Science.gov

Sample records for air-fuel ratio feedback

  1. System for feedback control of air-fuel ratio in internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, K.; Kunome, Y.

    1984-05-08

    A system for feedback control of the air-fuel ratio in a carburetor for an automotive internal combustion engine. The control system includes an auxiliary air bleed passage in the main air bleed of a fuel passage, an electromagnetic valve to periodically open and close the auxiliary air bleed passage, an exhaust sensor to detect a specific component of the exhaust gas as an indication of actual air-fuel ratio, and a control circuit to control the electromagnetic valve based on the output of the exhaust sensor. A vacuum passage connects the auxiliary air bleed passage at a section upstream of the electromagnetic valve to a venturi of the intake passage. A vacuum-responsive valve in the vacuum passage dilutes air admitted through the auxiliary air bleed passage with the venturi vacuum during higher speed operation of the engine to compensate for a tendency of the air through the auxiliary air bleed passage to be augmented.

  2. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  3. Air-fuel mixture ratio control using electrostatic force

    SciTech Connect

    Maruoka, H.

    1981-07-28

    Electrostatically charged liquid fuel is introduced into a venturi to be atomized therein and is then applied to the combustion chamber of an engine under the control of electrostatic force for properly controlling the air-fuel mixture ratio.

  4. Air-fuel mixture ratio control using electrostatic force

    SciTech Connect

    Maruoka, H.

    1980-01-15

    Electrostatically charged liquid fuel is introduced into a venturi to be atomized therein and is then applied to the combustion chambers of an engine under the control of electrostatic force for properly controlling the air-fuel mixture ratio.

  5. Electronic control system for air fuel ratio compensation in highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, J.; Noji, A.

    1981-12-29

    An electronic control system which electronically controls the air fuel ratio of a mixture being supplied to a gasoline engine in highlands is described. An orifice device is provided in a passage through which secondary air is supplied to the venturi section of the engine carburetor. An electronic control unit carries out programmed control of the orifice opening of the orifice device in response to the atmospheric pressure and the engine temperature to create a reference pressure. A further electronic control unit drives a second air control valve provided in the secondary air supply passage along a predetermined operating characteristic pattern in response to the difference between the reference pressure and an actual pressure present in the venturi section of the carburetor. A mixture having an optimum air fuel ratio corresponding to the atmospheric pressure can thus be supplied to the engine from the carburetor.

  6. Air-fuel ratio control system for an internal combustion engine with a three way catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, A.; Sato, Y.

    1986-04-29

    An air-fuel ratio control system is described for an internal combustion engine having at least one of a main fuel passage and a slow fuel passage in a fuel supply system thereof, the air-fuel ratio control system being adapted for performing a feedback control of air-fuel ratio according to a detected oxygen concentration of an exhaust gas of the engine, and comprising: an auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel to the engine through a fuel nozzle opening at a venturi part of a carburetor of the engine; an intake air temperature sensing means for sensing temperature of intake air introduced to the engine; and a control means for operating/stopping the feedback control of air-fuel ratio in accordance with the temperature of intake air sensed by the intake air temperature sensing means, the control means comprising a single control valve being adapted to stop the feedback control of air-fuel ratio and activate the auxiliary fuel supply means and to stop a supply of air into at least one of the main fuel passage and slow fuel passage, for enriching the air-fuel ratio when the temperature of intake air is below a predetermined level.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, MIRATECH CORPORATIONM GECO 3001 AIR/FUEL RATIO CONTROLLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Details on the verification test design, measurement test procedures, and Quality assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) procedures can be found in the test plan titled Testing and Quality Assurance Plan, MIRATECH Corporation GECO 3100 Air/Fuel Ratio Controller (SRI 2001). It can be d...

  8. Air fuel ratio control apparatus and method for an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger

    SciTech Connect

    Sawamoto, K.; Ikeura, K.; Morita, T.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1984-05-29

    Normally, an air-fuel ratio is controlled in accordance with the engine speed and the intake air quantity of an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger. When the output pressure of the turbocharger increases excessively, an intake relief valve opens to decrease the intake air quantity. In this case, the fuel injection quantity is controlled solely in accordance with the engine speed.

  9. Adaptive RBF network for parameter estimation and stable air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Yu, D L

    2008-01-01

    In the application of variable structure control to engine air-fuel ratio, the ratio is subjected to chattering due to system uncertainty, such as unknown parameters or time varying dynamics. This paper proposes an adaptive neural network method to estimate two immeasurable physical parameters on-line and to compensate for the model uncertainty and engine time varying dynamics, so that the chattering is substantially reduced and the air-fuel ratio is regulated within the desired range of the stoichiometric value. The adaptive law of the neural network is derived using the Lyapunov method, so that the stability of the whole system and the convergence of the networks are guaranteed. Computer simulations based on a mean value engine model demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. PMID:18166378

  10. Method and apparatus for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, S.

    1981-03-24

    A method and apparatus is described for varying the fuel ratio of an air-fuel mixture supplied to the carburetor of an internal combustion engine. In a first embodiment, a valve opens and closes a port in an aluminum block between a passage coupled to the pcv and carburetor and a second passage open to the atmosphere. A spring in the second passage modulates the air flow as a function of vacuum pressure and thermally responsive means maintains the valve closed until the engine reaches its operating temperature. In a second embodiment the valve is opened as a function of the wind pressure produced during vehicle movement.

  11. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  12. Development of a local continuous sampling probe for the equivalence air-fuel ratio measurement. Application to spark ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guibert, P.; Dicocco, E.

    This paper is a contribution to the development of an original technique for measuring the in-cylinder equivalence air-fuel ratio. The main objective was to construct an instrument able to furnish instantaneous values of hydrocarbon concentration for many consecutive cycles at a definite location, especially at the spark plug location. The probe is based on a hot-wire-like apparatus, but involves catalytic oxidation on the wire surface in order to be sensitive to the hydrocarbon concentration. In this paper, we present the different steps needed to develop and validate the probe. The first step focuses on the geometric configuration to simplify as much as possible the mass transfer phenomena on the wire. The second step is a parametric study to evaluate the sensitivity, confidence and lifetime of the wire. By physical analysis, we propose a relationship between the electrical signal and the air-fuel equivalence ratio of the sampled gases. The third step is the application of the probe to in-cylinder motored engine measurements, which confirms the ability of the technique to characterise, quantitatively, the homogeneity of the air-fuel mixture, especially during the compression stroke. This work points out that the global sensitivity is estimated at 4V per unit of equivalence air-fuel ratio and the response time is estimated at about 400μs. The equivalence air-fuel ratio range is from pure air to 1.2. Experiments show that it is necessary to calibrate the system before use because of the existence of multiple catalysis states. The probe presents advantages associated with its simplicity, its low cost and its direct engine application without any modifications.

  13. Stationary, gaseous-fueled, internal combustion engine, air-fuel ratio control for application of three-way catalysts for exhaust emission reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Engman, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    Exhaust emissions reduction has become very important to operators and manufacturers of stationary internal combustion engines. Many applications require the maximum reductions that only three-way nonselective catalysts can provide. Air-Fuel Ratio is an important variable that must be controlled to maintain efficient catalytic activity. Design considerations and operating results are presented for an Air-Fuel Ratio control system for application of catalytic converters to industrial, natural gas fueled engines.

  14. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  15. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  16. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  17. Pitch attitude stabilization system utilizing engine pressure ratio feedback signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The changes in the engine pressure ratio signals which result from thrust changes are used to generate a pitch stabilization signal. The signal is combined with other pitch control signals to automatically counteract pitching moments resulting from the changes in engine thrust.

  18. Variable-ratio schedules as variable-interval schedules with linear feedback loops.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J; Wixted, J T

    1986-11-01

    The mathematical theory of linear systems has been used successfully to describe responding on variable-interval (VI) schedules. In the simplest extension of the theory to the variable-ratio (VR) case, VR schedules are treated as if they were VI schedules with linear feedback loops. The assumption entailed by this approach, namely, that VR and VI-plus-linear-feedback schedules are equivalent, was tested by comparing responding on the two types of schedule. Four human subjects' lever pressing produced monetary reinforcers on five VR schedules, and on five VI schedules with linear feedback loops that reproduced the feedback properties of the VR schedules. Pressing was initiated by instructions in 2 subjects, and was shaped by successive approximation in the other 2. The different methods of response initiation did not have differential effects on behavior. For each of the 4 subjects, the VR and the comparable VI-plus-linear-feedback schedules generated similar average response rates and similar response patterns. The subjects' behavior on both types of schedule was similar to that of avian and rodent species on VR schedules. These results indicate that the assumption entailed by the VI-plus-linear-feedback approach to the VR case is valid and, consequently, that the approach is worth pursuing. The results also confute interresponse-time theories of schedule performance, which require interval and ratio contingencies to produce different response rates.

  19. Feedback type variable venturi carburetor

    SciTech Connect

    Morino, T.; Takada, S.; Takeuchi, Y.

    1982-02-09

    A feedback type variable venturi carburetor in which the negative pressure regulated by the variable venturi at a constant level is supplied to a solenoid valve which is opened and closed at a frequency of 5-30 hz and whose open-close time ratio is controlled in accordance with the signal from exhaust gas sensor to control the vacuum pressure applied to a diaphragm chamber of an air-bleed flow control means thereby controlling the air-fuel ratio of the mixture at an optimum level. This invention obviates the use of a regulator for regulating the negative pressure from the intake manifold and precludes the drawbacks experienced with conventional carburetors, such as the slow response in the feedback control caused when the main fuel system and the idling system of the conventional carburetor are switched over, and the unstable supply of fuel when the fuel begins to be delivered from the main fuel system.

  20. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  1. Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenstrom, Anna-Brita

    A study of feedback in conversational question-response exchanges focused on the questioner's feedback to the respondent. It examined three types of "followup" moves: the ordinary type revealing the questioner's attitude to the response and closing the exchange; the type signaling the questioner's reaction to the response and inviting further…

  2. Sex-ratio control erodes sexual selection, revealing evolutionary feedback from adaptive plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Tim W; Kuijper, Bram; Weissing, Franz J; Pen, Ido

    2011-09-20

    Female choice is a powerful selective force, driving the elaboration of conspicuous male ornaments. This process of sexual selection has profound implications for many life-history decisions, including sex allocation. For example, females with attractive partners should produce more sons, because these sons will inherit their father's attractiveness and enjoy high mating success, thereby yielding greater fitness returns than daughters. However, previous research has overlooked the fact that there is a reciprocal feedback from life-history strategies to sexual selection. Here, using a simple mathematical model, we show that if mothers adaptively control offspring sex in relation to their partner's attractiveness, sexual selection is weakened and male ornamentation declines. This weakening occurs because the ability to determine offspring sex reduces the fitness difference between females with attractive and unattractive partners. We use individual-based, evolutionary simulations to show that this result holds under more biologically realistic conditions. Sexual selection and sex allocation thus interact in a dynamic fashion: The evolution of conspicuous male ornaments favors sex-ratio adjustment, but this conditional strategy then undermines the very same process that generated it, eroding sexual selection. We predict that, all else being equal, the most elaborate sexual displays should be seen in species with little or no control over offspring sex. The feedback process we have described points to a more general evolutionary principle, in which a conditional strategy weakens directional selection on another trait by reducing fitness differences.

  3. High performance zinc air fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Song, Mancun; Xu, Huachi

    2014-03-01

    A zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) stack with inexpensive manganese dioxide (MnO2) as the catalyst is designed, in which the circulation flowing potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte carries the reaction product away and acts as a coolant. Experiments are carried out to investigate the characteristics of polarization, constant current discharge and dynamic response, as well as the factors affecting the performance and uniformity of individual cells in the stack. The results reveal that the peak power density can be as high as 435 mW cm-2 according to the area of the air cathode sheet, and the influence factors on cell performance and uniformity are cell locations, filled state of zinc pellets, contact resistance, flow rates of electrolyte and air. It is also shown that the time needed for voltages to reach steady state and that for current step-up or current step-down are both in milliseconds, indicating the ZAFC can be excellently applied to vehicles with rapid dynamic response demands.

  4. Rats show molar sensitivity to different aspects of random-interval-with-linear-feedback-functions and random-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Three experiments examined the impact of various aspects of reinforcement contingencies on responding maintained by free-operant schedules by food-deprived rats. Experiment 1 demonstrated that random interval (RI) and random-interval-with-positive-response-reinforcer-feedback (RI+) schedules maintained similar rates of responding at a variety of reinforcer frequencies. Experiment 2 demonstrated that a random ratio (RR) schedule maintained higher rates than RI or RI+ schedules, except at high rates of reinforcement, where response rates were similar on all schedules. Experiment 3 again demonstrated that RR schedules produced higher response rates than either RI or RI+ schedules, but modification of the RI+ schedule to prevent ratio strain enhanced response rates relative to an RI schedule. Together these results reveal a pattern of interacting factors in schedule controlled behavior: at high rates of reinforcement, this factor overrides the impact of other controlling factors, but as reinforcement rate decreases the joint impact of interresponse times reinforcement, response-reinforcer feedback functions, and ratio strain are observed. PMID:25915752

  5. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  6. Design and development of the Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Custom Engine Control Air/Fuel Module (AFM) is designed to control the air-fuel ratio for all Waukesha carbureted, gaseous fueled, industrial engine. The AFM is programmed with a personal computer to run in one of four control modes: catalyst, best power, best economy, or lean-burn. One system can control naturally aspirated, turbocharged, in-line or vee engines. The basic system consists of an oxygen sensing system, intake manifold pressure transducer, electronic control module, actuator and exhaust thermocouple. The system permits correct operation of Waukesha engines in spite of changes in fuel pressure or temperature, engine load or speed, and fuel composition. The system utilizes closed loop control and is centered about oxygen sensing technology. An innovative approach to applying oxygen sensors to industrial engines provides very good performance, greatly prolongs sensor life, and maintains sensor accuracy. Design considerations and operating results are given for application of the system to stationary, industrial engines operating on fuel gases of greatly varying composition.

  7. The impact of air-fuel mixture composition on SI engine performance during natural gas and producer gas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyła, G.; Postrzednik, S.; Żmudka, Z.

    2016-09-01

    The paper summarizers results of experimental tests of SI engine fuelled with gaseous fuels such as, natural gas and three mixtures of producer gas substitute that simulated real producer gas composition. The engine was operated under full open throttle and charged with different air-fuel mixture composition (changed value of air excess ratio). The spark timing was adjusted to obtain maximum brake torque (MBT) for each fuel and air-fuel mixture. This paper reports engine indicated performance based on in-cylinder, cycle resolved pressure measurements. The engine performance utilizing producer gas in terms of indicated efficiency is increased by about 2 percentage points when compared to fuelling with natural gas. The engine power de-rating when producer gas is utilized instead the natural gas, varies from 24% to 28,6% under stoichiometric combustion conditions. For lean burn (λ=1.5) the difference are lower and varies from 22% to 24.5%.

  8. Fabrication-tolerant 1310 nm laterally-coupled distributed feedback lasers with high side mode suppression ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, R.; Dridi, K.; Benhsaien, A.; Schriemer, H.; Hinzer, K.; Hall, T.

    2010-11-10

    A laterally-coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) laser was designed and fabricated using stepper lithography. Such DFB lasers eliminate the need of the commonly required re-growth steps in a conventional DFB laser fabrication process. With LC-DFB lasers, the grating can be lithographically patterned out of the ridge waveguide. High order gratings can enhance the lithographic tolerance for lower resolution patterning, yielding lasers more amenable to mass-manufacturing. 1310 nm InGaAsP/InP LC-DFB laser with third-order gratings was fabricated using i-line 5x stepper lithography. Excellent side mode suppression ratio over 52 dB has been measured with a single mode lasing around 1310 nm.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of Aluminum/Air Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Armando J.

    The technical and scientific challenges to provide reliable sources energy for US and global economy are enormous tasks, and especially so when combined with strategic and recent economic concerns of the last five years. It is clear that as part of the mix of energy sources necessary to deal with these challenges, fuel cells technology will play critical or even a central role. The US Department of Energy, as well as a number of the national laboratories and academic institutions have been aware of the importance such technology for some time. Recently, car manufacturers, transportation experts, and even utilities are paying attention to this vital source of energy for the future. In this thesis, a review of the main fuel cell technologies is presented with the focus on the modeling, and control of one particular and promising fuel cell technology, aluminum air fuel cells. The basic principles of this fuel cell technology are presented. A major part of the study consists of a description of the electrochemistry of the process, modeling, and simulations of aluminum air FC using Matlab Simulink(TM). The controller design of the proposed model is also presented. In sequel, a power management unit is designed and analyzed as an alternative source of power. Thus, the system commutes between the fuel cell output and the alternative power source in order to fulfill a changing power load demand. Finally, a cost analysis and assessment of this technology for portable devices, conclusions and future recommendations are presented.

  10. Zinc/air fuel cell for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N. J.; Krueger, R.; Cooper, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    We are conducting tests of an advanced zinc/air fuel cell design to determine effectiveness in various commercial applications. Our 322-cm2 cell uses gravity-fed zinc pellets as the anode, 12 M KOH electrolyte, and an air cathode catalyzed by a cobalt-porphyrin complex on carbon black. A single 322 cm2 cell runs at a standard operating power of 38 W (1200 W/m2) at 39 A (1245 A/m2) and 0.96 V with a power density of 2400 W/m2 at 0.67 V. With improved current collection hardware, already demonstrated in the laboratory, power generation increases to -3600 W/m2 at 1V. We conducted a 50-hour test in which a cell generated 587 Ah and 569 Wh. The power that may be generated increases by a factor of 2.5 between T = 28 °C and 52 °C. Electrolyte capacity, without stabilization additives, was measured at 147 Ah/L

  11. Improved alkaline hydrogen/air fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J; Kissel, G; Kordesch, K V; Kulesa, F; Taylor, E J; Gannon, E; Srinivasan, S

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the last few years on improvement of alkaline air electrodes for air depolarized chlor-alkali cells. Some of these electrodes from Union Carbide Corporation have been evaluated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in alkaline hydrogen/air fuel cells. In initial tests with 289 cm/sup 2/ electrodes, power densities of 100 mW/cm/sup 2/ were obtained at 0.65 V. This compares with power densities of 27 mW/cm/sup 2/ obtained by Kordesch in his vehicle fuel cell in the late sixties. Further improvements in the air electrode flow field yielded power densities of 126 mW/cm/sup 2/ at 0.65 V at an operating temperature of 70/sup 0/C. At 30/sup 0/C, nearly 60% of this power could be obtained at 0.65 V. The 289 cm/sup 2/ cells were units in a 16-cell 0.5 kW module. This module yielded similar power densities, and its power/weight and power/volume are sufficiently attractive for it to be considered as a building block for a fuel cell power plant in a fuel cell/battery hybrid vehicle.

  12. Enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser integrated with an electro-absorption modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Jongseong; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-09-01

    We report on the enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser diode integrated with an electro-absorption modulator. A directly- modulated dual-section laser can provide improved modulation performance under a low bias level ( i.e., below the threshold level) compared with a standard directly-modulated laser. By combining the extinction ratio from a dual-section laser with that from an electro-absorption modulator section, a total extinction ratio of 49.6. dB are successfully achieved.

  13. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  14. Effect of beam expansion loss in a carbon nanotube-doped PVA film on passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with different feedback ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kuang-Nan; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lo, Jui-Yung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-10-01

    The effect of beam expansion induced divergent loss in a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based ultrafast saturable absorber (SA) film thickness on the passive mode-locking (PML) performances of erbium-doped fiber lasers are demonstrated. The variation on the PML pulsewidth of the EDFL is discussed by changing the SWCNT-PVA SA film thicknesses, together with adjusting the pumping power and the intra-cavity feedback ratio. An almost 6 dB increment of divergent loss when enlarging the SWCNT-PVA based SA film thickness from 30-130 µm is observed. When shrinking the SA thickness to 30 µm at the largest pumping power of 52.5 mW, the optical spectrum red-shifts to 1558.8 nm with its 3 dB spectral linewidth broadening up to 2.7 nm, while the pulse has already entered the soliton regime with multi-order Kelly sidebands aside the spectral shoulder. The soliton pulsewidth is as short as 790 fs, which is much shorter than those obtained with other thicker SWCNT doped PVA polymer film based SAs; therefore, the peak power from the output of the PML-EDFL is significantly enlarged accompanied by a completely suppressed residual continuous-wave level to achieve the largest on/off extinction ratio. The main mechanism of pulse shortening with reducing thickness of SWCNT doped PVA polymer film based SA is attributed to the limited beam expansion as well as the enlarged modulation depth, which results in shortened soliton pulsewidth with a clean dc background, and broadened spectrum with enriched Kelly sidebands. The increase of total SWCNT amount in the thicker SA inevitably causes a higher linear absorption; hence, the mode-locking threshold also rises accordingly. By enlarging pumping power from 38.5-52.5 mW, the highest ascent on pulse extinction of up to 32 dB is observed among all kinds of feedback conditions. Nevertheless, the enlargement on the extinction slightly decays with increasing the feedback ratio from 30-90%, as

  15. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild…

  16. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  17. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Morphology control of zinc regeneration for zinc-air fuel cell and battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Xizhong

    2014-12-01

    Morphology control is crucial both for zinc-air batteries and for zinc-air fuel cells during zinc regeneration. Zinc dendrite should be avoided in zinc-air batteries and zinc pellets are yearned to be formed for zinc-air fuel cells. This paper is mainly to analyze the mechanism of shape change and to control the zinc morphology during charge. A numerical three-dimensional model for zinc regeneration is established with COMSOL software on the basis of ionic transport theory and electrode reaction electrochemistry, and some experiments of zinc regeneration are carried out. The deposition process is qualitatively analyzed by the kinetics Monte Carlo method to study the morphological change from the electrocrystallization point of view. Morphological evolution of deposited zinc under different conditions of direct currents and pulse currents is also investigated by simulation. The simulation shows that parametric variables of the flowing electrolyte, the surface roughness and the structure of the electrode, the charging current and mode affect morphological evolution. The uniform morphology of deposited zinc is attained at low current, pulsating current or hydrodynamic electrolyte, and granular morphology is obtained by means of an electrode of discrete columnar structure in combination with high current and flowing electrolyte.

  19. A review on air cathodes for zinc-air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neburchilov, Vladimir; Wang, Haijiang; Martin, Jonathan J.; Qu, Wei

    This paper reviews the compositions, design and methods of fabrication of air cathodes for alkali zinc-air fuel cells (ZAFCs), one of the few successfully commercialized fuel cells. The more promising compositions for air cathodes are based on individual oxides, or mixtures of such, with a spinel, perovskite, or pyrochlore structure: MnO 2, Ag, Co 3O 4, La 2O 3, LaNiO 3, NiCo 2O 4, LaMnO 3, LaNiO 3, etc. These compositions provide the optimal balance of ORR activity and chemical stability in an alkali electrolyte. The sol-gel and reverse micelle methods supply the most uniform distribution of the catalyst on carbon and the highest catalyst BET surface area. It is shown that the design of the air cathode, including types of carbon black, binding agents, current collectors, Teflon membranes, thermal treatment of the GDL, and catalyst layers, has a strong effect on performance.

  20. An Iterative Information-Reduced Quadriphase-Shift-Keyed Carrier Synchronization Scheme Using Decision Feedback for Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Tkacenko, A.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous publication [1], an iterative closed-loop carrier synchronization scheme for binary phase-shift keyed (BPSK) modulation was proposed that was based on feeding back data decisions to the input of the loop, the purpose being to remove the modulation prior to carrier synchronization as opposed to the more conventional decision-feedback schemes that incorporate such feedback inside the loop. The idea there was that, with sufficient independence between the received data and the decisions on it that are fed back (as would occur in an error-correction coding environment with sufficient decoding delay), a pure tone in the presence of noise would ultimately be produced (after sufficient iteration and low enough error probability) and thus could be tracked without any squaring loss. This article demonstrates that, with some modification, the same idea of iterative information reduction through decision feedback can be applied to quadrature phase-shift keyed (QPSK) modulation, something that was mentioned in the previous publication but never pursued.

  1. Supervisor Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  2. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, Peter

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  3. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  4. Coress feedback

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This issue of CORESS feedback highlights yet again the importance of checking medications before administration and of adequate handover. Documentation of important medical data including drug allergies, as failed to happen in the case described below, is vital. We are grateful to the clinicians who have provided the material for these reports. The online reporting form is on our website (www.coress.org.uk), which also includes all previous feedback reports. Published contributions will be acknowledged by a ‘Certificate of Contribution’, which may be included in the contributor’s record of continuing professional development.

  5. Effect of the air-fuel mixing on the NOx yield in a low-emission gas-turbine plant combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. D.; Bulysova, L. A.; Berne, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with construction of a simplified model of inhibition of nitric oxides formed in the combustors of the gas-turbine plants (GTPs) operating on natural gas. A combustor in which premixed, lean air-fuel mixtures are burnt is studied theoretically and experimentally. The research was carried out using a full-scale combustor that had parameters characteristic of modern GTPs. The article presents the results computed by the FlowVision software and the results of the experiments carried out on the test bench of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The calculations and the tests were conducted under the following conditions: a flow rate of approximately 4.6 kg/s, a pressure to 450 kPa, an air temperature at the combustor inlet of approximately 400°C, the outlet temperature t 3 ≤ 1200°C, and natural gas as the fuel. The comparison of the simulated parameters with the experimental results underlies the constructed correlation dependence of the experimental NO x emission on the calculated parameter of nonuniform fuel concentration at the premixing zone outlet. The postulate about a weak dependence of the emission of NO x formed upon combustion of a perfectly mixed air-fuel mixture—when the methane concentration in air is constant at any point of the air-fuel mixture, i.e., constant in the mixture bulk—on the pressure in the combustor has been experimentally proven. The correctness and the practicability of the stationary mathematical model of the mixing process used to assess the NO x emission by the calculated amount of the air-fuel mixture generated in the premixing zone has been validated. This eliminates some difficulties that arise in the course of calculation of combustion and formation of NO x .

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY REPORT, MIRATECH CORPORATION, GECO(TM) 3001 AIR/FUEL RATIO CONTROLLER (MANUFACTURED BY WOODWARD GOVERNOR COMPANY) PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the natural gas industry, transmission pipeline operators use internal combustion (IC) gas-fired engines to provide the mechanical energy needed to drive pipeline gas compressors. As such, owners and operators of compressor stations are interested in the performance of these e...

  7. Student Engagement with Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon; Shields, Cathy; Gardner, James; Hancock, Alysoun; Nutt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This report considers Biological Sciences students' perceptions of feedback, compared with those of the University as a whole, this includes what forms of feedback were considered most useful and how feedback used. Compared with data from previous studies, Biological Sciences students gave much greater recognition to oral feedback, placing it on a…

  8. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  9. Feedback on Feedback--Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speicher, Oranna; Stollhans, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that providing assessment feedback through the medium of screencasts is favourably received by students and encourages deeper engagement with the feedback given by the language teacher (inter alia Abdous & Yoshimura, 2010; Brick & Holmes, 2008; Cann, 2007; Stannard, 2007). In this short paper we will report the…

  10. Chromaticity Feedback at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-05-23

    Chromaticity feedback during the ramp to high beam energies has been demonstrated in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report we review the feedback design and measurement technique. Commissioning experiences including interaction with existing tune and coupling feedback are presented together with supporting experimental data.

  11. The Mythology of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcroft, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Much of the general education and discipline-specific literature on feedback suggests that it is a central and important element of student learning. This paper examines feedback from a social process perspective and suggests that feedback is best understood through an analysis of the interactions between academics and students. The paper argues…

  12. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  13. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  14. Types and Frequencies of Feedback Interventions in Classroom Interaction in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voerman, Lia; Meijer, Paulien C.; Korthagen, Fred A. J.; Simons, Robert Jan

    2012-01-01

    Contributing to the growing amount of literature on learning-enhancing feedback, this article attempts to distinguish between progress feedback and discrepancy feedback. Building on relevant literature drawn from psychology, we propose the use of a ratio of 3:1, positive:negative feedback. We analyzed contiguous 10 min blocks of classroom…

  15. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  16. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  17. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  18. The Power of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John; Timperley, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is one of the most powerful influences on learning and achievement, but this impact can be either positive or negative. Its power is frequently mentioned in articles about learning and teaching, but surprisingly few recent studies have systematically investigated its meaning. This article provides a conceptual analysis of feedback and…

  19. Four perspectives on climate feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldl, N.; Roe, G. H.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial pattern of climate feedbacks depends on how the feedbacks are defined. We employ an idealized aquaplanet simulation with radiative kernels diagnosed for the precise model setup and characterize the meridional structure of feedbacks under four different definitions: local feedbacks, global feedbacks, nondimensional feedback factors, and relative humidity feedbacks. First, the spatial pattern of the reference response (i.e., the Planck feedback) is found to vary with definition, largely as a consequence of polar-amplified warming, which affects other high-latitude feedbacks as well. Second, locally defined feedbacks allow for decomposition of the surface temperature response as a function of feedbacks, forcing, and heat transport. Third, different insights into the dynamical and thermodynamical underpinnings of the subtropical moisture response are gained by comparing different versions of humidity feedbacks. Thus, alternative approaches to the conventional, global definition of feedbacks offer several advantages for understanding patterns of warming and, ultimately, regional climate predictability.

  20. Designing Genetic Feedback Controllers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andreas W K; Dolan, James A; Kelly, Ciarán L; Anderson, James; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2015-08-01

    By incorporating feedback around systems we wish to manipulate, it is possible to improve their performance and robustness properties to meet pre-specified design objectives. For decades control engineers have been successfully implementing feedback controllers for complex mechanical and electrical systems such as aircraft and sports cars. Natural biological systems use feedback extensively for regulation and adaptation but apart from the most basic designs, there is no systematic framework for designing feedback controllers in Synthetic Biology. In this paper we describe how classical approaches from linear control theory can be used to close the loop. This includes the design of genetic circuits using feedback control and the presentation of a biological phase lag controller. PMID:26390502

  1. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  2. Novel ferrocene-anchored ZnO nanoparticle/carbon nanotube assembly for glucose oxidase wiring: application to a glucose/air fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Raoudha; Mattei, Jean-Gabriel; Thery, Jessica; Auger, Aurélien

    2015-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is immobilized on ZnO nanoparticle-modified electrodes. The immobilized glucose oxidase shows efficient mediated electron transfer with ZnO nanoparticles to which the ferrocenyl moiety is π-stacked into a supramolecular architecture. The constructed ZnO-Fc/CNT modified electrode exhibits high ferrocene surface coverage, preventing any leakage of the π-stacked ferrocene from the newly described ZnO hybrid nanoparticles. The use of the new architecture of ZnO supported electron mediators to shuttle electrons from the redox centre of the enzyme to the surface of the working electrode can effectively bring about successful glucose oxidation. These modified electrodes evaluated as a highly efficient architecture provide a catalytic current for glucose oxidation and are integrated in a specially designed glucose/air fuel cell prototype using a conventional platinum-carbon (Pt/C) cathode at physiological pH (7.0). The obtained architecture leads to a peak power density of 53 μW cm-2 at 300 mV for the Nafion® based biofuel cell under ``air breathing'' conditions at room temperature.

  3. Strategies for effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  4. Feedback in distance education.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, D

    1988-01-01

    Some tips, strategies, and techniques are presented for incorporating learner feedback into distance education courses. The most common form of learner feedback is immediate Knowledge of Response (KR). This general term can be delineated further as either Knowledge of Correct Response (KCR) or Knowledge of Incorrect Response (KIR). KCR is most useful for learning tasks that require a high level of automatic response such as vocabulary development and naming chemical structures. It also can be used for higher levels of learning. KIR occurs when the learner makes a response and knows only whether the response was correct or incorrect. If the learner was incorrect, the correct answer is not provided. Distant learners, as well as learners in a typical classroom, benefit from positive feedback, e.g., a few words written on the side of an assignment or a short note of encouragement. Personalized feedback tells students if they are performing satisfactorily and, if provided early in a course, can help reduce student attrition. If immediate feedback after an examination cannot be provided, every effort should be made to score and return the test as soon as possible before the student is expected to begin study on subsequent lessons. If this is not possible, a test review sheet could be mailed back upon receipt of the examination. Microcomputers are devices that can provide rapid and useful feedback, yet many methods that do not rely on computers can provide feedback. These include practice tests, small group exercises, and checklist response sheets. In addition to formally providing feedback after an assignment or examination, it is possible to use the principles of feedback by embedding questions and answers in text, audio, or video materials.

  5. Global Feedback Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Serrano, Lawrence Doolittle

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as the ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.

  6. Global Feedback Simulator

    2015-10-29

    GFS is a simulation engine that is used for the characterization of Accelerator performance parameters based on the machine layout, configuration and noise sources. It combines extensively tested Feedback models with a longitudinal phase space tracking simulator along with the interaction between the two via beam-based feedback using a computationally efficient simulation engine. The models include beam instrumentation, considerations on loop delays for in both the R and beam-based feedback loops, as well as themore » ability to inject noise (both correlated and uncorrelated) at different points of the machine including a full characterization of the electron gun performance parameters.« less

  7. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production.

  8. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  9. Making Time for Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Ask any teacher what he or she needs more of, and it is a good bet that time will top the list. Anything that promises to recoup a little bit of their workday time is sure to be a best seller. One overlooked time-saver is in how they use feedback. Teachers know that feedback is important for teaching and learning. Unfortunately, most secondary…

  10. Feedback and rewards, part II: formal and informal feedback reviews.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2013-02-01

    There are 2 major classes of feedback. One class of feedback consists of the informal, numerous conversations between various people in the organization regarding the performance, behavior, and goals of an individual. Another class of feedback consists of formal reviews held once or twice a year between a supervisor and an individual. This article discusses both types of feedback.

  11. Feedback and rewards, Part I: Introduction to effective feedback.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    This series of articles discusses conversations regarding feedback. Feedback can include input from numerous sources, including one's supervisor, peers, subordinates, suppliers, customers, patients, and/or society members. Effective feedback is very important to the operation of any organization and to the growth of the individual. However, feedback done poorly does not appear to be rare and can be highly destructive to all. A variety of tips on how to do feedback well are included in this article.

  12. Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Grant

    2012-01-01

    The term "feedback" is often used to describe all kinds of comments made after the fact, including advice, praise, and evaluation. But none of these are feedback, strictly speaking. Basically, feedback is information about how one is doing in his or her efforts to reach a goal. Whether feedback is just there to be grasped or is provided by another…

  13. Feedback: How Does It Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardwell, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    A study of feedback delay, expectation, and development was conducted in grades four, six, and eight, to assess whether feedback on a school related learning task serves an informational or reinforcing function. Results indicate that feedback serves an informational function and delayed feedback facilitates retention, contrary to reinforcement…

  14. Fuel-air ratio controlled carburetion system

    SciTech Connect

    Abbey, H. G.

    1980-02-12

    An automatic control system is disclosed supplying a fuel-air mixture to an internal combustion engine including a variable-venturi carburetor. Air is fed into the input of the venturi, the air passing through the throat thereof whose effective area is adjusted by a mechanism operated by a servo motor. Fuel is fed into the input of the venturi from a fuel reservoir through a main path having a fixed orifice and an auxiliary path formed by a metering valve operated by an auxiliary fuel-control motor. The differential air pressure developed between the inlet of the venturi and the throat thereof is sensed to produce an airvelocity command signal that is applied to a controller adapted to compare the command signal with the servo motor set point to produce an output for governing the servo motor to cause it to seek a null point, thereby defining a closed process control loop. The intake manifold vacuum, which varies in degree as a function of load and speed conditions is sensed to govern the auxiliary fuel-control motor accordingly, is at the same time converted into an auxiliary signal which is applied to the controller in the closed loop to modulate the command signal in a manner establishing an optimum air-fuel ratio under the varying conditions of load and speed.

  15. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  16. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  17. Stratospheric water vapor feedback.

    PubMed

    Dessler, A E; Schoeberl, M R; Wang, T; Davis, S M; Rosenlof, K H

    2013-11-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry-climate model to be +0.3 W/(m(2)⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  18. Stratospheric water vapor feedback

    PubMed Central

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-01-01

    We show here that stratospheric water vapor variations play an important role in the evolution of our climate. This comes from analysis of observations showing that stratospheric water vapor increases with tropospheric temperature, implying the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the strength of this feedback in a chemistry–climate model to be +0.3 W/(m2⋅K), which would be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. One-third of this feedback comes from increases in water vapor entering the stratosphere through the tropical tropopause layer, with the rest coming from increases in water vapor entering through the extratropical tropopause. PMID:24082126

  19. Augmented kinematic feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, Ed P., Jr.; Archipley-Smith, Donna K.

    1994-07-01

    This paper discusses a real-time augmented kinematic feedback system which can be used as a diagnosis tool for individuals with motor disabilities. The system captures and analyzes movement via color targets attached to an individual and then feeds back information about movement kinematics. This target tracking approach has a high potential for achieving a real- time kinematic assessment capability. The approach recognizes distinct moving colored targets using video data. Multiple colored targets are attached to an individual at strategic locations and then target movement is tracked using a video data acquisition system. The ability to track and assess movement in real-time allows researchers and practitioners to better study and potentially treat various motor disabilities. Recent research has suggested that kinematic feedback can enhance motor recovery of disabled individuals. This approach addresses the need for a real-time measure of human movement and discusses using kinematic feedback to enhance disability recovery.

  20. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  1. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  2. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  3. Accountability and feedback, part IV: destructive feedback.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-04-01

    There are times that feedback is destructive rather than helpful to the employee and the organization. Occasionally, this is deliberate, such as when a boss does not like someone for reasons that have nothing to do with his/her performance as an employee, or his/her character. More often, it is inadvertent. This could be due to erroneous information from others or the leader's failure to take the time to adequately observe or supervise others. It could also be due to a lack of understanding of the individual's communication style, or failure to take into account age, cultural, religious, or sex differences. This article addresses some of these issues and what to do about it.

  4. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  5. Feedback and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangelsdorff, A. David

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of providing feedback (results of how frequently a variety of tasks had been performed) on the job satisfaction of Dental Therapy Assistants (DTA's) during the course of several levels of training, i.e., up to three months, four to nine months and 10 to 18 months. Trainees were predominantly…

  6. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  7. Real, Fast, Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To better comprehend the needs of your clientele and colleagues, it is essential to use survey website applications. Doing so will help you become more efficient in obtaining constructive, timely feedback in order to adjust programming, therefore optimizing the impacts of Extension activities. Citing the most influential survey experts both in and…

  8. Feedback and Prior Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Cynthia; Tobias, Sigmund

    The hypothesis that feedback in programmed instruction is an important variable in the learning of novel, but not familiar, content was investigated. A linear, constructed response program dealing with the Sabbath rituals in the synagogue was chosen due to wide variability in student familiarity with this topic. Subjects were randomly assigned to…

  9. Review of Assessment Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  10. Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Losee, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    As Information Retrieval (IR) has evolved, it has become a highly interactive process, rooted in cognitive and situational contexts. Consequently the traditional cybernetic-based IR model does not suffice for interactive IR or the human approach to IR. Reviews different views of feedback in IR and their relationship to cybernetic and social…

  11. Feedback: A Basic Ingredient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skenderis, Theodoros; Laskaridou, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    The way we, teachers, talk to learners in general and, more specifically, the way we respond to what they have/haven't said or done affects them both as personalities and as learners. Even if we could agree that all teacher feedback is meant well, we could equally well agree that it does not always have the expected effects: learners do not always…

  12. Developmental remodeling of corticocortical feedback circuits in ferret visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Reem; Levitt, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    Visual cortical areas in the mammalian brain are linked through a system of interareal feedforward and feedback connections, which presumably underlie different visual functions. We characterized the refinement of feedback projections to primary visual cortex (V1) from multiple sources in juvenile ferrets ranging in age from 4-10 weeks postnatal. We studied whether the refinement of different aspects of feedback circuitry from multiple visual cortical areas proceeds at a similar rate in all areas. We injected the neuronal tracer cholera toxin B (CTb) into V1 and mapped the areal and laminar distribution of retrogradely labeled cells in extrastriate cortex. Around the time of eye opening at 4 weeks postnatal, the retinotopic arrangement of feedback appears essentially adult-like; however, suprasylvian cortex supplies the greatest proportion of feedback, whereas area 18 supplies the greatest proportion in the adult. The density of feedback cells and the ratio of supragranular/infragranular feedback contribution declined in this period at a similar rate in all cortical areas. We also found significant feedback to V1 from layer IV of all extrastriate areas. The regularity of cell spacing, the proportion of feedback arising from layer IV, and the tangential extent of feedback in each area all remained essentially unchanged during this period, except for the infragranular feedback source in area 18, which expanded. Thus, while much of the basic pattern of cortical feedback to V1 is present before eye opening, there is major synchronous reorganization after eye opening, suggesting a crucial role for visual experience in this remodeling process.

  13. Effect of optical feedback on a VCSEL TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujanic, D.; Jaeger, W.; Tulip, J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the effects of optical feedback on the sensitivity of VCSEL tunable-diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS). Three VCSELs, emitting at different wavelengths in the near-infrared, were used. A TDLS system, subjected to optical feedback, exhibited a common signal-to-noise ratio profile for all three lasers. A catastrophic degradation of TDLS sensitivity occurred when feedback exceeded a level which we associate with coherence collapse. The TDLS system had a CH4 minimum detection limit of 7.5 ppmm without optical feedback. Optical feedback of less than ten percent reduced this sensitivity by two orders of magnitude. This reduction of system sensitivity was accompanied by a second-harmonic absorption signal baseline shift which degraded the system accuracy.

  14. Reward feedback accelerates motor learning.

    PubMed

    Nikooyan, Ali A; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2015-01-15

    Recent findings have demonstrated that reward feedback alone can drive motor learning. However, it is not yet clear whether reward feedback alone can lead to learning when a perturbation is introduced abruptly, or how a reward gradient can modulate learning. In this study, we provide reward feedback that decays continuously with increasing error. We asked whether it is possible to learn an abrupt visuomotor rotation by reward alone, and if the learning process could be modulated by combining reward and sensory feedback and/or by using different reward landscapes. We designed a novel visuomotor learning protocol during which subjects experienced an abruptly introduced rotational perturbation. Subjects received either visual feedback or reward feedback, or a combination of the two. Two different reward landscapes, where the reward decayed either linearly or cubically with distance from the target, were tested. Results demonstrate that it is possible to learn from reward feedback alone and that the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning. An analysis of the underlying mechanisms reveals that although reward feedback alone does not allow for sensorimotor remapping, it can nonetheless lead to broad generalization, highlighting a dissociation between remapping and generalization. Also, the combination of reward and sensory feedback accelerates learning without compromising sensorimotor remapping. These findings suggest that the use of reward feedback is a promising approach to either supplement or substitute sensory feedback in the development of improved neurorehabilitation techniques. More generally, they point to an important role played by reward in the motor learning process.

  15. Feedback: Focusing Attention on Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Margaret; Handley, Karen; Millar, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Within many higher education systems there is a search for means to increase levels of student satisfaction with assessment feedback. This article suggests that the search is under way in the wrong place by concentrating on feedback as a product rather than looking more widely to feedback as a long-term dialogic process in which all parties are…

  16. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  17. Feedback: Part of a System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Just as a thermostat adjusts room temperature, effective feedback helps maintain a supportive environment for learning. Because of the many factors affecting how recipients respond to feedback, research offers no simple prescription for making feedback work effectively. What works in one classroom for one teacher will not work for another teacher.…

  18. How to Give Professional Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Moss, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning "should be a joy," the authors write, "not an affliction." Feedback experts Brookhart and Moss show how professional feedback can best motivate educators to learn. Professional conversations should be dialogs between the teacher and the principal, and feedback should feed teacher professional learning…

  19. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  20. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  1. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  2. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  3. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  4. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  5. Torque feedback transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.L.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes an infinitely variable transmission of inline configuration for interconnecting a primer mover with a load for clutch free operation in a range of speed including hydraulic neutral comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears supported by a planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the sun gear being connected mechanically to the load, output shaft means for joining the sun gear to the load; b. variable torque feedback means comprising (i) a variable displacement hydraulic motor whose rotor shaft is in line with the output shaft means and drivingly connected to the prime mover and the planetary gear carrier during the full range of operation of the transmission, and (ii) a fixed displacement hydraulic pump connected hydraulically to the motor, the rotor shaft of the pump being connected mechanically to the ring gear and being axially displaced from the output shaft means; c. means for adjusting the displacement volume within the hydraulic motor for controlling the torque feedback in the transmission to provide infinitely variable coupling between the prime mover and the load over the full range of the transmission including hydraulic neutral; d. a speed reducer between the primer mover and the motor rotor shaft and a speed multiplier between the sun gear and the load; and e. mechanical transmission assembly means between the speed multiplier and the load in line with the motor rotor shaft and the output shaft means for providing selection of drive, reverse, park, and neutral.

  6. Feedback control of waiting times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Tobias; Emary, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Feedback loops are known as a versatile tool for controlling transport in small systems, which usually have large intrinsic fluctuations. Here we investigate the control of a temporal correlation function, the waiting-time distribution, under active and passive feedback conditions. We develop a general formalism and then specify to the simple unidirectional transport model, where we compare costs of open-loop and feedback control and use methods from optimal control theory to optimize waiting-time distributions.

  7. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  8. Interresponse Time Structures in Variable-Ratio and Variable-Interval Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Matthew T.; Hill, Jade; Palya, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The interresponse-time structures of pigeon key pecking were examined under variable-ratio, variable-interval, and variable-interval plus linear feedback schedules. Whereas the variable-ratio and variable-interval plus linear feedback schedules generally resulted in a distinct group of short interresponse times and a broad distribution of longer…

  9. Driving neural oscillations with correlated spatial input and topographic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutt, Axel; Sutherland, Connie; Longtin, André

    2008-08-01

    We consider how oscillatory activity in networks of excitable systems depends on spatial correlations of random inputs and the spatial range of feedback coupling. Analysis of a neural field model with topographic delayed recurrent feedback reveals how oscillations in certain frequency bands, including the gamma band, are enhanced by increases in the input correlation length. Further, the enhancement is maximal when this length exceeds the feedback coupling range. Suppression of oscillatory power occurs concomitantly in other bands. These effects depend solely on the ratio of input and feedback length scales. The precise positions of these bands are determined by the synaptic constants and the delays. The results agree with numerical simulations of the model and of a network of stochastic spiking neurons, and are expected for any noise-driven excitable element networks.

  10. Distributed feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Andrews, J. T.; Evans, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A ridge waveguide distributed feedback laser was developed in InGaAsP. These devices have demonstrated CW output powers over 7 mW with threshold currents as low as 60 mA at 25 C. Measurements of the frequency response of these devices show a 3 dB bandwidth of about 2 GHz, which may be limited by the mount. The best devices have a single mode spectra over the entire temperature range tested with a side mode suppression of about 20 dB in both CW and pulsed modes. The design of this device, including detailed modeling of the ridge guide structure, effective index calculations, and a discussion of the grating configuration are presented. Also, the fabrication of the devices is presented in some detail, especially the fabrication of and subsequent growth over the grating. In addition, a high frequency fiber pigtailed package was designed and tested, which is a suitable prototype for a commercial package.

  11. Quantum Feedback Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Quantum amplification is essential for various quantum technologies such as communication and weak-signal detection. However, its practical use is still limited due to inevitable device fragility that brings about distortion in the output signal or state. This paper presents a general theory that solves this critical issue. The key idea is simple and easy to implement: just a passive feedback of the amplifier's auxiliary mode, which is usually thrown away. In fact, this scheme makes the controlled amplifier significantly robust, and furthermore it realizes the minimum-noise amplification even under realistic imperfections. Hence, the presented theory enables the quantum amplification to be implemented at a practical level. Also, a nondegenerate parametric amplifier subjected to a special detuning is proposed to show that, additionally, it has a broadband nature.

  12. Feedback control of canards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Joseph; Moehlis, Jeff

    2008-03-01

    We present a control mechanism for tuning a fast-slow dynamical system undergoing a supercritical Hopf bifurcation to be in the canard regime, the tiny parameter window between small and large periodic behavior. Our control strategy uses continuous feedback control via a slow control variable to cause the system to drift on average toward canard orbits. We apply this to tune the FitzHugh-Nagumo model to produce maximal canard orbits. When the controller is improperly configured, periodic or chaotic mixed-mode oscillations are found. We also investigate the effects of noise on this control mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that a sensor tuned in this way to operate near the canard regime can detect tiny changes in system parameters.

  13. Signatures of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, D.; Zakamska, N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. It operates by either heating or driving the gas that would otherwise be available for star formation out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. We have assembled a large sample of 133 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1100 M_{⊙} yr^{-1} where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, or `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  14. Project Echo: FM Demodulators with Negative Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthroff, Clyde L.

    1961-01-01

    The primary experimental objective of Project Echo was the transmission of radio communications between points on the earth by reflection from the balloon satellite. Owing to the large path losses from transmitter to receiver via the satellite, a wide-band frequency modulation technique was used in which bandwidth was traded for signal-to-noise ratio. This paper describes the FM receiving demodulators employed. Negative feedback applied to the local oscillator reduces the FM modulation index in the receiver IF amplifiers, resulting in threshold performance superior to that of conventional FM receivers.

  15. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  16. Using Computer Networking for Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, John; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Two studies involving 27 learning-disabled middle-school students and 30 mildly handicapped junior high students investigated use of Teacher Net, a computer networking system that facilitates immediate feedback. Teacher Net reduced the teachers' administrative workload, effectively monitored student understanding, provided feedback to teachers,…

  17. Feedback in sequential machine realizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, C. A.; Coates, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for determining the realizability of a sequential machine with trigger or set-reset flip-flop memory elements when the feedback of the machine is given by a Boolean function. Feedbacks in several types of sequential machines with different memory elements are compared, showing the memory specifications allowing the realization of such machines.

  18. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-12

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies.

  19. Fine-Tuning Corrective Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong

    2001-01-01

    Explores the notion of "fine-tuning" in connection with the corrective feedback process. Describes a longitudinal case study, conducted in the context of Norwegian as a second a language, that shows how fine-tuning and lack thereof in the provision of written corrective feedback differentially affects a second language learner's restructuring of…

  20. Student Interpretations of Diagnostic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assessment is increasingly being recognized as a potentially beneficial tool for teaching and learning (Jang, 2012). There have been calls in the research literature for students to receive diagnostic feedback and for researchers to investigate how such feedback is used by students. Therefore, this study examined how students…

  1. Children's Reasoning about Evaluative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Gail D.; Fu, Genyue; Sweet, Monica A.; Lee, Kang

    2009-01-01

    Children's reasoning about the willingness of peers to convey accurate positive and negative performance feedback to others was investigated among a total of 179 6- to 11-year-olds from the USA and China. In Study 1, which was conducted in the USA only, participants responded that peers would be more likely to provide positive feedback than…

  2. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  3. Feedback: Implications for Further Research and Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishikawa, Sue S.

    This report reviews current literature on feedback and suggests practical implications of feedback research for educators. A definition of feedback is offered, and past definitions in prior research are noted. An analysis of the current state of knowledge of feedback discusses the historical development of feedback theory and suggests that…

  4. Moving Feedback Forward: Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsmond, Paul; Maw, Stephen J.; Park, Julian R.; Gomez, Stephen; Crook, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial research interest in tutor feedback and students' perception and use of such feedback. This paper considers some of the major issues raised in relation to tutor feedback and student learning. We explore some of the current feedback drivers, most notably the need for feedback to move away from simply a monologue from a tutor to…

  5. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  6. Attributes of an Effective Feedback Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Not all feedback is created equal. It is actually quite uneven in its design and effectiveness. Feedback forms typically used by educators and the feedback process used to support learning have markedly different attributes. Understanding the key attributes of effective feedback is important for those involved in the feedback process. The tools…

  7. Feedback control of sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  8. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  9. Anxiety and feedback negativity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruolei; Huang, Yu-Xia; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2010-09-01

    It has been suggested that anxious individuals are more prone to feel that negative outcomes are particularly extreme and to interpret ambiguous outcomes as negative compared to nonanxious individuals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the feedback negativity (FN) component of event-related brain potential (ERP) is sensitive to outcome evaluation and outcome expectancy. Hence, we predicted that the FN should be different between high trait-anxiety (HTA) and low trait-anxiety (LTA) individuals. To test our hypothesis, the ERPs were recorded during a simple monetary gambling task. The FN was measured as a difference wave created across conditions. We found that the amplitude of the FN indicating negative versus positive outcomes was significantly larger for LTA individuals compared to HTA individuals. However, there was no significant difference in the FN between groups in response to ambiguous versus positive outcomes. The results indicate that there is a relationship between the FN and individual differences in anxiety. We suggest that these results reflect the impact of anxiety on outcome expectation. Our results challenge the reinforcement learning theory of error-related negativity, which proposes that ERN and FN reflect the same cognitive process.

  10. Feedback systems in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.A.; Jobe, R.K.; Johnson, R.; Phinney, N.

    1987-02-01

    Two classes of computer-controlled feedback have been implemented to stabilize parameters in subsystems of the SLC: (1) ''slow'' (time scales approx. minutes) feedback, and (2) ''fast'', i.e., pulse-to-pulse, feedback. The slow loops run in a single FEEDBACK process in the SLC host VAX, which acquires signals and sets control parameters via communication with the database and the network of normal SLC microprocessors. Slow loops exist to stabilize beam energy and energy spread, beam position and angle, and timing of kicker magnets, and to compensate for changes in the phase length of the rf drive line. The fast loops run in dedicated microprocessors, and may sample and/or feedback on particular parameters as often as every pulse of the SLC beam. The first implementations of fast feedback are to control transverse beam blow-up and to stabilize the energy and energy spread of bunches going into the SLC arcs. The overall architecture of the feedback software and the operator interface for controlling loops are discussed.

  11. Feedback control indirect response models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-08-01

    A general framework is introduced for modeling pharmacodynamic processes that are subject to autoregulation, which combines the indirect response (IDR) model approach with methods from classical feedback control of engineered systems. The canonical IDR models are modified to incorporate linear combinations of feedback control terms related to the time course of the difference (the error signal) between the pharmacodynamic response and its basal value. Following the well-established approach of traditional engineering control theory, the proposed feedback control indirect response models incorporate terms proportional to the error signal itself, the integral of the error signal, the derivative of the error signal or combinations thereof. Simulations are presented to illustrate the types of responses produced by the proposed feedback control indirect response model framework, and to illustrate comparisons with other PK/PD modeling approaches incorporating feedback. In addition, four examples from literature are used to illustrate the implementation and applicability of the proposed feedback control framework. The examples reflect each of the four mechanisms of drug action as modeled by each of the four canonical IDR models and include: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and extracellular serotonin; histamine H2-receptor antagonists and gastric acid; growth hormone secretagogues and circulating growth hormone; β2-selective adrenergic agonists and potassium. The proposed feedback control indirect response approach may serve as an exploratory modeling tool and may provide a bridge for development of more mechanistic systems pharmacology models. PMID:27394724

  12. Physician Characteristics Associated with Proficiency in Feedback Skills

    PubMed Central

    Menachery, Elizabeth P; Knight, Amy M; Kolodner, Ken; Wright, Scott M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Providing and eliciting high-quality feedback is valuable in medical education. Medical learners' attainment of clinical competence and professional growth can be facilitated by reliable feedback. This study's primary objective was to identify characteristics that are associated with physician teachers' proficiency with feedback. METHODS A cohort of 363 physicians, who were either past participants of the Johns Hopkins Faculty Development Program or members of a comparison group, were surveyed by mail in July 2002. Survey questions focused on personal characteristics, professional characteristics, teaching activities, self-assessed teaching proficiencies and behaviors, and scholarly activity. The feedback scale, a composite feedback variable, was developed using factor analysis. Logistic regression models were then used to determine which faculty characteristics were independently associated with scoring highly on a dichotomized version of the feedback scale. RESULTS Two hundred and ninety-nine physicians responded (82%) of whom 262 (88%) had taught medical learners in the prior 12 months. Factor analysis revealed that the 7 questions from the survey addressing feedback clustered together to form the “feedback scale” (Cronbach's α: 0.76). Six items, representing discrete faculty responses to survey questions, were independently associated with high feedback scores: (i) frequently attempting to detect and discuss the emotional responses of learners (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2 to 9.6), (ii) proficiency in handling conflict (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.5 to 9.3), (iii) frequently asking learners what they desire from the teaching interaction (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.2), (iv) having written down or reviewed professional goals in the prior year (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.6 to 6.4), (v) frequently working with learners to establish mutually agreed upon goals, objectives, and ground rules (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.7), and (vi) frequently

  13. Global Orbit Feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.

    2010-05-23

    For improved reproducibility of good operating conditions and ramp commissioning efficiency, new dual-plane slow orbit feedback during the energy ramp was implemented during run-10 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The orbit feedback is based on steering the measured orbit, after subtraction of the dispersive component, to either a design orbit or to a previously saved reference orbit. Using multiple correctors and beam position monitors, an SVD-based algorithm is used for determination of the applied corrections. The online model is used as a basis for matrix computations. In this report we describe the feedback design, review the changes made to realize its implementation, and assess system performance.

  14. New feedback detection method for performance evaluation of hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Wang, Semyung; Bentler, Ruth A.; He, Shuman

    2007-04-01

    New objective and accurate feedback detection method, transfer function variation criterion (TVC), has been developed for evaluating the performance of feedback cancellation techniques. The proposed method is able to classify stable, unstable, and sub-oscillatory stages of feedback in hearing aids. The sub-oscillatory stage is defined as a state where the hearing aid user may perceive distortion of sound quality without the occurrence of oscillation. This detection algorithm focuses on the transfer function variation of hearing aids and the relationship between system stability and feedback oscillation. The transfer functions are obtained using the FIR Wiener filtering algorithm off-line. An anechoic test box is used for the exact and reliable evaluation of different hearing aids. The results are listed and compared with the conventional power concentration ratio (PCR), which has been generally adopted as a feedback detection method for the performance evaluation of hearing aids. The possibility of real-time implementation is discussed in terms of a more convenient and exact performance evaluation of feedback cancellation techniques.

  15. Spatial patterns in the tropical forest reveal connections between negative feedback, aggregation and abundance.

    PubMed

    Seri, Efrat; Shnerb, Nadav

    2015-09-01

    The spatial arrangement of trees in a tropical forest reflects the interplay between aggregating processes, like dispersal limitation, and negative feedback that induces effective repulsion among individuals. Monitoring the variance-mean ratio for conspecific individuals along length-scales, we show that the effect of negative feedback is dominant at short scales, while aggregation characterizes the large-scale patterns. A comparison of different species indicates, surprisingly, that both aggregation and negative feedback scales are related to the overall abundance of the species. This suggests a bottom-up control mechanism, in which the negative feedback dictates the dispersal kernel and the overall abundance.

  16. Feedback Augmented Sub-Ranging (FASR) Quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guilligan, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is intended to reduce the size, power, and complexity of pipeline analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) that require high resolution and speed along with low power. Digitizers are important components in any application where analog signals (such as light, sound, temperature, etc.) need to be digitally processed. The innovation implements amplification of a sampled residual voltage in a switched capacitor amplifier stage that does not depend on charge redistribution. The result is less sensitive to capacitor mismatches that cause gain errors, which are the main limitation of such amplifiers in pipeline ADCs. The residual errors due to mismatch are reduced by at least a factor of 16, which is equivalent to at least 4 bits of improvement. The settling time is also faster because of a higher feedback factor. In traditional switched capacitor residue amplifiers, closed-loop amplification of a sampled and held residue signal is achieved by redistributing sampled charge onto a feedback capacitor around a high-gain transconductance amplifier. The residual charge that was sampled during the acquisition or sampling phase is stored on two or more capacitors, often equal in value or integral multiples of each other. During the hold or amplification phase, all of the charge is redistributed onto one capacitor in the feedback loop of the amplifier to produce an amplified voltage. The key error source is the non-ideal ratios of feedback and input capacitors caused by manufacturing tolerances, called mismatches. The mismatches cause non-ideal closed-loop gain, leading to higher differential non-linearity. Traditional solutions to the mismatch errors are to use larger capacitor values (than dictated by thermal noise requirements) and/or complex calibration schemes, both of which increase the die size and power dissipation. The key features of this innovation are (1) the elimination of the need for charge redistribution to achieve an accurate closed-loop gain of two

  17. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool. PMID:21841396

  18. Feedback control of multibunch instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, J. )

    1992-03-10

    This lecture is intended to be an introduction to the use of feedback control to counteract multibunch instabilities. Furthermore, the intent is to make the most direct connection possible between feedback system design and the linear equations of motion of a single particle in an accelerator. Descriptions of the electronic design and considerations of gain versus stability have been treated in the literature (1,2,3) and will be glossed over in this lecture. The exposition is aimed at an audience with reasonable background in linear charged particle optics and minimal familiarity with circuit theory and electronics design. We begin with a brief description of the sources of instability and a description of the function of a feedback system in terms of the equation of motion of a beam bunch. We will try to list the fundamentals of the design process of a feedback system in such a way as to give the reader a framework within which to evaluate the subsequent material. Section 2 develops simple definitions of feedback system performance parameters: damping time constant, gain, and power requirements. Sections 3 and 4 give a perspective on feedback signal processing, using several betatron damping systems to exemplify time domain signal processing. Section 5 views the signal processing problem in frequency domain, using the CERN PS Booster longitudinal damper as an example.

  19. Output-feedback control of reactive batch distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy-Loperena, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2000-02-01

    In this work, an output-feedback, control for the regulation of distillate purity via manipulations of the reflux ratio in reactive batch distillation is designed. The approach is based on an approximate model of the composition dynamics and makes use of a reduced-order observer to estimate the modeling error. An input/output linearizing feedback is proposed where the estimated modeling error is included to achieve robust tracking of a composition reference. It is shown that the resulting controller has the structure of a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller with antireset windup. The controller performance is tested using a simulation example including strong uncertainties in the reaction model. An interesting finding is that the required reflux ratio policy to reach asymptotically a constant reference resembles the reflux ratio policy obtained from posing an optimization technique.

  20. Effects of invalid feedback on learning and feedback-related brain activity in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Benjamin; Steinhauser, Marco

    2015-10-01

    For adaptive decision-making it is important to utilize only relevant, valid and to ignore irrelevant feedback. The present study investigated how feedback processing in decision-making is impaired when relevant feedback is combined with irrelevant and potentially invalid feedback. We analyzed two electrophysiological markers of feedback processing, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300, in a simple decision-making task, in which participants processed feedback stimuli consisting of relevant and irrelevant feedback provided by the color and meaning of a Stroop stimulus. We found that invalid, irrelevant feedback not only impaired learning, it also altered the amplitude of the P300 to relevant feedback, suggesting an interfering effect of irrelevant feedback on the processing of relevant feedback. In contrast, no such effect on the FRN was obtained. These results indicate that detrimental effects of invalid, irrelevant feedback result from failures of controlled feedback processing. PMID:26263382

  1. In-line rotation sensor based on VCSEL behavior under polarization-rotating optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Ura, Shogo; Shoda, Shinichiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2011-11-21

    Lasing behavior of a single-transverse-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) was observed while the polarization direction of an optical feedback was rotated. Optical powers of two polarization modes of a VCSEL showed sinusoidal dependences on the polarization-rotation angle. The power variation was seen when an optical feedback ratio was larger than -20 dB, though the variation depth dropped suddenly as the feedback ratio became smaller than -25 dB. An in-line type rotation sensor utilizing this behavior is proposed. The sensor system was constructed and the detection principle was demonstrated.

  2. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  3. Audiotape Feedback for Essays in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Paul A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twelve students writing essays for a photochemistry course at the Open University of the Netherlands received either audiocasette or written feedback. Time spent in recording versus writing feedback differed minimally. Recorded feedback was considerably greater in amount. Students' final grades did not differ, but recorded feedback was more…

  4. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  5. Feedback Revolution: What Gets in the Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback in writing has in recent years attracted the attention of an increasing number of writing researchers. While much feedback research focuses on the act of feedback per se, little attention has been paid to the issue of teacher readiness to implement change in feedback. Using data gathered from Hong Kong secondary teachers attending a…

  6. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  7. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  8. Dynamics of Team Reflexivity after Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabelica, Catherine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2014-01-01

    A great deal of work has been generated on feedback in teams and has shown that giving performance feedback to teams is not sufficient to improve performance. To achieve the potential of feedback, it is stated that teams need to proactively process this feedback and thus collectively evaluate their performance and strategies, look for…

  9. Providing Students with Formative Audio Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brearley, Francis Q.; Cullen, W. Rod

    2012-01-01

    The provision of timely and constructive feedback is increasingly challenging for busy academics. Ensuring effective student engagement with feedback is equally difficult. Increasingly, studies have explored provision of audio recorded feedback to enhance effectiveness and engagement with feedback. Few, if any, of these focus on purely formative…

  10. Position feedback system for volume holographic storage media

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Nathan J.; Henson, James A.; Carpenter, Christopher M.; Akin, Jr.. William R.; Ehrlich, Richard M.; Beazley, Lance D.

    1998-07-07

    A method of holographic recording in a photorefractive medium wherein stored holograms may be retrieved with maximum signal-to noise ratio (SNR) is disclosed. A plurality of servo blocks containing position feedback information is recorded in the crystal and made non-erasable by heating the crystal. The servo blocks are recorded at specific increments, either angular or frequency, depending whether wavelength or angular multiplexing is applied, and each servo block is defined by one of five patterns. Data pages are then recorded at positions or wavelengths enabling each data page to be subsequently reconstructed with servo patterns which provide position feedback information. The method of recording data pages and servo blocks is consistent with conventional practices. In addition, the recording system also includes components (e.g. voice coil motor) which respond to position feedback information and adjust the angular position of the reference angle of a reference beam to maximize SNR by reducing crosstalk, thereby improving storage capacity.

  11. A novel charge sensitive preamplifier without the feedback resistor

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuccio, G. . Dipt. di Elettronica e Informazione); Rehak, P.; Xi, D. )

    1992-01-01

    A novel charge sensitive preamplifier which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor is presented. No external device or circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The detector leakage and signal current flows away through the gate of the first JFET which works with its gate to source junction slightly forward biased. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is accomplished by an additional feedback loop, which permits to equalize the current flowing through the forward baised gate to source junction and the current coming from the detector. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using an input JFET with a transconductance to gate capacitance ratio of 4 mS/5.4 pF.

  12. A novel charge sensitive preamplifier without the feedback resistor

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuccio, G.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.

    1992-07-01

    A novel charge sensitive preamplifier which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor is presented. No external device or circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The detector leakage and signal current flows away through the gate of the first JFET which works with its gate to source junction slightly forward biased. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is accomplished by an additional feedback loop, which permits to equalize the current flowing through the forward baised gate to source junction and the current coming from the detector. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using an input JFET with a transconductance to gate capacitance ratio of 4 mS/5.4 pF.

  13. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities. PMID:18274573

  14. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  15. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  16. Parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian

    2013-12-15

    We present a parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometer based on spatial multiplexing which avoids the signal crosstalk in the former feedback interferometer. The interferometer outputs two close parallel laser beams, whose frequencies are shifted by two acousto-optic modulators by 2Ω simultaneously. A static reference mirror is inserted into one of the optical paths as the reference optical path. The other beam impinges on the target as the measurement optical path. Phase variations of the two feedback laser beams are simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with two different detectors. Their subtraction accurately reflects the target displacement. Under typical room conditions, experimental results show a resolution of 1.6 nm and accuracy of 7.8 nm within the range of 100 μm.

  17. A stratospheric water vapor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Wang, T.; Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Variations in stratospheric water vapor play a role in the evolution of our climate. We show here that variations in water vapor since 2004 can be traced to tropical tropopause layer (TTL) temperature perturbations from at least three processes: the quasi-biennial oscillation, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and the temperature of the troposphere. The connection between stratospheric water vapor and the temperature of the troposphere implies the existence of a stratospheric water vapor feedback. We estimate the feedback in a chemistry-climate model to have a magnitude of +0.3 W/m2/K, which could be a significant contributor to the overall climate sensitivity. About two-thirds of the feedback comes from the extratropical stratosphere below ~16 km (the lowermost stratosphere), with the rest coming from the stratosphere above ~16 km (the overworld).

  18. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  19. Force feedback in limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Wee, Jinyong; Rahman, Tariq; Seliktar, Rahamim; Akins, Robert; Levine, David; Richardson, Dean; Dodge, George R; Thabet, Ahmed M; Holmes, Lauren; Mackenzie, William G

    2010-01-01

    A new variable-rate distraction system using a motorized distractor driven by feedback from the distraction force was designed. The distractor was mounted on a unilateral fixator and attached to the tibiae of 6 sheep that underwent distraction osteogenesis. The sheep were divided equally into 3 groups. In group 1, the forces were recorded but were not used to drive the lengthening rate. In group 2, force feedback was used and the desired distraction force level was set to 300 N and the initial rate was 1 mm/day. Group 3 also underwent force feedback with the desired force limit at 300 N, but the rate change was initiated earlier, at 200 N. The distraction force was recorded at 15 second intervals throughout the distraction phase and stored onboard the distractor.

  20. Regimes of external optical feedback in 5.6 μm distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Jumpertz, L.; Carras, M.; Schires, K.; Grillot, F.

    2014-09-29

    External optical feedback is studied experimentally in mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers. These structures exhibit a dynamical response close to that observed in interband lasers, with threshold reduction and optical power enhancement when increasing the feedback ratio. The study of the optical spectrum proves that the laser undergoes five distinct regimes depending on the phase and amplitude of the reinjected field. These regimes are mapped in the plane of external cavity length and feedback strength, revealing unstable behavior only for a very narrow range of operation, making quantum cascade lasers much more stable than their interband counterparts.

  1. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  2. Long-term carbide development in high-velocity oxygen fuel/high-velocity air fuel Cr3C2-NiCr coatings heat treated at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; Hyland, M.; James, B.

    2004-12-01

    During the deposition of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings, compositional degradation occurs, primarily through the dissolution of the carbide phase into the matrix. Exposure at an elevated temperature leads to transformations in the compositional distribution and microstructure. While these have been investigated in short-term trials, no systematic investigations of the long-term microstructural development have been presented for high-velocity sprayed coatings. In this work, high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) coatings were treated at 900 °C for up to 60 days. Rapid refinement of the supersaturated matrix phase occurred, with the degree of matrix phase alloying continuing to decrease over the following 20 to 40 days. Carbide nucleation in the HVAF coatings occurred preferentially on the retained carbide grains, while that in the HVOF coatings developed in the regions of greatest carbide dissolution. This difference resulted in a variation in carbide morphologies. Preferential horizontal growth was evident in both coatings over the first 20 to 30 days of exposure, beyond which spheroidization of the microstructure occurred. After 30 days, the carbide morphology of both coatings was comparable, tending toward an expansive structure of coalesced carbide grains. The development of the carbide phase played a significant role in the microhardness variation of these coatings with time.

  3. ASDTIC - A feedback control innovation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (analog signal to discrete time interval converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  4. ASDTIC: A feedback control innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, V. R.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The ASDTIC (Analog Signal to Discrete Time Interval Converter) control subsystem provides precise output control of high performance aerospace power supplies. The key to ASDTIC operation is that it stably controls output by sensing output energy change as well as output magnitude. The ASDTIC control subsystem and control module were developed to improve power supply performance during static and dynamic input voltage and output load variations, to reduce output voltage or current regulation due to component variations or aging, to maintain a stable feedback control with variations in the loop gain or loop time constants, and to standardize the feedback control subsystem for power conditioning equipment.

  5. Weekly Feedback vs. Daily Feedback: An Application in Retail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Jennifer E.; Mullin, Jill; Wilder, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in a retail setting to (a) assess the effectiveness of a multi-component performance management intervention and (b) compare the effectiveness of weekly and daily feedback. During the first experiment, a multiple baseline design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of task clarification, goal setting, access to…

  6. Neural correlates of feedback processing in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marlene; Bekkering, Harold; Janssen, Denise J C; de Bruijn, Ellen R A; Hunnius, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    External feedback provides essential information for successful learning. Feedback is especially important for learning in early childhood, as toddlers strongly rely on external signals to determine the consequences of their actions. In adults, many electrophysiological studies have elucidated feedback processes using a neural marker called the feedback-related negativity (FRN). The neural generator of the FRN is assumed to be the ACC, located in medial frontal cortex. As frontal brain regions are the latest to mature during brain development, it is unclear when in early childhood a functional feedback system develops. Is feedback differentiated on a neural level in toddlers and in how far is neural feedback processing related to children's behavioral adjustment? In an EEG experiment, we addressed these questions by measuring the brain activity and behavioral performance of 2.5-year-old toddlers while they played a feedback-guided game on a touchscreen. Electrophysiological results show differential brain activity for feedback with a more negative deflection for incorrect than correct outcomes, resembling the adult FRN. This provides the first neural evidence for feedback processing in toddlers. Notably, FRN amplitudes were predictive of adaptive behavior: the stronger the differential brain activity for feedback, the better the toddlers' adaptive performance during the game. Thus, already in early childhood toddlers' feedback-guided performance directly relates to the functionality of their neural feedback processing. Implications for early feedback-based learning as well as structural and functional brain development are discussed.

  7. EFFECTS OF DUST FEEDBACK ON VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, Stephen

    2014-11-10

    We carried out two-dimensional, high-resolution simulations to study the effect of dust feedback on the evolution of vortices induced by massive planets in protoplanetary disks. Various initial dust to gas disk surface density ratios (0.001-0.01) and dust particle sizes (Stokes number 4 × 10{sup –4}-0.16) are considered. We found that while dust particles migrate inward, vortices are very effective at collecting them. When dust density becomes comparable to gas density within the vortex, a dynamical instability is excited and it alters the coherent vorticity pattern and destroys the vortex. This dust feedback effect is stronger with a higher initial dust/gas density ratio and larger dust grain. Consequently, we found that the disk vortex lifetime can be reduced up to a factor of 10. We discuss the implications of our findings on the survivability of vortices in protoplanetary disks and planet formation.

  8. The Secret of Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2016-01-01

    "The only important thing about feedback is what students do with it," declares Dylan Wiliam in this article. The standard school procedure (in which a teacher looks at a piece of student work and writes something on it, and the student later looks at what the teacher has written) does not necessarily increase student learning. Teachers…

  9. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  10. Educational Accountability and Policy Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, accountability policies have become more prominent in public K-12 education and have changed how teaching and learning are organized. It is less clear the extent to which these policies have altered the politics of education. This article begins to address that question through the lens of policy feedback. It identifies…

  11. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  12. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  13. Feedback sandwiches affect perceptions but not performance.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-08-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students think feedback sandwiches positively impact subsequent performance when there is no evidence that they do. The effort necessary to produce feedback sandwiches and students' unwarranted confidence in their performance impact have implications for teaching about how to give feedback.

  14. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  15. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  16. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Intrinsic stability of quantum cascade lasers against optical feedback.

    PubMed

    Mezzapesa, F P; Columbo, L L; Brambilla, M; Dabbicco, M; Borri, S; Vitiello, M S; Beere, H E; Ritchie, D A; Scamarcio, G

    2013-06-01

    We study the time dependence of the optical power emitted by terahertz and mid-IR quantum cascade lasers in presence of optical reinjection and demonstrate unprecedented continuous wave (CW) emission stability for strong feedback. We show that the absence of coherence collapse or other CW instabilities typical of diode lasers is inherently associated with the high value of the photon to carrier lifetime ratio and the negligible linewidth enhancement factor of quantum cascade lasers.

  18. Specialized ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Wyer, J C; Salzinger, F H

    1983-01-01

    Many common management techniques have little use in managing a medical group practice. Ratio analysis, however, can easily be adapted to the group practice setting. Acting as broad-gauge indicators, financial ratios provide an early warning of potential problems and can be very useful in planning for future operations. The author has gathered a collection of financial ratios which were developed by participants at an education seminar presented for the Virginia Medical Group Management Association. Classified according to the human element, system component, and financial factor, the ratios provide a good sampling of measurements relevant to medical group practices and can serve as an example for custom-tailoring a ratio analysis system for your medical group.

  19. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  20. Preface: Multiscale feedbacks in ecogeomorphology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheaton, Joseph M.; Gibbins, Chris; Wainwright, John; Larsen, Laurel G.; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Geomorphic systems are known to exhibit nonlinear responses to physical–biological feedbacks (Thornes, 1985; Baas, 2002; Reinhardt et al., 2010). These responses make understanding and/or predicting system response to change highly challenging. With growing concerns over ecosystem health, a pressing need exists for research that tries to elucidate these feedbacks (Jerolmack, 2008; Darby, 2010; National Research Council, 2010). A session was convened at the Fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) to provide an outlet for some of this truly interdisciplinary and original research, which is central to understanding geomorphic and ecological dynamics. The session attracted over 39 contributions, which were divided into two well-attended oral sessions and a very busy poster session. This special issue presents new research from the AGU session, which highlights clear physical–biological feedbacks. The aim is to bring together contrasting perspectives on biological and geomorphic feedbacks in a diversity of physiographic settings, ranging from wetlands and estuaries, through rivers, to uplands. These papers highlight biological and physical feedbacks which involve the modulation or amplification of geomorphic processes. These papers will be of interest to a core geomorphology audience, and should also draw attention from the fields of ecohydraulics, hydroecology, ecohydrology, ecomorphology, biogeochemistry and biogeography, and biogeomorphology as well as the more traditional fields of hydrology, ecology and biology. In this preface to the special issue, we a) review past contributions to the emerging field of ecogeomorphology and related disciplines, b) provide some context for how this topical special issue came to fruition, and c) summarize the contributions to this special issue.

  1. Birthweight ratio revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, K G; Ng, P C; Roussounis, S H; Dear, P R

    1991-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis suggested in a recent report that the birthweight ratio might be a useful predictor of several important clinical outcome measures in babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation, we examined the association between the birthweight ratio and aspects of both short and long term outcome in 436 Leeds babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation. Unlike the report, and contrary to what we had expected, we were unable to find any significant association between birthweight ratio and length of time on the ventilator, mortality, neurological outcome, or intellectual outcome. PMID:2025035

  2. Sample Grating Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser Array.

    PubMed

    Yan, F L; Zhang, J C; Liu, C W; Zhuo, N; Liu, Fq; Zhai, S Q; Wang, Z G

    2015-12-01

    A sample grating distributed feedback quantum cascade laser array aim at broad tunability and enhanced side mode suppression ratios is presented. Utilizing a sample grating dependence on emission wavelength and epitaxial side down bonding technique, the array of laser ridges exhibited three separated single mode emissions centered at 4.760, 4.721, and 4.711 μm respectively, in continuous wave at room temperature. Side mode suppression ratios of >35 dB and continuous wave output powers of >10 mW per laser ridge were obtained.

  3. Statistical identification of global hot spots in soil moisture feedbacks among IPCC AR4 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notaro, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Soil moisture feedbacks can regulate climate change and offer the potential for seasonal climate predictability, yet their strengths and regional importance are poorly understood. A statistical analysis of soil moisture feedbacks on boreal and austral summer precipitation is performed using output from 19 climate models in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report. The methodology, using lagged covariance ratios, was previously applied to study ocean-atmosphere and vegetation-atmosphere interactions. Reflecting ensemble-based findings from the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) for boreal summer, positive soil moisture feedback hot spots are identified over central United States, North Africa, India, northern Brazil, and western Eurasia. Hot spots for austral summer include the Amazon, Congo, Australia, Indonesia, Mexico, and southwest United States. This statistical approach focuses on appropriate spatial and temporal scales of interaction, quantifies local feedbacks with significance testing, and expedites a reliable model intercomparison of feedbacks, without producing additional dynamical experiments.

  4. Investigating Shareable Feedback Tags for Programming Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Stephen; Burd, Liz; Hatch, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an investigation into the usage of shareable feedback tags as a way of delivering feedback to three different cohorts of programming students. A series of research questions are examined; these include investigating any perceived benefit from students using feedback tags and exploring how students interact with their…

  5. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  6. Effective Feedback Design Using Free Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Jiangmei; Kim, ChanMin

    2015-01-01

    Feedback plays a critical role in student learning and performance. However, providing students with effective feedback is challenging in online environments because of physical separation between students and instructors. Technologies can be used to enhance the effectiveness of feedback in online courses. In this article, we propose effective…

  7. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  8. Engaging Students with Feedback through Adaptive Release

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Brian; Hepplestone, Stuart; Holden, Graham; Parkin, Helen J.; Thorpe, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Feedback to students has been highlighted in the literature as an area where improvements are needed. Students need high quality, prompt feedback, but they also need guidance and tools to help them engage with and learn from that feedback. This case study explores staff and student perceptions of a tool at Sheffield Hallam University which…

  9. The Impact of Feedback Training for Inspectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbelaer, Marjoleine J.; Prins, Frans J.; van Dongen, Dre

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether oral feedback by inspectors of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education is an adequate method to support the professional development of teachers in primary education. This study aims to examine the impact of short feedback training for inspectors (focused on effective feedback conversations) on…

  10. Feedback and the Reconstruction of Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Philip; And Others

    This investigation of the impact of feedback upon scrambled discourse was intended to show the effects of idiosyncratic processing and to provide a more sensitive indicator of feedback usefulness. Learner schemata, text organization, and feedback strategies interact in processing discourse, although past research has favored limited models…

  11. The Effects of Feedback as Interpersonal Reciprocities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Joseph; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that a response to a given feedback statement will be its reciprocal. In Phase 1, a pool of feedback statements was written and scaled along dimensions of power (dominance-submission) and affect (affection-hostility). In Phase 2, these statements were used as the basis for giving feedback and replying to it. (Author)

  12. A Survey of Psychological Assessment Feedback Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven R.; Wiggins, Chauntel M.; Gorske, Tad T.

    2007-01-01

    There have been no previous studies on how often psychologists conduct feedback and whether they view this practice as a useful component of assessment. To explore psychologists' feedback practices and their perception of the effects of feedback on their clients, the authors examined survey data from 719 psychologist members of the International…

  13. Changing Teachers' Feedback Practices: A Workshop Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Jesuína; Carvalho, Carolina; Conboy, Joseph; Valente, Maria Odete; Gama, Ana Paula; Salema, Maria Helena; Fiúza, Edite

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can promote teacher-student relations and student academic involvement, performance and self-regulation. However, some research indicates that teachers do not always employ feedback effectively. There is a need to promote teachers' appropriate use of feedback in the classroom. We describe a long-term workshop designed to enhance teachers'…

  14. The Courage to Seek Authentic Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Educators assess students' work and behavior every day. They are professional feedback-givers, dispensing grades, advice, support, and red ink. They believe in the power of feedback to communicate what students are doing well and how they can do better. However, some teachers shy away from opportunities for feedback on their own work. Some don't…

  15. Cost Analysis, Evaluation and Feedback. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on cost analysis, evaluation, and feedback in human resource development. "Training Evaluation with 360-Degree Feedback" (Froukje A. Jellema) reports on a quasi-experimental study that examined the effectiveness of 360-degree feedback in evaluating the training received by nurses in a Dutch…

  16. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  17. The Problem of Feedback in Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, James M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of feedback in hearing aids and offers examples based on a computer simulation of hearing aid behavior. The available technology for dealing with feedback is reviewed, and the new digital signal-processing approaches which may finally solve the feedback problem are described. (Author/DB)

  18. Effectiveness of Feedback: The Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Ann; Mahony, Mary Jane

    2008-01-01

    While effective feedback has frequently been identified as a key strategy in learning and teaching, little known research has focused on students' perceptions of feedback and the contribution feedback makes to students' learning and teaching. This reported qualitative study aims to enrich our understanding of these perceptions and importantly to…

  19. Chat-Line Interaction and Negative Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Junko; Oliver, Rhonda

    2003-01-01

    Examines communicative interactions between native speakers (NSs) and nonnative speakers (NNSs) of Japanese on Internet relay chat, with a special focus on implicit negative feedback in the interactions. Reports that NSs of Japanese gave implicit negative feedback to their NNS partners and NNSs used the feedback in their subsequent production, but…

  20. Feedback loop compensates for rectifier nonlinearity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Signal processing circuit with two negative feedback loops rectifies two sinusoidal signals which are 180 degrees out of phase and produces a single full-wave rectified output signal. Each feedback loop incorporates a feedback rectifier to compensate for the nonlinearity of the circuit.

  1. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, D. I.; Lackner, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Delayed auditory feedback disrupts the production of speech, causing an increase in speech duration as well as many articulatory errors. To determine whether prolonged exposure to delayed auditory feedback (DAF) leads to adaptive compensations in speech production, 10 subjects were exposed in separate experimental sessions to both incremental and constant-delay exposure conditions. Significant adaptation occurred for syntactically structured stimuli in the form of increased speaking rates. After DAF was removed, aftereffects were apparent for all stimulus types in terms of increased speech rates. A carry-over effect from the first to the second experimental session was evident as long as 29 days after the first session. The use of strategies to overcome DAF and the differences between adaptation to DAF and adaptation to visual rearrangement are discussed.

  2. Haptic feedback for multilayer cutting.

    PubMed

    Rianto, Sugeng; Li, Ling; Hartley, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    An approach in effectively estimating the force feedback for a tactile haptic based on multi-proxy rendering for 3D surface cuttings for a virtual surgery simulation is described in this paper. The force-models representing haptic force-feedback are approximated using D'Alembert's principle in the mechanic case of spring-damper-stiffness interaction of the surfaces. We also propose a combination between mesh refinement and adaptive re-meshing to create a progressive cutting over the layering surfaces. Experimental results prove that the physical interaction to create cutting paths over the multilayer surfaces can be deliver smoothly with haptic in real time with 3D visual stereo on a PC.

  3. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Physiological Feedback Method and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Severance, Kurt E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and system provide physiological feedback for a patient and/or physician. At least one physiological effect experienced by a body part of a patient is measured noninvasively. A three-dimensional graphics model serving as an analogous representation of the body part is altered in accordance with the measurements. A binocular image signal representative of the three-dimensional graphics model so-altered is displayed for the patient and/or physician in a virtual reality environment.

  5. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  6. Logistic systems with linear feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Leonid; Shulgin, Dmitry; Ogluzdina, Olga

    2016-08-01

    A wide variety of systems may be described by specific dependence, which is known as logistic curve, or S-curve, between the internal characteristic and the external parameter. Linear feedback between these two values may be suggested for a wide set of systems also. In present paper, we suggest a bifurcation behavior for systems with both features, and discuss it for two cases, which are the Ising magnet in external field, and the development of manufacturing enterprise.

  7. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  8. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  9. FBG feedback's effects on distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser's polarization modes' beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunbo; Yu, Kuanglu; Lao, Yiqin; Cheng, Linghao; Wu, Chongqing; Zhao, Yao; Shang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber optic laser has recently been extensively explored as a powerful sensor for various measurands, thanks to its high sensitivity, excellent signal-to-noise ratio, and inherent electronic magnetic immunity. The phase noise and linewidth of the laser's beat note limits this sensor's performances. We report in this letter, our recent experiments on noise reduction employing optical feedback from an external FBG. We also investigated the sensitivity reduction of the DBR sensor after feedback is introduced.

  10. Tailoring Feedback: Effective Feedback Should Be Adjusted Depending on the Needs of the Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    All students deserve effective feedback. General principles for effective feedback should be adjusted depending on the learner's needs. Feedback to struggling students should include focusing on the process, selecting only one or just a few points, giving self-referenced feedback to describe progress or capability, being very clear, and checking…

  11. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of…

  12. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  13. Design principle of multi-cluster and desynchronized states in oscillatory media via nonlinear global feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for the precise control of spatial patterns in oscillatory media using nonlinear global feedback, where a proper form of the feedback function corresponding to a specific pattern is predicted through the analysis of a phase diffusion equation with global coupling. In particular, feedback functions that generate the following spatial patterns are analytically given: (i) 2-cluster states with an arbitrary population ratio, (ii) equally populated multi-cluster states and (iii) a desynchronized state. Our method is demonstrated numerically by using the Brusselator model in the oscillatory regime. Experimental realization is also discussed.

  14. Evapotranspiration—Flooding Feedback in Forested Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. T.; Keim, R.

    2015-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is a principle efflux from flooded swamps. However, for many reasons (e.g., difficulties in measuring across small gradients), controls over ET in wetlands, and swamps particularly, remain unclear. We investigate how the interaction of vegetation and hydrology controls ET and energy partitioning in flooded forests in three different hydrologic landscapes of the southeastern USA: mesohaline coastal shrub forest, floodplain hardwood forest, and backswamp baldcypress-tupelo forest. Energy components were measured by eddy covariance, sapflow, Bowen ratio energy balance, and evaporation pan to partition canopy transpiration, understory transpiration, and evaporation from floodwaters. Together, we found the energy balances of forested wetlands often differed from that of terrestrial systems, because of the potentially substantial role of evaporation from the free water surface, and flood / salinity stress inhibiting transpiration. Highest ET rates were observed in the coastal shrub forest in flooded conditions, when saline water levels dropped below the root zone (on hummocks) with concurrent lateral advection of dry air. The other two sites behaved similar to terrestrial systems, with increasing transpiration during periosd of greater water availability, although with radiation transmitted to the understory mostly partitioned to latent heat which partially compensated for the variability in canopy transpiration. Identifying these differential controls over ET is critical to understanding long-term trajectory of these systems. Many wetlands of the southeastern US have been impounded and disconnected, necessitating some degree of balance between ET and precipitation for sustainability. The positive feedbacks between ET and water levels in the coastal system suggest lower ecosystem resilience than the other two systems that showed negative feedbacks between ET and water levels.

  15. Star Formation and Feedback in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shawfeng; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.

    2003-10-01

    similar dark matter potentials because they depend on many factors, such as the baryonic fraction, external perturbation, initial mass function, and background UV intensity. We suggest that the presence of very old stars in these dwarf galaxies indicates that their initial baryonic-to-dark matter content was comparable to the cosmic value. This constraint suggests that the initial density fluctuation of baryonic matter may be correlated with that of the dark matter. For the more massive dwarf elliptical galaxies, the star formation efficiency and gas retention rate are much higher. Their mass-to-light ratio is regulated by star formation feedback and is expected to be nearly independent of their absolute luminosity. The results of our theoretical models reproduce the observed (M/L)-Mv correlation.

  16. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  17. Constructivist coding: learning from selective feedback.

    PubMed

    Elwin, Ebba; Juslin, Peter; Olsson, Henrik; Enkvist, Tommy

    2007-02-01

    Although much learning in real-life environments relies on highly selective feedback about outcomes, virtually all cognitive models of learning, judgment, and categorization assume complete and representative feedback. We investigated empirically the effect of selective feedback on decision making and how people code experience with selective feedback. The results showed that, in contrast to a commonly raised concern, performance was not impaired following learning with selective and biased feedback. Furthermore, even in a simple decision task, the experience that people acquired was not a mere recording of the observed outcomes, but rather a reconstruction from general task knowledge. PMID:17425527

  18. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  19. [360-degree feedback for medical trainees].

    PubMed

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-12-01

    In 360-degree feedback medical colleagues and collaborators give a trainee feedback by answering a questionnaire on behaviour of the trainee. The questionnaire may contain questions answered on a scale or/and they may contain open questions. The result from 360-degree feedback is used for formative feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor.

  20. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  1. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F. Computational fluid dynamics calculations, with the Glenn developed National Combustor Code, are being performed to optimize the fuel nozzle designs.

  2. Comparing two methods of delivering neuropsychological feedback.

    PubMed

    Fallows, Robert R; Hilsabeck, Robin C

    2013-03-01

    Feedback methods have been studied in medical and psychotherapy settings, but limited research is available in neuropsychology. The purpose of this study was to examine whether supplementing oral feedback with written information would lead to greater retention of information and improved adherence to recommendations. Seventy-two veterans were enrolled in the study and randomized to receive oral feedback only or oral feedback with written information. The participants were then interviewed immediately after feedback and 1 month later by phone. Univariate analyses revealed that the written group freely recalled more recommendations at the phone interview; however, there were no differences in recall of diagnostic information or the number of recommendations attempted. Findings indicate that receiving supplemental written information improves recall of recommendations and that patients prefer to receive written information in addition to oral feedback. Recommendations to improve the retention of feedback information are discussed. PMID:23315402

  3. The feedback-related negativity is modulated by feedback probability in observational learning.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Stefan; Thoma, Patrizia; Daum, Irene; Bellebaum, Christian

    2011-12-01

    The feedback-related negativity (FRN), an event-related potentials (ERPs) component reflecting activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has been shown to be modulated by feedback expectancy following active choices in feedback-based learning tasks. A general reduction of FRN amplitude has been described in observational feedback learning, raising the question whether FRN amplitude is modulated in a similar way in this type of learning. The present study investigated whether the FRN and the P300 - a second ERP component related to feedback processing - are modulated by feedback probability in observational learning. Thirty-two subjects participated in the experiment. They observed a virtual person choosing between two symbols and receiving positive or negative feedback. Learning about stimulus-specific feedback probabilities was assessed in active test trials without feedback. In addition, the bias to learn from positive or negative feedback and - in a subsample of 17 subjects - empathy scores were obtained. General FRN and P300 modulations by feedback probability were found across all subjects. Only for the FRN in learners, an interaction between probability and valence was observed. Larger FRN amplitudes for negative relative to positive feedback only emerged for the lowest outcome probability. The results show that feedback expectancy modulates FRN amplitude also in observational learning, suggesting a similar ACC function as in active learning. On the other hand, the modulation is only seen for very low feedback expectancy, which suggests that brain regions other than those of the reward system contribute to feedback processing in an observation setting.

  4. A Recipe for Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many learners still struggled to appreciate, and understand the difference between, the concepts of fractions and ratio. This is not just a UK phenomenon, which is demonstrated here by the use of a resource developed by the Wisconsin Centre for Education, in association with the Freudenthal Institute of the University of Utrecht, with a group of…

  5. Area Ratios of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David R.; Arcidiacono, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Shows that the ratio of the area of the quadrilateral formed by joining the kth points to the area of the original quadrilateral is constant whether it is convex or concave quadrilateral. Presents many geoboard or dot paper diagrams and geometrical expresssions. (YP)

  6. Multiple-Try Feedback and Higher-Order Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Koul, Ravinder

    2005-01-01

    Although feedback is an important component of computer-based instruction (CBI), the effects of feedback on higher-order learning outcomes are not well understood. Several meta-analyses provide two rules of thumb: any feedback is better than no feedback and feedback with more information is better than feedback with less information. …

  7. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  8. Visual feedback in stuttering therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolka, Elzbieta

    1997-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results concerning the influence of visual echo and reverberation on the speech process of stutterers. Visual stimuli along with the influence of acoustic and visual-acoustic stimuli have been compared. Following this the methods of implementing visual feedback with the aid of electroluminescent diodes directed by speech signals have been presented. The concept of a computerized visual echo based on the acoustic recognition of Polish syllabic vowels has been also presented. All the research nd trials carried out at our center, aside from cognitive aims, generally aim at the development of new speech correctors to be utilized in stuttering therapy.

  9. Auditory categories with separable decision boundaries are learned faster with full feedback than with minimal feedback.

    PubMed

    Yi, Han Gyol; Chandrasekaran, Bharath

    2016-08-01

    During visual category learning, full feedback (e.g., "Wrong, that was a category 4."), relative to minimal feedback (e.g., "Wrong."), enhances performance when the relevant dimensions are separable. This pattern is reversed with inseparable dimensions. Here, the interaction between trial-by-trial feedback and separability of dimensions in the auditory domain is examined. Participants were trained to categorize auditory stimuli along separable or inseparable dimensions. One group received full feedback, while the other group received minimal feedback. In the separable-dimensions condition, the full-feedback group achieved higher accuracy than did the minimal-feedback group. In the inseparable-dimensions condition, performance was equivalent across the feedback groups. These results altogether suggest that trial-by-trial feedback affects auditory category learning performance differentially for separable and inseparable categories. PMID:27586759

  10. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  11. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  12. The impact of mechanical AGN feedback on the formation of massive early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ena; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Moster, Benjamin P.

    2015-06-01

    We employ cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the effects of AGN feedback on the formation of massive galaxies with present-day stellar masses of M_stel= 8.8 × 10^{10}-6.0 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with a pressure-entropy formulation that allows an improved treatment of contact discontinuities and fluid mixing, we run three sets of simulations of 20 haloes with different AGN feedback models: (1) no feedback, (2) thermal feedback, and (3) mechanical and radiation feedback. We assume that seed black holes are present at early cosmic epochs at the centre of emerging dark matter haloes and trace their mass growth via gas accretion and mergers with other black holes. Both feedback models successfully recover the observed MBH-σ relation and black hole-to-stellar mass ratio for simulated central early-type galaxies. The baryonic conversion efficiencies are reduced by a factor of 2 compared to models without any AGN feedback at all halo masses. However, massive galaxies simulated with thermal AGN feedback show a factor of ˜10-100 higher X-ray luminosities than observed. The mechanical/radiation feedback model reproduces the observed correlation between X-ray luminosities and velocity dispersion, e.g. for galaxies with σ = 200 km s- 1, the X-ray luminosity is reduced from 1042 erg s- 1 to 1040 erg s- 1. It also efficiently suppresses late-time star formation, reducing the specific star formation rate from 10-10.5 yr- 1 to 10-14 yr- 1 on average and resulting in quiescent galaxies since z = 2, whereas the thermal feedback model shows higher late-time in situ star formation rates than observed.

  13. Period dependent short-term shortwave and longwave feedback parameters derived from CERES observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Period dependent shortwave and longwave feedback parameters are derived from the CERES EBAF-TOA data from March 2000 through May 2014. The algorithm uses time series of top-of-atmosphere reflected shortwave and emitted longwave irradiances, as well as surface skin temperature monthly deseasonalized anomalies. The time series is converted to the period domain by Fourier transfer and feedback parameters are derived from the amplitude ratio of the reflected shortwave or emitted longwave anomalies to the surface skin temperature anomalies multiplied by the cosine of the phase shift (FFT approach). While feedback parameters vary significantly depending on the period, they appear to converge as the period increases. Once they are sorted into period bins with the width of 1 year and mean values from all bins are averaged, the global mean value agrees with that derived from a simple linear regression to their uncertainty. The FFT approach provides a method to screen feedback parameters with shorter periods (less than a year) that contribute to the variability significantly. While feedback parameters derived from current CERES observation of 15 years differ from climate feedback parameters, their relationship to climate feedback parameters can be tested with climate models. The advantage of the FFT approach as opposed to a linear regression is that it can derive time-scale dependent feedback parameters. In addition, period dependent feedback parameters can be used to assess a linear system assumption for shorter periods (less than 10 years) and provide a guide on the length of the data record needed to accurately infer climate feedback parameters.

  14. Feedback control of coupled-bunch instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Oxoby, G.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Serio, M.

    1993-05-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources and particle accelerators will require active feedback systems to control multi-bunch instabilities. Stabilizing hundreds or thousands of potentially unstable modes in these accelerator designs presents many technical challenges. Feedback systems to stabilize coupled-bunch instabilities may be understood in the frequency domain (mode-based feedback) or in the time domain (bunch-by-bunch feedback). In both approaches an external amplifier system is used to create damping fields that prevent coupled-bunch oscillations from growing without bound. The system requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback are presented, and possible implementation options developed. Feedback system designs based on digital signal-processing techniques are described. Experimental results are shown from a synchrotron oscillation damper in the SSRL/SLAC storage ring SPEAR that uses digital signal-processing techniques.

  15. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  16. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity. PMID:16486093

  17. Advanced information feedback in intelligent traffic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zheng, Wen-Chen; Yin, Chuan-Yang; Zhou, Tao

    2005-12-01

    The optimal information feedback is very important to many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. As to traffic flow, a reasonable real-time information feedback can improve the urban traffic condition by providing route guidance. In this paper, the influence of a feedback strategy named congestion coefficient feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other two information feedback strategies, i.e., travel time and mean velocity.

  18. Galaxy-scale AGN feedback - theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Umemura, M.; Sutherland, R. S.; Silk, J.

    2016-02-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative and positive feedback depend strongly on interstellar medium properties, especially the column depth and spatial distribution of clouds. Negative feedback is most effective if clouds are distributed spherically and individual clouds have small column depths, while positive feedback is most effective if clouds are predominantly in a disc-like configuration.

  19. Reducing the uncertainty in subtropical cloud feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Timothy A.; Norris, Joel R.

    2016-03-01

    Large uncertainty remains on how subtropical clouds will respond to anthropogenic climate change and therefore whether they will act as a positive feedback that amplifies global warming or negative feedback that dampens global warming by altering Earth's energy budget. Here we reduce this uncertainty using an observationally constrained formulation of the response of subtropical clouds to greenhouse forcing. The observed interannual sensitivity of cloud solar reflection to varying meteorological conditions suggests that increasing sea surface temperature and atmospheric stability in the future climate will have largely canceling effects on subtropical cloudiness, overall leading to a weak positive shortwave cloud feedback (0.4 ± 0.9 W m-2 K-1). The uncertainty of this observationally based approximation of the cloud feedback is narrower than the intermodel spread of the feedback produced by climate models. Subtropical cloud changes will therefore complement positive cloud feedbacks identified by previous work, suggesting that future global cloud changes will amplify global warming.

  20. Connecting tubule glomerular feedback antagonizes tubuloglomerular feedback in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Garvin, J L; D'Ambrosio, M A; Ren, Y; Carretero, O A

    2010-12-01

    In vitro experiments showed that the connecting tubule (CNT) sends a signal that dilates the afferent arteriole (Af-Art) when Na(+) reabsorption in the CNT lumen increases. We call this process CNT glomerular feedback (CTGF) to differentiate it from tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), which is a cross talk between the macula densa (MD) and the Af-Art. In TGF, the MD signals the Af-Art to constrict when NaCl transport by the MD is enhanced by increased luminal NaCl. CTGF is mediated by CNT Na(+) transport via epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaC). However, we do not know whether CTGF occurs in vivo or whether it opposes the increase in Af-Art resistance caused by TGF. We hypothesized that CTGF occurs in vivo and opposes TGF. To test our hypothesis, we conducted in vivo micropuncture of individual rat nephrons, measuring stop-flow pressure (P(SF)) as an index of glomerular filtration pressure. To test whether activation of CTGF opposes TGF, we used benzamil to block CNT Na(+) transport and thus CTGF. CTGF inhibition with the ENaC blocker benzamil (1 μM) potentiated the decrease in P(SF) at 40 and 80 nl/min. Next, we tested whether we could augment CTGF by inhibiting NaCl reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, 1 mM) to enhance NaCl delivery to the CNT. In the presence of HCTZ, benzamil potentiated the decrease in P(SF) at 20, 40, and 80 nl/min. We concluded that in vivo CTGF occurs and opposes the vasoconstrictor effect of TGF. PMID:20826574

  1. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization.

    PubMed

    Gori, Monica; Vercillo, Tiziana; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014). To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback, or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject's forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially congruent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality. PMID:25368587

  2. Fuzzy cloud concepts for assessing radiation feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.

    1995-09-01

    The importance of clouds in the climate system is well-known but poorly understood. Modeling and observational studies have suggested that there may be positive feedbacks associated with certain cloud processes, but it is not known how strong these feedbacks are in the context of the overall system. Examples include ice microphysics feedback, as shown by Liou`s model, and the relationship between SST and cloud cover in the tropics, which is the focus of this research. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Representation of feedback operators for hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, John A.; King, Belinda B.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the problem of obtaining integral representation of feedback operators for damped hyperbolic control systems. We show that for the wave equation with Kelvin-Voigt damping and non-compact input operator, the feedback gain operator is Hilbert-Schmidt. This result is then used to provide an explicit integral representation for the feedback operator in terms of functional gains. Numerical results are given to illustrate the role that damping plays in the smoothness of these gains.

  4. Improved feedback amplifier for electromagnetic induction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Waymond R.

    2016-05-01

    A method using feedback is presented that reduces several measurement errors inherent in electromagnetic induction sensors. Errors associated with coupling between receive coils and errors associated with operating near magnetic soils will both be reduced. The method uses feedback that is directly injected into the receive coils and does not require secondary coils. A simple circuit is introduced to perform the feedback and is optimized to reduce the errors and make the circuit stable. Experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the feedback.

  5. Can corrective feedback improve recognition memory?

    PubMed

    Kantner, Justin; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2010-06-01

    An understanding of the effects of corrective feedback on recognition memory can inform both recognition theory and memory training programs, but few published studies have investigated the issue. Although the evidence to date suggests that feedback does not improve recognition accuracy, few studies have directly examined its effect on sensitivity, and fewer have created conditions that facilitate a feedback advantage by encouraging controlled processing at test. In Experiment 1, null effects of feedback were observed following both deep and shallow encoding of categorized study lists. In Experiment 2, feedback robustly influenced response bias by allowing participants to discern highly uneven base rates of old and new items, but sensitivity remained unaffected. In Experiment 3, a false-memory procedure, feedback failed to attenuate false recognition of critical lures. In Experiment 4, participants were unable to use feedback to learn a simple category rule separating old items from new items, despite the fact that feedback was of substantial benefit in a nearly identical categorization task. The recognition system, despite a documented ability to utilize controlled strategic or inferential decision-making processes, appears largely impenetrable to a benefit of corrective feedback.

  6. Cloud feedback on climate change and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Yang, P.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud feedback on climate change and variability follow similar mechanism in climate models, and the magnitude of cloud feedback on climate change and variability are well correlated among models. Therefore, the cloud feedback on short-term climate fluctuations correlates with the equilibrium climate sensitivity in climate models. Using this correlation and the observed short-term climate feedback, we infer a climate sensitivity of ~2.9K. The cloud response to inter-annual surface warming is generally consistent in observations and climate models, except for the tropical boundary-layer low clouds.

  7. Modal insensitivity with optimality. [in feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Raman, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a constant gain, feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. Both full state and output feedback control are considered. A constraint is established for the feedback gain matrix that results in modal insensitivity, and necessary conditions for optimality subject to this constraint are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  8. Adaptive feedback cancellation in hearing aids with clipping in the feedback path.

    PubMed

    Freed, Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    Adaptive linear filtering algorithms are commonly used to cancel feedback in hearing aids. The use of these algorithms is based on the assumption that the feedback path is linear, so nonlinearities in the feedback path may affect performance. This study investigated the effect on feedback canceller performance of clipping of the feedback signal arriving at the microphone, as well as the benefit of applying identical clipping to the cancellation signal so that the cancellation path modeled the nonlinearity of the feedback path. Feedback signal clipping limited the amount of added stable gain that the feedback canceller could provide, and caused misadjustment in response to high-level inputs, by biasing adaptive filter coefficients toward lower magnitudes. Cancellation signal clipping mitigated these negative effects, permitting higher amounts of added stable gain and less misadjustment in response to high-level inputs, but the benefit was reduced in the presence of the highest-level inputs. PMID:18345849

  9. Feedback May Harm: Role of Feedback in Probabilistic Decision Making of Adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Yehuda; Shoham, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Inept probabilistic decision making is commonly associated with ADHD. In experimental designs aimed to model probabilistic decision making in ADHD, feedback following each choice was, in the majority of studies, part of the paradigm. This study examined whether feedback processing plays a role in the maladaptive choice behavior of subjects with ADHD by comparing feedback and no-feedback conditions. Sixty adolescents (49 males), ages 13-18, with and without ADHD, performed a descriptive probabilistic choice task in which outcomes and probabilities were explicitly provided. Subjects performed the task either with or without feedback. Under the no-feedback condition, adolescents with ADHD and controls performed similarly, whereas under the feedback condition, subjects with ADHD chose the unfavorable outcomes more frequently and risked smaller sums than controls. These finding demonstrate the crucial role of feedback in the decision making of adolescents with ADHD.

  10. Stress reduces use of negative feedback in a feedback-based learning task.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Antje; Plessow, Franziska; Goschke, Thomas; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to the well-established effects of stress on learning of declarative material, much less is known about stress effects on reward- or feedback-based learning. Differential effects on positive and negative feedback especially have received little attention. The objective of this study, thus, was to investigate effects of psychosocial stress on feedback-based learning with a particular focus on the use of negative and positive feedback during learning. Participants completed a probabilistic selection task in both a stress and a control condition. The task allowed quantification of how much participants relied on positive and negative feedback during learning. Although stress had no effect on general acquisition of the task, results indicate that participants used negative feedback significantly less during learning after stress compared with the control condition. An enhancing effect of stress on use of positive feedback failed to reach significance. These findings suggest that stress acts differentially on the use of positive and negative feedback during learning.

  11. Optical packet header identification utilizing an all-optical feedback chaotic reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jie; Zhao, Qingchun; Xu, Dongjiao; Yin, Hongxi; Chang, Ying; Huang, Degen

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an all-optical reservoir computing (RC) setup is proposed for identifying the types of optical packet headers in optical packet switching (OPS) network. The numerical simulation identification results of 3 bits and 32 bits optical headers with the bit rate of 10 Gbps are as low as 0.625% and 2.25%, respectively. The identification errors with the variation of the feedback strength and feedback delay are presented separately. Hence, the optimal feedback parameters are obtained. The all-optical feedback RC setup is robust to the white Gaussian noise. The recognition error is acceptable when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is greater than 15 dB.

  12. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  13. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  14. Disrupting vagal feedback affects birdsong motor control

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Jorge M.; Dall'Asén, Analía G.; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Coordination of different motor systems for sound production involves the use of feedback mechanisms. Song production in oscines is a well-established animal model for studying learned vocal behavior. Whereas the online use of auditory feedback has been studied in the songbird model, very little is known about the role of other feedback mechanisms. Auditory feedback is required for the maintenance of stereotyped adult song. In addition, the use of somatosensory feedback to maintain pressure during song has been demonstrated with experimentally induced fluctuations in air sac pressure. Feedback information mediating this response is thought to be routed to the central nervous system via afferent fibers of the vagus nerve. Here, we tested the effects of unilateral vagotomy on the peripheral motor patterns of song production and the acoustic features. Unilateral vagotomy caused a variety of disruptions and alterations to the respiratory pattern of song, some of which affected the acoustic structure of vocalizations. These changes were most pronounced a few days after nerve resection and varied between individuals. In the most extreme cases, the motor gestures of respiration were so severely disrupted that individual song syllables or the song motif were atypically terminated. Acoustic changes also suggest altered use of the two sound generators and upper vocal tract filtering, indicating that the disruption of vagal feedback caused changes to the motor program of all motor systems involved in song production and modification. This evidence for the use of vagal feedback by the song system with disruption of song during the first days after nerve cut provides a contrast to the longer-term effects of auditory feedback disruption. It suggests a significant role for somatosensory feedback that differs from that of auditory feedback. PMID:21113000

  15. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For ExB rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for ExB rotationally driven flute modes. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Control and diagnostic uses of feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A. K.

    2000-05-01

    Recent results on multimode feedback control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and a variety of diagnostic uses of feedback are summarized. First, is the report on reduction and scaling of transport under feedback. By controlling the fluctuation amplitudes and consequently the transport via feedback, it is found that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient is linear with root-mean-square rms fluctuation level. The scaling appears not to agree with any generic theory. A variety of other diagnostic uses of feedback have been developed. The primary goal is an experimental methodology for the determination of dynamic models of plasma turbulence, both for better transport understanding and more credible feedback controller designs. A specific motivation is to search for a low-order dynamic model, suitable for the convenient study of both transport and feedback. First, the time series analysis method is used for the determination of chaotic attractor dimension of plasma fluctuations. For E×B rotational flute modes it is found to be close to three, indicating that a low-order dynamic model may be adequate for transport prediction and feedback controller design. Second, a new method for direct experimental determination of nonlinear dynamical models of plasma turbulence using feedback has been developed. Specifically, the process begins with a standard three-wave coupling model and introduces a variable feedback gain. The power spectrum, delayed power spectrum, and bispectrum of fluctuations are then experimentally obtained. By varying the feedback gain continuously, an arbitrary number of numerical equations for a fixed number of unknowns can be generated. Their numerical solution yields the linear dispersion, as well as nonlinear coupling coefficients. This method has been successfully applied for E×B rotationally driven flute modes.

  17. Feedback Alignment: Effective and Ineffective Links between Tutors' and Students' Understanding of Coursework Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsmond, Paul; Merry, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Tutors' intentions when providing feedback may not be accurately perceived and acted on by students. In this study, 19 biological sciences students and six tutors were interviewed concerning the tutor's intentions when providing specific feedback and the students' perceptions and usage of that feedback. A phenomenological approach was used to…

  18. Closing the Feedback Loop? Iterative Feedback between Tutor and Student in Coursework Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Martin; Pinard, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the case for using feedback iteratively, to improve student engagement and learning. In this model, students were invited to respond to tutor feedback with students' own responses. Among the three courses/modules (three tutors) studied, differences in feedback styles were evident from: (a) thematic analysis of tutor comments and,…

  19. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  20. "Are You Listening Please?" The Advantages of Electronic Audio Feedback Compared to Written Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Tom; Curran, John

    2010-01-01

    Feedback on students' work is, probably, one of the most important aspects of learning, yet students' report, according to the National Union of Students (NUS) Survey of 2008, unhappiness with the feedback process. Students were unhappy with the quality, detail and timing of feedback. This paper examines the benefits of using audio, as opposed to…

  1. Feedback Perceptions and Attribution by Secretarial Employees: Effects of Feedback-Content and Sender Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raemdonck, Isabel; Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Theoretical explanations for the diverse reactive feedback from secretarial employees in different career phases are relatively unexplored. However, research examining age differences in the impact of feedback suggests that the effects of performance feedback may differ for employees in the early career phase and employees in the late…

  2. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  3. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  4. Stock price dynamics and option valuations under volatility feedback effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniainen, Juho; Piché, Robert

    2013-02-01

    According to the volatility feedback effect, an unexpected increase in squared volatility leads to an immediate decline in the price-dividend ratio. In this paper, we consider the properties of stock price dynamics and option valuations under the volatility feedback effect by modeling the joint dynamics of stock price, dividends, and volatility in continuous time. Most importantly, our model predicts the negative effect of an increase in squared return volatility on the value of deep-in-the-money call options and, furthermore, attempts to explain the volatility puzzle. We theoretically demonstrate a mechanism by which the market price of diffusion return risk, or an equity risk-premium, affects option prices and empirically illustrate how to identify that mechanism using forward-looking information on option contracts. Our theoretical and empirical results support the relevance of the volatility feedback effect. Overall, the results indicate that the prevailing practice of ignoring the time-varying dividend yield in option pricing can lead to oversimplification of the stock market dynamics.

  5. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  6. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  7. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  8. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  9. 10 CFR 850.40 - Performance feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Performance feedback. 850.40 Section 850.40 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.40 Performance feedback. (a) The responsible employer must conduct periodic analyses and assessments...

  10. Feedback Processes in Multimedia Language Learning Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Feedback has been one of the important elements of learning and teaching theories and still pervades the literature and instructional models, especially computer and web-based ones. However, the mechanisms about feedback dominating the fundamentals of all the instructional models designed for self-learning have changed considerably with the…

  11. Teaching Writing Using Peer Feedback Checklists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furneaux, Clare

    2002-01-01

    Discusses incorporation of peer feedback check lists in the English-as-a-Second-Language writing classroom. Highlights different types of check lists, including generic and text-specific, and how to use check lists for peer feedback. (Author/VWL)

  12. Optical feedback structures and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Snee, Preston T; Chan, Yin Thai; Nocera, Daniel G; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-11-18

    An optical resonator can include an optical feedback structure disposed on a substrate, and a composite including a matrix including a chromophore. The composite disposed on the substrate and in optical communication with the optical feedback structure. The chromophore can be a semiconductor nanocrystal. The resonator can provide laser emission when excited.

  13. Corrective Feedback and Learner Uptake in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a study in which we investigated the effects of corrective feedback on learner uptake in CALL. Learner uptake is here defined as learner responses to corrective feedback in which, in case of an error, students attempt to correct their mistake(s). 177 students from three Canadian universities participated in the study during…

  14. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  15. The Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce Wayne

    Originally designed to provide teachers with feedback and also used as a quantitative tool for specifying teacher behavior consistent with a psychological model of teaching described by Tuckman (1974), the Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF) is a 28-item semantic differential which generates four scores in the areas of creativity, dynamism…

  16. Feedback for Teachers: Focused, Specific, and Constructive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerberg, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    Across the country, there is a renewed emphasis on using teacher evaluation not only to rate teachers but also to give them formative feedback that will help them improve classroom instruction. Recent research shows that applying the strategies that teachers use to give students effective feedback to the teacher evaluation process produces…

  17. Computer-Generated Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige

    2011-01-01

    A distinction must be made between "computer-generated scoring" and "computer-generated feedback". Computer-generated scoring refers to the provision of automated scores derived from mathematical models built on organizational, syntactic, and mechanical aspects of writing. In contrast, computer-generated feedback, the focus of this article, refers…

  18. Recurrent Feedback Loops in Associative Learning.

    PubMed

    Person, Abigail L; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Gao et al. (2016) report on a little-studied feedback pathway from the cerebellar nuclei back to the cerebellar cortex. They find that it contributes to associative conditioning and execution of learned movements, highlighting a role for local feedback loops in the brain. PMID:26844826

  19. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  20. Immediate Feedback to Students and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A study reported by The National Center for Fair and Open Testing (Black & William, 2007) found that low achievers do particularly well when provided high quality feedback about their work. The type of feedback, as well as the information provided to students about their assignments, can positively impact student learning. Providing students with…

  1. Supporting Second Language Writing Using Multimodal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elola, Idoia; Oskoz, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The educational use of computer-based feedback in the classroom is becoming widespread. However, less is known about (1) the extent to which tools influence how instructors provide written and oral comments, and (2) whether receiving oral or written feedback influences the nature of learners' revisions. This case study, which expands existing…

  2. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change.

  3. Feedbacks in Human-Landscape Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L.; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change.

  4. Teacher Cognition in Corrective Feedback in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mori, Reiko

    2011-01-01

    Based on qualitative data, the current study explored how the knowledge and beliefs of two EFL professionals shaped their corrective feedback practices. The two teachers teaching in Japan had in common two main agendas that they kept in mind as they provided or opted not to provide corrective feedback. They aimed to teach the language and to…

  5. Peer Feedback on Language Form in Telecollaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Paige D.; O'Dowd, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We performed a two-phase, year-long research project that explored the impact of peer feedback on language development. We investigated specifically how and when post-secondary learners of English and Spanish provide corrective feedback on their partners' use of the target language in weekly asynchronous discussions by assigning them to one of two…

  6. Constructive feedback in organizational team-building.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, S L; Runcie, D; Lichtenstein, B

    1996-01-01

    Ways constructive feedback can help an organization achieve and maintain a competitive advantage within and without the workplace is the topic of this chapter. An approach called 360 feedback is detailed, by which an employee is rated by workers at various levels in the organizational hierarchy instead of by a single supervisor.

  7. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  8. Student Views on the Value of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marie, Jenny A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the value that a sample of students placed on feedback, what they valued it for and the conditions that affected this value judgement. I show that not all students value feedback particularly highly, especially when considered in relation to other factors in their education and when considered for its intrinsic value as…

  9. Preregulator feedback circuit utilizes Light Actuated Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayser, T. P.

    1966-01-01

    Preregulator feedback circuit employing a Light Actuated Switch /LAS/ provides a simple and efficient feedback device in a power supply preregulator which maintains dc isolation between input and output grounds. The LAS consists of a diode PN junction infrared source close to, but electrically isolated from, a photodetector.

  10. Feedback after Good Trials Enhances Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies (Chiviacowsky & Wulf, 2002, 2005) have shown that learners prefer to receive feedback after they believe they had a "good" rather than "poor" trial. The present study followed up on this finding and examined whether learning would benefit if individuals received feedback after good relative to poor trials. Participants practiced a…

  11. Graphical Understanding of Simple Feedback Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janvier, Claude; Garancon, Maurice

    1989-01-01

    Shows that graphs can reveal much about feedback systems that formula conceal, especially as microcomputers can provide complex graphs presented as animations and allow students to interact easily with them. Describes feedback systems, evolution of the system, and phase diagram. (YP)

  12. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  13. Electrometer preamplifier has drift correction feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labarthe, L. C.

    1965-01-01

    Negative feedback circuit corrects output drift in an electrometer. The negative feedback is used in the no signal state to maintain the output level at zero reference. Drift voltage storage in the signal on state is also used to provide a drift-free readout.

  14. High-fidelity measurement and quantum feedback control in circuit QED

    SciTech Connect

    Sarovar, Mohan; Milburn, G. J.; Goan, H.-S.; Spiller, T. P.

    2005-12-15

    Circuit QED is a promising solid-state quantum computing architecture. It also has excellent potential as a platform for quantum control--especially quantum feedback control--experiments. However, the current scheme for measurement in circuit QED is low efficiency and has low signal-to-noise ratio for single-shot measurements. The low quality of this measurement makes the implementation of feedback difficult, and here we propose two schemes for measurement in circuit QED architectures that can significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio and potentially achieve quantum-limited measurement. Such measurements would enable the implementation of quantum feedback protocols and we illustrate this with a simple entanglement-stabilization scheme.

  15. Variables affecting athletes' retention of coaches' feedback.

    PubMed

    Januário, Nuno M S; Rosado, Antonio F; Mesquita, Isabel

    2013-10-01

    Athletes' retention of information conveyed in coaches' feedback during training was examined, considering the nature of the information transmitted by each coach (extensions, total number of ideas transmitted, and total number of repeated ideas), athletes' characteristics, (ages, genders, school levels, and practice levels), and athletes' perceptions (relevance and acceptance of coaches' information, task motivational levels, and athletes' attention levels). Participants were 193 athletes (79 boys, 114 girls; 9 to 13 years of age) and 6 coaches. Feedback was both audio and video recorded and all athletes were interviewed. All coaches' feedback and athletes' recollections were subjected to content analysis. Information was completely retained in 31.60% of feedback episodes. Athletes' mean per-episode information retention was 63.0%. Three variables appeared to b e predictiveathletes' retention: athletes' practice levels (p = -.25), attention to coaches' provision of feedback (P = .17), and the number of different ideas transmitted by each coach (P = -.90).

  16. Feedbacks and landscape-level vegetation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Perry, George L W; Marston, J B

    2015-05-01

    Alternative stable-state theory (ASS) is widely accepted as explaining landscape-level vegetation dynamics, such as switches between forest and grassland. This theory argues that webs of feedbacks stabilise vegetation composition and structure, and that abrupt state shifts can occur if stabilising feedbacks are weakened. However, it is difficult to identify stabilising feedback loops and the disturbance thresholds beyond which state changes occur. Here, we argue that doing this requires a synthetic approach blending observation, experimentation, simulation, conceptual models, and narratives. Using forest boundaries and large mammal extinctions, we illustrate how a multifaceted research program can advance understanding of feedback-driven ecosystem change. Our integrative approach has applicability to other complex macroecological systems controlled by numerous feedbacks where controlled experimentation is impossible.

  17. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    PubMed Central

    Santesso, Diane L.; Steele, Katherine T.; Bogdan, Ryan; Holmes, Avram J.; Deveney, Christen M.; Meites, Tiffany M.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD subjects exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) subjects with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity (FRN) in RD and control subjects using a probabilistic punishment learning task. Despite equivalent behavioral performance, RD subjects showed larger FRNs to negative feedback relative to controls; group differences remained after accounting for residual anxiety and depressive symptoms. The present findings suggest that abnormal responses to negative feedback extend to samples at increased risk for depressive episodes in the absence of current symptoms. PMID:18580576

  18. Prediction feedback in intelligent traffic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuan-Fei; Ma, Xu; Wang, Guan-Wen; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2009-11-01

    The optimal information feedback has a significant effect on many socioeconomic systems like stock market and traffic systems aiming to make full use of resources. In this paper, we studied dynamics of traffic flow with real-time information provided and the influence of a feedback strategy named prediction feedback strategy is introduced, based on a two-route scenario in which dynamic information can be generated and displayed on the board to guide road users to make a choice. Our model incorporates the effects of adaptability into the cellular automaton models of traffic flow and simulation results adopting this optimal information feedback strategy have demonstrated high efficiency in controlling spatial distribution of traffic patterns compared with the other three information feedback strategies, i.e., vehicle number and flux.

  19. Minimum Requirements for Feedback Enhanced Force Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glen I.; McAuslan, David L.; Stace, Thomas M.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2013-09-01

    The problem of estimating an unknown force driving a linear oscillator is revisited. When using linear measurement, feedback is often cited as a mechanism to enhance bandwidth, sensitivity or resolution. We show that as long as the oscillator dynamics are known, there exists a real-time estimation strategy that reproduces the same measurement record as any arbitrary feedback protocol. Consequently some form of nonlinearity is required to gain any advantage beyond estimation alone. This result holds true in both quantum and classical systems, with nonstationary forces and feedback, and in the general case of non-Gaussian and correlated noise. Recently, feedback enhanced incoherent force resolution has been demonstrated [E. Gavartin, P. Verlot, and T. J. Kippenberg, Nat. Nano. 7, 509 (2012)], with the enhancement attributed to a feedback induced modification of the mechanical susceptibility. As a proof-of-principle, we experimentally reproduce this result through straightforward filtering.

  20. Artificial proprioceptive feedback for myoelectric control.

    PubMed

    Pistohl, Tobias; Joshi, Deepak; Ganesh, Gowrishankar; Jackson, Andrew; Nazarpour, Kianoush

    2015-05-01

    The typical control of myoelectric interfaces, whether in laboratory settings or real-life prosthetic applications, largely relies on visual feedback because proprioceptive signals from the controlling muscles are either not available or very noisy. We conducted a set of experiments to test whether artificial proprioceptive feedback, delivered noninvasively to another limb, can improve control of a two-dimensional myoelectrically-controlled computer interface. In these experiments, participants were required to reach a target with a visual cursor that was controlled by electromyogram signals recorded from muscles of the left hand, while they were provided with an additional proprioceptive feedback on their right arm by moving it with a robotic manipulandum. Provision of additional artificial proprioceptive feedback improved the angular accuracy of their movements when compared to using visual feedback alone but did not increase the overall accuracy quantified with the average distance between the cursor and the target. The advantages conferred by proprioception were present only when the proprioceptive feedback had similar orientation to the visual feedback in the task space and not when it was mirrored, demonstrating the importance of congruency in feedback modalities for multi-sensory integration. Our results reveal the ability of the human motor system to learn new inter-limb sensory-motor associations; the motor system can utilize task-related sensory feedback, even when it is available on a limb distinct from the one being actuated. In addition, the proposed task structure provides a flexible test paradigm by which the effectiveness of various sensory feedback and multi-sensory integration for myoelectric prosthesis control can be evaluated.

  1. Students’ perceptions on feedback module in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Varsha J.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Rana, Devang A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Feedback is an integral part of formative assessment though underutilized in medical education. The objective of this study was to review our feedback module through students’ perceptions. Methodology: We have developed a feedback module which is practiced by us for last 10 years for term ending examination that gives collective feedback to the whole class, followed by individual student-teacher interactions. Students were also exposed to 6–7 multiple choice questions (MCQs) based assessment during the course of pharmacology. Immediately after each MCQ test the answer keys is displayed along with an explanation. Two classes of students were requested to give their perceptions about the feedback by responding on Likert scale for the statements in the questionnaire. All the 206 students who volunteered for the study were enrolled in the study. Mann–Whitney test was used to calculate the difference in perceptions. Results: Of 278 students of two classes, 206 responded (74%). Students’ agreement varied from 93% to 98% for 5 items in the questionnaire for the feedback after term ending examinations. Perception of students attending one or more than one feedback session did not differ significantly. For MCQs, tests agreement was 91% to 98% for the 4 items. There was no significant difference between two classes in their perceptions regarding feedback practices (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Students gave a favorable opinion for our feedback module. In the medical colleges with a large number of students, this module is feasible for feedback in formative assessment in the form of written tests. PMID:27500170

  2. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  3. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    PubMed Central

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  4. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  5. Spherical accretion and AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulsen, Paul

    2014-06-01

    For a supermassive black hole accreting from a hot, quasi-spherical atmosphere, it is almost inevitable that the fluid approximation fails inside some point within the Bondi radius, but well outside the black hole event horizon. Within the region where the particle mean free paths exceed the radius, the flow must be modeled in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation. In the absence of magnetic fields, it is analogous to the "loss cone" problem for consumption of stars by a black hole. The accretion rate is suppressed well below the Bondi accretion rate and a significant power must be conveyed outward for the flow to proceed. This situation is complicated significantly by the presence of a magnetic field, but I will argue that the main outcomes are similar. I will also argue that the power emerging from such a flow, although generally far too little to suppress cooling on large scales, is an important ingredient of the AGN feedback cycle on scales comparable to the Bondi radius.

  6. The stochastic behavior of a molecular switching circuit with feedback

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Smith, Eric; Krakauer, David; Fontana, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Background Using a statistical physics approach, we study the stochastic switching behavior of a model circuit of multisite phosphorylation and dephosphorylation with feedback. The circuit consists of a kinase and phosphatase acting on multiple sites of a substrate that, contingent on its modification state, catalyzes its own phosphorylation and, in a symmetric scenario, dephosphorylation. The symmetric case is viewed as a cartoon of conflicting feedback that could result from antagonistic pathways impinging on the state of a shared component. Results Multisite phosphorylation is sufficient for bistable behavior under feedback even when catalysis is linear in substrate concentration, which is the case we consider. We compute the phase diagram, fluctuation spectrum and large-deviation properties related to switch memory within a statistical mechanics framework. Bistability occurs as either a first-order or second-order non-equilibrium phase transition, depending on the network symmetries and the ratio of phosphatase to kinase numbers. In the second-order case, the circuit never leaves the bistable regime upon increasing the number of substrate molecules at constant kinase to phosphatase ratio. Conclusion The number of substrate molecules is a key parameter controlling both the onset of the bistable regime, fluctuation intensity, and the residence time in a switched state. The relevance of the concept of memory depends on the degree of switch symmetry, as memory presupposes information to be remembered, which is highest for equal residence times in the switched states. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Artem Novozhilov (nominated by Eugene Koonin), Sergei Maslov, and Ned Wingreen. PMID:17540019

  7. Feedback and assessment for clinical placements: achieving the right balance

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2015-01-01

    During clinical placements, the provision of feedback forms an integral part of the learning process and enriches students’ learning experiences. The purpose of feedback is to improve the learner’s knowledge, skills, or behavior. Receipt of accurate feedback can help to narrow the gap between actual and desired performance. Effective and regular feedback has the potential to reinforce good practice and motivate the learner toward the desired outcome. Despite the obvious role of feedback in effective teaching and learning, a common complaint from students is that they do not receive adequate feedback. Unfortunately, skills in giving and receiving feedback are rarely taught to students or clinicians. This study aims to provide an understanding of the role of feedback within the learning process, consider consequences of inadequate or poorly given feedback, consider the barriers to the feedback process, provide practical guidelines for providing feedback, and consider the need for student and faculty development in feedback skills. PMID:26056511

  8. Operation of PEP longitudinal feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Karvonen, L.G.; McConnell, R.A.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-03-01

    In order to suppress longitudinal coupled-bunch oscillations which might limit the capabilities of PEP, the 18 GeV e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring at SLAC, a longitudinal feedback system is utilized. A frequency domain feedback system was chosen with the frequency spectrum of the stored beam being sampled close to a symmetry point in the ring where the feedback cavity itself is also located. The symmetry point chosen is symmetry point 5 which lies half-way between interaction regions 4 and 6. The system has been installed in PEP and is now operational. However, at stored currents up to the maximum stored in PEP to date at 14.5 GeV (approximately 40 mA in 6 bunches), the ring has been stable to all modes of longitudinal coupled-bunch oscillations both barycentric and the other fundamental modes. By deliberately detuning the main accelerating cavities, small multibunch oscillations can be introduced which, in turn, can be damped by the feedback system. Under optimized beam conditions the feedback system could be adjusted to positive feedback and excite oscillations with relatively small power to the feedback cavity. This will be described along with other details of the system.

  9. Pseudo-Haptic Feedback in Teleoperation.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Carsten; Matich, Sebastian; Scherping, Nick; Kupnik, Mario; Werthschutzky, Roland; Hatzfeld, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop possible realizations of pseudo-haptic feedback in teleoperation systems based on existing works for pseudo-haptic feedback in virtual reality and the intended applications. We derive four potential factors affecting the performance of haptic feedback (calculation operator, maximum displacement, offset force, and scaling factor), which are analyzed in three compliance identification experiments. First, we analyze the principle usability of pseudo-haptic feedback by comparing information transfer measures for teleoperation and direct interaction. Pseudo-haptic interaction yields well above-chance performance, while direct interaction performs almost perfectly. In order to optimize pseudo-haptic feedback, in the second study we perform a full-factorial experimental design with 36 subjects performing 6,480 trials with 36 different treatments. Information transfer ranges from 0.68 bit to 1.72 bit in a task with a theoretical maximum of 2.6 bit, with a predominant effect of the calculation operator and a minor effect of the maximum displacement. In a third study, short- and long-term learning effects are analyzed. Learning effects regarding the performance of pseudo-haptic feedback cannot be observed for single-day experiments. Tests over 10 days show a maximum increase in information transfer of 0.8 bit. The results show the feasibility of pseudo-haptic feedback for teleoperation and can be used as design basis for task-specific systems.

  10. Visual feedback for retuning to just intonation intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, R. Dean; Nordquist, Peter R.; Corn, Justin S.

    2005-04-01

    Musicians become used to equal temperament pitch intervals due to their widespread use in tuning pianos and other fixed-pitch instruments. For unaccompanied singing and some other performance situations, a more harmonious blending of sounds can be achieved by shifting to just intonation intervals. Lissajous figures provide immediate and striking visual feedback that emphasizes the frequency ratios and pitch intervals found among the first few members of a single harmonic series. Spirograph patterns (hypotrochoids) are also especially simple for ratios of small whole numbers, and their use for providing feedback to singers has been suggested previously [G. W. Barton, Jr., Am. J. Phys. 44(6), 593-594 (1976)]. A hybrid mixture of these methods for comparing two frequencies generates what appears to be a three dimensional Lissajous figure-a cylindrical wire mesh that rotates about its tilted vertical axis, with zero tilt yielding the familiar Lissajous figure. Sine wave inputs work best, but the sounds of flute, recorder, whistling, and a sung ``oo'' are good enough approximations to work well. This initial study compares the three modes of presentation in terms of the ease with which a singer can obtain a desired pattern and recognize its shape.

  11. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  12. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-09-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option on an infinite slab is presented and boundary values on a bounded domain are derived. This bounded, nonlinear, 2 dimensional initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically using a number of standard finite difference schemes and the methods incorporated in the symbolic software Maple{trade mark, serif}.

  13. The effects of outcome and process feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Debra Steele

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of process and outcome feedback on performance during a skill acquisition phase and a transfer test phase. The research also examined the role of two moderators: self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Subjects were college students participating for course credit. The task involved using a computerized simulation of the Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulation System (RMS). Results provided evidence of the beneficial effects of process feedback during skill acquisition. Results also provided evidence that self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation moderate the effects of feedback type on performance.

  14. Effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yeon-kyoung; Song, Juyeon; Jiang, Yi; Cho, Catherine; Bong, Mimi; Kim, Sung-il

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared the effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing. For confirmatory feedback trials, participants were informed that they had failed the task, whereas informative feedback trials presented task relevant information along with the notification of their failure. Fourteen male undergraduates performed a series of spatial-perceptual tasks and received feedback while their brain activity was recorded. During confirmatory feedback trials, greater activations in the amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the thalamus (including the habenular) were observed in response to incorrect responses. These results suggest that confirmatory feedback induces negative emotional reactions to failure. In contrast, informative feedback trials elicited greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) when participants experienced failure. Further psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a negative coupling between the DLPFC and the amygdala during informative feedback relative to confirmatory feedback trials. These findings suggest that providing task-relevant information could facilitate implicit down-regulation of negative emotions following failure. PMID:26175679

  15. AGN-starburst evolutionary connection : a physical interpretation based on radiative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, W.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    Observations point towards a close connection between nuclear starbursts, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and outflow phenomena. An evolutionary sequence, starting from a dust-obscured ultra-luminous infrared galaxy and eventually leading to an unobscured optical quasar, has been proposed and discussed in the literature. AGN feedback is usually invoked to expel the obscuring gas and dust in a blow-out event, but the underlying physical mechanism remains unclear. We consider AGN feedback driven by radiation pressure on dust, which directly acts on the obscuring dusty gas. We obtain that radiative feedback can potentially disrupt dense gas in the infrared-optically thick regime, and that an increase in the dust-to-gas fraction leads to an increase in the effective Eddington ratio. Thus the more dusty gas is preferentially expelled by radiative feedback, and the central AGN is prone to efficiently remove its own obscuring dust cocoon. Large amounts of dust imply heavy obscuration but also powerful feedback, suggesting a causal link between dust obscuration and blow-out. In this picture, AGN feedback and starburst phenomena are intrinsically coupled through the production of dust in supernova explosions, leading to a natural interpretation of the observed evolutionary path.

  16. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developed in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. With the help of Meteo France datas and experts, Predict services helps local communities and companies in decision making for flood management. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which

  17. Feedback on flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, K.; Roumagnac, A.

    2009-09-01

    For several years, as floods were increasing in South of France, local communities felt deprive to assume their mission of protection and information of citizens, and were looking for assistance in flood management. In term of flood disaster, the fact is that physical protection is necessary but inevitably limited. Tools and structures of assistance to anticipation remain slightly developed. To manage repeated crisis, local authorities need to be able to base their policy against flood on prevention, warnings, post-crisis analysis and feedback from former experience. In this objective, after 3 years of test and improvement since 2003, the initiative Predict-Services was developped in South of France: it aims at helping communities and companies to face repeated flood crisis. The principle is to prepare emergency plans, to organize crisis management and reduce risks; to help and assist communities and companies during crisis to activate and adapt their emergency plans with enough of anticipation; and to analyse floods effects and improve emergency plans afterwards. In order to reduce risks, and to keep the benefits of such an initiative, local communities and companies have to maintain the awareness of risk of the citizens and employees. They also have to maintain their safety plans to keep them constantly operational. This is a part of the message relayed. Companies, Local communities, local government authorities and basin stakeholders are the decision makers. Companies and local communities have to involve themselves in the elaboration of safety plans. They are also completely involved in their activation that is their own responsability. This applies to other local government authorities, like districts one's and basin stakeholders, which participle in the financing community safety plans and adminitrative district which are responsible of the transmission of meteorological alert and of rescue actions. In the crossing of the géo-information stemming from the

  18. Conceptual design of an active feedback system for the control of the resistive shell mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2001-03-01

    A quadratic dispersion relation is derived which governs the feedback-modified stability of the resistive shell mode in a large-aspect ratio, low-{beta} tokamak plasma. The effectiveness of a given feedback scheme is determined by a single parameter, {alpha}{sub 0}, which measures the coupling of different poloidal harmonics due to the nonsinusoidal nature of the feedback currents. Feedback fails when this parameter becomes either too positive or too negative. Feedback schemes can be classified into three groups, depending on the relative values of the poloidal mode number, m{sub 0}, of the intrinsically unstable resistive shell mode, and the number, M, of feedback coils in the poloidal direction. Group I corresponds to M{<=}2m{sub 0} and M{ne}m{sub 0}; group II corresponds to M=m{sub 0}; finally, group III corresponds to M>2m{sub 0}. The optimal group I feedback scheme is characterized by extremely narrow detector loops placed as close as possible to the plasma, i.e., well inside the resistive shell. Of course, such a scheme would be somewhat impractical. The optimal group II feedback scheme is characterized by large, nonoverlapping detector loops, and moderately large, nonoverlapping feedback coils. Such a scheme is 100% effective (i.e., it makes the resistive shell appear superconducting) when the detector loops are located just outside the shell. Unfortunately, the scheme only works efficiently for resistive shell modes possessing one particular poloidal mode number. The optimal group III feedback scheme is characterized by slightly overlapping detector loops, and strongly overlapping feedback coils. Such a scheme is 100% effective when the detector loops are located just outside the shell. In addition, the scheme works efficiently for resistive shell modes with a range of different poloidal mode numbers.

  19. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  20. The Greenhouse Effect and Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, C.; Haberle, R. M.; McKay, C. P.; Titov, D. V.

    2012-06-01

    We review the theory of the greenhouse effect and climate feedback. We also compare the theory with observations, using examples taken from all four known terrestrial worlds with substantial atmospheres: Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan.

  1. The Greenhouse Effect and Climate Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covey, C.; Haberle, R. M.; McKay, C. P.; Titov, D. V.

    This chapter reviews the theory of the greenhouse effect and climate feedback. It also compares the theory with observations, using examples taken from all four known terrestrial worlds with substantial atmospheres: Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan. The greenhouse effect traps infrared radiation in the atmosphere, thereby increasing surface temperature. It is one of many factors that affect a world's climate. (Others include solar luminosity and the atmospheric scattering and absorption of solar radiation.) A change in these factors — defined as climate forcing — may change the climate in a way that brings other processes — defined as feedbacks — into play. For example, when Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, warming the surface, the water vapor content of the atmosphere increases. This is a positive feedback on global warming because water vapor is itself a potent greenhouse gas. Many positive and negative feedback processes are significant in determining Earth's climate, and probably the climates of our terrestrial neighbors.

  2. Computer automation for feedback system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical techniques and explanations of various steps used by an automated computer program to design feedback systems are summarized. Special attention was given to refining the automatic evaluation suboptimal loop transmission and the translation of time to frequency domain specifications.

  3. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-28

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate, but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (optical depth <3.6, cloud top pressure <440 hPa) increase in response to inter-annual surface warming. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on short-term climate fluctuations, by reducing the planet’s ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20±0.21W/m2/°C, which is comparable to the surface albedo feedback. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  4. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  5. Nonlinear feedback control of multiple robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, T. J.; Yun, X.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple coordinated robot arms are modeled by considering the arms: (1) as closed kinematic chains, and (2) as a force constrained mechanical system working on the same object simultaneously. In both formulations a new dynamic control method is discussed. It is based on a feedback linearization and simultaneous output decoupling technique. Applying a nonlinear feedback and a nonlinear coordinate transformation, the complicated model of the multiple robot arms in either formulation is converted into a linear and output decoupled system. The linear system control theory and optimal control theory are used to design robust controllers in the task space. The first formulation has the advantage of automatically handling the coordination and load distribution among the robot arms. In the second formulation, by choosing a general output equation, researchers can superimpose the position and velocity error feedback with the force-torque error feedback in the task space simultaneously.

  6. Use of Feedback in Clinical Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Harold E.

    1972-01-01

    Results indicated that predictive accuracy is greater when feedback is applied to the basis for the prediction than when applied to gut" impressions. Judges forming hypotheses were also able to learn from experience. (Author)

  7. Distinguishing Feedback Mechanisms in Clock Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Alexander; Lubensky, David

    Biological oscillators are very diverse but can be classified based on dynamical motifs such as type of feedback. The S. Elongatus circadian oscillator is a novel circadian oscillator that can operate at constant protein number by modifying covalent states. It can be reproduced in vitro with only 3 different purified proteins: KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. We use computational and analytic techniques to compare models of the S. Elongatus post-translational oscillator that rely on positive feedback with models that rely on negative feedback. We show that introducing a protein that binds competitively with KaiA to the KaiB-KaiC complex can distinguish between positive and negative feedback as the primary driver of the rhythm, which has so far been difficult to address experimentally. NSF Grant DMR-1056456.

  8. Biased feedback in brain-computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Even though feedback is considered to play an important role in learning how to operate a brain-computer interface (BCI), to date no significant influence of feedback design on BCI-performance has been reported in literature. In this work, we adapt a standard motor-imagery BCI-paradigm to study how BCI-performance is affected by biasing the belief subjects have on their level of control over the BCI system. Our findings indicate that subjects already capable of operating a BCI are impeded by inaccurate feedback, while subjects normally performing on or close to chance level may actually benefit from an incorrect belief on their performance level. Our results imply that optimal feedback design in BCIs should take into account a subject's current skill level. PMID:20659350

  9. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  10. Cirrus feedback on interannual climate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Dessler, A. E.; Zelinka, M. D.; Yang, P.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are not only important in determining the current climate but also play an important role in climate change and variability. Analysis of satellite observations shows that the amount and altitude of cirrus clouds (cloud optical depth < 3.6, cloud top pressure < 440 hPa) increase in response to interannual surface warming. Using cirrus cloud radiative kernels, the magnitude of the interannual cirrus feedback is estimated to be 0.20 ± 0.21 W/m2/°C, which represents an important component of the cloud feedback. Thus, cirrus clouds are likely to act as a positive feedback on interannual climate fluctuations, by reducing the Earth's ability to radiate longwave radiation to space in response to planetary surface warming. Most of the cirrus feedback comes from increasing cloud amount in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and subtropical upper troposphere.

  11. Negative feedback system reduces pump oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenmann, W.

    1967-01-01

    External negative feedback system counteracts low frequency oscillations in rocket engine propellant pumps. The system uses a control piston to sense pump discharge fluid on one side and a gas pocket on the other.

  12. Different aspects of performance feedback engage different brain areas: disentangling valence and expectancy in feedback processing.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Nicola K; Opitz, Bertram

    2014-08-07

    Evaluating the positive and negative outcomes of our behaviour is important for action selection and learning. Such reinforcement learning has been shown to engage a specific neural circuitry including the mesencephalic dopamine system and its target areas, the striatum and medial frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). An intensively pursued debate regards the prevailing influence of feedback expectancy and feedback valence on the engagement of these two brain regions in reinforcement learning and their respective roles are far from being understood. To this end, we used a time estimation task with three different types of feedback that allows disentangling the effect of feedback valence and expectancy using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results show greater ACC activation after unexpected positive and unexpected negative feedback than after expected feedback and by this sensitivity to unexpected events in general irrespective of their valence.

  13. Sea ice-albedo climate feedback mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, J.L.; Curry, J.A.; Ebert, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism over the Arctic Ocean multiyear sea ice is investigated by conducting a series of experiments using several one-dimensional models of the coupled sea ice-atmosphere system. In its simplest form, ice-albedo feedback is thought to be associated with a decrease in the areal cover of snow and ice and a corresponding increase in the surface temperature, further decreasing the area cover of snow and ice. It is shown that the sea ice-albedo feedback can operate even in multiyear pack ice, without the disappearance of this ice, associated with internal processes occurring within the multiyear ice pack (e.g., duration of the snow cover, ice thickness, ice distribution, lead fraction, and melt pond characteristics). The strength of the ice-albedo feedback mechanism is compared for several different thermodynamic sea ice models: a new model that includes ice thickness distribution., the Ebert and Curry model, the Mayjut and Untersteiner model, and the Semtner level-3 and level-0 models. The climate forcing is chosen to be a perturbation of the surface heat flux, and cloud and water vapor feedbacks are inoperative so that the effects of the sea ice-albedo feedback mechanism can be isolated. The inclusion of melt ponds significantly strengthens the ice-albedo feedback, while the ice thickness distribution decreases the strength of the modeled sea ice-albedo feedback. It is emphasized that accurately modeling present-day sea ice thickness is not adequate for a sea ice parameterization; the correct physical processes must be included so that the sea ice parameterization yields correct sensitivities to external forcing. 22 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Extra-cavity feedback into unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Corkum, P B; Baldis, H A

    1979-05-01

    Unstable resonators constructed of totally reflecting optics are particularly sensitive to extra-cavity feedback. This is demonstrated experimentally by reflecting the attenuated output of an injection mode-locked TEA CO(2) laser, fitted with a confocal unstable resonator, back into the laser resonator. Even after attenuation by ~10(6), significant perturbation ( greater, similar10%) could be observed in the temporal characteristics of the output train. A theory of extra-cavity feedback in the geometric limit is presented. PMID:20212847

  15. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change. PMID:23592016

  16. Software feedback for monochromator tuning at UNICAT (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemian, Pete R.

    2002-03-01

    Automatic tuning of double-crystal monochromators presents an interesting challenge in software. The goal is to either maximize, or hold constant, the throughput of the monochromator. An additional goal of the software feedback is to disable itself when there is no beam and then, at the user's discretion, re-enable itself when the beam returns. These and other routine goals, such as adherence to limits of travel for positioners, are maintained by software controls. Many solutions exist to lock in and maintain a fixed throughput. Among these include a hardware solution involving a wave form generator, and a lock-in amplifier to autocorrelate the movement of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) providing fine adjustment of the second crystal Bragg angle. This solution does not work when the positioner is a slow acting device such as a stepping motor. Proportional integral differential (PID) loops have been used to provide feedback through software but additional controls must be provided to maximize the monochromator throughput. Presented here is a software variation of the PID loop which meets the above goals. By using two floating point variables as inputs, representing the intensity of x rays measured before and after the monochromator, it attempts to maximize (or hold constant) the ratio of these two inputs by adjusting an output floating point variable. These floating point variables are connected to hardware channels corresponding to detectors and positioners. When the inputs go out of range, the software will stop making adjustments to the control output. Not limited to monochromator feedback, the software could be used, with beam steering positioners, to maintain a measure of beam position. Advantages of this software feedback are the flexibility of its various components. It has been used with stepping motors and PZTs as positioners. Various devices such as ion chambers, scintillation counters, photodiodes, and photoelectron collectors have been used as

  17. Remote feedback stabilization of tokamak instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K. )

    1994-05-01

    A novel remote suppressor consisting of an injected ion beam has been used for the stabilization of plasma instabilities. A collisionless curvature-driven trapped-particle instability, an [bold E][times][bold B] flute mode and an ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability have been successfully suppressed down to noise levels using this scheme. Furthermore, the first experimental demonstration of a multimode feedback stabilization with a single sensor--suppressor pair has been achieved. Two modes (an [bold E][times][bold B] flute and an ITG mode) were simultaneously stabilized with a simple state-feedback-type method where more state'' information was generated from a single-sensor Langmuir probe by appropriate signal processing. The above experiments may be considered as paradigms for controlling several important tokamak instabilities. First, feedback suppression of edge fluctuations in a tokamak with a suitable form of insulated segmented poloidal limiter sections used as Langmuir-probe-like suppressors is proposed. Other feedback control schemes are proposed for the suppression of electrostatic core fluctuations via appropriately phased ion density input from a modulated neutral beam. Most importantly, a scheme to control major disruptions in tokamaks via feedback suppression of kink (and possibly) tearing modes is discussed. This may be accomplished by using a modulated neutral beam suppressor in a feedback loop, which will supply a momentum input of appropriate phase and amplitude. Simple theoretical models predict modest levels of beam energy, current, and power.

  18. Physical modeling of the feedback path in hearing aids with application to adaptive feedback cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Joanna L.; Rafaely, Boaz

    2002-05-01

    Hearing aid system modeling based on two-port network theory has been used previously to study the forward gain and the feedback path in hearing aids. The two-port modeling approach is employed in this work to develop an analytic model of the feedback path by reducing the model matrices to simplified analytic expressions. Such an analytic model can simulate the frequency response of the feedback path given the values of relatively few physical parameters such as vent dimensions. The model was extended to include variability in the feedback path due to slit leaks, for example. The analytic model was then incorporated in an adaptive feedback cancellation system, where the physical parameters of the model were adapted to match the actual feedback path and cancel the feedback signal. In the initial stage of this study, the ability of the model to match the frequency response of various measured feedback paths was studied using numerical optimization. Then, an adaptive filtering configuration based on the physical model was developed and studied using computer simulations. Results show that this new approach to adaptive feedback cancellation has the potential to improve both adaptation speed and performance robustness.

  19. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  20. Sonification and haptic feedback in addition to visual feedback enhances complex motor task learning.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Roland; Rauter, Georg; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Concurrent augmented feedback has been shown to be less effective for learning simple motor tasks than for complex tasks. However, as mostly artificial tasks have been investigated, transfer of results to tasks in sports and rehabilitation remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, the effect of different concurrent feedback was evaluated in trunk-arm rowing. It was then investigated whether multimodal audiovisual and visuohaptic feedback are more effective for learning than visual feedback only. Naïve subjects (N = 24) trained in three groups on a highly realistic virtual reality-based rowing simulator. In the visual feedback group, the subject's oar was superimposed to the target oar, which continuously became more transparent when the deviation between the oars decreased. Moreover, a trace of the subject's trajectory emerged if deviations exceeded a threshold. The audiovisual feedback group trained with oar movement sonification in addition to visual feedback to facilitate learning of the velocity profile. In the visuohaptic group, the oar movement was inhibited by path deviation-dependent braking forces to enhance learning of spatial aspects. All groups significantly decreased the spatial error (tendency in visual group) and velocity error from baseline to the retention tests. Audiovisual feedback fostered learning of the velocity profile significantly more than visuohaptic feedback. The study revealed that well-designed concurrent feedback fosters complex task learning, especially if the advantages of different modalities are exploited. Further studies should analyze the impact of within-feedback design parameters and the transferability of the results to other tasks in sports and rehabilitation.

  1. Protege Anxiety Attachment and Feedback in Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Poteat, Laura

    2010-01-01

    A model focused on protege anxious attachment and feedback in mentoring relationships was tested with a sample of matched doctoral student proteges and their faculty mentors. Results show that protege anxious attachment was associated with less feedback seeking and less feedback acceptance. Protege feedback acceptance was associated with both the…

  2. Giving Feedback to Subordinates. An Ideas Into Action Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buron, Raoul J.; McDonald-Mann, Dana

    This guidebook describes for managers how and when to give effective feedback. It emphasizes the need for frequent feedback so that employees may feel confident about what they are doing right and can work on areas in which they are less proficient. Feedback should also be used as a tool for development, which means that feedback, which should not…

  3. EFL Teachers' Attempts at Feedback Innovation in the Writing Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy; Mak, Pauline; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    To date, research on feedback in second language (L2) writing has primarily focused on feedback per se, with little attention paid to the teachers' professional development with regard to feedback in writing. This study aims to explore the ways in which two secondary teachers in Hong Kong attempted to implement feedback innovation in their writing…

  4. Feedback, a Powerful Lever in Teams: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabelica, Catherine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on the effects of feedback provided to teams in higher education or organizational settings. This review (59 empirical articles) showed that most of the feedback applications concerned "knowledge of results" (performance feedback). In contrast, there is a relatively small body of research using feedback conveying…

  5. Factors Influencing Spanish Instructors' In-Class Feedback Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura

    2016-01-01

    While oral corrective feedback is a principal focus in second language acquisition research, most studies examine feedback once it has been provided. Investigating how instructors make in-class feedback decisions has not been thoroughly explored, despite the fact that classroom feedback occurs at the discretion of the individual language…

  6. Adapting Progress Feedback and Emotional Support to Learner Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Matt; Masthoff, Judith; Mellish, Chris

    2016-01-01

    As feedback is an important part of learning and motivation, we investigate how to adapt the feedback of a conversational agent to learner personality (as well as to learner performance, as we expect an interaction effect between personality and performance on feedback). We investigate two aspects of feedback. Firstly, we investigate whether the…

  7. Uncovering Embedded Face Threat Mitigation in Landscape Architecture Critique Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Housley Gaffney, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving public feedback on academic work may threaten students' face, particularly when such feedback is critical. One way that feedback may be cushioned is through face-threat mitigation techniques. I analyzed the use of such techniques in the feedback given by faculty and professionals to landscape architecture students as preparation for…

  8. Rethinking Feedback Practices in Higher Education: A Peer Review Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, David; Thomson, Avril; Breslin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Peer review is a reciprocal process whereby students produce feedback reviews on the work of peers and receive feedback reviews from peers on their own work. Prior research has primarily examined the learning benefits that result from the receipt of feedback reviews, with few studies specifically exploring the merits of producing feedback reviews…

  9. Learning from Feedback: Spacing and the Delay-Retention Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Troy A.; Kimball, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of…

  10. Effects of Feedback in an Online Algebra Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokhove, Christian; Drijvers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The design and arrangement of appropriate automatic feedback in digital learning environment is a widely recognized issue. In this article, we investigate the effect of feedback on the design and the results of a digital intervention for algebra. Three feedback principles guided the intervention: timing and fading, crises, and feedback variation.…

  11. Feedback Dialogues That Stimulate Students' Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Oosterbaan, Anne; Schaap, Harmen

    2013-01-01

    How can feedback dialogues stimulate students' reflective thinking? This study aims to investigate: (1) the effects of feedback dialogues between teachers and students on students' perceptions of teacher feedback and (2) the relation between features of feedback dialogues and students' thinking activities as part of reflective…

  12. Feedback Frequency in Treatment for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maas, Edwin; Butalla, Christine E.; Farinella, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of feedback frequency in treatment for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Reducing the frequency of feedback enhances motor learning, and recently, such feedback frequency reductions have been recommended for the treatment of CAS. However, no published studies have explicitly compared different feedback frequencies in…

  13. Feedback in Action--The Mechanism of the Iris.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingnet, B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstration experiments. Outlines a demonstration of the general principle of positive and negative feedback and the influence of time delays in feedback circuits. Elucidates the principle of negative feedback with a model of the iris of the eye. Emphasizes the importance of feedback in biological systems. (CW)

  14. Interactive Information Seeking and Retrieving: A Third Feedback Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda

    1996-01-01

    Presents an overview of feedback within the cybernetics and social frameworks. These feedback concepts are then compared with the interactive feedback concept evolving within the framework of information seeking and retrieving, based on their conceptualization of the feedback loop and notion of information. (Author/AEF)

  15. Immediate Feedback and Learning in Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Laurent, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Context: Immediate feedback has been shown to improve student learning more efficiently than delayed feedback in lower-level general education courses. No research exists examining the effects of immediate feedback on learning in higher-level athletic training coursework. Objective: To determine if using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique…

  16. Exploring Occupational Therapy Students' Meaning of Feedback during Fieldwork Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathgeber, Karen Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have revealed that students' confidence and performance improve after they receive feedback from clinical supervisors regarding the delivery of quality patient care. Multiple studies of feedback have focused on the provision and acceptance of feedback; however, it was not known if or how students internalized feedback to promote…

  17. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  18. Complexity, Cues and Relationships: Student Perceptions of Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokorny, Helen; Pickford, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses issues relating to the effectiveness of feedback and the student perspective. The study described provides rich data relating to student perceptions of useful feedback, their perceptions of feedback cues and their feelings about the importance of feedback relationships in the process. The outcomes suggest that written…

  19. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  20. Design and application of feedback-sustained target waves in excitable medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ningjie; Chen, Jiangxing; Gao, Hongjun; Ying, Heping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a formulas of rational ratios between the frequency of external stimulus and its paced target waves, considering the existence of the absolute refractory period and the relative refractory period. Based on this, we design a self-sustained high-frequency target waves by feeding back few periphery field points to the center to responsibly play the role of source for pacemaker. Such constructed target waves, to all appearances, are shown as a repetition of their initial condition. We explore further in application that those feedback-sustained targets can eliminate both a freely rotating spiral waves and a pinned ones only if frequencies, feedback lengths and radius of obstacles are appropriately chosen. After feedback stimuli are removed, the system eventually returns to the rest state.

  1. Assessing AGN feedback models with c iii* measurement and photoionization modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinnis, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    Mass outflows in active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been hypothesized to represent a feedback mechanism through which black hole growth and galaxy formation are linked. In order to assess this claim, typical outflow kinetic luminosities must be compared to calculated minimum values that are needed to produce feedback relevance. We have developed a method for placing lower limits on the kinetic luminosity by combining photoionization modeling with column density measurements of a select few ionic species, including C III* 1175 as a measure of gas density. This method is applied to sample AGNs representative of those observed with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS). We find that although measured kinetic luminosity lower limits for the quasar SDSS J170322.41+23124.3 and Seyfert galaxy Akn 564 are several orders of magnitude less than that required for feedback relevance, our method can be drastically improved with increased signal to noise ratios.

  2. Insights from a refined decomposition of cloud feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Zhou, Chen; Klein, Stephen A.

    2016-09-01

    Decomposing cloud feedback into components due to changes in several gross cloud properties provides valuable insights into its physical causes. Here we present a refined decomposition that separately considers changes in free tropospheric and low cloud properties, better connecting feedbacks to individual governing processes and avoiding ambiguities present in a commonly used decomposition. It reveals that three net cloud feedback components are robustly nonzero: positive feedbacks from increasing free tropospheric cloud altitude and decreasing low cloud cover and a negative feedback from increasing low cloud optical depth. Low cloud amount feedback is the dominant contributor to spread in net cloud feedback but its anticorrelation with other components damps overall spread. The ensemble mean free tropospheric cloud altitude feedback is roughly 60% as large as the standard cloud altitude feedback because it avoids aliasing in low cloud reductions. Implications for the "null hypothesis" climate sensitivity from well-understood and robustly simulated feedbacks are discussed.

  3. Differential Memory Effects for Immediate and Delayed Feedback: A Delta Rule Explanation of Feedback Timing Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This paper describes the possible effects of feedback on learning (associations) using a connectionist tool, the delta rule. Feedback in instruction can be described in terms of the interaction of stimulus inputs and response outputs, an associationist perspective. Here the delta rule is applied to each instance that an input and an output likely…

  4. Audit and feedback and clinical practice guideline adherence: Making feedback actionable

    PubMed Central

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Best, Richard G; Pugh, Jacqueline A

    2006-01-01

    Background As a strategy for improving clinical practice guideline (CPG) adherence, audit and feedback (A&F) has been found to be variably effective, yet A&F research has not investigated the impact of feedback characteristics on its effectiveness. This paper explores how high performing facilities (HPF) and low performing facilities (LPF) differ in the way they use clinical audit data for feedback purposes. Method Descriptive, qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposeful sample of six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) with high and low adherence to six CPGs, as measured by external chart review audits. One-hundred and two employees involved with outpatient CPG implementation across the six facilities participated in one-hour semi-structured interviews where they discussed strategies, facilitators and barriers to implementing CPGs. Interviews were analyzed using techniques from the grounded theory method. Results High performers provided timely, individualized, non-punitive feedback to providers, whereas low performers were more variable in their timeliness and non-punitiveness and relied on more standardized, facility-level reports. The concept of actionable feedback emerged as the core category from the data, around which timeliness, individualization, non-punitiveness, and customizability can be hierarchically ordered. Conclusion Facilities with a successful record of guideline adherence tend to deliver more timely, individualized and non-punitive feedback to providers about their adherence than facilities with a poor record of guideline adherence. Consistent with findings from organizational research, feedback intervention characteristics may influence the feedback's effectiveness at changing desired behaviors. PMID:16722539

  5. Students' Perceptions of Electronic Feedback as an Alternative to Handwritten Feedback: One University's Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edeiken-Cooperman, Nanette; Berenato, Carolyn L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the area of effective feedback and whether undergraduate students prefer electronic or handwritten feedback. In teacher training programs this determination has become crucial because of the escalation in the number of formative assessments replacing summative assessments. A mixed methodology design was completed that involved…

  6. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical.

  7. Partial Compensation for Altered Auditory Feedback: A Tradeoff with Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katseff, Shira; Houde, John; Johnson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Talkers are known to compensate only partially for experimentally-induced changes to their auditory feedback. In a typical experiment, talkers might hear their F1 feedback shifted higher (so that /[epsilon]/ sounds like /[ash]/, for example), and compensate by lowering F1 in their subsequent speech by about a quarter of that distance. Here, we…

  8. Self-Controlled Feedback in 10-Year-Old Children: Higher Feedback Frequencies Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…

  9. Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in Australian Universities: They're Less than Impressed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate accounting students in Australian universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they currently receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of Australian university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…

  10. Assessment and Feedback: Institutional Experiences of Student Feedback, 1996 to 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James; Kane, David

    2009-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on sectoral concern with assessment and feedback as a result of the National Student Survey. Government, the higher education agencies and the NUS have called for urgent action to address this concern. Existing data from institutional student feedback surveys, using the Student Satisfaction Approach, some dating back…

  11. Closing the Feedback Loop: Physics Undergraduates' Use of Feedback Comments on Laboratory Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Pam

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory notebooks of physics undergraduates taking two second-year practical courses were audited to discover whether they had used feedback comments in their subsequent coursework. Ninety-five per cent of the 37 students on the first course and 100% of the 14 students on the second course whose work was audited had used feedback. The…

  12. Investigating Feedback on Practice among Teachers: Coherence of Observed and Perceived Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Despite that benefits of feedback in student learning are reported in much research, little has been reported regarding the use of feedback from teachers to other teachers--a key tool in professional development. In this study, we triangulated data from videotaped peer coaching sessions, questionnaires, and interviews regarding 12 primary school…

  13. CLIMATE FEEDBACKS AND FUTURE REMOTE SENSING OBSERVATIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, J.

    2009-12-01

    Water vapor and cloud - climate feedbacks are two fundamental feedbacks in the context of climate change. Although more realistic in terms of water vapor, present-day climate models fail to properly represent the physical processes associated with cloud-climate feedbacks. Remote sensing from space of these small-scale processes, such as clouds, turbulence and convection, is notoriously difficult and is still not good enough in order to provide the necessary constraints that would lead to a better understanding of the climate system and to improved climate prediction. A Program on ‘Climate Feedbacks and Future Remote Sensing Observations’ was organized under the auspices of the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS). The goals of this Program were: i) To bring together scientists from different branches of the climate research community (theory, models, observations) to address key problems in the physics of climate feedbacks; ii) To promote the use of remote sensing observational data in the climate physics and climate modeling community; iii) To provide guidance on future research and future missions regarding the physics of climate change. The main conclusions and recommendations from this KISS Program will be presented in detail.

  14. Proprioceptive feedback determines visuomotor gain in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bartussek, Jan; Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Multisensory integration is a prerequisite for effective locomotor control in most animals. Especially, the impressive aerial performance of insects relies on rapid and precise integration of multiple sensory modalities that provide feedback on different time scales. In flies, continuous visual signalling from the compound eyes is fused with phasic proprioceptive feedback to ensure precise neural activation of wing steering muscles (WSM) within narrow temporal phase bands of the stroke cycle. This phase-locked activation relies on mechanoreceptors distributed over wings and gyroscopic halteres. Here we investigate visual steering performance of tethered flying fruit flies with reduced haltere and wing feedback signalling. Using a flight simulator, we evaluated visual object fixation behaviour, optomotor altitude control and saccadic escape reflexes. The behavioural assays show an antagonistic effect of wing and haltere signalling on visuomotor gain during flight. Compared with controls, suppression of haltere feedback attenuates while suppression of wing feedback enhances the animal’s wing steering range. Our results suggest that the generation of motor commands owing to visual perception is dynamically controlled by proprioception. We outline a potential physiological mechanism based on the biomechanical properties of WSM and sensory integration processes at the level of motoneurons. Collectively, the findings contribute to our general understanding how moving animals integrate sensory information with dynamically changing temporal structure. PMID:26909184

  15. Simple models of assortment through environmental feedback.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John W

    2007-01-01

    Social evolution depends critically on assortment, or segregation versus even mixing, between cooperators and noncooperators. Altruistic traits, which reduce the absolute fitness of their bearers, cannot evolve without positive assortment (excess segregation). The question of how positive assortment can arise has been controversial, but most evolutionary biologists believe that common descent is the only effective general mechanism. Here I investigate another recently proposed mechanism for generating nonrandom assortment, termed environmental feedback. This requires only that two forms of a trait affect the quality of the local environment differently in such a way that all individuals are more likely to leave low-quality locales. Experiments with simple computational models confirm that environmental feedback generates significant levels of genetic similarity among non-kin within locales. The mechanism is fairly general, and can under some conditions produce levels of genetic similarity comparable to those resulting from close genealogical relationship. Environmental feedback can also generate the negative assortment necessary for the evolution of spiteful traits. Environmental feedback is expected to create positive frequency-dependent selection, which thus favor any social trait that becomes common in the population. Results from this stylized model suggest that environmental feedback could be important in the evolution of both cooperation and spite, within as well as between species.

  16. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK WORKS BOTH WAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Norris, R. P.

    2013-09-01

    Simulations of galaxy growth need to invoke strong negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress the formation of stars and thus prevent the over-production of very massive systems. While some observations provide evidence for such negative feedback, other studies find either no feedback or even positive feedback, with increased star formation associated with higher AGN luminosities. Here we report an analysis of several hundred AGNs and their host galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South using X-ray and radio data for sample selection. Combined with archival far-infrared data as a reliable tracer of star formation activity in the AGN host galaxies, we find that AGNs with pronounced radio jets exhibit a much higher star formation rate (SFR) than the purely X-ray-selected ones, even at the same X-ray luminosities. This difference implies that positive AGN feedback plays an important role, too, and therefore has to be accounted for in all future simulation work. We interpret this to indicate that the enhanced SFR of radio-selected AGNs arises because of jet-induced star formation, as is suggested by the different jet powers among our AGN samples, while the suppressed SFR of X-ray selected AGN is caused by heating and photo-dissociation of molecular gas by the hot AGN accretion disk.

  17. Prompting Secondary Students' Use of Criteria, Feedback Specificity and Feedback Levels during an Investigative Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Mark J. S.; Hattie, John

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of prompting on secondary students' written peer feedback in chemistry investigation reports. In particular, we examined students' feedback features in relation to the use of criteria, feedback specificity, and feedback levels. A quasi-experimental pre-test post-test design was adopted. Reviewers in…

  18. Feedback Providing Improvement Strategies and Reflection on Feedback Use: Effects on Students' Writing Motivation, Process, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duijnhouwer, Hendrien; Prins, Frans J.; Stokking, Karel M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feedback providing improvement strategies and a reflection assignment on students' writing motivation, process, and performance. Students in the experimental feedback condition (n = 41) received feedback including improvement strategies, whereas students in the control feedback condition (n = 41) received…

  19. Mesoscale modeling of smoke radiative feedback over the Sahel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Zhang, F.; Yue, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This study employs satellite observations and a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to study the smoke radative feedback on surface energy budget, boundary layer processes, and atmospheric lapse rate in February 2008 over the Sahel region. The smoke emission inventories we use come from various sources, including but not limited to the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) developed by NRL and the Fire Energetic and Emissions Research (FEER) developed by NASA GSFC. Model performance is evaluated using numerous satellite and ground-based datasets: MODIS true color images, ground-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements from AERONET, MODIS AOD retrievals, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) atmospheric backscattering and extinction products. Specification of smoke injection height of 650 m in WRF-Chem yields aerosol vertical profiles that are most consistent with CALIOP observations of aerosol layer height. Statistically, 5% of the CALIPSO valid measurements of aerosols in February 2008 show aerosol layers either above the clouds or between the clouds, reinforcing the importance of the aerosol vertical distribution for quantifying aerosol impact on climate in the Sahel region. The results further show that the smoke radiative feedbacks are sensitive to assumptions of black carbon and organic carbon ratio in the particle emission inventory. Also investigated is the smoke semi-direct effect as a function of cloud fraction.

  20. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.; Chin, M.; Doolittle, L.; Akre, R.

    2005-05-09

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx(R) ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  1. Practice teaching and the importance of feedback.

    PubMed

    Lally, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Practice teachers play a key role in ensuring health visitors, school nurses and occupational health nurses are capable of delivering safe and effective practice to the public. The practice teacher is a significant member of the learning team during the specialist community public health nursing programme. This paper discusses the role of feedback in facilitating students' learning while in practice. Its purpose is to raise awareness for those working as practice teachers to the issues they may experience when giving feedback and discusses the theories of transactional analysis, transference and counter-transference and the impact these may have on the practice teachers' ability to give constructive feedback to specialist community public health nursing students.

  2. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α. The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine.

  3. AGN feedback in galaxy clusters and groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. Athena will provide (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. I will present new predictions of Athena's ability to measure the energetic impact of powerful jets based on our most recent set of numerical models.

  4. Operation of the PEP transverse beam feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.W.; Paterson, J.M.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Rees, J.R.

    1981-02-01

    The PEP Storage Ring has been equipped with a wide band beam feedback system capable of damping the vertical and horizontal motion of six bunches. The oscillation detection is done at a symmetry point on the Storage Ring and feedback is applied at the same location one orbital period later. The signal is synchronously gated and the system appears as twelve independent feedback loops, operating on the two coordinates of each of the six bunches. Two beam deflection electrodes are driven each by a low-Q push-pull amplifier which is tuned at the 72nd harmonic of the revolution frequency and suppressed-carrier modulation is generated by a sequence of the detected bunch oscillations. The design parameters are reviewed as well as the salient features of the hardware, and the impact of this system on the machine operation is evaluated in the light of experimental results.

  5. PEP-II Transverse Feedback Electronics Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.M.; Chin, M.J.; Doolittle, L.R.; Akre, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) requires an upgrade of the transverse feedback system electronics. The new electronics require 12-bit resolution and a minimum sampling rate of 238 Msps. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used to implement the feedback algorithm. The FPGA also contains an embedded PowerPC 405 (PPC-405) processor to run control system interface software for data retrieval, diagnostics, and system monitoring. The design of this system is based on the Xilinx{reg_sign} ML300 Development Platform, a circuit board set containing an FPGA with an embedded processor, a large memory bank, and other peripherals. This paper discusses the design of a digital feedback system based on an FPGA with an embedded processor. Discussion will include specifications, component selection, and integration with the ML300 design.

  6. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  7. Applying vision feedback to crane controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lun-Hui; Huang, Pei-Hsiang; Pan, Shing-Tai; Wijaya Lie, Handra; Chiang, Tung-Chien; Chang, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Encoders are generally used to track the motion of industrial mechanisms. However, the information obtained by encoders may have errors due to encoder aging or mechanism-design problem. Therefore, information by visual feedback is a better way to track the movement of industrial mechanisms. However, image information costs lots of computing effort so it is not easy to be used in real-time control applications. This manuscript derives a simple but effective visual feedback method to follow the target and the image information is obtained only by a general handy camcorder. Besides, the proposed method can track multi-locations in a meantime. Fast image pattern recognition and localisation of the colour histogram by using a moving tracking block is applied to increase the calculation speed. Finally, the obtained locations information by the proposed visual feedback method is applied in an industrial crane control system to verify the effectiveness.

  8. Stellar feedback in dwarf galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Mashchenko, Sergey; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P

    2008-01-11

    Dwarf galaxies pose substantial challenges for cosmological models. In particular, current models predict a dark-matter density that is divergent at the center, which is in sharp contrast with observations that indicate a core of roughly constant density. Energy feedback, from supernova explosions and stellar winds, has been proposed as a major factor shaping the evolution of dwarf galaxies. We present detailed cosmological simulations with sufficient resolution both to model the relevant physical processes and to directly assess the impact of stellar feedback on observable properties of dwarf galaxies. We show that feedback drives large-scale, bulk motions of the interstellar gas, resulting in substantial gravitational potential fluctuations and a consequent reduction in the central matter density, bringing the theoretical predictions in agreement with observations.

  9. Practice teaching and the importance of feedback.

    PubMed

    Lally, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Practice teachers play a key role in ensuring health visitors, school nurses and occupational health nurses are capable of delivering safe and effective practice to the public. The practice teacher is a significant member of the learning team during the specialist community public health nursing programme. This paper discusses the role of feedback in facilitating students' learning while in practice. Its purpose is to raise awareness for those working as practice teachers to the issues they may experience when giving feedback and discusses the theories of transactional analysis, transference and counter-transference and the impact these may have on the practice teachers' ability to give constructive feedback to specialist community public health nursing students. PMID:23427710

  10. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kunche, Sameeran; Yan, Huaming; Calof, Anne L; Lowengrub, John S; Lander, Arthur D

    2016-03-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  11. Preceptor Development: Providing Effective Feedback, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Samaneh T.; Phillips, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An integral part of providing effective feedback to pharmacy residents occurs during the evaluation process. Residency evaluation involves measuring and documenting performance as it relates to standardized residency outcomes, goals, and learning objectives. Evaluations may be formative or summative and include the preceptor’s evaluation of the resident’s performance, the resident’s self-assessments, and the resident’s evaluation of the preceptor and learning experience. Evaluations are more structured than feedback, and they involve documentation of the verbal feedback that was provided throughout the learning experience. This article will focus on the preceptor’s role in providing effective resident evaluations based on specific learning activities. PMID:24958969

  12. Quantum feedback in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wade Patrick

    Photon correlation measurements reveal the response of the conditional evolution of the cavity QED system to a novel quantum feedback protocol. A photodetection collapses the state of the system and triggers a feedback pulse with an adjustable delay and amplitude that alters the intensity driving the system. The system's conditional evolution freezes into a new steady state where it resides until, after an amount of time determined by the experimenter, it re-equilibrates into the original steady state. I carry out a sensitivity analysis using a theoretical model and make quantitative comparisons with measured results. The analysis includes sensitivity response to the amplitude and delay time feedback parameters and the response to off-resonant excitation.

  13. Climate stability and cloud optical thickness feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, Richard C. J.; Iacobellis, Sam

    1989-01-01

    An improved radiative-convective model (RCM) has been developed and used to examine the role of cirrus clouds in the optical thickness feedback mechanism. Low and middle clouds are approximately black bodies for infrared radiative transfer, and so any increase in their optical thickness primarily increases the cloud albedo. Thus, if a climate warming is accompanied by an increase in average atmospheric absolute humidity and hence in average cloud liquid water content, low and middle cloud optical thickness and albedo may increase. The result is a negative feedback on the climate change, tending to reduce the surface temperature increase. Recent research suggests that the optical thickness feedback can depend sensitively on aspects of cirrus which are not well observed or adequately incorporated in typical present-day climate models.

  14. Health Behavior Change after Blood Pressure Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jia; Chewning, Betty A.; Johnson, Heather M.; Vanness, David J.; Young, Henry N.; Kreling, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding is needed for antihypertensive medication initiation and lifestyle modification among younger populations with elevated blood pressure. This study aimed to assess health behavior change after receiving a report of elevated blood pressure among African Americans and Caucasians younger than 50 years old. We used the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) repository dataset. By examination year twenty, 424 out of 2,478 Caucasian and 2,637 African American participants had received feedback from the CARDIA study due to elevated blood pressure readings. Blood pressure was measured by trained CARDIA researchers at the participant’s home and was repeatedly recorded at seven examinations over twenty years. A feedback/referral letter was sent to participants with an elevated blood pressure reading. On average, participants first had an elevated blood pressure reading at the age of 34. After receiving the feedback letter, 44% of the previously undiagnosed participants received a formal diagnosis. In addition, 23% initiated the use of antihypertensive medication if they had not received medication treatment before. Among the participants with at-risk lifestyle behaviors, 40% reduced alcohol consumption, 14% increased exercise level, 11% stopped smoking, and 8% reached normal weight. While none of the studied patient factors were associated with lifestyle modification, age had a positive impact on antihypertensive medication initiation (p<0.05). We found no evidence of differences in health behavior change between African American and Caucasian participants after receiving the feedback letter. This research is one of the first to study what followed after receiving a feedback letter about elevated blood pressure outside of healthcare settings. Although additional referral care and behavior interventions are needed to facilitate medication initiation and lifestyle modification, our observations suggest that providing blood pressure

  15. Misconceptions about the Golden Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowsky, George

    1992-01-01

    Typically, the mathematical properties concerning the golden ratio are stated correctly, but much of what is presented with respect to the golden ratio in art, architecture, literature, and aesthetics is false or seriously misleading. Discussed here are some of the most commonly repeated misconceptions promulgated, particularly within mathematics…

  16. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-01

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  17. Thermally widely tunable laser diodes with distributed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Todt, R.; Jacke, T.; Meyer, R.; Amann, M.-C.

    2005-07-11

    A thermally widely tunable buried heterostructure laser diode with distributed feedback (DFB) is demonstrated. This device requires only two tuning currents for wide quasicontinuous wavelength tuning, thereby facilitating easy and fast device calibration and control. Furthermore, being based on regular DFB laser fabrication technology, it is readily manufacturable. By using window structures instead of cleaved facets plus antireflection coatings, a regular tuning behavior has been achieved for a DFB-like widely tunable laser diode with only two tuning currents. The laser diode covers the wavelength range between 1552 and 1602 nm. Requiring side-mode suppression ratio and output power above 30 dB and 10 mW, respectively, a wavelength range of 43 nm is accessible.

  18. Optimal Quantum Feedback for Canonical Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, John

    2008-08-01

    We consider the problem of optimal feedback control of a quantum system with linear dynamics undergoing continual non-demolition measurement of position and/or momentum, or both together. Specifically, we show that a stable domain of solutions for the filtered state of the system will be given by a class of randomized squeezed states and we exercise the control problem amongst these states. Bellman's principle is then applied directly to optimal feedback control of such dynamical systems and the Hamilton Jacobi Bellman equation for the minimum cost is derived. The situation of quadratic performance criteria is treated as the important special case and solved exactly for the class of relaxed states.

  19. Feedback Techniques and Ecloud Instabilites - Design Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Ndabashimiye, G.; Rivetta, C.; Winkle, D.Van; Byrd, J.; Vay, J-L; Hofle, W.; Rumolo, G.; Maria, R.De; /Brookhaven

    2009-05-18

    The SPS at high intensities exhibits transverse single-bunch instabilities with signatures consistent with an Ecloud driven instability. While the SPS has a coupled-bunch transverse feedback system, control of Ecloud-driven motion requires a much wider control bandwidth capable of sensing and controlling motion within each bunched beam. This paper draws beam dynamics data from the measurements and simulations of this SPS instability, and estimates system requirements for a feedback system with 2-4 GS/sec. sampling rates to damp Ecloud-driven transverse motion in the SPS at intensities desired for high-current LHC operation.

  20. Feedback controlled electrostatic and electromagnetic sample positioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Elleman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    Four different sample positioners are discussed. The four systems share a common operating principle in that the sample positioning is achieved by feedback controlled forces which can be electrostatic, dielectrophoretic, or electromagnetic. The first system is the electrostatic liquid drop positioner which operates at the near ambient position. The second system is the tetrahedral electrostatic positioner which is being developed for the high temperature materials processing in vacuum. The third system is essentially the the same tetrahedral system above except that the position control is achieved by dielectrophoretic forces in the pressurized gas environment. Finally, the feasibility of a feedback controlled electromagnetic positioner is discussed.

  1. Feedback precision and postfeedback interval duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Precision of feedback gain was manipulated in a simple positioning task. An optimum was found; an increase in precision past that optimum produced deleterious effects upon rate of acquisition. In a second study, increasing postfeedback interval removed that optimum. The feedback precision effects were then replicated in a timing task. The combined results of the 3 studies were interpreted as supportive of an information-processing approach to the study of postfeedback interval events for simple motor skills. The findings additionally supported specific predictions by Bilodeau and deductions from Adams' 1971 theory of motor learning.

  2. Balanced-Bridge Feedback Control Of Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity to variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics reduced. Proposed control system for motor-driven rotary actuator includes three nested feedback loops which, when properly designed, decoupled from each other. Intended to increase accuracy of control by mitigating such degrading effects as vibrations and variations in electrical and mechanical characteristics of structure rotated. Lends itself to optimization of performance via independent optimization of each of three loops. Includes outer, actuator, and driver feedback loops, configured so that actuator is subsystem, and driver is subsystem of actuator.

  3. Symbolic Dynamics of Biological Feedback Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Krishna, Sandeep; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2009-02-01

    We formulate general rules for a coarse graining of the dynamics, which we term “symbolic dynamics,” of feedback networks with monotonic interactions, such as most biological modules. Networks which are more complex than simple cyclic structures can exhibit multiple different symbolic dynamics. Nevertheless, we show several examples where the symbolic dynamics is dominated by a single pattern that is very robust to changes in parameters and is consistent with the dynamics being dictated by a single feedback loop. Our analysis provides a method for extracting these dominant loops from short time series, even if they only show transient trajectories.

  4. Progressive Ratio Schedules of Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Peter R.; Posadas-Sanchez, Diana; Johansen, Espen Borgå; Thrailkill, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Pigeons’ pecks produced grain under progressive ratio (PR) schedules, whose response requirements increased systematically within sessions. Experiment 1 compared arithmetic (AP) and geometric (GP) progressions. Response rates increased as a function of the component ratio requirement, then decreased linearly (AP) or asymptotically (GP). Experiment 2 found the linear decrease in AP rates to be relatively independent of step size. Experiment 3 showed pausing to be controlled by the prior component length, which predicted the differences between PR and regressive ratio schedules found in Experiment 4. When the longest component ratios were signaled by different key colors, rates at moderate ratios increased, demonstrating control by forthcoming context. Models for response rate and pause duration described performance on AP schedules; GP schedules required an additional parameter representing the contextual reinforcement. PMID:19159161

  5. Terminal feedback outperforms concurrent visual, auditory, and haptic feedback in learning a complex rowing-type task.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Roland; Rauter, Georg; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Augmented feedback, provided by coaches or displays, is a well-established strategy to accelerate motor learning. Frequent terminal feedback and concurrent feedback have been shown to be detrimental for simple motor task learning but supportive for complex motor task learning. However, conclusions on optimal feedback strategies have been mainly drawn from studies on artificial laboratory tasks with visual feedback only. Therefore, the authors compared the effectiveness of learning a complex, 3-dimensional rowing-type task with either concurrent visual, auditory, or haptic feedback to self-controlled terminal visual feedback. Results revealed that terminal visual feedback was most effective because it emphasized the internalization of task-relevant aspects. In contrast, concurrent feedback fostered the correction of task-irrelevant errors, which hindered learning. The concurrent visual and haptic feedback group performed much better during training with the feedback than in nonfeedback trials. Auditory feedback based on sonification of the movement error was not practical for training the 3-dimensional movement for most participants. Concurrent multimodal feedback in combination with terminal feedback may be most effective, especially if the feedback strategy is adapted to individual preferences and skill level.

  6. Galaxies on FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments): stellar feedback explains cosmologically inefficient star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Kereš, Dušan; Oñorbe, José; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman; Bullock, James S.

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of high-resolution cosmological simulations1 of galaxy formation to z = 0, spanning halo masses ˜108-1013 M⊙, and stellar masses ˜104-1011 M⊙. Our simulations include fully explicit treatment of the multiphase interstellar medium and stellar feedback. The stellar feedback inputs (energy, momentum, mass, and metal fluxes) are taken directly from stellar population models. These sources of feedback, with zero adjusted parameters, reproduce the observed relation between stellar and halo mass up to Mhalo ˜ 1012 M⊙. We predict weak redshift evolution in the M*-Mhalo relation, consistent with current constraints to z > 6. We find that the M*-Mhalo relation is insensitive to numerical details, but is sensitive to feedback physics. Simulations with only supernova feedback fail to reproduce observed stellar masses, particularly in dwarf and high-redshift galaxies: radiative feedback (photoheating and radiation pressure) is necessary to destroy giant molecular clouds and enable efficient coupling of later supernovae to the gas. Star formation rates (SFRs) agree well with the observed Kennicutt relation at all redshifts. The galaxy-averaged Kennicutt relation is very different from the numerically imposed law for converting gas into stars, and is determined by self-regulation via stellar feedback. Feedback reduces SFRs and produces reservoirs of gas that lead to rising late-time star formation histories, significantly different from halo accretion histories. Feedback also produces large short-time-scale variability in galactic SFRs, especially in dwarfs. These properties are not captured by common `sub-grid' wind models.

  7. Altered sensory feedbacks in pianist's dystonia: the altered auditory feedback paradigm and the glove effect

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Felicia P.-H.; Großbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart O.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether AAF can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al., 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in synchrony with a metronome on a MIDI-piano with three auditory feedback conditions: (1) normal feedback; (2) no feedback; (3) constant delayed feedback. Experiment 2 employs synchronization-continuation paradigm: 12 MD patients and 12 healthy pianists had to repeatedly play C-major scales in two phases: first in synchrony with a metronome, secondly continue the established tempo without the metronome. There are four experimental conditions, among them three are the same AAF as in Experiment 1 and 1 is related to altered tactile sensory input. The coefficient of variation of inter-onset intervals of the key depressions was calculated to evaluate fine motor control. Results: In both experiments, the healthy controls and the patients behaved very similarly. There is no difference in the regularity of playing between the two groups under any condition, and neither did AAF nor did altered tactile feedback have a beneficial effect on patients' fine motor control. Conclusions: The results of the two experiments suggest that in the context of our experimental designs, AAF and altered tactile feedback play a minor role in motor coordination in patients with musicians' dystonia. We propose that altered auditory and tactile feedback do not serve as effective sensory tricks and may not temporarily reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from MD in this experimental context. PMID:24381552

  8. Positive feedback between increasing atmospheric CO2 and ecosystem productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Robertson, G. P.

    2009-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 will likely affect both the hydrologic cycle and ecosystem productivity. Current assumptions that increasing CO2 will lead to increased ecosystem productivity and plant water use efficiency (WUE) are driving optimistic predictions of higher crop yields as well as greater availability of freshwater resources due to a decrease in evapotranspiration. The plant physiological response that drives these effects is believed to be an increase in carbon uptake either by (a) stronger CO2 gradient between the stomata and the atmosphere, or by (b) reduced CO2 limitation of enzymatic carboxylation within the leaf. The (a) scenario will lead to increased water use efficiency (WUE) in plants. However, evidence for increased WUE is mostly based on modeling studies, and experiments producing a short duration or step-wise increase in CO2 concentration (e.g. free-air CO2 enrichment). We hypothesize that the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration is having a positive effect on ecosystem productivity and WUE. To investigate this hypothesis, we analyzed meteorological, ANPP, and soil CO2 flux datasets together with carbon isotopic ratio (13C/12C) of archived plant samples from the long term ecological research (LTER) program at Kellogg Biological Station. The datasets were collected between 1989 and 2007 (corresponding to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration of ~33 ppmv at Mauna Loa). Wheat (Triticum aestivum) samples taken from 1989 and 2007 show a significant decrease in the C isotope discrimination factor (Δ) over time. Stomatal conductance is directly related to Δ, and thus Δ is inversely related to plant intrinsic WUE (iWUE). Historical changes in the 13C/12C ratio (δ13C) in samples of a perennial forb, Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), taken from adjacent successional fields, indicate changes in Δ upon uptake of CO2 as well. These temporal trends in Δ suggest a positive feedback between the increasing CO2 concentration in the

  9. Tunable Fano resonances based on microring resonator with feedback coupled waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guolin; Zhao, Ting; Xiao, Huifu; Liu, Zilong; Liu, Guipeng; Yang, Jianhong; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jintao; Tian, Yonghui

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a tunable Fano resonance which originates from the optical interference between two different resonant cavities using silicon micro-ring resonator with feedback coupled waveguide fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. The resonance spectrum can be periodically tuned via changing the resonant wavelengths of two resonators through the thermo-optic effect. In addition to this, we can also change the transmission loss of the feedback coupled waveguide (FCW) to tune the resonance spectrum by the injection free carriers to FCW. We also build the theoretical model and we analyze the device performance by using the scattering matrix method. The simulation results are in a good agreement with the experimental results. The measurement maximum extinction ratio of the Fano resonance is as high as 30.8dB. Therefore, the proposed device is a most promising candidate for high on/off ratio optical switching/modulating, high-sensitivity biochemical sensing. PMID:27607626

  10. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  11. Teacher Language Awareness in Supervisory Feedback Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Kristen; Baecher, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates pre- and post-observation feedback provided to TESOL teacher candidates who are preparing to work in content-based instruction/content and language integrated learning contexts, extending the conceptualization of teacher language awareness (TLA) to candidate supervision. It examines the extent to which TLA is manifested by…

  12. Diversity in School Performance Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaeghe, Goedele; Schildkamp, Kim; Luyten, Hans; Valcke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As data-based decision making is receiving increased attention in education, more and more school performance feedback systems (SPFSs) are being developed and used worldwide. These systems provide schools with data on their functioning. However, little research is available on the characteristics of the different SPFSs. Therefore, this study…

  13. FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GACH, PENELOPE J.; AND OTHERS

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMICAL FEEDBACK SCORING SYSTEMS FOR REUSABLE KINDERGARTEN WORKBOOKS IS DESCRIBED. THREE PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS WERE DEVELOPED--(1) A METAL FOIL ACTIVATING AN ELECTRICAL PROBE, (2) A METAL FOIL REACTING WITH A MAGNETIC PROBE, AND (3) INVISIBLE FLUORESCENT INK REVEALED BY THE APPLICATION OF LONGWAVE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT. (MS)

  14. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  15. Real-time cleaning performance feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, M.

    1994-12-01

    Monitoring contamination levels on parts during cleaning operations will provide feedback that can be useful in reducing waste generation and air emissions caused by over- or under-cleaning. Such real-time process controls can help eliminate pollution in a wide variety of industries, including aerospace, electronics, and metal finishing.

  16. 7 CFR 2500.026 - Applicant feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applicant feedback. 2500.026 Section 2500.026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ADVOCACY AND OUTREACH.... U.S. Department of Agriculture, Departmental Management, Office of Advocacy and Outreach,...

  17. 7 CFR 2500.026 - Applicant feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Applicant feedback. 2500.026 Section 2500.026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ADVOCACY AND OUTREACH.... U.S. Department of Agriculture, Departmental Management, Office of Advocacy and Outreach,...

  18. 7 CFR 2500.026 - Applicant feedback.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Applicant feedback. 2500.026 Section 2500.026 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ADVOCACY AND OUTREACH.... U.S. Department of Agriculture, Departmental Management, Office of Advocacy and Outreach,...

  19. Designing Educational Social Machines for Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee-King, Matthew; Krivenski, Maria; Brenton, Harry; Grimalt-Reynes, Andreu; d'Inverno, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report on our development of an educational social machine based on the concept that feedback in communities is an effective means to support the development of communities of learning and practice. Key challenges faced by this work are how best to support educational and social interactions, how to deliver personalised tuition, and how to…

  20. Finite Feedback Cycling in Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayduk, Leslie A.

    2009-01-01

    In models containing reciprocal effects, or longer causal loops, the usual effect estimates assume that any effect touching a loop initiates an infinite cycling of effects around that loop. The real world, in contrast, might permit only finite feedback cycles. I use a simple hypothetical model to demonstrate that if the world permits only a few…

  1. Mechanical feedback stabilizes budding yeast morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Samhita; Trogdon, Michael; Petzold, Linda; Campas, Otger

    Walled cells have the ability to remodel their shape while sustaining an internal turgor pressure that can reach values up to 10 atmospheres. This requires a tight and simultaneous regulation of cell wall assembly and mechanochemistry, but the underlying mechanisms by which this is achieved remain unclear. Using the growth of mating projections in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a motivating example, we have developed a theoretical description that couples the mechanics of cell wall expansion and assembly via a mechanical feedback. In the absence of a mechanical feedback, cell morphogenesis is inherently unstable. The presence of a mechanical feedback stabilizes changes in cell shape and growth, and provides a mechanism to prevent cell lysis in a wide range of conditions. We solve for the dynamics of the system and obtain the different dynamical regimes. In particular, we show that several parameters affect the stability of growth, including the strength of mechanical feedback in the system. Finally, we compare our results to existing experimental data.

  2. Evidence in Support of Written Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitchener, John

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which ESL learners benefit from written corrective feedback has been debated at length since Truscott (1996) mounted a case for its abolition. Ten years later, the debate continues, not only because little attention has been given to testing its efficacy over time but also because studies that have investigated the issue have not…

  3. A Surprising Effect of Feedback on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmeyer, Regina; Rheinberg, Falko

    2005-01-01

    As meta-analyses demonstrate feedback effects on performance, our study examined possible mediators. Based on our cognitive-motivational model [Vollmeyer, R., & Rheinberg, F. (1998). Motivationale Einflusse auf Erwerb und Anwendung von Wissen in einem computersimulierten System [Motivational influences on the acquisition and application of…

  4. Assessing feedback in a mobile videogame

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Player feedback is an important part of serious games, although there is no consensus regarding its delivery or optimal content. "Mommio" is a serious game designed to help mothers motivate their preschoolers to eat vegetables. The purpose of this study was to assess optimal format and content of pl...

  5. Give Better Feedback on Engineering Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Robert, Jr.; Graham, Tony; Kapur, Arjun; Rhodes, Craig; Blackwell, Ellinor

    2005-01-01

    Most, if not all, systems have a mechanism that collects information to facilitate monitoring performance. This information is primarily used to modify the system to make it more efficient in performing desired tasks and, thus, attaining desired results. Similar to electrical, mechanical, or hydraulic systems, the feedback mechanism in an…

  6. Kaleidoscopic light feedback for television systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Woods, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Technique generates special effects for broadcast television to study effects of light feedback on television systems. Signals are produced for tape recording, broadcasting, or displaying on black-and-white or color monitors. The patterns have from three to eight sides and expand, contract, or rotate at various speeds.

  7. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  8. Negative feedback buffers effects of regulatory variants

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Daniel M; Wilkening, Stefan; Lin, Gen; Tekkedil, Manu M; Dietrich, Kim; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms conferring robustness against regulatory variants have been controversial. Previous studies suggested widespread buffering of RNA misexpression on protein levels during translation. We do not find evidence that translational buffering is common. Instead, we find extensive buffering at the level of RNA expression, exerted through negative feedback regulation acting in trans, which reduces the effect of regulatory variants on gene expression. Our approach is based on a novel experimental design in which allelic differential expression in a yeast hybrid strain is compared to allelic differential expression in a pool of its spores. Allelic differential expression in the hybrid is due to cis-regulatory differences only. Instead, in the pool of spores allelic differential expression is not only due to cis-regulatory differences but also due to local trans effects that include negative feedback. We found that buffering through such local trans regulation is widespread, typically compensating for about 15% of cis-regulatory effects on individual genes. Negative feedback is stronger not only for essential genes, indicating its functional relevance, but also for genes with low to middle levels of expression, for which tight regulation matters most. We suggest that negative feedback is one mechanism of Waddington's canalization, facilitating the accumulation of genetic variants that might give selective advantage in different environments. PMID:25634765

  9. Carbon cycle feedbacks and future climate change.

    PubMed

    Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2015-11-13

    Climate and carbon cycle are tightly coupled on many timescales, from interannual to multi-millennial timescales. Observations always evidence a positive feedback, warming leading to release of carbon to the atmosphere; however, the processes at play differ depending on the timescales. State-of-the-art Earth System Models now represent these climate-carbon cycle feedbacks, always simulating a positive feedback over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, although with substantial uncertainty. Recent studies now help to reduce this uncertainty. First, on short timescales, El Niño years record larger than average atmospheric CO2 growth rate, with tropical land ecosystems being the main drivers. These climate-carbon cycle anomalies can be used as emerging constraint on the tropical land carbon response to future climate change. Second, centennial variability found in last millennium records can be used to constrain the overall global carbon cycle response to climatic excursions. These independent methods point to climate-carbon cycle feedback at the low-end of the Earth System Models range, indicating that these models overestimate the carbon cycle sensitivity to climate change. These new findings also help to attribute the historical land and ocean carbon sinks to increase in atmospheric CO2 and climate change. PMID:26438284

  10. Group-Level Formative Feedback and Metadiscourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resendes, Monica; Scardamalia, Marlene; Bereiter, Carl; Chen, Bodong; Halewood, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the ability of grade 2 students to engage in productive discussion about the state of their knowledge building using group-level feedback tools to support their metadiscourse. Two aspects of knowledge work were common to the comparison and experimental classes: "Knowledge Building talk" (KB talk) involving…

  11. Carbon cycle feedbacks and future climate change.

    PubMed

    Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2015-11-13

    Climate and carbon cycle are tightly coupled on many timescales, from interannual to multi-millennial timescales. Observations always evidence a positive feedback, warming leading to release of carbon to the atmosphere; however, the processes at play differ depending on the timescales. State-of-the-art Earth System Models now represent these climate-carbon cycle feedbacks, always simulating a positive feedback over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, although with substantial uncertainty. Recent studies now help to reduce this uncertainty. First, on short timescales, El Niño years record larger than average atmospheric CO2 growth rate, with tropical land ecosystems being the main drivers. These climate-carbon cycle anomalies can be used as emerging constraint on the tropical land carbon response to future climate change. Second, centennial variability found in last millennium records can be used to constrain the overall global carbon cycle response to climatic excursions. These independent methods point to climate-carbon cycle feedback at the low-end of the Earth System Models range, indicating that these models overestimate the carbon cycle sensitivity to climate change. These new findings also help to attribute the historical land and ocean carbon sinks to increase in atmospheric CO2 and climate change.

  12. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of shear flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  13. Jet mixer noise suppressor using acoustic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to providing an improved jet mixer noise suppressor for high speed jets that rapidly mixes high speed air flow with a lower speed air flow, and more particularly, relates to an improved jet mixer noise suppressor that uses feedback of acoustic waves produced by the interaction of sheer flow instability waves with an obstacle downstream of the jet nozzle.

  14. The Problems of Multiple Feedback Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulcock, Jeffrey W.

    The use of two-stage least squares (2SLS) for the estimation of feedback linkages is inappropriate for nonorthogonal data sets because 2SLS is extremely sensitive to multicollinearity. It is argued that what is needed is use of a different estimating criterion than the least squares criterion. Theoretically the variance normalization criterion has…

  15. Industrial safety hazard reduction through performance feedback.

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer-Azaroff, B; de Santamaria, M C

    1980-01-01

    A "feedback package" system, designed to prevent occupational accidents and to fit directly into the normal operations of an industrial organization, was analyzed. Eighteen hazardous conditions in six production departments were assessed during seven observation sessions over a 12-week period, plus four follow-up observations over 4 months. The "feedback package" was presented in multiple baseline fashion, across subjects (department supervisors). It consisted of presenting the supervisor with copies of observational data, accompanied by a note which congratulated good practices and suggested ways for improving safety conditions, along with occasional comments from a senior executive. The results indicated that during the feedback phase, hazard rates were lower and less variable than during the baseline phase. Baseline data were highly variable with peaks ranging from 20 to 55 hazards per department. Following intervention, hazard frequencies dropped by 60%, averaged across departments, with decreases ranging from 29% to 88%. During treatment, data stabilized, with the highest frequency reaching 33. A modified feedback system was implemented by the organization following termination of the study, validating the assumption that such a system would tend to maintain. PMID:7380753

  16. Quantum entanglement capacity with classical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    For any quantum discrete memoryless channel, we define a quantity called quantum entanglement capacity with classical feedback (EB) , and we show that this quantity lies between two other well-studied quantities. These two quantities—namely the quantum capacity assisted by two-way classical communication (Q2) and the quantum capacity with classical feedback (QB) —are widely conjectured to be different: There exists a quantum discrete memoryless channel for which Q2>QB . We then present a general scheme to convert any quantum error-correcting codes into adaptive protocols for this newly defined quantity of the quantum depolarizing channel, and illustrate with the repetition code and Shor code. We contrast the present notion with entanglement purification protocols by showing that, whilst the Leung-Shor protocol can be applied directly, recurrence methods need to be supplemented with other techniques but at the same time offer a way to improve the aforementioned repetition code. For the quantum depolarizing channel, we prove a formula that gives lower bounds on the quantum capacity with classical feedback from any EB protocols. We then apply this formula to the EB protocols that we discuss to obtain lower bounds on the quantum capacity with classical feedback of the quantum depolarizing channel.

  17. Sex Differences, Positive Feedback and Intrinsic Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deci, Edward L.; And Others

    The paper presents two experiments which test the "change in feelings of competence and self-determination" proposition of cognitive evaluation theory. This proposition states that when a person receives feedback about his performance on an intrinsically motivated activity this information will affect his sense of competence and…

  18. Postidentification Feedback Affects Subsequent Eyewitness Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Matthew A.; Brewer, Neil; Weber, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    Eyewitnesses sometimes view more than one lineup during an investigation. We investigated the effects of postidentification feedback following one lineup on responses to a second lineup. Witnesses (N = 621) viewed a mock crime and, later, attempted to identify the culprit from an initial (target-absent) lineup and a second (target-present or…

  19. Distributed feedback imprinted electrospun fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Fasano, Vito; Moffa, Maria; Manco, Rita; D'Agostino, Stefania; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-01

    Imprinted, distributed feedback lasers are demonstrated on individual, active electrospun polymer nanofibers. In addition to advantages related to miniaturization, optical confinement and grating nanopatterning lead to a significant threshold reduction compared to conventional thin-film lasers. The possibility of imprinting arbitrary photonic crystal geometries on electrospun lasing nanofibers opens new opportunities for realizing optical circuits and chips.

  20. [Day surgery: recommendations, tools and feedback].

    PubMed

    Bontemps, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    The ANAP (French agency for supporting medical institutions' performance) has the legal responsibility to provide tools and recommendations and to support institutions in improving their organisational performance. In the context of the public authorities' push for day surgery, the ANAP has specifically addressed this issue, gathering feedback from French and European health institutions. PMID:26126379

  1. Web teleoperation of robots with simulation feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Medina, Fernando; Puente Mendez, Santiago; Canovas, J.; Mangas, J.; Martinez-Larraz, C.

    2002-02-01

    The use of a robot arm for industry is a very common problem. A great quantity of these robots have to have a remote human controller to achieve its task successfully. The user knows what is happening with the robot arm through sensors. This information has to arrive to the user and if it consists of a video then the system needs a high bandwidth to carry it to the user in real-time. The present system uses a simulation feedback instead of video information; this type of feedback gets as much information as a video with a lower bandwidth. The simulation of the system is based on virtual reality modeling feedback language (VRML) to model the robot arm which reproduces the movements of the real robot. This method of feedback has the advantage of required little information to afford the user a real approach to the system. The proposed system lets the user move the robot arm with different point-to-point trajectories and different possibilities of movement. The aim of this kind of laboratory is to facilitate the access for students and professionals in the field of robotics. This system is used for teaching university students the themes of robotics. It improves the training of the students permitting them access to a real robot which would be impossible for universities to afford if each student needed his own robot to practice. This paper presents a remote laboratory approach for experimentation with a real robot, which uses the communication techniques of the web.

  2. Obtaining Feedback for Indexing from Highlighted Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarroel, Miguel; Fuente, Pablo de la; Pedrero, Alberto; Vegas, Jesus; Adiego, Joaquin

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of weighted index terms in information retrieval focuses on a method for adjusting index weights by processing text in digital libraries that has been highlighted by users. Considers weights in query processing; feedback sources; active reading while accessing digital documents; collaborative information retrieval; and improving index…

  3. Rehabilitation and motor learning through vibrotactile feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchanathan, Roshan; Rosenthal, Jacob; McDaniel, Troy

    2014-05-01

    Group instruction is the most common delivery method of motor skill training given its cost and time effectiveness. This is also the case during rehabilitation where therapists divide their attention among several patients. Compared to dedicated one-on-one instruction, group instruction often suffers from reduced quality and quantity of instruction and feedback. Further, during rehabilitation programs, patients struggle outside of therapy sessions given the lack of instruction and feedback found only during clinic visits. We propose a wearable, low-cost motion sensing and actuation system capable of providing real-time vibrotactile feedback for trainer-defined goal movements and repetitions. The trainer inputs movement goals for the user, and adapts these values (joint angles, movement speeds) over time for continued progress. In this paper, we present a novel second generation design, and introduce a flexible vibrotactile strip to overcome construction challenges of these types of systems. The flexible display is constructed using commercial LED strips that have been modified by attaching pancake style vibration motors. The flexible display does not require external microcontrollers to enable or disable motors, and may allow these systems to be expanded to the whole body. We also summarize two previous studies that have assessed appropriate body sites and pattern designs for vibrotactile motor instructions and feedback signals.

  4. Timely Diagnostic Feedback for Database Concept Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng; Chuang, Yuh-Shy

    2013-01-01

    To efficiently learn database concepts, this work adopts association rules to provide diagnostic feedback for drawing an Entity-Relationship Diagram (ERD). Using association rules and Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) techniques, this work implements a novel Web-based Timely Diagnosis System (WTDS), which provides timely diagnostic feedback…

  5. Facial Feedback Mechanisms in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stel, Marielle; van den Heuvel, Claudia; Smeets, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    Facial feedback mechanisms of adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) were investigated utilizing three studies. Facial expressions, which became activated via automatic (Studies 1 and 2) or intentional (Study 2) mimicry, or via holding a pen between the teeth (Study 3), influenced corresponding emotions for controls, while individuals…

  6. The Nature of Automated Essay Scoring Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikli, Semire

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the nature of feedback that English as a Second Language (ESL) students received on their writings either from an automated essay scoring (AES) system or from the teacher. The participants were 12 adult ESL students who were attending an intensive English center at a university in Florida. The drafts of the…

  7. Spelling: Computerised Feedback for Self-Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawley, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that any assumption that L2 learners of English do well to rely on the feedback provided by generic spell checkers (for example, the MS Word spell checker) is misplaced. Efforts to develop spell checkers specifically for L2 learners have focused on training software to offer more appropriate suggestion lists for replacing…

  8. The effect of AGN feedback on the X-ray morphologies of clusters: Simulations vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Puchwein, Ewald; Böhringer, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Clusters of galaxies probe the large-scale distribution of matter and are a useful tool to test the cosmological models by constraining cosmic structure growth and the expansion of the Universe. It is the scaling relations between mass observables and the true mass of a cluster through which we obtain the cosmological constraints by comparing to theoretical cluster mass functions. These scaling relations are, however, heavily influenced by cluster morphology. The presence of the slight tension in recent cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 based on the CMB and clusters has boosted the interests in looking for possible sources for the discrepancy. Therefore we study here the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback as one of the major mechanisms modifying the cluster morphology influencing scaling relations. It is known that AGN feedback injects energies up to 1062 erg into the intracluster medium, controls the heating and cooling of a cluster, and re-distributes cold gas from the centre to outer radii. We have also learned that cluster simulations with AGN feedback can reproduce observed cluster properties, for example, the X-ray luminosity, temperature, and cooling rate at the centre better than without the AGN feedback. In this paper using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations we investigate how the AGN feedback changes the X-ray morphology of the simulated systems, and compare this to the observed Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) clusters. We apply two substructure measures, centre shifts (w) and power ratios (e.g. P3/P0), to characterise the cluster morphology, and find that our simulated clusters are more substructured than the observed clusters based on the values of w and P3/P0. We also show that the degree of this discrepancy is affected by the inclusion of AGN feedback. While the clusters simulated with the AGN feedback are in much better agreement with the REXCESS LX-T relation, they are also more substructured

  9. Baryons, neutrinos, feedback and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OverWhelmingly Large hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for z < 1.5, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than 2 per cent for scales k < 10 h Mpc-1 and better than 5 per cent for 10 < k < 100 h Mpc-1. Equipped with this precise tool, this paper presents the first constraint on baryonic feedback models using gravitational lensing data, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In this analysis, we show that the effect of neutrino mass on the mass power spectrum is degenerate with the baryonic feedback at small angular scales and cannot be ignored. Assuming a cosmology precision fixed by WMAP9, we find that a universe with massless neutrinos is rejected by the CFHTLenS lensing data with 85-98 per cent confidence, depending on the baryon feedback model. Some combinations of feedback and non-zero neutrino masses are also disfavoured by the data, although it is not yet possible to isolate a unique neutrino mass and feedback model. Our study shows that ongoing weak gravitational lensing surveys (KiDS, HSC and DES) will offer a unique opportunity to probe the physics of baryons at galactic scales, in

  10. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  11. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierlinger, Katharina M.; Burkert, Andreas; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars (`stellar feedback') create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 105 M⊙ (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8 per cent the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 M⊙. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model winds insert 2.34 times the energy of an SN and create stellar wind bubbles serving as pressure reservoirs. We find that during the pressure-driven phases of the bubble evolution radiative losses peak near the contact discontinuity (CD), and thus the retained energy depends critically on the scales of the mixing processes across the CD. Taking into account the winds of massive stars increases the amount of kinetic energy deposited in the cold ISM from 0.1 per cent to a few per cent of the feedback energy.

  12. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  13. Sex ratio effects on reproductive strategies in humans

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Ryan; Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Characterizations of coy females and ardent males are rooted in models of sexual selection that are increasingly outdated. Evolutionary feedbacks can strongly influence the sex roles and subsequent patterns of sex differentiated investment in mating effort, with a key component being the adult sex ratio (ASR). Using data from eight Makushi communities of southern Guyana, characterized by varying ASRs contingent on migration, we show that even within a single ethnic group, male mating effort varies in predictable ways with the ASR. At male-biased sex ratios, men's and women's investment in mating effort are indistinguishable; only when men are in the minority are they more inclined towards short-term, low investment relationships than women. Our results support the behavioural ecological tenet that reproductive strategies are predictable and contingent on varying situational factors. PMID:26064588

  14. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  15. Quantifying asymmetry: ratios and alternatives.

    PubMed

    Franks, Erin M; Cabo, Luis L

    2014-08-01

    Traditionally, the study of metric skeletal asymmetry has relied largely on univariate analyses, utilizing ratio transformations when the goal is comparing asymmetries in skeletal elements or populations of dissimilar dimensions. Under this approach, raw asymmetries are divided by a size marker, such as a bilateral average, in an attempt to produce size-free asymmetry indices. Henceforth, this will be referred to as "controlling for size" (see Smith: Curr Anthropol 46 (2005) 249-273). Ratios obtained in this manner often require further transformations to interpret the meaning and sources of asymmetry. This model frequently ignores the fundamental assumption of ratios: the relationship between the variables entered in the ratio must be isometric. Violations of this assumption can obscure existing asymmetries and render spurious results. In this study, we examined the performance of the classic indices in detecting and portraying the asymmetry patterns in four human appendicular bones and explored potential methodological alternatives. Examination of the ratio model revealed that it does not fulfill its intended goals in the bones examined, as the numerator and denominator are independent in all cases. The ratios also introduced strong biases in the comparisons between different elements and variables, generating spurious asymmetry patterns. Multivariate analyses strongly suggest that any transformation to control for overall size or variable range must be conducted before, rather than after, calculating the asymmetries. A combination of exploratory multivariate techniques, such as Principal Components Analysis, and confirmatory linear methods, such as regression and analysis of covariance, appear as a promising and powerful alternative to the use of ratios. PMID:24842694

  16. A technology using feedback to manage experience based learning.

    PubMed

    Dornan, Tim; Brown, Martin; Powley, Dan; Hopkins, Mike

    2004-12-01

    The aim was to establish how ICT could apply feedback principles to experience based learning. Based on a survey of student and staff requirements, we developed a personalized educational technology ('iSUS') that: (1) Made students clear what they should learn; (2) Helped them meet appropriate real patients; (3) Encouraged reflective feedback; (4) Calculated benchmarks from accumulated feedback; (5) Compared individual students' feedback against those benchmarks; (6) Matched clinical activities to curriculum objectives; (7) Gave feedback to teachers and course leads. Bench testing proved the system usable. During seven weeks of real time use, a whole year group of 111 students feedback on 1183 learning episodes. Five hundred and forty-one (46%) of feedback episodes were self initiated. We have successfully prototyped an application of feedback principles to experience based learning that students seem to find useful. PMID:15763881

  17. Characterizing Teacher Feedback to Student Miscues during Oral Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, James V.; Baker, Christopher

    1981-01-01

    Describes the feedback to oral reading miscue analysis system (FORMAS), a systematic procedure for teachers to use in examining the characteristics and effects of their own feedback to students' oral reading miscues. (FL)

  18. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri

    2015-11-01

    Active feedback techniques may stabilize the flute instability in mirror traps and make them viable candidates for fusion machines. A fast feedback with optical sensors and electrical actuators was implemented in a table-top mirror machine and used to study several aspects of feedback stabilization. For a cold, dense plasma the feedback reduces dramatically the flute amplitude of the first two mode. For higher temperature plasma, a significant increase of plasma density due to feedback stabilization is also demonstrated. The effect of changing feedback gain and phase has some interesting feature such as asymmetry with respect to positive and negative phase shifts and non-monotonic dependence of flute amplitude on feedback gain. These effects are explained using simplified analytic model of the flute and feedback.

  19. The Effects of Standardized Feedback on Orthopedic Patient Evaluation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DaRosa, Debra A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A study examined whether there are performance differences between surgery clerks provided corrective reinforcement on orthopedic history and physical examination write-ups and those assessed by traditional feedback means when both groups are exposed to the feedback instrument. (MLW)

  20. Feedback: an essential element of student learning in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Clynes, Mary P; Raftery, Sara E C

    2008-11-01

    Clinical practice is an essential component of the nursing curriculum. In order for the student to benefit fully from the experience regular performance feedback is required. Feedback should provide the student with information on current practice and offer practical advice for improved performance. The importance of feedback is widely acknowledged however it appears that there is inconsistency in its provision to students. The benefits of feedback include increased student confidence, motivation and self-esteem as well as improved clinical practice. Benefits such as enhanced interpersonal skills and a sense of personal satisfaction also accrue to the supervisor. Barriers to the feedback process are identified as inadequate supervisor training and education, unfavourable ward learning environment and insufficient time spent with students. In addition to the appropriate preparation of the supervisor effective feedback includes an appreciation of the steps of the feedback process, an understanding of the student response to feedback and effective communication skills.

  1. Stereotype Threat and Feedback Seeking in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Loriann; Deitch, Elizabeth A.; Brief, Arthur P.; Block, Caryn J.

    2003-01-01

    Among 166 African American managers, those who were the only minority-group member in their workgroup perceived more stereotype threat. Stereotype threat was related to indirect feedback seeking and discounting of supervisors' performance feedback. (Contains 41 references.) (SK)

  2. The importance of radiative feedback for the stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, Matthew R.

    2009-02-01

    We investigate the effect of radiative feedback on the star formation process using radiation hydrodynamical simulations. We repeat the previous hydrodynamical star cluster formation simulations of Bate et al. and Bate & Bonnell, but we use a realistic gas equation of state and radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation rather than the original barotropic equation of state. Whereas star formation in the barotropic simulations continued unabated until the simulations stopped, we find that radiative feedback, even from low-mass stars, were essentially terminates the production of new objects within low-mass dense molecular cloud cores after roughly one local dynamical time. Radiative feedback also dramatically decreases the propensity of massive circumstellar discs to fragment and inhibits fragmentation of other dense gas (e.g. filaments) close to existing protostellar objects. These two effects decrease the numbers of protostars formed by a factor of ~4 compared with the original hydrodynamical simulations using the barotropic equation of state. In particular, whereas the original simulations produced more brown dwarfs than stars, the radiative feedback results in a ratio of stars to brown dwarfs of approximately 5:1, in much better agreement with observations. Most importantly, we find that although the characteristic stellar mass in the original calculations scaled linearly with the initial mean Jeans mass in the clouds, when radiative feedback is included the characteristic stellar mass is indistinguishable for the two calculations, regardless of the initial Jeans mass of the clouds. We thus propose that the reason the observed initial mass function appears to be universal in the local Universe is due to self-regulation of the star formation process by radiative feedback. We present an analytic argument showing how a characteristic mass may be derived that is relatively independent of initial conditions such as the cloud's density.

  3. Inbreeding and parasite sex ratios.

    PubMed

    Nee, Sean; West, Stuart A; Read, Andrew F

    2002-04-01

    The breeding system of parasitic protozoa affects the evolution of drug resistance and virulence, and is relevant to disease diagnosis and the development of chemo- and immunotherapy. A major group of protozoan parasites, the phylum Apicomplexa, that includes the aetiological agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis and coccidiosis, all have dimorphic sexual stages. The sex ratio (proportion of males produced by parasites) is predicted to depend upon the inbreeding rate, and it has been suggested that sex-ratio data offer a relatively cheap and easy method for indirectly estimating inbreeding rates. Here, we exploit a new theoretical machinery to show that there are generally valid relationships between f, Wright's coefficient of inbreeding, and sex ratio, z(*), the generality being with respect to population structure. To focus the discussion, we concentrate on malaria and show that the previously derived result, f = 1 - 2z(*), does not depend on the artificial assumptions about population structure that were previously made. Not only does this justify the use of sex ratio as an indirect measure of f, but also we argue that it may actually be preferable to measure f by measuring sex ratios, rather than by measuring departures from Hardy-Weinberg genotypic proportions both in malaria and parasites more generally. PMID:11934369

  4. Urinary Total Hydroxyproline: Creatinine Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, B. A.; Gough, G.; Williams, Angela; Kitts, Sheila; Pennock, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The total hydroxyproline: creatinine ratio has been determined in random samples of urine collected from 1577 normal Bristol children and from children with hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency, coeliac disease, and rickets. The results in normal children had a profile similar to that of length velocity. When specific therapy was given to the children with growth failure there was a prompt increase in the total hydroxyproline: creatinine ratio, which occurred well before a growth spurt could be detected by anthropometry. The ratio could be a useful chemical adjunct to anthropometry and radiology in the assessment of normal and abnormal growth. The prompt response of the ratio to changes in growth rate suggests that it may be particularly useful in studying physiological variation in growth over short periods of time and in close monitoring of treatment regimens for growth failure. Random samples of urine may be used, automated methods of analysis are available, and other specialities find the investigation a useful one, so that for the paediatrician the urine total hydroxyproline: creatinine ratio has a potentially wide application. PMID:5018659

  5. Feedback implementation options and issues for B factory accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Briggs, D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Hosseini, W.; Oxoby, G.; Linscott, I.; Coiro, O.; Ghigo, A.; Serio, M.; Lambertson, G.; Voelker, F.

    1992-09-01

    The proposed B factory accelerator facilities will require active feedback systems to control multibunch instabilities. These feedback systems must operate in machines with thousands of circulating bunches and with short (2--4 ns) interbunch intervals. The functional requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback systems are presented. Several possible implementation options are discussed and system requirements developed. Conceptual designs are presented for the PEP II transverse and longitudinal feedback systems.

  6. Positive feedback in the transition from sexual reproduction to parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Tanja; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Dubman, Janie; Crespi, Bernard J

    2010-05-01

    Understanding how new phenotypes evolve is challenging because intermediate stages in transitions from ancestral to derived phenotypes often remain elusive. Here we describe and evaluate a new mechanism facilitating the transition from sexual reproduction to parthenogenesis. In many sexually reproducing species, a small proportion of unfertilized eggs can hatch spontaneously ('tychoparthenogenesis') and develop into females. Using an analytical model, we show that if females are mate-limited, tychoparthenogenesis can result in the loss of males through a positive feedback mechanism whereby tychoparthenogenesis generates female-biased sex ratios and increasing mate limitation. As a result, the strength of selection for tychoparthenogenesis increases in concert with the proportion of tychoparthenogenetic offspring in the sexual population. We then tested the hypothesis that mate limitation selects for tychoparthenogenesis and generates female-biased sex ratios, using data from natural populations of sexually reproducing Timema stick insects. Across 41 populations, both the tychoparthenogenesis rates and the proportions of females increased exponentially as the density of individuals decreased, consistent with the idea that low densities of individuals result in mate limitation and selection for reproductive insurance through tychoparthenogenesis. Our model and data from Timema populations provide evidence for a simple mechanism through which parthenogenesis can evolve rapidly in a sexual population.

  7. Smart building temperature control using occupant feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.

    This work was motivated by the problem of computing optimal commonly-agreeable thermal settings in spaces with multiple occupants. In this work we propose algorithms that take into account each occupant's preferences along with the thermal correlations between different zones in a building, to arrive at optimal thermal settings for all zones of the building in a coordinated manner. In the first part of this work we incorporate active occupant feedback to minimize aggregate user discomfort and total energy cost. User feedback is used to estimate the users comfort range, taking into account possible inaccuracies in the feedback. The control algorithm takes the energy cost into account, trading it off optimally with the aggregate user discomfort. A lumped heat transfer model based on thermal resistance and capacitance is used to model a multi-zone building. We provide a stability analysis and establish convergence of the proposed solution to a desired temperature that minimizes the sum of energy cost and aggregate user discomfort. However, for convergence to the optimal, sufficient separation between the user feedback frequency and the dynamics of the system is necessary; otherwise, the user feedback provided do not correctly reflect the effect of current control input value on user discomfort. The algorithm is further extended using singular perturbation theory to determine the minimum time between successive user feedback solicitations. Under sufficient time scale separation, we establish convergence of the proposed solution. Simulation study and experimental runs on the Watervliet based test facility demonstrates performance of the algorithm. In the second part we develop a consensus algorithm for attaining a common temperature set-point that is agreeable to all occupants of a zone in a typical multi-occupant space. The information on the comfort range functions is indeed held privately by each occupant. Using occupant differentiated dynamically adjusted prices as

  8. Effects of Differential Feedback on Students' Examination Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.; Smith, Jeffrey K.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of feedback on performance and factors associated with it were examined in a large introductory psychology course. The experiment involved college students (N = 464) working on an essay examination under 3 conditions: no feedback, detailed feedback that was perceived by participants to be provided by the course instructor, and detailed…

  9. Feedback Systems for Use with Paper-Based Instructional Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strandberg, Joel E.

    This survey describes 15 systems that provide feedback to students. Feedback is defined as information transfer from the instructional material to the student after a response is made by the student. The feedback is directed primarily to the student, but when a permanent record of the response occurs this information is also available to the…

  10. Feedback in Teacher Education: Mentor Discourse and Intern Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Phuong Thi Anh; Vasquez, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Giving and receiving feedback are essential activities in student teaching. This paper explores the strategies that mentors adopted in giving post-observation feedback to the interns in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and these teaching interns' perceptions of the feedback they received. The discourse analysis of six…

  11. Listening to Students: How to Make Written Assessment Feedback Useful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Agnes M.; Cochrane, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Written assessment feedback has not been widely researched despite higher education students continually expressing the need for meaningful and constructive feedback. This qualitative study employing focus groups captures and interprets the student perspective of written assessment feedback. Participants were Registered Nurses and non-traditional…

  12. To the point: medical education reviews--providing feedback.

    PubMed

    Bienstock, Jessica L; Katz, Nadine T; Cox, Susan M; Hueppchen, Nancy; Erickson, Sonya; Puscheck, Elizabeth E

    2007-06-01

    Formative feedback is an essential component of effective teaching and learning. Without it, the learner flounders. Furthermore, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education requires formative feedback within the clerkship and specifies that students must have the time and ability to remediate deficiencies before completing the clerkship. Few articles in the medical literature address how to give effective feedback. However, the themes within these articles are consistent. Formative feedback should be an interactive activity between the teacher and learner. Feedback must be approached with mutual respect and should be provided in a safe environment. Quality feedback is timely, specific to the situation, constructive, based on direct observation and nonjudgmental. With effective feedback, learners (and teachers) can discover what to improve, as well as which behaviors and skills to reinforce and augment. Learners appreciate and request specific feedback. In addition, learners tend to rate teachers who provide feedback more highly than they rate teachers who do not provide feedback. This article in the "To the Point" series will focus on the components of effective feedback and provide a practical and effective approach to giving feedback. PMID:17547874

  13. Evaluating Preference for Graphic Feedback on Correct versus Incorrect Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Ring, Brandon M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated preferences of undergraduate students for graphic feedback on percentage of incorrect performance versus feedback on percentage of correct performance. A total of 108 participants were enrolled in the study and received graphic feedback on performance on 12 online quizzes. One half of participants received graphic…

  14. Making Sense of Assessment Feedback in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a thematic analysis of the research evidence on assessment feedback in higher education (HE) from 2000 to 2012. The focus of the review is on the feedback that students receive within their coursework from multiple sources. The aims of this study are to (a) examine the nature of assessment feedback in HE through the…

  15. A Content Analysis of Peer Feedback in Triadic Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avent, Janeé R.; Wahesh, Edward; Purgason, Lucy L.; Borders, L. DiAnne; Mobley, A. Keith

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research on the types of peer feedback exchanged during triadic supervision. Through a content analysis, the authors found that students provided feedback about counseling performance and cognitive counseling skills most often in supervision sessions. However, there were differences in the types of feedback exchanged across three…

  16. The Value of a Focused Approach to Written Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitchener, John; Knoch, Ute

    2009-01-01

    Investigations into the most effective ways to provide ESL learners with written corrective feedback have often been overly comprehensive in the range of error categories examined. As a result, clear conclusions about the efficacy of such feedback have not been possible. On the other hand, oral corrective feedback studies have produced clear,…

  17. Using Screen Capture Feedback to Improve Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback is an effective instructional practice for improving achievement. The importance of feedback has been understood by teachers for many years, yet recent research has elevated its status. One characteristic of effective feedback is personalized comments, which assist students in understanding their performance. Most research analyzes the…

  18. Enhancing Feedback via Peer Learning in Large Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zher, Ng Huey; Hussein, Raja Maznah Raja; Saat, Rohaida Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has been lauded as a key pedagogical tool in higher education. Unfortunately, the value of feedback falls short when being carried out in large classrooms. In this study, strategies for sustaining feedback in large classroom based on peer learning are explored. All the characteristics identified within the concept of peer learning were…

  19. Sounds Good: Using Digital Audio for Evaluation Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotheram, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Feedback on student work is problematic for faculty and students in British higher education. Evaluation feedback takes faculty much time to produce and students are often dissatisfied with its quantity, timing, and clarity. The Sounds Good project has been experimenting with the use of digital audio for feedback, aiming to save faculty time and…

  20. Actual and Preferred Teacher Feedback on Student Blog Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wen-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This research illustrates the provisions and receptivity of teacher feedback in a blogmediated writing project between two colleges. The blog serves as a peer collaboration platform, as well as a mediating tool for teachers to offer timely feedback or prompt student idea exchanges. This paper discusses how teacher feedback may alter in response to…

  1. Using "Signals" for Appropriate Feedback: Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanes, Zeynep; Arnold, Kimberly E.; King, Abigail Selzer; Remnet, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is a crucial form of information for learners. With the availability of new educational technologies, the manner in which feedback is delivered has changed tremendously. Existing research on the learning outcomes of the content and nature of computer mediated feedback is limited and contradictory. "Signals" is an educational data-mining…

  2. The Performance versus Ability Distinction Following Social Comparison Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Justin T.; LeBeau, Lavonia Smith; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that self-evaluations can be influenced by social comparison feedback. The present study tested whether social comparison feedback has stronger effects on self-evaluations of performance than ability. Participants received social comparison feedback indicating that they had performed above or below average. In addition…

  3. Critical Thinking in Gifted Children's Offline and Online Peer Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Myriah T.; Olthouse, Jill

    2013-01-01

    This comparative study identified the differences between gifted children's offline and online peer feedback within a summer talented writer's workshop. Researchers analyzed ten students' writings for degrees of critical thinking evident in their feedback. Online feedback included students' writings in social writing sites Storybird.com and…

  4. Comparison of the domain and frequency domain state feedbacks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we present explicitly the equivalence of the time domain and frequency domain state feedbacks, as well as the dynamic state feedback and a modified frequency domain state feedback, from the closed-loop transfer function point of view. The difference of the two approaches is also shown.

  5. Planning in Feedback: Insights from Concurrent Verbal Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharmini, Sharon; Kumar, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Feedback plays an intervention role in the writing process. It is through feedback that writers are guided to achieve negotiated writing goals. Feedback encourages a process of discovery and this plays a developmental role in the writing process. In this paper, we report on three case studies that sought to understand cognitive processes when…

  6. The Personal Dimension in Teaching: Why Students Value Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Feedback is a central element of the learning experience yet, until recently, few studies have focused directly on what students think about feedback. This paper seeks to address this issue. Design/methodology/approach: Data collected as part of a larger study investigating reasons for consistently low ratings of feedback across the…

  7. Facilitating Productive Use of Feedback in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Although feedback has a great potential for learning, students do not always make use of this potential. This article therefore reviews research literature on students' use of feedback in higher education. This is done in order to find answers as to why some students do not use the feedback they receive and which factors are important in…

  8. Formative Feedback in a Malaysian Primary School ESL Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardareh, Sedigheh Abbasnasab

    2016-01-01

    The idea of providing students with formative feedback is a crucial part of formative assessment. Teachers need to provide students with feedback that improves their learning. In other words, formative feedback should provide learners with information that help them bridge their learning gap. As formative assessment itself is a newly introduced…

  9. Paper Review Revolution: Screencasting Feedback for Developmental Writers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, Joni; Carlson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Researchers from Kaplan University present findings from a media-rich feedback pilot program that targets students from developmental writing courses. One study of student reactions reveals how screencasting feedback encouraged more formative, holistic feedback and students' awareness of writing process, audience, and revision. A second study…

  10. Teachers' Classroom Feedback: Still Trying to Get It Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Eleanore

    2012-01-01

    This article examines feedback traditionally given by teachers in schools. Such feedback tends to focus on children's acquisition and retrieval of externally prescribed knowledge which is then assessed against mandated tests. It suggests that, from a sociocultural learning perspective, feedback directed towards such objectives may limit children's…

  11. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons’ non-technical skills

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons’ non-technical skills. Methods Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. Results Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees’ actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees’ perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive. Conclusions The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees. PMID:25602262

  12. Group Projects in Interior Design Studio Classes: Peer Feedback Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Group projects have been shown to be effective for providing peer feedback in classrooms. While students in regular enrollment classes benefit from peer feedback, low-enrollment classes face many challenges. This study compares peer feedback effectiveness between two interior design studio classes with different design projects. In one class,…

  13. Assessment Certitude as a Feedback Strategy for Learners' Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealy, W. A.; Ritzhaupt, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    Educational researchers have "rarely" addressed the problem of how to provide feedback on constructed responses. All participants (N = 76) read a story and completed short-answer questions based on the text, with some receiving feedback consisting of the exact material on which the questions were based. During feedback, two groups receiving…

  14. An adaptive phase alignment algorithm for cartesian feedback loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno-Martin, A.; Pardo-Martin, J.; Ortega-Gonzalez, F.

    2010-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm to correct phase misalignments in Cartesian feedback linearization loops for power amplifiers has been presented. It yields an error smaller than 0.035 rad between forward and feedback loop signals once convergence is reached. Because this algorithm enables a feedback system to process forward and feedback samples belonging to almost the same algorithm iteration, it is suitable to improve the performance not only of power amplifiers but also any other digital feedback system for communications systems and circuits such as all digital phase locked loops. Synchronizing forward and feedback paths of Cartesian feedback loops takes a small period of time after the system starts up. The phase alignment algorithm needs to converge before the feedback Cartesian loop can start its ideal behavior. However, once the steady state is reached, both paths can be considered synchronized, and the Cartesian feedback loop will only depend on the loop parameters (open-loop gain, loop bandwidth, etc.). It means that the linearization process will also depend only on these parameters since the misalignment effect disappears. Therefore, this algorithm relieves the power amplifier linearizer circuit design of any task required for solving phase misalignment effects inherent to Cartesian feedback systems. Furthermore, when a feedback Cartesian loop has to be designed, the designer can consider that forward and feedback paths are synchronized, since the phase alignment algorithm will do this task. This will reduce the simulation complexity. Then, all efforts are applied to determining the suitable loop parameters that will make the linearization process more efficient.

  15. Geometric foundations of the theory of feedback equivalence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, R.

    1987-01-01

    A description of feedback control is presented within the context of differential equations, differential geometry, and Lie theory. Work related to the integration of differential geometry with the control techniques of feedback linearization is summarized. Particular attention is given to the application of the theory of vector field systems. Feedback invariants for control systems in state space form are also addressed.

  16. Teacher Feedback during Active Learning: Current Practices in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Linda; Ros, Anje; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Background: Feedback is one of the most powerful tools, which teachers can use to enhance student learning. It appears dif?cult for teachers to give qualitatively good feedback, especially during active learning. In this context, teachers should provide facilitative feedback that is focused on the development of meta-cognition and social learning.…

  17. Differences in the Uptake of Peer and Teacher Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruegg, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in the uptake of peer and teacher feedback after writing students received longitudinal feedback from only one of these sources. It also investigates the types of feedback given by peers and a teacher in order to explain those any differences. Data was collected from 64 Japanese university students in four…

  18. Helping International Medical Graduates Engage in Effective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broquet, Karen E.; Punwani, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Timely, specific, behaviorally-based feedback is a cornerstone of medical education. The authors review basic tenets of effective feedback delivery in the context of potential challenges faced by (non-United States) international medical graduates (IMGs). Method: The authors provide a brief summary of the elements of effective feedback,…

  19. Mathematics Student Teachers' Views on Tutor Feedback during Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhagiar, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    A group of students studying to become mathematics teachers were asked to comment on the tutor feedback they received during teaching practice (TP) and to offer suggestions aimed at improving this feedback. Analysis of the written data--which was collected through emails--suggests the need for: (i) all TP tutors to provide good quality feedback;…

  20. Academic Writing and Grammatical Accuracy: The Role of Corrective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Gordani, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the effect of providing corrective feedback on L2 writing have often produced contradictory results. This study, following a line of research concerned with the role of corrective feedback in writing, contributes to this line of research by analyzing different feedback types in an EFL academic writing context. 45 graduate…