in the group of Fraden, who explored the phase behavior of a mixture of viruses with different effective diameters. In our model, species of the same types are considered as interacting with the hard-core repulsive potential, whereas the excluded volume for dissimilar rods is taken to be larger (smaller) then for the pure hard rods. Such a nonadditivity enhances (reduces) fractionation at

  13. Interfacial functionalization and engineering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang

    The intense research interest in nanoscience and nanotechnology is largely fueled by the unique properties of nanoscale materials. In this dissertation, the research efforts are focused on surface functionalization and interfacial engineering of functional nanoparticles in the preparation of patchy nanoparticles (e.g., Janus nanoparticles and Neapolitan nanoparticles) such that the nanoparticle structures and properties may be manipulated to an unprecedented level of sophistication. Experimentally, Janus nanoparticles were prepared by an interfacial engineering method where one hemisphere of the originally hydrophobic nanoparticles was replaced with hydrophilic ligands at the air|liquid or solid|liquid interface. The amphiphilic surface characters of the Janus nanoparticles were verified by contact angle measurements, as compared to those of the bulk-exchange counterparts where the two types of ligands were distributed rather homogeneously on the nanoparticle surface. In a further study, a mercapto derivative of diacetylene was used as the hydrophilic ligands to prepare Janus nanoparticles by using hydrophobic hexanethiolate-protected gold nanoparticles as the starting materials. Exposure to UV irradiation led to effective covalent cross-linking between the diacetylene moieties of neighboring ligands and hence marked enhancement of the structural integrity of the Janus nanoparticles, which was attributable to the impeded surface diffusion of the thiol ligands on the nanoparticle surface, as manifested in fluorescence measurements of aged nanoparticles. More complicated bimetallic AgAu Janus nanoparticles were prepared by interfacial galvanic exchange reactions of a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer of 1-hexanethiolate-passivated silver nanoparticles on a glass slide with gold(I)-mercaptopropanediol complex in a water/ethanol solution. The resulting nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution not only of the organic capping ligands on the nanoparticle surface but

  14. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  15. Interfacial properties of stanene-metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Pan, Feng; Ye, Meng; Wang, Yangyang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiuying; Li, Jingzhen; Zhang, Han; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Recently, two-dimensional buckled honeycomb stanene has been manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy growth. Free-standing stanene is predicted to have a sizable opened band gap of 100 meV at the Dirac point due to spin-orbit coupling (SOC), resulting in many fascinating properties such as quantum spin Hall effect, quantum anomalous Hall effect, and quantum valley Hall effect. In the first time, we systematically study the interfacial properties of stanene-metal interfaces (metals = Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pd, Pt, Ir, and Ni) by using ab initio electronic structure calculations considering the SOC effects. The honeycomb structure of stanene is preserved on the metal supports, but the buckling height is changed. The buckling of stanene on the Au, Al, Ag, and Cu metal supports is higher than that of free-standing stanene. By contrast, a planar graphene-like structure is stabilized for stanene on the Ir, Pd, Pt, and Ni metal supports. The band structure of stanene is destroyed on all the metal supports, accompanied by a metallization of stanene because the covalent bonds between stanene and the metal supports are formed and the structure of stanene is distorted. Besides, no tunneling barrier exists between stanene and the metal supports. Therefore, stanene and the eight metals form a good vertical Ohmic contact.

  16. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M R V L; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya M; Vandersypen, Lieven M K; Caviglia, Andrea D

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  17. Microfluidic Dynamic Interfacial Tensiometry (μDIT).

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Quentin; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-05-07

    We designed, developed and characterized a microfluidic method for the measurement of surfactant adsorption kinetics via interfacial tensiometry on a microfluidic chip. The principle of the measurement is based on the deformability of droplets as a response to hydrodynamic forcing through a series of microfluidic expansions. We focus our analysis on one perfluoro surfactant molecule of practical interest for droplet-based microfluidic applications. We show that although the adsorption kinetics is much faster than the kinetics of the corresponding pendant drop experiment, our droplet-based microfluidic system has a sufficient time resolution to obtain quantitative measurement at the sub-second time-scale on nanoliter droplet volumes, leading to both a gain by a factor of ∼10 in time resolution and a downscaling of the measurement volumes by a factor of ∼1000 compared to standard techniques. Our approach provides new insight into the adsorption of surfactant molecules at liquid-liquid interfaces in a confined environment, relevant to emulsification, encapsulation and foaming, and the ability to measure adsorption and desorption rate constants.

  18. Protein packing defects "heat up" interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Sierra, María Belén; Accordino, Sebastián R; Rodriguez-Fris, J Ariel; Morini, Marcela A; Appignanesi, Gustavo A; Fernández Stigliano, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Ligands must displace water molecules from their corresponding protein surface binding site during association. Thus, protein binding sites are expected to be surrounded by non-tightly-bound, easily removable water molecules. In turn, the existence of packing defects at protein binding sites has been also established. At such structural motifs, named dehydrons, the protein backbone is exposed to the solvent since the intramolecular interactions are incompletely wrapped by non-polar groups. Hence, dehydrons are sticky since they depend on additional intermolecular wrapping in order to properly protect the structure from water attack. Thus, a picture of protein binding is emerging wherein binding sites should be both dehydrons rich and surrounded by easily removable water. In this work we shall indeed confirm such a link between structure and dynamics by showing the existence of a firm correlation between the degree of underwrapping of the protein chain and the mobility of the corresponding hydration water molecules. In other words, we shall show that protein packing defects promote their local dehydration, thus producing a region of "hot" interfacial water which might be easily removed by a ligand upon association.

  19. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  20. Interfacial Engineering for Low-Density Graphene Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0192 Interfacial engineering for low- density graphene nanocomposites Micah Green TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY SYSTEM Final Report 07/23...98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 14-07-2014 Final April 2011 - March 2014 Interfacial engineering for low- density graphene nanocomposites and... alcohol films and electrospun fibers. The addition of pristine graphene showed substantial increases in strength and modulus at low graphene loading

  1. Surfactant adsorption and interfacial tension investigations on cyclopentane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Olcott, Kyle; Pfeiffer, Kristopher; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-02-26

    Gas hydrates represent an unconventional methane resource and a production/safety risk to traditional oil and gas flowlines. In both systems, hydrate may share interfaces with both aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. To accurately model macroscopic properties, such as relative permeability in unconventional systems or dispersion viscosity in traditional systems, knowledge of hydrate interfacial properties is required. This work presents hydrate cohesive force results measured on a micromechanical force apparatus, and complementary water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension data. By combining a revised cohesive force model with experimental data, two interfacial properties of cyclopentane hydrate were estimated: hydrate-water and hydrate-cyclopentane interfacial tension values at 0.32 ± 0.05 mN/m and 47 ± 5 mN/m, respectively. These fundamental physiochemical properties have not been estimated or measured for cyclopentane hydrate to date. The addition of surfactants in the cyclopentane phase significantly reduced the cyclopentane hydrate cohesive force; we hypothesize this behavior to be the result of surfactant adsorption on the hydrate-oil interface. Surface excess quantities were estimated for hydrate-oil and water-oil interfaces using four carboxylic and sulfonic acids. The results suggest the density of adsorbed surfactant may be 2× larger for the hydrate-oil interface than the water-oil interface. Additionally, hydrate-oil interfacial tension was observed to begin decreasing from the baseline value at significantly lower surfactant concentrations (1-3 orders of magnitude) than those for the water-oil interfacial tension.

  2. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  3. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume I. Chapters 1-5)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  4. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  5. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume IV. Chapters 15-19)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  6. Tuning the Interfacial Thermal Conductance between Polystyrene and Sapphire by Controlling the Interfacial Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kun; Sun, Fangyuan; Tian, Xia; Zhu, Jie; Ma, Yongmei; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Fosong

    2015-10-28

    In polymer-based electric microdevices, thermal transport across polymer/ceramic interface is essential for heat dissipation, which limits the improvement of the device performance and lifetime. In this work, four sets of polystyrene (PS) thin films/sapphire samples were prepared with different interface adhesion values, which was achieved by changing the rotation speeds in the spin-coating process. The interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) between the PS films and the sapphire were measured by time domain thermoreflectance method, and the interfacial adhesion between the PS films and the sapphire, as measured by a scratch tester, was found to increase with the rotation speed from 2000 to 8000 rpm. The ITC shows a similar dependence on the rotation speed, increasing up to a 3-fold from 7.0 ± 1.4 to 21.0 ± 4.2 MW/(m(2) K). This study demonstrates the role of spin-coating rotation speed in thermal transport across the polymer/ceramic interfaces, evoking a much simpler mechanical method for tuning this type of ITC. The findings of enhancement of the ITC of polymer/ceramic interface can shed some light on the thermal management and reliability of macro- and microelectronics, where polymeric and hybrid organic-inorganic nano films are employed.

  7. Interfacial Dislocation Networks and Creep in Directional Coarsened Ru-Containing Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, L. J.; Feng, Q.; Pollock, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of creep deformation in nickel-base superalloy single crystals in the directional coarsening regime have been studied in alloys with large variations in γ- γ' lattice misfit and phase composition, achieved by Ru additions and variable levels of Cr and Co. Interfacial dislocation spacings established by long-term annealing experiments under no externally applied stress indicate that the experimental alloys have high-temperature lattice misfits ranging from near-zero to as large as -0.65 pct. Variation in misfit influences the stress-induced directional coarsening (rafting) behavior during creep deformation at 950 °C and 290 MPa. In postcreep deformed material, the density of excess dislocations (defined as the dislocations beyond those necessary to relieve the lattice misfit) at the γ- γ' interfaces varied with alloy composition, with the most creep-resistant alloy containing the highest excess interfacial dislocation density. In the directional coarsening creep regime, continued deformation requires shearing of the γ' rafts and is strongly influenced by the resistance of the precipitates to shearing as well as the interfacial dislocation structure. A preliminary model for creep in the rafting regime is developed.

  8. Interfacial & colloidal aspects of lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Wilde, P J; Chu, B S

    2011-06-09

    chain fatty acids, particularly the very long chain n-3 fatty acids from fish oils are dependent on source and so may depend on food microstructure for optimal uptake [3]. The uptake of some poorly water soluble nutrients are enhanced by the presence of lipids, but the mechanisms are not clear. In addition, controlling the digestion of lipids can be beneficial as slower release of lipids into the bloodstream can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, and can promote gut feedback processes that reduce appetite. This presents an opportunity to colloid and interfacial science, as there are many unanswered questions regarding the specific physicochemical mechanisms underlying the process of lipid digestion and uptake. I will review our current knowledge of lipid digestion and present examples of how fundamental research in colloidal and interface science is beginning to address these issues. These include the adsorption behaviour of physiological surfactants such as bile salts; interfacial processes by which different polar lipids can influence lipolysis; and the effect of emulsion based delivery systems on cellular uptake of lipid soluble nutrients. A fundamental understanding of these processes is required if we are to develop intelligent design strategies for foods that will deliver optimal nutrition and improved health benefits in order to address the global challenges facing the food sector in the future.

  9. Mathematical problems arising in interfacial electrohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri

    established estimates are compared with numerical solutions of the equations which in turn suggest an optimal upper bound for the radius of the absorbing ball. A scaling argument is used to explain this, and a general conjecture is made based on extensive computations. We also carry out a complete study of the nonlinear behavior of competing physical mechanisms: long wave instability above a critical Reynolds number, short wave damping due to surface tension and intermediate growth due to the electric field. Through a combination of analysis and extensive numerical experiments, we elucidate parameter regimes that support non-uniform travelling waves, time-periodic travelling waves and complex nonlinear dynamics including chaotic interfacial oscillations. It is established that a sufficiently high electric field will drive the system to chaotic oscillations, even when the Reynolds number is smaller than the critical value below which the non-electrified problem is linearly stable. A particular case of this is Stokes flow, which is known to be stable for this class of problems (an analogous statement holds for horizontally supported films also). Our theoretical results indicate that such highly stable flows can be rendered unstable by using electric fields. This opens the way for possible heat and mass transfer applications which can benefit significantly from interfacial oscillations and interfacial turbulence. For the case of a horizontal plane, a weakly nonlinear theory is not possible due to the absence of the shear flow generated by the gravitational force along the plate when the latter is inclined. We study the fully nonlinear equation, which in this case is asymptotically correct and is obtained at the leading order. The model equation describes both overlying and hanging films - in the former case gravity is stabilizing while in the latter it is destabilizing. The numerical and theoretical analysis of the fully nonlinear evolution is complicated by the fact that the

  10. Formation of periodic interfacial misfit dislocation array at the InSb/GaAs interface via surface anion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bo Wen; Tan, Kian Hua; Loke, Wan Khai; Wicaksono, Satrio; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between growth temperature and the formation of periodic interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocations via the anion exchange process in InSb/GaAs heteroepitaxy was systematically investigated. The microstructural and electrical properties of the epitaxial layer were characterized using atomic force microscope, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Hall resistance measurement. The formation of interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocation arrays depended on growth temperature. A uniformly distributed IMF array was found in a sample grown at 310 °C, which also exhibited the lowest threading dislocation density. The analysis suggested that an incomplete As-for-Sb anion exchange process impeded the formation of IMF on sample grown above 310 °C. At growth temperature below 310 °C, island coalescence led to the formation of 60° dislocations and the disruption of periodic IMF array. All samples showed higher electron mobility at 300 K than at 77 K.

  11. Improvement in the breakdown endurance of high-κ dielectric by utilizing stacking technology and adding sufficient interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chin-Sheng; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2014-01-01

    Improvement in the time-zero dielectric breakdown (TZDB) endurance of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor with stacking structure of Al/HfO2/SiO2/Si is demonstrated in this work. The misalignment of the conduction paths between two stacking layers is believed to be effective to increase the breakdown field of the devices. Meanwhile, the resistance of the dielectric after breakdown for device with stacking structure would be less than that of without stacking structure due to a higher breakdown field and larger breakdown power. In addition, the role of interfacial layer (IL) in the control of the interface trap density (D it) and device reliability is also analyzed. Device with a thicker IL introduces a higher breakdown field and also a lower D it. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of the samples with different IL thicknesses is provided to confirm that IL is needed for good interfacial property.

  12. Effects of interfacial roughness on the planar Hall effect in NiFe/Cu/IrMn multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Chen, Xi; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yi-Wei; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports that the planar Hall effect in NiFe/Cu/IrMn multilayers was strongly influenced by the Cu spacer thickness ( t Cu), which was due to the variation of interfacial roughness. With t Cu increasing, a peculiar change of planar Hall voltage was observed. The reason for the voltage behaviors was that the interfacial roughness influenced the spin-asymmetry of spin-polarized electrons in ferromagnetic metals. The diffuse scattering to the electrons turned to specular scattering when the interface became flat, leading to the variation of resistivity change (Δ ρ). As the increase in t Cu, the extremum field was reduced because of the weaken exchange coupling between NiFe and IrMn layers.

  13. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  14. Fluorinated copper phthalocyanine nanowires for enhancing interfacial electron transport in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seok Min; Lou, Sylvia J; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Chen, Lin X; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Marks, Tobin

    2012-12-12

    Zinc oxide is a promising candidate as an interfacial layer (IFL) in inverted organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells due to the n-type semiconducting properties as well as chemical and environmental stability. Such ZnO layers collect electrons at the transparent electrode, typically indium tin oxide (ITO). However, the significant resistivity of ZnO IFLs and an energetic mismatch between the ZnO and the ITO layers hinder optimum charge collection. Here we report that inserting nanoscopic copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F(16)CuPc) layers, as thin films or nanowires, between the ITO anode and the ZnO IFL increases OPV performance by enhancing interfacial electron transport. In inverted P3HT:PC(61)BM cells, insertion of F(16)CuPc nanowires increases the short circuit current density (J(sc)) versus cells with only ZnO layers, yielding an enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ∼3.6% vs ∼3.0% for a control without the nanowire layer. Similar effects are observed for inverted PTB7:PC(71)BM cells where the PCE is increased from 8.1% to 8.6%. X-ray scattering, optical, and electrical measurements indicate that the performance enhancement is ascribable to both favorable alignment of the nanowire π-π stacking axes parallel to the photocurrent flow and to the increased interfacial layer-active layer contact area. These findings identify a promising strategy to enhance inverted OPV performance by inserting anisotropic nanostructures with π-π stacking aligned in the photocurrent flow direction.

  15. Simultaneous interfacial rheology and microstructure measurement of densely aggregated particle laden interfaces using a modified double wall ring interfacial rheometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2014-08-19

    The study of particle laden interfaces has increased significantly due to the increasing industrial use of particle stabilized foams and Pickering emulsions, whose bulk rheology and stability are highly dependent on particle laden interface's interfacial rheology, which is a function of interfacial microstructure. To understand the physical mechanisms that dictate interfacial rheology of particle laden interfaces requires correlating rheology to microstructure. To achieve this goal, a double wall ring interfacial rheometer has been modified to allow real time, simultaneous interfacial visualization and shear rheology measurements. The development of this tool is outlined, and its ability to provide novel and unique measurements is demonstrated on a sample system. This tool has been used to examine the role of microstructure on the steady shear rheology of densely packed, aggregated particle laden interfaces at three surface concentrations. Through examination of the rheology and analysis of interfacial microstructure response to shear, a transition from shear thinning due to aggregated cluster breakup to yielding at a slip plane within the interface has been identified. Interestingly, it is found that aggregated interfaces transition to yielding well before they reached a jammed state. Furthermore, these systems undergo significant shear induced order when densely packed. These results indicate that the mechanics of these interfaces are not simply jammed or unjammed and that the interfacial rheology relationship with microstructure can give us significant insight into understanding how to engineer particle laden interfaces in the future. By examining both rheology and microstructure, the mechanisms that dictate observed rheology are now understood and can be used to predict and control the rheology of the interface.

  16. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  17. Some Aspects of Interfacial Phenomena in Steelmaking and Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. J.; Viswanathan, N. N.; Muhmood, L.; Kapilashrami, E.; Seetharaman, S.

    2016-08-01

    Unique experiments were designed to study the surface phenomena in steelmaking reactions. The concept of surface sulfide capacities and an understanding of the surface accumulation of surface-active species, based on experimental results, are presented. In order to understand the flow phenomenon at slag/metal interface, experiments were designed to measure the interfacial velocity of S on the surface of an iron drop immersed in an aluminosilicate slag using the X-ray sessile drop method. The oscillation of the iron drop in the slag due to the change in the surface concentration of sulfur at the slag-metal interface was monitored by X-ray imaging. From the observations, the interfacial velocity of sulfur was evaluated. Similar experiments were performed to measure the interfacial velocity of oxygen at the interface as well as the impact of oxygen potential on the interfacial velocity of sulfur. The interfacial shear viscosity and the dilatational modulus were also evaluated. In a study of the wetting of alumina base by iron drop at constant oxygen pressure under isothermal condition, the contact angle was found to be decreased with the progress of the reaction leading to the formation of hercynite as an intermediate layer creating non-wetting conditions. In the case of silica substrate, an intermediate liquid fayalite layer was formed.

  18. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of designed β-strand peptides.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Annette F

    2010-12-07

    The structural and surfactant properties of a series of amphipathic β-strand peptides have been studied as a function of pH. Each nine-residue peptide has a framework of hydrophobic proline and phenylalanine amino acid residues, alternating with acidic or basic amino acids to give a sequence closely related to known β-sheet formers. Surface activity, interfacial mechanical properties, electronic circular dichroism (ECD), droplet sizing and zeta potential measurements were used to gain an overview of the peptide behavior as the molecular charge varied from ±4 to 0 with pH. ECD data suggest that the peptides form polyproline-type helices in bulk aqueous solution when highly charged, but may fold to β-hairpins rather than β-sheets when uncharged. In the uncharged state, the peptides adsorb readily at a macroscopic fluid interface to form mechanically strong interfacial films, but tend to give large droplet sizes on emulsification, apparently due to flocculation at a low droplet zeta potential. In contrast, highly charged peptide states gave a low interfacial coverage, but retained good emulsifying activity as judged by droplet size. Best emulsification was generally seen for intermediate charged states of the peptides, possibly representing a compromise between droplet zeta potential and interfacial binding affinity. The emulsifying properties of β-strand peptides have not been previously reported. Understanding the interfacial properties of such peptides is important to their potential development as biosurfactants.

  19. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  20. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  1. Capacitors with low equivalent series resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Patrick Franz (Inventor); Lakeman, Charles D. E. (Inventor); Fuge, Mark (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) in a coin or button cell configuration having low equivalent series resistance (ESR). The capacitor comprises mesh or other porous metal that is attached via conducting adhesive to one or both the current collectors. The mesh is embedded into the surface of the adjacent electrode, thereby reducing the interfacial resistance between the electrode and the current collector, thus reducing the ESR of the capacitor.

  2. Silicon-wall interfacial free energy via thermodynamics integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wan; Pan, Heng

    2016-11-01

    We compute the interfacial free energy of a silicon system in contact with flat and structured walls by molecular dynamics simulation. The thermodynamics integration method, previously applied to Lennard-Jones potentials [R. Benjamin and J. Horbach, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044707 (2012)], has been extended and implemented in Tersoff potentials with two-body and three-body interactions taken into consideration. The thermodynamic integration scheme includes two steps. In the first step, the bulk Tersoff system is reversibly transformed to a state where it interacts with a structureless flat wall, and in a second step, the flat structureless wall is reversibly transformed into an atomistic SiO2 wall. Interfacial energies for liquid silicon-wall interfaces and crystal silicon-wall interfaces have been calculated. The calculated interfacial energies have been employed to predict the nucleation mechanisms in a slab of liquid silicon confined by two walls and compared with MD simulation results.

  3. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H. J.

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity $L$ (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius ($r$) and volume fraction ($\\phi$) of the colloids ($L \\propto r/\\phi$). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by $L$ alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  4. Fiber-matrix interfacial adhesion in natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, L. Q. N.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fuentes, C.; van Vuure, A. W.; Verpoest, I.

    2015-04-01

    The interface between natural fibers and thermoplastic matrices is studied, in which fiber-matrix wetting analysis and interfacial adhesion are investigated to obtain a systematic understanding of the interface. In wetting analysis, the surface energies of the fibers and the matrices are estimated using their contact angles in test liquids. Work of adhesion is calculated for each composite system. For the interface tests, transverse three point bending tests (3PBT) on unidirectional (UD) composites are performed to measure interfacial strength. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization on the fibers is also carried out to obtain more information about the surface chemistry of the fibers. UD composites are examined to explore the correlation between the fiber-matrix interface and the final properties of the composites. The results suggest that the higher interfacial adhesion of the treated fiber composites compared to untreated fiber composites can be attributed to higher fiber-matrix physico-chemical interaction corresponding with the work of adhesion.

  5. Interfacial waves generated by electrowetting-driven contact line motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Park, Jaebum; Kim, Yunhee; Shin, Bongsu; Bae, Jungmok; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-10-01

    The contact angle of a liquid-fluid interface can be effectively modulated by the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology. Rapid movement of the contact line can be achieved by swift changes of voltage at the electrodes, which can give rise to interfacial waves under the strong influence of surface tension. Here we experimentally demonstrate EWOD-driven interfacial waves of overlapping liquids and compare their wavelength and decay length with the theoretical results obtained by a perturbation analysis. Our theory also allows us to predict the temporal evolution of the interfacial profiles in either rectangular or cylindrical containers, as driven by slipping contact lines. This work builds a theoretical framework to understand and predict the dynamics of capillary waves of a liquid-liquid interface driven by EWOD, which has practical implications on optofluidic devices used to guide light.

  6. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  8. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  9. Nanometre-scale evidence for interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation control of silicate glass corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Roland; Cotte, Stéphane; Cadel, Emmanuel; Malladi, Sairam; Karlsson, Lisa S.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Cabié, Martiane; Seyeux, Antoine

    2015-03-01

    Silicate glasses are durable solids, and yet they are chemically unstable in contact with aqueous fluids—this has important implications for numerous industrial applications related to the corrosion resistance of glasses, or the biogeochemical weathering of volcanic glasses in seawater. The aqueous dissolution of synthetic and natural glasses results in the formation of a hydrated, cation-depleted near-surface alteration zone and, depending on alteration conditions, secondary crystalline phases on the surface. The long-standing accepted model of glass corrosion is based on diffusion-coupled hydration and selective cation release, producing a surface-altered zone. However, using a combination of advanced atomic-resolution analytical techniques, our data for the first time reveal that the structural and chemical interface between the pristine glass and altered zone is always extremely sharp, with gradients in the nanometre to sub-nanometre range. These findings support a new corrosion mechanism, interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation. Moreover, they also highlight the importance of using analytical methods with very high spatial and mass resolution for deciphering the nanometre-scale processes controlling corrosion. Our findings provide evidence that interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation may be a universal reaction mechanism that controls both silicate glass corrosion and mineral weathering.

  10. Nanometre-scale evidence for interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation control of silicate glass corrosion.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Roland; Cotte, Stéphane; Cadel, Emmanuel; Malladi, Sairam; Karlsson, Lisa S; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Cabié, Martiane; Seyeux, Antoine

    2015-03-01

    Silicate glasses are durable solids, and yet they are chemically unstable in contact with aqueous fluids-this has important implications for numerous industrial applications related to the corrosion resistance of glasses, or the biogeochemical weathering of volcanic glasses in seawater. The aqueous dissolution of synthetic and natural glasses results in the formation of a hydrated, cation-depleted near-surface alteration zone and, depending on alteration conditions, secondary crystalline phases on the surface. The long-standing accepted model of glass corrosion is based on diffusion-coupled hydration and selective cation release, producing a surface-altered zone. However, using a combination of advanced atomic-resolution analytical techniques, our data for the first time reveal that the structural and chemical interface between the pristine glass and altered zone is always extremely sharp, with gradients in the nanometre to sub-nanometre range. These findings support a new corrosion mechanism, interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation. Moreover, they also highlight the importance of using analytical methods with very high spatial and mass resolution for deciphering the nanometre-scale processes controlling corrosion. Our findings provide evidence that interfacial dissolution-reprecipitation may be a universal reaction mechanism that controls both silicate glass corrosion and mineral weathering.

  11. Interfacial properties of hydrophilized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) layers with various thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Gyulai, G; Pénzes, Cs B; Mohai, M; Lohner, T; Petrik, P; Kurunczi, S; Kiss, É

    2011-10-15

    Biodegradable polyesters such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) copolymers (PLGA) are preferred materials for drug carrier systems although their surface hydrophobicity greatly limits their use in controlled drug delivery. PLGA thin films on a solid support blended with PEG-containing compound (Pluronic) were used as model systems to study the interfacial interactions with aqueous media. Degree of surface hydrophilization was assessed by wettability, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. Protein adsorption behavior was investigated by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. The degree of protein adsorption showed a good correlation with the hydrophilicity, and surface composition. Unexpectedly, the layer thickness was found to have a great impact on the interfacial characteristics of the polymer films in the investigated regime (20-200 nm). Thick layers presented higher hydrophilicity and great resistance to protein adsorption. That special behavior was explained as the result of the swelling of the polymer film combined with the partial dissolution of Pluronic from the layer. This finding might promote the rational design of surface modified biocompatible nanoparticles.

  12. Relationship Between Interfacial Strength and Materials Properties in Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Chad; Richardson, Mickey; Zhou, Jing; Holmes, Gale; Karim, Alamgir; D'Souza, Nandika

    2008-03-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIM's) are critical to the semiconductor electronics industry for heat dissipation, a potential show-stopper for future technology nodes. Essentially, an epoxy nanocomposite, TIMs suffer from a series of typical nanocomposite limitations including heat conduction in nanoscale inclusions, nanoparticle dispersion, void formation with thermal cycling, and interfacial resistance between the matrix and filler. It is postulated that the interfacial adhesion between the matrix and nanofiller is at the root cause of many of these difficulties, however, few techniques exist to characterize this critical property. Compounding this are the overall difficulties associated with characterizing these materials in their ultimate applications, i.e., thin films. To this end, a novel series of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructured materials based on layered double hydroxides in epoxy matrices were designed as a test bed to develop the measurement techniques needed to elucidate the relationship between the material structure and dynamics and the ultimate materials properties. Initial results are presented based on characterization by mechanical, dielectric, and thermal spectroscopies.

  13. Influence of silane surface modification of veneer on interfacial adhesion of wood-plastic plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lu; Chang, Liang; Guo, Wen-jing; Chen, Yongping; Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, wood-plastic plywood was fabricated with high density polyethylene (HDPE) film and poplar veneer by hot-pressing. To improve the interfacial adhesion between the wood veneer and HDPE film, silane A-171 (vinyltrimethoxysilane) was used to treat the surface of poplar veneer by spraying. The effects of silane agent on the veneer surface properties as well as the physical-mechanical performance of wood-plastic plywood were evaluated. The adsorption of several prehydrolyzed alkoxysilanes onto the veneer surface and the existence of a covalent bonding between the wood veneer and silane agent were confirmed using FTIR, XPS and contact angle. Silane surface treatment resulted in enhancement of shear strength and water resistance. When one layer HDPE film was used as adhesive, it caused 293.2% increase in shear strength, 34.6% and 40.8% reduction in water absorption and thickness swelling, respectively. In addition, the wood failure also increased from 5% to 100% due to the silane modification. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed that treated plywood have higher storage modulus, lower tan δ peak value and lagged temperature for tan δ peak value with respect to untreated plywood. Experimental results of interfacial morphology by SEM further revealed better interaction between silane A-171 treated veneer and HDPE film.

  14. Nonequilibrium Interfacial Tension in Simple and Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Mora, Serge; Dupas, Christelle; Cipelletti, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Interfacial tension between immiscible phases is a well-known phenomenon, which manifests itself in everyday life, from the shape of droplets and foam bubbles to the capillary rise of sap in plants or the locomotion of insects on a water surface. More than a century ago, Korteweg generalized this notion by arguing that stresses at the interface between two miscible fluids act transiently as an effective, nonequilibrium interfacial tension, before homogenization is eventually reached. In spite of its relevance in fields as diverse as geosciences, polymer physics, multiphase flows, and fluid removal, experiments and theoretical works on the interfacial tension of miscible systems are still scarce, and mostly restricted to molecular fluids. This leaves crucial questions unanswered, concerning the very existence of the effective interfacial tension, its stabilizing or destabilizing character, and its dependence on the fluid's composition and concentration gradients. We present an extensive set of measurements on miscible complex fluids that demonstrate the existence and the stabilizing character of the effective interfacial tension, unveil new regimes beyond Korteweg's predictions, and quantify its dependence on the nature of the fluids and the composition gradient at the interface. We introduce a simple yet general model that rationalizes nonequilibrium interfacial stresses to arbitrary mixtures, beyond Korteweg's small gradient regime, and show that the model captures remarkably well both our new measurements and literature data on molecular and polymer fluids. Finally, we briefly discuss the relevance of our model to a variety of interface-driven problems, from phase separation to fracture, which are not adequately captured by current approaches based on the assumption of small gradients.

  15. Interfacial Stability in a Two-Layer Benard Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy Technical Summary Report #2814 April 1985 I cti- Work Unit Number 2 - Physical Mathematics...34•"• -••’-’• ^ ••’••• VI , •• W -•- • •- ’•"• INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy I. INTRODUCTION Two layers of fluids are...Subtltl») INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM 7. AUTMORf.; Yuriko Renardy »• PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS

  16. Anomalous enhancement in interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy through uphill diffusion.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanmay; Kulkarni, Prabhanjan D; Purandare, S C; Barshilia, Harish C; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Chowdhury, Prasanta

    2014-06-17

    We observed interfacial chemical sharpening due to uphill diffusion in post annealed ultrathin multilayer stack of Co and Pt, which leads to enhanced interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). This is surprising as these elements are considered as perfectly miscible. This chemical sharpening was confirmed through quantitative energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and intensity distribution of images taken on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic (STEM) mode. This observation demonstrates an evidence of miscibility gap in ultrathin coherent Co/Pt multilayer stacks.

  17. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  18. Estimating interfacial thermal conductivity in metamaterials through heat flux mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Canbazoglu, Fatih M.; Vemuri, Krishna P.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2015-04-06

    The variability of the thickness as well as the thermal conductivity of interfaces in composites may significantly influence thermal transport characteristics and the notion of a metamaterial as an effective medium. The consequent modulations of the heat flux passage are analytically and experimentally examined through a non-contact methodology using radiative imaging, on a model anisotropic thermal metamaterial. It was indicated that a lower Al layer/silver interfacial epoxy ratio of ∼25 compared to that of a Al layer/alumina interfacial epoxy (of ∼39) contributes to a smaller deviation of the heat flux bending angle.

  19. The ensemble switch method for computing interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Fabian; Virnau, Peter

    2015-04-14

    We present a systematic thermodynamic integration approach to compute interfacial tensions for solid-liquid interfaces, which is based on the ensemble switch method. Applying Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques, we obtain results for hard spheres, which are in agreement with previous computations. The case of solid-liquid interfaces in a variant of the effective Asakura-Oosawa model and of liquid-vapor interfaces in the Lennard-Jones model are discussed as well. We demonstrate that a thorough finite-size analysis of the simulation data is required to obtain precise results for the interfacial tension.

  20. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  1. Supporting R&D of industrial fuel cell developers.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.

    1998-09-11

    Argonne National Laboratory is supporting the industrial developers of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) and tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results suggest that a lithium concentration level of 65-75 mol% in the LiNa electrolyte will improve cell performance. They have made inroads in understanding the interfacial resistance of bipolar plate materials, and they have reduced the air electrode overpotential in OSFCs by adding dopants.

  2. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGES

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; ...

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  3. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  4. Interfacial rheology: an overview of measuring techniques and its role in dispersions and electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Pelipenko, Jan; Kristl, Julijana; Rošic, Romana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kocbek, Petra

    2012-06-01

    Interfacial rheological properties have yet to be thoroughly explored. Only recently, methods have been introduced that provide sufficient sensitivity to reliably determine viscoelastic interfacial properties. In general, interfacial rheology describes the relationship between the deformation of an interface and the stresses exerted on it. Due to the variety in deformations of the interfacial layer (shear and expansions or compressions), the field of interfacial rheology is divided into the subcategories of shear and dilatational rheology. While shear rheology is primarily linked to the long-term stability of dispersions, dilatational rheology provides information regarding short-term stability. Interfacial rheological characteristics become relevant in systems with large interfacial areas, such as emulsions and foams, and in processes that lead to a large increase in the interfacial area, such as electrospinning of nanofibers.

  5. Effects of cathode electrolyte interfacial (CEI) layer on long term cycling of all-solid-state thin-film batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Ziying; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Xin, Huolin L.; ...

    2016-05-30

    All-solid-state lithium-ion batteries have the potential to not only push the current limits of energy density by utilizing Li metal, but also improve safety by avoiding flammable organic electrolyte. However, understanding the role of solid electrolyte – electrode interfaces will be critical to improve performance. In this paper, we conducted long term cycling on commercially available lithium cobalt oxide (LCO)/lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON)/lithium (Li) cells at elevated temperature to investigate the interfacial phenomena that lead to capacity decay. STEM-EELS analysis of samples revealed a previously unreported disordered layer between the LCO cathode and LiPON electrolyte. This electrochemically inactive layer grewmore » in thickness leading to loss of capacity and increase of interfacial resistance when cycled at 80 °C. Finally, the stabilization of this layer through interfacial engineering is crucial to improve the long term performance of thin-film batteries especially under thermal stress.« less

  6. Evaluation of interfacial mass transfer coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure in carbon dioxide/normal alkane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhou, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Peyman; Ayatollahi, Shahab; Jahromi, Iman Raoofi; Zolghadr, Ali

    2015-04-01

    CO2 gas injection is known as one of the most popular enhanced oil recovery techniques for light and medium oil reservoirs, therefore providing an acceptable mass transfer mechanism for CO2-oil systems seems necessary. In this study, interfacial mass transfer coefficient has been evaluated for CO2-normal heptane and CO2-normal hexadecane systems using equilibrium and dynamic interfacial tension data, which have been measured using the pendant drop method. Interface mass transfer coefficient has been calculated as a function of temperature and pressure in the range of 313-393 K and 1.7-8.6 MPa, respectively. The results showed that the interfacial resistance is a parameter that can control the mass transfer process for some CO2-normal alkane systems, and cannot be neglected. Additionally, it was found that interface mass transfer coefficient increased with pressure. However, the variation of this parameter with temperature did not show a clear trend and it was strongly dependent on the variation of diffusivity and solubility of CO2 in the liquid phase.

  7. Formation of Lamellar Pores for Splats via Interfacial or Sub-interfacial Delamination at Chemically Bonded Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin

    2017-02-01

    To comprehensively understand the formation mechanism of lamellar pores in splats, the delamination morphologies and crack patterns of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and lanthanum zirconia splats were examined. Results showed that both types of splats grew epitaxially on well-polished YSZ substrates, evidently confirming the formation of chemical bonding between splats and substrate. However, the interfacial or sub-interfacial delamination was observed in all kinds of splats in this study. Residual vertical cracks passing through delaminated domains (on bare substrate) were also observed, which clearly indicated that transverse delamination followed vertical cracking. Mechanical analysis about delamination was addressed, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  8. "Butterfly effect" in CuO/graphene composite nanosheets: a small interfacial adjustment triggers big changes in electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Jisheng; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Fedoseeva, Yu V; Okotrub, A V; Bulusheva, L G

    2014-10-08

    Generally speaking, excellent electrochemical performance of metal oxide/graphene nanosheets (GNSs) composite is attributed to the interfacial interaction (or "synergistic effect") between constituents. However, there are no any direct observations on how the electronic structure is changed and how the properties of Li-ion storage are affected by adjusting the interfacial interaction, despite of limited investigations on the possible nature of binding between GNSs and metal oxide. In this paper, CuO nanosheets/GNSs composites with a little Cu2O (ca. 4 wt %) were utilized as an interesting model to illustrate directly the changes of interfacial nature as well as its deep influence on the electronic structure and Li-ion storage performance of composite. The interfacial adjustment was successfully fulfilled by removal of Cu2O in the composite by NH3·H2O. Formation of Cu-O-C bonds on interfaces both between CuO and GNSs, and Cu2O and GNSs in the original CuO/GNSs composites was detected. The small interfacial alteration by removal of the little Cu2O results in the obvious changes in electronic structure, such as weakening of covalent Cu-O-C interfacial interaction and recovery of π bonds in graphene, and simultaneously leads to variations in electrochemical performance of composites, including a 21% increase of reversible capacity, degradation of cyclic stability and rate-performance, and obvious increase of charge-transfer resistance, which can be called a "butterfly effect" in graphene-based metal oxide composites. These interesting phenomena could be helpful to design not only the high-performance graphene/metal oxide anode materials but also various advanced graphene-based composites used in the other fields such as sensors, catalysis, fuel cells, solar cells, etc.

  9. Modulating conductivity, environmental stability of transparent conducting nanotube films on flexible substrates by interfacial engineering.

    PubMed

    Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Jun Suk; Jeong, Hae Deuk; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2010-08-24

    We have characterized the previously undescribed parameters for engineering the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films for technological applications. First, the interfacial tension between bare SWCNT network films and a top coating passivation material was shown to dictate the variability of the films' sheet resistance (R(s)) after application of the top coating. Second, the electrical stability of the coated SWCNT films was affected by the mismatch between the CTE of the supporting substrate and the SWCNT network film. An upshift in the Raman G-band spectrum of SWCNTs on bare PET suggested that compressive strain was induced by the CTE mismatch after heating and cooling. These findings provide important guidelines for the choice of substrate and passivation coating materials that promote environmental stability in SWCNT-based transparent conductive films.

  10. Interfacial Aspects of Electrodeposited Conductive Fibers/Epoxy Composites using Electro-Micromechanical Technique and Nondestructive Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Park, Joung-Man; Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Ki-Won; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2001-05-01

    Interfacial adhesion and nondestructive behavior of the electrodeposited (ED) carbon fiber reinforced composites were evaluated using the electro-micromechanical technique and acoustic emission (AE). Interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the ED carbon fiber/epoxy composites was higher than that of the untreated case. This might be expected because of the possible chemical and hydrogen bonding based on an electrically adsorbed polymeric interlayer. Logarithmic electrical resistivity of the untreated single-carbon fiber composite increased suddenly to infinity when the fiber fracture occurred, whereas that of the ED composite increased relatively broadly up to infinity. This may be due to the retarded fracture time as a result of the enhanced IFSS. In single- and 10-carbon fiber composites, the number of AE signals coming from the interlayer failure of the ED carbon fiber composite was much larger than that of the untreated composite. As the number of each first fiber fracture increased in the 10-carbon fiber composite, the electrical resistivity increased stepwise, and the slope of logarithmic electrical resistance increased. In the three-graphite filament composite with a narrow 1 time inter-filament distance, the total numbers of the filament fracture and the IFSS were smaller than those of the wider 5 times case. This might be because the interacting fracture energy caused by a filament break could affect the adjacent filaments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Thermodynamics of interfacial changes in a protein-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-03-04

    Recent experiments with biomacromolecular complexes suggest that structural modifications at the interfaces are vital for stability of the complexes and the functions of the biomacromolecules. Although several qualitative aspects about such interfaces are known from structural data, quantification of the interfacial changes is lacking. In this work, we study the thermodynamic changes at the interface in the complex between an enzyme, Nuclease A (NucA), and a specific inhibitor protein, NuiA. We calculate the conformational free energy and conformational entropy costs from histograms of the dihedral angles generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the complex and the free proteins. We extract the conformational thermodynamic parameters for changes in the tertiary structure of NuiA. We show that the binding is dominated by the interfacial changes, where the basic residues of NucA and acidic residues of NuiA are highly ordered and stabilized via strong electrostatic interactions. Our results correlate well with known information from structural studies. The tight interfacial structure is reflected in the significant changes in the structure and dynamics of the water molecules at the enzyme-inhibitor interface. The interfacial water molecules contribute significantly to the entropy loss for the overall complexation.

  12. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  13. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further.

  14. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements.

  15. Biomineralization mechanisms: a kinetics and interfacial energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nancollas, George H.; Wu, Wenju

    2000-04-01

    The calcium phosphates and oxalates are among the most frequently encountered biomineral phases and numerous kinetics studies have been made of their crystallization and dissolution in supersaturated and undersaturated solutions, respectively. These have focused mainly on parameters such as solution composition, ionic strength, pH, temperature, and solid surface characteristics. There is considerable interest in extending such studies to solutions more closely simulating the biological milieu. The constant composition method is especially useful for investigating the mechanisms of these reactions, and in the present work, the interfacial tensions between water and each of these surfaces have been calculated from measured contact angles using surface tension component theory. Values for the calcium phosphate phases such as dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), hydroxyapatite (HAP), and fluorapatite (FAP) may be compared with data calculated from dissolution kinetics experiments invoking different reaction mechanisms. Agreement between the directly measured interfacial energies and those calculated from the kinetics experiments provides valuable corroborative information about individual growth and dissolution mechanisms. For the calcium phosphates, the much smaller interfacial tensions of OCP and DCPD in contact with water as compared with those of HAP and FAP support the suggestion that the former phases are precursors in HAP and FAP biomineralization. The ability of a surface to nucleate mineral phases is closely related to the magnitude of the interfacial energies. Constant composition studies have also shown that HAP is an effective nucleator of calcium oxalate monohydrate, both of which are frequently observed in renal stones.

  16. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  17. The Hydrophobic Effect in Solute Partitioning and Interfacial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the partitioning of hydrophobic solutes between water and nonpolar solvents provide estimates for the energy cost of creating hydrophobic-water contacts. This energy is a factor of three lower than the work of adhesion derived from interfacial tension measurements. This discrepancy noted by Tanford in 1979 is widely viewed as a serious challenge to our understanding of hydrophobic interactions. However, the interfacial energy of a water-alkane interface depends on chain length. A simple analysis of published data shows that the loss of rotational freedom of an alkane chain at an interface accounts quantitatively for the length-dependent contribution to interfacial tension, leaving a length-independent contribution very close to the free energy of transfer per unit of solvent accessible surface area. This analysis thus clarifies the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and interfacial tension measurements of hydrophobic interaction energy. Alkanes do not loose rotational freedom when transferred between two different liquid phases but they do at an interface. This reconciles the difference between microscopic and macroscopic measurements. Like the partitioning free energy, the work of adhesion also has a large entropy and small enthalpy at 20 oC.

  18. Identifying mechanisms of interfacial dynamics using single-molecule tracking.

    PubMed

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2012-08-28

    The "soft" (i.e., noncovalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly varied (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and ionic), often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from the spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e., conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing the adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to track the molecular configuration and simultaneously directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius-activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more.

  19. Bcc crystal-fluid interfacial free energy in Yukawa systems.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, V; Mijailović, A; Achim, C V; Ala-Nissila, T; Rozas, R E; Horbach, J; Löwen, H

    2013-01-28

    We determine the orientation-resolved interfacial free energy between a body-centered-cubic (bcc) crystal and the coexisting fluid for a many-particle system interacting via a Yukawa pair potential. For two different screening strengths, we compare results from molecular dynamics computer simulations, density functional theory, and a phase-field-crystal approach. Simulations predict an almost orientationally isotropic interfacial free energy of 0.12k(B)T/a(2) (with k(B)T denoting the thermal energy and a the mean interparticle spacing), which is independent of the screening strength. This value is in reasonable agreement with our Ramakrishnan-Yussouff density functional calculations, while a high-order fitted phase-field-crystal approach gives about 2-3 times higher interfacial free energies for the Yukawa system. Both field theory approaches also give a considerable anisotropy of the interfacial free energy. Our result implies that, in the Yukawa system, bcc crystal-fluid free energies are a factor of about 3 smaller than face-centered-cubic crystal-fluid free energies.

  20. Meter-long multiblock copolymer microfibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Han; Remy, Roddel A.; Deng, Fei; Mackay, Michael E.; Fox, Joseph M.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight multiblock copolymers are synthesized as robust polymer fibers via interfacial bioorthogonal polymerization employing the rapid cycloaddition of s-tetrazines with strained trans-cyclooctenes. When cell-adhesive peptide was incorporated in the tetrazine monomer, the resulting protein-mimetic polymer fibers provide guidance cues for cell attachment and elongation. PMID:25824805

  1. Liquid metal actuation by electrical control of interfacial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaker, Collin B.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    By combining metallic electrical conductivity with low viscosity, liquid metals and liquid metal alloys offer new and exciting opportunities to serve as reconfigurable components of electronic, microfluidic, and electromagnetic devices. Here, we review the physics and applications of techniques that utilize voltage to manipulate the interfacial tension of liquid metals; such techniques include electrocapillarity, continuous electrowetting, electrowetting-on-dielectric, and electrochemistry. These techniques lower the interfacial tension between liquid metals and a surrounding electrolyte by driving charged species (or in the case of electrochemistry, chemical species) to the interface. The techniques are useful for manipulating and actuating liquid metals at sub-mm length scales where interfacial forces dominate. We focus on metals and alloys that are liquid near or below room temperature (mercury, gallium, and gallium-based alloys). The review includes discussion of mercury—despite its toxicity—because it has been utilized in numerous applications and it offers a way of introducing several phenomena without the complications associated with the oxide layer that forms on gallium and its alloys. The review focuses on the advantages, applications, opportunities, challenges, and limitations of utilizing voltage to control interfacial tension as a method to manipulate liquid metals.

  2. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  3. Measurement of interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Neilson, George F.; Baertlein, Carl; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion is given of a containerless microgravity experiment aimed at measuring the interfacial tension of immiscible liquid pairs using a compound drop rotation method. The reasons for the failure to execute such experiments in microgravity are described. Also, the results of post-flight analyses used to confirm our arguments are presented.

  4. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  5. Recent progress in interfacial tissue engineering approaches for osteochondral defects.

    PubMed

    Castro, Nathan J; Hacking, S Adam; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-08-01

    This review provides a brief synopsis of the anatomy and physiology of the osteochondral interface, scaffold-based and non-scaffold based approaches for engineering both tissues independently as well as recent developments in the manufacture of gradient constructs. Novel manufacturing techniques and nanotechnology will be discussed with potential application in osteochondral interfacial tissue engineering.

  6. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  7. Interfacial thermodynamics of water and six other liquid solvents.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A

    2014-06-05

    We examine the thermodynamics of the liquid-vapor interface by direct calculation of the surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy from extensive molecular dynamics simulations using the two-phase thermodynamics (2PT) method. Results for water, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexanol, N-methyl acetamide, and toluene are presented. We validate our approach by predicting the interfacial surface tensions (IFT--excess surface free energy per unit area) in excellent agreement with the mechanical calculations using Kirkwood-Buff theory. Additionally, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the IFT of water as described by the TIP4P/2005, SPC/Ew, TIP3P, and mW classical water models. We find that the TIP4P/2005 and SPC/Ew water models do a reasonable job of describing the interfacial thermodynamics; however, the TIP3P and mW are quite poor. We find that the underprediction of the experimental IFT at 298 K by these water models results from understructured surface molecules whose binding energies are too weak. Finally, we performed depth profiles of the interfacial thermodynamics which revealed long tails that extend far into what would be considered bulk from standard Gibbs theory. In fact, we find a nonmonotonic interfacial free energy profile for water, a unique feature that could have important consequences for the absorption of ions and other small molecules.

  8. Ion beam-induced interfacial growth in Si and silicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, F.; Nédellec, P.; Ruault, M. O.; Bernas, H.; Lin, X. W.; Boucaud, P.

    1995-12-01

    We review the mechanisms and consequences of ion beam-induced epitaxial crystallization (IBIEC) in the transition metal- or rare earth-implanted {aSi}/{cSi} systems, as determined from in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) during irradiation, combined with channeling, high resolution TEM and optical measurements. IBIEC experiments on nm-size crystals confirm previously measured low values of interface roughness in IBIEC. We have performed interfacial growth simulations which indicate that the IBIEC process is, in fact, interface roughness-limited. They also suggest that interfacial growth processes are similar in several respects to surface growth processes, and that they largely determine (i) the growth habit of silicide precipitation, which is dominated by the interfacial energy, (ii) the possibility of trapping a large fraction of the impurities in non-equilibrium sites, leading to significant supersaturation. A consequence of this effect is to allow incorporation of large (over 300-fold supersaturation) Er concentrations in the substitutional sites of the Si lattice, leading to room-temperature photoluminescence (without any oxygen co-implantation). Evidence of a new, thermally induced instability in interfacial growth is presented: it displays both intermittency and very high growth rates, and is strongly affected by ion irradiation.

  9. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  10. On the interfacial fracture of porcelain/zirconia and graded zirconia dental structures.

    PubMed

    Chai, Herzl; Lee, James J-W; Mieleszko, Adam J; Chu, Stephen J; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Porcelain fused to zirconia (PFZ) restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry. However, their susceptibility to fracture remains a practical problem. The failure of PFZ prostheses often involves crack initiation and growth in the porcelain, which may be followed by fracture along the porcelain/zirconia (P/Z) interface. In this work, we characterized the process of fracture in two PFZ systems, as well as a newly developed graded glass-zirconia structure with emphases placed on resistance to interfacial cracking. Thin porcelain layers were fused onto Y-TZP plates with or without the presence of a glass binder. The specimens were loaded in a four-point-bending fixture with the thin porcelain veneer in tension, simulating the lower portion of the connectors and marginal areas of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) during occlusal loading. The evolution of damage was observed by a video camera. The fracture was characterized by unstable growth of cracks perpendicular to the P/Z interface (channel cracks) in the porcelain layer, which was followed by stable cracking along the P/Z interface. The interfacial fracture energy GC was determined by a finite-element analysis taking into account stress-shielding effects due to the presence of adjacent channel cracks. The resulting GC was considerably less than commonly reported values for similar systems. Fracture in the graded Y-TZP samples occurred via a single channel crack at a much greater stress than for PFZ. No delamination between the residual glass layer and graded zirconia occurred in any of the tests. Combined with its enhanced resistance to edge chipping and good esthetic quality, graded Y-TZP emerges as a viable material concept for dental restorations.

  11. Structural and interfacial analysis of WC92 Co8 coating deposited on titanium alloy by electrospark deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. J.; Qian, Y. Y.; Liu, J.

    2004-04-01

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a promising process to produce hard and wear-resisting coatings on metallic substrates. In this paper, microstructure and interfacial characteristics of the WC92-Co8 coated-titanium are presented. A metallurgical bonding between the coating and substrate is obtained. The Ti element was found to distribute in WC92-Co8 at the metal pool, as well as the interface by diffusion. Some new phases were produced in the coating layer due to the chemical reaction during the ESD process. Experimental observation and thermodynamic analysis were utilized to study the mechanism of ESD.

  12. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Brian J.; Pearson, Raymond A.

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  13. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Interfacial Phenomena Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Ian C.

    Surfactants play an integral role in numerous functions ranging from stabilizing the emulsion in a favorite salad dressing to organizing the cellular components that make life possible. We are interested in lung surfactant, which is a mixture of lipids and proteins essential for normal respiration because it modulates the surface tension of the air-liquid interface of the thin fluid lining in the lungs. Through this surface tension modulation, lung surfactant ensures effortless lung expansion and prevents lung collapse during exhalation, thereby effecting proper oxygenation of the bloodstream. The function of lung surfactant, as well as numerous interfacial lipid systems, is not solely dictated by the behavior of materials confined to the two-dimensional interface. Rather, the distributions of materials in the liquid subphase also greatly influence the performance of interfacial films of lung surfactant. Therefore, to better understand the behavior of lung surfactant and other interfacial lipid systems, we require a three-dimensional characterization technique. In this dissertation, we have developed a novel confocal microscopy methodology for investigating the interfacial phenomena of surfactants at the air-liquid interface of a Langmuir trough. Confocal microscopy provides the excellent combination of in situ, fast, three-dimensional visualization of multiple components of the lung surfactant system that other characterization techniques lack. We detail the solutions to the numerous challenges encountered when imaging a dynamic air-liquid interface with a high-resolution technique like confocal microscopy. We then use confocal microscopy to elucidate the distinct mechanisms by which a polyelectrolyte (chitosan) and nonadsorbing polymer (polyethylene glycol) restore the function of lung surfactant under inhibitory conditions mimicking the effects of lung trauma. Beyond this physiological model, we also investigate several one- and two-component interfacial films

  14. Low resistance fuel electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Maskalick, Nichols J.; Folser, George R.

    1989-01-01

    An electrode 6 bonded to a solid, ion conducting electrolyte 5 is made, where the electrode 6 comprises a ceramic metal oxide 18, metal particles 17, and heat stable metal fibers 19, where the metal fibers provide a matrix structure for the electrode. The electrolyte 5 can be bonded to an air electrode cathode 4, to provide an electrochemical cell 2, preferably of tubular design.

  15. Interfacial free energy and stiffness of aluminum during rapid solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Nicholas T.; Martinez, Enrique; Qu, Jianmin

    2017-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and the capillary fluctuation method, we have calculated the anisotropic crystal-melt interfacial free energy and stiffness of aluminum in a rapid solidification system where a temperature gradient is applied to enforce thermal non-equilibrium. To calculate these material properties, the standard capillary fluctuation method typically used for systems in equilibrium has been modified to incorporate a second-order Taylor expansion of the interfacial free energy term. The result is a robust method for calculating interfacial energy, stiffness and anisotropy as a function of temperature gradient using the fluctuations in the defined interface height. This work includes the calculationmore » of interface characteristics for temperature gradients ranging from 11 to 34 K/nm. The captured results are compared to a thermal equilibrium case using the same model and simulation technique with a zero gradient definition. We define the temperature gradient as the change in temperature over height perpendicular to the crystal-melt interface. The gradients are applied in MD simulations using defined thermostat regions on a stable solid-liquid interface initially in thermal equilibrium. The results of this work show that the interfacial stiffness and free energy for aluminum are dependent on the magnitude of the temperature gradient, however the anisotropic parameters remain independent of the non-equilibrium conditions applied in this analysis. As a result, the relationships of the interfacial free energy/stiffness are determined to be linearly related to the thermal gradient, and can be interpolated to find material characteristics at additional temperature gradients.« less

  16. Investigation of the interfacial condition between bioceramic coatings and metallic substrates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Ong, Chuon-Szen

    2001-04-01

    The work reported here is on the characterization of the interfacial properties between plasma-sprayed Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates as used in cement-less hip orthopaedic implants. The phase velocity dispersion for the first Rayleigh-type mode for the coating-substrate system has been shown to be sensitive to the interfacial stiffness. Different interfacial conditions between the coating and substrate have been obtained by cyclic loading of the specimens in a four-point bend fatigue machine. The measured interfacial stiffness is then correlated with the interfacial fracture strength obtained by standard destructive shear tests.

  17. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  18. New insights into the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in thin film solar cells: Formation and properties of the MoSe2 interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkert, T.; Theys, B.; Patriarche, G.; Jubault, M.; Donsanti, F.; Guillemoles, J.-F.; Lincot, D.

    2016-10-01

    Being at the origin of an ohmic contact, the MoSe2 interfacial layer at the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related compounds) based solar cells has allowed for very high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies up to 22.3%. This article gives new insights into the formation and the structural properties of this interfacial layer. Different selenization-steps of a Mo covered glass substrate prior to the CIGS deposition by co-evaporation led to MoSe2 interfacial layers with varying thickness and orientation, as observed by x-ray diffraction and atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. A novel model based on the anisotropy of the Se diffusion coefficient in MoSe2 is proposed to explain the results. While the series resistance of finished CIGS solar cells is found to correlate with the MoSe2 orientation, the adhesion forces between the CIGS absorber layer and the Mo substrate stay constant. Their counter-intuitive non-correlation with the configuration of the MoSe2 interfacial layer is discussed and related to work from the literature.

  19. New insights into the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in thin film solar cells: Formation and properties of the MoSe2 interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Klinkert, T; Theys, B; Patriarche, G; Jubault, M; Donsanti, F; Guillemoles, J-F; Lincot, D

    2016-10-21

    Being at the origin of an ohmic contact, the MoSe2 interfacial layer at the Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 interface in CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and related compounds) based solar cells has allowed for very high light-to-electricity conversion efficiencies up to 22.3%. This article gives new insights into the formation and the structural properties of this interfacial layer. Different selenization-steps of a Mo covered glass substrate prior to the CIGS deposition by co-evaporation led to MoSe2 interfacial layers with varying thickness and orientation, as observed by x-ray diffraction and atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. A novel model based on the anisotropy of the Se diffusion coefficient in MoSe2 is proposed to explain the results. While the series resistance of finished CIGS solar cells is found to correlate with the MoSe2 orientation, the adhesion forces between the CIGS absorber layer and the Mo substrate stay constant. Their counter-intuitive non-correlation with the configuration of the MoSe2 interfacial layer is discussed and related to work from the literature.

  20. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples: COMPARISON OF FLUID-FLUID INTERFACIAL AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ~5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  1. Interfacial Area Transport of Vertical Upward Bubbly Flow in an Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Takashi Hibiki; Ye Mi; Rong Situ; Mamoru Ishii; Michitsugu Mori

    2002-07-01

    In relation to the development of the interfacial area transport equation, hydrodynamic separate tests without phase change were performed in an adiabatic air-water bubbly flow in a vertical annulus to identify the effect of bubble coalescence and breakup on the interfacial area transport. A total of 20 data sets on axial developments of local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and interfacial velocity were acquired by using the double-sensor conductivity probe method in an extensive bubbly flow region. The detailed discussion was given for the mechanism of the axial development of the local flow parameters. The one-dimensional interfacial area transport equation could reproduce proper trends of the interfacial area concentration change along the flow direction and good agreement between predicted and measured interfacial area concentration was obtained with an average relative deviation of {+-}8.96 %. (authors)

  2. Ferroelectric Thin Films for the Manipulation of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Robert

    Ferroelectric thin films (FETFs) offer a promising new platform for advancing liquid-phase interfacial sensing devices. FETFs are capable of expressing surface charge densities that are an order of magnitude higher than those of traditional charged surfaces in liquid environments (e.g., common oxides, self-assembled monolayers, or electrets). Furthermore, the switchable polarization state of FETFs enables patterning of charge-heterogeneous surfaces whose charge patterns persist over a range of environmental conditions. Integration of FETFs into liquid-phase interfacial sensing devices, however, requires the fabrication of films with nanometer-scale surface roughness, high remnant polarization values, and interfacial stability during prolonged exposure. The objectives of my research were to i) fabricate ferroelectric ultra-smooth lead zirconium titanate (US-PZT) thin films with nanometer-scale surface roughness, ii) establish the interfacial stability of these films after prolonged exposure to aqueous environments, iii) measure the interfacial forces as a function of film polarization and ionic strength, iv) calculate the surface potential of the US-PZT surface using electric double layer (EDL) theory, and v) demonstrate the guided deposition of charged colloidal particles onto locally polarized US-PZT thin films from solution. I demonstrate the use of ferroelectric US-PZT thin films to manipulate EDL interaction forces in aqueous environments. My work conclusively shows that the polarization state of US-PZT controls EDL formation and can be used to induce the guided deposition of charged colloidal particles in solution. I present a robust fabrication scheme for making ferroelectric US-PZT thin films from a sol-gel precursor. By optimizing critical thermal processing steps I am able to minimize the in-plane stress of the film and reliably produce US-PZT thin films on the wafer-scale with mean surface roughness values of only 2.4 nm over a 25 μm2 area. I then

  3. Contact resistance prediction and structure optimization of bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.; Ma, G. J.

    The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of clamping force on the interfacial contact resistance and the porosity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). An optimal rib shape for the bipolar plate is developed to analyze the electrical contact resistance. We found that the electrical contact resistance is determined by both the clamping force and the contact pressure distribution. A minimum contact resistance can be obtained in the case of a constant contact pressure distribution. The porosity of the GDLs underneath the rib of the bipolar plate decreases with increasing the clamping force, and the void volume is changed with the deformation of the GDLs. It is found that there exists an optimal rib width of the bipolar plates to obtain a reasonable combination of low interfacial contact resistance and good porosity for the GDL.

  4. Reliability assessment on interfacial failure of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin-Wei; Yang, Li; Zhou, Yi-Chun; He, Li-Min; Zhu, Wang; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) usually exhibit an uncertain lifetime owing to their scattering mechanical properties and severe service conditions. To consider these uncertainties, a reliability assessment method is proposed based on failure probability analysis. First, a limit state equation is established to demarcate the boundary between failure and safe regions, and then the failure probability is calculated by the integration of a probability density function in the failure area according to the first- or second-order moment. It is shown that the parameters related to interfacial failure follow a Weibull distribution in two types of TBC. The interfacial failure of TBCs is significantly affected by the thermal mismatch of material properties and the temperature drop in service.

  5. Interfacial Engineering for Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Fichou, Denis; Wang, Qing

    2016-04-20

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are promising solar-energy-conversion devices, as low-cost alternatives to the prevailing photovoltaic technologies. Compared with molecular dyes, nanocrystalline quantum dot (QD) light absorbers exhibit higher molar extinction coefficients and a tunable photoresponse. However, the power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of QDSCs are generally below 9.5 %, far behind their molecular sensitizer counterparts (up to 13 %). These low PCEs have been attributed to a large free-energy loss during sensitizer regeneration, energy loss during the charge-carrier transport and transfer processes, and inefficient charge separation at the QD/electrolyte interfaces, and various interfacial engineering strategies for enhancing the PCE and cell stability have been reported. Herein, we review recent progress in the interfacial engineering of QDSCs and discuss future prospects for the development of highly efficient and stable QDSCs.

  6. Actuation of interfacial waves in oil-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyeong; Weheliye, Weheliye; Chinaud, Maxime; Angeli, Panagiota; James Percival Collaboration; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Droplet detachment from interfacial waves in two-phase flows has pulled in noteworthy exploration interest. In order to examine this phenomenon experimentally and empower quantitative estimation, it is important to spatially confine the drop formation. In the present study, a cylinder, located close to the inlet of the test section and perpendicular to the direction of the flow, is placed in a two-phase stratified oil-water pipe flow. The introduction of this cylinder actuated interfacial waves and move from stratified to dispersed flow pattern. High speed visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement are utilized to investigate the flow pattern maps of the two-phase flow and the velocity fields in the wake of the cylinder, respectively. These results will be compared with previous experimental studies. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  7. The Interfacial-Area-Based Relative Permeability Function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Khaleel, Raziuddin

    2009-09-25

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the services of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical support for the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) activity within the Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project. A portion of the support provided in FY2009, was to extend the soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using an alternative approach. This alternative approach incorporates the Brooks and Corey (1964), van Genuchten (1980), and a modified van Genuchten water-retention models into the interfacial-area-based relative permeability model presented by Embid (1997). The general performance of the incorporated models is shown using typical hydraulic parameters. The relative permeability models for the wetting phase were further examined using data from literature. Results indicate that the interfacial-area-based model can describe the relative permeability of the wetting phase reasonably well.

  8. Interfacial trapping in an aged discotic liquid crystal semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Patrick, Michael S.; Paul, Sanjoy; Ellman, Brett; Semyonov, Alexander; Twieg, Robert J.; Matthews, Rachael; Pentzer, Emily; Singer, Kenneth D.

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on time-of-flight (TOF) hole mobility measurements in aged 2,3,6,7,10,11-Hexakis(pentyloxy)triphenylene columnar liquid crystals. In contrast to the original samples reported in 2006, homeotropically aligned samples yielded TOF transients with an extended non-exponential rise. The experimental data were fit to a simple model that accurately reproduces the TOF transients assuming delayed charge release from traps near the optically excited electrode. While interfacial trapping appears only in the aged materials, the bulk mobility is similar to the pristine material. The model addresses dispersive transport in quasi-one-dimensional materials, determines the charge carrier mobility in systems with interfacial traps, and provides a method for characterizing the traps.

  9. Modeling Interfacial Adsorption of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Numerous natural and industrial processes demand advances in our fundamental understanding of colloidal adsorption at liquid interfaces. Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model the interfacial adsorption of core-shell nanoparticles at the water-oil interface. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with polymer chains. The nanoparticles bind to the interface from either phase to minimize total surface energy. With a single nanoparticle, we demonstrate detailed kinetics of different stages in the adsorption process. Prominent effect of grafted polymer chains is characterized by varying molecular weight and polydispersity of the chains. We also preload nanoparticles straddling the interface to reveal the influence of nanoparticle surface density on further adsorption. Importantly, these studies show how surface-grafted polymer chains can alter the interfacial behavior of colloidal particles and provide guidelines for designing on-demand Pickering emulsion.

  10. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  11. Simulation of thin film membranes formed by interfacial polymerization.

    PubMed

    Oizerovich-Honig, Rachel; Raim, Vladimir; Srebnik, Simcha

    2010-01-05

    Interfacial polymerization is widely used today for the production of ultrathin films for encapsulation, chemical separations, and desalination. Polyamide films, in particular, are employed in manufacturing of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes. While these materials show excellent salt rejection, they have rather low water permeability, both properties that apparently stem from the rigid cross-linked structure. An increasing amount of experimental research on membranes of different chemistries and membrane characterization suggests the importance of other factors (such as unreacted functional groups and surface roughness) in determining membrane performance. We developed a molecular simulation model to qualitatively study the effects of various synthesis conditions on membrane performance, in terms of its estimated porosity and permeability. The model is of an interfacial aggregation process of two types of functional monomers. Film growth with time and structural characteristics of the final film are compared with predictions of existing theories and experimental observations.

  12. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  13. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  14. Interfacial Modification by Copolymers: The Importance of Copolymer Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadmun, Mark; Eastwood, Eric

    2002-03-01

    The dispersion of nanoscale particles or domains in a polymer matrix can readily lead to nonlinear enhancement of material properties. Our research group has been examining two primary methods to improve the properties of multicomponent polymer systems: compatibilization of a blend with an interfacial modifier or improving the miscibility and properties of polymer blends with specific interactions. In this talk, the importance of specific copolymer microstructure on its ability to strengthen a biphasic interface will be discussed. Atom transfer radical polymerization has been utilized to polymerize a series of multiblock copolymers containing styrene and methyl methacrylate. This, in turn, has allowed the synthesis of a series of copolymers with careful control of the sequence distribution. Subsequent experiments that determine the interfacial strength between two polymers in the presence and absence of these copolymers has provided critical information that documents the importance of copolymer sequence distribution on its ability to strengthen a biphasic interface.

  15. Interfacial exciplex formation in bilayers of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobuyasu, R. S.; Araujo, K. A. S.; Cury, L. A.; Jarrosson, T.; Serein-Spirau, F.; Lère-Porte, J.-P.; Dias, F. B.; Monkman, A. P.

    2013-10-01

    The donor-acceptor interactions in sequential bilayer and blend films are investigated. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) were measured to characterize the samples at different geometries of photoluminescence collection. At standard excitation, with the laser incidence at 45° of the normal direction of the sample surface, a band related to the aggregate states of donor molecules appears for both blend and bilayer at around 540 nm. For the PL spectra acquired from the edge of the bilayer, with the laser incidence made at normal direction of the sample surface (90° geometry), a new featureless band emission, red-shifted from donor and acceptor emission regions was observed and assigned as the emission from interfacial exciplex states. The conformational complexity coming from donor/acceptor interactions at the heterojunction interface of the bilayer is at the origin of this interfacial exciplex emission.

  16. Interfacial Properties of Bilayer and Trilayer Graphene on Metal Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Yangyang; Wang, Lu; Quhe, Ruge; Ni, Zeyuan; Mei, Wai-Ning; Gao, Zhengxiang; Yu, Dapeng; Shi, Junjie; Lu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    One popular approach to prepare graphene is to grow them on transition metal substrates via chemical vapor deposition. By using the density functional theory with dispersion correction, we systematically investigate for the first time the interfacial properties of bilayer (BLG) and trilayer graphene (TLG) on metal substrates. Three categories of interfacial structures are revealed. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Al, Ag, Cu, Au, and Pt substrates is a weak physisorption, but a band gap can be opened. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Ti, Ni, and Co substrates is a strong chemisorption, and a stacking-insensitive band gap is opened for the two uncontacted layers of TLG. The adsorption of B(T)LG on Pd substrate is a weaker chemisorption, with a band gap opened for the uncontacted layers. This fundamental study also helps for B(T)LG device study due to inevitable graphene/metal contact. PMID:23803738

  17. Interfacial entropy of water on rigid hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Fereshte; Leroy, Frédéric; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2013-08-06

    A simple theoretical model is proposed for computing the interfacial entropy of water at rigid hydrophobic surfaces. The interfacial entropy, which is not considered in mean field models of static wettability, is evaluated from the fluctuations of the water-surface dispersion energy at the single particle level and represents the configurational bias imposed on the fluid molecules by the attractive external potential of a solid wall. A comparison with results obtained from molecular dynamics simulations shows that the model quantitatively describes the entropy loss of water when a water-vapor interface turns to water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces such as graphene, graphite, and diamond, while it overestimates this quantity on hydrophilic surfaces.

  18. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGES

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; ...

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  19. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  20. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Biju, Vasudevan P.; Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-08-04

    We report on single molecule studies of photosensitized interfacial electron transfer (ET) processes in Coumarin 343 (C343)-TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) and Cresyl Violet (CV+)-TiO2 NP systems, using time-correlated single photon counting coupled with scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence intensity trajectories of individual dye molecules adsorbed on a semiconductor NP surface showed fluorescence fluctuations and blinking, with time constrants distributed from sub-milliseconds to several seconds.

  1. Avalanche in adhesion. [interfacial separation between two Ni crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John R.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    Consider surfaces being brought into contact. It is proposed that atomic layers can collapse or avalanche together when the interfacial spacing falls below a critical distance. This causes a discontinuous drop in the adhesive binding energy. Avalanche can occur regardless of the stiffness of external supports. A simple understanding of the origin of this phenomenon is provided. A numerical calculation has been carried out for adhesion in Ni. A new wear mechanism due to avalanche is suggested.

  2. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  3. Studying the Dependency of Interfacial Formation with Carbon Nanotube

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    observed that the sliding of nano -chips platelets from the CNCF occurs during sonication. Figure 4.1.1. SEM images of fracture surfaces for...was focused on understanding the capabilities of polymeric materials to form interfacial structures around carbon nanotubes and other nano -carbon...materials. The proposed effort led to the development of a new processing route for dispersing nano -carbons in dilute polymer solutions. This dispersion

  4. Relaxations and Interfacial Water Ordering at the Corundum (110) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2010-09-17

    In situ high resolution specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were used to examine relaxations and interfacial water ordering occurring at the corundum (110)-water interface. Sample preparation affected the resulting surface structure. Annealing in air at 1373 K produced a reconstructed surface formed through an apparently ordered aluminum vacancy. The effect of the reconstruction on in-plane periodicity was not determined. The remaining aluminum sites on the surface maintain full coordination by oxygen and the surface was coated with a layer of physically adsorbed water. Ordering of water further from the surface was not observed. Acid etching of this surface and preparing a surface through annealing at 723 K both produced an unreconstructed surface with identical relaxations and water ordering. Relaxations were confined primarily to the top {approx}4 {angstrom} of the surface and were dominated by an increased distribution width of the fully occupied surface aluminum site and outward relaxation of the oxygen surface functional groups. A layer of adsorbed water fully coated the surface and occurred in two distinct sites. Water above this showed signs of layering and indicated that water ordering extended 7-10 {angstrom} from the surface. Relaxations and the arrangement of interfacial water were nearly identical on both the unreconstructed corundum and isostructural hematite (110) surfaces. Comparison to corundum and hematite (012) suggests that the arrangement of interfacial water is primarily controlled by mineral surface structure.

  5. Interfacial Materials for Organic Solar Cells: Recent Advances and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhigang; Wei, Jiajun; Zheng, Qingdong

    2016-08-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have shown great promise as low-cost photovoltaic devices for solar energy conversion over the past decade. Interfacial engineering provides a powerful strategy to enhance efficiency and stability of OSCs. With the rapid advances of interface layer materials and active layer materials, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of both single-junction and tandem OSCs have exceeded a landmark value of 10%. This review summarizes the latest advances in interfacial layers for single-junction and tandem OSCs. Electron or hole transporting materials, including metal oxides, polymers/small-molecules, metals and metal salts/complexes, carbon-based materials, organic-inorganic hybrids/composites, and other emerging materials, are systemically presented as cathode and anode interface layers for high performance OSCs. Meanwhile, incorporating these electron-transporting and hole-transporting layer materials as building blocks, a variety of interconnecting layers for conventional or inverted tandem OSCs are comprehensively discussed, along with their functions to bridge the difference between adjacent subcells. By analyzing the structure-property relationships of various interfacial materials, the important design rules for such materials towards high efficiency and stable OSCs are highlighted. Finally, we present a brief summary as well as some perspectives to help researchers understand the current challenges and opportunities in this emerging area of research.

  6. Interfacial Shear Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments on decreasing the operating temperature for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have enabled the use of high temperature ferritic alloys as interconnect materials. Oxide scale will inevitably grow on the ferritic interconnects in a high temperature oxidation environment of SOFCs. The growth of the oxide scale induces growth stresses in the scale layer and on the scale/substrate interface. These growth stresses combined with the thermal stresses induced upon stacking cooling by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation, which may lead to serious cell performance degradation. Hence the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/modeling methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the SS 441 metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in details.

  7. Homocomposites of Polylactide (PLA) with Induced Interfacial Stereocomplex Crystallites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The demand for “green” degradable composite materials increases with growing environmental awareness. The key challenge is achieving the preferred physical properties and maintaining their eco-attributes in terms of the degradability of the matrix and the filler. Herein, we have designed a series of “green” homocomposites materials based purely on polylactide (PLA) polymers with different structures. Film-extruded homocomposites were prepared by melt-blending PLA matrixes (which had different degrees of crystallinity) with PLLA and PLA stereocomplex (SC) particles. The PLLA and SC particles were spherical and with 300–500 nm size. Interfacial crystalline structures in the form of stereocomplexes were obtained for certain particulate-homocomposite formulations. These SC crystallites were found at the particle/matrix interface when adding PLLA particles to a PLA matrix with d-lactide units, as confirmed by XRD and DSC data analyses. For all homocomposites, the PLLA and SC particles acted as nucleating agents and enhanced the crystallization of the PLA matrixes. The SC particles were more rigid and had a higher Young’s modulus compared with the PLLA particles. The mechanical properties of the homocomposites varied with particle size, rigidity, and the interfacial adhesion between the particles and the matrix. An improved tensile strength in the homocomposites was achieved from the interfacial stereocomplex formation. Hereafter, homocomposites with tunable crystalline arrangements and subsequently physical properties, are promising alternatives in strive for eco-composites and by this, creating materials that are completely degradable and sustainable. PMID:26523245

  8. Predictions of one-group interfacial area transport in TRACE

    SciTech Connect

    Worosz, T.; Talley, J. D.; Kim, S.; Bajorek, S. M.; Ireland, A.

    2012-07-01

    In current nuclear reactor system analysis codes utilizing the two-fluid model, flow regime dependent correlations are used to specify the interfacial area concentration (a i). This approach does not capture the continuous evolution of the interfacial structures, and thus, it can pose issues near the transition boundaries. Consequently, a pilot version of the system analysis code TRACE is being developed that employs the interfacial area transport equation (IATE). In this approach, dynamic estimation of a i is provided through mechanistic models for bubble coalescence and breakup. The implementation of the adiabatic, one-group IATE into TRACE is assessed against experimental data from 50 air-water, two-phase flow conditions in pipes ranging in inner diameter from 2.54 to 20.32 cm for both vertical co-current upward and downward flows. Predictions of pressure, void fraction, bubble velocity, and a i data are made. TRACE employing the conventional flow regime-based approach is found to underestimate a i and can only predict linear trends since the calculation is governed by the pressure. Furthermore, trends opposite to that of the data are predicted for some conditions. In contrast, TRACE with the one-group IATE demonstrates a significant improvement in predicting the experimental data with an average disagreement of {+-} 13%. Additionally, TRACE with the one-group IATE is capable of predicting nonlinear axial development of a, by accounting for various bubble interaction mechanisms, such as coalescence and disintegration. (authors)

  9. Interfacial thermal conductance of thiolate-protected gold nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Kelsey M.; Neidhart, Suzanne M.; Gezelter, J. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of thiolate-protected and solvated gold nanoparticles were carried out in the presence of a non-equilibrium heat flux between the solvent and the core of the particle. The interfacial thermal conductance (G) was computed for these interfaces, and the behavior of the thermal conductance was studied as a function of particle size, ligand flexibility, and ligand chain length. In all cases, thermal conductance of the ligand-protected particles was higher than the bare metal-solvent interface. A number of mechanisms for the enhanced conductance were investigated, including thiolate-driven corrugation of the metal surface, solvent ordering at the interface, solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand ordering relative to the particle surface. Only the smallest particles exhibited significant corrugation. All ligands permitted substantial solvent-ligand interpenetration, and ligand chain length has a significant influence on the orientational ordering of interfacial solvent. Solvent-ligand vibrational overlap, particularly in the low frequency range (<80 cm-1), was significantly altered by ligand rigidity, and had direct influence on the interfacial thermal conductance.

  10. How intermixing and anharmonicity enhances interfacial thermal conductance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanco, Carlos; Zhang, Jingjie; Le, Nam; Rastgarkafshgarkolaei, Rouzbeh; Norris, Pamela; Ghosh, Avik

    2015-03-01

    The thermal conductance at an interface, whether ballistic or diffusive, can be expressed as a product of the number of conducting channels (M) and their average transmission (T). The common expectation is that interfacial defects reduce T and thus hurt the conductance. This is however at odds with recent simulations showing that a thin intermixing layer can in fact enhance the conductance. We argue that such an enhancement occurs when the increase in number of modes outweighs the reduction in their average transmission. The new channels open as a result of (a) the random interfacial structure that relaxes the conservation rules for the transverse momentum and promotes transitions between formerly symmetry disallowed channels; and (b) inelastic scattering through phonon-phonon interactions that allow modes beyond the contact cut-off frequency to contribute to transport. We use these results to build a back of the envelope model for interfacial conductance that depends on the mixing distribution, the anharmonic strength, the phonon polarization and wavelength. Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) as well as Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations on Si/mixed layer/Ge, as well as simpler FCC crystals support our results. NSF-CAREER (QMHP 1028883), NSF-IDR (CBET 1134311), XSEDE (TG-DMR130123).

  11. Interfacial structures and acidity of edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Cheng, Jun; Sprik, Michiel; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng

    2015-11-01

    We report an FPMD (first-principles molecular dynamics) study of the interfacial structures and acidity constants of the edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites. To understand the effects of Fe oxidation states on the interfacial properties, we investigated both the oxidized and reduced states of the (0 1 0)-type edges of two clay models with different Fe contents. The coordination states of edge Fe atoms are determined from the free energy curves for the desorption of the H2O ligands. The results of both clay models show that for Fe(III), only the 6-coordinate states are stable, whereas for Fe(II), both the 6- and 5-coordinate states are stable. Using the FPMD-based vertical energy gap technique, the pKa values of the edge sites are evaluated for both oxidation states. The results indicate that for both clay models, both the octahedral and tetrahedral sites become much less acidic upon Fe reduction. Therefore, the comparison reveals that the interfacial structures and protonation states are strongly dependent on the Fe oxidation states. Using the calculated results, we have derived the pH-dependent surface complexing mechanisms of ferruginous smectites.

  12. Wettability controls slow immiscible displacement through local interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Michael; Brinkmann, Martin; Seemann, Ralf; Hiller, Thomas; Sanchez de La Lama, Marta; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Immiscible fluid displacement with average front velocities in the capillary-dominated regime is studied in a transparent Hele-Shaw cell with cylindrical posts. Employing various combinations of fluids and wall materials allows us to cover a range of advancing contact angles 46∘≤θa≤180∘ of the invading fluid in our experiments. In parallel, we study the displacement process in particle-based simulations that account for wall wettability. Considering the same arrangement of posts in experiments and simulation, we find a consistent crossover between stable interfacial displacement at θa≲80∘ and capillary fingering at high contact angles θa≳120∘ . The position of the crossover is quantified through the evolution of the interface length and the final saturation of the displaced fluid. A statistical analysis of the local displacement processes demonstrates that the shape evolution of the fluid front is governed by local instabilities as proposed by Cieplak and Robbins for a quasistatic interfacial displacement [Cieplak and Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.60.2042]. The regime of stable front advances coincides with a corresponding region of contact angles where cooperative interfacial instabilities prevail. Capillary fingering, however, is observed only for large θa, where noncooperative instabilities dominate the invasion process.

  13. Interfacial Materials for Organic Solar Cells: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhigang; Wei, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have shown great promise as low‐cost photovoltaic devices for solar energy conversion over the past decade. Interfacial engineering provides a powerful strategy to enhance efficiency and stability of OSCs. With the rapid advances of interface layer materials and active layer materials, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of both single‐junction and tandem OSCs have exceeded a landmark value of 10%. This review summarizes the latest advances in interfacial layers for single‐junction and tandem OSCs. Electron or hole transporting materials, including metal oxides, polymers/small‐molecules, metals and metal salts/complexes, carbon‐based materials, organic‐inorganic hybrids/composites, and other emerging materials, are systemically presented as cathode and anode interface layers for high performance OSCs. Meanwhile, incorporating these electron‐transporting and hole‐transporting layer materials as building blocks, a variety of interconnecting layers for conventional or inverted tandem OSCs are comprehensively discussed, along with their functions to bridge the difference between adjacent subcells. By analyzing the structure–property relationships of various interfacial materials, the important design rules for such materials towards high efficiency and stable OSCs are highlighted. Finally, we present a brief summary as well as some perspectives to help researchers understand the current challenges and opportunities in this emerging area of research. PMID:27812480

  14. Lipases at interfaces: unique interfacial properties as globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Reis, P; Miller, R; Krägel, J; Leser, M; Fainerman, V B; Watzke, H; Holmberg, K

    2008-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of two globular proteins, lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and beta-lactoglobulin, at inert oil/water and air/water interfaces was studied by the pendant drop technique. The kinetics and adsorption isotherms were interpreted for both proteins in different environments. It was found that the adopted mathematical models well describe the adsorption behavior of the proteins at the studied interfaces. One of the main findings is that unique interfacial properties were observed for lipase as compared to the reference beta-lactoglobulin. A folded drop with a "skinlike" film was formed for the two proteins after aging followed by compression. This behavior is normally associated with protein unfolding and covalent cross-linking at the interface. Despite this, the lipase activity was not suppressed. By highlighting the unique interfacial properties of lipases, we believe that the presented work contributes to a better understanding of lipase interfacial activation and the mechanisms regulating lipolysis. The results indicate that the understanding of the physical properties of lipases can lead to novel approaches to regulate their activity.

  15. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  16. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  17. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  18. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  19. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  20. Conductivity and interfacial charge induced phenomena in ferroelectric films and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chung Kwan

    2005-11-01

    Ferroelectric materials are polar dielectrics which normally possess small but finite electrical conductivity. We believe that conductivity in ferroelectrics can induce new phenomena or modify known physical phenomena, which may be difficult to understand if the materials are regarded as perfectly insulating. In this thesis, some "anomalous" phenomena are investigated for which the origins are still under debate in literature, and we suggest that these may very well be manifestations of electrical conduction and electric charges. Ferroelectric systems of interest to this investigation include composites and films. Electrical conductivity in ferroelectric composites allows free charge to accumulate at the matrix-inclusion interfaces. We focus on the role of interfacial charge at such interfaces in ferroelectric 0--3 composites (normally, ferroelectric ceramic inclusions dispersed in polymer matrices) in the interpretation of their peculiar experimental results. The effect of interfacial charge on the piezoelectric properties of ferroelectric 0--3 composites and the effect of electrical conductivity on their dielectric and piezoelectric properties are also investigated. Our previously developed model has been extended to include the additional contribution from the deformation of the inclusion particles (for discussing the effect of interfacial charge) due to the applied stresses in piezoelectric measurements, and for discussing the effect of conductivity to include its contribution as well as the frequency of measurement. Phenomena induced by electrical conductivity in other ferroelectric systems have also been studied. We consider the effects of electrical conductivity on the dynamic polarization behavior of ferroelectric films. Using a parallelogram-like P-E hysteresis model for the film material, explicit expressions are obtained for describing the D-E loops of ferroelectric films as would be measured from a Sawyer-Tower circuit which originally assumes the

  1. Interfacial polymerization on hydrophobic PVDF UF membranes surface: Membrane wetting through pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Sung; Lee, Hyun Ho; Seo, Jin Ah; Park, Hyun Sic; Park, Jinwon; Min, Byoung Ryul

    2015-11-01

    PVDF is widely used in water treatment membranes because of it high chemical resistance and thermal stability levels, and desirable mechanical properties. On the other hand, it is seldom used as support membrane for RO membranes, as it is difficult to undertake interfacial polymerization by traditional methods due to characteristic of hydrophobic surface. However, if the MPD solution is applied at pressures which exceed the pressure at which the PVDF membrane pushes water away, then it can be wetted within the membrane and PA/PVDF composite membrane can be prepared through the reaction of the wetted MPD and TMC. The theoretical penetration pressure needed to wet MPD solution in PVDF with pore size of 10 nm, calculated using Jurin's Law, is 8.8 bar. In this study, PVDF membrane was immersed in MPD solution for 4 h at pressures higher than theoretical penetration pressure using N2 gas at 25 °C. Interfacial polymerization with TMC was undertaken with surface of the PVDF membrane wetted in MPD solution in this manner to form a thin but consistent PA layer, which was verified through FT-IR and SEM. Salt rejection and permeation flux measurements for NaCl 5000 ppm was conducted for the PA/PVDF membranes prepared in this manner at 25 °C, 30 bar using cross-flow water permeation system. PA/PVDF composite membrane wetted with MPD solution and interfacial polymerization undertaken at 10, 16 and 20 bar with N2 gas displayed salt rejection ratio of 37.94, 41.79 and 51.03%, and permeation flux of 7.38, 5.26 and 7.94LMH, respectively. The salt rejection ratio for membrane wetted with MPD at 16 bar with CO2 gas displayed salt rejection ratio of 78.26% and permeation flux of 4.91LMH. The results confirmed the possibility of using PVDF UF membrane of superior properties as support membrane for NF and RO.

  2. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  3. Interfacial structure of sugar beet pectin studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Kirby, A R; Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    2009-07-21

    Unlike pectins from other origins, sugar beet pectin (SBP) acts as an emulsifier, a property which has been correlated to its more hydrophobic character and high protein content. In this work, we have investigated the structure of SBP at interfaces by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three situations were studied: the mica/water, graphite/water, and air/water interface. For the latter, the interfacial film was transferred onto mica using the Langmuir-Blodgett method. While the adsorption of individual pectin chains on mica requires the addition of divalent cations, on graphite a thin layer containing amorphous areas and rodlike chains forms spontaneously. We suggest that the layer contains proteins and pectin chains which are bound to the graphite via CH-pi interactions. SBP adsorbed at the air/water interface forms an elastic layer, as evidenced by pendant drop and surface shear rheology measurements. AFM Images reveal the layer is crippled with holes and contains rodlike chains, suggesting that the pectin chains prevent the formation of a densely packed protein layer. Nevertheless, we show that the interfacial pectin film is more resistant to displacement by surfactants than a pure protein film, possibly because of the formation of linkages between the pectin chains. In contrast, alkali treatment of the pectin appears to remove the pectin chains from the air/water interface and leaves a film that behaves similarly to pure protein. This work gives a new insight into the nanoscale organization of polysaccharides and polysaccharide-protein mixtures at macroscopic surfaces. The results gathered from the different interfaces studied permit a better understanding of the likely structure of SBP at the interface of emulsion droplets. Such knowledge might be used to modify rationally the pectin in order to improve its emulsifying properties, leading to broader commercial applications.

  4. Characterization of the surface and interfacial properties of the lamina splendens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexwinkle, Joe T.; Hunt, Heather K.; Pfeiffer, Ferris M.

    2017-01-01

    Joint disease affects approximately 52.5 million patients in the United States alone, costing 80.8 billion USD in direct healthcare costs. The development of treatment programs for joint disease and trauma requires accurate assessment of articular cartilage degradation. The articular cartilage is the interfacial tissue between articulating surfaces, such as bones, and acts as low-friction interfaces. Damage to the lamina splendens, which is the articular cartilage's topmost layer, is an early indicator of joint degradation caused by injury or disease. By gaining comprehensive knowledge on the lamina splendens, particularly its structure and interfacial properties, researchers could enhance the accuracy of human and animal biomechanical models, as well as develop appropriate biomimetic materials for replacing damaged articular cartilage, thereby leading to rational treatment programs for joint disease and injury. Previous studies that utilize light, electron, and force microscopy techniques have found that the lamina splendens is composed of collagen fibers oriented parallel to the cartilage surface and encased in a proteoglycan matrix. Such orientation maximizes wear resistance and proteoglycan retention while promoting the passage of nutrients and synovial fluid. Although the structure of the lamina splendens has been explored in the literature, the low-friction interface of this tissue remains only partially characterized. Various functional models are currently available for the interface, such as pure boundary lubrication, thin films exuded under pressure, and sheets of trapped proteins. Recent studies suggest that each of these lubrication models has certain advantages over one another. Further research is needed to fully model the interface of this tissue. In this review, we summarize the methods for characterizing the lamina splendens and the results of each method. This paper aims to serve as a resource for existing studies to date and a roadmap of the

  5. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  6. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  7. INTERFACIAL AREA TRANSPORT AND REGIME TRANSITION IN COMBINATORIAL CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Seugjin Kim

    2011-01-28

    . This study investigates the geometric effects of 90-degree vertical elbows and flow configurations in two-phase flow. The study shows that the elbows make a significant effect on the transport characteristics of two-phase flow, which includes the changes in interfacial structures, bubble interaction mechanisms and flow regime transition. The effect of the elbows is characterized for global and local two-phase flow parameters. The global two-phase flow parameters include two-phase pressure, interfacial structures and flow regime transition. In order to characterize the frictional pressure drop and minor loss across the vertical elbows, pressure measurements are obtained across the test section over a wide range of flow conditions in both single-phase and two-phase flow conditions. A two-phase pressure drop correlation analogous to Lockhart-Martinelli correlation is proposed to predict the minor loss across the elbows. A high speed camera is employed to perform extensive flow visualization studies across the elbows in vertical upward, horizontal and vertical downward sections and modified flow regime maps are proposed. It is found that modified flow regime maps immediately downstream of the vertical upward elbow deviate significantly from the conventional flow regime map. A qualitative assessment of the counter-current flow limitation characteristics specific to the current experimental facility is performed. A multi-sensor conductivity probe is used to measure local two-phase flow parameters such as: void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency. The local measurements are obtained for six different flow conditions at ten measurement locations along axial direction of the test section. Both the vertical-upward and vertical-downward elbows have a significant impact on bubble distribution, resulting in, a bimodal distribution along the horizontal radius of the tube cross-section and migration of bubbles towards the inside of the

  8. Micromechanical study of concrete materials with interfacial transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambheera, Ramesh

    This thesis describes analytical and finite element micromechanical studies for investigating the mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A concrete material is treated as a three phase composite consisting of aggregate, bulk paste and an interfacial transition zone around the aggregate. Experimental work on the microstructure of concrete has demonstrated the existence of interfacial transition zone and that this is the weakest link in the composite system of concrete material. Hence, the main focus of this thesis is to understand the role of the interfacial transition zone on the overall mechanical behavior of concrete materials. A four phase composite model consisting of aggregate, ITZ, bulk paste and an equivalent homogeneous medium is proposed to represent the concrete material. Analytical solutions are derived for the overall elastic moduli of the four phase composite model. The effects of volume fraction and the elastic moduli of the transition zone on the overall elastic moduli are investigated. The results obtained using the analytical model are in good agreement with those obtained from experiments. Analytical stress solutions are also derived for the four phase composite model subjected to uniaxial compression in two and three dimensions. The stress concentration and the tensile stress development in the interfacial transition zone are investigated. The effect of imperfect shear interfacial bond on the overall elastic moduli and on the stresses in the transition zone is also investigated. Basic concepts of damage mechanics are applied to model the damage in the transition zone. The effect of local damage in the transition zone on the overall damage in a concrete material is illustrated. For the specific case of uniaxial compression, the pre-peak stress-strain curves are generated. Computational analysis of micromechanical models of concrete materials requires efficient finite elements. This thesis proposes the use of hybrid finite elements for the

  9. Determination of interfacial tension of binary mixtures from perturbative approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules from direct simulation of the vapour-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with same molecular size but different dispersive energy parameter values. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček, presented recently by MacDowell and Blas and Martínez-Ruiz et al., to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of Lennard-Jones molecules with a cut-off distance rc = 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ε22/ε11, is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the less volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, a direct consequence of stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in

  10. The Interfacial Behavior between Biochar and Soil Minerals and Its Effect on Biochar Stability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhao, Ling; Gao, Bin; Xu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Xinde

    2016-03-01

    In this study, FeCl3, AlCl3, CaCl2, and kaolinite were selected as model soil minerals and incubated with walnut shell derived biochar for 3 months and the incubated biochar was then separated for the investigation of biochar-mineral interfacial behavior using XRD and SEM-EDS. The XPS, TGA, and H2O2 oxidation were applied to evaluate effects of the interaction on the stability of biochar. Fe8O8(OH)8Cl1.35 and AlCl3·6H2O were newly formed on the biochar surface or inside of the biochar pores. At the biochar-mineral interface, organometallic complexes such as Fe-O-C were generated. All the 4 minerals enhanced the oxidation resistance of biochar surface by decreasing the relative contents of C-O, C═O, and COOH from 36.3% to 16.6-26.5%. Oxidation resistance of entire biochar particles was greatly increased with C losses in H2O2 oxidation decreasing by 13.4-79.6%, and the C recalcitrance index (R50,bicohar) in TGA analysis increasing from 44.6% to 45.9-49.6%. Enhanced oxidation resistance of biochar surface was likely due to the physical isolation from newly formed minerals, while organometallic complex formation was probably responsible for the increase in oxidation resistance of entire biochar particles. Results indicated that mineral-rich soils seemed to be a beneficial environment for biochar since soil minerals could increase biochar stability, which displays an important environmental significance of biochar for long-term carbon sequestration.

  11. Interfacial Phenomena in Fe/Stainless Steel-TiC Systems and the Effect of Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiviö, Miia; Holappa, Lauri; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    Titanium carbide is used as reinforcement particles in composites due to its hardness, wear resistance and stability. This work is a part of the study in which titanium carbides are formed in stainless steel castings in the mold to improve the wear resistance of a certain surface of the casting. Such local reinforcement is a very potential method but it is a quite demanding task requiring profound knowledge of interfacial phenomena in the system, wettability, stability, dissolution and precipitation of new phases in production of these materials. Good wetting between different constituents in the material is a key factor to attain maximal positive effects. Mo is used with TiC or Ti(C,N) reinforcement in composites to improve wettability. In this work the effect of Mo on the phenomena in Fe/stainless steel-TiC systems was examined by wetting experiments between the substrate and the alloy. Wetting was not significantly improved by adding Mo to the systems. Core-rim type carbides as well as more homogenous carbide particles were observed. Overall the carbide particles are very complex regarding to their chemistry, size and shape which aspects have to be taken into account in the development of these materials and manufacturing processes.

  12. Air electrode material for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solid solution with a perovskite-like crystal structure having the general formula La.sub.1-x-w (M.sub.L).sub.x (Ce).sub.w (M.sub.S1).sub.1-y (M.sub.S2).sub.y O.sub.3 where M.sub.L is Ca, Sr, Ba, or mixtures thereof, M.sub.S1 is Mn, Cr, or mixtures thereof and M.sub.S2 is Ni, Fe, Co, Ti, Al, In, Sn, Mg, Y, Nb, Ta, or mixtures thereof, w is about 0.05 to about 0.25, x+w is about 0.1 to about 0.7, and y is 0 to about 0.5. In the formula, M.sub.L is preferably Ca, w is preferably 0.1 to 0.2, x+w is preferably 0.4 to 0.7, and y is preferably 0. The solid solution can be used in an electrochemical cell where it more closely matches the thermal expansion characteristics of the support tube and electrolyte of the cell.

  13. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  14. The effect of chain rigidity on the interfacial layer thickness and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Carroll, Bobby; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    There are growing experimental evidences showing the existence of an interfacial layer that has a finite thickness with slowing down dynamics in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Moreover, it is believed that the interfacial layer plays a significant role on various macroscopic properties of PNCs. A thicker interfacial layer is found to have more pronounced effect on the macroscopic properties such as the mechanical enhancement. However, it is not clear what molecular parameter controls the interfacial layer thickness. Inspired by our recent computer simulations that showed the chain rigidity correlated well with the interfacial layer thickness, we performed systematic experimental studies on different polymer nanocomposites by varying the chain stiffness. Combining small-angle X-ray scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, we find a good correlation between the polymer Kuhn length and the thickness of the interfacial layer, confirming the earlier computer simulations results. Our findings provide a direct guidance for the design of new PNCs with desired properties.

  15. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Shutthanandan, V.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2014-01-10

    The interfacial region between graphene and an imidazolium based ionic liquid is studied using spectroscopic analysis and computational modelling. This combined approach reveals that the molecular level structure of the interfacial region is significantly influenced by functional group defects on the graphene surface.The combined experimental and computational study reveals that the molecular structure at interfacial region between graphene and imidazolium based ionic liquid is defined by the hydroxyl functional groups on the graphene surface

  16. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  17. Directed disassembly of an interfacial rubisco protein network.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; Malcolm, Andrew S; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2007-05-22

    We present the first study of the directed disassembly of a protein network at the air-water interface by the synergistic action of a surfactant and an enzyme. We seek to understand the fundamentals of protein network disassembly by using rubisco adsorbed at the air-water interface as a model. We propose that rubisco adsorption at the air-water interface results in the formation of a fishnet-like network of interconnected protein molecules, capable of transmitting lateral force. The mechanical properties of the rubisco network during assembly and disassembly at the air-water interface were characterized by direct measurement of laterally transmitted force through the protein network using the Cambridge interfacial tensiometer. We have shown that, when used individually, either 2 ppm of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzyl sulfonate (SDOBS), or 2 ppm of the enzyme, subtilisin A (SA), were insufficient to completely disassemble the rubisco network within 1 h of treatment. However, a combination of 2 ppm SDOBS and 2 ppm SA led to almost complete disassembly within 1 h. Increasing the concentration of SA in the mixture from 2 to 10 ppm, while keeping the SDOBS concentration constant, significantly decreased the time required to completely disassemble the rubisco network. Furthermore, the initial rate of network disassembly using formulations containing SDOBS was surprisingly insensitive to this increase in SA concentration. This study gives insight into the role of lateral interactions between protein molecules at interfaces in stabilizing interfacial protein networks and shows that surfactant and enzyme working in combination proves more effective at disrupting and mobilizing the interfacial protein network than the action of either agent alone.

  18. Sorption and Interfacial Rheology Study of Model Asphaltene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pradilla, Diego; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Samaniuk, Joseph; Skrzypiec, Marta; Vermant, Jan

    2016-03-29

    The sorption and rheological properties of an acidic polyaromatic compound (C5PeC11), which can be used to further our understanding of the behavior of asphaltenes, are determined experimentally. The results show that C5PeC11 exhibits the type of pH-dependent surface activity and interfacial shear rheology observed in C6-asphaltenes with a decrease in the interfacial tension concomitant with the elastic modulus when the pH increases. Surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms show evidence of aggregation behavior and π-π stacking at both the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Similarly, interactions between adsorbed C5PeC11 compounds are evidenced through desorption experiments at the oil/water interface. Contrary to indigenous asphaltenes, adsorption is reversible, but desorption is slower than for noninteracting species. The reversibility enables us to create layers reproducibly, whereas the presence of interactions between the compounds enables us to mimic the key aspects of interfacial activity in asphaltenes. Shear and dilatational rheology show that C5PeC11 forms a predominantly elastic film both at the liquid/air and the liquid/liquid interfaces. Furthermore, a soft glassy rheology model (SGR) fits the data obtained at the liquid/liquid interface. However, it is shown that the effective noise temperature determined from the SGR model for C5PeC11 is higher than for indigenous asphaltenes measured under similar conditions. Finally, from a colloidal and rheological standpoint, the results highlight the importance of adequately addressing the distinction between the material functions and true elasticity extracted from a shear measurement and the apparent elasticity measured in dilatational-pendant drop setups.

  19. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  20. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-07

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed.

  1. Interfacial sciences in unconventional petroleum production: from fundamentals to applications.

    PubMed

    He, Lin; Lin, Feng; Li, Xingang; Sui, Hong; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-08-07

    With the ever increasing demand for energy to meet the needs of growth in population and improvement in the living standards in particular in developing countries, the abundant unconventional oil reserves (about 70% of total world oil), such as heavy oil, oil/tar sands and shale oil, are playing an increasingly important role in securing global energy supply. Compared with the conventional reserves unconventional oil reserves are characterized by extremely high viscosity and density, combined with complex chemistry. As a result, petroleum production from unconventional oil reserves is much more difficult and costly with more serious environmental impacts. As a key underpinning science, understanding the interfacial phenomena involved in unconventional petroleum production, such as oil liberation from host rocks, oil-water emulsions and demulsification, is critical for developing novel processes to improve oil production while reducing GHG emission and other environmental impacts at a lower operating cost. In the past decade, significant efforts and advances have been made in applying the principles of interfacial sciences to better understand complex unconventional oil-systems, while many environmental and production challenges remain. In this critical review, the recent research findings and progress in the interfacial sciences related to unconventional petroleum production are critically reviewed. In particular, the chemistry of unconventional oils, liberation mechanisms of oil from host rocks and mechanisms of emulsion stability and destabilization in unconventional oil production systems are discussed in detail. This review also seeks to summarize the current state-of-the-art characterization techniques and brings forward the challenges and opportunities for future research in this important field of physical chemistry and petroleum.

  2. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/Si(111) interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Song, Hong-Quan; Shen, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    By applying the Chen-Möbius inversion method, a concise formula is introduced to get the pair potentials of the Ag/Si(111) interface by inversion of the ab initio adhesive energies. The check shows that the inversed potentials are self-consistent. Then, by using the interfacial potentials obtained, we analyze the changes of the energy, stress and atomic structures, giving a detailed presentation of the fracture process about the Ag/Si(111) interface. Meanwhile, we know that there are three kinds of fracture mode. In this work, the fracture process is performed in mode II (shear).

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial crack propagation in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.M. |; Selinger, R.L.B.

    1999-08-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the evolution of a crack front in interfacial fracture in three dimensions. They find that when a crack passes through a localized region of heterogeneous toughness, crack front waves are initiated and propagate laterally. They also investigate the development of roughness of the crack front when the crack propagates in a region of heterogeneous toughness. They find that in steady state the mean square width W of the front scales with system size L as W {approximately} L{sup 0.35}, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  4. Interfacial properties of asphaltenes at toluene-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zarkar, Sharli; Pauchard, Vincent; Farooq, Umer; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2015-05-05

    Asphaltenes are "n-alkane insoluble" species in crude oil that stabilize water-in-oil emulsions. To understand asphaltene adsorption mechanisms at oil-water interfaces and coalescence blockage, we first studied the behavior in aliphatic oil-water systems in which asphaltenes are almost insoluble. They adsorbed as monomers, giving a unique master curve relating interfacial tension (IFT) to interfacial coverage through a Langmuir equation of state (EoS). The long-time surface coverage was independent of asphaltene bulk concentration and asymptotically approached the 2-D packing limit for polydisperse disks. On coalescence, the surface coverage exceeded the 2-D limit and the asphaltene film appeared to become solidlike, apparently undergoing a transition to a soft glassy material and blocking further coalescence. However, real systems consist of mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic components in which asphaltenes may be quite soluble. To understand solubility effects, we focus here on how the increased bulk solubility of asphaltenes affects their interfacial properties in comparison to aliphatic oil-water systems. Unlike the "almost irreversible" adsorption of asphaltenes where the asymptotic interfacial coverage was independent of the bulk concentration, an equilibrium surface pressure, dependent on bulk concentration, was obtained for toluene-water systems because of adsorption being balanced by desorption. The equilibrium surface coverage could be obtained from the short- and long-term Ward-Tordai approximations. The behavior of the equilibrium surface pressure with the equilibrium surface coverage was then derived. These data for various asphaltene concentrations were used to determine the EoS, which for toluene-water could also be fitted by the Langmuir EoS with Γ∞ = 3.3 molecule/nm(2), the same value as that found for these asphaltenes in aliphatic media. Asphaltene solubility in the bulk phase only appears to affect the adsorption isotherm but not the Eo

  5. An analysis of interfacial waves and air ingestion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimov, Azat

    This research was focused on developing analytical methods with which to derive the functional forms of the various interfacial forces in two-fluid models [Galimov et al., 2004], and on the Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of traveling breaking waves and plunging liquid jets. Analytical results are presented for a stable stratified wavy two-phase flow and the associated interfacial force densities of a two-fluid model. In particular, the non-drag interfacial force density [Drew & Passman, 1998], the Reynolds stress tensor, and the term ( p˜cli -pcl)∇alphacl, which drives surface waves, were derived, where p˜cli is interfacial average pressure, pcl is the average pressure, and alphacl is the volume fraction of the continuous liquid phase. These functional forms are potentially useful for developing two-fluid model closure relations for computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) numerical solvers. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be generalized to other flow regimes (e.g., annular flows). A comparison of the analytical and ensemble-averaged DNS results show good agreement, and it appears that this approach can be used to develop phenomenological flow-regime-specific closure laws for two-fluid models [Lahey & Drew, 2004], [Lahey, 2005]. A successful 2-D DNS of breaking traveling waves was performed. These calculations had periodic boundary conditions and the physical parameters for air/water flow at atmospheric pressure, including a liquid/gas density ratio of 1,000 and representative surface tension and viscosities. Detailed 3-D DNS was also made for a plunging liquid jet. The processes of forming the liquid jet, the associated air cavity, capturing an initial large donut-shaped air bubble, and developing and breaking-up this bubble into smaller bubbles due to liquid shear, were shown. These simulations showed that the inertia of the liquid jet initially depressed the pool's surface and the toroidal liquid eddy formed subsequently resulted in air

  6. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  7. Quantum Oscillations in an Interfacial 2D Electron Gas.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bingop; Lu, Ping; Liu, Henan; Lin, Jiao; Ye, Zhenyu; Jaime, Marcelo; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Yuan, Huiqiu; Wu, Huizhen; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb1-xSnxTe thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.

  8. Interfacial deformation and friction heating in ultrasonic Al ribbon bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo; Maeda, Masakatsu; Ando, Masaya; Yamaguchi, Eito

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial deformation and friction behavior between an Al ribbon and an electric pad (or substrate) during ultrasonic bonding is analyzed, based on numerical simulation and experimental results. The friction heating is estimated by the friction slip work at the bonding interface between the ribbon and pad. The temperature rise of the bonding interface is calculated by the numerical simulation and compared with the experimental results. It is suggested that the electric pad reduces the temperature rise, as compared to the bonding process without a pad. The shear stress at the bonding interface increases as the bonding progresses. The frictional slip due to adhesion increases stress and heats the bond interface.

  9. Exploiting interfacial water properties for desalination and purification applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu; Varma, Sameer; Nyman, May Devan; Alam, Todd Michael; Thuermer, Konrad; Holland, Gregory P.; Leung, Kevin; Liu, Nanguo; Xomeritakis, George K.; Frankamp, Benjamin L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Hartl, Monika A.; Travesset, Alex; Anderson, Joshua A.; Huber, Dale L.; Kissel, David J.; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Lorenz, Christian Douglas; Major, Ryan C.; McGrath, Matthew J.; Farrow, Darcie; Cecchi, Joseph L.; van Swol, Frank B.; Singh, Seema; Rempe, Susan B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Feibelman, Peter Julian; Houston, Jack E.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Chen, Zhu; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Pless, Jason D.; Daemen, Luke L.; Gerung, Henry; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2008-09-01

    A molecular-scale interpretation of interfacial processes is often downplayed in the analysis of traditional water treatment methods. However, such an approach is critical for the development of enhanced performance in traditional desalination and water treatments. Water confined between surfaces, within channels, or in pores is ubiquitous in technology and nature. Its physical and chemical properties in such environments are unpredictably different from bulk water. As a result, advances in water desalination and purification methods may be accomplished through an improved analysis of water behavior in these challenging environments using state-of-the-art microscopy, spectroscopy, experimental, and computational methods.

  10. Interfacial interactions between natural RBC membranes and synthetic polymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian T.; Jack Hu, Che-Ming; Fang, Ronnie H.; Dehaini, Diana; Carpenter, Cody; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-02-01

    The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from 65 to 340 nm. Additionally, the study reveals that both surface glycans on RBC membranes and the substrate properties play a significant role in driving and directing the membrane-particle assembly. These findings further the understanding of the dynamics between cellular membranes and nanoscale substrates and provide valuable information toward future development and characterization of cellular membrane-cloaked nanodevices.The unique structural features and stealth properties of a recently developed red blood cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticle (RBC-NP) platform raise curiosity over the interfacial interactions between natural cellular membranes and polymeric nanoparticle substrates. Herein, several interfacial aspects of the RBC-NPs are examined, including completeness of membrane coverage, membrane sidedness upon coating, and the effects of polymeric particles' surface charge and surface curvature on the membrane cloaking process. The study shows that RBC membranes completely cover negatively charged polymeric nanoparticles in a right-side-out manner and enhance the particles' colloidal stability. The membrane cloaking process is applicable to particle substrates with a diameter ranging from

  11. Identifying and Engineering the Electronic Properties of the Resistive Switching Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    The resistive switching interface is promising for building random access memory devices with electroforming-free characteristics, rectification functionality and highly reproducible resistive switching performance. The electronic structures of the resistive switching interface are important not only from a fundamental point of view, but also from the fascinating perspective of interface engineering for high performance devices. However, the electronic properties of typical resistive switching interfacial structures at an atomic level are less well understood, compared to those of bulky resistive switching structures. In this work, we study the electronic structures of two typical resistive switching interfacial structures, TiO2/Ti4O7 and Ta2O5/TaO2, using the screened exchange (sX-LDA) functional. We uncover that the system Fermi energies of both interfaces are just above the conduction band edge of the corresponding stoichiometric oxides. According to the defect charge transition levels, the oxygen vacancy is stabilized at the -2 charged state in Ta2O5 and TiO2 where the switching takes place. However, it is desirable for the +2 charged oxygen vacancy to be stabilized to achieve controlled resistive switching under the electrical field. We propose to introduce interfacial dopants to shift the system Fermi energies downward so that the +2 charged oxygen vacancy can be stable. Several dipole models are presented to account for the ability of the Fermi level to shift due to the interfacial dopants. These methods are readily applicable to interface engineering for high performance devices.

  12. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900 °C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900 °C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650 °C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900 °C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  13. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  14. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form.

  15. Solar-Pumping Upconversion of Interfacial Coordination Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2017-01-01

    An interfacial coordination nanoparticle successfully exhibited an upconversion blue emission excited by very low-power light irradiation, such as sunlight. The interfacial complex was composed of Yb ions and indigo dye, which formed a nano-ordered thin shell layer on a Tm2O3 nanoparticle. At the surface of the Tm2O3 particle, the indigo dye can be excited by non-laser excitation at 640 nm, following the intramolecular energy transfer from the indigo dye to the Yb ions. Additionally, the excitation energy of the Yb ion was upconverted to the blue emission of the Tm ion at 475 nm. This upconversion blue emission was achieved by excitation with a CW Xe lamp at an excitation power of 0.14 mW/cm2, which is significantly lower than the solar irradiation power of 1.4 mW/cm2 at 640 ± 5 nm.

  16. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Provis, John

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz) aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE) generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N)-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution) and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  17. Solar-Pumping Upconversion of Interfacial Coordination Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2017-01-01

    An interfacial coordination nanoparticle successfully exhibited an upconversion blue emission excited by very low-power light irradiation, such as sunlight. The interfacial complex was composed of Yb ions and indigo dye, which formed a nano-ordered thin shell layer on a Tm2O3 nanoparticle. At the surface of the Tm2O3 particle, the indigo dye can be excited by non-laser excitation at 640 nm, following the intramolecular energy transfer from the indigo dye to the Yb ions. Additionally, the excitation energy of the Yb ion was upconverted to the blue emission of the Tm ion at 475 nm. This upconversion blue emission was achieved by excitation with a CW Xe lamp at an excitation power of 0.14 mW/cm2, which is significantly lower than the solar irradiation power of 1.4 mW/cm2 at 640 ± 5 nm. PMID:28134295

  18. A nanoengine governor based on the end interfacial effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Kun; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2016-12-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a nanoengine governor based on the end interfacial effect of two rotary nanotubes. The governor contains a thermal-driven rotary nanomotor made from double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) and a coaxially laid out rotary nanotube near one end of the nanomotor rotor. The rotation of the rotor in the nanomotor can be controlled by two features. One is the stator (the outer tube of DWCNTs) which has some end atoms with inward radial deviation (IRD) on the stator. The other is the relative rotation of the neighboring rotary tube of the rotor. As the configuration of the stator is fixed, the end interfacial interaction between the two rotors will govern the dynamic response of the rotor in the nanomotor system. The obtained results demonstrate that the relative rotational speed between the two rotors provides friction on the rotor in the nanomotor system. In particular, higher relative rotational speed will provide lower friction on rotor 1, which is opposite to that between neighboring shells in DWCNTs.

  19. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  20. Characterization of interfacial waves in horizontal core-annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Singh, Ramesh; Tabor, Rico F.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we characterize interfacial waves in horizontal core annular flow (CAF) of fuel-oil and water. Experimental studies on CAF were performed in an acrylic pipe of 15.5mm internal diameter, and the time evolution of the oil-water interface shape was recorded with a high speed camera for a range of different flow-rates of oil (Qo) and water (Qw). The power spectrum of the interface shape shows a range of notable features. First, there is negligible energy in wavenumbers larger than 2 π / a , where a is the thickness of the annulus. Second, for high Qo /Qw , there is no single dominant wavelength, as the flow in the confined annulus does not allow formation of a preferred mode. Third, for lower Qo /Qw , a dominant mode arises at a wavenumber of 2 π / a . We also observe that the power spectrum of the interface shape depends weakly on Qw, and strongly on Qo, perhaps because the net shear rate in the annulus appears to depend weakly on Qw as well. We also attempt to build a general empirical model for CAF by relating the interfacial stress (calculated via the mean pressure gradient) to the flow rate in the annulus, the annular thickness and the core velocity. Authors are thankful to Orica Mining Services (Australia) for the financial support.

  1. Capillary, wettability and interfacial dynamics in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2009-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for different applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance/durability limitation in the PEFC arises from liquid water transport, perceived as the Holy Grail in PEFC operation. The porous catalyst layer (CL), fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and flow channels play a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance due to the transport limitation in the presence of liquid water and flooding phenomena. Although significant research, both theoretical and experimental, has been performed, there is serious paucity of fundamental understanding regarding the underlying structure-transport-performance interplay in the PEFC. The inherent complex morphologies, micro-scale transport physics involving coupled multiphase, multicomponent, electrochemically reactive phenomena and interfacial interactions in the constituent components pose a formidable challenge. In this paper, the impact of capillary transport, wetting characteristics and interfacial dynamics on liquid water transport is presented based on a comprehensive mesoscopic modeling framework with the objective to gain insight into the underlying electrodynamics, two-phase dynamics and the intricate structure-transport-interface interactions in the PEFC.

  2. Stabilization of PS/PLA cocontinuous blends by interfacial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lian; He, Siyao; Fruehwirth, John; Stein, Andreas; Cheng, Xiang; Macosko, Christopher

    Reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) is known to be effective in increasing the conductivity of cocontinuous polymer blends with a lower electrical percolation threshold. However, little is known regarding the localization and dynamics of r-GO along with morphology change during annealing. In this study, we develop a facile method to stabilize the polystyrene (PS)/polylactic acid (PLA) cocontinuous blends with r-GO jammed at interface. In this method, the non-functionalized GO is premixed with PLA via solvent method, and then reduced in-situ at 210oC to obtain a PLA/r-GO polymer composite. This composite is further mixed with PS via batch melt compounding. We observe the migration of r-GO from the PLA phase to the interface during annealing. The interfacial r-GO suppresses the coarsening of cocontinuous morphology and increases the conductivity of the filled polymer blend. Moreover, we systematically investigate the relationship between r-GO localization, rheological and conductivity change during annealing of r-GO filled PLA/PS blends. University of Minnesota Industrial Partnership for Research in Interfacial and Materials Engineering (IPRIME).

  3. Plasmonic Imaging of the Interfacial Potential Distribution on Bipolar Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hasheminejad, Meisam; Fang, Yimin; Li, Meng; Jiang, Yingyan; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar electrochemistry is based on the gradient distribution of free-electron density along an electrically isolated electrode, which causes a positive electrode potential at one end and a negative potential at the other, allowing for wide applications in analytical chemistry and materials science. To take full advantage of its wireless and high-throughput features, various types of optical probes, such as pH indicators and fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence reagents, have often been used to indirectly monitor the interfacial electron transfer through chromogenic or fluorogenic reactions. Herein, we report the first probe-free imaging approach that can directly visualize the distribution of the interfacial potential in bipolar electrodes, providing essential information for the validation and development of the theory and applications of bipolar electrochemistry. This approach is based on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance imaging on the local electron density in the electrode, which enables the direct mapping of potential with a spatial resolution close to the optical diffraction limit, a temporal resolution of 50 ms, and a sensitivity of 10 mV. In addition, in contrast to previous optical readouts that relied on faradaic reactions, the present work achieved the impedance-based measurements under non-faradaic conditions. It is anticipated that this technique will greatly expand the application of bipolar electrochemistry as a platform for chemical and biosensing.

  4. Molecular and Interfacial Calculations of Iron(II) Light Harvesters.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Wärnmark, Kenneth; Sundström, Villy; Persson, Petter

    2016-04-07

    Iron-carbene complexes show considerable promise as earth-abundant light-harvesters, and adsorption onto nanostructured TiO2 is a crucial step for developing solar energy applications. Intrinsic electron injection capabilities of such promising Fe(II) N-heterocyclic complexes (Fe-NHC) to TiO2 are calculated here, and found to correlate well with recent experimental findings of highly efficient interfacial injection. First, we examine the special bonding characteristics of Fe-NHC light harvesters. The excited-state surfaces are examined using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) to explore relaxed excited-state properties. Finally, by relaxing an Fe-NHC adsorbed on a TiO2 nanocluster, we show favorable injection properties in terms of interfacial energy level alignment and electronic coupling suitable for efficient electron injection of excited electrons from the Fe complex into the TiO2 conduction band on ∼100 fs time scales.

  5. Substrate-induced interfacial plasmonics for photovoltaic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinxi; Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Wang, Wei; Fang, Zheyu; Zhang, Guoqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used as light trapping schemes in solar cells, because it can concentrate light fields surrounding metal nanostructures and realize light management at the nanoscale. SPR in photovoltaics generally occurs at the metal/dielectric interfaces. A well-defined interface is therefore required to elucidate interfacial SPR processes. Here, we designed a photovoltaic device (PVD) with an atomically flat TiO2 dielectric/dye/graphene/metal nanoparticle (NP) interface for quantitatively studying the SPR enhancement of the photovoltaic conversion. Theoretical and experimental results indicated that the graphene monolayer was transparent to the electromagnetic field. This transparency led to significant substrate-induced plasmonic hybridization at the heterostructure interface. Combined with interparticle plasmonic coupling, the substrate-induced plasmonics concentrated light at the interface and enhanced the photo-excitation of dyes, thus improving the photoelectric conversion. Such a mechanistic understanding of interfacial plasmonic enhancement will further promote the development of efficient plasmon-enhanced solar cells and composite photocatalysts.

  6. Substrate-induced interfacial plasmonics for photovoltaic conversion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxi; Jia, Chuancheng; Ma, Bangjun; Wang, Wei; Fang, Zheyu; Zhang, Guoqing; Guo, Xuefeng

    2015-09-28

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is widely used as light trapping schemes in solar cells, because it can concentrate light fields surrounding metal nanostructures and realize light management at the nanoscale. SPR in photovoltaics generally occurs at the metal/dielectric interfaces. A well-defined interface is therefore required to elucidate interfacial SPR processes. Here, we designed a photovoltaic device (PVD) with an atomically flat TiO2 dielectric/dye/graphene/metal nanoparticle (NP) interface for quantitatively studying the SPR enhancement of the photovoltaic conversion. Theoretical and experimental results indicated that the graphene monolayer was transparent to the electromagnetic field. This transparency led to significant substrate-induced plasmonic hybridization at the heterostructure interface. Combined with interparticle plasmonic coupling, the substrate-induced plasmonics concentrated light at the interface and enhanced the photo-excitation of dyes, thus improving the photoelectric conversion. Such a mechanistic understanding of interfacial plasmonic enhancement will further promote the development of efficient plasmon-enhanced solar cells and composite photocatalysts.

  7. Interfacial Coupling-Induced Ferromagnetic Insulator Phase in Manganite Film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bangmin; Wu, Lijun; Yin, Wei-Guo; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Ping; Venkatesan, T; Chen, Jingsheng; Zhu, Yimei; Chow, Gan Moog

    2016-07-13

    Interfaces with subtle differences in atomic and electronic structures in perovskite ABO3 heterostructures often yield intriguingly different properties, yet their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report an integrated study of unusual transport, magnetic, and structural properties of Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film on SrTiO3 substrate. The variations in the out-of-plane lattice constant and BO6 octahedral rotation across the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3/SrTiO3 interface strongly depend on the thickness of the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film. In the 12 nm film, a new interface-sensitive ferromagnetic polaronic insulator (FI') phase is formed during the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition of SrTiO3, apparently due to the enhanced electron-phonon interaction and atomic disorder in the film. The transport properties of the FI' phase in the 30 nm film are masked because of the reduced interfacial coupling and smaller interface-to-volume ratio. This work demonstrates how thickness-dependent interfacial coupling leads to the formation of a theoretically predicted ferromagnetic-polaronic insulator, as illustrated in a new phase diagram, that is otherwise ferromagnetic metal (FM) in bulk form.

  8. Experiments of Interfacial Instability on a Ferrofluid Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Cheng, Y.-Z.; Tsai, W.-K.; Miranda, Jose A.

    2008-11-01

    The interfacial morphologies of an extremely thin layer of ferrofluid droplet under a constant perpendicular magnetic field are investigated. Striking patterns consisting of numerous sub-scale droplets that develop from Rosensweig instability are observed. For a dry plate the breaking pattern of sub-scale droplets can be characterized by a dimensionless magnetic Bond number, Bom. In general, a more pronounced instability, which is evident by a greater number of breaking sub-scale droplets N, arises with a higher Bom. For a magnetic Bond number that is larger than a critical value, the central droplet is torn apart. For a prewetted plate, a nearly flat fluid surface is achieved due to a smaller contact angle, which then leads to virtually evenly distributed sub-scale droplets. A global size for all breaking sub-scale droplets is observed regardless of their initial diameters. On the other hand, when a ferrofluid droplet is immersed in a thin layer of a nonmagnetic fluid, a formation of intriguing interfacial structures is observed, and the development of a hybrid-type ferrohydrodynamic instability is verified, where peak and labyrinthine ferrofluid patterns coexist and share a coupled dynamic evolution.

  9. Apparent Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Resin/Ceramic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Della Bona, A.; Anusavice, K.J.; Mecholsky, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest that the apparent interfacial fracture toughness (KA) may be estimated by fracture mechanics and fractography. This study tested the hypothesis that the KA of the adhesion zone of resin/ceramic systems is affected by the ceramic microstructure. Lithia disilicate-based (Empress2-E2) and leucite-based (Empress-E1) ceramics were surface-treated with hydrofluoric acid (HF) and/or silane (S), followed by an adhesive resin. Microtensile test specimens (n = 30; area of 1 ± 0.01 mm2) were indented (9.8 N) at the interface and loaded to failure in tension. We used tensile strength (σ) and the critical crack size (c) to calculate KA (KA = Yσc1/2) (Y = 1.65). ANOVA and Weibull analyses were used for statistical analyses. Mean KA (MPa•m1/2) values were: (E1HF) 0.26 ± 0.06; (E1S) 0.23 ± 0.06; (E1HFS) 0.30 ± 0.06; (E2HF) 0.31 ± 0.06; (E2S) 0.13 ± 0.05; and (E2HFS) 0.41 ± 0.07. All fractures originated from indentation sites. Estimation of interfacial toughness was feasible by fracture mechanics and fractography. The KA for the systems tested was affected by the ceramic microstructure and surface treatment. PMID:17062746

  10. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  11. Insect flight on fluid interfaces: a chaotic interfacial oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2013-11-01

    Flight is critical to the dominance of insect species on our planet, with about 98 percent of insect species having wings. How complex flight control systems developed in insects is unknown, and arboreal or aquatic origins have been hypothesized. We examine the biomechanics of aquatic origins of flight. We recently reported discovery of a novel mode of ``2D flight'' in Galerucella beetles, which skim along an air-water interface using flapping wing flight. This unique flight mode is characterized by a balance between capillary forces from the interface and biomechanical forces exerted by the flapping wings. Complex interactions on the fluid interface form capillary wave trains behind the insect, and produce vertical oscillations at the surface due to non-linear forces arising from deformation of the fluid meniscus. We present both experimental observations of 2D flight kinematics and a dynamic model explaining the observed phenomena. Careful examination of this interaction predicts the chaotic nature of interfacial flight and takeoff from the interface into airborne flight. The role of wingbeat frequency, stroke plane angle and body angle in determining transition between interfacial and fully airborne flight is highlighted, shedding light on the aquatic theory of flight evolution.

  12. Intelligent chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized.

  13. Interfacial Coupling-Induced Ferromagnetic Insulator Phase in Manganite Film

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Bangmin; Wu, Lijun; Yin, Wei-Guo; ...

    2016-06-08

    Interfaces with subtle differences in atomic and electronic structures in perovskite ABO3 heterostructures often yield intriguingly different properties, yet their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report an integrated study of unusual transport, magnetic, and structural properties of Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film on SrTiO3 substrate. The variations in the out-of-plane lattice constant and BO6 octahedral rotation across the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3/SrTiO3 interface strongly depend on the thickness of the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film. In the 12-nm film, a new interface-sensitive ferromagnetic polaronic insulator (FI') phase is formed during the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition of SrTiO3, apparently due to the enhanced electron–phonon interaction and atomic disorder in themore » film. The transport properties of the FI' phase in the 30-nm film are masked because of the reduced interfacial coupling and smaller interface-to-volume ratio. In conclusion, this work demonstrates how thickness-dependent interfacial coupling leads to the formation of a theoretically predicted ferromagnetic–polaronic insulator, as illustrated in a new phase diagram, that is otherwise ferromagnetic metal (FM) in bulk form.« less

  14. Intelligent Chiral Sensing Based on Supramolecular and Interfacial Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J.; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized. PMID:22163577

  15. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for optical biosensing with surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Park, Hyeyoung; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Yao, Danfeng; Yu, Fang

    2004-10-01

    We describe several approaches to design, synthesize and assemble supramolecular (bio-)functional interfacial architectures for applications in optical biosensing using, in particular, surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). Firstly, we discuss the build-up of an interfacial catcher probe layer for surface-hybridization studies with PCR amplicons. The well-established biotin-streptavidin coupling scheme is used to assemble a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe matrix. SPFS allows then for a very detailed and quantitative evaluation of the kinetics and affinities of the association and dissociation reactions between these catcher oligonucleotide strands and chromophore-labeled PCR (125 bp) strands from solution. The second example concerns the study of protein binding using an ELISA-analogue sandwich approach: a primary antibody against the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) used in these examples is coupled to a dextran binding matrix at the sensor surface via EDC/NHS-coupling. The detection limits for PSA are then evaluated using a 2-step- or 1-step-antigen/secondary antibody strategy by monitoring the fluorescence intensity emitted from chromophore-labels covalently bound to the secondary antibody. The final system that we describe involves a novel model membrane system, i.e., a tethered bimolecular lipid membrane (tBLM). Reconstitution of integrin receptors then allows for a quantitative study of the binding of fluorophore-labeled collagen fragments to the membrane-based integrin receptors.

  16. Fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution in an interfacial shearing flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaraj, Vignesh; McBride, Samantha; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2015-11-01

    Although the association of fibril plaques with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is well established, in-depth understanding of the roles played by various physical factors in seeding and growth of fibrils is far from well known. Of the numerous factors affecting this complex phenomenon, the effect of fluid flow and shear at interfaces is paramount as it is ubiquitous and the most varying factor in vivo. Many amyloidogenic proteins have been found to denature upon contact at hydrophobic interfaces due to the self-assembling nature of protein in its monomeric state. Here, fibrillization kinetics of insulin solution is studied in an interfacial shearing flow. The transient surface rheological response of the insulin solution to the flow and its effect on the bulk fibrillization process has been quantified. Minute differences in hydrophobic characteristics between two variants of insulin- Human recombinant and Bovine insulin are found to result in very different responses. Results presented will be in the form of fibrillization assays, images of fibril plaques formed, and changes in surface rheological properties of the insulin solution. The interfacial velocity field, measured from images (via Brewster Angle Microscopy), is compared with computations. Supported by NNX13AQ22G, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8.

  18. Microfluidic destabilization of viscous stratifications: Interfacial waves and droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyi; Cubaud, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidic two-fluid flows with large differences in viscosity are experimentally investigated to examine the role of fluid properties on hydrodynamic destabilization processes at the small scale. Two- and three-layer flow configurations are systematically studied in straight square microchannels using miscible and immiscible fluid pairs. We focus our attention on symmetric three-layer stratifications with a fast central stream made of low-viscosity fluid and a slow sheath flow composed of high-viscosity fluid. We quantify the influence of the capillary and the Reynolds numbers on the formation and evolution of droplets and wavy stratifications. Several functional relationships are developed for the morphology and dynamics of droplets and interfacial waves including size, celerity and frequency. In the wavy stratification regime, the formation and entrainment of thin viscous ligaments from wave crests display a rich variety of dynamics either in the presence or in the absence of interfacial tension between liquids. This work is supported by NSF (CBET-1150389).

  19. Limiting amplitudes of fully nonlinear interfacial tides and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar-González, Borja; Gerkema, Theo

    2016-08-01

    A new two-fluid layer model consisting of forced rotation-modified Boussinesq equations is derived for studying tidally generated fully nonlinear, weakly nonhydrostatic dispersive interfacial waves. This set is a generalization of the Choi-Camassa equations, extended here with forcing terms and Coriolis effects. The forcing is represented by a horizontally oscillating sill, mimicking a barotropic tidal flow over topography. Solitons are generated by a disintegration of the interfacial tide. Because of strong nonlinearity, solitons may attain a limiting table-shaped form, in accordance with soliton theory. In addition, we use a quasi-linear version of the model (i.e. including barotropic advection but linear in the baroclinic fields) to investigate the role of the initial stages of the internal tide prior to its nonlinear disintegration. Numerical solutions reveal that the internal tide then reaches a limiting amplitude under increasing barotropic forcing. In the fully nonlinear regime, numerical experiments suggest that this limiting amplitude in the underlying internal tide extends to the nonlinear case in that internal solitons formed by a disintegration of the internal tide may not reach their table-shaped form with increased forcing, but appear limited well below that state.

  20. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula. PMID:19325935

  1. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Tong, J

    2006-06-15

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula.

  2. Field-dependent perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and interfacial metal-insulator transition in CoFeB/MgO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, Igor; Fu, Yu; Safranski, C.; Chen, Yu-Jin; Youngblood, B.; Goncalves, A.; Sampaio, L.; Arias, R.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.; Krivorotov, I.

    2015-03-01

    The CoFeB/MgO systems play a central role in magnetic tunnel junction devices due to the high tunneling magnetoresistance ratio. A strong perpendicular anisotropy (PMA) and voltage-controlled anisotropy are beneficial for spintronics application. We study PMA in thin films of Ta/Co20Fe60B20/MgO in the thickness range of 0.9-2.5 nm and find that it can be best described by the first two order terms. Surprisingly, we find PMA to be strongly field-dependent. Our results show that the field dependence has significant implications for determining and customizing magnetic anisotropy in spintronic applications. Our data suggest that it can be caused by an inhomogeneous interfacial spin pinning with a possibly ferrimagnetic phase at the CoFeB/MgO interface. We perform magnetometry and transport measurements and find a magnetization peak and resistance transitions at 160K, which are consistent with the presence of an interfacial oxide phase undergoing a Morin-like transition.

  3. Mechanical and interfacial properties of poly(vinyl chloride) based composites reinforced by cassava stillage residue with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Gan, Tao; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Wei, Yongzuo; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    Cassava stillage residue (CSR), a kind of agro-industrial plant fiber, was modified by coupling agent (CA), mechanical activation (MA), and MA-assisted CA (MACA) surface treatments, respectively. The untreated and different surface treated CSRs were used to prepare plant fibers/polymer composites (PFPC) with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as polymer matrix, and the properties of these CSR/PVC composites were compared. Surface treated CSR/PVC composites possessed better mechanical properties, water resistance and dimensional stability compared with the untreated CSR/PVC composite, attributing to the improvement of interfacial properties between CSR and PVC matrix. MACA-treated CSR was the best reinforcement among four types of CSRs (untreated, MA-treated, CA-treated, and MACA-treated CSRs) because MACA treatment led to the significant improvement of dispersion, interfacial adhesion and compatibility between CSR and PVC. MACA treatment could be considered as an effective and green method for enhancing reinforcement efficiency of plant fibers and the properties of PFPC.

  4. Improvement of interfacial interactions using natural polyphenol-inspired tannic acid-coated nanoclay enhancement of soy protein isolate biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong; Kang, Haijiao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shifeng; Li, Jianzhang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel and economic surface modification technique for montmorillonite (MMT) nanosheets, a biocompatible coupling cross-linking agent, was developed on an attempt at improving the interfacial adhesion with soy protein isolate (SPI) matrix. Inspired by natural polyphenol, the "green dip-coating" method using tannic acid (TA) to surface-modify MMT (TA@MMT). SPI nanocomposite films modified with MMT or TA@MMT, as well as the control ones, were prepared via the casting method. The TA layer was successfully coated on the MMT surface through the (FeIII) ions coordination chemistry and the synthetic samples were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The compatibility and interfacial interactions between modified MMT and SPI matrix were greatly enhanced by the TA-FeIII coating on the MMT surface. The mechanical properties, water resistance, and thermal stability of the resultant biofilm were increased accordingly. Compared with that of the unmodified SPI film, the tensile strength of the nanocomposite films modified by the green dip-coating was increased by 113.3%. These SPI-based nanocomposite films showed the favorable potential in terms of food packing applications due to their efficient barriers to water vapor and UV and/or visible light.

  5. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoOx interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoOx/CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  6. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    Interfacial rupture and entrainment are commonly observed, e.g., air bubbles within a container being filled with water from a faucet. The example involves a liquid jet (density, rho, and viscosity, η) plunging into a receiving pool of liquid. Below a critical liquid-jet velocity, the interface develops a cusp-like shape within the receiving pool. The cusp becomes sharper with increasing liquid-jet velocity, and at a critical velocity ( Vc), the interface between the liquid and the surrounding fluid (density, rho0, and viscosity, η0) ruptures. Interfacial tension (sigma) can no longer preserve the integrity of the interface between the two immiscible fluids, and the plunging jet drags/entrains surrounding fluid into the receiving pool. Subsequently, the entrained fluid breaks up into bubbles within the receiving pool. The focus of this dissertation is the numerical prediction of the critical entrainment inception velocities for laminar plunging jets using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to simulate multi-fluid flows. Canonical to bottle-filling operations in the industry is the plunging-jet configuration -- the liquid jet issues from a nozzle and plunges into a container filled with liquid. Simulations of this configuration require capturing flow phenomena over a large range of length scales (4 orders of magnitude). Results show severe under-prediction of critical entrainment velocities when the maximum resolution is insufficient to capture the sharpening, and eventual rupture, of the interfacial cusp. Higher resolutions resulted in computational meshes with prohibitively large number of cells, and a drastic reduction in time-step values. Experimental results in the literature suggest at least a 100-fold increase in the smallest length scale when the entrained fluid is a liquid instead of air. This narrows the range of length scales in the problem. We exploit the experimental correlation between critical capillary

  7. Interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant systems: on the role of intra-molecular forces on interfacial tension values using DPD simulations.

    PubMed

    Deguillard, E; Pannacci, N; Creton, B; Rousseau, B

    2013-04-14

    We have computed interfacial tension in oil-water-surfactant model systems using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. Oil and water molecules are modelled as single DPD beads, whereas surfactant molecules are composed of head and tail beads linked together by a harmonic potential to form a chain molecule. We have investigated the influence of the harmonic potential parameters, namely, the force constant K and the equilibrium distance r0, on the interfacial tension values. For both parameters, the range investigated has been chosen in agreement with typical values in the literature. Surprisingly, we observe a large effect on interfacial tension values, especially at large surfactant concentration. We demonstrate that, due to a subtle balance between intra-molecular and inter-molecular interactions, the local structure of surfactants at the oil-water interface is modified, the interfacial tension is changed and the interface stability is affected.

  8. Comparison of Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test and X-ray Microtomography Measurements of Immiscible Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas within the Identical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, K. C.; McDonald, K.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial area between immiscible fluids in porous media has been demonstrated to be a critical entity for improved understanding, characterization, and simulation of multiphase flow and mass transport in the subsurface. Two general methods are available for measuring interfacial areas for 3-D porous-media systems, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Each method has their associated advantages and disadvantages. A few prior research efforts have conducted comparative analyses of the two methods, which have generally indicated disparities in measured values for natural geomedia. For these studies, however, interfacial areas were measured for separate samples with each method due to method restrictions. Thus, to date, there has been no comparative analysis conducted wherein the two measurement methods were applied to the exact same sample. To address this issue, trichloroethene-water interfacial areas were measured for a system comprising a well-sorted, natural sand (median grain diameter of 0.323 mm) using both X-ray microtomography and IPTTs. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns used to conduct the IPTTs. Columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate potential impacts of the tracer tests on fluid configuration. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT were 4-6 times larger than the microtomography results, which is consistent with previous work. This disparity was attributed to the inability of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness. The results indicate that both methods provide useful measures of interfacial area as long as their limitations are recognized.

  9. Investigation of the interfacial tension of complex coacervates using field-theoretic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Complex coacervation, a liquid-liquid phase separation that occurs when two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are mixed in a solution, has the potential to be exploited for many emerging applications including wet adhesives and drug delivery vehicles. The ultra-low interfacial tension of coacervate systems against water is critical for such applications, and it would be advantageous if molecular models could be used to characterize how various system properties (e.g., salt concentration) affect the interfacial tension. In this article we use field-theoretic simulations to characterize the interfacial tension between a complex coacervate and its supernatant. After demonstrating that our model is free of ultraviolet divergences (calculated properties converge as the collocation grid is refined), we develop two methods for calculating the interfacial tension from field-theoretic simulations. One method relies on the mechanical interpretation of the interfacial tension as the interfacial pressure, and the second method estimates the change in free energy as the area between the two phases is changed. These are the first calculations of the interfacial tension from full field theoretic simulation of which we are aware, and both the magnitude and scaling behaviors of our calculated interfacial tension agree with recent experiments.

  10. USING MOLECULAR PROBES TO STUDY INTERFACIAL REDOX REACTION AT FE-BEARING SMECTITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interfacial electron transfer of clay-water systems has a wide range of significance in geochemical and biogeochernical environments. However the mechanism of interfacial electron transport is poorly understood. The electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of...

  11. Organic photovoltaic device with interfacial layer and method of fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Hains, Alexander W.

    2013-03-19

    An organic photovoltaic device and method of forming same. In one embodiment, the organic photovoltaic device has an anode, a cathode, an active layer disposed between the anode and the cathode; and an interfacial layer disposed between the anode and the active layer, the interfacial layer comprising 5,5'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]-2,2'-bithiophene (PABTSi.sub.2).

  12. Efficient Solar-Thermal Energy Harvest Driven by Interfacial Plasmonic Heating-Assisted Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chao; Yang, Chao; Liu, Yanming; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Deng, Tao

    2016-09-07

    The plasmonic heating effect of noble nanoparticles has recently received tremendous attention for various important applications. Herein, we report the utilization of interfacial plasmonic heating-assisted evaporation for efficient and facile solar-thermal energy harvest. An airlaid paper-supported gold nanoparticle thin film was placed at the thermal energy conversion region within a sealed chamber to convert solar energy into thermal energy. The generated thermal energy instantly vaporizes the water underneath into hot vapors that quickly diffuse to the thermal energy release region of the chamber to condense into liquids and release the collected thermal energy. The condensed water automatically flows back to the thermal energy conversion region under the capillary force from the hydrophilic copper mesh. Such an approach simultaneously realizes efficient solar-to-thermal energy conversion and rapid transportation of converted thermal energy to target application terminals. Compared to conventional external photothermal conversion design, the solar-thermal harvesting device driven by the internal plasmonic heating effect has reduced the overall thermal resistance by more than 50% and has demonstrated more than 25% improvement of solar water heating efficiency.

  13. Role of molecular level interfacial forces in hard biomaterial mechanics: a review.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Devendra K; Tomar, Vikas

    2010-06-01

    Biological materials have evolved over millions of years and are often found as complex composites with superior properties compared to their relatively weak original constituents. Hard biomaterials such as nacre, bone, and dentin have intrigue researchers for decades for their high stiffness and toughness, multifunctionality, and self-healing capabilities. Challenges lie in identifying nature's mechanisms behind imparting such properties and her pathways in fabricating these composites. The route frequently acquired by nature is embedding submicron- or nano-sized mineral particles in protein matrix in a well-organized hierarchical arrangement. The key here is the formation of large amount of precisely and carefully designed organic-inorganic interfaces and synergy of mechanisms acting over multiple scales to distribute loads and damage, dissipate energy, and resist change in properties owing to events such as cracking. An important aspect to focus on is the chemo-mechanics of the organic-inorganic interfaces and its correlation with overall mechanical behavior of materials. This review focuses on presenting an overview of the past work and currently ongoing work done on this aspect. Analyses focuses on understanding role played by the interfacial mechanics on overall mechanical strength of hard biomaterials. Specific attention is given to synergy between experiments and modeling at the nanoscale to understand the hard biomaterial biomechanics.

  14. The Influence of Interfacial Roughness on Fiber Sliding in Oxide Composites with La-Monazite Interphases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. B.; Hay, R. S.; Marshall, D. B.; Morgan, P. E. D.; Sayir, A.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor); Farmer, Serene C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Room temperature debonding and sliding of La-Monazite coated fibers is assessed using a composite with a polycrystalline alumina matrix and fibers of several different single crystal (mullite, sapphire) and directionally solidified eutectic (Al2O3/Y3Al5O12 and Al2O3/Y-ZrO2) compositions. These fibers provide a range of residual stresses and interfacial roughnesses. Sliding occurred over a debond crack at the fiber-coating interface when the sliding displacement and surface roughness were relatively small. At large sliding displacements with relatively rough interfaces, the monazite coatings were deformed extensively by fracture, dislocations and occasional twinning, whereas the fibers were undamaged. Dense, fine-grained (10 nm) microstructures suggestive of dynamic recrystallization were also observed in the coatings. Frictional heating during sliding is assessed. The possibility of low temperature recrystallization is discussed in the light of the known resistance of monazite to radiation damage. The ability of La-Monazite to undergo plastic deformation relatively easily at low temperatures may be enabling for its use as a composite interface.

  15. Mechanics of finite cracks in dissimilar anisotropic elastic media considering interfacial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Pierre-Alexandre; Dingreville, Rémi

    2017-02-01

    Interfacial crack fields and singularities in bimaterial interfaces (i.e., grain boundaries or dissimilar materials interfaces) are considered through a general formulation for two-dimensional (2-D) anisotropic elasticity while accounting for the interfacial structure by means of an interfacial elasticity paradigm. The interfacial elasticity formulation introduces boundary conditions that are effectively equivalent to those for a weakly bounded interface. This formalism considers the 2-D crack-tip elastic fields using complex variable techniques. While the consideration of the interfacial elasticity does not affect the order of the singularity, it modifies the oscillatory effects associated with problems involving interface cracks. Constructive or destructive "interferences" are directly affected by the interface structure and its elastic response. This general formulation provides an insight on the physical significance and the obvious coupling between the interface structure and the associated mechanical fields in the vicinity of the crack tip.

  16. Mechanics of finite cracks in dissimilar anisotropic elastic media considering interfacial elasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, Pierre -Alexandre; Dingreville, Remi

    2016-10-31

    Interfacial crack fields and singularities in bimaterial interfaces (i.e., grain boundaries or dissimilar materials interfaces) are considered through a general formulation for two-dimensional (2-D) anisotropic elasticity while accounting for the interfacial structure by means of an interfacial elasticity paradigm. The interfacial elasticity formulation introduces boundary conditions that are effectively equivalent to those for a weakly bounded interface. This formalism considers the 2-D crack-tip elastic fields using complex variable techniques. While the consideration of the interfacial elasticity does not affect the order of the singularity, it modifies the oscillatory effects associated with problems involving interface cracks. Constructive or destructive “interferences” are directly affected by the interface structure and its elastic response. Furthermore, this general formulation provides an insight on the physical significance and the obvious coupling between the interface structure and the associated mechanical fields in the vicinity of the crack tip.

  17. Mechanics of finite cracks in dissimilar anisotropic elastic media considering interfacial elasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Juan, Pierre -Alexandre; Dingreville, Remi

    2016-10-31

    Interfacial crack fields and singularities in bimaterial interfaces (i.e., grain boundaries or dissimilar materials interfaces) are considered through a general formulation for two-dimensional (2-D) anisotropic elasticity while accounting for the interfacial structure by means of an interfacial elasticity paradigm. The interfacial elasticity formulation introduces boundary conditions that are effectively equivalent to those for a weakly bounded interface. This formalism considers the 2-D crack-tip elastic fields using complex variable techniques. While the consideration of the interfacial elasticity does not affect the order of the singularity, it modifies the oscillatory effects associated with problems involving interface cracks. Constructive or destructive “interferences” aremore » directly affected by the interface structure and its elastic response. Furthermore, this general formulation provides an insight on the physical significance and the obvious coupling between the interface structure and the associated mechanical fields in the vicinity of the crack tip.« less

  18. Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S. . Lab. de Energia Solar)

    1994-09-01

    The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. A multilayer of 0.3 [mu]m thick CuS film deposited over a thin film of ZnS upon annealing at 150 C shows atomic ratios of Zn to Cu of [approximately]0.15 and [approximately]0.48 at the surface layers of the samples annealed for 12 and 24 h, respectively. In the case of CuS on PbS film, the corresponding Pb to Cu atomic ratios at the surface layers are 0.43 and 0.83. The optical transmittance spectra and sheet resistance of these multilayer films indicate thermal stabilities superior to that of the CuS-only coatings. Application of the interfacial diffusion process in the production of thermally stable solar control coatings, solar absorber coating, or p-type films for solar cell structures is discussed.

  19. Interfacial phenomena and microscale transport processes in evaporating ultrathin menisci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchamgam, Sashidhar S.

    The study of interfacial phenomena in the three-phase contact line region, where a liquid-vapor interface intersects a solid surface, is of importance to many equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes. However, lack of experimental data on microscale transport processes controlled by interfacial phenomena has restricted progress. This thesis includes a high resolution image analyzing technique, based on reflectivity measurements, that accurately measures the thickness, contact angle and curvature profiles of ultrathin films, drops and curved menisci. In particular, the technique was used to emphasize measurements for thicknesses, delta < 100 nm, while studying delta < 2.5 mum. Using the "reflectivity technique", we studied fluid flow and heat transfer in a wickless, miniature heat pipe, a device which will be a very effective passive heat exchanger in a microgravity environment. The heat pipe is based on the Vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble (VCVB) concept. The broad objective was to increase the efficiency of the miniature heat pipe by enhancing the liquid flow towards the hotter region. This was achieved by understanding and manipulating the wetting and spreading characteristics of the liquid on the solid surface. By using a binary mixture (98% pentane and 2% octane by volume) instead of either pure pentane or octane, we were able to achieve a significant increase in the microscale phase change heat transfer. The experimental work was supported by numerical studies to understand the physics of the system at microscopic scale. In addition, using the reflectivity technique, we enhanced our understanding of interfacial phenomena in the contact line region. Experiments included flow instabilities in HFE-7000 meniscus on quartz (System S1), the spreading of a pentane (System S2 and S3), octane (System S4) and binary mixture menisci (System S5) during evaporation. The main objectives of the work are to present a new experimental technique, new observations, new data

  20. Experimental study on interfacial area transport in downward two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyi

    In view of the importance of two group interfacial area transport equations and lack of corresponding accurate downward flow database that can reveal two group interfacial area transport, a systematic database for adiabatic, air-water, vertically downward two-phase flow in a round pipe with inner diameter of 25.4 mm was collected to gain an insight of interfacial structure and provide benchmarking data for two-group interfacial area transport models. A four-sensor conductivity probe was used to measure the local two phase flow parameters and data was collected with data sampling frequency much higher than conventional data sampling frequency to ensure the accuracy. Axial development of local flow parameter profiles including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, and Sauter mean diameter were presented. Drastic inter-group transfer of void fraction and interfacial area was observed at bubbly to slug transition flow. And the wall peaked interfacial area concentration profiles were observed in churn-turbulent flow. The importance of local data about these phenomenon on flow structure prediction and interfacial area transport equation benchmark was analyzed. Bedsides, in order to investigate the effect of inlet conditions, all experiments were repeated after installing the flow straightening facility, and the results were briefly analyzed. In order to check the accuracy of current data, the experiment results were cross-checked with rotameter measurement as well as drift-flux model prediction, the averaged error is less than 15%. Current models for two-group interfacial area transport equation were evaluated using these data. The results show that two-group interfacial area transport equations with current models can predict most flow conditions with error less than 20%, except some bubbly to slug transition flow conditions and some churn-turbulent flow conditions. The disagreement between models and experiments could result from underestimate of inter

  1. Estimation of NAPL/Water Interfacial Areas in Well-Characterized Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, R.; Schroth, M. H.; Oostrom, M.; Zeyer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAPL/water interfacial area is an important parameter which affects the rate of NAPL dissolution in porous media. We generated a set of baseline data for specific interfacial area in a well-characterised laboratory system, and subsequently used these data to evaluate current models that seek to predict this parameter. The interfacial tracer technique was used to measure specific NAPL/water interfacial areas at residual NAPL-saturation in four grades of silica sand wet-packed into a 28cm-long, 3cm-i.d. column. The two-phase system contained water and hexadecane as NAPL. The first model tested distributes entrapped NAPL over the pore classes based on Land's algorithm and assumes spherical geometry for the resulting ganglia. The other model is thermodynamically based, assuming that reversible work done on the system results in an increase in the interfacial area, such that the area between drainage and imbibition curves can be related to the interfacial area. The interfacial tracer tests gave specific interfacial areas between 57 cm-1 for the finest sand and 16 cm-1 for the coarsest, compared to values between 33 cm-1 and 7 cm-1 for the first model and between 19 cm-1 and 5cm-1 for the thermodynamic model. The assumption of spherical geometry made by the first model serves to minimise the specific interfacial areas of the ganglia. Computed tomography (CT) scans of similar samples to those used in the column experiments showed that the geometry of the visible blobs was generally not spherical; hence it is reasonable to suggest that this may explain the underprediction by the first model. We believe the thermodynamic model underestimates the interfacial area because it assumes that entrapment occurs only within the largest pores. We also calculated a modified version of this model assuming entrapment across all pore classes; this yielded values between 64 cm-1 and 14 cm-1, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate method.

  2. Interfacial Tension Effect on Cell Partition in Aqueous Two-Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Joshi, Ramila; Mann, Jay Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-09-30

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) provide a mild environment for the partition and separation of cells. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the effect of interfacial tension of polymeric ATPS on the partitioning of cells between two phases and their interface. Two-phase systems are generated using polyethylene glycol and dextran of specific properties as phase-forming polymers and culture media as the solvent component. Ultralow interfacial tensions of the solutions are precisely measured using an axisymmetric drop shape analysis method. Partition experiments show that two-phase systems with an interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2) result in distribution of majority of cells to the bottom dextran phase. An increase in the interfacial tension results in a distribution of cells toward the interface. An independent cancer cell spheroid formation assay confirms these observations: a drop of the dextran phase containing cancer cells is dispensed into the immersion polyethylene glycol phase to form a cell-containing drop. Only at very small interfacial tensions do cells remain within the drop to aggregate into a spheroid. We perform a thermodynamic modeling of cell partition to determine variations of free energy associated with displacement of cells in ATPS with respect to the ultralow interfacial tensions. This modeling corroborates with the experimental results and demonstrates that at the smallest interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2), the free energy is a minimum with cells in the bottom phase. Increasing the interfacial tension shifts the minimum energy and partition of cells toward the interfacial region of the two aqueous phases. Examining differences in the partition behavior and minimum free energy modeling of A431.H9 cancer cells and mouse embryonic stem cells shows that the surface properties of cells further modulate partition in ATPS. This combined approach provides a fundamental understanding of interfacial tension role on cell partition in

  3. Effect of thin film confined between two dissimilar solids on interfacial thermal resistance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Tsai, Hai-Lung

    2011-12-14

    A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics model is developed to investigate how a thin film confined between two dissimilar solids affects the thermal transport across the material interface. For two highly dissimilar (phonon frequency mismatched) solids, it is found that the insertion of a thin film between them can greatly enhance thermal transport across the material interface by a factor of 2.3 if the thin film has one of the following characteristics: (1) a multi-atom-thick thin film of which the phonon density of states (DOS) bridges the two different phonon DOSs for the solid on each side of the thin film; (2) a single-atom-thick film which is weakly bonded to the solid on both sides of the thin film. The enhanced thermal transport in the single-atom-thick film case is found mainly due to the increased inelastic scattering of phonons by the atoms in the film. However, for solid-solid interfaces with a relatively small difference in the phonon DOS, it is found that the insertion of a thin film may decrease the thermal transport.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the interfacial thermal conductance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and van der Waals force induced deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Qingyuan; Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Thermal boundary resistance (TBR) plays an important role in the thermal conduction of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials and CNT networks (e.g., thin films, arrays, and aerogels). Although individual CNTs have extremely high thermal conductivity, interfacial resistances can dominate the overall resistance and largely influence their thermal performance. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically study the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC, the inverse of TBR) of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-substrate interfaces and MWNT-MWNT junctions, and compare the CNT-CNT junctions with graphene-graphene junctions. The results show that for CNTs with the diameter of a few nanometers, the total ITCs first decrease and then stabilize with the increase of the number of walls, mainly due to the changes of mechanical strength and adhesive energy. Increasing the CNT diameter leads to a larger total ITC and it is mainly due to a larger contact area. The area normalized ITC of CNT-CNT junctions increases and then saturates with the number of walls, and it behaves non-monotonically with the diameter. Furthermore, a trapezoidal model of multi-layer graphene-graphene junctions is used to explain the number of wall dependence of ITC. We also find that with the same adhesive energy, total ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions and graphene-graphene junctions are similar, which allows us to roughly estimate ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions without performing numerical simulations.

  5. Interfacial Energy Alignment at the ITO/Ultra-Thin Electron Selective Dielectric Layer Interface and Its Effect on the Efficiency of Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Eiji; Goto, Yoshinori; Saka, Yusuke; Fukuda, Katsutoshi

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the photovoltaic properties of an inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cell in a device with an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/electron selective layer (ESL)/P3HT:PCBM active layer/MoOx/Ag multilayered structure. The insertion of only single layer of poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PDDA) cationic polymer film (or poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) polymeric interfacial dipole layer) and titanium oxide nanosheet (TN) films as an ESL effectively improved cell performance. Abnormal S-shaped curves were observed in the inverted BHJ cells owing to the contact resistance across the ITO/active layer interface and the ITO/PDDA/TN/active layer interface. The series resistance across the ITO/ESL interface in the inverted BHJ cell was successfully reduced using an interfacial layer with a positively charged surface potential with respect to ITO base electrode. The positive dipole in PEI and the electronic charge phenomena at the electrophoretic deposited TN (ED-TN) films on ITO contributed to the reduction of the contact resistance at the electrode interface. The surface potential measurement revealed that the energy alignment by the transfer of electronic charges from the ED-TN to the base electrodes. The insertion of the ESL with a large positive surface potential reduced the potential barrier for the electron injection at ITO/TN interface and it improved the photovoltaic properties of the inverted cell with an ITO/TN/active layer/MoOx/Ag structure.

  6. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  7. The origin of interfacial charging in irradiated silicon nitride capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. C.

    1984-08-01

    Many experiments show that when metal-silicon nitride-silicon dioxide-silicon (MNOS) devices are irradiated in short circuit, a large interfacial charge builds up near the nitride-SiO2-Si interface. This effect cannot be explained by simple models of radiation-induced conductivity of the nitride, but it is reported here that inclusion of carrier diffusion and recombination in the photoconductivity equations can predict the observed behavior. Numerical solutions on a computer are required, however, when these complications are added. The simulations account for the magnitude and radiation dose dependence of the results, as well as the occurrence of a steady state during the irradiation. The location of the excess trapped charge near the interface is also predicted, along with the large number of new traps which must be introduced to influence the steady-state charge distribution.

  8. Origin of interfacial charging in irradiated silicon nitride capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.

    1984-08-15

    Many experiments show that when metal-silicon nitride-silicon dioxide-silicon (MNOS) devices are irradiated in short circuit, a large interfacial charge builds up near the nitride-SiO/sub 2/-Si interface. This effect cannot be explained by simple models of radiation-induced conductivity of the nitride, but it is reported here that inclusion of carrier diffusion and recombination in the photoconductivity equations can predict the observed behavior. Numerical solutions on a computer are required, however, when these complications are added. The simulations account for the magnitude and radiation dose dependence of the results, as well as the occurrence of a steady state during the irradiation. The location of the excess trapped charge near the interface is also predicted, along with the large number of new traps which must be introduced to influence the steady-state charge distribution.

  9. Interfacial action of natural surfactants in oil/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Onishi, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper concerns the tendency of a few natural surfactants at the oil/water interface to induce spontaneous emulsification. N-paraffin (n-dodecane), liquid triglycerides (oleic safflower oil and corn oil), and liquid fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were used as the oil phase and distilled water was used as the water phase. Natural surfactants such as cholesterol, lecithin, and oleic acid were applied to the systems as the oil-soluble additives. Lecithin was the most strongly effective in reducing the interfacial tension of the oil/water systems, and cholesterol was effective at the second strength. The oil/water interface of the systems containing the oil-soluble additives changed in various ways as observed by microscopy and the unaided eye. The most remarkable change was found in the system of glycerides containing cholesterol in contact with water, in which crystals of cholesterol were formed at the interface. 13 references.

  10. Chemistry of the metal-polymer interfacial region.

    PubMed

    Leidheiser, H; Deck, P D

    1988-09-02

    In many polymer-metal systems, chemical bonds are formed that involve metal-oxygen-carbon complexes. Infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies indicate that carboxylate groups play an important role in some systems. The oxygen sources may be the polymer, the oxygen present in the oxide on the metal surface, or atmospheric oxygen. Diffusion of metal ions from the substrate into the polymer interphase may occur in some systems that are cured at elevated temperatures. It is unclear whether a similar, less extensive diffusion occurs over long time periods in systems maintained at room temperature. The interfacial region is dynamic, and chemical changes occur with aging at room temperature. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may have application to characterizing the voids at the metal-polymer interface.

  11. Novel Epitaxy Between Oxides and Semiconductors - Growth and Interfacial Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-16

    transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The interfacial chemical information has also been performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS ). The...XTEM of GaN/ Gd2O3 (24Å)/GaN(0.64μm)/Al2O3 Sapphire substrate Overgrown GaN GaN Gd2O3 Intermediate layer or nucleation layer III. Growth of GaN on c...microscopy study on a hetero-structure of GaN/ Gd2O3 (1.8nm thick)/GaN(0.64μm thick)/α-Al2O3 (sapphire). Take a note on the interface between the

  12. Interfacial Reactions in Sn-Ag/Co Couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sinn-wen; Chen, Tung-Kai; Chang, Jui-shen; Hsu, Chia-ming; Chen, Wei-An

    2014-02-01

    Sn-Ag alloys are important solders, and Co and Co alloys are investigated as barrier layers. Interfacial reactions in Sn-Ag/Co couples were examined in this study for Ag contents of 1.0 wt.%, 2.0 wt.%, and 3.5 wt.% and reaction temperatures of 250°C, 200°C, and 150°C. Only CoSn3 formed in Sn-Ag/Co couples reacted at 250°C, but both CoSn3 and Ag3Sn formed in couples reacted at 200°C and 150°C. The reaction layer was 100 μm thick in Sn-3.5 wt.%Ag/Co couples reacted at 200°C for 110 h. The reaction rates were lower if Ag was added, but remained very fast compared with those for Ni and Ni-based substrates.

  13. Solute-Free Interfacial Zones in Polar Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Binghua; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2010-01-01

    Large, solute-free interfacial zones have recently been described in aqueous solutions. Found next to hydrophilic surfaces, these “exclusion zones” are commonly several hundred micrometers wide and represent regions of water that appear to be more ordered than bulk water. We report here that other polar solvents including methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetic acid, D2O and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) show similar near-surface exclusion zones, albeit of smaller magnitude. Microelectrode measurements show that these zones are negatively charged and grow in response to incident infrared radiation, similar to exclusion zones in aqueous solutions. Hence, near-surface exclusion zones appear to be features characteristic not only of water but of other polar liquids as well. PMID:20369860

  14. Metal-semiconductor interfacial reactions - Ni/Si system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, N. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Mayer, J. W.; Ullrich, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and channeling measurements with MeV He-4(+) ions have been used to probe the structure of the interface in the Ni/Si system. It is found that reactions occur where Ni is deposited on Si at 10 to the -10th torr: Si atoms are displaced from lattice sites, the Ni atoms are in an Si-rich environment, and the Ni/Si interface is graded in composition. Composition gradients are present at both interfaces in the Si/Ni2/Si/Ni system. For the Ni-Si system, cooling the substrate to 100 K slows down the reaction rate. The temperature dependence of the interfacial reactivity indicates the kinetic nature of metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  15. Interfacial Charge Transfer States in Condensed Phase Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewal, Koen

    2016-05-01

    Intermolecular charge transfer (CT) states at the interface between electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials in organic thin films are characterized by absorption and emission bands within the optical gap of the interfacing materials. CT states efficiently generate charge carriers for some D-A combinations, and others show high fluorescence quantum efficiencies. These properties are exploited in organic solar cells, photodetectors, and light-emitting diodes. This review summarizes experimental and theoretical work on the electronic structure and interfacial energy landscape at condensed matter D-A interfaces. Recent findings on photogeneration and recombination of free charge carriers via CT states are discussed, and relations between CT state properties and optoelectronic device parameters are clarified.

  16. Crystal-liquid interfacial free energy via thermodynamic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Ronald; Horbach, Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    A novel thermodynamic integration (TI) scheme is presented to compute the crystal-liquid interfacial free energy (γ{sub cl}) from molecular dynamics simulation. The scheme is applied to a Lennard-Jones system. By using extremely short-ranged and impenetrable Gaussian flat walls to confine the liquid and crystal phases, we overcome hysteresis problems of previous TI schemes that stem from the translational movement of the crystal-liquid interface. Our technique is applied to compute γ{sub cl} for the (100), (110), and (111) orientation of the crystalline phase at three temperatures under coexistence conditions. For one case, namely, the (100) interface at the temperature T = 1.0 (in reduced units), we demonstrate that finite-size scaling in the framework of capillary wave theory can be used to estimate γ{sub cl} in the thermodynamic limit. Thereby, we show that our TI scheme is not associated with the suppression of capillary wave fluctuations.

  17. Modeling interfacial charge transport of quantum dots using cyclic voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Andrew K.; Jones, Marcus

    2011-10-01

    Quantum dot applications are numerous and range from photovoltaic devices and lasers, to bio labeling. Complexities in the electronic band structure of quantum dots create the necessity for analysis techniques that can accurately and reproducibly provide their absolute band energies. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is a novel candidate for these studies and has the potential to become a useful tool in engineering new nanocrystal technology, by providing information necessary for predicting and modeling interfacial charge transfer to and from quantum dots. Advancing from previous reports of nanocrystal CV, a carbon paste electrode was utilized in an attempt to increase measured current by ensuring intimate contact between nanocrystals and the electrode. Our goal was to investigate band energies and model nanocrystal-molecule electron transfer systems.

  18. Repetitive cleavage of elastomeric membrane via controlled interfacial fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Min Sung; Um, Hyung Sik; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Pilnam; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report a method of fabricating thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with a thickness in the range of 60-80 nm, which can be repeatedly generated (more than 10 times) from the same block of PDMS via controlled interfacial fracture. The thin layers can be transferred to various substrates by peeling off from the bulk PDMS. The cleavage is attributed to the built-in stress at the fracture interface due to plasma treatment, resulting in the repetitive formation of the thin membranes, with no residue from processing, and with a surface roughness of ∼5 nm. We were able to demonstrate transferred patterns with controlled thickness by varying the oxygen plasma treatment conditions and the composition of bulk PDMS stamp. Using the method, we achieved residual-free patterns with submicrometer resolution for applications in biomolecule array templates.

  19. Pressure flotation of nitrocellulose fines: Hydrodynamics and interfacial chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Hu, H.L.; LaFrance, P.; Kim, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    The production of nitrocellulose (NC) creates large quantities of waste NC fines in wash water streams. Current processing techniques attempt to remove these fines by cross-flow microfiltration, pressure flotation, settling, centrifugation, and lime precipitation. Pressure flotation, or dissolved air flotation (DAF), is a solid/liquid separation process first developed in the ore processing industry. DAF has since found many applications in the environmental engineering field including: drinking water clarification, sludge thickening, and the clarification of wastewater from a variety of industrial and municipal processes. The work presented herein is part of a larger effort to explore techniques to recover and reuse nitrocellulose (NC) fines resulting from propellant manufacturing processes. Previous papers investigated NC particle stability and interfacial thermodynamics and developed a flotation trajectory model. This paper builds on that work and presents a sensitivity analysis of the flotation trajectory model. The sensitivity analysis explores both operational and parameter estimation uncertainty.

  20. Francois Frenkiel Award Lecture: Thermocapillary migration of interfacial droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Edwin F.

    2010-11-01

    Thermocapillary migration of bubbles through the bulk liquid--a process in which tangential surface stresses arising from the variation of surface tension with temperature create a propulsive force on the bubble--has been extensively studied in the past. In contrast, the motion of droplets confined to the free surface of a liquid substrate has received much less attention. Recent developments in microfluidics provided new motivation to understand how applied thermal gradients can affect the motion of, and mixing inside, small aqueous droplets. In particular, the quality and speed of mixing depend rather sensitively on the flow structure inside the droplet. In this talk we describe different approaches that allow one to compute both the flow inside interfacial droplets and the flow in the layer of liquid substrate supporting the droplet and the lessons which can be learned by analyzing these flows.

  1. Non-equilibrium dynamics and structure of interfacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Donadio, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2006-07-01

    Stimulated by recent experiments [C.-Y. Ruan et al. Science 304, (2004) 81], we have performed molecular dynamics and ab initio structural studies of the laser-induced heating and restructuring processes of nanometer-scale ice on a substrate of chlorine terminated Si(1 1 1). Starting from proton disordered cubic ice configurations the thin film behavior has been characterized at several temperatures up to the melting point. The surface induces order with crystallization in the Ic lattice, but with void amorphous regions. The structure changes on the ultrashort time scale and restructures by heat dissipation depending on the relaxation time and final temperature. Our results show the general behavior observed experimentally, thus providing the nature of forces in the atomic-scale description of interfacial ice.

  2. Interfacial chemistry of zinc anodes for reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R.; McGill, G.E.; Cryer, C.B.; Stoneman, A.; Carter, R.R.

    1997-12-01

    Thermally-sprayed zinc anodes are used in both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems for reinforced concrete structures. The Albany Research Center, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation, has been studying the effect of electrochemical aging on the bond strength of zinc anodes for bridge cathodic protection systems. Changes in anode bond strength and other anode properties can be explained by the chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface. The chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface in laboratory electrochemical aging studies is compared with that of several bridges with thermal-sprayed zinc anodes and which have been in service for 5 to 10 years using both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems. The bridges are the Cape Creek Bridge on the Oregon coast and the East Camino Undercrossing near Placerville, CA. Also reported are interfacial chemistry results for galvanized steel rebar from the 48 year old Longbird Bridge in Bermuda.

  3. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  4. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  5. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  6. Interfacial transfer in annular dispersed flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Kataoka, I.

    1982-01-01

    The interfacial drag, droplet entrainment, droplet deposition and droplet-size distributions are important for detailed mechanistic modeling of annular dispersed two-phase flow. In view of this, recently developed correlations for these parameters are presented and discussed in this paper. The onset of droplet entrainment significantly alters the mechanisms of mass, momentum, and energy transfer between the film and gas core flow as well as the transfer between the two-phase mixture and the wall. By assuming the roll wave entrainment mechanism, the correlations for the amount of entrained droplet as well as for the droplet-size distribution have been obtained from a simple model in collaboration with a large number of data. Then the rate equations for entrainment and deposition have been developed. The drag correlations relevant to the droplet transfer is also presented. The comparison of the correlations to various data show satisfactory agreement.

  7. Substratum interfacial energetic effects on the attachment of marine bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ista, Linnea Kathryn

    Biofilms represent an ancient, ubiquitous and influential form of life on earth. Biofilm formation is initiated by attachment of bacterial cells from an aqueous suspension onto a suitable attachment substratum. While in certain, well studied cases initial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation is mediated by specific ligand-receptor pairs on the bacteria and attachment substratum, in the open environment, including the ocean, it is assumed to be non-specific and mediated by processes similar to those that drive adsorption of colloids at the water-solid interface. Colloidal principles are studied to determine the molecular and physicochemical interactions involved in the attachment of the model marine bacterium, Cobetia marina to model self-assembled monolayer surfaces. In the simplest application of colloidal principles the wettability of attachment substrata, as measured by the advancing contact angle of water (theta AW) on the surface, is frequently used as an approximation for the surface tension. We demonstrate the applicability of this approach for attachment of C. marina and algal zoospores and extend it to the development of a means to control attachment and release of microorganisms by altering and tuning surface thetaAW. In many cases, however, thetaAW does not capture all the information necessary to model attachment of bacteria to attachment substrata; SAMs with similar thetaAW attach different number of bacteria. More advanced colloidal models of initial bacterial attachment have evolved over the last several decades, with the emergence of the model proposed by van Oss, Chaudhury and Good (VCG) as preeminent. The VCG model enables calculation of interfacial tensions by dividing these into two major interactions thought to be important at biointerfaces: apolar, Lifshitz-van der Waals and polar, Lewis acid-base (including hydrogen bonding) interactions. These interfacial tensions are combined to yield DeltaGadh, the free energy associated with

  8. Thermography Applied to Interfacial Phenomena, Potentials and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, M.; Sefiane, K.

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a non-intrusive method for temperature measurement. Its ability to produce two-dimensional temperature images makes it a powerful tool for investigating systems exhibiting spatial variation of temperature. IR temperature measurements are almost always surface measurements; the technique has therefore found use in obtaining interfacial temperatures, primarily in heat and mass transfer investigations. The reasons for the technique's limited uptake likely stems from the requirement of accurate material emissivity data and the large number of potential sources of error. This chapter provides an overview of the underlying theory of radiative heat transfer. Key considerations and problems in the application of IR thermography are discussed with reference to some examples of recent successful applications.

  9. Indirect measurement of interfacial melting from macroscopic ice observations.

    PubMed

    Saruya, Tomotaka; Kurita, Kei; Rempel, Alan W

    2014-06-01

    Premelted water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state well below the bulk melting temperature and can supply the segregated growth of ice lenses. Using macroscopic measurements of ice-lens initiation position in step-freezing experiments, we infer how the nanometer-scale thicknesses of premelted films depend on temperature depression below bulk melting. The interfacial interactions between ice, liquid, and soda-lime glass particles exhibit a power-law behavior that suggests premelting in our system is dominated by short-range electrostatic forces. Using our inferred film thicknesses as inputs to a simple force-balance model with no adjustable parameters, we obtain good quantitative agreement between numerical predictions and observed ice-lens thickness. Macroscopic observations of lensing behavior have the potential as probes of premelting behavior in other systems.

  10. Interfacial instabilities and fingering formation in Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1996-10-01

    The interfacial instability of Hele-Shaw flow has been a crucial issue for the understanding of the pattern formation of viscous fingers in a Hele-Shaw cell. By using a unified asymptotic approach, we derive two different types of instability mechanisms for slightly' time-dependent finger solutions; namely, (i) the global-trapped-wave (GTW) instability; and (ii) the zero-frequency (null-f) instability. On the basis of these instability mechanisms, the selection of viscous finger formation is clarified; the apparent contradiction between the previous linearstability analysis by Tanveer (1987, Phys. Fluid 30, 1589) and others and the numerical simulations by DeGregoria & Schwartz (1986, J. Fluid Mech. 164, 383)and the experimental evidence is reconciled.

  11. Interfacial Charge Effects on Sticky Bubble Morphology in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Jonathan; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Many multiphase fluidic processes in small conduits, such as petroleum extraction and biochemical analysis, can encounter disastrous flow blockages due to the lodging of immiscible bubbles or droplets. The complete drainage of a thin-film lubrication layer surrounding an adhered bubble demands a significantly higher threshold pressure gradient in order to reinitiate bulk flows. In this work, we investigate bubble morphology due to the lubrication layer drainage process that results in bubble adhesion and study how an electrostatically charged bubble interface and charged channel wall may affect bubble morphology in preventing bubble adhesion. We report on our multiphysics computational analysis of an oversized gas bubble in a water-filled microchannel under the influence of surface tension and interfacial electrostatic forces. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for support of this research.

  12. Effect of polarity on Ni/InN interfacial reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kragh-Buetow, K. C.; Weng, X.; Readinger, E. D.; Wraback, M.; Mohney, S. E.

    2013-01-14

    Ni films on (0001) and (0001) InN exhibited different reaction kinetics upon annealing at 673K. Structural and chemical analysis using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry indicated that an interfacial reaction did not occur between the Ni film and the In-polar (0001) InN layer. However, the N-polar face reacted with Ni to form the Ni{sub 3}InN{sub x} ternary phase with an anti-perovskite structure. The difference in reactivity for Ni on In-face and N-face InN indicates that polarity alters the reaction and may also affect interactions between other metals and group III-nitride semiconductors.

  13. Ultralow Interfacial Tension Measurement through Jetting/Dripping Transition.

    PubMed

    Moiré, Marie; Peysson, Yannick; Herzhaft, Benjamin; Pannacci, Nicolas; Gallaire, François; Augello, Laura; Dalmazzone, Christine; Colin, Annie

    2017-03-14

    In this paper, we present a dynamic microfluidic tensiometer able to perform measurements over more than four decades and which is suitable for high throughput experimentations. This tensiometer is able to withstand hard conditions such as high pressure, high temperature, high salinity, and crude oil. It is made of two coaxial capillaries in which two immiscible fluids are injected. Depending on the flow rate of each phase, either droplets or jetting will be obtained. The transition between these two regimes relies on the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. This transition can be theoretically computed thanks to a linear analysis based on the convective and absolute instabilities theory. From this model, the interfacial tension between the two phases can be calculated.

  14. Cyclic Fiber Push-In Test Monitors Evolution of Interfacial Behavior in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites are being developed for high-temperature advanced jet engine applications. Obtaining a strong, tough composite material depends critically on optimizing the mechanical coupling between the reinforcing fibers and the surrounding matrix material. This has usually been accomplished by applying a thin C or BN coating onto the surface of the reinforcing fibers. The performance of these fiber coatings, however, may degrade under cyclic loading conditions or exposure to different environments. Degradation of the coating-controlled interfacial behavior will strongly affect the useful service lifetime of the composite material. Cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of fiber sliding behavior in both C- and BN-coated small-diameter (15-mm) SiC-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The cyclic fiber push-in tests were performed using a desktop fiber push-out apparatus. At the beginning of each test, the fiber to be tested was aligned underneath a 10- mm-diameter diamond punch; then, the applied load was cycled between selected maximum and minimum loads. From the measured response, the fiber sliding distance and frictional sliding stresses were determined for each cycle. Tests were performed in both room air and nitrogen. Cyclic fiber push-in tests of C-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC showed progressive increases in fiber sliding distances along with decreases in frictional sliding stresses for continued cycling in room air. This rapid degradation in interfacial response was not observed for cycling in nitrogen, indicating that moisture exposure had a large effect in immediately lowering the frictional sliding stresses of C-coated fibers. These results indicate that matrix cracks bridged by C-coated fibers will not be stable, but will rapidly grow in moisture-containing environments. In contrast, cyclic fiber push-in tests of both BN-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC and BNcoated, Si

  15. Interfacial Coupling-Induced Ferromagnetic Insulator Phase in Manganite Film

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bangmin; Wu, Lijun; Yin, Wei-Guo; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Ping; Venkatesan, T.; Chen, Jingsheng; Zhu, Yimei; Chow, Gan Moog

    2016-06-08

    Interfaces with subtle differences in atomic and electronic structures in perovskite ABO3 heterostructures often yield intriguingly different properties, yet their exact roles remain elusive. Here, we report an integrated study of unusual transport, magnetic, and structural properties of Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film on SrTiO3 substrate. The variations in the out-of-plane lattice constant and BO6 octahedral rotation across the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3/SrTiO3 interface strongly depend on the thickness of the Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film. In the 12-nm film, a new interface-sensitive ferromagnetic polaronic insulator (FI') phase is formed during the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition of SrTiO3, apparently due to the enhanced electron–phonon interaction and atomic disorder in the film. The transport properties of the FI' phase in the 30-nm film are masked because of the reduced interfacial coupling and smaller interface-to-volume ratio. In conclusion, this work demonstrates how thickness-dependent interfacial coupling leads to the formation of a theoretically predicted ferromagnetic–polaronic insulator, as illustrated in a new phase diagram, that is otherwise ferromagnetic metal (FM) in bulk form.

  16. Correlating interfacial properties with stress transfer in SMA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, G.E.; Jonnalagadda, K.; Sottos, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wires have been proposed as large strain actuators for use in smart structures. SMA wires can be embedded in a host material to alter the stiffness or modal response and provide vibration control. The interaction between the embedded SMA and the host material is critical to applications requiring transfer of loads or strain from the wire to the host. Paine, Jones and Rogers have asserted the importance of interfacial adhesion between embedded SMA wires and the host material. When the SMA wires are actuated, large shear strains are generated at the SMA/host interface. The stronger the interface, the greater the transfer of strain from the actuator to the host material. Although there has been a significant amount of research dedicated to characterizing and modeling the response of SMA alone, little work has been done to understand the behavior of embedded SMA wires. Maximum displacement, load transfer and repeatability of actuation of the embedded wire are particularly critical in assessing the effects of the host material. This work continues to investigate the interaction between SMA wires and a host polymer matrix. High resolution photoelasticity was utilized to study the internal stresses induced during actuation of an embedded shape memory alloy wire in a polymer matrix. The influence of several wire surface treatments on the resulting stresses and load transfer was investigated. Four different surface treatments were considered: untreated, acid etched, hand sanded and sandblasted. Pull-out data indicated that sandblasting of wires increased the SMA/polymer interfacial bond strength while hand sanding and acid cleaning actually decreased the bond strength. Wires with greater adhesion (sandblasted) resulted in higher stresses induced in the polymer while those with lower adhesion transferred less load. Overall, properties of the SMA/polymer interface were shown to significantly affect the performance of the embedded SMA actuator.

  17. Role of a nucleation layer in suppressing interfacial pitting in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, A. K.; Salamanca-Riba, L.; Partin, D. L.; Heremans, J.; Green, L.; Fuller, B. K.

    1993-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the role of a low temperature nucleation layer on the interfacial properties of InAs epilayers grown on (100) semi-insulating InP substrates using a two-step metalorganic chemical vapor deposition method. Cross-sectional and plan-view transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out on InAs films of nearly equal total film thicknesses but for different thicknesses of a nucleation layer of InAs deposited at low temperature on the substrate. Our studies show that thermal etchpits are created at the interface between the InAs film, and the InP substrate for thin nucleation layer thicknesses. This is because the low temperature nucleation layer of InAs does not cover completely the surface of the InP substrate. Hence, when the temperature is raised to deposit the bulk of the InAs film, severe thermal pitting is observed at the interface. These thermal etchpits are sources of threading dislocations. To obtain high quality InAs films and suppress interfacial pitting there is an optimum thickness of the nucleation layer. Also, our studies show that there is a relationship between the density of defects in the film and the thickness of the nucleation layer. This in turn relates to the variation of the electronic properties of the InAs films. We have observed that for all nucleation layer thicknesses, the density of threading dislocations is higher close to the interface than at the free surface of the film.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  19. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  20. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yakang; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Zilong; Lu, Shuangfang; Xue, Qingzhong

    2016-04-01

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  1. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  2. Interfacial strength development in thermoplastic resins and fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, Jeremy C.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to develop test methods to be used to characterize interfacial (autohesive) strength development in polysulfone thermoplastic resin and graphite-polysulfone prepreg during processing is reported. Two test methods were used to examine interfacial strength development in neat resin samples. These included an interfacial tension test and a compact tension (CT) fracture toughness test. The interfacial tensile test proved to be very difficult to perform with a considerable amount of data scatter. Thus, the interfacial test was discarded in favor of the fracture toughness test. Interfacial strength development was observed by measuring the refracture toughness of precracked compact tension specimens that were rehealed at a given temperature and contact time. The measured refracture toughness was correlated with temperature and contact time. Interfacial strength development in graphite-polysulfone unidirectional composites was measured using a double cantilever beam (DCB) interlaminar fracture toughness test. The critical strain energy release rate of refractured composite specimens was measured as a function of healing temperature and contact time.

  3. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  4. Interfacial Engineering and Charge Carrier Dynamics in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edley, Michael

    Photovoltaic energy is a clean and renewable source of electricity; however, it faces resistance to widespread use due to cost. Nanostructuring decouples constraints related to light absorption and charge separation, potentially reducing cost by allowing a wider variety of processing techniques and materials to be used. However, the large interfacial areas also cause an increased dark current which negatively affects cell efficiency. This work focuses on extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells that used a ZnO nanowire array as a scaffold for an extremely thin CdSe absorber layer. Photoexcited electrons generated in the CdSe absorber are transferred to the ZnO layer, while photogenerated holes are transferred to the liquid electrolyte. The transfer of photoexcited carriers to their transport layer competes with bulk recombination in the absorber layer. After charge separation, transport of charge carriers to their respective contacts must occur faster than interfacial recombination for efficient collection. Charge separation and collection depend sensitively on the dimensions of the materials as well as their interfaces. We demonstrated that an optimal absorber thickness can balance light absorption and charge separation. By treating the ZnO/CdSe interface with a CdS buffer layer, we were able to improve the Voc and fill factor, increasing the ETA cell's efficiency from 0.53% to 1.34%, which is higher than that achievable using planar films of the same material. We have gained additional insight into designing ETA cells through the use of dynamic measurements. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that characteristic times for electron injection from CdSe to ZnO are less than 1 ps. Electron injection is rapid compared to the 2 ns bulk lifetime in CdSe. Optoelectronic measurements such as transient photocurrent/photovoltage and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were applied to study the processes of charge transport and interfacial recombination

  5. Interfacial optimization of fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites for soft fibrous tissue applications.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Julianne L; Lowman, Anthony M; VanLandingham, Mark R; Palmese, Giuseppe R

    2014-08-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body, yet the current treatment of choice is a partial meniscectomy, which is known to lead to joint degeneration and osteoarthritis. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring function to the meniscus following an injury. Fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites are particularly suited for replicating the mechanical function of native fibrous tissues due to their ability to mimic the native anisotropic property distribution present. A critical issue with these materials, however, is the potential for the fiber-matrix interfacial properties to severely limit composite performance. In this work, the interfacial properties of an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel are studied. A novel chemical grafting technique, confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, is used to improve UHMWPE-PVA interfacial adhesion. Interfacial shear strength is quantified using fiber pull-out tests. Results indicate significantly improved fiber-hydrogel interfacial adhesion after chemical grafting, where chemically grafted samples have an interfacial shear strength of 256.4±64.3kPa compared to 11.5±2.9kPa for untreated samples. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy of fiber surfaces after fiber pull-out reveal cohesive failure within the hydrogel matrix for treated fiber samples, indicating that the UHMWPE-PVA interface has been successfully optimized. Lastly, inter-fiber spacing is observed to have a significant effect on interfacial adhesion. Fibers spaced further apart have significantly higher interfacial shear strengths, which is critical to consider when optimizing composite design. The results in this study are applicable in developing similar chemical grafting techniques and optimizing fiber-matrix interfacial properties for other hydrogel-based composite systems.

  6. Ultralow interfacial tensions of aqueous two-phase systems measured using drop shape.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Mann, J Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-08-19

    Aqueous solutions of different polymers can separate and form aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). ATPS provide an aqueous, biocompatible, and mild environment for separation and fractionation of biomolecules. The interfacial tension between the two aqueous phases plays a major role in ATPS-mediated partition of biomolecules. Because of the structure of the two aqueous phases, the interfacial tensions between the phases can be 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than conventional fluid-liquid systems: ∼1-100 μJ/m(2) for ATPS compared to ∼72 mJ/m(2) for the water-vapor interface. This poses a major challenge for the experimental measurements of reproducible interfacial tension data for these systems. We address the need for precise determination of ultralow interfacial tensions by systematically studying a series of polymeric ATPS comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran (DEX) as the phase-forming polymers. Sessile and pendant drops of the denser DEX phase are formed within the immersion PEG phase. An axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) is used to determine interfacial tensions of eight different ATPS. Specific criteria are used to reproducibly determine ultralow interfacial tensions of the ATPS from pendant and sessile drops. Importantly, for a given ATPS, pendant drop and sessile drop experiments return values within 0.001 mJ/m(2) indicating reliability of our measurements. Then, the pendant drop technique is used to measure interfacial tensions of all eight ATPS. Our measured values range from 0.012 ± 0.001 mJ/m(2) to 0.381 ± 0.006 mJ/m(2) and vary with the concentration of polymers in equilibrated phases of ATPS. Measurements of ultralow interfacial tensions with such reproducibility will broadly benefit studies involving partition of different biomolecules in ATPS and elucidate the critical effect of interfacial tension.

  7. Improvement of thermal contact resistance by carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Helen F.; Cooper, Sarah M.; Meyyappan, M.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial thermal resistance results of various nanotube and nanofiber coatings, prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods, are reported at relatively low clamping pressures. The five types of samples examined include multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes growth by CVD, multi-walled nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) and carbon nanofibers of differing aspect ratio grown by PECVD. Of the samples examined, only high aspect ratio nanofibers and thermally grown multi-walled nanotubes show an improvement in thermal contact resistance. The improvement is approximately a 60% lower thermal resistance than a bare Si-Cu interface and is comparable to that attained by commercially available thermal interface materials.

  8. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for interfacial tension measurement at zero bond number.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Michael J; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-12-30

    A widely used method to determine the interfacial tension between fluids is to quantify the pendant drop shape that is determined by gravity and interfacial tension forces. Failure of this method for small drops or small fluid density differences is a critical limitation in microfluidic applications and when only small fluid samples are available. By adding a small spherical particle to the interface to apply an axisymmetric deformation, both the particle density and the interfacial tension can be simultaneously and precisely determined, providing an accurate and elegant solution to a long-standing problem.

  9. Mass transfer during the period of drop formation in presence of interfacial instability

    SciTech Connect

    Shatokhin, V.I.; Ermakov, A.A.; Maksimenko, M.Z.

    1985-04-20

    The authors propose to find a functional relationship that describes experimental kinetic data on mass transfer during the period of drop formation in presence of interfacial instability. They conduct their experiments in a thermostated glass column where the disperse phase is fed by a micropump through a movable capillary. They conclude that spontaneous interfacial convection has an enormous influence on the end effect. The degree of increase of the amount of substance transferred depends on the intensity of the interfacial convection arising during extraction of acids in various systems.

  10. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  11. Effects of crystal-melt interfacial energy anisotropy on dendritic morphology and growth kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Singh, N. B.

    1989-01-01

    Morphological and kinetic studies of succinonitrile, a BCC crystal with a low (0.5 percent) anisotropy and pivalic acid, and FCC crystal with relatively large (5 percent) anisotropy in solid-liquid interfacial energy, show clearly that anisotropy in the solid-liquid interfacial energy does not affect the tip radius-velocity relationship, but has a profound influence on the tip region and the rate of amplification of branching waves. Anisotropy of the solid-liquid interfacial energy may be one of the key factors by which the microstructural characteristics of cast structures reflect individual material behavior, especially crystal symmetry.

  12. Effect of interfacial oxide layers on the current-voltage characteristics of Al-Si contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Aluminum-silicon contacts with very thin interfacial oxide layers and various surface impurity concentrations are studied for both n and p-type silicon. To determine the surface impurity concentrations on p(+)-p and n(+)-n structures, a modified C-V technique was utilized. Effects of interfacial oxide layers and surface impurity concentrations on current-voltage characteristics are discussed based on the energy band diagrams from the conductance-voltage plots. The interfacial oxide and aluminum layer causes image contrasts on X-ray topographs.

  13. The effect of interfacial tension on droplet formation in flow-focusing microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; Yang, Min; Guo, Shi-shang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Xing-zhong

    2011-06-01

    Interfacial tension plays an important role in microfluidic emulsification, which is the process of preparing emulsions. A promising method which controls droplet behavior according to the function of the interfacial tension in the process of microfluidic emulsification is reported. The droplet size and generation frequency changed regularly to obtain appropriate concentrations of surfactant. This method could be of great help for setting up the size-controllable droplet generation systems, and ameliorating the emulsification technology. The interfacial tension effect was first analyzed by computational simulation before the real experiment, which significantly improved the efficiency of the whole research process.

  14. Understanding the interfacial phenomena of a 4.7 V and 55 °C Li-ion battery with Li-rich layered oxide cathode and grap2hite anode and its correlation to high-energy cycling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu Quang; Hwang, Eui-Hyung; Kwon, Young-Gil; Song, Seung-Wan

    2016-08-01

    Research progress of high-energy performance and interfacial phenomena of Li1.13Mn0.463Ni0.203Co0.203O2 cathode and graphite anode in a 55 °C full-cell under an aggressive charge cut-off voltage to 4.7 V (4.75 V vs. Li/Li+) is reported. Although anodic instability of conventional electrolyte is the critical issue on high-voltage and high-temperature cell operation, interfacial phenomena and the solution to performance improvement have not been reported. Surface spectroscopic evidence revealed that structural degradation of both cathode and anode materials, instability of surface film at cathode, and metal-dissolution from cathode and -deposition at anode, and a rise of interfacial resistance with high-voltage cycling in 55 °C conventional electrolyte are resolved by the formation of a stable surface film with organic/inorganic mixtures at cathode and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) at anode using blended additives of fluorinated linear carbonate and vinylene carbonate. As a result, significantly improved cycling stability of 77% capacity retention delivering 227-174 mAhg-1 after 50 cycles is obtained, corresponding to 819-609 Wh per kg of cathode active material. Interfacial stabilization approach would pave the way of controlling the performance and safety, and widening the practical application of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials and high-voltage electrolyte materials in various high-energy density Li-ion batteries.

  15. Interfacial Behavior of Polymers: Using Interfaces to Manipulate Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-02-26

    The self-assembly of block copolymers into arrays of nanoscopic domains with areal densities approaching 10 terbit/in2 offer tremendous promise for the fabrication of ultrahigh density storage devices, batteries and other energy relevant devices. Interfacial interactions play a key role in dictating the orientation and ordering of these self-assembling materials. We have investigated the use of preferential and neutral solvents to overcome interfacial interactions and to rapid accelerate the dynamics of these materials, since the high molecular weight of the polymers significantly slows diffusion processes. Using a tailor-made chamber, we have introduced solvent vapor annealing (SVA) where solvent with a well-defined vapor pressures sells the copolymer film, enabling control over the solvent content in the film and, therefore, the thermodynamics governing the microphase separation of the copolymer, the interactions with the substrate and air interfaces and the dynamics. This tailor-made chamber also allows us to perform in situ grazing incidence x-ray scattering studies where the copolymer films can be characterized on the nanoscopic level over macroscopic distances. The methodologies developed in our laboratories are now used in numerous laboratories world-wide. We have found that arrays of block copolymer microdomains with perfect orientational order can be achieved over macroscopic areas using the SVA processes but the translational order is perturbed during the film drying process. As the copolymer film is swollen, the confinement of the film to the substrate introduces a frustration to the ordering of the microdomains. After equilibrium is achieved, when the swollen films are brought very close to the ordering transition, near perfect ordering is achieved. However, upon removal of the solvent, the confinement of the film to the substrate introduces translational disorder. We have investigated the influence of the rate of solvent removal and have found that

  16. Interfacial and transport properties of nanoconstrained inorganic and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherlakota, Lakshmi Suhasini

    Nanoscale constraints impact the material properties of both organic and inorganic systems. The systems specifically studied here are (i) nanoconstrained polymeric systems, poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) relevant to gas separation membranes (ii) Zwitterionic polymers poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA), poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA), and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate) (PEGMA) brushes critical for reducing bio-fouling (iii) Surface properties of N-layer graphene sheets. Interfacial constraints in ultrathin poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) membranes yielded gas permeabilities and CO2/helium selectivities that exceed bulk PTMSP membrane transport properties by up to three-fold for membranes of submicrometer thickness. Indicative of a free volume increase, a molecular energetic mobility analysis (involving intrinsic friction analysis) revealed enhanced methyl side group mobilities in thin PTMSP membranes with maximum permeation, compared to bulk films. Aging studies conducted over the timescales relevant to the conducted experiments signify that the free volume states in the thin film membranes are highly unstable in the presence of sorbing gases such as CO2. To maintain this high free volume configuration of polymer while improving the temporal stability an "inverse" architecture to conventional polymer nanocomposites was investigated, in which the polymer phase of PTMSP and PEO were interfacially and dimensionally constrained in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. While with this architecture the benefits of nanocomposite and ultrathin film membranes of PTMSP could be reproduced and improved upon, also the temporal stability could be enhanced substantially. The PEO-AAO nanocomposite membranes also revealed improved gas selectivity properties of CO2 over helium. In the thermal transition studies of zwitterionic pSBMA brushes a reversible critical transition temperature of 60

  17. Morphological Instability in InAs/GaSb Superlattices due to Interfacial Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.H.; Moss, S.C.; Stokes, D.W.; Caha, O.; Bassler, K.E.; Ammu, S.L.; Bai, J.

    2005-08-26

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to compare the misfit strain and composition in a self-organized nanowire array in an InAs/GaSb superlattice with InSb interfacial bonds to a planar InAs/GaSb superlattice with GaAs interfacial bonds. It is found that the morphological instability that occurs in the nanowire array results from the large misfit strain that the InSb interfacial bonds have in the nanowire array. Based on this result, we propose that tailoring the type of interfacial bonds during the epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor films provides a novel approach for producing the technologically important morphological instability in anomalously thin layers.

  18. Interfacial Friction in Gas-Liquid Annular Flow: Analogies to Full and Transition Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.C.; Beus, S.G.; Fore, L.B.

    1999-03-01

    New film thickness and pressure gradient data were obtained in a 5.08 by 101.6 mm duct for nitrogen and water in annular flow. Pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and temperatures of 38 and 93 C were used to vary the gas density and liquid viscosity. These data are used to compute interfacial shear stresses and interfacial friction factors for comparison with several accepted literature correlations. These comparisons are reasonable for small values of the relative film thickness. However, the new data cover conditions not approached by the data used to construct those correlations. By combining the current data with the results of two other comprehensive modern experimental studies, a new correlation for the interfacial friction factor has been developed. This correlation adds elements of transition roughness to Wallis' fully-rough analogy to better predict interfacial friction factors over a wide range of gas Reynolds numbers and liquid film thicknesses.

  19. Interfacial adhesion in rayon/nylon sheath/core composite fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Weiying.

    1991-01-01

    The fibers with enhanced adhesion were produced using a wire coating type process. One objective was to determine an effective coupling agent and the most-appropriate application conditions for maximum interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon bicomponent fibers. The second objective was to characterize the interfacial adhesion between the core fiber and the rayon skin. After removal of the spin finish by water washing, the nylon core fibers were pretreated with fumaric acid (FA) as an adhesion promoter and then were coated with viscose rayon. The results indicated that the interfacial adhesion in the rayon/nylon composite fibers was significantly improved under the application conditions of 1.0% with 36 second pretreatment time, 1.5% with 18 second pretreatment, and 2% with 9 second pretreatment time. A fiber pull adhesion test method was developed to test the interfacial adhesion. This method effectively determined the adhesion between the core and the skin.

  20. Chemo-Marangoni convection driven by an interfacial reaction: pattern formation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eckert, K; Acker, M; Tadmouri, R; Pimienta, V

    2012-09-01

    A combined study devoted to chemo-Marangoni convection and the underlying kinetics is presented for a biphasic system in which surfactants are produced in situ by an interfacial reaction. The pattern formation studied in a Hele-Shaw cell in both microgravity and terrestrial environments initially shows an ensemble of chemo-Marangoni cells along a nearly planar interface. Soon, a crossover occurs to periodic large-scale interfacial deformations which coexist with the Marangoni cells. This crossover can be correlated with the autocatalytic nature of the interfacial reaction identified in the kinetic studies. The drastic increase in the product concentration is associated with an enhanced aggregate-assisted transfer after the critical micellar concentration is approached. In this context, it was possible to conclusively explain the changes in the periodicity of the interfacial deformations depending on the reactant concentration ratio.

  1. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  2. Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction studied by time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, H. S.; Stigloher, J.; Bauer, H. G.; Hata, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Back, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the propagation of Damon-Eshbach spin waves in micrometer-sized Pt(2 nm)/Co(0.4 nm)/Py(5 nm)/MgO(5 nm) stripes. We use time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy to image the spin waves excited by a microwave antenna and to directly access their dispersion. The presence of an interfacial DMI manifests itself in an asymmetry in the dispersion for counterpropagating spin waves which reverses sign upon reversal of the direction of the externally applied magnetic field. From this asymmetry we deduce the strength of the interfacial DMI. Micromagnetic simulations confirm that the observed difference in the wave numbers and the signature of the asymmetry are characteristic for the occurrence of an interfacial DMI at the Pt/Co interface and cannot be explained by the uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy field originating from the same interface.

  3. Interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates: A molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zi-Yu; Wei, Ning; Wang, Ce; Zhou, He; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Lu

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was conducted to analyze orientations of sodium branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates molecules at nonane/water interface, which is helpful to design optimal surfactant structures to achieve ultralow interfacial tension (IFT). Through the two dimensional density profiles, monolayer collapses are found when surfactant concentration continues to increase. Thus the precise scope of monolayer is certain and orientation can be analyzed. Based on the simulated results, we verdict the interfacial assignment of branched-alkyl benzene sulfonates at the oil-water interface, and discuss the effect of hydrophobic tail structure on surfactant assignment. Bigger hydrophobic size can slow the change rate of surfactant occupied area as steric hindrance, and surfactant meta hydrophobic tails have a stronger tendency to stretch to the oil phase below the collapsed concentration. Furthermore, an interfacial model with reference to collapse, increasing steric hindrance and charge repulsive force between interfacial surfactant molecules, responsible for effecting of surfactant concentration and structure has been supposed.

  4. Gas-liquid phase separation in oppositely charged colloids: stability and interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea; Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2006-09-07

    We study the phase behavior and the interfacial tension of the screened Coulomb (Yukawa) restricted primitive model (YRPM) of oppositely charged hard spheres with diameter sigma using Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the gas-liquid and gas-solid phase transitions using free energy calculations and grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations for varying inverse Debye screening length kappa. We find that the gas-liquid phase separation is stable for kappasigmainterfacial tension using grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The interfacial tension decreases upon increasing the range of the interaction. In particular, we find that simple scaling can be used to relate the interfacial tension of the YRPM to that of the restricted primitive model, where particles interact with bare Coulomb interactions.

  5. Role of the elasticity of pharmaceutical materials on the interfacial mechanical strength of bilayer tablets.

    PubMed

    Busignies, Virginie; Mazel, Vincent; Diarra, Harona; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2013-11-30

    The effect of the elasticity of various pharmaceutical materials on the interfacial adhesion in bilayer tablets was investigated. The elastic properties of five pharmaceutical products were characterized by their total elastic recovery. To test the interfacial strength of the bilayer tablets a new flexural test was proposed. Thanks to the test configuration, the experimental breaking force is directly correlated with the interfacial layer strength. Depending on the materials, the fracture occurred over the interface or in one of the two layers. In most cases, the highest breaking forces were obtained when the materials had close elastic recovery. On the contrary, for materials with different elastic recovery, the breaking forces were reduced. The observed changes in the interfacial mechanical strength were statistically analyzed. Such an approach has an importance in the growing interest in the Quality by Design (QbD) concept in pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Determination of Interfacial Adhesion Strength between Oxide Scale and Substrate for Metallic SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-01-21

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in SOFC operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  7. Quantifying the Interfacial Strength of Oxide Scale and SS 441 Substrate Used in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-08-15

    Under a typical SOFC working environment, oxide scale will grow on the metallic interconnects in oxidant environment. The growth of the oxide scale induces the growth stresses in the oxide scale and on the scale/substrate interface combined with the thermal stresses induced by thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the oxide scale and the substrate, which may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during stack cooling, even leading to serious cell performance degradation. Therefore, the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of the metallic interconnect in SOFC operating environments. As a powerful contender of ferritic interconnects used in SOFC, its interfacial strength between the oxide scale and SS 441 substrate is very important for its application. In this paper, we applied an integrated experimental/analytical methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and metallic interconnect. The predicted interfacial strength is discussed in detailed

  8. Sound-induced Interfacial Dynamics in a Microfluidic Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-11-01

    Retrieving sound wave by a fluidic means is challenging due to the difficulty in visualizing the very minute sound-induced fluid motion. This work studies the interfacial response of multiphase systems towards fluctuation in the flow. We demonstrate a direct visualization of music in the form of ripples at a microfluidic aqueous-aqueous interface with an ultra-low interfacial tension. The interface shows a passive response to sound of different frequencies with sufficiently precise time resolution, enabling the recording of musical notes and even subsequent reconstruction with high fidelity. This suggests that sensing and transmitting vibrations as tiny as those induced by sound could be realized in low interfacial tension systems. The robust control of the interfacial dynamics could be adopted for droplet and complex-fiber generation.

  9. Effect of transcrystalline morphology on interfacial adhesion in biocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.; Hedenberg, P.; Felix, J.

    1995-12-01

    The efficient transfer of load from matrix to fibers is crucial for achieving good mechanical performance in composite materials. Much attention has been paid in recent years to producing strong bonds across fibers and matrix in composite materials. An attractive alternative to surface modification of fibers or the use of compatibilizing agents is creating molecular order at the interphase. In this study, the ability of natural cellulose fibers, such as cotton and wood fibers, to induce transcrystallinity in synthetic polymer such as polypropylene (PP), was utilized to create various interphase morphologies. The effect of trancrystalline layers of different thicknesses at the fiber interface on interfacial shear stress transfer was investigated using the single-fiber fragmentation test. It was found that the trancrystalline morphology at the fiber/matrix interface considerably improved the shear transfer. The fiber surface roughness as measured by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) as well as surface crystalline structure is proposed to be responsible for creating a favorable interphase morphology. The interphase morphology of a new generation of biodegradable composites based on celluse fiber-reinforced bacteria-produced polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is currently under investigation in our laboratories.

  10. Effect of confinement and molecular architecture on interfacial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Androulaki, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Anastasiadis, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of polyester polyols in the bulk, under confinement when the polymers are intercalated within the galleries of a hydrophilic clay and close to the inorganic surfaces is investigated utilizing Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy (DRS). A series of linear biobased polyesters with hydroxyl end groups were utilized in the bulk and in nanohybrids and the results were compared with the case of hyperbranched polymers of similar chemistry but non-linear architecture. A broad range of temperatures below and above the bulk polymer glass transition temperature, Tg, was investigated covering both the regimes of beta-like local processes and segmental (alpha-process) dynamics. The polymer dynamics observed in all the nanocomposites are quite different compared to the bulk due to the different interactions whereas differences are seen due to the architecture as well. Moreover, non-standard local dielectric spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nanocomposites dynamics at the local scale: polymer relaxation has been investigated in the same material both close and far from the MMT surfaces. The comparison of the results from the two techniques allowed the understanding, in more detail, of the influence of the complex interfacial interactions on the relaxation dynamics.

  11. Interfacial ionic 'liquids': connecting static and dynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Uysal, Ahmet; Zhou, Hua; Feng, Guang; Lee, Sang Soo; Li, Song; Cummings, Peter T.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Dai, Sheng; McDonough, John K.; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Fenter, Paul

    2014-12-05

    It is well known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e. with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. For this research, we used in situ, real-time x-ray reflectivity to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene–RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can be described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at various static potentials. Lastly, the potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion- and cation-adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (~0.15 eV).

  12. Interfacial ionic 'liquids': connecting static and dynamic structures

    DOE PAGES

    Uysal, Ahmet; Zhou, Hua; Feng, Guang; ...

    2014-12-05

    It is well known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e. with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. For this research, we used in situ, real-time x-ray reflectivity to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene–RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can bemore » described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at various static potentials. Lastly, the potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion- and cation-adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (~0.15 eV).« less

  13. Calorimetric study of surface and interfacial properties of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Melkus, T.G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to study the surface/interfacial properties of fine coal, heat flux calorimeter was used to make heat of immersion (..delta..H/sub imm/) measurements. These heats have been shown to be a valuable means of investigating the chemistry and surface properties of solids as they interact with adsorbate molecules. In addition, heats of immersion can be used to characterize a solid in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and estimate its relative wetting tendency. The first phase of experiments that were performed served as a basis for comparison of coal components/characteristics immersed in deionized, distilled water. The results of these experiments were found to correlate well with reported flotation trends. In the second phase of experiments, the solids that were previously investigated were immersed in various wetting media. The solids were characterized in terms of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and their relative wetting tendency was also established. Heat of immersion measurements using surfactant solutions demonstrated that preferential adsorption of the surfactant molecule occurs on the coal surface, thereby altering its surface properties. This was supported by laboratory vacuum filtration tests. Using flotation agents as the wetting medium, the heat of immersion was found to vary with kerosene concentration, pH, kaolin addition and oxidation of the solid surface. The results of these ..delta..H/sub imm/ measurements were found to correlate very well with results obtained by independent flotation experiments performed under the same conditions.

  14. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO3 and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  15. Interfacial transport alone accounts for coffee-ring deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandadi, Vahid; Jafari Kang, Saeed; Felske, James D.; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-11-01

    When a colloidal sessile droplet dries on a substrate, the suspended particles usually deposit on the surface in a ring-like pattern. The phenomenon is commonly known as the "coffee-ring" effect and it is widely believed to stem from the transport of solutes towards the pinned contact line by the evaporation-induced flow inside the drop. It is, therefore, assumed that the liquid-gas interface does not play an active role in shaping the deposition pattern. Here, we propose an alternative mechanism for the coffee-ring deposition, in which the particles first intersect the receding free surface and then are transported along the interface until they deposit at the edge. That the interface "captures" the solutes as the evaporation proceeds is supported by a Lagrangian tracking of particles advected by the flow field within the droplet. We model the interfacial adsorption and transport of particles by a one-dimensional advection-generation equation in a toroidal coordinate system and show that the theory adequately accounts for the coffee-ring effect. Using this model, we study the final deposition pattern on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under diffusive and uniform evaporation fluxes.

  16. Interfacial magnetic anisotropy from a 3-dimensional Rashba substrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwen; Haney, Paul M

    2016-07-18

    We study the magnetic anisotropy which arises at the interface between a thin film ferromagnet and a 3-d Rashba material. We use a tight-binding model to describe the bilayer, and the 3-d Rashba material characterized by the spin-orbit strength α and the direction of broken bulk inversion symmetry n̂. We find an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in the ẑ × n̂ direction, where ẑ is the interface normal. For realistic values of α, the uniaxial anisotropy is of a similar order of magnitude as the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Evaluating the uniaxial anisotropy for a simplified model in 1-d shows that for small band filling, the in-plane easy axis anisotropy scales as α(4) and results from a twisted exchange interaction between the spins in the 3-d Rashba material and the ferromagnet. For a ferroelectric 3-d Rashba material, n̂ can be controlled with an electric field, and we propose that the interfacial magnetic anisotropy could provide a mechanism for electrical control of the magnetic orientation.

  17. Electrically active bioceramics: a review of interfacial responses.

    PubMed

    Baxter, F R; Bowen, C R; Turner, I G; Dent, A C E

    2010-06-01

    Electrical potentials in mechanically loaded bone have been implicated as signals in the bone remodeling cycle. Recently, interest has grown in exploiting this phenomenon to develop electrically active ceramics for implantation in hard tissue which may induce improved biological responses. Both polarized hydroxyapatite (HA), whose surface charge is not dependent on loading, and piezoelectric ceramics, which produce electrical potentials under stress, have been studied in order to determine the possible benefits of using electrically active bioceramics as implant materials. The polarization of HA has a positive influence on interfacial responses to the ceramic. In vivo studies of polarized HA have shown polarized samples to induce improvements in bone ingrowth. The majority of piezoelectric ceramics proposed for implant use contain barium titanate (BaTiO(3)). In vivo and in vitro investigations have indicated that such ceramics are biocompatible and, under appropriate mechanical loading, induce improved bone formation around implants. The mechanism by which electrical activity influences biological responses is yet to be clearly defined, but is likely to result from preferential adsorption of proteins and ions onto the polarized surface. Further investigation is warranted into the use of electrically active ceramics as the indications are that they have benefits over existing implant materials.

  18. Interfacial reactions in the Sn-Ag/Au couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sinn-Wen; Yen, Yee-Wen

    2001-09-01

    Ag-Sn alloys are one of the most promising lead-free solders. Their reactions with Au substrates have been examined by using the reaction couple technique. Sn-3.5wt.%Ag/Au and Sn-25wt.%Ag/Au couples have been prepared and reacted at 120, 150, 180 and 200 C for various lengths of time. Three phases, δ-AuSn, ɛ2-AuSn2, and η-AuSn4, are found in all the couples. The thickness of the reaction layers inccreases with higher temperatures and longer reaction time, and their growth rates are described by using the parabolic law. Arrhenius equation is used to describe the temperature dependence of the growth rates. The activation energy of the growth of the intermetallic layers in both kinds of the reaction couples is similar and is determined to be 76.74 KJ/mole. Based on the reaction path knowledge and interfacial morphology, it is concluded that Sn is the fastest diffusion species in the couples.

  19. Particle laden fluid interfaces: dynamics and interfacial rheology.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alma J; Guzmán, Eduardo; Martínez-Pedrero, Fernando; Ritacco, Hernán; Rubio, Ramón G; Ortega, Francisco; Starov, Victor M; Miller, Reinhard

    2014-04-01

    We review the dynamics of particle laden interfaces, both particle monolayers and particle+surfactant monolayers. We also discuss the use of the Brownian motion of microparticles trapped at fluid interfaces for measuring the shear rheology of surfactant and polymer monolayers. We describe the basic concepts of interfacial rheology and the different experimental methods for measuring both dilational and shear surface complex moduli over a broad range of frequencies, with emphasis in the micro-rheology methods. In the case of particles trapped at interfaces the calculation of the diffusion coefficient from the Brownian trajectories of the particles is calculated as a function of particle surface concentration. We describe in detail the calculation in the case of subdiffusive particle dynamics. A comprehensive review of dilational and shear rheology of particle monolayers and particle+surfactant monolayers is presented. Finally the advantages and current open problems of the use of the Brownian motion of microparticles for calculating the shear complex modulus of monolayers are described in detail.

  20. Interfacial turbulence and regularization in electrified falling films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseluiko, Dmitri; Blyth, Mark; Lin, Te-Sheng; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Consider a liquid film flowing down an inclined wall and subjected to a normal electric field. Previous studies on the problem invoked the long-wave approximation. Here, for the first time, we analyze the Stokes-flow regime using both a non-local long-wave model and the full system of governing equations. For an obtuse inclination angle and strong surface tension, the evolution of the interface is chaotic in space and time. However, a sufficiently strong electric field has a regularizing effect, and the time-dependent solution evolves into an array of continuously interacting pulses, each of which resembles a single-hump solitary pulse. This is the so-called interfacial turbulence regime. For an acute inclination angle and a sufficiently small supercritical value of the electric field, solitary-pulse solutions do not exist, and the time-dependent solution is instead a modulated array of short-wavelength waves. When the electric field is increased, the evolution of the interface first becomes chaotic, but then is regularized so that an array of pulses is generated. A coherent-structure theory for such pulses is developed and corroborated by numerical simulations. This work was supported by the EPSRC under Grants EP/J001740/1 and EP/K041134/1.