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Sample records for air-fuel ratio signal

  1. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  2. Air/fuel ratio visualization in a diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabell, Kevin David

    1993-01-01

    To investigate some features of high pressure diesel spray ignition, we have applied a newly developed planar imaging system to a spray in an engine-fed combustion bomb. The bomb is designed to give flow characteristics similar to those in a direct injection diesel engine yet provide nearly unlimited optical access. A high pressure electronic unit injector system with on-line manually adjustable main and pilot injection features was used. The primary scalar of interest was the local air/fuel ratio, particularly near the spray plumes. To make this measurement quantitative, we have developed a calibration LIF technique. The development of this technique is the key contribution of this dissertation. The air/fuel ratio measurement was made using biacetyl as a seed in the air inlet to the engine. When probed by a tripled Nd:YAG laser the biacetyl fluoresces, with a signal proportional to the local biacetyl concentration. This feature of biacetyl enables the fluorescent signal to be used as as indicator of local fuel vapor concentration. The biacetyl partial pressure was carefully controlled, enabling estimates of the local concentration of air and the approximate local stoichiometry in the fuel spray. The results indicate that the image quality generated with this method is sufficient for generating air/fuel ratio contours. The processes during the ignition delay have a marked effect on ignition and the subsequent burn. These processes, vaporization and pre-flame kinetics, very much depend on the mixing of the air and fuel. This study has shown that poor mixing and over-mixing of the air and fuel will directly affect the type of ignition. An optimal mixing arrangement exists and depends on the swirl ratio in the engine, the number of holes in the fuel injector and the distribution of fuel into a pilot and main injection. If a short delay and a diffusion burn is desired, the best mixing parameters among those surveyed would be a high swirl ratio, a 4-hole nozzle and a

  3. Flatness-based embedded control of air-fuel ratio in combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Arsie, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    A nonlinear controller is designed for air-fuel ratio control in combustion engines, making use of differential flatness theory and of the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter. It is proven that the air-fuel ratio system is a differentially flat one and admits dynamic feedback linearization. Using a change of variables that is based on differential flatness theory it is shown that the air-fuel ratio system can be transformed to the linear canonical form, for which the design of a state feedback controller is easier. Moreover, to compensate for modeling uncertainties and external disturbances the Derivative-free nonlinear Kalman Filter is designed as a disturbance observer. The estimation of the perturbations that effect the air-fuel systems enables their compensation through the inclusion of an additional term in the feedback control law. The efficiency of the proposed nonlinear feedback control scheme is tested through simulation experiments.

  4. Effect of Volatility on Air-Fuel Ratio Distribution and Torque Output of a Carbureted Light Aircraft Piston Engine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Positive displacement fuel flow sensor Burette type volumetric fuel flowmeter(2) Meriam laminar airflow meter Lamdascan air-fuel ratio meter Lebow inline...therefore the resulting data was not utilized. The volumetric flowrate of engine intake air was calculated from the pressure drop across a Meriam Model 50MC2

  5. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  6. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  7. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  8. Automated Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled spectrum analysis gives rapid results for communication systems. Locates carrier signal in intermediate-frequency band and measures both carrier amplitude and amplitude of noise in several channels near carrier frequency. Computer then computes ratio of signal to average noise. Because measurements and calculations are rapid, system used in fading communication channels.

  9. Contingent stimuli signal subsequent reinforcer ratios.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nathalie; Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas

    2011-07-01

    Conditioned reinforcer effects may be due to the stimulus' discriminative rather than its strengthening properties. While this was demonstrated in a frequently-changing choice procedure, a single attempt to replicate in a relatively static choice environment failed. We contend that this was because the information provided by the stimuli was nonredundant in the frequently-changing preparation, and redundant in the steady-state arrangement. In the present experiments, 6 pigeons worked in a steady-state concurrent schedule procedure with nonredundant informative stimuli (red keylight illuminations). When a response-contingent red keylight signaled that the next food delivery was more likely on one of the two alternatives, postkeylight choice responding was reliably for that alternative. This effect was enhanced after a history of extended informative red keylight presentation (Experiment 2). These results lend support to recent characterizations of conditioned reinforcer effects as reflective of a discriminative, rather than a reinforcing, property of the stimulus.

  10. Algorithm for astronomical, point source, signal to noise ratio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R.; Schroeder, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to simulate the expected signal to noise ratios as a function of observation time in the charge coupled device detector plane of an optical telescope located outside the Earth's atmosphere for a signal star, and an optional secondary star, embedded in a uniform cosmic background. By choosing the appropriate input values, the expected point source signal to noise ratio can be computed for the Hubble Space Telescope using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera science instrument.

  11. Signal-to-noise ratios in coherent soft limiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Expressions for the output signal-to-noise power ratio of a bandpass soft limiter followed by a coherent detection device are presented and discussed. It is found that a significant improvement in the output signal-to-noise ratio at low input SNRs can be achieved by such soft limiters as compared to hard limiters. This indicates that the soft limiter may be of some use in the area of threshold extension. Approximation methods for determining output signal-to-noise spectral densities are also presented.

  12. SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT USING SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO ESTIMATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    systems by using signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) estimation of the received signal. Such SNR estimates can be used to adaptively control important system...parameters whose design explicitly depends on SNR . The results of this investigation show, for certain types of systems, performance can indeed be...substantially improved by SNR estimation. The analysis of the report is basically in two parts. In the first part consideration is given to the design

  13. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  14. High performance zinc air fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Song, Mancun; Xu, Huachi

    2014-03-01

    A zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) stack with inexpensive manganese dioxide (MnO2) as the catalyst is designed, in which the circulation flowing potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte carries the reaction product away and acts as a coolant. Experiments are carried out to investigate the characteristics of polarization, constant current discharge and dynamic response, as well as the factors affecting the performance and uniformity of individual cells in the stack. The results reveal that the peak power density can be as high as 435 mW cm-2 according to the area of the air cathode sheet, and the influence factors on cell performance and uniformity are cell locations, filled state of zinc pellets, contact resistance, flow rates of electrolyte and air. It is also shown that the time needed for voltages to reach steady state and that for current step-up or current step-down are both in milliseconds, indicating the ZAFC can be excellently applied to vehicles with rapid dynamic response demands.

  15. Required signal-to-interference ratios for shortwave broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, George

    1997-09-01

    The required signal-to-Interference (RSI) ratio for a specified grade of HF radio service is the hourly median wanted signal power at the input of the receiver needed relative to the sum of the hourly median unwanted signal power and the hourly median radio noise power in the RF bandwidth of the receiver, adjusted so that the hourly median ratio will not fall below the RSI ratio more than a certain percentage of the time due to minute-to-minute fading within the hour. Shortwave listeners are well aware of the deleterious effects of cochannel and adjacent channel interference. This type of interference is especially prevalent in the overcrowded international broadcast bands where it is manifested by cross talk and a beat note produced in the receiver by the carrier of the unwanted signal. Yet little agreement exists as to the magnitude of the amplitude-modulated, double sideband (AM-DSB) interfering signal that can be tolerated by the listener. Numerous protection ratios have been proposed in the literature, as well as by elements of the International Telecommunication Union. These values tend to range from 17 dB [International Frequency Registration Board, 1989] to as high as 50 dB for "good commercial quality," offset in carrier frequency of 500 Hz and 10 dB short-term fade protection [CCIR, 1970]. In this paper, several significant experiments are reviewed for the purpose of normalizing their findings to a common set of parameters. The parameters relate to articulation scoring, type of noise (if used), fading of wanted and unwanted signals, type of interference, listener skill, bandwidth of the receiver, carrier frequency offset, etc. From this compilation of normalized data, RSI values are recommended as they relate to the desired broadcast quality and the signal-to-noise ratio of the wanted signal. The RSI ratios are compatible for use in HF sky wave prediction programs that contain appropriate RF noise and interference combining subroutines. The recommended

  16. Estimating the signal-to-noise ratio of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1988-01-01

    To make the best use of narrowband airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, an investigator needs to know the ratio of signal to random variability or noise (signal-to-noise ratio or SNR). The signal is land cover dependent and varies with both wavelength and atmospheric absorption; random noise comprises sensor noise and intrapixel variability (i.e., variability within a pixel). The three existing methods for estimating the SNR are inadequate, since typical laboratory methods inflate while dark current and image methods deflate the SNR. A new procedure is proposed called the geostatistical method. It is based on the removal of periodic noise by notch filtering in the frequency domain and the isolation of sensor noise and intrapixel variability using the semi-variogram. This procedure was applied easily and successfully to five sets of AVIRIS data from the 1987 flying season and could be applied to remotely sensed data from broadband sensors.

  17. Signal processing considerations for low signal to noise ratio laser Doppler and phase Doppler signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, K. M.; Wertheimer, G. D.; Bachalo, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The relative performance of current methods used for estimating the phase and the frequency in LDV and phase Doppler applications in low signal to noise ratio conditions is analyzed. These methods include the Fourier analysis and the correlation techniques. Three methods that use the correlation function for frequency and phase estimations are evaluated in terms of accuracy and speed of processing. These methods include: (1) the frequency estimation using zero crossings counting of the auto-correlation function, (2) the Blackman-Tukey method, and (3) the AutoRegressive method (AR). The relative performance of these methods is evaluated and compared with the Fourier analysis method which provides the optimum performance in terms of the Maximum Likelihood (ML) criteria.

  18. Imaging signal-to-noise ratio of synthetic aperture ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of the Poisson photocurrent statistics in the photon-limited heterodyne detection, in this paper, the signal-to-noise ratios in the receiver in the time domain and on the focused 1-D image and 2-D image in the space domain are derived for both the down-looking and side-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladars using PIN or APD photodiodes. The major shot noises in the down-looking SAIL and the side-looking SAIL are, respectively, from the dark current of photodiode and the local beam current. It is found that the ratio of 1-D image SNR to receiver SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the cross direction of travel and the ratio of 2-D image SNR to 1-D image SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the travel direction. And the sensitivity, the effect of Fourier transform of sampled signal, and the influence of time response of detection circuit are discussed, too. The study will help to correctly design a SAIL system.

  19. Optical signal to noise ratio improvement through unbalanced noise beating in phase-sensitive parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Olsson, S L I; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-05-05

    We investigate the beating of signal and idler waves, which have imbalanced signal to noise ratios, in a phase-sensitive parametric amplifier. Imbalanced signal to noise ratios are achieved in two ways; first by imbalanced noise loading; second by varying idler to signal input power ratio. In the case of imbalanced noise loading the phase-sensitive amplifier improved the signal to noise ratio from 3 to 6 dB, and in the case of varying idler to signal input power ratio, the signal to noise ratio improved from 3 to in excess of 20 dB.

  20. Fuel Cell Electrodes for Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cell Assemblies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report describes the design and evaluation of a hydrogen-air fuel cell module for use in a portable hydrid fuel cell -battery system. The fuel ... cell module consists of a stack of 20 single assemblies. Each assembly contains 2 electrically independent cells with a common electrolyte compartment

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio in parametrically driven oscillators.

    PubMed

    Batista, Adriano A; Moreira, Raoni S N

    2011-12-01

    We report a theoretical model based on Green's functions and averaging techniques that gives analytical estimates to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near the first parametric instability zone in parametrically driven oscillators in the presence of added ac drive and added thermal noise. The signal term is given by the response of the parametrically driven oscillator to the added ac drive, while the noise term has two different measures: one is dc and the other is ac. The dc measure of noise is given by a time average of the statistically averaged fluctuations of the displacement from equilibrium in the parametric oscillator due to thermal noise. The ac measure of noise is given by the amplitude of the statistically averaged fluctuations at the frequency of the parametric pump. We observe a strong dependence of the SNR on the phase between the external drive and the parametric pump. For some range of the phase there is a high SNR, while for other values of phase the SNR remains flat or decreases with increasing pump amplitude. Very good agreement between analytical estimates and numerical results is achieved.

  2. Signal-to-noise ratio limitations for intensity correlation imaging.

    PubMed

    Fried, David L; Riker, Jim; Agrawal, Brij

    2014-07-01

    Intensity correlation imaging (ICI) is a concept which has been considered for the task of providing images of satellites in geosynchronous orbit using ground-based equipment. This concept is based on the intensity interferometer principle first developed by Hanbury Brown and Twiss. It is the objective of this paper to establish that a sun-lit geosynchronous satellite is too faint a target object to allow intensity interferometry to be used in developing image information about it-at least not in a reasonable time and with a reasonable amount of equipment. An analytic treatment of the basic phenomena is presented. This is an analysis of one aspect of the statistics of the very high frequency random variations of a very narrow portion of the optical spectra of the incoherent (black-body like-actually reflected sunlight) radiation from the satellite, an analysis showing that the covariance of this radiation as measured by a pair of ground-based telescopes is directly proportional to the square of the magnitude of one component of the Fourier transform of the image of the satellite-the component being the one for a spatial frequency whose value is determined by the separation of the two telescopes. This analysis establishes the magnitude of the covariance. A second portion of the analysis considers shot-noise effects. It is shown that even with much less than one photodetection event (pde) per signal integration time an unbiased estimate of the covariance of the optical field's random variations can be developed. Also, a result is developed for the standard deviation to be associated with the estimated value of the covariance. From these results an expression is developed for what may be called the signal-to-noise ratio to be associated with an estimate of the covariance. This signal-to-noise ratio, it turns out, does not depend on the measurement's integration time, Δt (in seconds), or on the optical spectral bandwidth, Δν (in Hertz), utilized-so long as

  3. Linear signal noise summer accurately determines and controls S/N ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Linear signal noise summer precisely controls the relative power levels of signal and noise, and mixes them linearly in accurately known ratios. The S/N ratio accuracy and stability are greatly improved by this technique and are attained simultaneously.

  4. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  5. Graphene Nanogrids FET Immunosensor: Signal to Noise Ratio Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Jayeeta; RoyChaudhuri, Chirasree

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a reproducible and scalable chemical method for fabrication of smooth graphene nanogrids has been reported which addresses the challenges of graphene nanoribbons (GNR). These nanogrids have been found to be capable of attomolar detection of biomolecules in field effect transistor (FET) mode. However, for detection of sub-femtomolar concentrations of target molecule in complex mixtures with reasonable accuracy, it is not sufficient to only explore the steady state sensitivities, but is also necessary to investigate the flicker noise which dominates at frequencies below 100 kHz. This low frequency noise is dependent on the exposure time of the graphene layer in the buffer solution and concentration of charged impurities at the surface. In this paper, the functionalization strategy of graphene nanogrids has been optimized with respect to concentration and incubation time of the cross linker for an enhancement in signal to noise ratio (SNR). It has been interestingly observed that as the sensitivity and noise power change at different rates with the functionalization parameters, SNR does not vary monotonically but is maximum corresponding to a particular parameter. The optimized parameter has improved the SNR by 50% which has enabled a detection of 0.05 fM Hep-B virus molecules with a sensitivity of around 30% and a standard deviation within 3%. Further, the SNR enhancement has resulted in improvement of quantification accuracy by five times and selectivity by two orders of magnitude. PMID:27740605

  6. Periodic variations in the signal-to-noise ratios of signals received from the ICE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, T.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the ICE probe to comet Giacobini-Zinner are analyzed to determine the effects of spacecraft rotation upon the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the two channels of data. In addition, long-term variations from sources other than rotations are considered. Results include a pronounced SNR variation over a period of three seconds (one rotation) and a lesser effect over a two minute period (possibly due to the receiving antenna conscan).

  7. Effects of a Signaled Delay to Reinforcement in the Previous and Upcoming Ratios on Between-Ratio Pausing in Fixed-Ratio Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Aimee; Foster, T. Mary; Levine, Joshua; Temple, William

    2012-01-01

    Domestic hens responded under multiple fixed-ratio fixed-ratio schedules with equal fixed ratios. One component provided immediate reinforcement and the other provided reinforcement after a delay, signaled by the offset of the key light. The components were presented quasi-randomly so that all four possible transitions occurred in each session.…

  8. Air/fuel supply system for use in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy A; Schilp, Reinhard; Gambacorta, Domenico

    2014-06-17

    A fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine combustor assembly. The fuel injector includes a main body and a fuel supply structure. The main body has an inlet end and an outlet end and defines a longitudinal axis extending between the outlet and inlet ends. The main body comprises a plurality of air/fuel passages extending therethrough, each air/fuel passage including an inlet that receives air from a source of air and an outlet. The fuel supply structure communicates with and supplies fuel to the air/fuel passages for providing an air/fuel mixture within each air/fuel passage. The air/fuel mixtures exit the main body through respective air/fuel passage outlets.

  9. Pilot Signal Design for Massive MIMO Systems: A Received Signal-To-Noise-Ratio-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Jungho; Kim, Donggun; Lee, Yuni; Sung, Youngchul

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the pilot signal design for massive MIMO systems to maximize the training-based received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is considered under two channel models: block Gauss-Markov and block independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) channel models. First, it is shown that under the block Gauss-Markov channel model, the optimal pilot design problem reduces to a semi-definite programming (SDP) problem, which can be solved numerically by a standard convex optimization tool. Second, under the block i.i.d. channel model, an optimal solution is obtained in closed form. Numerical results show that the proposed method yields noticeably better performance than other existing pilot design methods in terms of received SNR.

  10. The impact of air-fuel mixture composition on SI engine performance during natural gas and producer gas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyła, G.; Postrzednik, S.; Żmudka, Z.

    2016-09-01

    The paper summarizers results of experimental tests of SI engine fuelled with gaseous fuels such as, natural gas and three mixtures of producer gas substitute that simulated real producer gas composition. The engine was operated under full open throttle and charged with different air-fuel mixture composition (changed value of air excess ratio). The spark timing was adjusted to obtain maximum brake torque (MBT) for each fuel and air-fuel mixture. This paper reports engine indicated performance based on in-cylinder, cycle resolved pressure measurements. The engine performance utilizing producer gas in terms of indicated efficiency is increased by about 2 percentage points when compared to fuelling with natural gas. The engine power de-rating when producer gas is utilized instead the natural gas, varies from 24% to 28,6% under stoichiometric combustion conditions. For lean burn (λ=1.5) the difference are lower and varies from 22% to 24.5%.

  11. Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Stu; Grube, Dan; Mokgwathi, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally known that in educational settings, excessive noise masks what the teacher is saying; thus, and for maximum learning to occur, the teacher's voice must be highly intelligible to all children (Crandell, Smaldino, & Flexer, 1995). The difference between what the teacher is saying (signal) and the classroom noise level is commonly…

  12. Imaging resolution signal-to-noise ratio in transverse phase amplification from classical information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Doug; Huang, Zun; Pao, Hsueh-Yuan; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-03-01

    A quantum phase amplifier operated in the spatial domain can improve the signal-to-noise ratio in imaging beyond the classical limit. The scaling of the signal-to-noise ratio with the gain of the quantum phase amplifier is derived from classical information theory.

  13. EFFECTS OF A SIGNALED DELAY TO REINFORCEMENT IN THE PREVIOUS AND UPCOMING RATIOS ON BETWEEN-RATIO PAUSING IN FIXED-RATIO SCHEDULES

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Aimee; Foster, T. Mary; Levine, Joshua; Temple, William

    2012-01-01

    Domestic hens responded under multiple fixed-ratio fixed-ratio schedules with equal fixed ratios. One component provided immediate reinforcement and the other provided reinforcement after a delay, signaled by the offset of the key light. The components were presented quasirandomly so that all four possible transitions occurred in each session. The delay was varied over 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32 s with fixed-ratio 5 schedules, and over 0, 8 and 32 s with fixed-ratio 1, 15 and 40 schedules. Main effects of fixed-ratio value and delay duration were detected on between-ratio pauses. Pauses were longer when the multiple-schedule stimulus correlated with a delayed-reinforcer component was presented, with the longest pauses occurring at the transition from a component with an immediate reinforcer to one with a delayed reinforcer. Pause durations were shortest during immediate components. Overall, both the presence or absence of a delay in the upcoming component, and the presence or absence of a delay in the preceding component affected pause length, but the upcoming delay had the larger effect. Thus changes in delay had similar effects to past reports of the effects of changes in response force, response requirement, and reinforcer magnitude in multiple fixed-ratio fixed-ratio schedules. PMID:23144507

  14. Signal to Noise Ratios of Pulsed and Sinewave Modulated Direct Detection Lidar for IPDA Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios have been derived for IPDA lidar using a direct detection receiver for both pulsed and sinewave laser modulation techniques, and the results and laboratory measurements are presented

  15. Improving signal-to-noise ratio of fetal magnetocardiograph by third order flux transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachir, Wesam; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    The application of SQUIDS and superconducting radiometers in clinical biomagnetic instrumentation for fetal magnetocardiography is presented. The paper focuses on the characteristics and performance of the third order flux transformer for fetal magnetocardiography with a good signal to noise ratio. An optimum figure of merit of the third order flux transformer was determined. The optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was used as the optimization criterion.

  16. Three-Signal Method for Accurate Measurements of Depolarization Ratio with Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Baumgart, Rudolf; McGee, Thomsa J.

    2003-01-01

    A method is presented that permits the determination of atmospheric depolarization-ratio profiles from three elastic-backscatter lidar signals with different sensitivity to the state of polarization of the backscattered light. The three-signal method is insensitive to experimental errors and does not require calibration of the measurement, which could cause large systematic uncertainties of the results, as is the case in the lidar technique conventionally used for the observation of depolarization ratios.

  17. Application of the CLEAN Detector to Low Signal to Noise Ratio Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    address low signal to noise ( SNR ) targets. The Reformulated CLEAN Detector is presented which is shown to allow the detection of low SNR targets in the...results of the author’s two previous papers on application of the CLEAN Algorithm to the condition of low signal to noise ratio ( SNR ) targets. The first...paper expands on the author?s previous work by adapting the CLEAN algorithm to address low signal to noise ( SNR ) targets. The Reformulated CLEAN

  18. Mechanism for improving the signal-to-noise ratio in scanning optical microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Walker, Edwin P.

    1996-08-01

    We demonstrate an improved signal-to-noise ratio in a scanning optical microscope used to read out information from a magneto-optical data storage layer. By placing a shading band in the return path of the optical system we can reduce noise by as much as 3 dB in certain spatial frequency ranges. The signal-to-noise ratio improvement arises from differences in the signal and noise distributions in the pupil of the optical system. Although the experimental results are shown only in one dimension, the concept is applicable to two-dimensional scanning of low-contrast samples.

  19. Zinc/air fuel cell for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N. J.; Krueger, R.; Cooper, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    We are conducting tests of an advanced zinc/air fuel cell design to determine effectiveness in various commercial applications. Our 322-cm2 cell uses gravity-fed zinc pellets as the anode, 12 M KOH electrolyte, and an air cathode catalyzed by a cobalt-porphyrin complex on carbon black. A single 322 cm2 cell runs at a standard operating power of 38 W (1200 W/m2) at 39 A (1245 A/m2) and 0.96 V with a power density of 2400 W/m2 at 0.67 V. With improved current collection hardware, already demonstrated in the laboratory, power generation increases to -3600 W/m2 at 1V. We conducted a 50-hour test in which a cell generated 587 Ah and 569 Wh. The power that may be generated increases by a factor of 2.5 between T = 28 °C and 52 °C. Electrolyte capacity, without stabilization additives, was measured at 147 Ah/L

  20. Projection method for improving signal to noise ratio of localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Abumazwed, Ahmed; Kubo, Wakana; Shen, Chen; Tanaka, Takuo; Kirk, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and accurate method (the projection method) to improve the signal to noise ratio of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The nanostructures presented in the paper can be readily fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The finite difference time domain method is used to simulate the structures and generate a reference matrix for the method. The results are validated against experimental data and the proposed method is compared against several other recently published signal processing techniques. We also apply the projection method to biotin-streptavidin binding experimental data and determine the limit of detection (LoD). The method improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by one order of magnitude, and hence decreases the limit of detection when compared to the direct measurement of the transmission-dip. The projection method outperforms the established methods in terms of accuracy and achieves the best combination of signal to noise ratio and limit of detection. PMID:28101430

  1. The analysis of signal-to-noise ratio of airborne LIDAR system under state of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Huang; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Yingchao; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This article gives an overview of airborne LIDAR (laser light detection and ranging) system and its application. By analyzing the transmission and reception process of laser signal, the article constructs a model of echo signal of the LIDAR system, and gives some basic formulas which make up the relationship of signal-to-noise ratio, for example, the received power, the dark noise power and so on. And this article carefully studies and analyzes the impact of some important parameters in the equation on the signal-to-noise ratio, such as the atmospheric transmittance coefficient, the work distance. And the matlab software is used to simulate the detection environment, and obtains a series values of signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio under different circumstances such as sunny day, cloudy day, day, night. And the figures which describe how the SNR of LIDAR system is influenced by the critical factors are shown in the article. Finally according to the series values of signal-to-noise ratio and the figures, the SNR of LIDAR system decreases as the distance increases, and the atmospheric transmittance coefficient caused by bad weather, and also high work temperature drops the SNR. Depending on these conclusions, the LIDAR system will work even better.

  2. Comparison of 14 decibels versus 20 decibels desired to undesired signal protection ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badinelli, Martin; Cushman, Arthur; Randazzo, Philip

    1991-04-01

    Due to a shortage of very high frequency (VHF) communications frequencies, the FAA must use the same frequencies in different airspaces across the country. The geographical separation between ground transmitters is engineered to provide a desired signal that is at least 14 decibel (dB) above any co-channel signal the receiver may receive. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recommends a greater 20-dB separation. This difference between the two signals is known as the desired to undesired (D/U) ratio. Tests performed on eight avionics receivers at the FAA Technical Center to compare receiver performance when exposed to 14- and 20-dB co-channel interference are described. It was concluded that at both D/U ratios, the receiver was able to reproduce clear, audible, and intelligible speech at both D/U ratios.

  3. Photoacoustic correlation signal-to-noise ratio enhancement by coherent averaging and optical waveform optimization.

    PubMed

    Telenkov, Sergey A; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of biological tissues using laser diodes instead of conventional Q-switched pulsed systems provides an attractive alternative for biomedical applications. However, the relatively low energy of laser diodes operating in the pulsed regime, results in generation of very weak acoustic waves, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the detected signals. This problem can be addressed if optical excitation is modulated using custom waveforms and correlation processing is employed to increase SNR through signal compression. This work investigates the effect of the parameters of the modulation waveform on the resulting correlation signal and offers a practical means for optimizing PA signal detection. The advantage of coherent signal averaging is demonstrated using theoretical analysis and a numerical model of PA generation. It was shown that an additional 5-10 dB of SNR can be gained through waveform engineering by adjusting the parameters and profile of optical modulation waveforms.

  4. Possible breakthrough: Significant improvement of signal to noise ratio by stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, L. B.

    1996-06-01

    The simplest stochastic resonator is used, a level crossing detector (LCD), to investigate key properties of stochastic resonance (SR). It is pointed out that successful signal processing and biological applications of SR require to work in the large signal limit (nonlinear transfer limit) which requires a completely new approach: wide band input signal and a new, generalised definition of output noise. The new way of approach is illustrated by a new arrangement. The arrangement employs a special LCD, white input noise and a special, large, subthreshold wide band signal. First time in the history of SR (for a wide band input noise), the signal to noise ratio becomes much higher at the output of a stochastic resonator than at its input. In that way, SR is proven to have a potential to improve signal transfer. Note, that the new arrangement seems to have resemblance to neurone models, therefore, it has a potential also for biological applications.

  5. Automatic computation of signal-to-noise ratio for magnetic resonances images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. F.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    An automatic method to measure the signal-to-noise ratio of images is proposed. The region of interest in a phantom image is reliably determined by the image contour by the Sobel operator. With these data, the signal-to-noise ratio was computed using two phantom images. Results showed very good agreement with those reported in the literature. This scheme can be implemented in line to save a great deal of effort and time when assessing the performance of RF coils, B0 uniformity, image quality, etc.

  6. Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum. A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR Payam Yeganeh, Mohammad H. Moradi, Ali Reshad...Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, AMIR KABIR University of Technology Abstract- Bispectrum has been widely used to enhance the SNR . This is based...consider the use of Bispectrum techniques when repeated measurements are made of a deterministic signal embedded in random noise where SNR is in the

  7. The effect of digitisation on the signal-to-noise ratio of a pulsed radio signal} of a pulsed radio signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenhoven, M. L. A.; Voûte, J. L. L.

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the effect of digitisation on the signal-to-noise ratio of pulsed radio signals. We describe a general n-bit digitiser and show that a symmetric and equidistant digitiser has two free parameters: the threshold and the output value. We derive the best choice of these values for a 1, 1.5, 2, 4 and 8-bit digitiser and calculate the signal-to-noise ratio after digitisation of an undetected signal and of a detected signal with a Gaussian or a chi 2-distribution. Measurements made using PuMa, the new digital pulsar machine at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, are presented and are shown to agree with the theoretical response of the digitiser.

  8. Precision limits of lock-in amplifiers below unity signal-to-noise ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, G.T.; Allison, S.W.

    1986-02-01

    An investigation of noise-related performance limits of commercial-grade lock-in amplifiers has been carried out. The dependence of the output measurement error on the input signal-to-noise ratio was established in each case and measurements of noise-related gain variations were made.

  9. Log-ratio signal-processing technique for beam position monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.E.

    1993-02-01

    Two basic signal-processing techniques are presently in wide use for the processing of signals from beam position monitors (BPMs); difference-over-sum, and amplitude-modulation-to-phase-modulation (AM-PM) conversion. Difference-over-sum offers simplicity and low cost, but poor real-time normalized response and amplitude dynamic range. AM-PM offers fast real-time response and large dynamic range, but is costly and difficult to implement. Logarithmic-ratio processing, a technique using newly available inexpensive hybrid circuits, appears to offer the advantages of both, and the disadvantages of neither. This paper reviews the features techniques, and highlights the features of the log-ratio technique. Among the advantages of log-ratio is a beam-displacement response linearity that is superior to either difference-over-sum or AM-PM for circular-aperture BPMs.

  10. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  11. A sub-grouping methodology and non-parametric sequential ratio test for signal validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chenggang

    2002-09-01

    On-line signal validation is essential for safe and economic operations of a complicated industrial system such as a nuclear power plant. Various signal validation methods based on empirical signal estimation have been developed and successfully used. The first part of the thesis addresses a common and unavoidable problem for these methods---fault propagation, which causes false identification of healthy signals as faulty ones because of the faults existing in other signals. This effect is especially serious when faults occur in multiple signals and/or during system transient. A sub-grouping technique is presented in the thesis to prevent the effect of fault propagation in general signal validation methods. Specifically, two methods, Subgroups Consistency Check (SCC) and Subgroups Voting (SV), are developed. Their effectiveness is demonstrated by using a well-known Multivariate State Estimation technique (MSET) as a general method of signal estimation. To further improve the performance of MSET estimation, a procedure called Feedback Once (FBO) is also developed. All these new methods are tested and compared with MSET by using real transient data from a reactor startup process in a nuclear power plant. The results show that false identification of signals caused by fault propagation is significantly reduced by the two sub-grouping methods and the FBO method is able to improve the performance of MSET estimation to some extent. The results demonstrate that implementation of these new methods can lead to an improved signal validation technique that remains effective even when faults occur in multiple signals during system transients. The other major contribution is on the improvement of statistical test used for signal validation. Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) is a popular method that has been widely used in many signal validation methods. However, the assumption of SPRT is too stringent to satisfy in practice, which may cause the false identification rate

  12. Zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test for drug safety signal detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Zheng, Dan; Zalkikar, Jyoti; Tiwari, Ram

    2017-02-01

    In recent decades, numerous methods have been developed for data mining of large drug safety databases, such as Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Adverse Event Reporting System, where data matrices are formed by drugs such as columns and adverse events as rows. Often, a large number of cells in these data matrices have zero cell counts and some of them are "true zeros" indicating that the drug-adverse event pairs cannot occur, and these zero counts are distinguished from the other zero counts that are modeled zero counts and simply indicate that the drug-adverse event pairs have not occurred yet or have not been reported yet. In this paper, a zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test method is proposed to identify drug-adverse event pairs that have disproportionately high reporting rates, which are also called signals. The maximum likelihood estimates of the model parameters of zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test are obtained using the expectation and maximization algorithm. The zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test is also modified to handle the stratified analyses for binary and categorical covariates (e.g. gender and age) in the data. The proposed zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test method is shown to asymptotically control the type I error and false discovery rate, and its finite sample performance for signal detection is evaluated through a simulation study. The simulation results show that the zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test method performs similar to Poisson model based likelihood ratio test method when the estimated percentage of true zeros in the database is small. Both the zero-inflated Poisson model based likelihood ratio test and likelihood ratio test methods are applied to six selected drugs, from the 2006 to 2011 Adverse Event Reporting System database, with varying percentages of observed zero-count cells.

  13. IMPROVING DISPLACEMENT SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO FOR LOW-SIGNAL RADIATION FORCE ELASTICITY IMAGING USING BAYESIAN TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Douglas M.; Walsh, Kristy M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation force-based elasticity imaging is currently being investigated as a possible diagnostic modality for a number of clinical tasks, including liver fibrosis staging and the characterization of cardiovascular tissue. In this study, we evaluate the relationship between peak displacement magnitude and image quality and propose using a Bayesian estimator to overcome the challenge of obtaining viable data in low displacement signal environments. Displacement data quality were quantified for two common radiation force-based applications, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, which measures the displacement within the region of excitation, and shear wave elasticity imaging, which measures displacements outside the region of excitation. Performance as a function of peak displacement magnitude for acoustic radiation force impulse imaging was assessed in simulations and lesion phantoms by quantifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio for varying peak displacement magnitudes. Overall performance for shear wave elasticity imaging was assessed in ex vivo chicken breast samples by measuring the displacement SNR as a function of distance from the excitation source. The results show that for any given displacement magnitude level, the Bayesian estimator can increase the SNR by approximately 9 dB over normalized cross-correlation and the contrast-to-noise ratio by a factor of two. We conclude from the results that a Bayesian estimator may be useful for increasing data quality in SNR-limited imaging environments. PMID:27157861

  14. Investigation into the common mode rejection ratio of the physiological signal conditioner circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of the single operational amplifier (op amp) differential amplifier and of the three operational amplifier differential amplifier was investigated. The three op amp differential amplifier circuit is used in the signal conditioner circuit which amplifies signals such as the electromyograph or electrocardiogram. The investigation confirmed via SPICE modeling what has been observed by others in the recent literature that the CMRR for the circuit can be maximized without precision resistor values or precisely matched op amps. This can be done if one resistor in the final stage can be adjusted either by a potentiometer or by laser trimming in the case of hybrid circuit fabrication.

  15. Wavelet package frequency-band energy ratios of human EEG signals in sleeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Han, Qingpeng; Wang, Ping; Wen, Bangchun

    2005-12-01

    Human EEG (Electroencephalogram) signals, including 4 rhythms i.e. δ, θ, α, β, are typically nonlinear. They just coincide with different human sleeping states. The wavelet package decomposition and reconstruction techniques are firstly introduced in order to analyze the nonlinear EEG. A 6 level decomposition of EEG was achieved with "db20" as the mother wavelet, and the above 4 rhythms were combined with specialized 8 frequency sub-bands obtained in wavelet package transform. The four frequency band energy ratios, with normalized values, were calculated from the reconstructed signals. These frequency band energy ratios are used as quantify estimation indexes for human sleeping states. The experimental results confirm the proposed method to be effective.

  16. Note: One order of magnitude better signal-to-noise ratio for neutron backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    We report on a new achievement which allows increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of reactor backscattering spectrometers by more than one order of magnitude by sacrificing at most 50% of the count rate. This method was recently tested on the backscattering instrument IN16B at ILL, where signal-to-noise ratios of more than 10 000 for standard samples and up to 40 000 for strong scatterers were measured with only 37% reduction in intensity. The described method is applicable at any reactor backscattering spectrometer equipped with a so-called background chopper which can optionally function as a pulse suppression chopper and presents a major advancement for high energy resolution spectroscopy with neutrons.

  17. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Prediction and Validation for Space Shuttle GPS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Adkins, Antha A.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Brown, Lisa C.; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2002-01-01

    A deterministic method for Space Station Global Positioning System (GPS) Signal-To- Noise Ratio (SNR) predictions is proposed. The complex electromagnetic interactions between GPS antennas and surrounding Space Station structures are taken into account by computational electromagnetic technique. This computer simulator is capable of taking into account multipath effects from dynamically changed solar panels and thermal radiators. A comparison with recent collected Space Station GPS system flight experiment data is presented. The simulation results are in close agreement with flight data.

  18. Signal-To-Noise Ratio Considerations in Modified Matched Spatial Filters,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    General expressions are derived for the degradation in the signal to noise ratio ( SNR ) as a function of rotation and scale distortions for modified...demonstrate the effects of training set size, input noise level, and image space bandwidth product (SBWP) on the resulting SNR . The SNR for distorted input...images is shown to improve, whereas the SNR for undistorted inputs degrades, as the number of training set images is increased. If the number of training

  19. Optical signal to noise ratio monitoring using variable phase difference phase portrait with software synchronization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Yu, Changyuan

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, a novel optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) monitoring method using 2-dimension (2-D) phase portrait is proposed and demonstrated, which is generated by using a single low-speed sampling channel with software synchronization technique. Moreover, variable phase difference is proposed to generate the X-Y pairs, which increases the tolerance of synchronization accuracy significantly. This method is a cost effective solution with simple system setup.

  20. Use of polarization to improve signal to clutter ratio in an outdoor active imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontoura, Patrick F.; Giles, Michael K.; Padilla, Denise D.

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the methodology and presents the results of the design of a polarization-sensitive system used to increase the signal-to-clutter ratio in a robust outdoor structured lighting sensor that uses standard CCD camera technology. This lighting sensor is intended to be used on an autonomous vehicle, looking down to the ground and horizontal to obstacles in an 8 foot range. The kinds of surfaces to be imaged are natural and man-made, such as asphalt, concrete, dirt and grass. The main problem for an outdoor eye-safe laser imaging system is that the reflected energy from background clutter tends to be brighter than the reflected laser energy. A narrow-band optical filter does not reduce significantly the background clutter in bright sunlight, and problems also occur when the surface is highly absorptive, like asphalt. Therefore, most of applications are limited to indoor and controlled outdoor conditions. A series of measurements was made for each of the materials studied in order to find the best configuration for the polarizing system and also to find out the potential improvement in the signal-to-clutter ratio (STC). This process was divided into three parts: characterization of the reflected sunlight, characterization of the reflected laser light, and measurement of the improvement in the STC. The results show that by using polarization properties it is possible to design an optical system that is able to increase the signal-to-clutter ratio from approximately 30% to 100% in the imaging system, depending on the kind of surface and on the incidence angle of the sunlight. The technique was also analyzed for indoor use, with the background clutter being the room illumination. For this specific case, polarization did not improve the signal-to-clutter ratio.

  1. Approximate expression to estimate signal-to-noise ratio improvement in cylindrical near-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeu, Jordi; Jofre, Lluis; Cardama, Angel

    1994-07-01

    A very simple approximate expression for the process gain (PG) for the cylindrical case is derived. The different approximations and assumptions required to obtain this expression are shown. This expression might be useful for most practical cylindrical near-field measurements, providing a very simple mean to assess the near-field dynamic range requirements to obtain a desired far-field signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  2. Can persistence hunting signal male quality? A test considering digit ratio in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Longman, Daniel; Wells, Jonathan C K; Stock, Jay T

    2015-01-01

    Various theories have been posed to explain the fitness payoffs of hunting success among hunter-gatherers. 'Having' theories refer to the acquisition of resources, and include the direct provisioning hypothesis. In contrast, 'getting' theories concern the signalling of male resourcefulness and other desirable traits, such as athleticism and intelligence, via hunting prowess. We investigated the association between androgenisation and endurance running ability as a potential signalling mechanism, whereby running prowess, vital for persistence hunting, might be used as a reliable signal of male reproductive fitness by females. Digit ratio (2D:4D) was used as a proxy for prenatal androgenisation in 439 males and 103 females, while a half marathon race (21km), representing a distance/duration comparable with that of persistence hunting, was used to assess running ability. Digit ratio was significantly and positively correlated with half-marathon time in males (right hand: r = 0.45, p<0.001; left hand: r = 0.42, p<0.001) and females (right hand: r = 0.26, p<0.01; left hand: r = 0.23, p = 0.02). Sex-interaction analysis showed that this correlation was significantly stronger in males than females, suggesting that androgenisation may have experienced stronger selective pressure from endurance running in males. As digit ratio has previously been shown to predict reproductive success, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that endurance running ability may signal reproductive potential in males, through its association with prenatal androgen exposure. However, further work is required to establish whether and how females respond to this signalling for fitness.

  3. Signal to noise ratio in water balance maps with different resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ziqi; Gottschalk, Lars; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-12-01

    What is the best resolution of annual water balance maps for a correct balance between the basic spatial signal in the observations of precipitation, actual evapotranspiration and runoff across a larger drainage basin and the error in estimates for grid cells in the map to avoid giving a false impression of accuracy? To answer this question an approach based a signal to noise ratio is proposed, which allows finding the optimal resolution maximizing the signal in the map. The approach is demonstrated on gauge data in the Huai River Basin, China. Stochastic interpolation methods were applied to create grid maps of long-term mean values, as well as for estimating variances of the three water balance components in a range of scales from 5 × 5 km to 200 × 200 km2 grid cells. Interpolation algorithms using covariances of long-term means of data with different spatial support were developed. The identified optimal resolutions by the signal to noise ratio appeared to be very different - 10 × 10, 50 × 50, and 30 × 30 km2 for precipitation, actual evapotranspiration, and runoff, respectively. These values are directly linked to the observation network densities. The magnitude of the signal to noise ratio shows similar strong differences with values 34, 3.7, and 5.4, respectively. It gives a direct indication of the reliability of the map, which can be considered as satisfactory only for precipitation for the data available for the present study. The critical factors for this magnitude are parameters characterising the spatial covariance in data and the network density.

  4. Can Persistence Hunting Signal Male Quality? A Test Considering Digit Ratio in Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Longman, Daniel; Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Stock, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Various theories have been posed to explain the fitness payoffs of hunting success among hunter-gatherers. ‘Having’ theories refer to the acquisition of resources, and include the direct provisioning hypothesis. In contrast, ‘getting’ theories concern the signalling of male resourcefulness and other desirable traits, such as athleticism and intelligence, via hunting prowess. We investigated the association between androgenisation and endurance running ability as a potential signalling mechanism, whereby running prowess, vital for persistence hunting, might be used as a reliable signal of male reproductive fitness by females. Digit ratio (2D:4D) was used as a proxy for prenatal androgenisation in 439 males and 103 females, while a half marathon race (21km), representing a distance/duration comparable with that of persistence hunting, was used to assess running ability. Digit ratio was significantly and positively correlated with half-marathon time in males (right hand: r = 0.45, p<0.001; left hand: r = 0.42, p<0.001) and females (right hand: r = 0.26, p<0.01; left hand: r = 0.23, p = 0.02). Sex-interaction analysis showed that this correlation was significantly stronger in males than females, suggesting that androgenisation may have experienced stronger selective pressure from endurance running in males. As digit ratio has previously been shown to predict reproductive success, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that endurance running ability may signal reproductive potential in males, through its association with prenatal androgen exposure. However, further work is required to establish whether and how females respond to this signalling for fitness. PMID:25853679

  5. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of marine seismic data: A case study from offshore Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyoun; Jang, Seonghyung

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface imaging is difficult without removing the multiples intrinsic to most marine seismic data. Choosing the right multiple suppression method when working with marine data depends on the type of multiples and sometimes involves trial and error. A major amount of multiple energy in seismic data is related to the large reflectivity of the surface. Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is effective for suppressing free-surface-related multiples. Although SRME has some limitations, it is widely used because it requires no assumptions about the subsurface velocities, positions, and reflection coefficients of the reflector causing the multiples. The common reflector surface (CRS) stacking technique uses CRS reflectors rather than common mid-point (CMP) reflectors. It stacks more traces than conventional stacking methods and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The purpose of this study is to address a process issue for multiple suppression with SRME and Radon filtering, and to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by using CRS stacking on seismic data from the eastern continental margin of Korea. To remove free surface multiples, SRME and Radon filtering are applied to attenuate the interbed multiples. Results obtained using synthetic data and field data show that the combination of SRME and Radon filtering is effective for suppressing free-surface multiples and peg-leg multiples. Applying CRS stacking to seismic data in which multiples have been eliminated increases the signal-to-noise ratio for the area examined, which is being considered for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

  6. Possible breakthrough: Significant improvement of signal to noise ratio by stochastic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, L.B.

    1996-06-01

    The {ital simplest} {ital stochastic} {ital resonator} {ital is} {ital used}, {ital a} {ital level} {ital crossing} {ital detector} (LCD), to investigate key properties of stochastic resonance (SR). It is pointed out that successful signal processing and biological applications of SR require to work in the {ital large} {ital signal} {ital limit} (nonlinear transfer limit) which requires a completely new approach: {ital wide} {ital band} {ital input} {ital signal} and a {ital new}, {ital generalised} {ital definition} {ital of} {ital output} {ital noise}. The new way of approach is illustrated by a new arrangement. The arrangement employs a special LCD, white input noise and a special, large, subthreshold wide band signal. {ital First} {ital time} {ital in} {ital the} {ital history} {ital of} {ital SR} (for a wide band input noise), the {ital signal} {ital to} {ital noise} {ital ratio} {ital becomes} {ital much} {ital higher} {ital at} {ital the} {ital output} of a stochastic resonator than {ital at} {ital its} {ital input}. In that way, SR is proven to have a potential to improve signal transfer. Note, that the new arrangement seems to have resemblance to {ital neurone} {ital models}, therefore, it has a potential also for biological applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Symbol signal-to-noise ratio loss in square-wave subcarrier downconversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the simulated results of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss in the process of a square-wave subcarrier down conversion. In a previous article, the SNR degradation was evaluated at the output of the down converter based on the signal and noise power change. Unlike in the previous article, the SNR loss is defined here as the difference between the actual and theoretical symbol SNR's for the same symbol-error rate at the output of the symbol matched filter. The results show that an average SNR loss of 0.3 dB can be achieved with tenth-order infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. This loss is a 0.2-dB increase over the SNR degradation in the previous analysis where neither the signal distortion nor the symbol detector was considered.

  8. Signal-to-noise ratio of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode single-photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2014-08-01

    Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) use the avalanche mechanism of semiconductors to amplify signals in individual pixels. With proper thresholding, a pixel will be either "on" (avalanching) or "off." This discrete detection scheme eliminates read noise, which makes these devices capable of counting single photons. Using these detectors for imaging applications requires a well-developed and comprehensive expression for the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper derives the expected SNR of a GM-APD detector in gated operation based on gate length, number of samples, signal flux, dark count rate, photon detection efficiency, and afterpulsing probability. To verify the theoretical results, carrier-level Monte Carlo simulation results are compared to the derived equations and found to be in good agreement.

  9. Noise reduction and signal-to-noise ratio improvement of atomic magnetometers with optical gradiometer configurations.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Keigo; Ito, Yosuke; Ichihara, Sunao; Mizutani, Natsuhiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-03-09

    In the field of biomagnetic measurement, optically-pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have attracted significant attention. With the improvement of signal response and the reduction of sensor noise, the sensitivity of OPAMs is limited mainly by environmental magnetic noise. To reduce this magnetic noise, we developed the optical gradiometer, in which the differential output of two distinct measurement areas inside a glass cell was obtained directly via the magneto-optical rotation of one probe beam. When operating in appropriate conditions, the sensitivity was improved by the differential measurement of the optical gradiometer. In addition, measurements of the pseudo-magnetic noise and signal showed the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio. These results demonstrate the feasibility of our optical gradiometer as an efficient method for reducing the magnetic noise.

  10. A stochastic resonator is able to greatly improve signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loerincz, K.; Gingl, Z.; Kiss, L. B.

    1996-02-01

    After a decade of doubts, for the first time in the history of stochastic resonance (SR), we demonstrate that a simple stochastic resonator does greatly improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a periodic signal with additive Gaussian noise. The particular stochastic resonator is a level-crossing detector (LCD) driven by the sum of a periodic spike train signal and a band-limited Gaussian white noise. To reach the improvement of the SNR, the stochastic resonator has to work in the strongly nonlinear response limit and the noise has to have a high cut-off frequency compared to the reciprocal duration of the spikes. We demonstrate by analog and computer simulations that the SNR gain goes beyond four orders of magnitude at practical conditions. These findings get a particular importance due the fact that simplest neurone models behave very similarly to our arrangement, so the results might have direct applications in neural systems.

  11. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-01-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  12. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-10-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  13. The use of air fuel cell cathodes to remove contaminants from spent chromium plating solutions.

    PubMed

    Huang, K L; Holsen, T M; Chou, T C; Yang, M C

    2004-01-01

    Results from experiments using an impregnation-reduction (I-R) Pt / Nafion membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in an air fuel cell cathode to remove contaminants (Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(III)) from spent chromium electroplating baths are presented in this study. A platinum-carbon (Pt-C) / Nafion MEA and a Pb planar cathode were also used for comparison. The average removal rates of Cu(II) and Ni(II) were almost the same (0.39 and 0.40 mM hr(-1) (or 0.117 and 0.12 mmol hr(-1)), respectively) but higher than that of Fe(III) (0.16 mM hr(-1), or 0.048 mmol hr(-1)) in accordance with the Nernst-Planck flux equation. The removal rates for the same cation were independent of the cathode used. The average removal rate of each impurity was approximately proportional to the product of its initial concentration and separator area/anolyte volume ratio using Pb cathodes. Under constant current conditions the system using the Pt-C / Nafion cathode needed the highest cell voltage, about 3 V more than needed for the system with the Pt / Nafion cathode. The cell voltage required using the Pt / Nafion cathode was similar to that using the conventional planar Pb cathode. Analyses of cathode deposits by SEM/EDS and XPS techniques indicated they were minimal on the Pb and Pt / Nafion cathode and more apparent on the Pt-C / Nafion cathode. The primary deposits on the Pb cathode were chromium oxides (e.g., Cr2O3) with minor amount of lead chromate (lead dichromate or lead trichromate) and other chromium solids (Cr black). As expected, the dominant deposit on the lead anode surface was PbO2.

  14. Dye screening and signal-to-noise ratio for retrogradely transported voltage-sensitive dyes.

    PubMed

    Tsau, Y; Wenner, P; O'Donovan, M J; Cohen, L B; Loew, L M; Wuskell, J P

    1996-12-28

    Using a novel method for retrogradely labeling specific neuronal populations, we tested different styryl dyes in attempt to find dyes whose staining would be specific, rapid, and lead to large activity dependent signals. The dyes were injected into the ventral roots of the isolated chick spinal cord from embryos at days E9-E12. The voltage-sensitive dye signals were recorded from synaptically activated motoneurons using a 464 element photodiode array. The best labeling and optical signals were obtained using the relatively hydrophobic dyes di-8-ANEPPQ and di-12-ANEPEQ. Over the 24 h period we examined, these dyes bound specifically to the cells with axons in the ventral roots. The dyes responded with an increase in fluorescence of 1-3% (delta F/F) in response to synaptic depolarization of the motoneurons. The signal-to-noise ratio obtained in a single trial from a detector that received light from a 14 x 14 microns2 area of the motoneuron population was about 10:1. Nonetheless, signals on neighboring diodes were similar, suggesting that we were not detecting the activity of individual neurons. Retrograde labeling and optical recording with voltage-sensitive dyes provides a means for monitoring the activity of identified neurons in situations where microelectrode recordings are not feasible.

  15. Analog-digital conversion signal-to-noise ratio analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Zheng, Cheng; Yao, Xianxun; Yang, Baohua; Shang, Xiaozhou; Miao, Jungang

    2014-01-01

    A nontrivial analog-digital conversion (ADC) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis for synthetic aperture interferometric radiometers for microwave remote sensing is presented. Correlation uncertainty is a key issue in the digital processing of radiometric signals. The ADC digitizes the analog intermediate frequency signal to perform digital correlations, hence the ADC noise is critical for radiometric performance, but this effect has lacked sufficient analysis. First, the ADC SNR requirement is drawn, and ADC SNR degradation is attributed to input noise, quantization noise, and sampling jitter. Second, it is proved that the input and the quantization noise have negligible effects on visibility uncertainty. Third, it is shown that the sampling jitter should be stringently controlled by Gaussian noise digitization SNR requirement. The sampling clock jitter is the dominant contributor in jitter caused SNR, and is evaluated by the long-term statistical time interval error jitter. Finally, the sampling jitter, the realized ADC SNR ratio and visibility uncertainties are tested on BHU-2D-U radiometer to verify the demonstrations. The analysis results can be used as a guideline in the digital correlation design of polarimetric or synthetic aperture radiometric systems.

  16. Normal-hearing listener preferences of music as a function of signal-to-noise-ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jillian G.

    2005-04-01

    Optimal signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for speech discrimination are well-known, well-documented phenomena. Discrimination preferences and functions have been studied for both normal-hearing and hard-of-hearing populations, and information from these studies has provided clearer indices on additional factors affecting speech discrimination ability and SNR preferences. This knowledge lends itself to improvements in hearing aids and amplification devices, telephones, television and radio transmissions, and a wide arena of recorded media such as movies and music. This investigation was designed to identify the preferred signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of normal-hearing listeners in a musical setting. The signal was the singer's voice, and music was considered the background. Subjects listened to an unfamiliar ballad with a female singer, and rated seven different SBR treatments. When listening to melodic motifs with linguistic content, results indicated subjects preferred SBRs similar to those in conventional speech discrimination applications. However, unlike traditional speech discrimination studies, subjects did not prefer increased levels of SBR. Additionally, subjects had a much larger acceptable range of SBR in melodic motifs where the singer's voice was not intended to communicate via linguistic means, but by the pseudo-paralinguistic means of vocal timbre and harmonic arrangements. Results indicate further studies investigating perception of singing are warranted.

  17. The concept of signal-to-noise ratio in the modulation domain and speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Dubbelboer, Finn; Houtgast, Tammo

    2008-12-01

    A new concept is proposed that relates to intelligibility of speech in noise. The concept combines traditional estimations of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) with elements from the modulation transfer function model, which results in the definition of the signal-to-noise ratio in the modulation domain: the (SN)(mod). It is argued that this (SN)(mod), quantifying the strength of speech modulations relative to a floor of spurious modulations arising from the speech-noise interaction, is the key factor in relation to speech intelligibility. It is shown that, by using a specific test signal, the strength of these spurious modulations can be measured, allowing an estimation of the (SN)(mod) for various conditions of additive noise, noise suppression, and amplitude compression. By relating these results to intelligibility data for these same conditions, the relevance of the (SN)(mod) as the key factor underlying speech intelligibility is clearly illustrated. For instance, it is shown that the commonly observed limited effect of noise suppression on speech intelligibility is correctly "predicted" by the (SN)(mod), whereas traditional measures such as the speech transmission index, considering only the changes in the speech modulations, fall short in this respect. It is argued that (SN)(mod) may provide a relevant tool in the design of successful noise-suppression systems.

  18. Estimation of LDA signal frequency using the autocovariance (ACV) lag ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matovic, D.; Tropea, C.

    1989-08-01

    An algorithm to realize the ACV lag ratio method is introduced and applied to real Doppler signals as acquired using a transient recorder, and processed on a digital computer. Measurements using other time domain and frequency domain estimation techniques are also performed on the same data sets and compared using basic statistical parameters. Results are presented for comparisons with an estimate based on the power spectral density, since the time domain estimates investigated are unable to achieve meaningful results for signals with high noise content. The prospects of implementing the ACV lag ratio method in a dedicated processor are discussed and the potential advantages of such a processor are summarized. For applications in phase/Doppler anemometry, the cross-correlation of the two Doppler signals rather than the autocorrelation can be computed without having to modify the algorithm for frequency determination. Once the frequency is known, the phase difference can be immediately computed by examining the shift of the cross-correlation function maximum away from lag time zero. Thus both particle velocity and size can be recovered with no additional computation.

  19. Enhancing scatterometry CD signal-to-noise ratio for 1x logic and memory challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, Derrick; Krishnan, Shankar; Wei, Lanhua; Shchegrov, Andrei V.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing transition from 2D to 3D structures in logic and memory has led to an increased adoption of scatterometry CD (SCD) for inline metrology. However, shrinking device dimensions in logic and high aspect ratios in memory represent primary challenges for SCD and require a significant breakthrough in improving signal-to-noise performance. We present a report on the new generation of SCD technology, enabled by a new laser-driven plasma source. The developed light source provides several key advantages over conventional arc lamps typically used in SCD applications. The plasma color temperature of the laser driven source is considerably higher than available with arc lamps resulting in >5X increase in radiance in the visible and >10X increase in radiance in the DUV when compared to sources on previous generation SCD tools while maintaining or improving source intensity noise. This high radiance across such a broad spectrum allows for the use of a single light source from 190-1700nm. When combined with other optical design changes, the higher source radiance enables reduction of measurement box size of our spectroscopic ellipsometer from 45×45um box to 25×25um box without compromising signal to noise ratio. The benefits for 1×nm SCD metrology of the additional photons across the DUV to IR spectrum have been found to be greater than the increase in source signal to noise ratio would suggest. Better light penetration in Si and poly-Si has resulted in improved sensitivity and correlation breaking for critical parameters in 1xnm FinFET and HAR flash memory structures.

  20. Effect of range sidelobe reduction on signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, K. M. M.

    It is well-known that the matched-filter waveform associated with the linear FM pulse-compression signal essentially has a (sin x)/x shape, with time or range sidelobes extending on either side of the compressed pulse. These Doppler sidelobes may be partially controlled by varying the amplitudes of the pulses upon transmission and/or reception. However, this reduces the signal-to-noise ratio and range resolution under peak power limitation. In this paper, general expressions are given for the loss factor for the three cases considered and numerical results are presented for the physically realizable weighting functions having excellent characteristics. General weighting function data are also included.

  1. A complex symbol signal-to-noise ratio estimator and its performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents an algorithm for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals that contain data on a downconverted suppressed carrier or the first harmonic of a square-wave subcarrier. This algorithm can be used to determine the performance of the full-spectrum combiner for the Galileo S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) mission by measuring the input and output symbol SNR. A performance analysis of the algorithm shows that the estimator can estimate the complex symbol SNR using 10,000 symbols at a true symbol SNR of -5 dB with a mean of -4.9985 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2454 dB, and these analytical results are checked by simulations of 100 runs with a mean of -5.06 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2506 dB.

  2. Degradation of signal-to-noise ratio due to amplitude distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Shahshahani, Mehrdad; Hurd, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of filtering on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a coherently demodulated band-limited signal is determined in the presence of worst-case amplitude ripple. The problem is formulated as an optimizaton in the Hilbert space L2. The form of the worst-case amplitude ripple is specified, and the degradation in the SNR is derived in closed form. It is shown that, when the maximum passband amplitude ripple is 2Delta (peak-to-peak), the SNR is degraded by at most (1-Delta-squared), even when the ripple is unknown or uncompensated. For example, an SNR loss of less than 0.01 dB due to amplitude ripple can be assured by keeping the amplitude ripple under 0.42 dB.

  3. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  4. Calculation of mutual information for nonlinear communication channel at large signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, I. S.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    Using the path-integral technique we examine the mutual information for the communication channel modeled by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with additive Gaussian noise. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation is one of the fundamental models in nonlinear physics, and it has a broad range of applications, including fiber optical communications—the backbone of the internet. At large signal-to-noise ratio we present the mutual information through the path-integral, which is convenient for the perturbative expansion in nonlinearity. In the limit of small noise and small nonlinearity we derive analytically the first nonzero nonlinear correction to the mutual information for the channel.

  5. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz-1 cm-1). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  6. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimations for a Volcanic ASH Detection Lidar. Case Study: The Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoussis, George; Adam, Mariana; Avdikos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we calculate the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating under Met Office organization. The methodology for the accurate estimation is presented for day and nighttime conditions. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for both nighttime and daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and proves that such system is able to detect volcanic ash over a range of 20 km.

  7. Real-time Signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR) Estimation for BPSK and QPSK Modulation Using the Active Communications Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and apparatus for estimating signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of a composite input signal e(t) on a phase modulated (e.g., BPSK) communications link. A first demodulator receives the composite input signal and a stable carrier signal and outputs an in-phase output signal; a second demodulator receives the composite input signal and a phase-shifted version of the carrier signal and outputs a quadrature-phase output signal; and phase error theta(sub E)(t) contained within the composite input signal e(t) is calculated from the outputs of the first and second demodulators. A time series of statistically independent phase error measurements theta(sub E)(t(sub 1)), theta (sub E)(t(sub 2)),..., theta (sub E)(t(sub k)) is obtained from the composite input signal subtending a time interval delta t = t(sub k) - t(sub 1) whose value is small enough such that gamma(t) and sigma(t) can be taken to be constant in delta t. A biased estimate gamma(sup *) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma if the composite input signal is calculated using maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques, and an unbiased estimate gamma(sup ^) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of the composite input signal is determined from the biased estimate gamma(sup *), such as by use of a look-up table.

  8. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratios in frog hearing can be achieved through amplitude death

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    In the ear, hair cells transform mechanical stimuli into neuronal signals with great sensitivity, relying on certain active processes. Individual hair cell bundles of non-mammals such as frogs and turtles are known to show spontaneous oscillation. However, hair bundles in vivo must be quiet in the absence of stimuli, otherwise the signal is drowned in intrinsic noise. Thus, a certain mechanism is required in order to suppress intrinsic noise. Here, through a model study of elastically coupled hair bundles of bullfrog sacculi, we show that a low stimulus threshold and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved through the amplitude death phenomenon (the cessation of spontaneous oscillations by coupling). This phenomenon occurs only when the coupled hair bundles have inhomogeneous distribution, which is likely to be the case in biological systems. We show that the SNR has non-monotonic dependence on the mass of the overlying membrane, and find out that the SNR has maximum value in the region of amplitude death. The low threshold of stimulus through amplitude death may account for the experimentally observed high sensitivity of frog sacculi in detecting vibration. The hair bundles' amplitude death mechanism provides a smart engineering design for low-noise amplification. PMID:23883956

  9. Recovery of Raman spectra with low signal-to-noise ratio using Wiener estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Lin, Xiaoqian; Yuen, Clement; Padmanabhan, Saraswathi; Beuerman, Roger W; Liu, Quan

    2014-05-19

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-destructive technique for qualitatively and quantitatively characterizing materials. However, noise often obscures interesting Raman peaks due to the inherently weak Raman signal, especially in biological samples. In this study, we develop a method based on spectral reconstruction to recover Raman spectra with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The synthesis of narrow-band measurements from low-SNR Raman spectra eliminates the effect of noise by integrating the Raman signal along the wavenumber dimension, which is followed by spectral reconstruction based on Wiener estimation to recover the Raman spectrum with high spectral resolution. Non-negative principal components based filters are used in the synthesis to ensure that most variance contained in the original Raman measurements are retained. A total of 25 agar phantoms and 20 bacteria samples were measured and data were used to validate our method. Four commonly used de-noising methods in Raman spectroscopy, i.e. Savitzky-Golay (SG) algorithm, finite impulse response (FIR) filtration, wavelet transform and factor analysis, were also evaluated on the same set of data in addition to the proposed method for comparison. The proposed method showed the superior accuracy in the recovery of Raman spectra from measurements with extremely low SNR, compared with the four commonly used de-noising methods.

  10. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. An Investigation of Preliminary Feature Screening Using Signal-To-Noise Ratios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    Aptovd kvpnk &󈧏’,e DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITYL) AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio AFIT/GOR...USING SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIOS THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University...Variable 1 and Variable 2, and the second 60 0.7 0.6- 0.4 EU .0 0.4- 0 Epoc U) 0- 10 I N 1 10 r E 9- E-E E Epoch 151 0.8 0.7 w 0.4 S -I 0 2 0.3 o 0.2

  12. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  13. Worldwide Uncertainty Assessments of Ladar and Radar Signal-to-Noise Ratio Performance for Diverse Low Altitude Atmospheric Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    interrogation. Results are presented in the form of worldwide plots of notional signal to noise ratio. The ladar and 95 GHz system types exhibit similar SNR ...signal to noise ratio. The ladar and 95 GHz system types exhibit similar SNR performance for forward oblique clear air operation. 1.557 µm ladar...good to very good SNR performance for both oblique and vertical paths for both fog and stratus conditions. 1.1 HELEEOS Worldwide Seasonal, Diurnal

  14. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratio estimation for tropospheric lidar channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Barragan, Rubén; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    This works combines the fields of tropospheric lidar remote sensing and signal processing to come up with a robust signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimator apt for elastic and Raman channels. The estimator uses a combined low-pass / high-pass filtering scheme along with high-order statistics (kurtosis) to estimate the range-dependent signal and noise components with minimum distortion. While low-pass filtering is used to estimate the range-dependent signal level, high-pass filtering is used to estimate the noise component with minimum distortion. From this noise component estimate (a random realization) the noise level (e.g., variance) is computed as a function of range along with error bars. The minimum-distortion specification determines the optimal cut-off de-noising filter frequency and, in turn, the spatial resolution of the SNR estimation algorithm. The proposed SNR estimator has a much wider dynamic range of operation than well-known classic SNR estimation techniques, in which the SNR is directly computed from the mean and standard deviation of the measured noise-corrupted lidar signal along successive adjacent range intervals and where the spatial resolution is just a subjective input from the user's side. Aligned with ACTRIS (http://www.actris.net) WP on "optimization of the processing chain and Single-Calculus Chain (SCC)" the proposed topic is of application to assess lidar reception channel performance and confidence on the detected atmospheric morphology (e.g., cloud base and top, and location of aerosol layers). The SNR algorithm is tested against the classic SNR estimation approach using test-bed synthetic lidar data modelling the UPC multi-spectral lidar. Towards this end, the Nd:YAG UPC elastic-Raman lidar provides aerosol channels in the near-infrared (1064 nm), visible (532 nm), and ultra-violet (355 nm) as well as aerosol Raman and water-vapour channels with fairly varying SNR levels. The SNR estimator is also used to compare SNR levels between

  15. The Effect of Vegetation on Soil Moisture Retrievals from GPS Signal-to-Noise Ratio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, C. C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Zavorotny, V.

    2012-12-01

    GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR) is a method of environmental monitoring that relates changes in ground-reflected (multipath) GPS signals to changes in surface soil moisture and vegetative state for an area of approximately 1000 m2 surrounding a GPS antenna. GPS-IR operates as a bi-static radar: L2C frequency signals transmitted by GPS satellites and subsequent reflections (multipath) are measured by antennas at permanent GPS stations. Changes in multipath signals are seen in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) interferograms, which are recorded by the GPS receiver. Results from previous field studies have shown that shallow soil moisture can be estimated from SNR phase for bare soil conditions or when vegetation is sparse. Vegetation surrounding a GPS antenna affects the phase shift, amplitude, and frequency/apparent reflector height of SNR oscillations. Therefore, it is necessary to quantify the vegetation conditions, for example vegetation height or water content, that preclude retrieval of soil moisture estimates using GPS-IR. We use both field data and an electrodynamic model that simulates SNR interferograms for variable soil and vegetation conditions to: 1. Determine how changes in vegetation height, biomass, and water content affect GPS phase, amplitude, and apparent reflector height and 2. Quantify the amount of vegetation that obscures the soil moisture signal in SNR data. We report results for rangeland and agricultural sites. At the rangeland sites, vegetation water content only varies between 0 and 0.6 kg/m2. Both observed and simulated SNR data from these sites show that apparent reflector height is nearly constant. Therefore, SNR interferograms are strongly affected by permittivity at the soil surface, and thus soil moisture can be retrieved. Even though reflector height does not change, SNR phase shift and amplitude are affected by fluctuations in rangeland vegetation and must be accounted for in soil moisture retrievals. At several agricultural

  16. Critical ratios of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and masked signal duration.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christine

    2008-10-01

    This article examines the masking of a complex beluga vocalization by natural and anthropogenic noise. The call consisted of six 150 ms pulses exhibiting spectral peaks between 800 Hz and 8 kHz. Comparing the spectra and spectrograms of the call and noises at detection threshold showed that the animal did not hear the entire call at threshold. It only heard parts of the call in frequency and time. From the masked hearing thresholds in broadband continuous noises, critical ratios were computed. Fletcher critical bands were narrower than either 15 or 111 of an octave at the low frequencies of the call (<2 kHz), depending on which frequency the animal cued on. From the masked hearing thresholds in intermittent noises, the audible signal duration at detection threshold was computed. The intermittent noises differed in gap length, gap number, and masking, but the total audible signal duration at threshold was the same: 660 ms. This observation supports a multiple-looks model. The two amplitude modulated noises exhibited weaker masking than the unmodulated noises hinting at a comodulation masking release.

  17. Local Area Signal-to-Noise Ratio (LASNR) algorithm for Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, L; Fong, P; Glenn, S; Liebman, J

    2007-07-03

    Many automated image-based applications have need of finding small spots in a variably noisy image. For humans, it is relatively easy to distinguish objects from local surroundings no matter what else may be in the image. We attempt to capture this distinguishing capability computationally by calculating a measurement that estimates the strength of signal within an object versus the noise in its local neighborhood. First, we hypothesize various sizes for the object and corresponding background areas. Then, we compute the Local Area Signal to Noise Ratio (LASNR) at every pixel in the image, resulting in a new image with LASNR values for each pixel. All pixels exceeding a pre-selected LASNR value become seed pixels, or initiation points, and are grown to include the full area extent of the object. Since growing the seed is a separate operation from finding the seed, each object can be any size and shape. Thus, the overall process is a 2-stage segmentation method that first finds object seeds and then grows them to find the full extent of the object. This algorithm was designed, optimized and is in daily use for the accurate and rapid inspection of optics from a large laser system (National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA), which includes images with background noise, ghost reflections, different illumination and other sources of variation.

  18. Signal-to-background ratio preferences of normal-hearing listeners as a function of music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jillian Gallant

    The purpose of this study was to identify listeners' signal-to-background-ratio (SBR) preference levels for vocal music and to investigate whether or not SBR differences existed for different music genres. The ``signal'' was the singer's voice, and the ``background'' was the accompanying music. Three songs were each produced in two different genres (total of 6 genres represented). Each song was performed by three male and three female singers. Analyses addressed influences of musical genre, singing style, and singer timbre on listener's SBR choices. Fifty-three normal-hearing California State University of Northridge students ranging in age from 20-52 years participated as subjects. Subjects adjusted the overall music loudness to a comfortable listening level, and manipulated a second gain control which affected only the singer's voice. Subjects listened to 72 stimuli and adjusted the singer's voice to the level they felt sounded appropriate in comparison to the background music. Singer and Genre were the two primary contributors to significant differences in subject's SBR preferences, although the results clearly indicate Genre, Style and Singer interact in different combinations under different conditions. SBR differences for each song, each singer, and each subject did not occur in a predictable manner, and support the hypothesis that SBR preferences are neither fixed nor dependent merely upon music application or setting. Further investigations regarding psychoacoustical bases responsible for differences in SBR preferences are warranted.

  19. Paradoxical Effect of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of GRAPPA Calibration Lines: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Xue, Hui; Ahmad, Rizwan; Chang, Ti-chiun; Ting, Samuel T.; Simonetti, Orlando P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intuitively, GRAPPA auto-calibration signal (ACS) lines with higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may be expected to boost the accuracy of kernel estimation and increase the SNR of GRAPPA reconstructed images. Paradoxically, Sodickson and his colleagues pointed out that using ACS lines with high SNR may actually lead to lower SNR in the GRAPPA reconstructed images. A quantitative study of how the noise in the ACS lines affects the SNR of the GRAPPA reconstructed images is presented. Methods In a phantom, the singular values of the GRAPPA encoding matrix and the root-mean-square error of GRAPPA reconstruction were evaluated using multiple sets of ACS lines with variant SNR. In volunteers, ACS lines with high and low SNR were estimated, and the SNR of corresponding TGRAPPA reconstructed images was evaluated. Results We show that the condition number of the GRAPPA kernel estimation equations is proportional to the SNR of the ACS lines. In dynamic image series reconstructed with TGRAPPA, high SNR ACS lines result in reduced SNR if appropriate regularization is not applied. Conclusion Noise has a similar effect to Tikhonov regularization. Without appropriate regularization, a GRAPPA kernel estimated from ACS lines with higher SNR amplifies random noise in the GRAPPA reconstruction. PMID:25078425

  20. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Signal to noise ratio analysis of maximum length sequence deconvolution of overlapping evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Jorge; Ozdamar, Ozcan

    2006-05-01

    In this study a general formula for the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the maximum length sequence (MLS) deconvolution averaging is developed using the frequency domain framework of the generalized continuous loop averaging deconvolution procedure [Ozdamar and Bohórquez, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 429-438 (2006)]. This formulation takes advantage of the well known equivalency of energies in the time and frequency domains (Parseval's theorem) to show that in MLS deconvolution, SNR increases with the square root of half of the number of stimuli in the sweep. This increase is less than that of conventional averaging which is the square root of the number of sweeps averaged. Unlike arbitrary stimulus sequences that can attenuate or amplify phase unlocked noise depending on the frequency characteristics, the MLS deconvolution attenuates noise in all frequencies consistently. Furthermore, MLS and its zero-padded variations present optimal attenuation of noise at all frequencies yet they present a highly jittered stimulus sequence. In real recordings of evoked potentials, the time advantage gained by noise attenuation could be lost by the signal amplitude attenuation due to neural adaptation at high stimulus rates.

  2. Kalman Filters in Improving the Signal to Noise Ratio of Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehrmanesh, M.; Ravat, D.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied several extensions and optimal smoothing approaches of the Kalman filter, one of the best known recursive data processing techniques, on the Full Tensor Gradiometry (FTG) data acquired by Bell Geospace over the Vinton salt dome located in southwest Louisiana. We used the filter to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of gravity gradiometry components. We tested the standard Kalman filter and Fading memory and Constrained Kalman filter extensions with Fixed-lag and Forward-Backward smoothing methods to maintain symmetry. Our most meaningful results were obtained through the Kalman filter with the constraint of Laplace's equation combined with the Forward-Backward filter operations. Laplace's equation constraint was incorporated using two separate strategies: Model reduction and Perfect constraint (or Perfect measurement). In general, Kalman filter processed data have greater dynamic range than previously filtered data and also have the ability to extract signal from noisy data without having to remove a band of wavenumbers. In addition, our constrained Kalman filter also has the ability to force the Laplace's equation constraint. These characteristics enable the Kalman filter to investigate short wavelength signals associated with near-surface lateral density variations. In analyzing two dimensional maps for geologic variations, our workflow includes leveling and decorrugation, both procedures necessary for data processed along profiles. Several previously mapped near-subsurface geologic features like faults and their continuity in the Vinton dome area are more readily apparent in our Kalman filter processed components. Since the processed data generally agree with the previously mapped and interpreted structures, the interpretation could be extended to previously unmapped areas. The use of Kalman filtering in combination with Laplace's equation in applications such as gravity and magnetic gradiometry could be useful in determining more precisely the

  3. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Analysis of a Phase-Sensitive Voltmeter for Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ethan K; Takhti, Mohammad; Skinner, Joseph; Halter, Ryan J; Odame, Kofi

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, thorough analysis along with mathematical derivations of the matched filter for a voltmeter used in electrical impedance tomography systems are presented. The effect of the random noise in the system prior to the matched filter, generated by other components, are considered. Employing the presented equations allow system/circuit designers to find the maximum tolerable noise prior to the matched filter that leads to the target signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the voltmeter, without having to over-design internal components. A practical model was developed that should fall within 2 dB and 5 dB of the median SNR measurements of signal amplitude and phase, respectively. In order to validate our claims, simulation and experimental measurements have been performed with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) followed by a digital matched filter, while the noise of the whole system was modeled as the input referred at the ADC input. The input signal was contaminated by a known value of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) noise, and the noise level was swept from 3% to 75% of the least significant bit (LSB) of the ADC. Differences between experimental and both simulated and analytical SNR values were less than 0.59 and 0.35 dB for RMS values ≥ 20% of an LSB and less than 1.45 and 2.58 dB for RMS values < 20% of an LSB for the amplitude and phase, respectively. Overall, this study provides a practical model for circuit designers in EIT, and a more accurate error analysis that was previously missing in EIT literature.

  4. Effects of Signal-to-Noise Ratio on Auditory Cortical Frequency Processing

    PubMed Central

    Teschner, Magnus J.; Seybold, Bryan A.; Malone, Brian J.; Hüning, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support the robust processing of acoustic signals in the presence of background noise in the auditory system remain largely unresolved. Psychophysical experiments have shown that signal detection is influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the overall stimulus level, but this relationship has not been fully characterized. We evaluated the neural representation of frequency in rat primary auditory cortex by constructing tonal frequency response areas (FRAs) in primary auditory cortex for different SNRs, tone levels, and noise levels. We show that response strength and selectivity for frequency and sound level depend on interactions between SNRs and tone levels. At low SNRs, jointly increasing the tone and noise levels reduced firing rates and narrowed FRA bandwidths; at higher SNRs, however, increasing the tone and noise levels increased firing rates and expanded bandwidths, as is usually seen for FRAs obtained without background noise. These changes in frequency and intensity tuning decreased tone level and tone frequency discriminability at low SNRs. By contrast, neither response onset latencies nor noise-driven steady-state firing rates meaningfully interacted with SNRs or overall sound levels. Speech detection performance in humans was also shown to depend on the interaction between overall sound level and SNR. Together, these results indicate that signal processing difficulties imposed by high noise levels are quite general and suggest that the neurophysiological changes we see for simple sounds generalize to more complex stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Effective processing of sounds in background noise is an important feature of the mammalian auditory system and a necessary feature for successful hearing in many listening conditions. Even mild hearing loss strongly affects this ability in humans, seriously degrading the ability to communicate. The mechanisms involved in achieving high performance in background noise are not

  5. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving signal-to-noise ratio in Kerr microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lian, J; Xu, X J; Li, X; Li, P; Li, M M; Wang, Y; Liu, Y X

    2016-03-01

    The magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. Optimization of Kerr microscopy will improve the detecting sensitivity and provide high-quality domain images. In this work, we provide a method to optimize the polarizer azimuth in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in longitudinal Kerr microscopy with the generalized magneto optical ellipsometry. Detailed analysis of the MOKE signal and the noise components are provided to study the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combinations. Results show that, for a fixed polarizer angle 1°, the laser intensity noise and the shot noise, which vary with the input laser power, have a similar amplitude and decline with the analyzer azimuth increasing. When the analyzer is set at the extinction place, the Johnson noise plays a dominate role in the total noise. Then, the S/N values are calculated to find the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth. Results show that the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combination for Permalloy is (18.35°, 68.35°) under an incident angle of 45°. After that, the S/N of 200 nm Permalloy at different analyzer angles with the polarizer azimuth set at 18.35° is measured to verify the validity of the simulation results. At last, the S/N at different incident angles is calculated. Results show that the optimum incident angle of 200 nm Permalloy film to improve the S/N is 70.35° under the polarizer and analyzer angles set at the optimal combinations (18.35°, 68.35°).

  6. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  7. Garonne River monitoring from Signal-to-Noise Ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Darrozes, José; Ramillien, Guillaume; Bonneton, Philippe; Bonneton, Natalie; Detandt, Guillaume; Roques, Manon; Orseau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for water level monitoring through the last decades. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and a classical GNSS receiver. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, classical SNR analysis method used to estimate the variations of the reflecting surface height h(t) has a limited domain of validity due to its variation rate dh/dt(t) assumed to be negligible. In [1], authors solve this problem with a "dynamic SNR method" taking the dynamic of the surface into account to conjointly estimate h(t) and dh/dt(t) over areas characterized by high amplitudes of tides. If the performance of this dynamic SNR method is already well-established for ocean monitoring [1], it was not validated in continental areas (i.e., river monitoring). We carried out a field study during 3 days in August and September, 2015, using a GNSS antenna to measure the water level variations in the Garonne River (France) in Podensac located 140 km downstream of the estuary mouth. In this site, the semi-diurnal tide amplitude reaches ~5 m. The antenna was located ~10 m above the water surface, and reflections of the GNSS electromagnetic waves on the Garonne River occur until 140 m from the antenna. Both classical SNR method and dynamic SNR method are tested and results are compared. [1] N. Roussel, G. Ramillien, F. Frappart, J. Darrozes, A. Gay, R. Biancale, N. Striebig, V. Hanquiez, X. Bertin, D. Allain : "Sea level monitoring and sea state estimate using a single geodetic receiver", Remote Sensing of Environment 171 (2015) 261-277.

  8. An algorithm for the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio in surface myoelectric signals generated during cyclic movements.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In many applications requiring the study of the surface myoelectric signal (SMES) acquired in dynamic conditions, it is essential to have a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the collected signals. When the activation pattern of a muscle has to be obtained by means of single- or double-threshold statistical detectors, the background noise level e (noise) of the signal is a necessary input parameter. Moreover, the detection strategy of double-threshold detectors may be properly tuned when the SNR and the duty cycle (DC) of the signal are known. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for the estimation of e (noise), SNR, and DC of an SMES collected during cyclic movements. The algorithm is validated on synthetic signals with statistical properties similar to those of SMES, as well as on more than 100 real signals.

  9. Mapping the signal-to-noise-ratios of cortical sources in magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Goldenholz, Daniel M; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Sharon, Dahlia; Ishitobi, Mamiko; Vaina, Lucia M; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-04-01

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) have been available for decades, their relative merits are still debated. We examined regional differences in signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) of cortical sources in MEG and EEG. Data from four subjects were used to simulate focal and extended sources located on the cortical surface reconstructed from high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The SNR maps for MEG and EEG were found to be complementary. The SNR of deep sources was larger in EEG than in MEG, whereas the opposite was typically the case for superficial sources. Overall, the SNR maps were more uniform for EEG than for MEG. When using a noise model based on uniformly distributed random sources on the cortex, the SNR in MEG was found to be underestimated, compared with the maps obtained with noise estimated from actual recorded MEG and EEG data. With extended sources, the total area of cortex in which the SNR was higher in EEG than in MEG was larger than with focal sources. Clinically, SNR maps in a patient explained differential sensitivity of MEG and EEG in detecting epileptic activity. Our results emphasize the benefits of recording MEG and EEG simultaneously.

  10. Mapping the Signal-To-Noise-Ratios of Cortical Sources in Magnetoencephalography and Electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Goldenholz, Daniel M.; Ahlfors, Seppo P.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Sharon, Dahlia; Ishitobi, Mamiko; Vaina, Lucia M.; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) have been available for decades, their relative merits are still debated. We examined regional differences in signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs) of cortical sources in MEG and EEG. Data from four subjects were used to simulate focal and extended sources located on the cortical surface reconstructed from high-resolution magnetic resonance images. The SNR maps for MEG and EEG were found to be complementary. The SNR of deep sources was larger in EEG than in MEG, whereas the opposite was typically the case for superficial sources. Overall, the SNR maps were more uniform for EEG than for MEG. When using a noise model based on uniformly distributed random sources on the cortex, the SNR in MEG was found to be underestimated, compared with the maps obtained with noise estimated from actual recorded MEG and EEG data. With extended sources, the total area of cortex in which the SNR was higher in EEG than in MEG was larger than with focal sources. Clinically, SNR maps in a patient explained differential sensitivity of MEG and EEG in detecting epileptic activity. Our results emphasize the benefits of recording MEG and EEG simultaneously. PMID:18465745

  11. Estimates of Signal-to-Microstructural-Noise Ratios in Ultrasonic Inspections of Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Margetan, F. J.; Roberts, R.; Thompson, R. B.

    2006-03-06

    Ultrasonic defect detection in jet-engine alloys is often a hunt for a flaw response in the presence of microstructural noise. Signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) are often used to quantify the extent to which the response from a defect or reference reflector stands out above the competing noise. In many cases of practical interest the microstructural scattering is 'weak' in the sense that single-scattering events dominate and multiple scattering may be ignored. In such cases, independent-scatterer noise models apply and can be used to develop simple, approximate formulas for S/N. For pulse-echo (P/E) inspections, the formulas relate S/N to the response-weighted volume of the incident sonic pulse, and these formulas have proven useful in designing P/E inspections of jet-engine forgings. After briefly reviewing the P/E case, we introduce generalized versions of the formulas which apply to ultrasonic pitch-catch inspections. The use of the new formulas to assess inspections is then discussed, including a treatment of phased-array inspections using so-called dynamic depth focusing.

  12. Intrinsic low pass filtering improves signal-to-noise ratio in critical-point flexure biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-08-25

    A flexure biosensor consists of a suspended beam and a fixed bottom electrode. The adsorption of the target biomolecules on the beam changes its stiffness and results in change of beam's deflection. It is now well established that the sensitivity of sensor is maximized close to the pull-in instability point, where effective stiffness of the beam vanishes. The question: “Do the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit-of-detection (LOD) also improve close to the instability point?”, however remains unanswered. In this article, we systematically analyze the noise response to evaluate SNR and establish LOD of critical-point flexure sensors. We find that a flexure sensor acts like an effective low pass filter close to the instability point due to its relatively small resonance frequency, and rejects high frequency noise, leading to improved SNR and LOD. We believe that our conclusions should establish the uniqueness and the technological relevance of critical-point biosensors.

  13. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio adaptive post-filtering method for intelligibility enhancement of telephone speech.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Emma; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Pulakka, Hannu; Vainio, Martti; Alku, Paavo

    2012-12-01

    Post-filtering can be utilized to improve the quality and intelligibility of telephone speech. Previous studies have shown that energy reallocation with a high-pass type filter works effectively in improving the intelligibility of speech in difficult noise conditions. The present study introduces a signal-to-noise ratio adaptive post-filtering method that utilizes energy reallocation to transfer energy from the first formant to higher frequencies. The proposed method adapts to the level of the background noise so that, in favorable noise conditions, the post-filter has a flat frequency response and the effect of the post-filtering is increased as the level of the ambient noise increases. The performance of the proposed method is compared with a similar post-filtering algorithm and unprocessed speech in subjective listening tests which evaluate both intelligibility and listener preference. The results indicate that both of the post-filtering methods maintain the quality of speech in negligible noise conditions and are able to provide intelligibility improvement over unprocessed speech in adverse noise conditions. Furthermore, the proposed post-filtering algorithm performs better than the other post-filtering method under evaluation in moderate to difficult noise conditions, where intelligibility improvement is mostly required.

  15. Estimates of Signal-to-Microstructural-Noise Ratios in Ultrasonic Inspections of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, F. J.; Roberts, R.; Thompson, R. B.

    2006-03-01

    Ultrasonic defect detection in jet-engine alloys is often a hunt for a flaw response in the presence of microstructural noise. Signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) are often used to quantify the extent to which the response from a defect or reference reflector stands out above the competing noise. In many cases of practical interest the microstructural scattering is "weak" in the sense that single-scattering events dominate and multiple scattering may be ignored. In such cases, independent-scatterer noise models apply and can be used to develop simple, approximate formulas for S/N. For pulse-echo (P/E) inspections, the formulas relate S/N to the response-weighted volume of the incident sonic pulse, and these formulas have proven useful in designing P/E inspections of jet-engine forgings. After briefly reviewing the P/E case, we introduce generalized versions of the formulas which apply to ultrasonic pitch-catch inspections. The use of the new formulas to assess inspections is then discussed, including a treatment of phased-array inspections using so-called dynamic depth focusing.

  16. Estimating the image spectrum signal-to-noise ratio for imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafy, Mohamed E.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Guney, Durdu O.

    2015-01-01

    The image spectrum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) provides a means of estimating the noise effective spatial resolution of an imaging system and a means of estimating the highest spatial frequency which can be reconstructed with a postdetection image reconstruction algorithm. Previous work has addressed the effects of aerosol scattering on the overall point spread function (PSF). Here, we seek to extend these results to also account for the effects of measurement noise and to then estimate the noise effective resolution of the system, which accounts for scattering effects on the PSF and measurement noise in the detector. We use a previously published approach to estimating the effective PSF and radiometric calculations to estimate the mean numbers of direct and scattered photons detected by an imaging system due to reflected radiation in the visible and near-infrared, and emitted radiation in mid-infrared (MIR) band, for a horizontal near-ground imaging scenario. The analysis of the image spectrum SNR presented here shows a reduction in the value of noise effective cutoff spatial frequency for images taken through fog aerosol media, and hence emphasizes the degrading effect of fog aerosol models on the spatial resolution of imaging systems.

  17. Post-embedding tem signal-to-noise ratio of S-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the reactivity of purified S-100 antiserum in immuno-electron microscopy by counting the number of gold particles per microns 2 over inner ear tissues embedded in different media. Sections containing predominantly Schwann's cell cytoplasm and nucleus, afferent fiber axoplasm and myelin sheath of chick cochleae were reacted with anti-S-100 IgG, an antibody to a calcium binding protein of neuronal tissues, then labeled with anti-IgG-gold conjugate. This investigation was conducted because previously published procedures, unmodified, did not yield acceptable results. Preparation of all specimens was identical. Only the medium (PolyBed 812, Araldite or Spurr epoxies; and LR White, LR Gold or Lowicryl plastics) was changed. The medium was made the changing variable because antigens available in post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy are decreased by heat, either used and/or released during polymerization of the embedding medium. The results indicate that: (a) none of the embedding media above provided optimal signal-to-noise ratio for all parts of the nerve stained in the same section; (b) aggregation of gold particles over cells was highest in embedding media with high background labeling over areas devoid of tissue (noise); (c) aggregation occurred randomly throughout both cellular and acellular regions; and (d) particles aggregated less and were distributed more evenly in tissues from media yielding good ultrastructural integrity.

  18. Threshold value for acceptable video quality using signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaahteranoksa, Mikko; Vuori, Tero

    2007-01-01

    Noise decreases video quality considerably, particularly in dark environments. In a video clip, noise can be seen as an unwanted spatial or temporal variation in pixel values. The object of the study was to find a threshold value for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in which the video quality is perceived to be good enough. Different illumination levels for video shooting were studied using both subjective and objective (SNR measurements) methodologies. Five camcorders were selected to cover different sensor technologies, recording formats and price categories. The test material for the subjective test was recorded in an environment simulator, where it was possible to adjust lighting levels. Double staircase test was used as the subjective test method. The test videos for objective measurements were recorded using an ISO 15739 based environment. There was a correlation found between objective and subjective measurements, between measured SNR and perceived quality. Good enough video quality was reached between SNR values of 15.3 dB and 17.2 dB. With 3CCD and super HAD-CCD technologies, video quality was brighter, less noisy, and the SNR was better in low light conditions compared to the quality with conventional CCDs.

  19. Downhole microseismic monitoring for low signal-to-noise ratio events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Microseismic monitoring plays an important role in the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas/oil production. The accuracy of event location is an essential issue in microseismic monitoring. The data obtained from downhole monitoring system usually show a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the recorded data from the surface. For small microseismic events, however, P waves recorded in a downhole array may be very weak, while S waves are generally dominant and strong. Numerical experiments suggest that inverting S-wave arrival times alone is not sufficient to constrain event locations. In this study, we perform extensive location tests with various noise effects using a grid search method that matches the travel time data of the S wave across a recording array. We conclude that fitting S-wave travel time data along with at least one P-wave travel time of the same event can significantly improve location accuracy. In practice, picking S-wave arrival time data and at least one P-wave pick is possible for many small events. We demonstrate that fitting the combination of the travel time data is a robust approach, which can help increase the number of microseismic events to be located accurately during hydraulic fracturing.

  20. A method to analyze low signal-to-noise ratio functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Kayali, M Amin; Jansen, Ben H

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of using a single, representative hemodynamic response function (canonical HRF) to model functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is questionable given the trial-to-trial variability of the brain's responses. In addition, the changes in blood-oxygenation level due to sensory stimulation may be small, especially when auditory stimuli are used. Here we introduce a correlation-based single trial analysis method for fMRI data analysis to deal with the low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio and variability of the HRF in response to repeated, identical auditory stimuli. The correlation technique identifies the "active" trials, i.e., those showing a robust hemodynamic response among all single trials. Using data collected from 14 healthy subjects, it was found that the correlation method can find significant differences between brain areas and brain states in actual fMRI data. Also, the correlation-based method confirmed that the superior temporal gyrus (STG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and thalamus (THA) are involved in auditory information processing in general, and the involvement of the bilateral STG, right THA and left DLPFC in sensory gating. In contrast, conventional analysis failed to find any regions involved in sensory gating. The findings suggest that our single trial analysis method can increase the sensitivity of fMRI data analysis.

  1. Speech perception at positive signal-to-noise ratios using adaptive adjustment of time compression.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Anne; Brand, Thomas; Lemke, Ulrike; Nitzschner, Stefan; Kollmeier, Birger; Holube, Inga

    2015-11-01

    Positive signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) characterize listening situations most relevant for hearing-impaired listeners in daily life and should therefore be considered when evaluating hearing aid algorithms. For this, a speech-in-noise test was developed and evaluated, in which the background noise is presented at fixed positive SNRs and the speech rate (i.e., the time compression of the speech material) is adaptively adjusted. In total, 29 younger and 12 older normal-hearing, as well as 24 older hearing-impaired listeners took part in repeated measurements. Younger normal-hearing and older hearing-impaired listeners conducted one of two adaptive methods which differed in adaptive procedure and step size. Analysis of the measurements with regard to list length and estimation strategy for thresholds resulted in a practical method measuring the time compression for 50% recognition. This method uses time-compression adjustment and step sizes according to Versfeld and Dreschler [(2002). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 401-408], with sentence scoring, lists of 30 sentences, and a maximum likelihood method for threshold estimation. Evaluation of the procedure showed that older participants obtained higher test-retest reliability compared to younger participants. Depending on the group of listeners, one or two lists are required for training prior to data collection.

  2. Modeling the effects of distortion, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio on stereophotogrammetric range mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Deen, Robert G.; Huffman, William C.; Willson, Reginald G.

    2016-09-01

    Stereophotogrammetry typically employs a pair of cameras, or a single moving camera, to acquire pairs of images from different camera positions, in order to create a three dimensional `range map' of the area being observed. Applications of this technique for building three-dimensional shape models include aerial surveying, remote sensing, machine vision, and robotics. Factors that would be expected to affect the quality of the range maps include the projection function (distortion) of the lenses and the contrast (modulation) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquired image pairs. Basic models of the precision with which the range can be measured assume a pinhole-camera model of the geometry, i.e. that the lenses provide perspective projection with zero distortion. Very-wide-angle or `fisheye' lenses, however (for e.g. those used by robotic vehicles) typically exhibit projection functions that differ significantly from this assumption. To predict the stereophotogrammetric range precision for such applications, we extend the model to the case of an equidistant lens projection function suitable for a very-wide-angle lens. To predict the effects of contrast and SNR on range precision, we perform numerical simulations using stereo image pairs acquired by a stereo camera pair on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Contrast is degraded and noise is added to these data in a controlled fashion and the effects on the quality of the resulting range maps are assessed.

  3. Coherent dual-comb spectroscopy at high signal-to-noise ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Newbury, N. R.

    2010-10-15

    Two coherent frequency combs are used to measure the full complex response of a sample in a configuration analogous to a dispersive Fourier transform spectrometer, infrared time domain spectrometer, or a multiheterodyne laser spectrometer. This dual-comb spectrometer retains the frequency accuracy and resolution of the reference underlying the stabilized combs. We discuss the specific design of our coherent dual-comb spectrometer and demonstrate the potential of this technique by measuring the overtone vibration of hydrogen cyanide, centered at 194 THz (1545 nm). We measure the fully normalized, complex response of the gas over a 9 THz bandwidth at 220 MHz frequency resolution yielding 41,000 resolution elements. The average spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the 9 THz bandwidth is 2500 for both the magnitude and phase of the measured spectral response and the peak SNR is 4000. This peak SNR corresponds to a fractional absorption sensitivity of 0.05% and a phase sensitivity of 250 microradians. As the spectral coverage of combs expands, coherent dual-comb spectroscopy could provide high-frequency accuracy and resolution measurements of a complex sample response across a range of spectral regions. Work of U. S. government, not subject to copyright.

  4. Reliable motion detection of small targets in video with low signal-to-clutter ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, S.A.; Naylor, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Studies show that vigilance decreases rapidly after several minutes when human operators are required to search live video for infrequent intrusion detections. Therefore, there is a need for systems which can automatically detect targets in live video and reserve the operator`s attention for assessment only. Thus far, automated systems have not simultaneously provided adequate detection sensitivity, false alarm suppression, and ease of setup when used in external, unconstrained environments. This unsatisfactory performance can be exacerbated by poor video imagery with low contrast, high noise, dynamic clutter, image misregistration, and/or the presence of small, slow, or erratically moving targets. This paper describes a highly adaptive video motion detection and tracking algorithm which has been developed as part of Sandia`s Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) program. The AES is a wide-area detection and assessment system for use in unconstrained exterior security applications. The AES detection and tracking algorithm provides good performance under stressing data and environmental conditions. Features of the algorithm include: reliable detection with negligible false alarm rate of variable velocity targets having low signal-to-clutter ratios; reliable tracking of targets that exhibit motion that is non-inertial, i.e., varies in direction and velocity; automatic adaptation to both infrared and visible imagery with variable quality; and suppression of false alarms caused by sensor flaws and/or cutouts.

  5. Reliable motion detection of small targets in video with low signal-to-clutter ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Scott A.; Naylor, R. B.

    1995-09-01

    Studies show that vigilance decreases rapidly after several minutes when human operators are required to search live video for infrequent intrusion detections. Therefore, there is a need for systems which can automatically detect targets in live video and reserve the operator's attention for assessment only. Thus far, automated systems have not simultaneously provided adequate detection sensitivity, false alarm suppression, and ease of setup when used in external, unconstrained environments. This unsatisfactory performance can be exacerbated by poor video imagery with low contrast, high noise, dynamic clutter, image misregistration, and/or the presence of small, slow, or erratically moving targets. This paper describes a highly adaptive video motion detection and tracking algorithm provides good performance under stressing data and environmental conditions. Features of the algorithm include: reliable detection with negligible false alarm rate of variable velocity targets having low signal-to- clutter ratios; reliable tracking of targets that exhibit motion that is non-inertial, i.e. varies in direction and velocity; automatic adaptation to both infrared and visible imagery with variable quality; and suppression of false alarms caused by sensor flaws and/or cutouts.

  6. Optimizing the Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio of MRI Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    An MRI detector is formed from a conducting strip separated by a dielectric substrate from a ground plane, and tuned to a quarter-wavelength. By distributing discrete tuning elements along the strip, the geometric design may be adjusted to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given application. Here a numerical electromagnetic (EM) method of moments (MoM) is applied to determine the length, width, substrate thickness, dielectric constant, and number of tuning elements that yield the best intrinsic SNR (ISNR) of the strip detector at 1.5 Tesla. The central question of how strip performance compares with that of a conventional optimized loop coil is also addressed. The numerical method is validated against the known ISNR performance of loop coils, and its ability to predict the tuning capacitances and performance of seven experimental strip detectors of varying length, width, substrate thickness, and dielectric constant. We find that strip detectors with low-dielectric constant, moderately thin-substrate, and length about 1.3 (±0.2) times the depth of interest perform best. The ISNR of strips is comparable to that of loops (i.e., higher close to the detector but lower at depth). The SNR improves with two inherently-decoupled strips, whose sensitivity profile is well-suited to parallel MRI. The findings are summarized as design “rules of thumb.” PMID:16724302

  7. Measurement and study on signal-to-noise ratio of a spaceborne camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuheng; Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2011-11-01

    The developed spaceborne camera is an exclusive functional load of a micro satellite. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reflects its radiance response and is the parameter that directly associates with the quality of its acquired images. The SNR determination task of the spaceborne camera mainly consists of two parts: As is reported before firstly the spatial environment is simulated and the atmosphere transmission mode is built with MODTRAN to calculate and predict the SNR of the speceborne camera under aerial working condition. In this paper, the in-lab measuring experiment is carried out to measure the theoretical imaging performance of the camera before its aerial use. An integrating sphere is utilized to supply well-proportioned illumination, and a number of images are acquired by the spaceborne camera under different luminance conditions. The images are processed in use of certain algorithm and a special filter to extract the noise. The SNRs corresponding to different illumination conditions are calculated so that full-scale radiance response feature of the camera can be gained. The dynamic range is another parameter that characterizes the imaging capacity of a camera. The relationship between dynamic range and SNR of a camera is to be explored in this paper. Different dynamic configurations are set and the SNRs of different dynamic range configurations are tested, which experimentally reveals the dynamic range's influence on SNR.

  8. Perceptually optimized gain function for cochlear implant signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Dawson, Pam W; Hersbach, Adam A

    2012-01-01

    Noise reduction in cochlear implants has achieved significant speech perception improvements through spectral subtraction and signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction techniques. Current methods use gain functions derived through mathematical optimization or motivated by normal listening psychoacoustic experiments. Although these gain functions have been able to improve speech perception, recent studies have indicated that they are not optimal for cochlear implant noise reduction. This study systematically investigates cochlear implant recipients' speech perception and listening preference of noise reduction with a range of gain functions. Results suggest an advantageous gain function and show that gain functions currently used for noise reduction are not optimal for cochlear implant recipients. Using the cochlear implant optimised gain function, a 27% improvement over the current advanced combination encoder (ACE) stimulation strategy in speech weighted noise and a 7% improvement over current noise reduction strategies were observed in babble noise conditions. The optimized gain function was also most preferred by cochlear implant recipients. The CI specific gain function derived from this study can be easily incorporated into existing noise reduction strategies, to further improve listening performance for CI recipients in challenging environments.

  9. Techniques and software tools for estimating ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2016-02-01

    At Iowa State University's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISU CNDE), the use of models to simulate ultrasonic inspections has played a key role in R&D efforts for over 30 years. To this end a series of wave propagation models, flaw response models, and microstructural backscatter models have been developed to address inspection problems of interest. One use of the combined models is the estimation of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in circumstances where backscatter from the microstructure (grain noise) acts to mask sonic echoes from internal defects. Such S/N models have been used in the past to address questions of inspection optimization and reliability. Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was recently initiated to improve existing research-grade software by adding graphical user interface (GUI) to become user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of S/N for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based GUI for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signal and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The latter makes use of several models including: the Multi-Gaussian Beam Model for computing sonic fields radiated by commercial transducers; the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect; the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise; and the Stanke-Kino Unified Model for attenuation. The initial emphasis was on reformulating the research-grade code into a suitable modular form, adding the graphical user interface and performing computations rapidly and robustly. Thus the initial inspection problem being addressed is relatively simple. A normal-incidence pulse/echo immersion inspection is simulated for a curved metal component having a non-uniform microstructure, specifically an equiaxed, untextured microstructure in which the average

  10. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography by a lock-in amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lili; Wu, Jingping; Lin, Guimin; Hu, Liangjun; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    With high spatial resolution of ultrasonic location and high sensitivity of optical detection, ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) is a promising noninvasive biological tissue imaging technology. In biological tissue, the ultrasound-modulated light signals are very weak and are overwhelmed by the strong unmodulated light signals. It is a difficulty and key to efficiently pick out the weak modulated light from strong unmodulated light in UOT. Under the effect of an ultrasonic field, the scattering light intensity presents a periodic variation as the ultrasonic frequency changes. So the modulated light signals would be escape from the high unmodulated light signals, when the modulated light signals and the ultrasonic signal are processed cross correlation operation by a lock-in amplifier and without a chopper. Experimental results indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT is significantly improved by a lock-in amplifier, and the higher the repetition frequency of pulsed ultrasonic wave, the better the signal-to-noise ratio of UOT.

  11. A HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO COMPOSITE SPECTRUM OF GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Prochaska, J. X.; Jakobsson, P.

    2011-02-01

    We present a composite spectrum of 60 long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows with redshifts in the range 0.35 < z < 6.7 observed with low-resolution optical spectra. The composite spectrum covers the wavelength range 700-6600 A in the rest frame and has a mean signal-to-noise ratio of 150 per 1 A pixel and reaches a maximum of {approx}300 in the range 2500-3500 A. Equivalent widths are measured from metal absorption lines from the Ly{alpha} line to {approx}5200 A, and associated metal and hydrogen lines are identified between the Lyman break and Ly{alpha} line. The average transmission within the Lyman forest is consistent with that found along quasar lines of sight. We find a temporal variation in fine-structure lines when dividing the sample into bursts observed within 2 hr from their trigger and those observed later. Other lines in the predominantly neutral gas show variations too, but this is most likely a random effect caused by weighting of individual strong absorption lines and which mimics a temporal variation. Bursts characterized with high- or low-prompt GRB energy release produce afterglows with similar absorption line strengths, and likewise for bursts with bright or faint optical afterglows. Bursts defined as dark from their optical to X-ray spectral index have stronger absorption lines relative to the optically bright bursts. The composite spectrum has strong Ca II and Mg II absorption lines as commonly found in dusty galaxies, however, we find no evidence for dust or a significant molecular content based on the non-detection of diffuse interstellar bands. Compared to starburst galaxy spectra, the GRB composite has much stronger fine-structure lines, while metal absorption lines are weaker.

  12. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  13. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static-mode down-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyong; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yu; Cai, Guangyu; Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    The static-mode down-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) can keep the target and carrying-platform still during the collection process. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static-mode down-looking SAIL is investigated. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved by increasing scanning time and sampling rate in static-mode down-looking SAIL. In the experiment, the targets are reconstructed in different scanning time and different sampling rate. As the increasing of the scanning time and sampling rate, the reconstructed images become clearer. These techniques have a great potential for applications in extensive synthetic aperture imaging ladar fields.

  14. Impact of amplitude jitter and signal-to-noise ratio on the nonlinear spectral compression in optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscolo, Sonia; Fatome, Julien; Finot, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    We numerically study the effects of amplitude fluctuations and signal-to-noise ratio degradation of the seed pulses on the spectral compression process arising from nonlinear propagation in an optical fibre. The unveiled quite good stability of the process against these pulse degradation factors is assessed in the context of optical regeneration of intensity-modulated signals, by combining nonlinear spectral compression with centered bandpass optical filtering. The results show that the proposed nonlinear processing scheme indeed achieves mitigation of the signal's amplitude noise. However, in the presence of a jitter of the temporal duration of the pulses, the performance of the device deteriorates. © 2016 Elsevier

  15. Fuel-air ratio controlled carburetion system

    SciTech Connect

    Abbey, H. G.

    1980-02-12

    An automatic control system is disclosed supplying a fuel-air mixture to an internal combustion engine including a variable-venturi carburetor. Air is fed into the input of the venturi, the air passing through the throat thereof whose effective area is adjusted by a mechanism operated by a servo motor. Fuel is fed into the input of the venturi from a fuel reservoir through a main path having a fixed orifice and an auxiliary path formed by a metering valve operated by an auxiliary fuel-control motor. The differential air pressure developed between the inlet of the venturi and the throat thereof is sensed to produce an airvelocity command signal that is applied to a controller adapted to compare the command signal with the servo motor set point to produce an output for governing the servo motor to cause it to seek a null point, thereby defining a closed process control loop. The intake manifold vacuum, which varies in degree as a function of load and speed conditions is sensed to govern the auxiliary fuel-control motor accordingly, is at the same time converted into an auxiliary signal which is applied to the controller in the closed loop to modulate the command signal in a manner establishing an optimum air-fuel ratio under the varying conditions of load and speed.

  16. Empirical evaluation of a new method for calculating signal-to-noise ratio for microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-05-01

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect-match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called the signal-to-both-standard-deviations ratio (SSDR), was developed and evaluated, along with other two methods, the signal-to-standard-deviation ratio (SSR) and the signal-to-background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of the SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60, and 0.80 with an oligonucleotide and a PCR amplicon as target templates and 2.0, 1.60, and 0.70 with genomic DNAs as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained under high-stringency conditions. The thresholds of the SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types) and the presence of background DNA and a decrease in the compositions of targets, while the SBR remained unchanged in all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives and false negatives was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  17. The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms while Class Is in Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Jeffery B.; Blair, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the signal-to-noise ratios in classrooms while class was in session and students were interacting with the teacher and each other. Method: Measurements of noise and reverberation were collected for 5 different classrooms in 3 different schools while class was in session. Activities taking place…

  18. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  19. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Performance of PEM Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol-Air Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A direct methanol-air fuel cell operating at near atmospheric pressure, low-flow rate air, and at temperatures close to 60oC would tremendously enlarge the scope of potential applications. While earlier studies have reported performance with oxygen, the present study focuses on characterizing the performance of a PEM liquid feed direct methanol-air cell consisting of components developed in house. These cells employ Pt-Ru catalyst in the anode, Pt at the cathode and Nafion 117 as the PEM. The effect of pressure, flow rate of air and temperature on cell performance has been studied. With air, the performance level is as high as 0.437 V at 300 mA/cm2 (90oC, 20 psig, and excess air flow) has been attained. Even more significant is the performance level at 60oC, 1 atm and low flow rates of air (3-5 times stoichiometric), which is 0.4 V at 150 mA/cm2. Individual electrode potentials for the methanol and air electrode have been separated and analyzed. Fuel crossover rates and the impact of fuel crossover on the performance of the air electrode have also been measured. The study identifies issues specific to the methanol-air fuel cell and provides a basis for improvement strategies.

  1. Morphology control of zinc regeneration for zinc-air fuel cell and battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Xizhong

    2014-12-01

    Morphology control is crucial both for zinc-air batteries and for zinc-air fuel cells during zinc regeneration. Zinc dendrite should be avoided in zinc-air batteries and zinc pellets are yearned to be formed for zinc-air fuel cells. This paper is mainly to analyze the mechanism of shape change and to control the zinc morphology during charge. A numerical three-dimensional model for zinc regeneration is established with COMSOL software on the basis of ionic transport theory and electrode reaction electrochemistry, and some experiments of zinc regeneration are carried out. The deposition process is qualitatively analyzed by the kinetics Monte Carlo method to study the morphological change from the electrocrystallization point of view. Morphological evolution of deposited zinc under different conditions of direct currents and pulse currents is also investigated by simulation. The simulation shows that parametric variables of the flowing electrolyte, the surface roughness and the structure of the electrode, the charging current and mode affect morphological evolution. The uniform morphology of deposited zinc is attained at low current, pulsating current or hydrodynamic electrolyte, and granular morphology is obtained by means of an electrode of discrete columnar structure in combination with high current and flowing electrolyte.

  2. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRasse) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRasse) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNRasse and CNRasse. The results of the study show that the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNRasse (SNRasse) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNRasse (SNRasse) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNRasse (SNRasse) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNRasse and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-07

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR(asse)) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR(asse)) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNR(asse) and CNR(asse). The results of the study show that the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNR(asse) and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  4. [Study of the effect of light source stability on the signal to noise ratio in degenerate four wave mixing experiment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Bo; Chen, De-Ying; Fan, Rong-Wei; Xia, Yuan-Qin

    2010-02-01

    The effects of the stability of dye laser on the signal to noise ratio in degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) were first investigated in iodine vapor using forward geometries. Frequency-doubled outputs from a multi-mode Nd : YAG laser pumped dye laser with laser dye PM580 dissolved in ethanol was used. With the help of forward compensated beam-split technique and imaging detecting system, the saturation intensity of DFWM spectrum in the iodine vapor at 5 554.013 nm was first measured to be 290 microJ under the condition of atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The features of the dye laser such as wavelength ranges, beam quality and energy conversion efficiency decreased gradually with increasing pumping service use, pulse number and intensity. Additionally, with the comparison of the stable and unstable dye laser output, it was found that the instability of dye laser output had greatly influenced the DFWM signal and decreased the signal to background noise ratio. Shot to shot jitter and the broadening in the output frequency leads to an effective broadening of the recorded spectrum and loss of the DFWM signal to noise ratio under the same pumping intensity at different time. The study is of importance to the detection of trace atom, molecule and radical in combustion diagnosis.

  5. A Measure of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Microarray Samples and Studies Using Gene Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Venet, David; Detours, Vincent; Bersini, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of gene expression data can vary dramatically from platform to platform, study to study, and sample to sample. As reliable statistical analysis rests on reliable data, determining such quality is of the utmost importance. Quality measures to spot problematic samples exist, but they are platform-specific, and cannot be used to compare studies. Results As a proxy for quality, we propose a signal-to-noise ratio for microarray data, the “Signal-to-Noise Applied to Gene Expression Experiments”, or SNAGEE. SNAGEE is based on the consistency of gene-gene correlations. We applied SNAGEE to a compendium of 80 large datasets on 37 platforms, for a total of 24,380 samples, and assessed the signal-to-noise ratio of studies and samples. This allowed us to discover serious issues with three studies. We show that signal-to-noise ratios of both studies and samples are linked to the statistical significance of the biological results. Conclusions We showed that SNAGEE is an effective way to measure data quality for most types of gene expression studies, and that it often outperforms existing techniques. Furthermore, SNAGEE is platform-independent and does not require raw data files. The SNAGEE R package is available in BioConductor. PMID:23251415

  6. Signal to Noise Ratio in Digital Lock-in Detection for Multiple Intensity-Modulated Signals in CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, S.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Nehrir, A. R.; Campbell, J. F.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, N. M.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometers (LASs) for the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) column mixing ratio from both air- and space-borne platforms. The LAS system uses high-power fiber lasers/amplifiers in the 1.57-um CO2 absorption band and the 1.26-um O2 absorption band in the transmitters and simultaneous digital lock-in detection for the multiple intensity-modulated signals with different modulation waveforms , such as simple sinusoidal waves at different frequencies, associated with different wavelengths in the receivers. The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in the system is of interest for the system designs and the performance prediction of airborne and space-borne implementations in the future. This paper will discuss the properties of the signals and various noises in the LAS system, especially for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection with a single detector for the multiple intensity-modulated signals at different frequencies. The numerical simulation of the SNR for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in terms of relative intensity of the multiple modulated signals and the integration time, and an initial experimental verification will be presented.

  7. Analysis of signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing on geostationary orbit with variations of solar incident angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Chun-guang; Yang, Wen-bo; Tian, Qing-jiu; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Zong-ming; Zhang, Han-mo

    2014-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) sensors on a geostationary orbit (GEO) have important potential value in atmospheric remote sensing, but the satellites orbit mode of it is quit different from sun-synchronous orbit satellites, which result in the significant diurnal and seasonal variations in radiation environment of earth observation and radiation signal of sensors, therefore, the effect to sensor radiometric performance, such as signal to noise ratio for atmospheric ultraviolet remote sensing caused by variations of solar angle is significant in the performance design of sensors. The synthetic ultraviolet sensor is set at the geostationary orbit, 36000 km away from the sea level of the Equator with 8.75 degree field of view, and the subsatellite track point of which is located at 90 degrees east longitude and Equator. The Satellite scanning angles (SA) from 0 to 8.648 degree that cover the earth surface are selected corresponding to the 10 degrees equal interval view zenith angle, and the SA from 8.648 to 8.785 degree cover the earth lamb 100 km far away from earth tangent point. Based on the MODTRAN4 model, on normal atmospheric conditions, the distributions of the UV upwelling radiance from surface or limb viewing path of the earth could be simulated with the change of sun's right ascension. Moreover, the average signal to noise ratio to the atmospheric sounding is obtained in different UV spectra using the Sensor signal to noise ratio model. The results show that the thresholds range, tendency and shape of signal to noise ratio have a variety of features affected by variation of Sun hour angles and declinations. These result and conclusions could contribute to performance design of UV sensors on the geostationary orbit.

  8. A Signal-to-Noise-Ratio, Bearing-Deviation-Indicator Meter Unit Utilizing Clipper-Correlator Circuitry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report describes a sonar test unit combining a signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) meter and a bearing deviation indicator (BDI) that has been designed...and constructed at this facility. The SNR meter operates by clipper correlating the left-half and right-half sonar-array outputs and then converting...the correlation coefficient to SNR ; the BDI operates with a clipper correlator that has a 90 deg phase-shifted input signal. Calibration, installation, and trouble-shooting procedures for the unit are presented. (Author)

  9. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  10. A review on air cathodes for zinc-air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neburchilov, Vladimir; Wang, Haijiang; Martin, Jonathan J.; Qu, Wei

    This paper reviews the compositions, design and methods of fabrication of air cathodes for alkali zinc-air fuel cells (ZAFCs), one of the few successfully commercialized fuel cells. The more promising compositions for air cathodes are based on individual oxides, or mixtures of such, with a spinel, perovskite, or pyrochlore structure: MnO 2, Ag, Co 3O 4, La 2O 3, LaNiO 3, NiCo 2O 4, LaMnO 3, LaNiO 3, etc. These compositions provide the optimal balance of ORR activity and chemical stability in an alkali electrolyte. The sol-gel and reverse micelle methods supply the most uniform distribution of the catalyst on carbon and the highest catalyst BET surface area. It is shown that the design of the air cathode, including types of carbon black, binding agents, current collectors, Teflon membranes, thermal treatment of the GDL, and catalyst layers, has a strong effect on performance.

  11. Visual Motherese? Signal-to-Noise Ratios in Toddler-Directed Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Sam V.; Smith, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the "signal") and those that are not (the "noise"). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV…

  12. A Comparison of Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution and Speckle Imaging Energy Spectrum Signal-to-Noise Ratios (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-11

    in the SPIE proceedings Vol. 7108, Fall 2008. “Government Purpose Rights” 14. ABSTRACT An analytical signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) expression is...expression cannot, in general, be derived, Cramer-Rao lower bounds are used in place of the variances. As a result, the SNR expression provided upper bounds...to the achievable SNR’s that are independent of the NFBD algorithm implementation. The SNR expression is evaluated for the scenario of ground-based

  13. High power, high signal-to-noise ratio single-frequency 1μm Brillouin all-fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Qian; Jin, Dongchen; Sun, Ruoyu; Shi, Hongxing; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Pu

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-power, high signal-to-noise ratio single-frequency 1 μm Brillouin all-fiber laser with high slope efficiency. The Brillouin laser system consists of a high-power single-frequency fiber laser and a single-pass Brillouin ring cavity. The high-power single-frequency fiber laser is one-stage master-oscillator power amplifier with the maximum output power of 10.33 W, the signal-to-noise ratio of 50 dB and the slope efficiency of 46%. The Brillouin fiber laser is pumped by the amplified laser with a linewidth of 33 kHz and an output power of 2.61 W limited by the damage threshold of the optical isolator. By optimizing the length of the Brillouin ring cavity to 10 m, stable singlefrequency Brillouin fiber laser is obtained with 3 kHz linewidth owing to the linewidth narrowing effect. At the launched pump power of 2.15 W, the Brillouin fiber laser generates maximum output power of 1.4 W with a slope efficiency of 79% and the optical signal-to-noise ratio of 77 dB.

  14. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  15. Note: A signal-to-noise ratio enhancement based on wafer light irradiation system for optical modulation spectroscopy measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouaib, H.; Kelly, P. V.

    2012-02-01

    We have recently found that the magnitude of the photoreflectance (PR) signal ΔR/R on silicon wafers depends on the duration of continuous probe or pump beams irradiation. This temporal behavior of the ΔR/R signal is attributed to the defects related electronic states at the Si/ SiO2 interface, which could be modified by the optical irradiation. Prior to the actual measurement, an optical irradiation of the silicon on insulator or ion implanted Si wafer can significantly enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the PR intensity and, therefore, improve the goodness of fit. Such phenomena can be exclusively seen using a rapid detection system. A new design of the method is reported.

  16. Performance of signal-to-noise ratio estimation for scanning electron microscope using autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Lim, M S; Yeap, Z X

    2016-07-01

    A new technique to quantify signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is proposed. This technique is known as autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion (ACLDR) model. To test the performance of this technique, the SEM image is corrupted with noise. The autocorrelation function of the original image and the noisy image are formed. The signal spectrum based on the autocorrelation function of image is formed. ACLDR is then used as an SNR estimator to quantify the signal spectrum of noisy image. The SNR values of the original image and the quantified image are calculated. The ACLDR is then compared with the three existing techniques, which are nearest neighbourhood, first-order linear interpolation and nearest neighbourhood combined with first-order linear interpolation. It is shown that ACLDR model is able to achieve higher accuracy in SNR estimation.

  17. Speed of response, pile-up, and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, J.

    1989-06-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the electrostatic transformer, is presented. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage.

  18. Laser ultrasonics - Generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  19. Laser ultrasonics: generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  20. Signal intensity ratio on magnetic resonance imaging as a prognostic factor in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Jun Jae; Cho, Yong Eun; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with intramedullary signal intensity (SI) changes have a poor prognosis after surgical decompression in cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM); however, some patients show no clear relationship between the SI and postsurgical prognosis. This discrepancy may be because no comprehensive and proper quantitative evaluation exists to assess SI on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was prospectively to evaluate the correlation between the clinical features, neurological outcome of patients with CCM, and the quantitative assessment of SI changes preoperatively and postoperatively, and the correlation with SI severity. A total of 112 patients with CCM at 1 or 2 levels underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. We quantitatively analyzed MR signal changes on T1-weighted MR images (T1WI), gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced T1WI, and T2-weighted MR images (T2WI) using the signal intensity ratio (SIR). We evaluated the correlations between various variables and neurological outcome using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale, and the severity of SI change by grade (i.e., grade 0 [“none”], grade 1 [“light”], and grade 2 [“bright on T2WI”]). Significant differences between the 3 grades existed in symptom duration, preoperative JOA score, SIR on T2WI, and JOA recovery ratio. The JOA recovery ratio was negatively correlated with symptom duration and the SIR on T2WI, and positively correlated with the preoperative JOA score and cord compression ratio, but not with the SIR on T1WI and contrast-enhanced T1WI. On the postoperative 12-month follow-up MRI, the JOA recovery ratio and SIR on T2WI of the SI reversal patients were better than those of the nonreversal patients. On multiple regression analysis, the SIR on T2WI was the main significant prognostic factor of surgical outcome. The grading system on T2WI provided reliable predictive information for neurological outcome

  1. Measurement of duration and signal-to-noise ratio of astronomical transients using a Spectral Kurtosis spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-08-01

    Following our prior theoretical and instrumental work addressing the problem of automatic real-time radio frequency interference (RFI) detection and excision from astronomical signals, the wideband Spectral Kurtosis (SK) spectrometer design we proposed is currently being considered as an alternative to the traditional spectrometers when building the new generation of radio instruments. The unique characteristic of an SK spectrometer is that it accumulates both power and power-squared, which are then used to compute an SK statistical estimator proven to be very effective in detecting and excising certain types of RFI signals. In this paper we introduce a novel measurement technique that exploits the power and power square statistics of an SK spectrometer to determine durations and signal-to-noise ratios of transient signals, whether they are RFI or natural signals, even when they are below the time resolution of the instrument. We demonstrate this novel experimental technique by analyzing a segment of data recorded by the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array Subsystem Testbed (EST) during a solar radio burst in which microwave spike bursts occurred with durations shorter than the 20 ms time resolution of the instrument. The duration of one well-observed spike is quantitatively shown to be within a few percent of 8 ms despite the 20 ms resolution of the data.

  2. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measures Efficacy of Biological Computing Devices and Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biological cells to perform computations has a broad range of important potential applications, including precision medical therapies, biosynthesis process control, and environmental sensing. Implementing predictable and effective computation, however, has been extremely difficult to date, due to a combination of poor composability of available parts and of insufficient characterization of parts and their interactions with the complex environment in which they operate. In this paper, the author argues that this situation can be improved by quantitative signal-to-noise analysis of the relationship between computational abstractions and the variation and uncertainty endemic in biological organisms. This analysis takes the form of a ΔSNRdB function for each computational device, which can be computed from measurements of a device’s input/output curve and expression noise. These functions can then be combined to predict how well a circuit will implement an intended computation, as well as evaluating the general suitability of biological devices for engineering computational circuits. Applying signal-to-noise analysis to current repressor libraries shows that no library is currently sufficient for general circuit engineering, but also indicates key targets to remedy this situation and vastly improve the range of computations that can be used effectively in the implementation of biological applications. PMID:26177070

  3. Signal-to-background-ratio preferences of normal-hearing listeners as a function of music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jillian G.

    2005-04-01

    The primary purpose of speech is to convey a message. Many factors affect the listener's overall reception, several of which have little to do with the linguistic content itself, but rather with the delivery (e.g., prosody, intonation patterns, pragmatics, paralinguistic cues). Music, however, may convey a message either with or without linguistic content. In instances in which music has lyrics, one cannot assume verbal content will take precedence over sonic properties. Lyric emphasis over other aspects of music cannot be assumed. Singing introduces distortion of the vowel-consonant temporal ratio of speech, emphasizing vowels and de-emphasizing consonants. The phonemic production alterations of singing make it difficult for even those with normal hearing to understand the singer. This investigation was designed to identify singer-to-background-ratio (SBR) prefer- ences for normal hearing adult listeners (as opposed to SBR levels maxi-mizing speech discrimination ability). Stimuli were derived from three different original songs, each produced in two different genres and sung by six different singers. Singer and genre were the two primary contributors to significant differences in SBR preferences, though results clearly indicate genre, style and singer interact in different combinations for each song, each singer, and for each subject in an unpredictable manner.

  4. 1 Tbit/inch2 Recording in Angular-Multiplexing Holographic Memory with Constant Signal-to-Scatter Ratio Schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Makoto; Ishii, Toshiki; Tanaka, Asato; Koga, Shogo; Hoshizawa, Taku

    2013-09-01

    We developed an iterative method for optimizing the exposure schedule to obtain a constant signal-to-scatter ratio (SSR) to accommodate various recording conditions and achieve high-density recording. 192 binary images were recorded in the same location of a medium in approximately 300×300 µm2 using an experimental system embedded with a blue laser diode with a 405 nm wavelength and an objective lens with a 0.85 numerical aperture. The recording density of this multiplexing corresponds to 1 Tbit/in.2. The recording exposure time was optimized through the iteration of a three-step sequence consisting of total reproduced intensity measurement, target signal calculation, and recording energy density calculation. The SSR of pages recorded with this method was almost constant throughout the entire range of the reference beam angle. The signal-to-noise ratio of the sampled pages was over 2.9 dB, which is higher than the reproducible limit of 1.5 dB in our experimental system.

  5. Attitude determination for small satellites using GPS signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Daniel

    An embedded system for GPS-based attitude determination (AD) using signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements was developed for CubeSat applications. The design serves as an evaluation testbed for conducting ground based experiments using various computational methods and antenna types to determine the optimum AD accuracy. Raw GPS data is also stored to non-volatile memory for downloading and post analysis. Two low-power microcontrollers are used for processing and to display information on a graphic screen for real-time performance evaluations. A new parallel inter-processor communication protocol was developed that is faster and uses less power than existing standard protocols. A shorted annular patch (SAP) antenna was fabricated for the initial ground-based AD experiments with the testbed. Static AD estimations with RMS errors in the range of 2.5° to 4.8° were achieved over a range of off-zenith attitudes.

  6. Measuring multielectron beam imaging fidelity with a signal-to-noise ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Maseeh; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Quoi, Kathy; Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad

    2016-07-01

    Java Monte Carlo Simulator for Secondary Electrons (JMONSEL) simulations are used to generate expected imaging responses of chosen test cases of patterns and defects with the ability to vary parameters for beam energy, spot size, pixel size, and/or defect material and form factor. The patterns are representative of the design rules for an aggressively scaled FinFET-type design. With these simulated images and resulting shot noise, a signal-to-noise framework is developed, which relates to defect detection probabilities. Additionally, with this infrastructure, the effect of detection chain noise and frequency-dependent system response can be made, allowing for targeting of best recipe parameters for multielectron beam inspection validation experiments. Ultimately, these results should lead to insights into how such parameters will impact tool design, including necessary doses for defect detection and estimations of scanning speeds for achieving high throughput for high-volume manufacturing.

  7. Attention enhances synaptic efficacy and the signal-to-noise ratio in neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Farran; Mangun, George R; Usrey, W Martin

    2013-07-25

    Attention is a critical component of perception. However, the mechanisms by which attention modulates neuronal communication to guide behaviour are poorly understood. To elucidate the synaptic mechanisms of attention, we developed a sensitive assay of attentional modulation of neuronal communication. In alert monkeys performing a visual spatial attention task, we probed thalamocortical communication by electrically stimulating neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus while simultaneously recording shock-evoked responses from monosynaptically connected neurons in primary visual cortex. We found that attention enhances neuronal communication by increasing the efficacy of presynaptic input in driving postsynaptic responses, by increasing synchronous responses among ensembles of postsynaptic neurons receiving independent input, and by decreasing redundant signals between postsynaptic neurons receiving common input. The results demonstrate that attention finely tunes neuronal communication at the synaptic level by selectively altering synaptic weights, enabling enhanced detection of salient events in the noisy sensory environment.

  8. Approaches to Increasing Surface Stress for Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Microcantilever Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hai-Feng; Armon, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microcantilever sensor technology has been steadily growing for the last fifteen years. While we have gained a great amount of knowledge in microcantilever bending due to surface stress changes, which is a unique property of microcantilever sensors, we are still in the early stages of understanding the fundamental surface chemistries of surface-stress-based microcantilever sensors. In general, increasing surface stress, which is caused by interactions on the microcantilever surfaces, would improve the S/N ratio, and subsequently the sensitivity and reliability of microcantilever sensors. In this review, we will summarize: A) the conditions under which a large surface stress can readily be attained, and B) the strategies to increase surface stress in case a large surface stress can not readily be reached. We will also discuss our perspectives on microcantilever sensors based on surface stress changes. PMID:20128621

  9. Enhanced Ratio of Signals Enables Digital Mutation Scanning for Rare Allele Detection

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  10. Superior signal-to-noise ratio of a new AA1 sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar.

    PubMed

    Rybaltowski, Adam; Taflove, Allen

    2004-08-01

    In an earlier work [Proc. SPIE 4484, 216 (2001)] we proposed a new AA1 modulation sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar. It possesses significantly better signal properties than other pseudorandom codes (the M, A1, and A2 sequences). We derive and compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new AA1 sequence with those of previous modulation sequences. Using a figure of merit proposed for pseudorandom sequences in additive (and generally colored) noise, we show that the SNR of the AA1 sequence in 1/f noise can be as much as 50 times better than that of the commonly used M sequence. This improved SNR should permit as much as a 7:1 increase of the maximum lidar sensing range in baseband-modulation direct-detection infrared lidar with no significant changes to the transmitter and receiver.

  11. Indoor location awareness based on received signal strength ratio and time division multiplexing using light-emitting diode light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soo-Yong; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Chang-Soo

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an indoor location awareness method for an autonomous robot vehicle using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The location is estimated by measuring received signal strength ratio (RSSR), which is the relative ratio of optical powers detected between each LED and optical receiver. In this method, multiple LED lamps on the indoor ceiling are used, which can radiate light only during the individual time slot assigned to each of them. Using the RSSRs, circle or straight line equations are obtained and the crossing point among those equations determines the location of the object. In the experiment, four LED lamps are identified by time-division multiplexing with room dimensions of 1.0×1.0×1.3 m3, and the results show that the mean of the location error is 3.24 cm in the entire floor area.

  12. [Position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the signal-to-noise ratio measurement in parallel imaging].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Koichi; Yoshida, Koji; Yanagimoto, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    We studied the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gave the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurement of parallel imaging (PI). Sensitivity correction processing that referred to the sensitivity distribution of the body coil improved regional uniformity more than the sensitivity uniformity correction filter with a fixed correction factor. In addition, the position dependent influence to give the SNR measurement in PI was different from the sensitivity correction processing. Therefore, if we divide SNR of the sensitivity correction processing image by SNR of the original image in each pixel and calculate SNR ratio, we can show the position dependent influence that sensitivity correction processing gives the SNR measurement in PI. It is with an index of the sensitivity correction processing precision.

  13. Discretization in time gives rise to noise-induced improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in static nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidović, A.; Huntington, E. H.; Frater, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    For some nonlinear systems the performance can improve with an increasing noise level. Such noise-induced improvement in static nonlinearities is of great interest for practical applications since many systems can be modeled in that way (e.g., sensors, quantizers, limiters, etc.). We present experimental evidence that noise-induced performance improvement occurs in those systems as a consequence of discretization in time with the achievable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain increasing with decreasing ratio of input noise bandwidth and total measurement bandwidth. By modifying the input noise bandwidth, noise-induced improvement with SNR gain larger than unity is demonstrated in a system where it was not previously thought possible. Our experimental results bring closer two different theoretical models for the same class of nonlinearities and shed light on the behavior of static nonlinear discrete-time systems.

  14. Speech intelligibility in reverberation with ideal binary masking: effects of early reflections and signal-to-noise ratio threshold.

    PubMed

    Roman, Nicoleta; Woodruff, John

    2013-03-01

    Ideal binary masking is a signal processing technique that separates a desired signal from a mixture by retaining only the time-frequency units where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) exceeds a predetermined threshold. In reverberant conditions there are multiple possible definitions of the ideal binary mask in that one may choose to treat the target early reflections as either desired signal or noise. The ideal binary mask may therefore be parameterized by the reflection boundary, a predetermined division point between early and late reflections. Another important parameter is the local SNR threshold used in labeling the time-frequency units as either target or background. Two experiments were designed to assess the impact of these two parameters on speech intelligibility with ideal binary masking for normal-hearing listeners in reverberant conditions. Experiment 1 shows that in order to achieve intelligibility improvements only the early reflections should be preserved by the binary mask. Moreover, it shows that the effective SNR should be accounted for when deciding the local threshold optimal range. Experiment 2 shows that with long reverberation times, intelligibility improvements are only obtained when the reflection boundary is 100 ms or less. Also, the experiment suggests that binary masking can be used for dereverberation.

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation on SEM images using cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Kiani, M A; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2014-01-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay noise reduction filtering is designed to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. This approach is found to present better result when compared with two existing techniques: nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. When applied to evaluate the quality of SEM images, noise can be eliminated efficiently with optimal choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time.

  16. Visual motherese? Signal-to-noise ratios in toddler-directed television.

    PubMed

    Wass, Sam V; Smith, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the 'signal') and those that are not (the 'noise'). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV programmes (TotTV/ATV). We examined how low-level visual features (that previous research has suggested influence gaze allocation) relate to semantic information, namely the location of the character speaking in each frame. We show that this relationship differs between TotTV and ATV. First, we conducted Receiver Operator Characteristics analyses and found that feature congestion predicted speaking character location in TotTV but not ATV. Second, we used multiple analytical strategies to show that luminance differentials (flicker) predict face location more strongly in TotTV than ATV. Our results suggest that TotTV designers have intuited techniques for controlling toddler attention using low-level visual cues. The implications of these findings for structuring childhood learning experiences away from a screen are discussed.

  17. Drought and flood signals in subtropical estuaries recorded by stable isotope ratios in bivalve shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, B. D.; Rowley, J. L.

    2013-11-01

    Isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen recorded in biogenic carbonates can be effective proxies for ambient conditions in estuaries including salinity and temperature. Together, they have the potential to allow periods of drought and flooding to be identified in subtropical estuaries that receive stochastic and aperiodic delivery of freshwater inflow. We investigated the ability of δ13C and δ18O values in shell increments from the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica sampled from subtropical estuaries in the western Gulf of Mexico to indicate differences in temperature and salinity dynamics at fine spatial scales. Oyster shells at locations that experienced both hypersalinity during droughts and dramatic decreases in salinity during floods showed distinct variations in shell δ13C and δ18O values that reflected local salinity conditions. In contrast, oysters at sites where no major salinity fluctuation occurred showed only seasonal fluctuations in isotopes reflecting temperature and possibly feeding patterns. Further, similar isotopic patterns were observed across multiple individuals from each site. Our results show that δ13C and δ18O values in shells measured together provide a powerful method to identify droughts and floods in subtropical estuaries and therefore extend records of dynamic inflow to these stressed ecosystems.

  18. Phenomenology of amplitude-corrected post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms for compact binary inspiral: I. Signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, Chris; Sengupta, Anand S.

    2007-01-01

    We study the phenomenological consequences of amplitude-corrected post-Newtonian (PN) gravitational waveforms, as opposed to the more commonly used restricted PN waveforms, for the quasi-circular, adiabatic inspiral of compact binary objects. In the case of initial detectors it has been shown that the use of amplitude-corrected waveforms for detection templates would lead to significantly lower signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) than those suggested by simulations based exclusively on restricted waveforms. We further elucidate the origin of the effect by an in-depth analytic treatment. The discussion is extended to advanced detectors, where new features emerge. Non-restricted waveforms are linear combinations of harmonics in the orbital phase, and in the frequency domain the kth harmonic is cut off at kfLSO, with fLSO the orbital frequency at the last stable orbit. As a result, with non-restricted templates it is possible to achieve sizeable signal-to-noise ratios in cases where the dominant harmonic (which is the one at twice the orbital phase) does not enter the detector's bandwidth. This will have important repercussions on the detection of binary inspirals involving intermediate-mass black holes. For sources at a distance of 100 Mpc, taking into account the higher harmonics will double the mass reach of Advanced LIGO, and that of EGO gets tripled. Conservative estimates indicate that the restricted waveforms underestimate detection rates for intermediate mass binary inspirals by at least a factor of 20.

  19. A high signal-to-noise ratio passive near-field microscope equipped with a helium-free cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuan-Ting; Komiyama, Susumu; Kim, Sunmi; Kawamura, Ken-ichi; Kajihara, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a passive long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) installed in a helium-free mechanically cooled cryostat, which facilitates cooling of an LWIR detector and optical elements to 4.5 K. To reduce mechanical vibration propagation from a compressor unit, we have introduced a metal bellows damper and a helium gas damper. These dampers ensure the performance of the s-SNOM to be free from mechanical vibration. Furthermore, we have introduced a solid immersion lens to improve the confocal microscope performance. To demonstrate the passive s-SNOM capability, we measured thermally excited surface evanescent waves on Au/SiO2 gratings. A near-field signal-to-noise ratio is 4.5 times the improvement with an acquisition time of 1 s/pixel. These improvements have made the passive s-SNOM a more convenient and higher-performance experimental tool with a higher signal-to-noise ratio for a shorter acquisition time of 0.1 s.

  20. Emotional content of an image attracts attention more than visually salient features in various signal-to-noise ratio conditions.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Joanna; Kuniecki, Michał

    2014-10-07

    Emotional images are processed in a prioritized manner, attracting attention almost immediately. In the present study we used eye tracking to reveal what type of features within neutral, positive, and negative images attract early visual attention: semantics, visual saliency, or their interaction. Semantic regions of interest were selected by observers, while visual saliency was determined using the Graph-Based Visual Saliency model. Images were transformed by adding pink noise in several proportions to be presented in a sequence of increasing and decreasing clarity. Locations of the first two fixations were analyzed. The results showed dominance of semantic features over visual saliency in attracting attention. This dominance was linearly related to the signal-to-noise ratio. Semantic regions were fixated more often in emotional images than in neutral ones, if signal-to-noise ratio was high enough to allow participants to comprehend the gist of a scene. Visual saliency on its own did not attract attention above chance, even in the case of pure noise images. Regions both visually salient and semantically relevant attracted a similar amount of fixation compared to semantic regions alone, or even more in the case of neutral pictures. Results provide evidence for fast and robust detection of semantically relevant features.

  1. NanoCapillary Network Proton Conducting Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen/Air Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pintauro, Peter

    2012-07-09

    The objective of this proposal is to fabricate and characterize a new class of NanoCapillary Network (NCN) proton conducting membranes for hydrogen/air fuel cells that operate under high temperature, low humidity conditions. The membranes will be intelligently designed, where a high density interconnecting 3-D network of nm-diameter electrospun proton conducting polymer fibers is embedded in an inert (uncharged) water/gas impermeable polymer matrix. The high density of fibers in the resulting mat and the high ion-exchange capacity of the fiber polymer will ensure high proton conductivity. To further enhance water retention, molecular silica will be added to the sulfonated polymer fibers. The uncharged matrix material will control water swelling of the high ion-exchange capacity proton conducting polymer fibers and will impart toughness to the final nanocapillary composite membrane. Thus, unlike other fuel cell membranes, the role of the polymer support matrix will be decoupled from that of the proton-conducting channels. The expected final outcome of this 5-year project is the fabrication of fuel cell membranes with properties that exceed the DOE’s technical targets, in particular a proton conductivity of 0.1 S/cm at a temperature less than or equal to120°C and 25-50% relative humidity.

  2. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components. PMID:23573167

  3. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  4. Receiver Signal to Noise Ratios for IPDA Lidars Using Sine-wave and Pulsed Laser Modulation and Direct Detections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar can be used to remotely measure the column density of gases in the path to a scattering target [1]. The total column gas molecular density can be derived from the ratio of the laser echo signal power with the laser wavelength on the gas absorption line (on-line) to that off the line (off-line). 80th coherent detection and direct detection IPDA lidar have been used successfully in the past in horizontal path and airborne remote sensing measurements. However, for space based measurements, the signal propagation losses are often orders of magnitude higher and it is important to use the most efficient laser modulation and detection technique to minimize the average laser power and the electrical power from the spacecraft. This paper gives an analysis the receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) of several laser modulation and detection techniques versus the average received laser power under similar operation environments. Coherent detection [2] can give the best receiver performance when the local oscillator laser is relatively strong and the heterodyne mixing losses are negligible. Coherent detection has a high signal gain and a very narrow bandwidth for the background light and detector dark noise. However, coherent detection must maintain a high degree of coherence between the local oscillator laser and the received signal in both temporal and spatial modes. This often results in a high system complexity and low overall measurement efficiency. For measurements through atmosphere the coherence diameter of the received signal also limits the useful size of the receiver telescope. Direct detection IPDA lidars are simpler to build and have fewer constraints on the transmitter and receiver components. They can use much larger size 'photon-bucket' type telescopes to reduce the demands on the laser transmitter. Here we consider the two most widely used direct detection IPDA lidar techniques. The first technique uses two CW

  5. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity; Relating count rates to image signal-to-noise ratios using noise equivalent counts

    SciTech Connect

    Strother, S.C. ); Casey, M.E. ); Hoffman, E.J. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom.

  6. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of an ECL-based sensor using ad hoc carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanginario, A.; Giorcelli, M.; Tagliaferro, A.; Demarchi, D.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that mechanically modified cylinder-shaped carbon nanotube (CNT) working electrodes (WEs), combined with an averaging processing algorithm, can increase electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) limit of detection by more than one order of magnitude, compared to gold electrodes. With CNT WEs, we obtained a stable light emission that lasts for hundreds of voltammetric cycles. This stability was further exploited to increase the detection limit with a simple algorithm, based on mean calculation. Ad hoc fabricated sensors are characterized with a full-custom potentiostat testbed and software platform, using tris(2,2-bipyridyl)ruthenium (II) as ECL labels. Our measurement results show that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improves by a factor of larger than 20 compared to standard gold WEs to reach a detection limit up to 40 pg μl-1.

  7. Seamless Data-Rate Change Using Punctured Convolutional Codes for a Time-Varying Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Ying; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) environment, symbol rate is changed to maximize data return. However, the symbol-rate changes may cause the receiver symbol loop to lose lock, thus losing real-time data. We propose an alternate way of varying the data rate in a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream and transmitting the punctured encoded symbols with a constant symbol rate. We systematically searched for good puncturing patterns for the Galileo (14,1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the punctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997. We concluded that this scheme reduces the symbol-rate changes from 9 to 2 and provides a larger data return and a higher symbol SNR during most of the day.

  8. Resolution and signal-to-noise ratio improvement in confocal fluorescence microscopy using array detection and maximum-likelihood processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G.; Phillips, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) is widely used in biological sciences because of its enhanced 3D resolution that allows image sectioning and removal of out-of-focus blur. This is achieved by rejection of the light outside a detection pinhole in a plane confocal with the illuminated object. In this paper, an alternative detection arrangement is examined in which the entire detection/image plane is recorded using an array detector rather than a pinhole detector. Using this recorded data an attempt is then made to recover the object from the whole set of recorded photon array data; in this paper maximum-likelihood estimation has been applied. The recovered object estimates are shown (through computer simulation) to have good resolution, image sectioning and signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional pinhole CFM images.

  9. Wide-angle narrow-bandpass optical detection system optimally designed to have a large signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Naftali; Arieli, Yoel

    2000-02-01

    A method for achieving optimal design of a wide-angle narrow-bandpass optical detection system composed of a spherical interference filter and a circular photodetector is introduced. It was found that there is an optimal photodetector diameter that maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given filter configuration. We show how to optimize optical detection systems based on spherical interference filters for all the important parameters simultaneously. The SNR values of these systems are compared with the SNR values of spherical-step-filter-based detection systems. When large silicon photodetectors are used, the two systems have equal SNR values so that the more economical step-filter systems are preferable. The results given here in the near-infrared region can be used for the optimization of any configuration of a detection system based on a spherical interference filter and a silicon photodetector working at the same wavelength range, without further calculations.

  10. Comparisons of jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio from directly digitized versus taped voice samples.

    PubMed

    Gelfer, M P; Fendel, D M

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measures obtained from tape-recorded samples with the same measures made on directly digitized voice samples, with use of the CSpeech acoustic analysis program. Subjects included 30 young women who phonated the vowel /a/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness level. Voice samples were simultaneously recorded and digitized, and the resulting perturbation measures for the two conditions were compared. Results indicated that there were small but statistically significant differences between percent jitter, percent shimmer, and SNR calculated from taped samples compared with the same measures calculated from directly digitized samples. It was concluded that direct digitization for clinical measures of vocal perturbation was most desirable, but that taped samples could be used, if necessary, with some caution.

  11. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-24

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2). Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g(-1)carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1)carbon at 20 μA cm(-2) and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  12. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g‑1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g‑1carbon at 20 μA cm‑2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage.

  13. A Rechargeable Li-Air Fuel Cell Battery Based on Garnet Solid Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiyang; Zhao, Ning; Li, Yiqiu; Guo, Xiangxin; Feng, Xuefei; Liu, Xiaosong; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Guanglei; Zheng, Hao; Gu, Lin; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Non-aqueous Li-air batteries have been intensively studied in the past few years for their theoretically super-high energy density. However, they cannot operate properly in real air because they contain highly unstable and volatile electrolytes. Here, we report the fabrication of solid-state Li-air batteries using garnet (i.e., Li6.4La3Zr1.4Ta0.6O12, LLZTO) ceramic disks with high density and ionic conductivity as the electrolytes and composite cathodes consisting of garnet powder, Li salts (LiTFSI) and active carbon. These batteries run in real air based on the formation and decomposition at least partially of Li2CO3. Batteries with LiTFSI mixed with polyimide (PI:LiTFSI) as a binder show rechargeability at 200 °C with a specific capacity of 2184 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2. Replacement of PI:LiTFSI with LiTFSI dissolved in polypropylene carbonate (PPC:LiTFSI) reduces interfacial resistance, and the resulting batteries show a greatly increased discharge capacity of approximately 20300 mAh g−1carbon and cycle 50 times while maintaining a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g−1carbon at 20 μA cm−2 and 80 °C. These results demonstrate that the use of LLZTO ceramic electrolytes enables operation of the Li-air battery in real air at medium temperatures, leading to a novel type of Li-air fuel cell battery for energy storage. PMID:28117359

  14. Optimization of wide-angle seismic signal-to-noise ratios and P-wave transmission in Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacob, A.W.B.; Vees, R.; Braile, L.W.; Criley, E.

    1994-01-01

    In previous refraction and wide-angle reflection experiments in the Kenya Rift there were problems with poor signal-noise ratios which made good seismic interpretation difficult. Careful planning and preparation for KRISP 90 has substantially overcome these problems and produced excellent seismic sections in a difficult environment. Noise levels were minimized by working, as far as possible, at times of the day when conditions were quiet, while source signals were optimized by using dispersed charges in water where it was available and waterfilled boreholes in most cases where it was not. Seismic coupling at optimum depth in water has been found to be more than 100 times greater than it is in a borehole in dry loosely compacted material. Allowing for the source coupling, a very marked difference has been found between the observation ranges in the rift and those on the flanks, where the observation ranges are greater. These appear to indicate a significant difference in seismic transmission through the two types of crust. ?? 1994.

  15. Significant improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in capillary electrophoresis through optimization of aperture width for UV absorption detection.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, K; Sato, Y

    2001-10-01

    In capillary electrophoresis (CE), light flux passes through a capillary cell and is in most cases detected photometrically. Due to the thinness of the cell, a part of the light passes through the wall and misses hitting the sample. In most CE apparatuses, incident light is focused by converging lenses in order to condense light beams passing through the capillary. Considering the aberration of lenses and lens effects of capillary, we assumed that light beams inside were approximately parallel. Although the path lengths of light beams vary depending on their tracks, we could estimate the virtual light path length, L, by measuring absorbance when concentration and molar absorptivity of the sample solution were known. A light-restricting device consisting of narrow slits makes effectively L longer and signal intensity higher. On the other hand, noise increases as light width narrows. The signal-to-noise ratio showed a maximum at 68 microm of light width for a capillary with diameter of 75 microm. The optimized L was evaluated by the simulation. The experimental data verified it even in indirect UV detection. Our approach could help to design the optics of CE apparatuses.

  16. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Susceptibility Weighted Imaging: A Novel Multicomponent Non-Local Approach

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Pasquale; Palma, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Enrico; Cocozza, Sirio; Comerci, Marco; Alfano, Bruno; Haacke, E. Mark; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), the high resolution required to obtain a proper contrast generation leads to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The application of a denoising filter to produce images with higher SNR and still preserve small structures from excessive blurring is therefore extremely desirable. However, as the distributions of magnitude and phase noise may introduce biases during image restoration, the application of a denoising filter is non-trivial. Taking advantage of the potential multispectral nature of MR images, a multicomponent approach using a Non-Local Means (MNLM) denoising filter may perform better than a component-by-component image restoration method. Here we present a new MNLM-based method (Multicomponent-Imaginary-Real-SWI, hereafter MIR-SWI) to produce SWI images with high SNR and improved conspicuity. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons of MIR-SWI with the original SWI scheme and previously proposed SWI restoring pipelines showed that MIR-SWI fared consistently better than the other approaches. Noise removal with MIR-SWI also provided improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and vessel conspicuity at higher factors of phase mask multiplications than the one suggested in the literature for SWI vessel imaging. We conclude that a proper handling of noise in the complex MR dataset may lead to improved image quality for SWI data. PMID:26030293

  17. Predicting speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio after modulation-frequency selective processing.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2011-09-01

    A model for predicting the intelligibility of processed noisy speech is proposed. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model has a similar structure as the model of Ewert and Dau [(2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196], developed to account for modulation detection and masking data. The model estimates the speech-to-noise envelope power ratio, SNR(env), at the output of a modulation filterbank and relates this metric to speech intelligibility using the concept of an ideal observer. Predictions were compared to data on the intelligibility of speech presented in stationary speech-shaped noise. The model was further tested in conditions with noisy speech subjected to reverberation and spectral subtraction. Good agreement between predictions and data was found in all cases. For spectral subtraction, an analysis of the model's internal representation of the stimuli revealed that the predicted decrease of intelligibility was caused by the estimated noise envelope power exceeding that of the speech. The classical concept of the speech transmission index fails in this condition. The results strongly suggest that the signal-to-noise ratio at the output of a modulation frequency selective process provides a key measure of speech intelligibility.

  18. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-03-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  19. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. Here, we are applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantify the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining data sets from several analysers and using simulations, we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time lag eliminates these effects (provided the time lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  20. Modeling Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Otoacoustic Emissions in Workers Exposed to Different Industrial Noise Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nassiri, Parvin; Zare, Sajad; Monazzam, Mohammad R.; Pourbakht, Akram; Azam, Kamal; Golmohammadi, Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Noise is considered as the most common cause of harmful physical effects in the workplace. A sound that is generated from within the inner ear is known as an otoacoustic emission (OAE). Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) assess evoked emission and hearing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess the signal-to-noise ratio in different frequencies and at different times of the shift work in workers exposed to various levels of noise. It was also aimed to provide a statistical model for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of OAEs in different frequencies based on the two variables of sound pressure level (SPL) and exposure time. Materials and Methods: This case–control study was conducted on 45 workers during autumn 2014. The workers were divided into three groups based on the level of noise exposure. The SNR was measured in frequencies of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz in both ears, and in three different time intervals during the shift work. According to the inclusion criterion, SNR of 6 dB or greater was included in the study. The analysis was performed using repeated measurements of analysis of variance, spearman correlation coefficient, and paired samples t-test. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the three exposed groups in terms of the mean values of SNR (P > 0.05). Only in signal pressure levels of 88 dBA with an interval time of 10:30–11:00 AM, there was a statistically significant difference between the right and left ears with the mean SNR values of 3000 frequency (P = 0.038). The SPL had a significant effect on the SNR in both the right and left ears (P = 0.023, P = 0.041). The effect of the duration of measurement on the SNR was statistically significant in both the right and left ears (P = 0.027, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated that after noise exposure during the shift, SNR of OAEs reduced from the beginning to the end of the shift

  1. Evolution of stalk/spore ratio in a social amoeba: cell-to-cell interaction via a signaling chemical shaped by cheating risk.

    PubMed

    Uchinomiya, Kouki; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-11-07

    The social amoeba (or cellular slime mold) is a model system for cell cooperation. When food is depleted in the environment, cells aggregate together. Some of these cells become stalks, raising spores to aid in their dispersal. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a signaling chemical produced by prespore cells and decomposed by prestalk cells. It affects the rate of switching between prestalk and prespore cells, thereby achieving a stable stalk/spore ratio. In this study we analyzed the evolution of the stalk/spore ratio. Strains may differ in the production and decomposition rates of the signaling chemical, and in the sensitivity of cells to switch in response to the signaling chemical exposure. When two strains with the same stalk/spore ratio within their own fruiting body are combined into a single fruiting body, one strain may develop into prespores to a greater degree than the other. Direct evolutionary simulations and quantitative genetic dynamics demonstrate that if a fruiting body is always formed by a single strain, the cells evolve to produce less signaling chemical and become more sensitive to the signaling chemical due to the cost of producing the chemical. In contrast, if a fruiting body is formed by multiple strains, the cells evolve to become less sensitive to the signaling chemical and produce more signaling chemical in order to reduce the risk of being exploited. In contrast, the stalk-spore ratio is less likely to be affected by small cheating risk.

  2. Spectral parameters and signal-to-noise ratio requirement for TANSAT hyper spectral remote sensor of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Zhong-Dong; Bi, Yan-Meng

    2014-11-01

    , the results indicate that sampling ratio should exceed 2 pixels/FWHM to ensure the accuracy of CO2 spectrum. Signal-to-noise ratio is one of the most important parameters of hyper spectral CO2 detectors to ensure the reliability of CO2 signal. SNR requirements of CO2 detector to different detection precisions are explored based on the radiance sensitivity factors. The results show that it is difficult to achieve the SNR to detect 1×10-6-4×10-6 CO2 concentration change in the boundary layer by solar shortwave infrared passive remote sensing, limited by the instrument development at present. However, the instrument SNR to detect 1% change in the CO2 column concentration is attainable. The results of this study are not only conductive to universal applications and guides on developing grating spectrometer, but also helpful to have a better understanding of the complexity of CO2 retrieval.

  3. A passive microfluidic hydrogen-air fuel cell with exceptional stability and high performance.

    PubMed

    Mitrovski, Svetlana M; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2006-03-01

    We describe an advanced microfluidic hydrogen-air fuel cell (FC) that exhibits exceptional durability and high performance, most notably yielding stable output power (>100 days) without the use of an anode-cathode separator membrane. This FC embraces an entirely passive device architecture and, unlike conventional microfluidic designs that exploit laminar hydrodynamics, no external pumps are used to sustain or localize the reagent flow fields. The devices incorporate high surface area/porous metal and metal alloy electrodes that are embedded and fully immersed in liquid electrolyte confined in the channels of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic network. The polymeric network also serves as a self-supporting membrane through which oxygen and hydrogen are supplied to the cathode and alloy anode, respectively, by permeation. The operational stability of the device and its performance is strongly dependent on the nature of the electrolyte used (5 M H2SO4 or 2.5 M NaOH) and composition of the anode material. The latter choice is optimized to decrease the sensitivity of the system to oxygen cross-over while still maintaining high activity towards the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Three types of high surface area anodes were tested in this work. These include: high-surface area electrodeposited Pt (Pt); high-surface area electrodeposited Pd (Pd); and thin palladium adlayers supported on a "porous" Pt electrode (Pd/Pt). The FCs display their best performance in 5 M H2SO4 using the Pd/Pt anode. This exceptional stability and performance was ascribed to several factors, namely: the high permeabilities of O2, H2, and CO2 in PDMS; the inhibition of the formation of insoluble carbonate species due to the presence of a highly acidic electrolyte; and the selectivity of the Pd/Pt anode toward the HOR. The stability of the device for long-term operation was modeled using a stack of three FCs as a power supply for a portable display that otherwise uses a 3 V

  4. Non-linear signal response functions and their effects on the statistical and noise cancellation properties of isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, W.

    2013-07-01

    A nebulizer-centric response function model of the analytical inductively coupled argon plasma ion source was used to investigate the statistical frequency distributions and noise reduction factors of simultaneously measured flicker noise limited isotope ion signals and their ratios. The response function model was extended by assuming i) a single gaussian distributed random noise source (nebulizer gas pressure fluctuations) and ii) the isotope ion signal response is a parabolic function of the nebulizer gas pressure. Model calculations of ion signal and signal ratio histograms were obtained by applying the statistical method of translation to the non-linear response function model of the plasma. Histograms of Ni, Cu, Pr, Tl and Pb isotope ion signals measured using a multi-collector plasma mass spectrometer were, without exception, negative skew. Histograms of the corresponding isotope ratios of Ni, Cu, Tl and Pb were either positive or negative skew. There was a complete agreement between the measured and model calculated histogram skew properties. The nebulizer-centric response function model was also used to investigate the effect of non-linear response functions on the effectiveness of noise cancellation by signal division. An alternative noise correction procedure suitable for parabolic signal response functions was derived and applied to measurements of isotope ratios of Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl. The largest noise reduction factors were always obtained when the non-linearity of the response functions was taken into account by the isotope ratio calculation. Possible applications of the nebulizer-centric response function model to other types of analytical instrumentation, large amplitude signal noise sources (e.g., lasers, pumped nebulizers) and analytical error in isotope ratio measurements by multi-collector plasma mass spectrometry are discussed.

  5. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  6. Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

  7. The intensitive DL of tones: dependence of signal/masker ratio on tone level and on spectrum of added noise.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D D

    1993-02-01

    In Greenwood [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 33, 484-502 (1961a)] the ratio of masked signal threshold to masker level (S/M) decreased about 4 dB at a masker level of about 50 dB SL, the 'transition' level, when noise bands were subcritical but not when supercritical. Schlauch et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, S73 (1982)] report a related result. A pilot study [Greenwood, Harvard Psychoacoustic Lab. Status Report 37, 8-9 (1961)] in which pure tones masked identical tones in-phase showed a larger change in S/M. Detailed tone-tone growth-of-masking curves from over a dozen subjects in 1967-69, and in 1960, are reported here. A transition in slope, of variable abruptness, often begins to occur at about 50 dB SL, dropping S/M ratio by 6 to 8 dB or more [Rabinowitz et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 35, 1053 (1976)]; the curves sometimes possess two segments, sometimes are simply convex. All have overall slopes less than 1.0, known also as the 'near miss'. Consistent with other results [Zwicker, Acustica 6, 365-396 (1956); Viemeister, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1265-1296 (1972); Moore and Raab, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 55, 1049-1060 (1974)], addition of low-level wide-band and high-pass noise was found to counteract the change in S/M, i.e., to raise the high-level section of the growth-of-masking curve. However, the ability of narrow 'band-pass' noise to exert this effect was greatest when added at a frequency ratio (band/masking-tone) of 1.3 to 1.5, which seems more closely to link the effects of added noise to the effects of increasing a masking band from sub- to supercritical width (above). Interpretation of the decrease in DL with level begins by noting that the 'transition' level correlates approximately with the level at which a primary unit population excited by a given pure tone begins rapidly to expand basally. Underlying this, the basalward shift of a tone's displacement envelope peak accelerates at about the same level [Rhode, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 49, 1218-1231 (1971); Sellick et al., J

  8. Symbolic Data Analysis to Defy Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Microarray Data for Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Le Lann, Marie-Veronique; Kempowsky, Tatiana; Dalenc, Florence; Aguilar-Martin, Joseph; Favre, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Microarray profiling has recently generated the hope to gain new insights into breast cancer biology and thereby improve the performance of current prognostic tools. However, it also poses several serious challenges to classical data analysis techniques related to the characteristics of resulting data, mainly high dimensionality and low signal-to-noise ratio. Despite the tremendous research work performed to handle the first challenge in the feature selection framework, very little attention has been directed to address the second one. We propose in this article to address both issues simultaneously based on symbolic data analysis capabilities in order to derive more accurate genetic marker–based prognostic models. In particular, interval data representation is employed to model various uncertainties in microarray measurements. A recent feature selection algorithm that handles symbolic interval data is used then to derive a genetic signature. The predictive value of the derived signature is then assessed by following a rigorous experimental setup and compared with existing prognostic approaches in terms of predictive performance and estimated survival probability. It is shown that the derived signature (GenSym) performs significantly better than other prognostic models, including the 70-gene signature, St. Gallen, and National Institutes of Health criteria. PMID:23899014

  9. Temporal and spatial binning of TCSPC data to improve signal-to-noise ratio and imaging speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is the most robust method for fluorescence lifetime imaging using laser scanning microscopes. However, TCSPC is inherently slow making it ineffective to capture rapid events due to the single photon product per laser pulse causing extensive acquisition time limitations and the requirement of low fluorescence emission efficiency to avoid bias of measurement towards short lifetimes. Furthermore, thousands of photons per pixel are required for traditional instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence lifetime exponential decay estimation. Instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence exponential decay estimation can be performed in several ways including iterative least squares minimization and Laguerre deconvolution. This paper compares the limitations and accuracy of these fluorescence decay analysis techniques to accurately estimate double exponential decays across many data characteristics including various lifetime values, lifetime component weights, signal-to-noise ratios, and number of photons detected. Furthermore, techniques to improve data fitting, including binning data temporally and spatially, are evaluated as methods to improve decay fits and reduce image acquisition time. Simulation results demonstrate that binning temporally to 36 or 42 time bins, improves accuracy of fits for low photon count data. Such a technique reduces the required number of photons for accurate component estimation if lifetime values are known, such as for commercial fluorescent dyes and FRET experiments, and improve imaging speed 10-fold.

  10. Diffraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio of multiplexed volume phase holograms recorded in a photographic emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, R.; Bélendez, A.; Fimia, A.

    1996-07-01

    The problems related to noise that arise during recording and reconstruction of holograms used in optical data storage or in massive optical interconnection systems are quite similar and can be analyzed in order to improve the quality of the images that these optical systems provide. In this paper, we will analyze noise in cases in which several coherent object waves are simultaneously stored in a phase recording material in a way that allows us to obtain information about the relationship that exists between the recording material and the number of waves that are being stored. The material used in this study is Agfa Gevaert 8E75 HD holographic film processed with a rehalogenating—type bleach bath without a fixation step. Additionally, we show experimentally that it is possible to holographically store more than 400 waves at the same time (in a coherent fashion) using the same storage geometry, with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 20 and an average diffraction efficiency of 15%.

  11. General expressions for downlink signal to interference and noise ratio in homogeneous and heterogeneous LTE-Advanced networks.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nora A; Mourad, Hebat-Allah M; ElSayed, Hany M; El-Soudani, Magdy; Amer, Hassanein H; Daoud, Ramez M

    2016-11-01

    The interference is the most important problem in LTE or LTE-Advanced networks. In this paper, the interference was investigated in terms of the downlink signal to interference and noise ratio (SINR). In order to compare the different frequency reuse methods that were developed to enhance the SINR, it would be helpful to have a generalized expression to study the performance of the different methods. Therefore, this paper introduces general expressions for the SINR in homogeneous and in heterogeneous networks. In homogeneous networks, the expression was applied for the most common types of frequency reuse techniques: soft frequency reuse (SFR) and fractional frequency reuse (FFR). The expression was examined by comparing it with previously developed ones in the literature and the comparison showed that the expression is valid for any type of frequency reuse scheme and any network topology. Furthermore, the expression was extended to include the heterogeneous network; the expression includes the problem of co-tier and cross-tier interference in heterogeneous networks (HetNet) and it was examined by the same method of the homogeneous one.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratios in IUE SWP-LO spectra of chromospheric emission-line sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1990-12-01

    The short-wavelength-prime (SWP) detector of the International Ultraviolet Explorer should operate near the photon-counting limit, but the noise levels in flat-field images are several times higher. The exaggerated noise can be traced to the incomplete removal of the pixel-to-pixel granularity of the television frames by the prevailing spectral image processing system. An empirical noise model for the current-epoch photometric linearization strategy and one for a hypothetical processing system that achieves complete flat fielding of the raw images are derived. A formula is then proposed to predict the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured flux of an emission line (possibly superimposed on a smooth continuum) in an IUE low-dispersion (5 A resolution) far-ultraviolet (1150 A-1950 A) spectrum as recorded with the SWP camera. For illustration, the formula is specialized to the important C IV 1549 A feature of F-K stars. The S/N relation permits one to determine sensitivity limits, upper limits in faint exposures, and optimum exposure times.

  13. Measurement of Low Signal-To-Noise Ratio Solar p-Modes in Spatially Resolved Helioseismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; Leibacher, J.; Appourchaux, T.; Hill, F.

    2009-05-01

    We present an adaptation of the rotation-corrected, m-averaged spectrum technique designed to observe low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), low-frequency solar p-modes. The frequency shift of each of the 2l + 1 m spectra of a given (n, l) multiplet is chosen that maximizes the likelihood of the m-averaged spectrum. A high S/N can result from combining individual low S/N, individual-m spectra, none of which would yield a strong enough peak to measure. We apply the technique to Global Oscillation Network Group and Michelson Doppler Imager data and show that it allows us to measure modes with lower frequencies than those obtained with classic peak-fitting analysis of the individual-m spectra. We measure their central frequencies, splittings, asymmetries, lifetimes, and amplitudes. The low frequency, low- and intermediate-angular degrees rendered accessible by this new method correspond to modes that are sensitive to the deep solar interior down to the core (l <= 3) and to the radiative interior (4 <= l <= 35). Moreover, the low-frequency modes have deeper upper turning points, and are thus less sensitive to the turbulence and magnetic fields of the outer layers, as well as uncertainties in the nature of the external boundary condition. As a result of their longer lifetimes (narrower linewidths) at the same S/N the determination of the frequencies of lower frequency modes is more accurate, and the resulting inversions should be more precise.

  14. No-reference peak signal to noise ratio estimation based on generalized Gaussian modeling of transform coefficient distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Ji-Woo; Lee, Seon-Oh; Sim, Dong-Gyu; Han, Jong-Ki

    2012-02-01

    We present a no-reference peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) estimation algorithm based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficient distributions from H.264/MPEG-4 part 10 advanced video codec (H.264/AVC) bitstreams. To estimate the PSNR of a compressed picture without the original picture on the decoder side, it is important to model the distribution of transform coefficients obtained from quantized coefficients accurately. Whereas several conventional algorithms use the Laplacian or Cauchy distribution to model the DCT coefficient distribution, the proposed algorithm uses a generalized Gaussian distribution. Pearson's χ2 (chi-square) test was applied to show that the generalized Gaussian distribution is more appropriate than the other models for modeling the transform coefficients. The χ2 test was also used to find optimum parameters for the generalized Gaussian model. It was found that the generalized Gaussian model improves the accuracy of the DCT coefficient distribution, thus reducing the mean squared error between the real and the estimated PSNR.

  15. Symbolic data analysis to defy low signal-to-noise ratio in microarray data for breast cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hedjazi, Lyamine; Le Lann, Marie-Veronique; Kempowsky, Tatiana; Dalenc, Florence; Aguilar-Martin, Joseph; Favre, Gilles

    2013-08-01

    Microarray profiling has recently generated the hope to gain new insights into breast cancer biology and thereby improve the performance of current prognostic tools. However, it also poses several serious challenges to classical data analysis techniques related to the characteristics of resulting data, mainly high dimensionality and low signal-to-noise ratio. Despite the tremendous research work performed to handle the first challenge in the feature selection framework, very little attention has been directed to address the second one. We propose in this article to address both issues simultaneously based on symbolic data analysis capabilities in order to derive more accurate genetic marker-based prognostic models. In particular, interval data representation is employed to model various uncertainties in microarray measurements. A recent feature selection algorithm that handles symbolic interval data is used then to derive a genetic signature. The predictive value of the derived signature is then assessed by following a rigorous experimental setup and compared with existing prognostic approaches in terms of predictive performance and estimated survival probability. It is shown that the derived signature (GenSym) performs significantly better than other prognostic models, including the 70-gene signature, St. Gallen, and National Institutes of Health criteria.

  16. Sea level estimate from multi-frequency signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Ramillien, Guillaume; Darrozes, José; Cornu, Gwendolyne; Koummarasy, Khanithalath

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for sea level monitoring. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and receiver, transforming them to real tide gauges. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, the classical SNR analysis method for estimating the reflecting surface-antenna height is limited by an approximation: the vertical velocity of the reflecting surface must be negligible. Authors present a significant improvement of the SNR technique to solve this problem and broaden the scope of SNR-based tide monitoring. The performances achieved on the different GNSS frequency band (L1, L2 and L5) are analyzed. The method is based on a Least-Mean Square Resolution Method (LSM), combining simultaneous measurements from different GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS), which permits to take the dynamic of the surface into account. It was validated in situ [1], with an antenna placed at 60 meters above the Atlantic Ocean surface with variations reaching ±3 meters, and amplitude rate of the semi-diurnal tide up to 0.5 mm/s. Over the three months of SNR records on L1 frequency band for sea level determination, we found linear correlations of 0.94 by comparing with a classical tide gauge record. Our SNR-based time series was also compared to a tide theoretical model and amplitudes and phases of the main astronomical periods (6-, 12- and 24-h) were perfectly well detected. Waves and swell are also likely to be detected. If the validity of our method is already well-established with L1 band [1], the aim of our current study is to analyze the results obtained with the other GNSS frequency band: L2 and L5. L1 band seems to provide the best sea

  17. Extended likelihood ratio test-based methods for signal detection in a drug class with application to FDA's adverse event reporting system database.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueqin; Yi, Min; Tiwari, Ram C

    2016-05-02

    A likelihood ratio test, recently developed for the detection of signals of adverse events for a drug of interest in the FDA Adverse Events Reporting System database, is extended to detect signals of adverse events simultaneously for all the drugs in a drug class. The extended likelihood ratio test methods, based on Poisson model (Ext-LRT) and zero-inflated Poisson model (Ext-ZIP-LRT), are discussed and are analytically shown, like the likelihood ratio test method, to control the type-I error and false discovery rate. Simulation studies are performed to evaluate the performance characteristics of Ext-LRT and Ext-ZIP-LRT. The proposed methods are applied to the Gadolinium drug class in FAERS database. An in-house likelihood ratio test tool, incorporating the Ext-LRT methodology, is being developed in the Food and Drug Administration.

  18. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  19. Automated measurement of the bit-error rate as a function of signal-to-noise ratio for microwave communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Daugherty, Elaine S.; Kramarchuk, Ihor

    1987-01-01

    The performance of microwave systems and components for digital data transmission can be characterized by a plot of the bit-error rate as a function of the signal to noise ratio (or E sub b/E sub o). Methods for the efficient automated measurement of bit-error rates and signal-to-noise ratios, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, are described. Noise measurement considerations and time requirements for measurement accuracy, as well as computer control and data processing methods, are discussed.

  20. Making the Most of a Patient’s Laboratory Data: Optimisation of Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    All results in laboratory medicine are compared to some reference for interpretation. This reference may be a previous result from the same patient, a reference population – either healthy or diseased, or both – or a decision limit recommended by an expert group. The aim for the medical laboratory is to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by increasing the signal or reducing the noise. This presentation deals with the more general tools for reduction of the noise component, and focuses on biological within-subject variation, reference intervals and decision models. Regarding biological within-subject variation, the estimation of reference change value (RCV) as a yardstick for judging measured differences within the patient over time is an important tool. Here, only type 1 errors are usually applied, but type 2 errors should also be taken into consideration. Moreover, variance homogeneity is assumed for the application of RCV, but this assumption is not always fulfilled, and erroneous interpretations may be introduced. A tool for comparison of different and more complicated algorithms applied to serial measurements is computer simulation (e.g. on data from tumour markers). In order to reduce the noise component from reference intervals, partitioning according to relevant subgroups is a tool, and useful criteria for judging whether subgroups should be combined are reported. Geographical and racial differences may cause different reference distributions (e.g. plasma proteins), but it has been possible to establish common reference intervals for 25 common components in Caucasians in the five Nordic countries. Transformation of data and presentation of accumulated ranked values in rankit plots where Gaussian (or log-Gaussian) distributions show up as straight lines is a valuable tool for interpretation of the distributions and comparison of subgroups. In this way it is often possible to isolate a low-risk group which fits a log-Gaussian distribution. In case of

  1. Design of phase-only, binary phase-only, and complex ternary matched filters with increased signal-to-noise ratios for colored noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, B. V. K. V.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is provided for treating nonwhite additive noise in determining regions of support for phase-only filters, binary phase-only filters, and complex ternary matched filters. It is analytically shown to be optimal in the signal-to-noise ratio sense. It extends earlier research that assumed white noise.

  2. Measures of performance in nonlinear estimation tasks: prediction of estimation performance at low signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Stefan P.; Abbey, Craig K.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Moore, Stephen C.; Foley Kijewski, Marie

    2005-08-01

    Maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation is an established paradigm for the assessment of imaging system performance in nonlinear quantitation tasks. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), ML estimates are asymptotically Gaussian-distributed, unbiased and efficient, thereby attaining the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). Therefore, at high SNR the CRB is useful as a predictor of the variance of ML estimates and, consequently, as a basis for measures of estimation performance. At low SNR, however, the achievable parameter variances are often substantially larger than the CRB and the estimates are no longer Gaussian-distributed. These departures imply that inference about the estimates that is based on the CRB and the assumption of a normal distribution will not be valid. We have found previously that for some tasks these effects arise at noise levels considered clinically acceptable. We have derived the mathematical relationship between a new measure, χ2pdf-ML, and the expected probability density of the ML estimates, and have justified the use of χ2pdf-ML-isocontours in parameter space to describe the ML estimates. We validated this approach by simulation experiments using spherical objects imaged with a Gaussian point spread function. The parameters, activity concentration and size, were estimated simultaneously by ML, and variances and covariances calculated over 1000 replications per condition from 3D image volumes and from 2D tomographic projections of the same object. At low SNR, where the CRB is no longer achievable, χ2pdf-ML-isocontours provide a robust prediction of the distribution of the ML estimates. At high SNR, the χ2pdf-ML-isocontours asymptotically approach the analogous χ2pdf-F-contours derived from the Fisher information matrix. The χ2pdf-ML model appears to be suitable for characterization of the influence of the noise level and characteristics, the task, and the object on the shape of the probability density of the ML estimates at low SNR. Furthermore, it

  3. Demonstration of improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Thomson scattering signal obtained by using a multi-pass optical cavity on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2

    SciTech Connect

    Togashi, H. Ejiri, A.; Nakamura, K.; Takase, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Furui, H.; Imamura, K.; Inada, T.; Nakanishi, A.; Oosako, T.; Shinya, T.; Tsuda, S.; Tsujii, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kakuda, H.; Sonehara, M.; Wakatsuki, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Narihara, K.; and others

    2014-11-15

    The multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) scheme enables obtaining many photons by accumulating multiple TS signals. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the accumulation number. In this study, we performed multi-pass TS measurements for ohmically heated plasmas, and the relationship between SNR and the accumulation number was investigated. As a result, improvement of SNR in this experiment indicated similar tendency to that calculated for the background noise dominant situation.

  4. PEM fuel cell cathode carbon corrosion due to the formation of air/fuel boundary at the anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Qi, Zhigang; Ramani, Manikandan; Elter, John F.

    The impacts of unprotected start up and shut down on fuel cell performance degradation was investigated using both single cell and dual cell configurations. It was found that the air/fuel boundary developed at the anode side after a fuel cell shut down or during its restart caused extremely quick degradation of the cathode. The thickness, the electrochemical active surface area, and the performance of the cathode catalyst layer were significantly reduced. By using a dual cell configuration, cathode potential as high as two times of open circuit voltage was measured, and the corrosion current flowing externally between the two cells was detected and quantified. Carbon catalyst-support corrosion/oxidation at such a high potential was largely responsible for the accelerated fuel cell performance degradation.

  5. Multiple quantum filtered (23)Na NMR in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart: Ratio of triple/double quantum filtered signals correlates with [Na]i.

    PubMed

    Eykyn, Thomas R; Aksentijević, Dunja; Aughton, Karen L; Southworth, Richard; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the potential of multiple quantum filtered (MQF) (23)Na NMR to probe intracellular [Na]i in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart. In the presence of Tm(DOTP) shift reagent the triple quantum filtered (TQF) signal originated largely from the intracellular sodium pool with a 32±6% contribution of the total TQF signal arising from extracellular sodium, whilst the rank 2 double-quantum filtered signal (DQF), acquired with a 54.7° flip-angle pulse, originated exclusively from the extracellular sodium pool. Given the different cellular origins of the (23)Na MQF signals we propose that the TQF/DQF ratio can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of [Na]i in the mouse heart. We demonstrate a good correlation of this ratio with [Na]i measured with shift reagent at baseline and under conditions of elevated [Na]i. We compare the measurements of [Na]i using both shift reagent and TQF/DQF ratio in a cohort of wild type mouse hearts and in a transgenic PLM(3SA) mouse expressing a non-phosphorylatable form of phospholemman, showing a modest but measurable elevation of baseline [Na]i. MQF filtered (23)Na NMR is a potentially useful tool for studying normal and pathophysiological changes in [Na]i, particularly in transgenic mouse models with altered Na regulation.

  6. Multiple quantum filtered 23Na NMR in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart: Ratio of triple/double quantum filtered signals correlates with [Na]i

    PubMed Central

    Eykyn, Thomas R.; Aksentijević, Dunja; Aughton, Karen L.; Southworth, Richard; Fuller, William; Shattock, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential of multiple quantum filtered (MQF) 23Na NMR to probe intracellular [Na]i in the Langendorff perfused mouse heart. In the presence of Tm(DOTP) shift reagent the triple quantum filtered (TQF) signal originated largely from the intracellular sodium pool with a 32 ± 6% contribution of the total TQF signal arising from extracellular sodium, whilst the rank 2 double-quantum filtered signal (DQF), acquired with a 54.7° flip-angle pulse, originated exclusively from the extracellular sodium pool. Given the different cellular origins of the 23Na MQF signals we propose that the TQF/DQF ratio can be used as a semi-quantitative measure of [Na]i in the mouse heart. We demonstrate a good correlation of this ratio with [Na]i measured with shift reagent at baseline and under conditions of elevated [Na]i. We compare the measurements of [Na]i using both shift reagent and TQF/DQF ratio in a cohort of wild type mouse hearts and in a transgenic PLM3SA mouse expressing a non-phosphorylatable form of phospholemman, showing a modest but measurable elevation of baseline [Na]i. MQF filtered 23Na NMR is a potentially useful tool for studying normal and pathophysiological changes in [Na]i, particularly in transgenic mouse models with altered Na regulation. PMID:26196304

  7. Influence of coherence length, signal-to-noise ratio, log transform, and low-pass filtering on layer thickness assessment with OCT in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Cervantes, Joel; Reddikumar, Maddipatla; Cense, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the retina are inevitably affected by the finite width of the coherence function and noise. To make low-reflective layers visible, the raw OCT signal is log transformed; to reduce the effect of noise the images can be low-pass filtered. We determined the effects of these operations on layer thickness assessment, as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), by performing measurements in a phantom eye and modeling. The log transform appeared to be the key factor in a SNR-dependent overestimation of peak widths and a less predictive bias in the widths of low-reflective layers. PMID:27895990

  8. Focal overlap gating in velocity map imaging to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio in photo-ion pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Champenois, Elio G.; Cryan, James P.; Wright, Travis; Wingard, Taylor; Belkacem, Ali

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a technique in velocity map imaging (VMI) that allows spatial gating of the laser focal overlap region in time resolved pump-probe experiments. This significantly enhances signal-to-noise ratio by eliminating background signal arising outside the region of spatial overlap of pump and probe beams. This enhancement is achieved by tilting the laser beams with respect to the surface of the VMI electrodes which creates a gradient in flight time for particles born at different points along the beam. By suitably pulsing our microchannel plate detector, we can select particles born only where the laser beams overlap. This spatial gating in velocity map imaging can benefit nearly all photo-ion pump-probe VMI experiments especially when extreme-ultraviolet light or X-rays are involved which produce large background signals on their own.

  9. A coherent frequency-domain THz spectrometer with a signal-to-noise ratio of 60 dB at 1 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Joseph R.; Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Bergeron, Normand J.; Brown, Elliot R.

    2008-04-01

    A terahertz frequency domain spectrometer is implemented using two ErAs:GaAs photomixers in a highly compact configuration, utilizing all solid-state components and no moving parts. Digital signal processing electronics provide precise frequency control and yield ~200 MHz accuracy of the THz signal frequency. Continuous frequency sweeping is demonstrated with better than 1 GHz resolution from 200 GHz to 1.85 THz. The coherent detection sensitivity is shown to be in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions and yields a signal-to-noise ratio of 80 dB*Hz at 200 GHz and 60 dB*Hz at 1 THz through a path length in air of one foot.

  10. A signal input coil made of superconducting thin film for improved signal-to-noise ratio in a high-Tc SQUID-based ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Ku, Yue-Bai; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wang, Li-Min; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Resonant coupling schemes are commonly used in SQUID-based ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems to couple the spin relaxation signals from samples to the SQUID. Generally, in NMR systems, a resonant coupling scheme is composed of two solenoid coils which are made of enamel insulated wires and a capacitor connected in series. In this work, we tried to replace the metal solenoid input coil with a planar high-Tc superconducting spiral coil to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ULF NMR signal. A measurement of the free induction decay signal of water protons was performed to demonstrate the improved performance of the system. This improvement is due to the fact that the planar superconducting spiral coil possesses a higher mutual inductance with the SQUID. Therefore, it is a promising way to enhance the SNR of high-Tc SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI systems.

  11. Roles of proteome dynamics and cytokinin signaling in root to hypocotyl ratio changes induced by shading roots of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jan; Černý, Martin; Pavlů, Jaroslav; Zemánková, Jana; Skalák, Jan; Plačková, Lenka; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2015-05-01

    In nature, root systems of most terrestrial plants are protected from light exposure by growing in a dark soil environment. Hence, in vitro cultivation in transparent Petri dishes leads to physiological perturbations, but the mechanisms underlying root-mediated light perception and responses have not been fully elucidated. Thus, we compared Arabidopsis thaliana seedling development in transparent and darkened Petri dishes at low light intensity (20 µmol m(-2) s(-1)), allowing us to follow (inter alia) hypocotyl elongation, which is an excellent process for studying interactions of signals involved in the regulation of growth and developmental responses. To obtain insights into molecular events underlying differences in seedling growth under these two conditions, we employed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) shotgun proteomics (available via the PRIDE deposit PXD001612). In total, we quantified the relative abundances of peptides representing 1,209 proteins detected in all sample replicates of LC-MS analyses. Comparison of MS spectra after manual validation revealed 48 differentially expressed proteins. Functional classification, analysis of available gene expression data and literature searches revealed alterations associated with root illumination (inter alia) in autotrophic CO2 fixation, C compound and carbohydrate metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism. The results also indicate a previously unreported role for cytokinin plant hormones in the escape-tropism response to root illumination. We complemented these results with reverse transcription followed by quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), chlorophyll fluorescence and detailed cytokinin signaling analyses, detecting in the latter a significant increase in the activity of the cytokinin two-component signaling cascade in roots and implicating the cytokinin receptor AHK3 as the major mediator of root to hypocotyl signaling in responses to root illumination.

  12. Real-time in Situ Signal-to-noise Ratio Estimation for the Assessment of Operational Communications Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here formulates the rigorous statistical basis for the correct estimation of communication link SNR of a BPSK, QPSK, and for that matter, any M-ary phase-modulated digital signal from what is known about its statistical behavior at the output of the receiver demodulator. Many methods to accomplish this have been proposed and implemented in the past but all of them are based on tacit and unwarranted assumptions and are thus defective. However, the basic idea is well founded, i.e., the signal at the output of a communications demodulator has convolved within it the prevailing SNR characteristic of the link. The acquisition of the SNR characteristic is of the utmost importance to a communications system that must remain reliable in adverse propagation conditions. This work provides a correct and consistent mathematical basis for the proper statistical 'deconvolution' of the output of a demodulator to yield a measure of the SNR. The use of such techniques will alleviate the need and expense for a separate propagation link to assess the propagation conditions prevailing on the communications link. Furthermore, they are applicable for every situation involving the digital transmission of data over planetary and space communications links.

  13. Digital signal processing of cylinder pressure data for combustion diagnostics of HCCI engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Maurya, Rakesh; Pal, Dev Datt; Kumar Agarwal, Avinash

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of combustion is necessary for the estimation of the combustion quality, and control of combustion timing in advanced combustion concepts like HCCI. Combustion diagnostics is often performed using digital processing of pressure signals measured using piezoelectric sensor installed in the combustion chamber of the engine. Four-step pressure signal processing consisting of (i) absolute pressure correction, (ii) phasing w.r.t. crank angle, (iii) cycle averaging and (iv) smoothening is used to get cylinder pressure data from the engine experiments, which is further analyzed to get information about combustion characteristics. This study focuses on various aspect of signal processing (cycle averaging and smoothing) of in-cylinder pressure signal from a HCCI engine acquired using a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Experimental investigations are conducted on a HCCI combustion engine operating at different engine speed/load/air-fuel ratio conditions. The cylinder pressure history of 3000 consecutive engine cycles is acquired for analysis using piezoelectric pressure sensor. This study determines the optimum number of engine cycles to be acquired for reasonably good pressure signals based on standard deviation of in-cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise and rate of heat release signals. Different signal smoothening methods (using various digital filters) are also analyzed and their results are compared. This study also presents effect of signal processing methods on pressure, pressure rise rate and rate of heat release curves at different engine operating conditions.

  14. Apparatus for controlling the air fuel mixture of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, H.; Kimata, K.; Nakazeki, T.

    1980-06-03

    A fuel feeding apparatus for internal combustion engines comprises an area type air flow rate measuring section in which the air flow rate is dependent on the displacement of an air flow rate detecting valve, and a fuel flow rate measuring and distributing section in which a variable orifice defined by a rotor and a stator determines the fuel flow rate proportional to the air flow rate. This apparatus is characterized by the provision of an exhaust gas sensor disposed in the exhaust pipe for the detection of the oxygen concentration of the exhaust gas in order to achieve the complete combustion of fuel in the internal combustion engine, the output signal from the exhaust gas sensor being used to compensate the fuel feeding pressure and a spring force which acts on the pressure difference setting diaphragm of a servo-mechanism.

  15. Seamless Data-Rate Change Using Punctured Convolutional Codes for Time-Varying Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Ying

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise (SNR) environment, symbol rate is often changed to maximize ata return. However, the symbol-rate change has some undesirable effects such as changing the ransmission bandwidth and perhaps causing the receiver symbol loop to lose lock temporarily, thus osing some data. In this article, we are proposing an alternate way of varying the data rate without hanging the symbol rate and therefore the transmission bandwidth. The data rate change is achieved n a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream to adapt to the hanging SNR environment. We have also derived an exact expression to enumerate the number of nique puncturing patterns. To demonstrate this seamless rate-change capability, we searched for good uncturing patterns for the Galileo (14, 1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the unctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997.

  16. Detection of Multiple Innervation Zones from Multi-Channel Surface EMG Recordings with Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Using Graph-Cut Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Farahi, Morteza; Rojas, Monica; Mañanas, Miguel Angel; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the location of muscle Innervation Zones (IZs) is important in many applications, e.g. for minimizing the quantity of injected botulinum toxin for the treatment of spasticity or for deciding on the type of episiotomy during child delivery. Surface EMG (sEMG) can be noninvasively recorded to assess physiological and morphological characteristics of contracting muscles. However, it is not often possible to record signals of high quality. Moreover, muscles could have multiple IZs, which should all be identified. We designed a fully-automatic algorithm based on the enhanced image Graph-Cut segmentation and morphological image processing methods to identify up to five IZs in 60-ms intervals of very-low to moderate quality sEMG signal detected with multi-channel electrodes (20 bipolar channels with Inter Electrode Distance (IED) of 5 mm). An anisotropic multilayered cylinder model was used to simulate 750 sEMG signals with signal-to-noise ratio ranging from -5 to 15 dB (using Gaussian noise) and in each 60-ms signal frame, 1 to 5 IZs were included. The micro- and macro- averaged performance indices were then reported for the proposed IZ detection algorithm. In the micro-averaging procedure, the number of True Positives, False Positives and False Negatives in each frame were summed up to generate cumulative measures. In the macro-averaging, on the other hand, precision and recall were calculated for each frame and their averages are used to determine F1-score. Overall, the micro (macro)-averaged sensitivity, precision and F1-score of the algorithm for IZ channel identification were 82.7% (87.5%), 92.9% (94.0%) and 87.5% (90.6%), respectively. For the correctly identified IZ locations, the average bias error was of 0.02±0.10 IED ratio. Also, the average absolute conduction velocity estimation error was 0.41±0.40 m/s for such frames. The sensitivity analysis including increasing IED and reducing interpolation coefficient for time samples was performed

  17. Increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by using vertically stacked phased array coils for low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dandan; Hui, Hon Tat; Yeo, Tat Soon

    2012-11-01

    A new method is introduced to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems by using a vertically stacked phased coil array. It is shown theoretically that the SNR is increased with the square root of the number of coils in the array if the array signals are properly combined to remove the mutual coupling effect. Based on this, a number of vertically stacked phased coil arrays have been designed and characterized by a numerical simulation method. The performance of these arrays confirms the significant increase of SNR by increasing the number of coils in the arrays. This provides a simple and efficient method to improve the SNR for low-field MRI systems.

  18. Control of the optical carrier to sideband ratio in optical double/single sideband modulation by the phase variation of RF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Danqi; Sun, Junqiang; Xie, Heng

    2015-10-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel approach to realize tunable optical carrier-to-sideband ratio (OCSR) by introducing two radiofrequency (RF) signals with phase difference to drive a Mach-Zehnder modulator. Stimulated Brillouin scattering is adopted to remove the undesirable sideband, converting double sideband (DSB) to single sideband (SSB). By altering RF signal phase difference, wide ranges of OCSR from -23 to 44 dB and -21 to 44 dB are obtained for the DSB and SSB modulation, respectively. The operation frequency bandwidth covers from 5 to 42.3 GHz. The optimum OCSR to maximize the output RF power is also presented for the best transmission behavior. The proposed approach will be vital for optimizing the transmission performance by improving modulation efficiency and receiver sensitivity.

  19. Optimal control of the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle: the crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases.

    PubMed

    Lapert, M; Assémat, E; Glaser, S J; Sugny, D

    2015-01-28

    We show to which extent the signal to noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle can be maximized. We consider a cyclic repetition of experiments made of a measurement followed by a radio-frequency magnetic field excitation of the system, in the case of unbounded amplitude. In the periodic regime, the objective of the control problem is to design the initial state of the system and the pulse sequence which leads to the best signal to noise performance. We focus on two specific issues relevant in nuclear magnetic resonance, the crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this non-standard control problem. We discuss the optimality of the Ernst angle solution, which is commonly applied in spectroscopic and medical imaging applications. In the radiation damping situation, we show that in some cases, the optimal solution differs from the Ernst one.

  20. Optimal control of the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle: The crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases

    SciTech Connect

    Lapert, M.; Glaser, S. J.; Assémat, E.; Sugny, D.

    2015-01-28

    We show to which extent the signal to noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle can be maximized. We consider a cyclic repetition of experiments made of a measurement followed by a radio-frequency magnetic field excitation of the system, in the case of unbounded amplitude. In the periodic regime, the objective of the control problem is to design the initial state of the system and the pulse sequence which leads to the best signal to noise performance. We focus on two specific issues relevant in nuclear magnetic resonance, the crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this non-standard control problem. We discuss the optimality of the Ernst angle solution, which is commonly applied in spectroscopic and medical imaging applications. In the radiation damping situation, we show that in some cases, the optimal solution differs from the Ernst one.

  1. Polydatin promotes apoptosis through upregulation the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and inhibits proliferation by attenuating the β-catenin signaling in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ge; Kuang, Ge; Jiang, Wengao; Jiang, Rong; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most prevalent primary malignant bone tumor mainly endangering young adults. In this study, we explore whether polydatin (PD), a glycoside form of resveratrol, is effective for osteosarcoma. Our results showed that PD dose-dependently inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, examined by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Further, we found PD increased expression of Bax and attenuated expression of Bcl-2, and consequently augmented caspase-3 activity. Moreover, PD also dose-dependently inhibited β-catenin signaling pathway as indicated by decreased β-catenin expression and activity, while overexpression of β-catenin by adenoviruses system could abrogate the anti-tumor effect of PD. Our finding indicated that PD could inhibit the proliferation by inhibiting the β-catenin signaling and induce apoptosis via upregulation the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in human osteosarcoma cells. PMID:27158379

  2. A Modified Magnitude System that Produces Well-Behaved Magnitudes, Colors, and Errors Even for Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, Robert H.; Gunn, James E.; Szalay, Alexander S.

    1999-09-01

    We describe a modification of the usual definition of astronomical magnitudes, replacing the usual logarithm with an inverse hyperbolic sine function; we call these modified magnitudes ``asinh magnitudes.'' For objects detected at signal-to-noise ratios of greater than about 5, our modified definition is essentially identical to the traditional one; for fainter objects (including those with a formally negative flux), our definition is well behaved, tending to a definite value with finite errors as the flux goes to zero. This new definition is especially useful when considering the colors of faint objects, as the difference of two ``asinh'' magnitudes measures the usual flux ratio for bright objects, while avoiding the problems caused by dividing two very uncertain values for faint objects. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey data products will use this scheme to express all magnitudes in their catalogs.

  3. Linear frequency modulation photoacoustic radar: optimal bandwidth and signal-to-noise ratio for frequency-domain imaging of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    The development of the pulse compression photoacoustic (PA) radar using linear frequency modulation (LFM) demonstrated experimentally that spectral matching of the signal to the ultrasonic transducer bandwidth does not necessarily produce the best PA signal-to-noise ratio, and it was shown that the optical and acoustic properties of the absorber will modify the optimal bandwidth. The effects of these factors are investigated in frequency-domain (FD) PA imaging by employing one-dimensional and axisymmetric models of the PA effect, and a Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei model for the employed transducers. LFM chirps with various bandwidths were utilized and transducer sensitivity was measured to ensure the accuracy of the model. The theory was compared with experimental results and it was shown that the PA effect can act as a low-pass filter in the signal generation. Furthermore, with the PA radar, the low-frequency behavior of two-dimensional wave generation can appear as a false peak in the cross correlation signal trace. These effects are important in optimizing controllable features of the FD-PA method to improve image quality.

  4. Critical ratios in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) for tonal signals between 0.315 and 150 kHz in random Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul J; Hoek, Lean; Au, Whitlow W L; Terhune, John M; de Jong, Christ A F

    2009-09-01

    A psychoacoustic behavioral technique was used to determine the critical ratios (CRs) of two harbor porpoises for tonal signals with frequencies between 0.315 and 150 kHz, in random Gaussian white noise. The masked 50% detection hearing thresholds were measured using a "go/no-go" response paradigm and an up-down staircase psychometric method. CRs were determined at one masking noise level for each test frequency and were similar in both animals. For signals between 0.315 and 4 kHz, the CRs were relatively constant at around 18 dB. Between 4 and 150 kHz the CR increased gradually from 18 to 39 dB ( approximately 3.3 dB/octave). Generally harbor porpoises can detect tonal signals in Gaussian white noise slightly better than most odontocetes tested so far. By combining the mean CRs found in the present study with the spectrum level of the background noise levels at sea, the basic audiogram, and the directivity index, the detection threshold levels of harbor porpoises for tonal signals in various sea states can be calculated.

  5. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the beat note between a frequency comb and a tunable laser using a dynamically tracking optical filter.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Hugo; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Genest, Jérôme

    2016-09-15

    An acousto-optic filter is locked to a tunable continuous wave (CW) laser so that a frequency comb can be dynamically filtered around the wavelength of the CW source. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the heterodyne beat note between the comb and the CW laser is improved by a factor of up to 19 dB. Furthermore, a SNR of more than 56 dB in 100 kHz is obtained over an 85 nm wavelength span. This technique could enable wideband, agile, and cycle-slip-free phase tracking of a beat note across a full comb spectrum.

  6. The ultraviolet emission properties of five low-redshift active galactic nuclei at high signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laor, Ari; Bahcall, John N.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Green, Richard F.; Hartig, George F.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the ultraviolet (UV) emission line and continuum properties of five low-redshift active galactic nuclei (four luminous quasars: PKS 0405-123, H1821 + 643, PG 0953 + 414, and 3C 273, and one bright Seyfert 1 galaxy: Mrk 205). The HST spectra have higher signal-to-noise ratios (typically approximately 60 per resolution element) and spectral resolution (R = 1300) than all previously published UV spectra used to study the emission characteristics of active galactic nuclei. We include in the analysis ground-based optical spectra covering H beta and the narrow (O III) lambda lambda 4959, 5007 doublet. New results are obtained and presented.

  7. Evaluation of pixel-wise geometric constraint-based phase-unwrapping method for low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yatong; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Song

    2016-12-01

    This paper evaluates the robustness of our recently proposed geometric constraint-based phase-unwrapping method to unwrap a low-signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) phase. Instead of capturing additional images for absolute phase unwrapping, the new phase-unwrapping algorithm uses geometric constraints of the digital fringe projection (DFP) system to create a virtual reference phase map to unwrap the phase pixel by pixel. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that this new phase-unwrapping method can even successfully unwrap low-SNR phase maps that bring difficulties for conventional multi-frequency phase-unwrapping methods.

  8. Seamless data-range change using punctured convolutional codes for time-varying signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise ration (SNR) environment, symbol rate is often changed to maximize data return. However, the symbol-rate change has some undesirable effects, such as changing the transmission bandwidth and perhaps causing the receiver symbol loop to lose lock temporarily, thus losing some data. In this article, we are proposing an alternate way of varying the data rate without changing the symbol rate and, therefore, the transmission bandwidth. The data rate change is achieved in a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream to adapt to the changing SNR environment. We have also derived an exact expression to enumerate the number of distinct puncturing patterns. To demonstrate this seamless rate change capability, we searched for good puncturing patterns for the Galileo (14,1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the punctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997. We show that this scheme reduces the symbol-rate changes from nine to two and provides a comparable data return in a day and a higher symbol SNR during most of the day.

  9. Effect of the air-fuel mixing on the NOx yield in a low-emission gas-turbine plant combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. D.; Bulysova, L. A.; Berne, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with construction of a simplified model of inhibition of nitric oxides formed in the combustors of the gas-turbine plants (GTPs) operating on natural gas. A combustor in which premixed, lean air-fuel mixtures are burnt is studied theoretically and experimentally. The research was carried out using a full-scale combustor that had parameters characteristic of modern GTPs. The article presents the results computed by the FlowVision software and the results of the experiments carried out on the test bench of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The calculations and the tests were conducted under the following conditions: a flow rate of approximately 4.6 kg/s, a pressure to 450 kPa, an air temperature at the combustor inlet of approximately 400°C, the outlet temperature t 3 ≤ 1200°C, and natural gas as the fuel. The comparison of the simulated parameters with the experimental results underlies the constructed correlation dependence of the experimental NO x emission on the calculated parameter of nonuniform fuel concentration at the premixing zone outlet. The postulate about a weak dependence of the emission of NO x formed upon combustion of a perfectly mixed air-fuel mixture—when the methane concentration in air is constant at any point of the air-fuel mixture, i.e., constant in the mixture bulk—on the pressure in the combustor has been experimentally proven. The correctness and the practicability of the stationary mathematical model of the mixing process used to assess the NO x emission by the calculated amount of the air-fuel mixture generated in the premixing zone has been validated. This eliminates some difficulties that arise in the course of calculation of combustion and formation of NO x .

  10. Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio in ophthalmic optical coherence tomography by image registration--method and clinical examples.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Thomadsen, Jakob; Christensen, Ulrik; Soliman, Wael; Sander, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has already proven an important clinical tool for imaging and diagnosing retinal diseases. Concerning the standard commercial ophthalmic OCT systems, speckle noise is a limiting factor with respect to resolving relevant retinal features. We demonstrate successful suppression of speckle noise from mutually aligning a series of in vivo OCT recordings obtained from the same retinal target using the Stratus system from Humphrey-Zeiss. Our registration technique is able to account for the axial movements experienced during recording as well as small transverse movements of the scan line from one scan to the next. The algorithm is based on a regularized shortest path formulation for a directed graph on a map formed by interimage (B-scan) correlations. The resulting image enhancement typically increases the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with a factor of three or more and facilitates segmentation and quantitative characterization of pathologies. The method is currently successfully being applied by medical doctors in a number of specific retinal case studies.

  11. Signal-to-Noise Ratios of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to advance technologies in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission and to demonstrate them initially from a high-altitude airborne platform. With a multiple fiber-amplifier-based Swept-Frequency Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (SF-IM-CW) high-power laser transmitter and a multiple-aperture receiver, the ACES system provides simultaneous measurements of the differential optical depth at the 1571-nm CO2 absorption line and the associated range between the transmitter and target on an airborne platform. The precise measurement of the CO2 differential optical depth and the range, determined by signal amplitudes and phases in the ACES returns, together with the temperature, pressure, and water vapor information at the same location, make it possible to retrieve the column-averaged CO2 dry air mixing ratio (XCO2). The Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNRs) of both return-signal amplitudes and phases of three simultaneously-received SF-IM-CW signals in the ACES system directly affect the measurement precision of the differential optical depths and the ranges between the ACES system and the Earth's surface or the tops of intermediate cloud layers. In this paper, we present results from numerical simulations and experimental measurements of ACES SNRs based on the laboratory-determined system parameters and flight experiments over ocean and land areas. These results will be used in the design of an IM-CW CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar system for ASCENDS mission.

  12. Analysis of SATIR test for the qualification of high heat flux components: defect detection and classification by signal-to-noise ratio maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismondi, F.; Xerri, B.; Jauffret, C.; Schlosser, J.; Vignal, N.; Durocher, A.

    2007-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFC) in Tore Supra and W7X adopt the flat tile concept using carbon fibre composite (CFC) material for the plasma facing material. As the cooling structure is made of a copper alloy material (CuCrZr), the bonding technique between CFC tiles and CuCrZr is critical. Currently, a soft metallic compliant layer is interposed between the two; in such a way the significant thermal expansion mismatch between carbon and copper can be accomodated. The development of a reliable non-destructive inspection technique (NDT) for the bond, to be performed during the manufacturing process, is obviously of great importance. The SATIR (infrared thermography) test bed operating at Commisariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) Cadarache performs this function using transient infrared thermography: the thermal excitation is realized in the cooling channel and the presence of a faulty tile is detected in the form of a delayed thermal response. With this technique, the evolution of the surface temperature of an inspected element was compared to that of a defined free-defect element, using the so-called DTref criterion (maximum of the transient temperature difference). The defect detection capability of the SATIR test bed can be improved using signal processing methods. A first treatment based on spatial image autocorrelation allows a better localization of the bond defect. Moreover, the problem of detection and classification of random signals (like the thin defect signature) can be solved maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two filters maximizing this ratio were optimized: the stochastic matched filter (SMF) aims at defect detection, while the constrained SMF aims at defect classification. These methods assume that the second-order properties of the process at play are known, through covariance matrices. All these methods process the SATIR signal utilizing any free-defect element as reference signal. The tile temperature signal is either processed by itself or

  13. Computation of the ensemble channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio for ordered-subset image reconstruction using noisy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Edward J.; Gifford, Howard C.; Glick, Stephen J.

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the estimation of the ensemble channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for ordered-subset (OS) image reconstruction using noisy projection data. Previously, we computed the ensemble CHO SNR using a method for approximating the channelized covariance of OS reconstruction, which requires knowledge of the noise-free projection data. Here, we use a "plug-in" approach, in which noisy data is used in place of the noise-free data in the aforementioned channelized covariance approximation. Additionally, we evaluated the use of smoothing of the noisy projections before use in the covariance approximation. Additionally, we evaluated the use of smoothing of the noisy projections before use in the covariance calculation. The task was detection of a 10% contrast Gaussian signal within a slice of the MCAT phantom. Simulated projections of the MCAT phantom were scaled and Poisson noise was added to create 100 noisy signal-absent data sets. Simulated projections of the scaled signal were then added to the noisy background projections to create 100 noisy signal-present data set. These noisy data sets were then used to generate 100 estimates of the ensemble CHO SNR for reconstructions at various iterates. For comparison purposes, the same calculation was repeated with the noise-free data. The results, reported as plots of the average CHO SNR generated in this fashion, along with 95% confidence intervals, demonstrate that this approach works very well, and would allow optimization of imaging systems and reconstruction methods using a more accurate object model (i.e., real patient data).

  14. Inhibition of FUSCA3 degradation at high temperature is dependent on ABA signaling and is regulated by the ABA/GA ratio.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Rex Shun; Saleh, Yazan; Gazzarrini, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    During seed imbibition at supra-optimal temperature, an increase in the abscisic acid (ABA)/gibberellin (GA) ratio imposes secondary dormancy to prevent germination (thermoinhibition). FUSCA3 (FUS3), a positive regulator of seed dormancy, accumulates in seeds imbibed at high temperature and increases ABA levels to inhibit germination. Recently, we showed that ABA inhibits FUS3 degradation at high temperature, and that ABA and high temperature also inhibit the ubiquitin-proteasome system, by dampening both proteasome activity and protein polyubiquitination. Here, we investigated the role of ABA signaling components and the ABA antagonizing hormone, GA, in the regulation of FUS3 levels. We show that the ABA receptor mutant, pyl1-1, is less sensitive to ABA and thermoinhibition. In this mutant background, FUS3 degradation in vitro is faster. Similarly, GA alleviates thermoinhibition and also increases FUS3 degradation. These results indicate that inhibition of FUS3 degradation at high temperature is dependent on a high ABA/GA ratio and a functional ABA signaling pathway. Thus, FUS3 constitutes an important node in ABA-GA crosstalk during germination at supra-optimal temperature.

  15. Rician noise removal by non-Local Means filtering for low signal-to-noise ratio MRI: applications to DT-MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiest-Daesslé, Nicolas; Prima, Sylvain; Coupé, Pierrick; Morrissey, Sean Patrick; Barillot, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is subject to random noise yielding measures that are different from their real values, and thus biasing the subsequently estimated tensors. The Non-Local Means (NLMeans) filter has recently been proposed to denoise MRI with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This filter has been shown to allow the best restoration of image intensities for the estimation of diffusion tensors (DT) compared to state-of-the-art methods. However, for DW-MR images with high b-values (and thus low SNR), the noise, which is strictly Rician-distributed, can no longer be approximated as additive white Gaussian, as implicitly assumed in the classical formulation of the NLMeans. High b-values are typically used in high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) or q-space imaging (QSI), for which an optimal restoration is critical. In this paper, we propose to adapt the NLMeans filter to Rician noise corrupted data. Validation is performed on synthetic data and on real data for both conventional MR images and DT images. Our adaptation outperforms the original NLMeans filter in terms of peak-signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) for DW-MRI.

  16. Ideal current patterns yielding optimal signal-to-noise ratio and specific absorption rate in magnetic resonance imaging: computational methods and physical insights.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2012-07-01

    At high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths, understanding interactions between tissues and the electromagnetic fields generated by radiofrequency coils becomes crucial for safe and effective coil design as well as for insight into limits of performance. In this work, we present a rigorous electrodynamic modeling framework, using dyadic Green's functions, to derive the electromagnetic field in homogeneous spherical and cylindrical samples resulting from arbitrary surface currents in the presence or absence of a surrounding radiofrequency shield. We show how to calculate ideal current patterns that result in the highest possible signal-to-noise ratio (ultimate intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio) or the lowest possible radiofrequency power deposition (ultimate intrinsic specific absorption rate) compatible with electrodynamic principles. We identify familiar coil designs within optimal current patterns at low to moderate field strength, thereby establishing and explaining graphically the near-optimality of traditional surface and volume quadrature designs. We also document the emergence of less familiar patterns, e.g., involving substantial electric--as well as magnetic-dipole contributions, at high field strength. Performance comparisons with particular coil array configurations demonstrate that optimal performance may be approached with finite arrays if ideal current patterns are used as a guide for coil design.

  17. Application of TiC reinforced Fe-based coatings by means of High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Sommer, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the field of hydraulic applications, different development trends can cause problems for coatings currently used as wear and corrosion protection for piston rods. Aqueous hydraulic fluids and rising raw material prices necessitate the search for alternatives to conventional coatings like galvanic hard chrome or High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC/Co coatings. In a previous study, Fe/TiC coatings sprayed by a HVOF-process, were identified to be promising coating systems for wear and corrosion protection in hydraulic systems. In this feasibility study, the novel High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF)-process, a modification of the HVOF-process, is investigated using the same feedstock material, which means the powder is not optimized for the HVAF-process. The asserted benefits of the HVAF-process are higher particle velocities and lower process temperatures, which can result in a lower porosity and oxidation of the coating. Further benefits of the HVAF process are claimed to be lower process costs and higher deposition rates. In this study, the focus is set on to the applicability of Fe/TiC coatings by HVAF in general. The Fe/TiC HVAF coating could be produced, successfully. The HVAF- and HVOF-coatings, produced with the same powder, were investigated using micro-hardness, porosity, wear and corrosion tests. A similar wear coefficient and micro-hardness for both processes could be achieved. Furthermore the propane/hydrogen proportion of the HVAF process and its influence on the coating thickness and the porosity was investigated.

  18. Children’s Recall of Words Spoken in Their First and Second Language: Effects of Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Reverberation Time

    PubMed Central

    Hurtig, Anders; Keus van de Poll, Marijke; Pekkola, Elina P.; Hygge, Staffan; Ljung, Robert; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Speech perception runs smoothly and automatically when there is silence in the background, but when the speech signal is degraded by background noise or by reverberation, effortful cognitive processing is needed to compensate for the signal distortion. Previous research has typically investigated the effects of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reverberation time in isolation, whilst few have looked at their interaction. In this study, we probed how reverberation time and SNR influence recall of words presented in participants’ first- (L1) and second-language (L2). A total of 72 children (10 years old) participated in this study. The to-be-recalled wordlists were played back with two different reverberation times (0.3 and 1.2 s) crossed with two different SNRs (+3 dBA and +12 dBA). Children recalled fewer words when the spoken words were presented in L2 in comparison with recall of spoken words presented in L1. Words that were presented with a high SNR (+12 dBA) improved recall compared to a low SNR (+3 dBA). Reverberation time interacted with SNR to the effect that at +12 dB the shorter reverberation time improved recall, but at +3 dB it impaired recall. The effects of the physical sound variables (SNR and reverberation time) did not interact with language. PMID:26834665

  19. Evaluation of Free Breathing Versus Breath Hold Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Terms Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) Values for Solid Abdominal Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herek, Duygu; Karabulut, Nevzat; Kocyıgıt, Ali; Yagcı, Ahmet Baki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Our aim was to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal abdominal parenchymal organs and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements in the same patients with breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Material/Methods Forty-eight patients underwent both BH and FB DWI. Spherical region of interest (ROI) was placed on the right hepatic lobe, spleen, pancreas, and renal cortices. ADC values were calculated for each organ on each sequence using an automated software. Image noise, defined as the standard deviation (SD) of the signal intensities in the most artifact-free area of the image background was measured by placing the largest possible ROI on either the left or the right side of the body outside the object in the recorded field of view. SNR was calculated using the formula: SNR=signal intensity (SI)(organ)/standard deviation (SD)(noise). Results There were no statistically significant differences in ADC values of the abdominal organs between BH and FB DWI sequences (p>0.05). There were statistically significant differences between SNR values of organs on BH and FB DWIs. SNRs were found to be better on FB DWI than BH DWI (p<0.001). Conclusions Free breathing DWI technique reduces image noise and increases SNR for abdominal examinations. Free breathing technique is therefore preferable to BH DWI in the evaluation of abdominal organs by DWI. PMID:27822326

  20. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S-H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Enhancing signal to noise ratio by fine-tuning tapers of cladded/uncladded buffer rods in ultrasonic time domain reflectometry in smelters.

    PubMed

    Viumdal, Håkon; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-03-01

    Buffer rods (BR) as waveguides in ultrasonic time domain reflectometry (TDR) can somewhat extend the range of industrial applications of ultrasonics. Level, temperature and flow measurements involving elevated temperatures, corrosive fluids and generally harsh environments are some of the applications in which conventional ultrasonic transducers cannot be used directly in contact with the media. In such cases, BRs with some design modifications can make ultrasonic TDR measurements possible with limited success. This paper deals with TDR in conjunction with distance measurements in extremely hot fluids, using conventional ultrasonic transducers in combination with BRs. When using BRs in the ultrasonic measurement systems in extreme temperatures, problems associated with size and the material of the buffer, have to be addressed. The resonant frequency of the transducer and the relative size of the transducer with respect to the diameter of BR are also important parameters influencing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the signal processing system used in the ultrasonic TDR. This paper gives an overview of design aspects related to the BRs with special emphasis on tapers and cladding used on BRs. As protective cladding, zirconium oxide-yttrium oxide composite was used, with its proven thermal stability in withstanding temperatures in rocket and jet engines up to 1650 °C. In general a BR should guide the signals through to the medium and from and back to the transducer without excessive attenuation and at the same time not exacerbate the noise in the measurement system. The SNR is the decisive performance indicator to consider in the design of BR based ultrasonic TDR, along with appropriate transducer, with suitable size and operating frequency. This work presents and analyses results from extensive experiments related to fine-tuning both geometry of and signals in cladded/uncladded BRs used in high temperature ultrasonic TDR with focus on overall performance based on

  2. An optimized method for NMR-based plant seed metabolomic analysis with maximized polar metabolite extraction efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and chemical shift consistency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangyu; Li, Ning; Li, Hongde; Tang, Huiru

    2014-04-07

    Plant metabolomic analysis has become an essential part of functional genomics and systems biology and requires effective extraction of both primary and secondary metabolites from plant cells. To establish an optimized extraction method for the NMR-based analysis, we used the seeds of mungbean (Vigna radiata cv. Elü no. 1) as a model and systematically investigated the dependence of the metabolite composition in plant extracts on various extraction parameters including cell-breaking methods, extraction solvents, number of extraction repeats, tissue-to-solvent ratio, and extract-to-buffer ratio (for final NMR analysis). We also compared two NMR approaches for quantitative metabolomic analysis from completely relaxed spectra directly and from partially relaxed spectra calculated with T1. By maximizing the extraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio but minimizing inter-sample chemical-shift variations and metabolite degradations, we established a parameter-optimized protocol for NMR-based plant seed metabolomic analysis. We concluded that aqueous methanol was the best extraction solvent with an optimal tissue-to-solvent ratio of about 1 : 10-1 : 15 (mg per μL). The combination of tissuelyser homogenization with ultrasonication was the choice of cell-breaking method with three repeated extractions being necessary. For NMR analysis, the optimal extract-to-solvent was around 5-8 mg mL(-1) and completely relaxed spectra were ideal for intrinsically quantitative metabolomic analysis although partially relaxed spectra were employable for comparative metabolomics. This optimized method will offer ensured data quality for high-throughput and reliable plant metabolomics studies.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY REPORT, MIRATECH CORPORATION, GECO(TM) 3001 AIR/FUEL RATIO CONTROLLER (MANUFACTURED BY WOODWARD GOVERNOR COMPANY) PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the natural gas industry, transmission pipeline operators use internal combustion (IC) gas-fired engines to provide the mechanical energy needed to drive pipeline gas compressors. As such, owners and operators of compressor stations are interested in the performance of these e...

  4. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium in a newly approved pharmaceutical formulation using different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Ghany, Maha F.; Hussein, Lobna A.; Magdy, Nancy; Yamani, Hend Z.

    2016-03-01

    Three spectrophotometric methods have been developed and validated for determination of indacaterol (IND) and glycopyrronium (GLY) in their binary mixtures and novel pharmaceutical dosage form. The proposed methods are considered to be the first methods to determine the investigated drugs simultaneously. The developed methods are based on different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra namely; Numerical Differentiation (ND), Savitsky-Golay (SG) and Fourier Transform (FT). The developed methods showed linearity over concentration range 1-30 and 10-35 (μg/mL) for IND and GLY, respectively. The accuracy calculated as percentage recoveries were in the range of 99.00%-100.49% with low value of RSD% (< 1.5%) demonstrating an excellent accuracy of the proposed methods. The developed methods were proved to be specific, sensitive and precise for quality control of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form without the need for any separation process.

  5. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium in a newly approved pharmaceutical formulation using different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra.

    PubMed

    Abdel Ghany, Maha F; Hussein, Lobna A; Magdy, Nancy; Yamani, Hend Z

    2016-03-15

    Three spectrophotometric methods have been developed and validated for determination of indacaterol (IND) and glycopyrronium (GLY) in their binary mixtures and novel pharmaceutical dosage form. The proposed methods are considered to be the first methods to determine the investigated drugs simultaneously. The developed methods are based on different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra namely; Numerical Differentiation (ND), Savitsky-Golay (SG) and Fourier Transform (FT). The developed methods showed linearity over concentration range 1-30 and 10-35 (μg/mL) for IND and GLY, respectively. The accuracy calculated as percentage recoveries were in the range of 99.00%-100.49% with low value of RSD% (<1.5%) demonstrating an excellent accuracy of the proposed methods. The developed methods were proved to be specific, sensitive and precise for quality control of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form without the need for any separation process.

  6. Compromised extinction and signal-to-noise ratios of weak-resonant-cavity laser diode transmitter injected by channelized and amplitude squeezed spontaneous-emission.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hung; Lin, Gong-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Lin; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2010-03-01

    By using a 200GHz AWG channelized ASE source in connection with a saturable semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based noise blocker as the injecting source at the remote node in front of the local optical network units (ONUs), we demonstrate the spectrum-sliced ASE transmitter with greatly suppressed intensity noise performance in WDM-PON network. Such channelized SOA filtering technique effectively reduces the relative intensity noise of the ASE source by at least 4.5 dB. The low-noise WRC-FPLD transmitter improves its extinction-ratio (ER) from 8.9 to 9.6 dB and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) from 5.9 to 6.3 dB. In comparison with broad-band ASE injection-locked WRC-FPLD transmitter at same power, there is an improvement on receiving power penalty (DeltaP(Receiver)) by 2 dB at BER 10(-9) in back-to-back case, and the receiving power of BER 10(-9) can achieve -24 dBm even after 25km fiber transmission. With additional AWG filtering, the intraband crosstalk effect between the upstream transmitted data and the reflected ASE signal is significantly reduced by 6.3dB. The compromised effects of ER and SNR on BER performance are also elucidated via the modified SNR model for the WRC-FPLD under ASE injection induced gain-saturation condition. The DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaSNR of 8.89 at same ER condition is more pronounced than the DeltaP(Receiver)/DeltaER of 3.17 obtained under same SNR condition, indicating that the SNR plays a more important role than the ER on enhancing the BER performance.

  7. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena—such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis—may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging. PMID:27829050

  8. Effects of input frequency content and signal-to-noise ratio on the parametric estimation of surface EMG-torque dynamics.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Mahsa A; Kearney, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    The dynamic relationship between surface EMG (sEMG) and torque can be estimated from data acquired while subjects voluntarily modulate joint torque. We have shown that for such data, the input (EMG) contains a feedback component from the output (torque) and so accurate estimates of the dynamics require the use of closed-loop identification algorithms. Moreover, this approach has several other limitations since the input is controlled indirectly and so the frequency content and signal-to-noise ratio cannot be controlled. This paper investigates how these factors influence the accuracy of estimates. This was studied using experimental sEMG recorded from healthy human subjects for tasks with different modulation rates. Box-Jenkin (BJ) method was used for identification. Results showed that input frequency content had little effect on estimates of gain and natural frequency but had strong effect on damping factor estimates. It was demonstrated that to accurately estimate the damping factor, the command signal switching rate must be less than 2s. It was also shown that random errors increased with noise level but was limited to 10% of the parameters true value for highest noise level tested. To summarize, simulation study of this work showed that voluntary modulation paradigm can accurately identify sEMG-torque dynamics.

  9. Low voltage-driven oxide phototransistors with fast recovery, high signal-to-noise ratio, and high responsivity fabricated via a simple defect-generating process

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Myeong Gu; Kim, Ye Kyun; Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Cho, Sung Woon; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that photo-thin film transistors (photo-TFTs) fabricated via a simple defect-generating process could achieve fast recovery, a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio, and high sensitivity. The photo-TFTs are inverted-staggered bottom-gate type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) TFTs fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-derived Al2O3 gate insulators. The surfaces of the Al2O3 gate insulators are damaged by ion bombardment during the deposition of the IGZO channel layers by sputtering and the damage results in the hysteresis behavior of the photo-TFTs. The hysteresis loops broaden as the deposition power density increases. This implies that we can easily control the amount of the interface trap sites and/or trap sites in the gate insulator near the interface. The photo-TFTs with large hysteresis-related defects have high S/N ratio and fast recovery in spite of the low operation voltages including a drain voltage of 1 V, positive gate bias pulse voltage of 3 V, and gate voltage pulse width of 3 V (0 to 3 V). In addition, through the hysteresis-related defect-generating process, we have achieved a high responsivity since the bulk defects that can be photo-excited and eject electrons also increase with increasing deposition power density. PMID:27553518

  10. Low voltage-driven oxide phototransistors with fast recovery, high signal-to-noise ratio, and high responsivity fabricated via a simple defect-generating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Myeong Gu; Kim, Ye Kyun; Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Cho, Sung Woon; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    We have demonstrated that photo-thin film transistors (photo-TFTs) fabricated via a simple defect-generating process could achieve fast recovery, a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio, and high sensitivity. The photo-TFTs are inverted-staggered bottom-gate type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) TFTs fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-derived Al2O3 gate insulators. The surfaces of the Al2O3 gate insulators are damaged by ion bombardment during the deposition of the IGZO channel layers by sputtering and the damage results in the hysteresis behavior of the photo-TFTs. The hysteresis loops broaden as the deposition power density increases. This implies that we can easily control the amount of the interface trap sites and/or trap sites in the gate insulator near the interface. The photo-TFTs with large hysteresis-related defects have high S/N ratio and fast recovery in spite of the low operation voltages including a drain voltage of 1 V, positive gate bias pulse voltage of 3 V, and gate voltage pulse width of 3 V (0 to 3 V). In addition, through the hysteresis-related defect-generating process, we have achieved a high responsivity since the bulk defects that can be photo-excited and eject electrons also increase with increasing deposition power density.

  11. Erythropoietin Rescues Primary Rat Cortical Neurons by Altering the Nrf2:Bach1 Ratio: Roles of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Dong-Xue; Zhao, Xiao-Chun; Sun, Wenbo

    2017-01-12

    While inhalation anesthetics are indispensable, and generally considered safe and effective, there is growing concern about the selective neurotoxicity of these agents, especially sevoflurane. Erythropoetin (EPO)-induced protection against sevoflurane-induced neuronal death is an effective intervention, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Extracellular signal-related kinases (Erk) 1/2 plays a pivotal role in cell growth and proliferation. Alteration of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2)/BTB-to-CNC homology 1 (Bach1) ratio by Erk1/2 ameliorates the oxidative stress which occurs in human macrophages. Primary cortical neuron cultures exposed to sevoflurane were assessed for Nrf2, Bach1, total Erk1/2, and phosphorylated Erk1/2 with the following: 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide; propidium iodide uptake; lactate dehydrogenase; malondialdehyde (MDA); superoxide dismutase (SOD); and Western blot. Sevoflurane exposure increased cell death, injury, and MDA (n = 9, P < 0.05), but decreased cell viability and the Nrf2:Bach1 ratio (n = 9, P < 0.05) and down-regulated SOD (n = 9, P < 0.05), while EPO partially rescued the neurotoxicity induced by sevoflurane (n = 9, P < 0.05). Inhibition of Erk1/2 phosphorylation via PD98059 reversed the protective effect of EPO (n = 9, P < 0.05). Thus, protection of EPO markedly attenuated death of neurons exposed to sevoflurane by altering the Nrf2:Bach1 ratio mediated by phosphorylation and activation of Erk1/2.

  12. Visual threshold is set by linear and nonlinear mechanisms in the retina that mitigate noise: how neural circuits in the retina improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the single-photon response.

    PubMed

    Pahlberg, Johan; Sampath, Alapakkam P

    2011-06-01

    In sensory biology, a major outstanding question is how sensory receptor cells minimize noise while maximizing signal to set the detection threshold. This optimization could be problematic because the origin of both the signals and the limiting noise in most sensory systems is believed to lie in stimulus transduction. Signal processing in receptor cells can improve the signal-to-noise ratio. However, neural circuits can further optimize the detection threshold by pooling signals from sensory receptor cells and processing them using a combination of linear and nonlinear filtering mechanisms. In the visual system, noise limiting light detection has been assumed to arise from stimulus transduction in rod photoreceptors. In this context, the evolutionary optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio in the retina has proven critical in allowing visual sensitivity to approach the limits set by the quantal nature of light. Here, we discuss how noise in the mammalian retina is mitigated to allow for highly sensitive night vision.

  13. Principal component analysis with pre-normalization improves the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in positron emission tomography studies of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razifar, Pasha; Engler, Henry; Blomquist, Gunnar; Ringheim, Anna; Estrada, Sergio; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2009-06-01

    This study introduces a new approach for the application of principal component analysis (PCA) with pre-normalization on dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. These images are generated using the amyloid imaging agent N-methyl [11C]2-(4'-methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole ([11C]PIB) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HVs). The aim was to introduce a method which, by using the whole dataset and without assuming a specific kinetic model, could generate images with improved signal-to-noise and detect, extract and illustrate changes in kinetic behavior between different regions in the brain. Eight AD patients and eight HVs from a previously published study with [11C]PIB were used. The approach includes enhancement of brain regions where the kinetics of the radiotracer are different from what is seen in the reference region, pre-normalization for differences in noise levels and removal of negative values. This is followed by slice-wise application of PCA (SW-PCA) on the dynamic PET images. Results obtained using the new approach were compared with results obtained using reference Patlak and summed images. The new approach generated images with good quality in which cortical brain regions in AD patients showed high uptake, compared to cerebellum and white matter. Cortical structures in HVs showed low uptake as expected and in good agreement with data generated using kinetic modeling. The introduced approach generated images with enhanced contrast and improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and discrimination power (DP) compared to summed images and parametric images. This method is expected to be an important clinical tool in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia.

  14. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  15. Ras signaling pathway in the chemopreventive action of different ratios of fish oil and corn oil in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kansal, S; Negi, A K; Bhatnagar, A; Agnihotri, N

    2012-01-01

    Dietary factors play a significant role in colon cancer. The essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), n-3 PUFAs, and n-6 PUFAs exert inverse effect on cancer. This study was designed to understand the mechanism of chemopreventive action of different ratios of fish oil (FO) and corn oil (CO) in colon carcinoma. Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: Group 1 received purified diet whereas Groups 2 and 3 received modified diet with FO:CO (1:1) and FO:CO (2.5:1), respectively. The groups were further subdivided into controls receiving ethylenediamine-tetra acetic-acid and treated groups received dimethylhydrazine-dihydrochloride (DMH)/wk for 4 wk. Animals sacrificed 48 h after last injection constituted initiation phase and that sacrificed after 16 wk constituted post-initiation phase. Differential effect of different ratios of FO and CO was analyzed in isolated colonocytes. In both phases, DMH treatment showed an increase in pan Ras, Raf, MEK1/2, extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk)1/2, and c-fos levels. Akt levels were increased in post-initiation phase only. Treatment with FO + CO (1:1) + DMH decreased pan Ras, MEK1/2 and Erk1/2 levels in post-initiation phase whereas Raf and c-fos were decreased in both phases. Treatment with FO + CO (2.5:1) + DMH decreased Ras, Raf, MEK1/2, Erk1/2, and c-fos levels in both phases. Akt was decreased in post-initiation phase only. The chemo-preventive action of FO and CO may be mediated by time- and dose-dependent effect.

  16. Magnetic Field Strength Dependence of Transverse Relaxation and Signal-to-Noise Ratio for Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 and Helium-3 Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Viqueira, William

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases (HNG), 3He or 129Xe, has become a promising approach for studying lung anatomy and function. Unlike conventional MR imaging, the magnetization in HNG MR is independent of the magnetic field strength. This means that no improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is expected with increasing clinical field strength above ˜0.25T. Furthermore, it has been predicted that the SNR may decline at clinical field strength due to decreases in the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*), caused by the increased magnetic susceptibility induced field gradients at the air-tissue interface. In this thesis the magnetic field strength dependence of T2* and SNR in HNG MR is investigated experimentally in rodent and human lungs. For rodent imaging, a novel broad-band (0.1-100MHz) variable field strength MR imaging system for rodents was built. This system permitted imaging of 129Xe, 3He and 1H at low magnetic field strengths (3-73.5mT) to experimentally investigate the field dependence of HNG imaging SNR in rodent lungs. In vivo 129Xe and 3He signals were acquired at 73.5mT and T 2* was estimated to be approximately 180+/-8 ms, in good agreement with previously reported values. At 73.5mT, image noise is dominated by losses originated from the radiofrequency (RF) coils. To address this issue, RF coils were built using different types of copper wire and compared in phantoms and in vivo in rat lungs using hyperpolarized 3He and 129Xe gas. An SNR improvement of up to 200% was obtained with Litz wire compared to conventional copper wire. This improvement demonstrated the feasibility of HNG lung imaging in rodents at 73.5mT with SNR comparable to that obtained at clinical field strengths. To verify the SNR field dependence in humans, hyperpolarized 3He lung imaging at two commonly used clinical field strengths (1.5T and 3T) was performed in the same volunteers and compared. No significant differences in SNR were obtained

  17. Effect of Simultaneous Bilingualism on Speech Intelligibility across Different Masker Types, Modalities, and Signal-to-Noise Ratios in School-Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Reetzke, Rachel; Lam, Boji Pak-Wing; Xie, Zilong; Sheng, Li; Chandrasekaran, Bharath

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing speech in adverse listening conditions is a significant cognitive, perceptual, and linguistic challenge, especially for children. Prior studies have yielded mixed results on the impact of bilingualism on speech perception in noise. Methodological variations across studies make it difficult to converge on a conclusion regarding the effect of bilingualism on speech-in-noise performance. Moreover, there is a dearth of speech-in-noise evidence for bilingual children who learn two languages simultaneously. The aim of the present study was to examine the extent to which various adverse listening conditions modulate differences in speech-in-noise performance between monolingual and simultaneous bilingual children. To that end, sentence recognition was assessed in twenty-four school-aged children (12 monolinguals; 12 simultaneous bilinguals, age of English acquisition ≤ 3 yrs.). We implemented a comprehensive speech-in-noise battery to examine recognition of English sentences across different modalities (audio-only, audiovisual), masker types (steady-state pink noise, two-talker babble), and a range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs; 0 to -16 dB). Results revealed no difference in performance between monolingual and simultaneous bilingual children across each combination of modality, masker, and SNR. Our findings suggest that when English age of acquisition and socioeconomic status is similar between groups, monolingual and bilingual children exhibit comparable speech-in-noise performance across a range of conditions analogous to everyday listening environments. PMID:27936212

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio and spectral linewidth improvements between 1.5 and 7 Tesla in proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Mueller, Bryon; Ugurbil, Kamil; Wald, Lawrence; Posse, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    This study characterizes gains in sensitivity and spectral resolution of proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with increasing magnetic field strength (B(0)). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit volume and unit time, and intrinsic linewidth (LW) of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured with PEPSI at 1.5, 3, 4, and 7 Tesla on scanners that shared a similar software and hardware platform, using circularly polarized (CP) and eight-channel phased-array (PA) head coils. Data were corrected for relaxation effects and processed with a time-domain matched filter (MF) adapted to each B(0). The SNR and LW measured with PEPSI were very similar to those measured with conventional point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) SI. Measurements with the CP coil demonstrated a nearly linear SNR gain with respect to B(0) in central brain regions. For the PA coil, the SNR-B(0) relationship was less than linear, but there was a substantial SNR increase in comparison to the CP coil. The LW in units of ppm decreased with B(0), resulting in improved spectral resolution. These studies using PEPSI demonstrated linear gains in SNR with respect to B(0), consistent with theoretical expectations, and a decrease in ppm LW with increasing B(0).

  19. The effect of activity outside the field-of-view on image signal-to-noise ratio for 3D PET with 15O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibaraki, Masanobu; Sugawara, Shigeki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Fumiko; Kinoshita, Toshibumi

    2011-05-01

    Activity outside the field-of-view (FOV) degrades the count rate performance of 3D PET and consequently reduces signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of reconstructed images. The aim of this study was to evaluate a neck-shield installed in a 3D PET scanner for reducing the effect of the outside FOV activity. Specifically, we compared brain PET scans (15O2 and H215O) with and without the use of the neck-shield. Image SNRs were directly estimated by a sinogram bootstrap method. The bootstrap analysis showed that the use of the neck-shield improved the SNR by 8% and 19% for H215O and 15O2, respectively. The SNR improvements were predominantly due to the reduction of the random count rates. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) analysis provided SNR estimates that were very similar with the bootstrap-based results for H215O, but not for 15O2. This discrepancy may be due to the fundamental difference between the two methods: the bootstrap method directly calculates the local SNR of reconstructed images, whereas the NECR calculation is based on the whole-gantry count rates, indicating a limitation of the conventional NECR-based method as a tool for assessing the image SNR. Although quantitative parameters, e.g. cerebral blood flow, did not differ when examined with and without the neck-shield, the use of the shield for brain 15O study is recommended in terms of the image SNR.

  20. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement on SEM images using a cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay filters and weighted least squares error.

    PubMed

    Kiani, M A; Sim, K S; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2015-05-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing using weighted least squares error filter is enhanced for scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. A diversity of sample images is captured and the performance is found to be better when compared with the moving average and the standard median filters, with respect to eliminating noise. This technique can be implemented efficiently on real-time SEM images, with all mandatory data for processing obtained from a single image. Noise in images, and particularly in SEM images, are undesirable. A new noise reduction technique, based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay and weighted least squares error method, is developed. We apply the combined technique to single image signal-to-noise ratio estimation and noise reduction for SEM imaging system. This autocorrelation-based technique requires image details to be correlated over a few pixels, whereas the noise is assumed to be uncorrelated from pixel to pixel. The noise component is derived from the difference between the image autocorrelation at zero offset, and the estimation of the corresponding original autocorrelation. In the few test cases involving different images, the efficiency of the developed noise reduction filter is proved to be significantly better than those obtained from the other methods. Noise can be reduced efficiently with appropriate choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time.

  1. On the Contribution of Curl-Free Current Patterns to the Ultimate Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio at Ultra-High Field Strength.

    PubMed

    Pfrommer, Andreas; Henning, Anke

    2017-02-10

    The ultimate intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a coil independent performance measure to compare different receive coil designs. To evaluate this benchmark in a sample, a complete electromagnetic basis set is required. The basis set can be obtained by curl-free and divergence-free surface current distributions, which excite linearly independent solutions to Maxwell's equations. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the contribution of curl-free current patterns to the ultimate intrinsic SNR in a spherical head-sized model at 9.4 T. Therefore, we compare the ultimate intrinsic SNR obtained with having only curl-free or divergence-free current patterns, with the ultimate intrinsic SNR obtained from a combination of curl-free and divergence-free current patterns. The influence of parallel imaging is studied for various acceleration factors. Moreover results for different field strengths (1.5 T up to 11.7 T) are presented at specific voxel positions and acceleration factors. The full-wave electromagnetic problem is analytically solved using dyadic Green's functions. We show, that at ultra-high field strength (B0 ⩾7T) a combination of curl-free and divergence-free current patterns is required to achieve the best possible SNR at any position in a spherical head-sized model. On 1.5- and 3T platforms, divergence-free current patterns are sufficient to cover more than 90% of the ultimate intrinsic SNR.

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope with a high-signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and high-speed imaging for live cell observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Takimoto, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, which can produce images of specific molecules without staining, has attracted the attention of researchers, as it matches the need for molecular imaging and pathway analysis of live cells. In particular, there have been an increasing number of CARS experimental results regarding lipids in live cells, which cannot be fluorescently tagged while keeping the cells alive. One of the important applications of lipid research is for the metabolic syndrome. Since the metabolic syndrome is said to be related to the lipids in lipocytes, blood, arterial vessels, and so on, the CARS technique is expected to find application in this field. However, CARS microscopy requires a pair of picosecond laser pulses, which overlap both temporally and spatially. This makes the optical adjustments of a CARS microscope challenging. The authors developed a CARS unit that includes optics for easy and stable adjustment of the overlap of these laser pulses. Adding the CARS unit to a laser scanning microscope provides CARS images of a high signal-to-noise ratio, with an acquisition rate as high as 2 microseconds per pixel. Thus, images of fast-moving lipid droplets in Hela cells were obtained.

  3. Improved signal to noise ratio and sensitivity of an infrared imaging video bolometer on large helical device by using an infrared periscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Shwetang N. Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Enokuchi, Akito; Takeyama, Norihide

    2014-07-15

    An Infrared imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) diagnostic is currently being used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for studying the localization of radiation structures near the magnetic island and helical divertor X-points during plasma detachment and for 3D tomography. This research demands high signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity to improve the temporal resolution for studying the evolution of radiation structures during plasma detachment and a wide IRVB field of view (FoV) for tomography. Introduction of an infrared periscope allows achievement of a higher SNR and higher sensitivity, which in turn, permits a twofold improvement in the temporal resolution of the diagnostic. Higher SNR along with wide FoV is achieved simultaneously by reducing the separation of the IRVB detector (metal foil) from the bolometer's aperture and the LHD plasma. Altering the distances to meet the aforesaid requirements results in an increased separation between the foil and the IR camera. This leads to a degradation of the diagnostic performance in terms of its sensitivity by 1.5-fold. Using an infrared periscope to image the IRVB foil results in a 7.5-fold increase in the number of IR camera pixels imaging the foil. This improves the IRVB sensitivity which depends on the square root of the number of IR camera pixels being averaged per bolometer channel. Despite the slower f-number (f/# = 1.35) and reduced transmission (τ{sub 0} = 89%, due to an increased number of lens elements) for the periscope, the diagnostic with an infrared periscope operational on LHD has improved in terms of sensitivity and SNR by a factor of 1.4 and 4.5, respectively, as compared to the original diagnostic without a periscope (i.e., IRVB foil being directly imaged by the IR camera through conventional optics). The bolometer's field of view has also increased by two times. The paper discusses these improvements in apt details.

  4. Metals in the z ˜ 3 intergalactic medium: results from an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES quasar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; Pomante, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Viel, M.; Barai, P.; Becker, G. D.; Calura, F.; Cupani, G.; Fontanot, F.; Haehnelt, M. G.; Kim, T.-S.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Rorai, A.; Tescari, E.; Vanzella, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the abundance and distribution of metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at ≃ 2.8 through the analysis of an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES spectrum of the quasar HE0940-1050. In the C IV forest, our deep spectrum is sensitive at 3σ to lines with column density down to log NCIV ≃ 11.4 and in 60 per cent of the considered redshift range down to ≃11.1. In our sample, all H I lines with log NHI ≥ 14.8 show an associated C IV absorption. In the range 14.0 ≤ log NHI < 14.8, 43 per cent of H I lines has an associated C IV absorption. At log NHI < 14.0, the detection rates drop to <10 per cent, possibly due to our sensitivity limits and not to an actual variation of the gas abundance properties. In the range log NHI ≥ 14, we observe a fraction of H I lines with detected C IV a factor of 2 larger than the fraction of H I lines lying in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of relatively bright Lyman-break galaxies hosted by dark matter haloes with ˜ 1012 M⊙. The comparison of our results with the output of a grid of photoionization models and of two cosmological simulations implies that the volume filling factor of the IGM gas enriched to a metallicity log Z/Z_{⊙} ≳-3 should be of the order of ˜10-13 per cent. In conclusion, our results favour a scenario in which metals are found also outside the CGM of bright star-forming galaxies, possibly due to pollution by lower mass objects and/or to an early enrichment by the first sources.

  5. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-07

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  6. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  7. Stable carbon isotope ratios in tree rings of co-occurring species from semi-arid tropics in Africa: Patterns and climatic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrekirstos, Aster; Worbes, Martin; Teketay, Demel; Fetene, Masresha; Mitlöhner, Ralph

    2009-04-01

    Although several proxies have been proposed to trace the course of environmental and climatological fluctuations, precise paleoclimate records from the tropics, notably from Africa are still sorely lacking today. Stable carbon isotopes ( δ13C) in tree rings are an attractive record of climate. In this study, the patterns and climatic signals of δ13C ratios were determined on tree rings of deciduous ( Acacia senegal, Acacia tortilis, Acacia seyal) and an evergreen ( Balanites aegyptiaca) species, from a semi-arid Acacia Woodland in Ethiopia. δ13C inter-annual patterns are synchronous among the co-occurring species. A declining trend with time was observed in δ13C, notably for B. aegyptiaca, which could be due to anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO 2 concentration and decrease in atmospheric δ13C. Tree ring δ13C values of all the species revealed significant negative correlation with precipitation amount but not with temperature and relative humidity. The δ13C series of the deciduous species shows a higher correlation ( r = - 0.70 to - 0.78) with precipitation than the evergreen species ( r = - 0.55). A master δ13C series, composed of the average of the three Acacia species, displayed stronger significant correlation ( r = - 0.82) than any of the individual species δ13C series. The weak relationship between temperature and δ13C in this study indicates that photosynthetic rate is not a significant factor. Moisture stress, however, may have a direct impact on the stomatal conductance and explain the strong negative relationship between δ13C and precipitation. The results demonstrate the potential of δ13C in tree rings to reflect physiological responses to environmental changes as a vehicle for paleoclimatic reconstruction, which is important to understand tree response to past and future climate change.

  8. 1H-MRS evaluation of breast lesions by using total choline signal-to-noise ratio as an indicator of malignancy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiang Jiang; Song, Hui Sheng; Chen, Long Hua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the use of total choline signal-to-noise ratio (tCho SNR) criteria in MRS studies for benign/malignant discrimination of focal breast lesions. We conducted (1) a meta-analysis based on 10 studies including 480 malignant breast lesions and 312 benign breast lesions and (2) a subgroup meta-analysis of tCho SNR ≥ 2 as cutoff for malignancy based on 7 studies including 371 malignant breast lesions and 239 benign breast lesions. (1) The pooled sensitivity and specificity of proton MRS with tCho SNR were 0.74 (95 % CI 0.69-0.77) and 0.76 (95 % CI 0.71-0.81), respectively. The PLR and NLR were 3.67 (95 % CI 2.30-5.83) and 0.25 (95 % CI 0.14-0.42), respectively. From the fitted SROC, the AUC and Q* index were 0.89 and 0.82. Publication bias was present (t = 2.46, P = 0.039). (2) Meta-regression analysis suggested that neither threshold effect nor evaluated covariates including strength of field, pulse sequence, TR and TE were sources of heterogeneity (all P value >0.05). (3) Subgroup meta-analysis: The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 and 0.72, respectively. The PLR and NLR were 3.49 and 0.20, respectively. The AUC and Q* index were 0.92 and 0.85. The use of tCho SNR criteria in MRS studies was helpful for differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions. However, pooled diagnostic measures might be overestimated due to publication bias. A tCho SNR ≥ 2 as cutoff for malignancy resulted in higher diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  10. Variations in the structure and electrochemical characteristics of membrane electrode assemblies during the endurance testing of hydrogen-air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakov, V. B.; Aliev, A. D.; Bogdanovskaya, V. A.; Ivanitskii, B. A.; Kazanskii, L. P.; Kapustin, A. V.; Korchagin, O. V.; Landgraf, I. K.; Tarasevich, M. P.; Chalykh, A. E.

    2015-05-01

    Variations in the characteristics of a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) are studied during the endurance testing of a hydrogen-air fuel cell (FC) based on a Nafion 212 proton conducting membrane and platinum catalysts. It is shown that the voltage drop observed during MEA testing was mainly due to physicochemical transformations of the cathode catalyst, i.e., the oxidation of platinum and its subsequent recrystallization with nanoparticle coarsening. It is established that the rate of degradation increases along with temperature and loading, and with periodic FC depressurization. It is concluded that the enhancing effects of additional factors of degradation, e.g., platinum ion transport to the proton-conducting membrane and corrosion of the carbon carrier, were responsible for these processes.

  11. Treatment of synthetic arsenate wastewater with iron-air fuel cell electrocoagulation to supply drinking water and electricity in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Maitlo, Hubdar Ali; Park, Joo Yang

    2017-05-15

    Electrocoagulation with an iron-air fuel cell is an innovative arsenate removal system that can operate without an external electricity supply. Thus, this technology is advantageous for treating wastewater in remote regions where it is difficult to supply electricity. In this study, the possibility of real applications of this system for arsenate treatment with electricity production was verified through electrolyte effect investigations using a small-scale fuel cell and performance testing of a liter-scale fuel cell stack. The electrolyte species studied were NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaHCO3. NaCl was overall the most effective electrolyte for arsenate treatment, although Na2SO4 produced the greatest electrical current and power density. In addition, although the current density and power density were proportional to the concentrations of NaCl and Na2SO4, the use of concentrations above 20 mM of NaCl and Na2SO4 inhibited arsenate treatment due to competition effects between anions and arsenate in adsorption onto the iron hydroxide. The dominant iron hydroxide produced at the iron anode was found to be lepidocrocite by means of Raman spectroscopy. A liter-scale four-stack iron-air fuel cell with 10 mM NaCl electrolyte was found to be able to treat about 300 L of 1 ppm arsenate solution to below 10 ppb during 1 day, based on its 60-min treatment capacity, as well as produce the maximum power density of 250 mW/m(2).

  12. A novel technique for determination of two dimensional signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor of an antiscatter grid in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nøtthellen, Jacob; Konst, Bente; Abildgaard, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: to present a new and simplified method for pixel-wise determination of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor KSNR of an antiscatter grid, when used with a digital imaging system. The method was based on approximations of published formulas. The simplified estimate of K2SNR may be used as a decision tool for whether or not to use an antiscatter grid. Methods: the primary transmission of the grid Tp was determined with and without a phantom present using a pattern of beam stops. The Bucky factor B was measured with and without a phantom present. Hence K2SNR maps were created based on Tp and B. A formula was developed to calculate K2SNR from the measured Bs without using the measured Tp. The formula was applied on two exposures of anthropomorphic phantoms, adult legs and baby chest, and on two homogeneous poly[methyl methacrylate] (PMMA) phantoms, 5 cm and 10 cm thick. The results from anthropomorphic phantoms were compared to those based on the beam stop method. The results for the PMMA-phantoms were compared to a study that used a contrast-detail phantom. Results: 2D maps of K2SNR over the entire adult legs and baby chest phantoms were created. The maps indicate that it is advantageous to use the antiscatter grid for imaging of the adult legs. For baby chest imaging the antiscatter grid is not recommended if only the lung regions are of interest. The K2SNR maps based on the new method correspond to those from the beam stop method, and the K2SNR from the homogenous phantoms arising from two different approaches also agreed well with each other. Conclusion: a method to measure 2D K2SNR associated with grid use in digital radiography system was developed and validated. The proposed method requires four exposures and use of a simple formula. It is fast and provides adequate estimates for K2SNR.

  13. Comparison of entrance exposure and signal-to-noise ratio between an SBDX prototype and a wide-beam cardiac angiographic system.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Michael A; Wilfley, Brian P; Star-Lack, Josh M; Heanue, Joseph A; Betts, Timothy D; Van Lysel, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system uses an inverse geometry, narrow x-ray beam, and a 2-mm thick CdTe detector to improve the dose efficiency of the coronary angiographic procedure. Entrance exposure and large-area iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured with the SBDX prototype and compared to that of a clinical cardiac interventional system with image intensifier (II) and charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Philips H5000, MRC-200 x-ray tube, 72 kWp max). Phantoms were 18.6-35.0 cm acrylic with an iohexol-equivalent disk placed at midthickness (35 mg/cm2 iodine radiographic density). Imaging was performed at 15 frame/s, with the disk at mechanical isocenter and an 11-cm object-plane field width. The II/CCD system was operated in cine mode with automatic exposure control. With the SBDX prototype at maximum x-ray output (120 kVp, 24.3 kWp), the SBDX SNR was 107%-69% of the II/CCD SNR, depending on phantom thickness, and the SBDX entrance exposure rate was 10.7-9.3 R/min (9.4-8.2 cGy/min air kerma). For phantoms where an equal-kVp imaging comparison was possible (> or = 23.3 cm), the SBDX SNR ranged from 47% to 69% of the II/CCD SNR while delivering 6% to 9% of the II/CCD entrance exposure rate. From these measurements it was determined that the relative SBDX entrance exposure at equal SNR would be 31%-16%. Results were consistent with a model for relative entrance exposure at equal SNR, which predicted a 3-7 times reduction in entrance exposure due to SBDX's comparatively low scatter fraction (5.5%-8.1% measured, including off-focus radiation), high detector detective quantum efficiency (66%-73%, measured from 70 to 120 kVp), and large entrance field area (1.7x - 2.3x, for the same object-plane field width). With improvements to the system geometry, detector, and x-ray source, SBDX technology is projected to achieve conventional cine-quality SNR over a full range of patient thicknesses, with 5-10 times lower skin dose.

  14. Comparison of entrance exposure and signal-to-noise ratio between an SBDX prototype and a wide-beam cardiac angiographic system

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, Michael A.; Wilfley, Brian P.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Heanue, Joseph A.; Betts, Timothy D.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    The scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system uses an inverse geometry, narrow x-ray beam, and a 2-mm thick CdTe detector to improve the dose efficiency of the coronary angiographic procedure. Entrance exposure and large-area iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured with the SBDX prototype and compared to that of a clinical cardiac interventional system with image intensifier (II) and charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Philips H5000, MRC-200 x-ray tube, 72 kWp max). Phantoms were 18.6-35.0 cm acrylic with an iohexol-equivalent disk placed at midthickness (35 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine radiographic density). Imaging was performed at 15 frame/s, with the disk at mechanical isocenter and an 11-cm object-plane field width. The II/CCD system was operated in cine mode with automatic exposure control. With the SBDX prototype at maximum x-ray output (120 kVp, 24.3 kWp), the SBDX SNR was 107%-69% of the II/CCD SNR, depending on phantom thickness, and the SBDX entrance exposure rate was 10.7-9.3 R/min (9.4-8.2 cGy/min air kerma). For phantoms where an equal-kVp imaging comparison was possible ({>=}23.3 cm), the SBDX SNR ranged from 47% to 69% of the II/CCD SNR while delivering 6% to 9% of the II/CCD entrance exposure rate. From these measurements it was determined that the relative SBDX entrance exposure at equal SNR would be 31%-16%. Results were consistent with a model for relative entrance exposure at equal SNR, which predicted a 3-7 times reduction in entrance exposure due to SBDX's comparatively low scatter fraction (5.5%-8.1% measured, including off-focus radiation), high detector detective quantum efficiency (66%-73%, measured from 70 to 120 kVp), and large entrance field area (1.7x-2.3x, for the same object-plane field width). With improvements to the system geometry, detector, and x-ray source, SBDX technology is projected to achieve conventional cine-quality SNR over a full range of patient thicknesses, with 5-10 times lower skin dose.

  15. Multimodal integration of EEG and MEG data: a simulation study with variable signal-to-noise ratio and number of sensors.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Fabio; Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo M; Angelone, Leonardo M; Cincotti, Febo

    2004-05-01

    Previous simulation studies have stressed the importance of the multimodal integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data in the estimation of cortical current density. In such studies, no systematic variations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and of the number of sensors were explicitly taken into account in the estimation process. We investigated effects of variable SNR and number of sensors on the accuracy of current density estimate by using multimodal EEG and MEG data. This was done by using as the dependent variable both the correlation coefficient (CC) and the relative error (RE) between imposed and estimated waveforms at the level of cortical region of interests (ROI). A realistic head and cortical surface model was used. Factors used in the simulations were: (1). the SNR of the simulated scalp data (with seven levels: infinite, 30, 20, 10, 5, 3, 1); (2). the particular inverse operator used to estimate the cortical source activity from the simulated scalp data (INVERSE, with two levels, including minimum norm and weighted minimum norm); and (3). the number of EEG or MEG sensors employed in the analysis (SENSORS, with three levels: 128, 61, 29 for EEG and 153, 61, or 38 in MEG). Analysis of variance demonstrated that all the considered factors significantly affect the CC and the RE indexes. Combined EEG-MEG data produced statistically significant lower RE and higher CC in source current density reconstructions compared to that estimated by the EEG and MEG data considered separately. These observations hold for the range of SNR values presented by the analyzed data. The superiority of current density estimation by multimodal integration of EEG and MEG was not due to differences in number of sensors between unimodal (EEG, MEG) and combined (EEG-MEG) inverse estimates. In fact, the current density estimate relative to the EEG-MEG multimodal integration involved 61 EEG plus 63 MEG sensors, whereas estimations carried out

  16. Demonstration of in-service wavelength division multiplexing optical-signal-to-noise ratio performance monitoring and operating guidelines for coherent data channels with different modulation formats and various baud rates.

    PubMed

    Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Khaleghi, Salman; Daab, Wajih; Almaiman, Ahmed; Ziyadi, Morteza; Mohajerin-Ariaei, Amirhossein; Rogawski, Devora; Tur, Moshe; Touch, Joseph D; Vusirikala, Vijay; Zhao, Wendy; Willner, Alan E

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrated a delay-line interferometer (DLI)-based, optical-signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) monitoring scheme of 100  Gbit/s polarization multiplexed quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PM-QPSK) four-channel WDM at 50-GHz International Telecommunication Union (ITU) grid with <0.5  dB error for signals with up to 26 dB of actual OSNR. We also demonstrated data format transparency and baud rate tunability of the OSNR monitor by measuring the OSNR for a 200  Gbit/s PM-16-QAM (25-Gbaud) signal and a 200  Gbit/s PM-QPSK (50-Gbaud) signal. We also explored and studied different monitor parameters, including the shape of the filter spectrum, the bandwidth of the filter, DLI delay, and DLI phase-detuning to determine the design guidelines for a desired level of accuracy for the OSNR monitor in an optical network.

  17. RATIO COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1958-11-11

    An electronic computer circuit is described for producing an output voltage proportional to the product or quotient of tbe voltages of a pair of input signals. ln essence, the disclosed invention provides a computer having two channels adapted to receive separate input signals and each having amplifiers with like fixed amplification factors and like negatlve feedback amplifiers. One of the channels receives a constant signal for comparison purposes, whereby a difference signal is produced to control the amplification factors of the variable feedback amplifiers. The output of the other channel is thereby proportional to the product or quotient of input signals depending upon the relation of input to fixed signals in the first mentioned channel.

  18. Novel ferrocene-anchored ZnO nanoparticle/carbon nanotube assembly for glucose oxidase wiring: application to a glucose/air fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Raoudha; Mattei, Jean-Gabriel; Thery, Jessica; Auger, Aurélien

    2015-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is immobilized on ZnO nanoparticle-modified electrodes. The immobilized glucose oxidase shows efficient mediated electron transfer with ZnO nanoparticles to which the ferrocenyl moiety is π-stacked into a supramolecular architecture. The constructed ZnO-Fc/CNT modified electrode exhibits high ferrocene surface coverage, preventing any leakage of the π-stacked ferrocene from the newly described ZnO hybrid nanoparticles. The use of the new architecture of ZnO supported electron mediators to shuttle electrons from the redox centre of the enzyme to the surface of the working electrode can effectively bring about successful glucose oxidation. These modified electrodes evaluated as a highly efficient architecture provide a catalytic current for glucose oxidation and are integrated in a specially designed glucose/air fuel cell prototype using a conventional platinum-carbon (Pt/C) cathode at physiological pH (7.0). The obtained architecture leads to a peak power density of 53 μW cm-2 at 300 mV for the Nafion® based biofuel cell under ``air breathing'' conditions at room temperature.

  19. Novel ferrocene-anchored ZnO nanoparticle/carbon nanotube assembly for glucose oxidase wiring: application to a glucose/air fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raoudha; Mattei, Jean-Gabriel; Thery, Jessica; Auger, Aurélien

    2015-06-28

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) is immobilized on ZnO nanoparticle-modified electrodes. The immobilized glucose oxidase shows efficient mediated electron transfer with ZnO nanoparticles to which the ferrocenyl moiety is π-stacked into a supramolecular architecture. The constructed ZnO-Fc/CNT modified electrode exhibits high ferrocene surface coverage, preventing any leakage of the π-stacked ferrocene from the newly described ZnO hybrid nanoparticles. The use of the new architecture of ZnO supported electron mediators to shuttle electrons from the redox centre of the enzyme to the surface of the working electrode can effectively bring about successful glucose oxidation. These modified electrodes evaluated as a highly efficient architecture provide a catalytic current for glucose oxidation and are integrated in a specially designed glucose/air fuel cell prototype using a conventional platinum-carbon (Pt/C) cathode at physiological pH (7.0). The obtained architecture leads to a peak power density of 53 μW cm(-2) at 300 mV for the Nafion® based biofuel cell under "air breathing" conditions at room temperature.

  20. In situ STM studies of zinc in aqueous solutions containing PEG DiAcid inhibitor: Correlation with electrochemical performances of zinc-air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Hyams, Tzipi; Ziengerman, Yuli; Ein-Eli, Yair

    Electrochemical performance of prismatic zinc-air fuel cells comprising zinc anode gel containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG 600) and poly(ethylene glycol) bis(carboxymethyl) ether (PEG DiAcid 600) as corrosion inhibitor were studied. It was found that in addition to the low zinc corrosion rates obtained from cells utilizing PEG DiAcid 600 as corrosion inhibitor, both analog and global mobile system (GSM) discharge capacities and potential plateaus, in a wide range of temperatures were higher once PEG DiAcid was added to the zinc gel mixtures. The results obtained from in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of zinc substrates immersed in deionized (DI) water containing inhibitors reveal that the film produced on the zinc metal in the presence of PEG DiAcid is by far thinner than the film produced by other inhibitors such as PEG 600 and polyoxyethylene alkyl phosphate ester acid (GAFAC RA 600). These studies also reveal that the addition of PEG DiAcid forms an adherent and a complete protective coverage, while the addition of PEG 600 and GAFAC RA 600 resulted in an incomplete coverage with the appearance of pits and terraces, indicating on a restricted inhibition performance of these two polymers compared with PEG DiAcid. These studies suggest a low interface resistivity of zinc immersed in alkaline solution containing PEG DiAcid, which is expressed in a higher working potential and increased cell capacity in different temperatures at two discharge modes of analog and GSM.

  1. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  2. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Montano, Luis A.; Randtke, Edward A.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging. PMID:26633584

  3. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Dina V; Montano, Luis A; Randtke, Edward A; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging.

  4. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio of optoacoustic signals from double-walled carbon nanotubes by using an array of dual-wavelength high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; de Varona, Omar E.; Escudero, Pedro; Carpintero del Barrio, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela Rivera, Horacio

    2015-07-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging is a rising biomedical technique that has attracted much interest over the last 15 years. This technique permits to visualize the internal soft tissues in depth by using short laser pulses, able to generate ultrasonic signals in a large frequency range. It combines the high contrast of optical imaging with the high resolution of ultrasound systems. The OA signals detected from the whole surface of the body serve to reconstruct in detail the image of the internal tissues, where the absorbed optical energy distribution outlines the regions of interest. In fact, the use of contrast agents could improve the detection of growing anomalies in soft tissues, such as carcinomas. This work proposes the use of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as a potential nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent applicable in OA to reveal the presence of malignant in-depth tissues in near infrared (NIR) wavelength range (0.75-1.4 μm), where the biological tissues are fairly transparent to optical radiation. A dual-wavelength (870 and 905 nm) OA system is presented, based on arrays of high power diode lasers (HPDLs) that generate ultrasound signals from a DWCNT solution embedded within a biological phantom. The OA signals generated by DWCNTs are compared with those obtained using black ink, considered to be a very good absorber at these wavelengths. The experiments prove that DWCNTs are a potential contrast agent for optoacoustic spectroscopy (OAS).

  5. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  6. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  7. When is an optimization not an optimization? Evaluation of clinical implications of information content (signal-to-noise ratio) in optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy, and how to measure and maximize it.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Punam A; Willson, Keith; Stegemann, Berthold; van Geldorp, Irene E; Kyriacou, Andreas; Moraldo, Michela; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2011-05-01

    Impact of variability in the measured parameter is rarely considered in designing clinical protocols for optimization of atrioventricular (AV) or interventricular (VV) delay of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). In this article, we approach this question quantitatively using mathematical simulation in which the true optimum is known and examine practical implications using some real measurements. We calculated the performance of any optimization process that selects the pacing setting which maximizes an underlying signal, such as flow or pressure, in the presence of overlying random variability (noise). If signal and noise are of equal size, for a 5-choice optimization (60, 100, 140, 180, 220 ms), replicate AV delay optima are rarely identical but rather scattered with a standard deviation of 45 ms. This scatter was overwhelmingly determined (ρ = -0.975, P < 0.001) by Information Content, [Formula: see text], an expression of signal-to-noise ratio. Averaging multiple replicates improves information content. In real clinical data, at resting, heart rate information content is often only 0.2-0.3; elevated pacing rates can raise information content above 0.5. Low information content (e.g. <0.5) causes gross overestimation of optimization-induced increment in VTI, high false-positive appearance of change in optimum between visits and very wide confidence intervals of individual patient optimum. AV and VV optimization by selecting the setting showing maximum cardiac function can only be accurate if information content is high. Simple steps to reduce noise such as averaging multiple replicates, or to increase signal such as increasing heart rate, can improve information content, and therefore viability, of any optimization process.

  8. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Energy-Dispersive X-Ray (STEM-EDX) Spectrum Images Using Single-Atomic-Column Cross-Correlation Averaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2016-06-01

    Acquiring an atomic-resolution compositional map of crystalline specimens has become routine practice, thus opening possibilities for extracting subatomic information from such maps. A key challenge for achieving subatomic precision is the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of compositional maps. Here, we report a simple and reliable solution for achieving high-SNR energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy spectrum images for individual atomic columns. The method is based on standard cross-correlation aided by averaging of single-column EDX maps with modifications in the reference image. It produces EDX maps with minimal specimen drift, beam drift, and scan distortions. Step-by-step procedures to determine a self-consistent reference map with a discussion on the reliability, stability, and limitations of the method are presented here.

  9. Contingent Stimuli Signal Subsequent Reinforcer Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutros, Nathalie; Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Conditioned reinforcer effects may be due to the stimulus' discriminative rather than its strengthening properties. While this was demonstrated in a frequently-changing choice procedure, a single attempt to replicate in a relatively static choice environment failed. We contend that this was because the information provided by the stimuli was…

  10. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  11. The Dependence of Signal-To-Noise Ratio (S/N) Between Star Brightness and Background on the Filter Used in Images Taken by the Vulcan Photometric Planet Search Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    1998-10-01

    The Vulcan Photometric Planet Search is the ground-based counterpart of Kepler Mission Proposal. The Kepler Proposal calls for the launch of telescope to look intently at a small patch of sky for four year. The mission is designed to look for extra-solar planets that transit sun-like stars. The Kepler Mission should be able to detect Earth-size planets. This goal requires an instrument and software capable of detecting photometric changes of several parts per hundred thousand in the flux of a star. The goal also requires the continuous monitoring of about a hundred thousand stars. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Class proposal similar in cost to the Lunar Prospector. The Vulcan Search is also a NASA project but based at Lick Observatory. A small wide-field telescope monitors various star fields successively during the year. Dozens of images, each containing tens of thousands of stars, are taken any night that weather permits. The images are then monitored for photometric changes of the order of one part in a thousand. These changes would reveal the transit of an inner-orbit Jupiter-size planet similar to those discovered recently in spectroscopic searches. In order to achieve a one part in one thousand photometric precision even the choice of a filter used in taking an exposure can be critical. The ultimate purpose of an filter is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of one's observation. Ideally, filters reduce the sky glow cause by street lights and, thereby, make the star images more distinct. The higher the S/N, the higher is the chance to observe a transit signal that indicates the presence of a new planet. It is, therefore, important to select the filter that maximizes the S/N.

  12. The Dependence of Signal-To-Noise Ratio (S/N) Between Star Brightness and Background on the Filter Used in Images Taken by the Vulcan Photometric Planet Search Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    1998-01-01

    The Vulcan Photometric Planet Search is the ground-based counterpart of Kepler Mission Proposal. The Kepler Proposal calls for the launch of telescope to look intently at a small patch of sky for four year. The mission is designed to look for extra-solar planets that transit sun-like stars. The Kepler Mission should be able to detect Earth-size planets. This goal requires an instrument and software capable of detecting photometric changes of several parts per hundred thousand in the flux of a star. The goal also requires the continuous monitoring of about a hundred thousand stars. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Class proposal similar in cost to the Lunar Prospector. The Vulcan Search is also a NASA project but based at Lick Observatory. A small wide-field telescope monitors various star fields successively during the year. Dozens of images, each containing tens of thousands of stars, are taken any night that weather permits. The images are then monitored for photometric changes of the order of one part in a thousand. These changes would reveal the transit of an inner-orbit Jupiter-size planet similar to those discovered recently in spectroscopic searches. In order to achieve a one part in one thousand photometric precision even the choice of a filter used in taking an exposure can be critical. The ultimate purpose of an filter is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of one's observation. Ideally, filters reduce the sky glow cause by street lights and, thereby, make the star images more distinct. The higher the S/N, the higher is the chance to observe a transit signal that indicates the presence of a new planet. It is, therefore, important to select the filter that maximizes the S/N.

  13. Novel pure component contribution, mean centering of ratio spectra and factor based algorithms for simultaneous resolution and quantification of overlapped spectral signals: An application to recently co-formulated tablets of chlorzoxazone, aceclofenac and paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toubar, Safaa S.; Hegazy, Maha A.; Elshahed, Mona S.; Helmy, Marwa I.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, resolution and quantitation of spectral signals are achieved by several univariate and multivariate techniques. The novel pure component contribution algorithm (PCCA) along with mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR) and the factor based partial least squares (PLS) algorithms were developed for simultaneous determination of chlorzoxazone (CXZ), aceclofenac (ACF) and paracetamol (PAR) in their pure form and recently co-formulated tablets. The PCCA method allows the determination of each drug at its λmax. While, the mean centered values at 230, 302 and 253 nm, were used for quantification of CXZ, ACF and PAR, respectively, by MCR method. Partial least-squares (PLS) algorithm was applied as a multivariate calibration method. The three methods were successfully applied for determination of CXZ, ACF and PAR in pure form and tablets. Good linear relationships were obtained in the ranges of 2-50, 2-40 and 2-30 μg mL- 1 for CXZ, ACF and PAR, in order, by both PCCA and MCR, while the PLS model was built for the three compounds each in the range of 2-10 μg mL- 1. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with a reported one. PCCA and MCR methods were validated according to ICH guidelines, while PLS method was validated by both cross validation and an independent data set. They are found suitable for the determination of the studied drugs in bulk powder and tablets.

  14. Restoration of transforming growth factor-beta signaling enhances radiosensitivity by altering the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in the p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cell line MIA PaCa-2.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mansoor M; Alcock, Rachael A; Chendil, Damodaran; Dey, Swatee; Das, Anindita; Venkatasubbarao, Kolaparthi; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Sun, LuZhe; Strodel, William E; Freeman, James W

    2002-01-18

    In this study, we investigated whether lack of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (RII) expression and loss of TGF-beta signaling played a role in radiation resistance of pancreatic cancer cells MIA PaCa-2 that possess a mutated p53 gene. Transfection of this cell line with a RII cDNA led to a stimulation of the transcriptional activity of p3TP-Lux, a TGF-beta-responsive reporter construct. The RII transfectants (MIA PaCa-2/RII) showed a significant increase in sensitivity to radiation when compared with MIA PaCa-2/vector cells. The increase in sensitivity to radiation was reversed by neutralizing antibodies to TGF-beta, indicating that these changes were dependent on TGF-beta signaling. Compared with MIA PaCa-2/vector cells, MIA PaCa-2/RII cells showed a greater than 3-fold increase in apoptosis after radiation. Enhanced radiation sensitivity of MIA PaCa-2/RII cells was associated with an induction of Bax mRNA and protein that was followed by a release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage after radiation exposure. Overexpression of Bcl-x(L) or treatment with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against Bax significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in MIA PaCa-2/RII but not in MIA PaCa-2/Vector cells, suggesting that Bax induction is necessary for radiation-induced TGF-beta signaling-mediated apoptosis. Thus, restoration of TGF-beta signaling sensitized these cells to ionizing radiation, although these cells possess a mutated p53 gene. In addition, disruption of RII function by dominant negative mutant of RII inhibited the radiation-induced TGF-beta signaling and apoptosis in primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Together, these observations imply that RII is an important component of radiation-induced TGF-beta signaling, and loss of function of RII may enhance resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis.

  15. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  16. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by adiponectin and insulin in mouse adipocytes: requirement of acyl-CoA synthetases FATP1 and Acsl1 and association with an elevation in AMP/ATP ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Sun, Lei; Ruderman, Neil; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Adiponectin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocytes, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that AMP, generated in activating fatty acids to their CoA derivatives, catalyzed by acyl-CoA synthetases, is involved in AMPK activation by adiponectin. Moreover, in adipocytes, insulin affects the subcellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetase FATP1. Thus, we also tested whether insulin activates AMPK in these cells and, if so, whether it activates through a similar mechanism. We examined these hypotheses by measuring the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activation on adiponectin and insulin stimulation and after knocking down acyl-CoA synthetases in adipocytes. We show that adiponectin activation of AMPK is accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Moreover, FATP1 and Acsl1, the 2 major acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in adipocytes, are essential for AMPK activation by adiponectin. We also show that after 40 min. insulin activated AMPK in adipocytes, which was coupled with a 5-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Knockdown studies show that FATP1 and Acsl1 are required for these processes, as well as for stimulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adiponection and insulin. These studies demonstrate that a change in cellular energy state is associated with AMPK activation by both adiponectin and insulin, which requires the activity of FATP1 and Acsl1.

  17. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  18. Workshop on Cyclostationary Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-30

    Time Compression, Terry M. Turpin and Leslie H. Gesell 73 iv New Cyclic Spectral Analysis Algorithms for Reducing Storage and Search, Grace Yeung and...phases of the signal, and the power of the signal and the noise), the log-likelihood ratio test yields a sufficient statistic (W)f=WHLW with linear...modeled as a random variable uniformly distributed over the period of cyclostationarity, and the resulting likelihood ratio test does not exploit the

  19. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Experimental runs were conducted on direct ammonia fuel cells . Effects of temperature, composition, as well as run effect and block effect were...cells and to electrode flooding are discussed. Data on performance of complete laboratory direct ammonia-oxygen fuel cells are presented and discussed. (Author)

  20. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    fuel cell was investigated. This cell is based on the use of a non-aqueous fused hydroxide electrolyte matrix, and operates in the intermediate temperature range of 180-300 C. Studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the ratecontrolling step in the kinetics of the anodic oxidation of ammonia. A new type of Ni/NiOOH reference electrode was developed for the measurement of single electrode potentials in experimental galvanic fuel cells employing this type of matrix electrolyte. In addition to various exploratory studies, two statistical analysis

  1. A methanol/air fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    High power-density, self-regulating fuel cell develops electrical power from catalyzed reaction between methanol and atmospheric oxygen. Cells such as these are of particular interest, because they may one day offer an emission-free, extremely efficient alternative to internal-combustion engines as power source.

  2. Hydrogen/Air Fuel Nozzle Emissions Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of hydrogen combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines provides significant opportunities to reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Hydrogen has many advantages (no CO2 production, high reaction rates, high heating value, and future availability), along with some disadvantages (high current cost of production and storage, high volume per BTU, and an unknown safety profile when in wide use). One of the primary reasons for switching to hydrogen is the elimination of CO2 emissions. Also, with hydrogen, design challenges such as fuel coking in the fuel nozzle and particulate emissions are no longer an issue. However, because it takes place at high temperatures, hydrogen-air combustion can still produce significant levels of NOx emissions. Much of the current research into conventional hydrocarbon-fueled aircraft gas turbine combustors is focused on NOx reduction methods. The Zero CO2 Emission Technology (ZCET) hydrogen combustion project will focus on meeting the Office of Aerospace Technology goal 2 within pillar one for Global Civil Aviation reducing the emissions of future aircraft by a factor of 3 within 10 years and by a factor of 5 within 25 years. Recent advances in hydrocarbon-based gas turbine combustion components have expanded the horizons for fuel nozzle development. Both new fluid designs and manufacturing technologies have led to the development of fuel nozzles that significantly reduce aircraft emissions. The goal of the ZCET program is to mesh the current technology of Lean Direct Injection and rocket injectors to provide quick mixing, low emissions, and high-performance fuel nozzle designs. An experimental program is planned to investigate the fuel nozzle concepts in a flametube test rig. Currently, a hydrogen system is being installed in cell 23 at NASA Glenn Research Center's Research Combustion Laboratory. Testing will be conducted on a variety of fuel nozzle concepts up to combustion pressures of 350 psia and inlet air temperatures of 1200 F. Computational fluid dynamics calculations, with the Glenn developed National Combustor Code, are being performed to optimize the fuel nozzle designs.

  3. A Micro Hydrogen Air Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    thin enough that it does not block the channels. This eliminated the step of having to sputter chrome /gold onto the wells and channels. Currently...to make the ink compatible with conventional thick film printing. In addition, the typical process for manufacturing electrode/membrane assemblies...catalytic activity of these inks, polarization curves for hydrogen oxidation were obtained using a pure hydrogen feed at one atmosphere pressure. With

  4. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    performed on four commercially available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and...hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to decompose...thermally. 0 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially below the 245 C reported by previous

  5. Electrolytes for Hydrocarbon Air Fuel Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    available electrolytes; namely, -methanedisulfonic acid - sulfoacetic acid -10-dl-camphorsulfonic acid -and pentadecafluorooctanoic acid . These four...in the hydrocarbon chain can increase the stability of aliphatic sulfonic acids . Sulfoacetic and dl-10-camphorsulfonic acids were tested and found to...decompose thermally. 6 Sulfoacetic acid thermally decomposes at 180 C apparently due to decarboxylation. This is substantially 6 below the 245 C

  6. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  7. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  8. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  9. Signal voter

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.L.

    1981-04-28

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals , each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  10. Suppression of mTOR Signaling Pathways in Skeletal Muscle of Finishing Pigs by Increasing the Ratios of Ether Extract and Neutral Detergent Fiber at the Expense of Starch in Iso-energetic Diets.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changning; Li, Yanjiao; Zhang, Bolin; Lin, Meng; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Tianjiao; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-02-24

    Three iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diets were fed to finishing pigs for 28 days to investigate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ubiquitin-proteasome signaling pathways of skeletal muscle by altering compositions of dietary energy sources. Diet A, diet B, and diet C contained 44.1%, 37.6%, and 30.9% starch; 5.9%, 9.5%, and 14.3% ether extract (EE); and 12.6%, 15.4%, and 17.8% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), respectively. An increase of mRNA expression of MuRF1 (1.09 ± 0.10 vs 1.00 ± 0.08) and MAFbx (1.10 ± 0.06 vs 1.00 ± 0.11) and a decrease of concentrations of plasma insulin (8.2 ± 0.8 vs 10.8 ± 1.2) and glucose (5.76 ± 0.12 vs 6.43 ± 0.33) together with mRNA expression of IRS (0.78 ± 0.19 vs 1.01 ± 0.05) and Akt (0.92 ± 0.01 vs 1.00 ± 0.05) were observed in pigs fed diet C compared with diet A. Protein levels of total and phosphorylated mTOR (0.31 ± 0.04 vs 0.48 ± 0.03 and 0.39 ± 0.01 vs 0.56 ± 0.02), 4EBP1 (0.66 ± 0.06 vs 0.90 ± 0.09 and 0.60 ± 0.12 vs 0.84 ± 0.09), and S6K1 (0.66 ± 0.01 vs 0.89 ± 0.01 and 0.48 ± 0.03 vs 0.79 ± 0.02) were decreased; however, total and phosphorylated AMPK (0.96 ± 0.06 vs 0.64 ± 0.04 and 0.97 ± 0.09 vs 0.61 ± 0.09) were increased in pigs fed diet C compared with diet A. In conclusion, diet C suppressed the mTOR pathway and accelerated the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs.

  11. Ratio imaging instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    Using ratio imaging to obtain quantitative information from microscope images is a powerful tool that has been used successfully in numerous studies. Although ratio imaging reduces the effects of many parameters that can interfere with accurate measurements, it is not a panacea. In designing a ratio imaging experiment, all of the potential problems discussed in this chapter must be considered. Undoubtedly, other problems that were not discussed can also interfere with accurate and meaningful measurements. Many of the problems discussed here were observed in the authors' laboratories. In our experience there are no standard routines or methods that can foresee every problem before it has been encountered. Good experimental design can minimize problems, but the investigator must continue to be alert. Progress in instrumentation continues to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in ratio imaging. CCD cameras with 12- to 14-bit pixel depth are being used more frequently, and several confocal microscope manufacturers are now also using 12-bit digitization. The dramatic increase in the use of confocal microscopes over the past decade is now causing microscope manufacturers to more critically evaluate the effect of axial chromatic aberration in objectives, and recent designs to minimize this problem are being implemented. Other developments such as the use of AOTFs to attenuate laser lines extend the applicability of ratio imaging. Ratio imaging is clearly applicable to a wide range of cell biological problems beyond its widespread use for measuring ion concentrations. Imaginative but careful use of this technique should continue to provide novel insights into the properties of cells.

  12. Digit ratio in birds.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Michael P; Thorpe, Patrick A; Brown, Barbara M; Sian, Katie

    2008-12-01

    The Homeobox (Hox) genes direct the development of tetrapod digits. The expression of Hox genes may be influenced by endogenous sex steroids during development. Manning (Digit ratio. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002) predicted that the ratio between the lengths of digits 2 (2D) and 4 (4D) should be sexually dimorphic because prenatal exposure to estrogens and androgens positively influence the lengths of 2D and 4D, respectively. We measured digits and other morphological traits of birds from three orders (Passeriformes, house sparrow, Passer domesticus; tree swallow, Tachycineta bicolor; Pscittaciformes, budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulates; Galliformes, chicken, Gallus domesticus) to test this prediction. None were sexually dimorphic for 2D:4D and there were no associations between 2D:4D and other sexually dimorphic traits. When we pooled data from all four species after we averaged right and left side digits from each individual and z-transformed the resulting digit ratios, we found that males had significantly larger 2D:4D than did females. Tetrapods appear to be sexually dimorphic for 2D:4D with 2D:4D larger in males as in some birds and reptiles and 2D:4D smaller in males as in some mammals. The differences between the reptile and mammal lineages in the directionality of 2D:4D may be related to the differences between them in chromosomal sex determination. We suggest that (a) natural selection for a perching foot in the first birds may have overridden the effects of hormones on the development of digit ratio in this group of vertebrates and (b) caution be used in making inferences about prenatal exposure to hormones and digit ratio in birds.

  13. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  14. Multi-ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.C.

    1987-07-14

    A preselected multi-ratio power transmission is described comprising: input means for transmitting drive forces; output means; first, second and third friction clutch means each selectively engageable with the input means for accepting drive forces. First input gear means drivingly connects with the first friction clutch means; second input gear means drivingly connects with the second friction clutch means; third input gear means drivingly connects with the third clutch means; first output gear means drivingly connects with the first input gear means; second output gear means drivingly connects with the first and second input gear means; third output means drivingly connects between the third input gear means and the output means; and one double-acting synchronizer clutch for selectively engaging the first output gear means with the output means and alternately the second output gear means with the output means. The first friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The second friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two other forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The third friction clutch means is engageable to provide another forward drive ratio between the input means and the output means; and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch is relieved of transmitting drive forces during the engagement of the third friction clutch means and being manipulable for alternate connection with either the first output gear or the second output gear while the third friction clutch means is engaged.

  15. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia.

  16. Likelihood Ratios and Signal Detection for Nongaussian Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    order stochastic processes, particularly as developed by Hida [10]. The general problem is that of discriminating between a Gaussian noise process (N(t...inequalities, and measures of exponentiality and normality, Annals of Probability, 2, 112-130 (1974). 10. T. Hida , Canonical representations of Gaussian

  17. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

    PubMed

    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type.

  18. CALIPSO Lidar Ratio Retrieval Over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josset, Damien B.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali H.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type

  19. Signal Reception via Multi-Platform Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    interference cancellation, multi-platform receivers, signal collection, signal interception 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 71 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY ...CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ABSTRACT Unclassified...Quadrature Phase Shift Keying SIC Successive Interference Cancellation SNR Signal-To-Noise Ratio SOI Signal Of Interest WLAN Wireless Local Area

  20. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  1. Delayed reinforcement and fixed-ratio performance.

    PubMed

    Jarmolowicz, David P; Lattal, Kennon A

    2013-11-01

    Effects of delayed reinforcement on fixed-ratio (FR) maintained responding of pigeons were investigated. In Experiments 1-3, the delay of reinforcement was increased across successive sessions until pigeons paused for 300 s. Both signaled and unsignaled delays were studied across different conditions. Overall response rates and run rates (timed from the first to last response of a ratio) decreased and postreinforcement pauses increased as delays increased in each experiment. As delays increased, the likelihood of pausing during a ratio run also increased. When these measures were plotted as a function of obtained delays, signaled delays had less of an effect on the above measures than did unsignaled ones. In Experiment 2, delays had a greater effect on the above measures than did a control condition arranging equivalent interreinforcer intervals to those accompanying the delays. Experiments 3 and 4 examined the generality of the effects obtained in the first two experiments. In Experiment 3, delays imposed on FR or yoked-interval schedules had similar behavioral effects. In Experiment 4, effects similar to those found in Experiments 1-3 for 1, 10, and 20-s delays imposed on FR 50 schedules were found when the FR requirement increased across sessions. Despite the different contingencies relating response rate and reinforcement rates on interval and ratio schedules, delays of reinforcement generally affect performance on these schedules similarly.

  2. Fixed-ratio escape reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Azrin, N. H.; Holz, W. C.; Hake, D. F.; Ayllon, T.

    1963-01-01

    Escape responses of squirrel monkeys were reinforced according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The reinforcement was a period of safety from a stimulus that signalled the delivery of intermittent pain-shocks. When the frequency of shock was gradually reduced, the performance remained at a high level until the shocks were quite infrequent. Similarly, the duration of the period of safety could be reduced to a few seconds with little loss of behavior. Thus, the responses appeared to be reinforced by even a brief period of safety, the actual degree of shock reduction being fairly slight. The changes in responding during this fixed-ratio escape procedure were comparable to the response changes typically obtained during fixed-ratio food procedures. PMID:13965780

  3. Signal quality of endovascular electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bryan D.; Ebrahimi, Mosalam; Palafox, Leon; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2016-02-01

    Objective, Approach. A growing number of prototypes for diagnosing and treating neurological and psychiatric diseases are predicated on access to high-quality brain signals, which typically requires surgically opening the skull. Where endovascular navigation previously transformed the treatment of cerebral vascular malformations, we now show that it can provide access to brain signals with substantially higher signal quality than scalp recordings. Main results. While endovascular signals were known to be larger in amplitude than scalp signals, our analysis in rabbits borrows a standard technique from communication theory to show endovascular signals also have up to 100× better signal-to-noise ratio. Significance. With a viable minimally-invasive path to high-quality brain signals, patients with brain diseases could one day receive potent electroceuticals through the bloodstream, in the course of a brief outpatient procedure.

  4. Measurement of the temperature coefficient of ratio transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the temperature coefficient of the output of several ratio transformers at ratios near 0.500,000 using an ac bridge and a dual-phase, lock-in amplifier. The two orthogonal output components were each resolved to +/- ppb of the bridge drive signal. The results for three commercial ratio transformers between 20 and 50 C range from 0.5 to 100 ppb/K for the signal component in phase with the bridge drive, and from 4 to 300 ppb/K for the quadrature component.

  5. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  6. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  7. Combining Ratio Estimation for Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmoud, Saad; Hi, Jianjun

    2012-01-01

    The Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Code decoding algorithm make use of a scaled receive signal derived from maximizing the log-likelihood ratio of the received signal. The scaling factor (often called the combining ratio) in an AWGN channel is a ratio between signal amplitude and noise variance. Accurately estimating this ratio has shown as much as 0.6 dB decoding performance gain. This presentation briefly describes three methods for estimating the combining ratio: a Pilot-Guided estimation method, a Blind estimation method, and a Simulation-Based Look-Up table. The Pilot Guided Estimation method has shown that the maximum likelihood estimates of signal amplitude is the mean inner product of the received sequence and the known sequence, the attached synchronization marker (ASM) , and signal variance is the difference of the mean of the squared received sequence and the square of the signal amplitude. This method has the advantage of simplicity at the expense of latency since several frames worth of ASMs. The Blind estimation method s maximum likelihood estimator is the average of the product of the received signal with the hyperbolic tangent of the product combining ratio and the received signal. The root of this equation can be determined by an iterative binary search between 0 and 1 after normalizing the received sequence. This method has the benefit of requiring one frame of data to estimate the combining ratio which is good for faster changing channels compared to the previous method, however it is computationally expensive. The final method uses a look-up table based on prior simulated results to determine signal amplitude and noise variance. In this method the received mean signal strength is controlled to a constant soft decision value. The magnitude of the deviation is averaged over a predetermined number of samples. This value is referenced in a look up table to determine the combining ratio that prior simulation associated with the average magnitude of

  8. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  9. Signal Words

    MedlinePlus

    ... product. The signal word can be ei- ther: DANGER,WARNING or CAUTION. Products with the DANGER signal word are the most toxic. Products with ... causes moderate eye or skin irritation. 2,4 DANGER means that the pesticide product is highly toxic ...

  10. Measuring Abundance Ratios from Integrated Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthey, G.

    2010-06-01

    Age, overall abundance, and detailed, element-by-element abundances can be extracted from the integrated light of distant galaxies. The method, at its most basic, is merely the comparison of observed spectra with appropriate models. The relative ratios of elements C, N, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr, and Ba can be determined to scientifically useful precision. Cases of interest that are borderline because they suffer internal degeneracies (although plenty of signal is present) are Al and the trio C, N, and O. The elements S, K, Cu, Eu, and the noble gases are too difficult to measure, and V is borderline. Changing the relative abundance ratios, even at fixed heavy-element content, changes the temperatures, luminosities, and number densities of the underlying stellar evolution, as well as more direct changes in the spectra of the stars present. The latter effects dominate the spectral shape, while the former effects render age estimation quite difficult.

  11. CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Biraud, S

    2011-02-23

    The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

  12. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; Sam Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-12-23

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature-male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton's local mate competition (LMC) and Clark's local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC &LRC) in the field of SRS research.

  13. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; (Sam) Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature—male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton’s local mate competition (LMC) and Clark’s local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC & LRC) in the field of SRS research. PMID:28009000

  14. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; (Sam) Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-12-01

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature—male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton’s local mate competition (LMC) and Clark’s local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC & LRC) in the field of SRS research.

  15. Software For Computing Image Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Gigi L.

    1993-01-01

    RATIO_TOOL is interactive computer program for viewing and analyzing large sets of multispectral image data created by imaging spectrometer. Uses ratios between intensities in different spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within multispectral image. Each image band viewed iteratively, or selected image band of set of data requested and displayed. When image ratios computed, result displayed as grayscale image. Written in C Language.

  16. Prevalence odds ratio versus prevalence ratio: choice comes with consequences.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A; Cutter, Gary R

    2016-12-30

    Odds ratio, risk ratio, and prevalence ratio are some of the measures of association which are often reported in research studies quantifying the relationship between an independent variable and the outcome of interest. There has been much debate on the issue of which measure is appropriate to report depending on the study design. However, the literature on selecting a particular category of the outcome to be modeled and/or change in reference group for categorical independent variables and the effect on statistical significance, although known, is scantly discussed nor published with examples. In this article, we provide an example of a cross-sectional study wherein prevalence ratio was chosen over (Prevalence) odds ratio and demonstrate the analytic implications of the choice of category to be modeled and choice of reference level for independent variables. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Steganography in arrhythmic electrocardiogram signal.

    PubMed

    Edward Jero, S; Ramu, Palaniappan; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    Security and privacy of patient data is a vital requirement during exchange/storage of medical information over communication network. Steganography method hides patient data into a cover signal to prevent unauthenticated accesses during data transfer. This study evaluates the performance of ECG steganography to ensure secured transmission of patient data where an abnormal ECG signal is used as cover signal. The novelty of this work is to hide patient data into two dimensional matrix of an abnormal ECG signal using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Singular Value Decomposition based steganography method. A 2D ECG is constructed according to Tompkins QRS detection algorithm. The missed R peaks are computed using RR interval during 2D conversion. The abnormal ECG signals are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Percentage Residual Difference, Kullback-Leibler distance and Bit Error Rate are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach.

  18. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  19. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  20. 40 CFR 1051.115 - What other requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... range (specified in paragraph (d)(1) of this section) must include all air-fuel ratios between the lean... lean limit is the air-fuel ratio that produces the highest engine power output (averaged over the...

  1. 40 CFR 1051.115 - What other requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... range (specified in paragraph (d)(1) of this section) must include all air-fuel ratios between the lean... lean limit is the air-fuel ratio that produces the highest engine power output (averaged over the...

  2. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds.

  3. Pressure Ratio to Thermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Wang, Winston

    2012-01-01

    A pressure ratio to thermal environments (PRatTlE.pl) program is a Perl language code that estimates heating at requested body point locations by scaling the heating at a reference location times a pressure ratio factor. The pressure ratio factor is the ratio of the local pressure at the reference point and the requested point from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) solutions. This innovation provides pressure ratio-based thermal environments in an automated and traceable method. Previously, the pressure ratio methodology was implemented via a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and macro scripts. PRatTlE is able to calculate heating environments for 150 body points in less than two minutes. PRatTlE is coded in Perl programming language, is command-line-driven, and has been successfully executed on both the HP and Linux platforms. It supports multiple concurrent runs. PRatTlE contains error trapping and input file format verification, which allows clear visibility into the input data structure and intermediate calculations.

  4. Continually variable transmission having fixed ratio and variable ratio mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Moan, R.D

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a transmission for producing a stepless, continually variable range of ratios of the speed of its output to its input comprising: a fluid coupling having an impeller adapted for connection to a power source and a turbine hydrodynamically connected to the impeller; as planetary gearset having a ring gear, a sun gear, a first set of planet pinions meshing with the sun gear, a second set of planet pinions meshing with the first set of pinions and with the ring gear, and a pinion carrier on which the first and second sets of pinions are rotatably supported; first drive means drivable connecting the turbine and the sun gear for producing a variable speed ratio therebetween having a range between an underdrive ratio and an overdrive ratio; second drive means drivably connecting the impeller and the ring gear for producing a fixed speed ratio therebetween; a first clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the ring gear and the second drive means; and a second clutch means for drivably connecting and disconnecting the first drive means and the pinion carrier.

  5. Transionospheric signal detection with chirped wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Doser, A.B.; Dunham, M.E.

    1997-11-01

    Chirped wavelets are utilized to detect dispersed signals in the joint time scale domain. Specifically, pulses that become dispersed by transmission through the ionosphere and are received by satellites as nonlinear chirps are investigated. Since the dispersion greatly lowers the signal to noise ratios, it is difficult to isolate the signals in the time domain. Satellite data are examined with discrete wavelet expansions. Detection is accomplished via a template matching threshold scheme. Quantitative experimental results demonstrate that the chirped wavelet detection scheme is successful in detecting the transionospheric pulses at very low signal to noise ratios.

  6. 40 CFR 1051.115 - What other requirements apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control the air-fuel ratio may be treated separately under paragraph (d) of this section. An operating... air-fuel ratio in less than one hour with a few parts whose total cost is under $50 (in 2001 dollars... meet all the requirements of this part for any air-fuel ratio within the adjustable range described...

  7. A Review on Sensor, Signal, and Information Processing Algorithms (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ratio , and tonality [66]. The number of speakers in the speech signals was determined by analyzing the mod- ulation characteristics of the signals in...gorithms combined local decisions that were corrupted during the transmission process due to channel fading. Also, a new likelihood ratio based test was...maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the fusion C-11 TRANSMISSION PHASE TRAINING PHASE ( fixed ) trn tot P P - trn P tot P

  8. Masking in three pinnipeds: underwater, low-frequency critical ratios.

    PubMed

    Southall, B L; Schusterman, R J; Kastak, D

    2000-09-01

    Behavioral techniques were used to determine underwater masked hearing thresholds for a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Octave-band white noise maskers were centered at five test frequencies ranging from 200 to 2500 Hz; a slightly wider noise band was used for testing at 100 Hz. Critical ratios were calculated at one masking noise level for each test frequency. Above 200 Hz, critical ratios increased with frequency. This pattern is similar to that observed in most animals tested, and indicates that these pinnipeds lack specializations for detecting low-frequency tonal sounds in noise. However, the individual pinnipeds in this study, particularly the northern elephant seal, detected signals at relatively low signal-to-noise ratios. These results provide a means of estimating zones of auditory masking for pinnipeds exposed to anthropogenic noise sources.

  9. A Ratio Explanation for Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riss, Pam Helfers

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on physical anthropology activities for teaching students about evolution. Using evidence found in hominid skulls, students conduct investigations that involve calculating ratios. Eight full-page photographs of skulls from the program Stones and Bones are included. (PR)

  10. Overconfidence, Incentives and Digit Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Neyse, Levent; Bosworth, Steven; Ring, Patrick; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to a better understanding of the biological underpinnings of overconfidence by analyzing performance predictions in the Cognitive Reflection Test with and without monetary incentives. In line with the existing literature we find that the participants are too optimistic about their performance on average; incentives lead to higher performance; and males score higher than females on this particular task. The novelty of this paper is an analysis of the relation between participants’ performance prediction accuracy and their second to fourth digit ratio. It has been reported that the digit ratio is a negatively correlated bio-marker of prenatal testosterone exposure. In the un-incentivized treatment, we find that males with low digit ratios, on average, are significantly more overconfident about their performance. In the incentivized treatment, however, we observe that males with low digit ratios, on average, are less overconfident about their performance. These effects are not observed in females. We discuss how these findings fit into the literature on testosterone and decision making and how they might help to explain seemingly opposing evidence. PMID:27039893

  11. Link Budget Analysis for Undersea Acoustic Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    wireless communications for estimating signal-to- noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter power, transmitter...is represented as an intermediate result called the channel SNR . The channel SNR includes ambient-noise and transmission-loss components. Several...to satellite and wireless communications for estimating signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) at the receiver. Link-budget analysis considers transmitter

  12. Reinforcement magnitude and pausing on progressive-ratio schedules

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Alan; Mikorski, Jeffrey; Schlund, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Rats responded under progressive-ratio schedules for sweetened milk reinforcers; each session ended when responding ceased for 10 min. Experiment 1 varied the concentration of milk and the duration of postreinforcement timeouts. Postreinforcement pausing increased as a positively accelerated function of the size of the ratio, and the rate of increase was reduced as a function of concentration and by timeouts of 10 s or longer. Experiment 2 varied reinforcement magnitude within sessions (number of dipper operations per reinforcer) in conjunction with stimuli correlated with the upcoming magnitude. In the absence of discriminative stimuli, pausing was longer following a large reinforcer than following a small one. Pauses were reduced by a stimulus signaling a large upcoming reinforcer, particularly at the highest ratios, and the animals tended to quit responding when the past reinforcer was large and the stimulus signaled that the next one would be small. Results of both experiments revealed parallels between responding under progressive-ratio schedules and other schedules containing ratio contingencies. Relationships between pausing and magnitude suggest that ratio pausing is under the joint control of inhibitory properties of the past reinforcer and excitatory properties of stimuli correlated with the upcoming reinforcer, rather than under the exclusive control of either factor alone. PMID:16812671

  13. Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    ORGANIZATION Univ of Minnesota (f*fto U. S. Army Research Office 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (Wiy Stat, and ZIP Code...Minneapolis, MN 55455 P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sa. NAME Of FUNDING ISPONSORING Sb. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT...PROJECT ITASK jWORK UNIT Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 EMNTO.I NO NO CESOIO 11. TITLE (Incudt Security Classifiratio") Signal Processing of, he auth

  14. Signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, David M.

    The application of signal processing technology to conventional weapons systems can lower operator workloads and enhance kill probabilities, while automating wide-area surveillance, target search and classification, target tracking, and aimpoint selection. Immediate opportunities exist for automatic target cueing in underwater and over-the-horizon targeting, as well as for airborne multiple-target fire control. By embedding the transit/receive electronics into conformal aircraft sensor arrays, a 'smart' skin can be created. Electronically scanned phased arrays can be used to yield accurate azimuthal and elevation positions while nullifying EW threats. Attention is given to major development thrusts in algorithm design.

  15. Estimating diversity via frequency ratios.

    PubMed

    Willis, Amy; Bunge, John

    2015-12-01

    We wish to estimate the total number of classes in a population based on sample counts, especially in the presence of high latent diversity. Drawing on probability theory that characterizes distributions on the integers by ratios of consecutive probabilities, we construct a nonlinear regression model for the ratios of consecutive frequency counts. This allows us to predict the unobserved count and hence estimate the total diversity. We believe that this is the first approach to depart from the classical mixed Poisson model in this problem. Our method is geometrically intuitive and yields good fits to data with reasonable standard errors. It is especially well-suited to analyzing high diversity datasets derived from next-generation sequencing in microbial ecology. We demonstrate the method's performance in this context and via simulation, and we present a dataset for which our method outperforms all competitors.

  16. Models of ratio schedule performance.

    PubMed

    Bizo, L A; Killeen, P R

    1997-07-01

    Predictions of P. R. Killeen's (1994) mathematical principles of reinforcement were tested for responding on ratio reinforcement schedules. The type of response key, the number of sessions per condition, and first vs. second half of a session had negligible effects on responding. Longer reinforcer durations and larger grain types engendered more responding, affecting primarily the parameter alpha (specific activation). Key pecking was faster than treadle pressing, affecting primarily the parameter delta (response time). Longer intertrial intervals led to higher overall response rates and shorter postreinforcement pauses and higher running rates, and ruled out some competing explanations. The treadle data required a distinction between the energetic requirements and rate-limiting properties of extended responses. The theory was extended to predict pause durations and run rates on ratio schedules.

  17. Strange Baryon to Meson Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ayala, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    We present a model to compute baryon and meson transverse momentum distributions, and their ratios, in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The model allows to compute the probability to form colorless bound states of either two or three quarks as functions of the evolving density during the collision. The qualitative differences of the baryon to meson ratio for different collision energies and for different particle species can be associated to the different density dependent probabilities and to the combinatorial factors which in turn depend on whether the quarks forming the bound states are heavy or light. We compare to experimental data and show that we obtain a good description up to intermediate values of pt.

  18. Sex ratios in bumble bees

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    The median proportion of investment in females among 11 populations of seven bumble bee (Bombus) species was 0.32 (range 0.07 to 0.64). By contrast, two species of workerless social parasites in the related genus Psithyrus had female-biased sex allocation, the reasons for which remain unclear. Male-biased sex allocation in Bombus contradicts the predictions of Trivers and Hare's sex ratio model for the social Hymenoptera, which are that the population sex investment ratio should be 0.5 (1:1) under queen control and 0.75 (3:1 females:males) under worker control (assuming single, once-mated, outbred queens and non-reproductive workers). Male bias in Bombus does not appear to be either an artefact, or purely the result of symbiotic sex ratio distorters. According to modifications of the Trivers–Hare model, the level of worker male-production in Bombus is insufficient to account for observed levels of male bias. There is also no evidence that male bias arises from either local resource competition (related females compete for resources) or local mate enhancement (related males cooperate in securing mates). Bulmer presented models predicting sexual selection for protandry (males are produced before females) in annual social Hymenoptera and, as a consequence (given some parameter values), male-biased sex allocation. Bumble bees fit the assumptions of Bulmer's models and are protandrous. These models therefore represent the best current explanation for the bees' male-biased sex investment ratios. This conclusion suggests that the relative timing of the production of the sexes strongly influences sex allocation in the social Hymenoptera.

  19. Segregation Ratios in Alport's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Elizabeth; Shaw, Richard F.

    1973-01-01

    Pooled data of 35 pedigrees for Alport's syndrome were analysed. Affected to normal ratios among the offspring of heterozgyous fathers and mothers were tabulated. Offspring of heterozygous mothers were tabulated separately where the mother showed symptoms of the disease and where she was asymptomatic. Three current theories on the inheritance of Alport's syndrome are considered and discussed. Each theory fails to account fully for the known facts. A non-chromosomal agent has not yet been excluded for this intriguing disease. PMID:4697851

  20. Chaotic background phase matching signal separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wu; Hui, Xia; Chen, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the problem of separating the useful signal in the chaos background and using the phase matching method, the signal can be extracted effectively from the chaotic background. In this method, the chaotic background is not estimated with phase reconstruction and the geometric analysis of phase space is not required. Through the separation Simulation of the sinusoidal signal in the chaos background and the separation degree analysis, the low signal to noise ratio of the signal in the chaos background can be effectively separated. The effect of removing the chaotic background noise is obvious.

  1. Carrier-interference ratios for frequency sharing between frequency-modulated amplitude-modulated-vestigial-sideband television systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, S. P.; Miller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    For just perceptible interference, an FM television signal interfering with another FM television signal must have an average signal power that is 26 to 37 db less than the wanted signal power. For an AM-VSB television signal interfering with an FM television signal, the AM-VSB television's sync peak average power must be 18 to 31 db below the FM television signal's average power. Also, when an FM television signal interferes with an AM-VSB signal, the average signal power of the FM signal should be 56 to 59 db below the sync peak average power of the AM-VSB television signal. The range of power ratios occur as a result of different TV scenes used in the tests and different FM-signal frequency deviations used. All tests were performed using 525 line, system M, color-television signals.

  2. Iterative method to determine an averaged backscatter-to-extinction ratio in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Elouragini, S; Flamant, P H

    1996-03-20

    An iterative method to determine an average backscatter-to-extinction ratio and extinction coefficient simultaneously in cirrus clouds is proposed. The method is based on Klett's inversion, which is constrained by the total optical depth. A signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 at the cloud top is required for an error in the backscatter-to-extinction ratio lower than 20% to result. The method has been tested with simulated lidar signals. An application to an experimental lidar signal is discussed.

  3. Flame ionization mass spectrometry--Isotope ratio determinations for potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Koirtyohann, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The air/acetylene flame provides a convenient ion source for the determination of potassium isotopic ratios by mass spectrometry. Unlike the argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP), the flame provides low background in the mass region of interest. Ion production is quite satisfactory for isotope ratio measurements at the micrograms per milliliter (μg/mL) level and slightly below, with 1 μg/mL potassium giving about 105counts/second at a nominal mass-to-charge ratio of 39. The detection limit for potassium was 2-3 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). The ratio of 41K/39K was measured with 0.5-1% relative standard deviation, and a 41K spike representing 0.2% of the total potassium was readily detected. Both signal levels and signal stability were improved by adding a second easily ionized element such as cesium to samples and standards. Alternatively, a cesium solution could be aspirated for about 1 minute between sample measurements to ensure signal stability.

  4. The recognition of extraterrestrial artificial signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeger, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Considerations in the design of receivers for the detection and recognition of artificial microwave signals of extraterrestrial origin are discussed. Following a review of the objectives of SETI and the probable reception and detection characteristics of extraterrestrial signals, means for the improvement of the sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratios and on-line data processing capabilities of SETI receivers are indicated. The characteristics of the signals likely to be present at the output of an ultra-low-noise microwave receiver are then examined, including the system background noise, terrestrial radiations, astrophysical radiations, accidental artificial radiations of terrestrial origin, and intentional radiations produced by humans and by extraterrestrial intelligence. The classes of extraterrestrial signals likely to be detected, beacons and leakage signals, are considered, and options in the specification of gating and thresholding for a high-spectral resolution, high-time-resolution signal discriminator are indicated. Possible tests for the nonhuman origin of a received signal are also pointed out.

  5. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low

  6. Using Ratio Analysis to Evaluate Financial Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The ways in which ratio analysis can help in long-range planning, budgeting, and asset management to strengthen financial performance and help avoid financial difficulties are explained. Types of ratios considered include balance sheet ratios, net operating ratios, and contribution and demand ratios. (MSE)

  7. Low conversion ratio fuel studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.

    2006-02-28

    Recent studies on TRU disposition in fast reactors indicated viable reactor performance for a sodium cooled low conversion ratio reactor design. Additional studies have been initiated to refine the earlier work and consider the feasibility of alternate fuel forms such as nitride and oxide fuel (rather than metal fuel). These alternate fuel forms may have significant impacts upon the burner design and the safety behavior. The work performed thus far has focused on compiling the necessary fuel form property information and refinement of the physics models. For this limited project, the burner design and performance using nitride fuel will be assessed.

  8. Microphone array power ratio for quality assessment of reverberated speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Reuven; Cohen, Israel

    2015-12-01

    Speech signals in enclosed environments are often distorted by reverberation and noise. In speech communication systems with several randomly distributed microphones, involving a dynamic speaker and unknown source location, it is of great interest to monitor the perceived quality at each microphone and select the signal with the best quality. Most of existing approaches for quality estimation require prior information or a clean reference signal, which is unfortunately seldom available. In this paper, a practical non-intrusive method for quality assessment of reverberated speech signals is proposed. Using a statistical model of the reverberation process, we examine the energies as measured by unidirectional elements in a microphone array. By measuring the power ratio, we obtain a measure for the amount of reverberation in the received acoustic signals. This measure is then utilized to derive a blind estimation of the direct-to-reverberation energy ratio in the room. The proposed approach attains a simple, reliable, and robust quality measure, shown here through persuasive simulation results.

  9. 60-WATT HYDRAZINE-AIR FUEL CELL SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    fuel cell system as presented in our Design Plan. Prior to preparation of the Design Plan, a systems analysis of the basic electrochemical system was made. From the results of this analysis, the operating parameters of the support equipment were defined and an initial selection of components made. System components defined were: the cell stack, electrolyte tank, hydrazine feed system, cooling and chemical air blowers, voltage regulator, and thermal control system. A package design was then made for these components and the final detail design completed.

  10. Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

  11. Simultaneous Continuous Wave Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    signals are transmitted from a source and incident signals are received at a receiver for processing . The processed signals provide...in Doppler resolution. This is because the narrowband signal can be filtered from the other signals and processed as if it was sent alone. [0011... signals are filtered to separate narrowband and broadband incident signals before processing each signal type. The incident signals may then be used

  12. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  13. Urothelial Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The urothelium, which lines the inner surface of the renal pelvis, the ureters, and the urinary bladder, not only forms a high-resistance barrier to ion, solute and water flux, and pathogens, but also functions as an integral part of a sensory web which receives, amplifies, and transmits information about its external milieu. Urothelial cells have the ability to sense changes in their extracellular environment, and respond to chemical, mechanical and thermal stimuli by releasing various factors such as ATP, nitric oxide, and acetylcholine. They express a variety of receptors and ion channels, including P2X3 purinergic receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and TRP channels, which all have been implicated in urothelial-neuronal interactions, and involved in signals that via components in the underlying lamina propria, such as interstitial cells, can be amplified and conveyed to nerves, detrusor muscle cells, and ultimately the central nervous system. The specialized anatomy of the urothelium and underlying structures, and the possible communication mechanisms from urothelial cells to various cell types within the bladder wall are described. Changes in the urothelium/lamina propria (“mucosa”) produced by different bladder disorders are discussed, as well as the mucosa as a target for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23589830

  14. Variable ratio regenerative braking device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1981-12-15

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device (10) for an automotive vehicle. The device includes an energy storage assembly (12) having a plurality of rubber rollers (26, 28) mounted for rotation between an input shaft (36) and an output shaft (42), clutches (38, 46) and brakes (40, 48) associated with each shaft, and a continuously variable transmission (22) connectable to a vehicle drivetrain and to the input and output shafts by the respective clutches. The rubber rollers are torsionally stressed to accumulate energy from the vehicle when the input shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the output shaft is applied, and are torsionally relaxed to deliver energy to the vehicle when the output shaft is clutched to the transmission while the brake on the input shaft is applied. The transmission ratio is varied to control the rate of energy accumulation and delivery for a given rotational speed of the vehicle drivetrain.

  15. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  16. Isokinetic Hamstrings: Quadriceps Ratios in Intercollegiate Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.; Mahaffey, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared the differences in the concentric hamstrings to quadriceps (H:Q) ratio among athletes in different sports at three velocities. Measurement of H:Q ratio of both knees among male and female college athletes indicated that the H:Q ratio increased as velocity increased. No differences existed for the H:Q ratio for sport or side of body. (SM)

  17. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  18. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  19. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio

    PubMed Central

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We therefore developed a genetically-encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25416365

  20. DETECTION OF LOW-MASS-RATIO STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  1. Backscatter ratios for arbitrary oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2014-10-01

    Three dimensionless ratios widely used for interpretation of lidar signals, i.e., the color ratio, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio, have been calculated for hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds as functions of their spatial orientation. The physical-optics algorithm developed earlier by the authors is applied. It is shown that these ratios are minimal at the horizontal crystal orientation. Then these quantities increase with the effective tilt angle approaching the asymptotic values of the random particle orientation. The values obtained are consistent with the available experimental data.

  2. Notch Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yan; Wu, Tao; Li, Qing; Wang, Min-Cong; Jing, Li; Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Yu; Nan, Ke-Jun; Guo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal and aggressive malignancy. Currently, the identities of prognostic and predictive makers of NSCLC have not been fully established. Dysregulated Notch signaling has been implicated in many human malignancies, including NSCLC. However, the prognostic value of measuring Notch signaling and the utility of developing Notch-targeted therapies in NSCLC remain inconclusive. The present study investigated the association of individual Notch receptor and ligand levels with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) prognosis using the Kaplan-Meier plotte database. This online database encompasses 2437 lung cancer samples. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The results showed that higher Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, and DLL1 mRNA expression predicted better overall survival (OS) in lung ADC, but showed no significance in SCC patients. Elevated Notch3, JAG2, and DLL3 mRNA expression was associated with poor OS of ADC patients, but not in SCC patients. There was no association between Notch4 and OS in either lung ADC or SCC patients. In conclusion, the set of Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, DLL1 and that of Notch3, JAG2, DLL3 played opposing prognostic roles in lung ADC patients. Neither set of Notch receptors and ligands was indicative of lung SCC prognosis. Notch signaling could serve as promising marker to predict outcomes in lung ADC patients. The distinct features of lung cancer subtypes and Notch components should be considered when developing future Notch-targeted therapies. PMID:27196489

  3. Eaves-dropping on plant volatiles by a specialist moth: significance of ratio and concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile signals mediate many multitrophic interactions, some due to coevolution and others due to eavesdropping, but the role of specific concentrations and ratios has been controversial and difficult to test due to methodological limitations. We investigated the role of ratio and concentration usi...

  4. Ratios of the molecular species of triacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil estimated by mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratios of regioisomers of 72 molecular species of triacylglycerols (TAG) in lesquerella oil were estimated using the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the lithium adducts of TAG in the HPLC fractions of lesquerella oil. The ratios of ion signal intensities (or relative abundances) of ...

  5. BOC(n,n) signal multipath mitigation using MEDLL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xuan; Zhang, Yanmei; Su, Lianqing; Guo, Haichao

    2015-11-01

    For satellite navigation and positioning receivers are susceptible to the influence of the multipath, this paper used multipath estimating delay lock loop (MEDLL) technology for BOC (n, n) multipath signal tracking. Through the analysis of multipath signal model, it is concluded that all the multipath signal can be expressed by its amplitude, phase and delay. Then in odor to get the accurate direct signal, this paper applied MEDLL algorithm to estimate the received signal. Finally, the simulation show that this algorithm can realize multipath signal track demodulation and accurate data demodulation under a low signal noise ratio environment (SNR= -20db).

  6. Photonic generation of high order uniform QAM signals based on IQ modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A pre-distortion algorithm of generating driving signals was proposed for high-order QAM modulation based on IQ modulator. IQ modulator working in the nonlinear area and driving by non-uniform signals was employed. The pre-distorted driving signal requires lower signal-to-noise ratio than the common uniform driving signal in QAM modulation.

  7. Frequency domain laser velocimeter signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Murphy, R. Jay

    1991-01-01

    A new scheme for processing signals from laser velocimeter systems is described. The technique utilizes the capabilities of advanced digital electronics to yield a signal processor capable of operating in the frequency domain maximizing the information obtainable from each signal burst. This allows a sophisticated approach to signal detection and processing, with a more accurate measurement of the chirp frequency resulting in an eight-fold increase in measurable signals over the present high-speed burst counter technology. Further, the required signal-to-noise ratio is reduced by a factor of 32, allowing measurements within boundary layers of wind tunnel models. Measurement accuracy is also increased up to a factor of five.

  8. A Librarian's Primer on Financial Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerbel, Sandra Sandor

    1982-01-01

    Explains in simple terms the nature and function of a number of basic types of business and industrial financial ratios. An annotated list of five basic sources for ratios is included and a reference list and bibliography are attached. (JL)

  9. Evolutionarily stable sex ratios and mutation load.

    PubMed

    Hough, Josh; Immler, Simone; Barrett, Spencer C H; Otto, Sarah P

    2013-07-01

    Frequency-dependent selection should drive dioecious populations toward a 1:1 sex ratio, but biased sex ratios are widespread, especially among plants with sex chromosomes. Here, we develop population genetic models to investigate the relationships between evolutionarily stable sex ratios, haploid selection, and deleterious mutation load. We confirm that when haploid selection acts only on the relative fitness of X- and Y-bearing pollen and the sex ratio is controlled by the maternal genotype, seed sex ratios evolve toward 1:1. When we also consider haploid selection acting on deleterious mutations, however, we find that biased sex ratios can be stably maintained, reflecting a balance between the advantages of purging deleterious mutations via haploid selection, and the disadvantages of haploid selection on the sex ratio. Our results provide a plausible evolutionary explanation for biased sex ratios in dioecious plants, given the extensive gene expression that occurs across plant genomes at the haploid stage.

  10. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  11. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment. PMID:28067332

  12. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  13. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-09

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  14. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation.

  15. Developing Ocean Subsurface Data Record from CALIPSO Depolarization Ratio Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Rodier, S. D.; Zhai, P.; Josset, D. B.; Omar, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    CALIOP, the dual wavelength, polarization sensitive lidar flying aboard the CALIPSO satellite, has been operating since June 2006 and is expected to continue for several more years. CALIOP's depolarization ratio is one of the best calibrated measurements made by the A-Train sensors. Over the life of the CALIPSO mission, the stability of the CALIOP depolarization ratio calibration has remained within 1%. CALIOP's depolarization ratio measurements can be used for studying changes in the backscatter of ocean subsurface particulates. The ocean surface/subsurface depolarization ratio measurements from CALIOP together with collocated A-train instruments can be used for estimating the subsurface particulate backscatter coefficient (bbp) and the cross polarization component of the column integrated ocean subsurface backscatter signal. To derive the cross component of inte¬grated ocean subsurface backscatter signal from the depolarization ratio of CALIOP integrated ocean surface/subsurface range bins, we need theoretical estimates of the ocean surface back¬scatter cross section, which can be derived accurately from CloudSat ocean surface backscatter measurements or from AMSR-E wind speeds. Using the CALIOP cross component of the integrated ocean subsurface backscatter together with diffuse attenuation coefficient derived from MODIS, bbp can be estimated. Preliminary CALIOP data analysis shows that in the Southern Oceans, ocean subsurface backscatter has increased by about 5% since the beginning of the CALIPSO mission in June 2006. This study will: (1) introduce the CALIPSO ocean subsurface backscatter data products; (2) assess the uncertainties in the data products and comparing with in situ optics measurements, radiative transfer modeling and aircraft lidar measurements; and (3) summarize the global and regional (e.g., Gulf of Mexico region) statistics and temporal variations of the ocean subsurface backscatter from CALIPSO measurements.

  16. Galactose metabolic genes in yeast respond to a ratio of galactose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Escalante-Chong, Renan; Savir, Yonatan; Carroll, Sean M; Ingraham, John B; Wang, Jue; Marx, Christopher J; Springer, Michael

    2015-02-03

    Natural environments are filled with multiple, often competing, signals. In contrast, biological systems are often studied in "well-controlled" environments where only a single input is varied, potentially missing important interactions between signals. Catabolite repression of galactose by glucose is one of the best-studied eukaryotic signal integration systems. In this system, it is believed that galactose metabolic (GAL) genes are induced only when glucose levels drop below a threshold. In contrast, we show that GAL gene induction occurs at a constant external galactose:glucose ratio across a wide range of sugar concentrations. We systematically perturbed the components of the canonical galactose/glucose signaling pathways and found that these components do not account for ratio sensing. Instead we provide evidence that ratio sensing occurs upstream of the canonical signaling pathway and results from the competitive binding of the two sugars to hexose transporters. We show that a mutant that behaves as the classical model expects (i.e., cannot use galactose above a glucose threshold) has a fitness disadvantage compared with wild type. A number of common biological signaling motifs can give rise to ratio sensing, typically through negative interactions between opposing signaling molecules. We therefore suspect that this previously unidentified nutrient sensing paradigm may be common and overlooked in biology.

  17. Adaptive Noise Suppression Using Digital Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; Nelson, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to eliminate noise from noise corrupted speech signals. The algorithm determines the signal to noise ratio and adjusts the spectral subtraction proportion appropriately. After spectra subtraction low amplitude signals are squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both eh noise corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoice frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Applications include the emergency egress vehicle and the crawler transporter.

  18. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  19. Management Ratios 1. For Colleges & Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, John, Ed.

    Ratios that enable colleges and universities to select other institutions for comparison are presented. The ratios and underlying data also enable colleges to rank order institutions and to calculate means, quartiles, and ranges for these groups. The data are based on FY 1983 U.S. Department of Education Statistics. The ratios summarize the…

  20. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualification ratios. 400.162 Section 400.162...; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The sixteen qualification ratios include: (a) Eleven National Association of Insurance Commissioner's (NAIC's)...

  1. 12 CFR 567.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 567.8 Section 567.8 Banks and... § 567.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 516.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  2. 12 CFR 167.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 167.8 Section 167.8 Banks and... § 167.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a Federal savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 116.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  3. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualification ratios. 400.162 Section 400.162...; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The sixteen qualification ratios include: (a) Eleven National Association of Insurance Commissioner's (NAIC's)...

  4. 12 CFR 390.467 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 390.467 Section 390.467 Banks... REGULATIONS TRANSFERRED FROM THE OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION Capital § 390.467 Leverage ratio. (a) The... defined in this subpart, shall consist of a ratio of core capital to adjusted total assets of 3...

  5. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification ratios. 400.162 Section 400.162...; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The sixteen qualification ratios include: (a) Eleven National Association of Insurance Commissioner's (NAIC's)...

  6. 12 CFR 390.467 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 390.467 Section 390.467 Banks... REGULATIONS TRANSFERRED FROM THE OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION Capital § 390.467 Leverage ratio. (a) The... defined in this subpart, shall consist of a ratio of core capital to adjusted total assets of 3...

  7. 7 CFR 400.162 - Qualification ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualification ratios. 400.162 Section 400.162...; Regulations for the 1997 and Subsequent Reinsurance Years § 400.162 Qualification ratios. The sixteen qualification ratios include: (a) Eleven National Association of Insurance Commissioner's (NAIC's)...

  8. 12 CFR 567.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 567.8 Section 567.8 Banks and... § 567.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 516.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  9. 12 CFR 390.467 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 390.467 Section 390.467 Banks... REGULATIONS TRANSFERRED FROM THE OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION Capital § 390.467 Leverage ratio. (a) The... defined in this subpart, shall consist of a ratio of core capital to adjusted total assets of 3...

  10. 12 CFR 567.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 567.8 Section 567.8 Banks and... § 567.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 516.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  11. 12 CFR 167.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 167.8 Section 167.8 Banks and... § 167.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a Federal savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 116.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  12. 12 CFR 167.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leverage ratio. 167.8 Section 167.8 Banks and... § 167.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a Federal savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 116.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  13. 12 CFR 567.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Leverage ratio. 567.8 Section 567.8 Banks and... § 567.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 516.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  14. 12 CFR 567.8 - Leverage ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Leverage ratio. 567.8 Section 567.8 Banks and... § 567.8 Leverage ratio. (a) The minimum leverage capital requirement for a savings association assigned a composite rating of 1, as defined in § 516.3 of this chapter, shall consist of a ratio of...

  15. Isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry of D/H by high temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert; Douthitt; Schlüter; Brand

    1999-07-01

    Of all the elements, hydrogen has the largest naturally occurring variations in the ratio of its stable isotopes (D/H). It is for this reason that there has been a strong desire to add hydrogen to the list of elements amenable to isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS). In irm-GC/MS the sample is entrained in helium as the carrier gas, which is also ionized and separated in the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Because of the low abundance of deuterium in nature, precise and accurate on-line monitoring of D/H ratios with an IRMS requires that low energy helium ions be kept out of the m/z 3 collector, which requires the use of an energy filter. A clean mass 3 (HD(+.)) signal which is independent of a large helium load in the electron impact ion source is essential in order to reach the sensitivity required for D/H analysis of capillary GC peaks. A new IRMS system, the DELTA(plus)XL(trade mark), has been designed for high precision, high accuracy measurements of transient signals of hydrogen gas. It incorporates a retardation lens integrated into the m/z 3 Faraday cup collector. Following GC separation, the hydrogen bound in organic compounds must be quantitatively converted into H(2) gas prior to analysis in the IRMS. Quantitative conversion is achieved by high temperature conversion (TC) at temperatures >1400 degrees C. Measurements of D/H ratios of individual organic compounds in complicated natural mixtures can now be made to a precision of 2 per thousand (delta notation) or, better, with typical sample amounts of approximately 200 ng per compound. Initial applications have focused on compounds of interest to petroleum research (biomarkers and natural gas components), food and flavor control (vanillin and ethanol), and metabolic studies (fatty acids and steroids). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  17. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  18. Infrared Avionics Signal Distribution Using WDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Supporting analog RF signal transmission over optical fibers, this project demonstrates a successful application of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to the avionics environment. We characterize the simultaneous transmission of four RF signals (channels) over a single optical fiber. At different points along a fiber optic backbone, these four analog channels are sequentially multiplexed and demultiplexed to more closely emulate the conditions in existing onboard aircraft. We present data from measurements of optical power, transmission response (loss and gain), reflection response, group delay that defines phase distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range that defines nonlinear distortion. The data indicate that WDM is very suitable for avionics applications.

  19. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.; Barbis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution FIR emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne Fourier-transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32 deg N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2 deg were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069/cm were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 x 10 to the -11th, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35 percent. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  20. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H. ); Carli, B. ); Barbis, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution far-infrared emission spectra obtained with a balloon-born Fourier transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32{degree}N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2{degree} were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069 cm{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 {times} 10{sub {minus}11}, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35%. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus, HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  1. Ammonia 15N/14N Isotope Ratio in the Jovian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.R.; Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, M. H.; Owen, T. C; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer has been used to derive the N-15/N-14 isotope ratio in ammonia at Jupiter. Although the mass spectral interference from the water contribution to 18 amu makes an accurate derivation of the (N-15)H3/(N-14)H3 ratio difficult from measurements of the singly ionized signals at 18 and 17 amu, this interference is not present in the doubly charged 8.5 and 9.0 amu signals from (N-14)H3++ and (N-15)H3++ respectively. Although the count rate from the 9 amu signal is low during the direct sampling of the atmosphere, the ammonia signal was considerably enhanced during the first enrichment cell (EC1) experiment that measured gas sampled between 0.8 and 2.8 bar. Count rates at 9 amu in the EC1 experiment reach 60/second and measure ammonia sampled from 0.88 to 2.8 bar. In the EC1 measurements the 8.5 amu signal is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the ammonia contribution to 17 amu and the ratio of NH3 ions of a double to single charged observed during a high resolution mass scan taken near the end of the descent. The high resolution scan gives this ratio from ammonia sampled much deeper in the atmosphere. These results are described and compared with Infrared Space Observatory-Short Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-SWS) observations that give this ratio at 400 mbar.

  2. Modified Noise Power Ratio testing of high resolution digitizers

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    A broadband, full signal range, side-by-side (tandem) test method for estimating the internal noise performance of high resolution digitizers is described and illustrated. The technique involves a re-definition of the traditional Noise Power Ratio (NPR) test, a change that not only makes this test applicable to higher resolution systems than was previously practical, but also enhances its value and flexibility. Since coherence analysis is the basis of this new definition, and since the application of coherence procedures to high resolution data poses several problems, this report discusses these problems and their resolution.

  3. On the Voltage Standing Wave Ratio of barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aichmann, H.; Nimtz, G.; Bruney, P.

    2015-12-01

    The reflection and thus the Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) of barriers depend on several barrier properties. Scattering may take place at frequencies below or above the barrier height and may depend on the barrier's capacitive or inductive quality. At frequencies below the barrier height, faster than light (FTL) tunneled signals were observed. This must also occur in optical tunneling couplers presently applied in fiber communications. The tests confirmed the assumption that tunneling waves are virtual, the propagation is FTL, yet causality is nevertheless preserved. It is further noted that FTL propagation with preserved causality has also been measured within the near fields of antennas.

  4. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  5. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  6. Expected geoneutrino signal at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Virginia; Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Mantovani, Fabio; McDonough, William F.; Ricci, Barbara; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the Earth's composition and on its radiogenic energy budget come from the detection of geoneutrinos. The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and Borexino experiments recently reported the geoneutrino flux, which reflects the amount and distribution of U and Th inside the Earth. The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) neutrino experiment, designed as a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector, will be built in an underground laboratory in South China about 53 km from the Yangjiang and Taishan nuclear power plants, each one having a planned thermal power of approximately 18 GW. Given the large detector mass and the intense reactor antineutrino flux, JUNO aims not only to collect high statistics antineutrino signals from reactors but also to address the challenge of discriminating the geoneutrino signal from the reactor background. The predicted geoneutrino signal at JUNO is terrestrial neutrino unit (TNU), based on the existing reference Earth model, with the dominant source of uncertainty coming from the modeling of the compositional variability in the local upper crust that surrounds (out to approximately 500 km) the detector. A special focus is dedicated to the 6° × 4° local crust surrounding the detector which is estimated to contribute for the 44% of the signal. On the basis of a worldwide reference model for reactor antineutrinos, the ratio between reactor antineutrino and geoneutrino signals in the geoneutrino energy window is estimated to be 0.7 considering reactors operating in year 2013 and reaches a value of 8.9 by adding the contribution of the future nuclear power plants. In order to extract useful information about the mantle's composition, a refinement of the abundance and distribution of U and Th in the local crust is required, with particular attention to the geochemical characterization of the accessible upper crust where 47% of the expected geoneutrino signal originates and this region contributes

  7. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Keith Edward; Moser, William Elliott; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald; Knox, Kevin Jay

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  8. Identification of contaminant type in surface electromyography (EMG) signals.

    PubMed

    McCool, Paul; Fraser, Graham D; Chan, Adrian D C; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J

    2014-07-01

    The ability to recognize various forms of contaminants in surface electromyography (EMG) signals and to ascertain the overall quality of such signals is important in many EMG-enabled rehabilitation systems. In this paper, new methods for the automatic identification of commonly occurring contaminant types in surface EMG signals are presented. Such methods are advantageous because the contaminant type is typically not known in advance. The presented approach uses support vector machines as the main classification system. Both simulated and real EMG signals are used to assess the performance of the methods. The contaminants considered include: 1) electrocardiogram interference; 2) motion artifact; 3) power line interference; 4) amplifier saturation; and 5) additive white Gaussian noise. Results show that the contaminants can readily be distinguished at lower signal to noise ratios, with a growing degree of confusion at higher signal to noise ratios, where their effects on signal quality are less significant.

  9. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  10. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics.

  11. Multidimensional signal processing for ultrasonic signal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2001-04-01

    Neural network based signal classification systems are being used increasingly in the analysis of large volumes of data obtained in NDE applications. One example is in the interpretation on ultrasonic signals obtained from inspection of welds where signals can be due to porosity, slag, lack of fusion and cracks in the weld region. Standard techniques rely on differences in individual A-scans to classify the signals. This paper proposes an ultrasonic signal classification technique based on the information in a group of signals and examining the statistical characteristics of the signals. The method was 2-dimensional signal processing algorithms to analyze the information in B- and B'-scan images. In this paper, 2-dimensional transform based coefficients of the images are used as features and a multilayer perceptron is used to classify them. These results are then combined to get the final classification for the inspected region. Results of applying the technique to data obtained from the inspection of welds are presented.

  12. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  13. Calculating Obscuration Ratios Of Contaminated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1989-01-01

    Equations derived to estimate obscuration ratios of surfaces contaminated by particles. Ratio is fraction of surface area covered by particles. Useful as index of cleanliness in clean-room operations in manufacturing of semiconductor devices, magnetic recording media, optical devices, and pharmaceutical and biotechnological products.

  14. The effects of nurse to patient ratios.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer

    This article examines the literature on nurse to patient ratios to establish the impact on both patients and staff of understaffing on hospital wards. It discusses theories on ideal staff to patient ratios and the resource implications of these, and recommends a number of dynamic and innovative ways to allocate staff.

  15. Sex ratios in pheasant research and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dale, F.H.

    1952-01-01

    Sex ratios are of primary importance in interpretation of extensive studies of pheasant populations. They are necessary for converting crowing-cock indices to population estimates even where annual trends are to be studied in the same area. Reliability of population estimates from hunting season kill of pheasants suffers primarily from inability to estimate sex ratios accurately. Fall sex ratio is an index to production and where adult sex ratios are divergent can serve as a good check on production per hen. Age ratios of cocks cannot be interpreted directly as an index of productivity, even within the boundaries of one state, unless adult sex ratios are known. The relationship between observed and actual sex ratio varies significantly from season to season and according to the method of observation. In view of their importance in population studies and the lack of reliability of present methods, it is believed that intensive studies on techniques for obtaining sex ratios are a major need in pheasant research.

  16. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  17. How to use and interpret hormone ratios.

    PubMed

    Sollberger, Silja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Hormone ratios have become increasingly popular throughout the neuroendocrine literature since they offer a straightforward way to simultaneously analyze the effects of two interdependent hormones. However, the analysis of ratios is associated with statistical and interpretational concerns which have not been sufficiently considered in the context of endocrine research. The aim of this article, therefore, is to demonstrate and discuss these issues, and to suggest suitable ways to address them. In a first step, we use exemplary testosterone and cortisol data to illustrate that one major concern of ratios lies in their distribution and inherent asymmetry. As a consequence, results of parametric statistical analyses are affected by the ultimately arbitrary decision of which way around the ratio is computed (i.e., A/B or B/A). We suggest the use of non-parametric methods as well as the log-transformation of hormone ratios as appropriate methods to deal with these statistical problems. However, in a second step, we also discuss the complicated interpretation of ratios, and propose moderation analysis as an alternative and oftentimes more insightful approach to ratio analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that researchers carefully consider which statistical approach is best suited to investigate reciprocal hormone effects. With regard to the hormone ratio method, further research is needed to specify what exactly this index reflects on the biological level and in which cases it is a meaningful variable to analyze.

  18. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-04

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide.

  19. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  20. Negative Poisson's ratio in rippled graphene.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huasong; Sun, Yu; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Li, Mengjie; Liu, Yilun

    2017-03-10

    In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of rippling on the Poisson's ratio of graphene. Due to the atomic scale thickness of graphene, out-of-plane ripples are generated in free standing graphene with topological defects (e.g. heptagons and pentagons) to release the in-plane deformation energy. Through MD simulations, we have found that the Poisson's ratio of rippled graphene decreases upon increasing its aspect ratio η (amplitude over wavelength). For the rippled graphene sheet η = 0.188, a negative Poisson's ratio of -0.38 is observed for a tensile strain up to 8%, while the Poisson's ratio for η = 0.066 is almost zero. During uniaxial tension, the ripples gradually become flat, thus the Poisson's ratio of rippled graphene is determined by the competing factors of the intrinsic positive Poisson's ratio of graphene and the negative Poisson's ratio due to the de-wrinkling effect. Besides, the rippled graphene exhibits excellent fracture strength and toughness. With the combination of its auxetic and excellent mechanical properties, rippled graphene may possess potential for application in nano-devices and nanomaterials.

  1. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  2. The Divine Ratio and Golden Rectangles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martin

    1982-01-01

    The material examines aspects of Fibonacci and Lucas sequences, the generation of the Divine Ratio, and the nature of this ratio in golden rectangles, triangles, and figures made up of golden triangles. It is noted Lucas sequence is formed like Fibonacci but has one and three as the first elements. (Author/MP)

  3. Human behaviour: sex ratio and the city.

    PubMed

    Székely, Áron; Székely, Tamás

    2012-09-11

    The ratio of males to females in a population is known to influence the behaviour, life histories and demography of animals. A recent experimental study finds that sex ratio also affects human economic behaviour, and in a manner consistent with evolutionary theory.

  4. Empirical Analysis of Drill Ratio Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    Providing students an appropriate level of challenge, called the instructional level, is an important component of effective instruction. Research regarding the optimal ratio of known to unknown items for drill tasks has been inconsistent. The author of the current article conducted an empirical metaanalysis of research on drill ratios by using…

  5. The Rain Ratio Hypothesis: Can it be Rescued?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munhoven, Guy

    2010-05-01

    The Rain Ratio Hypothesis (Archer and Maier-Reimer, 1994, Nature 367, 260-263) ascribes an important part of the observed glacial-interglacial variations of CO2 in the atmosphere to reduced sea-floor rain ratio (i.e., carbonate-C/organic-C in the biogenic particle flux at the sea-floor) during glacial times. With a lower sea-floor rain ratio the influence of organic carbon respiration on carbonate dissolution is stronger. The deep-sea carbonate ion concentration required for global ocean carbonate compensation will then be higher, which in turn contributes to lower atmospheric pCO2. Munhoven (2007, Deep-Sea Research II, 722-746) showed that the suggested rain ratio reductions lead to unrealistic sedimentary records for %CaCO3: the transition zone changes in the model sedimentary record were too large and opposite in phase to available observational data. The rain ratio reduction applied by Munhoven (2007) was uniform over the ocean and the author hypothesised that a non-uniform reduction could change the complete picture. If the rain ratio variations had primarily taken place in open ocean areas of great depth-essentially in regions where the sea floor was deeper than the saturation horizon or the CCD-then the transition zone boundaries could possibly have moved less. Here, we test this hypothesis and analyse the effect of depth dependent variations. It is shown that concentrating rain ratio changes over areas of greatest water depth completely alters the sedimentary imprint: the phase relationship of the signal reverts (compared to the uniform case) and the amplitude of the change decreases, bringing it into better agreement with the observations. However, the pCO2 response is also reduced. The global average rain ratio reduction of 40% that yielded a 40 ppm reduction of atmospheric pCO2 in the uniform case only leads to 25 ppm in this non-uniform case. Results for other depth-dependent reductions will also be discussed.

  6. High Transformer ratios in collinear wakefield accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanreykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2008-01-01

    Based on our previous experiment that successfully demonstrated wakefield transformer ratio enhancement in a 13.625 GHz dielectric-loaded collinear wakefield accelerator using the ramped bunch train technique, we present here a redesigned experimental scheme for even higher enhancement of the efficiency of this accelerator. Design of a collinear wakefield device with a transformer ratio R2, is presented. Using a ramped bunch train (RBT) rather than a single drive bunch, the enhanced transformer ratio (ETR) technique is able to increase the transformer ratio R above the ordinary limit of 2. To match the wavelength of the fundamental mode of the wakefield with the bunch length (sigmaz=2 mm) of the new Argonne wakefield accelerator (AWA) drive gun (where the experiment will be performed), a 26.625 GHz dielectric based accelerating structure is required. This transformer ratio enhancement technique based on our dielectric-loaded waveguide design will result in a compact, high efficiency accelerating structures for future wakefield accelerators.

  7. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  8. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  9. Poisson's ratio of individual metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Eoin K; Bellew, Allen T; Sader, John E; Boland, John J

    2014-07-07

    The measurement of Poisson's ratio of nanomaterials is extremely challenging. Here we report a lateral atomic force microscope experimental method to electromechanically measure the Poisson's ratio and gauge factor of individual nanowires. Under elastic loading conditions we monitor the four-point resistance of individual metallic nanowires as a function of strain and different levels of electrical stress. We determine the gauge factor of individual wires and directly measure the Poisson's ratio using a model that is independently validated for macroscopic wires. For macroscopic wires and nickel nanowires we find Poisson's ratios that closely correspond to bulk values, whereas for silver nanowires significant deviations from the bulk silver value are observed. Moreover, repeated measurements on individual silver nanowires at different levels of mechanical and electrical stress yield a small spread in Poisson ratio, with a range of mean values for different wires, all of which are distinct from the bulk value.

  10. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  11. Equity Theory Ratios as Causal Schemas

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Alexios; Hantzi, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Equity theory approaches justice evaluations based on ratios of exchange inputs to exchange outcomes. Situations are evaluated as just if ratios are equal and unjust if unequal. We suggest that equity ratios serve a more fundamental cognitive function than the evaluation of justice. More particularly, we propose that they serve as causal schemas for exchange outcomes, that is, they assist in determining whether certain outcomes are caused by inputs of other people in the context of an exchange process. Equality or inequality of ratios in this sense points to an exchange process. Indeed, Study 1 shows that different exchange situations, such as disproportional or balanced proportional situations, create perceptions of give-and-take on the basis of equity ratios. Study 2 shows that perceptions of justice are based more on communicatively accepted rules of interaction than equity-based evaluations, thereby offering a distinction between an attribution and an evaluation cognitive process for exchange outcomes. PMID:27594846

  12. Combining absorption and dispersion signals to improve signal-to-noise for rapid-scan EPR imaging.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2010-04-01

    Direct detection of the rapid-scan EPR signal with quadrature detection and without automatic frequency control provides both the absorption and dispersion components of the signal. The use of a cross-loop resonator results in similar signal-to-noise in the two channels. The dispersion signal can be converted to an equivalent absorption signal by means of Kramers-Kronig relations. The converted signal is added to the directly measured absorption signal. Since the noise in the two channels is not correlated, this procedure increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the resultant absorption signal by up to a factor of square root 2. The utility of this method was demonstrated for 2D spectral-spatial imaging of a phantom containing three tubes of LiPc with different oxygen concentrations and therefore different linewidths.

  13. Signal quality and Bayesian signal processing in neurofeedback based on real-time fMRI.

    PubMed

    Koush, Yury; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Dyck, Miriam; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Mathiak, Klaus

    2012-01-02

    Real-time fMRI allows analysis and visualization of the brain activity online, i.e. within one repetition time. It can be used in neurofeedback applications where subjects attempt to control an activation level in a specified region of interest (ROI) of their brain. The signal derived from the ROI is contaminated with noise and artifacts, namely with physiological noise from breathing and heart beat, scanner drift, motion-related artifacts and measurement noise. We developed a Bayesian approach to reduce noise and to remove artifacts in real-time using a modified Kalman filter. The system performs several signal processing operations: subtraction of constant and low-frequency signal components, spike removal and signal smoothing. Quantitative feedback signal quality analysis was used to estimate the quality of the neurofeedback time series and performance of the applied signal processing on different ROIs. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) across the entire time series and the group event-related SNR (eSNR) were significantly higher for the processed time series in comparison to the raw data. Applied signal processing improved the t-statistic increasing the significance of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes. Accordingly, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the feedback time series was improved as well. In addition, the data revealed increase of localized self-control across feedback sessions. The new signal processing approach provided reliable neurofeedback, performed precise artifacts removal, reduced noise, and required minimal manual adjustments of parameters. Advanced and fast online signal processing algorithms considerably increased the quality as well as the information content of the control signal which in turn resulted in higher contingency in the neurofeedback loop.

  14. Derivation of sideband gain ratio for Herschel/HIFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Do; Higgins, Ronan; Teyssier, David

    2017-03-01

    Context. Heterodyne mixers are commonly used for high-resolution spectroscopy at radio telescopes. When used as a double sideband system, the accurate flux calibration of spectral lines acquired by those detectors is highly dependent on the system gains in the respective mixer sidebands via the so-called sideband gain ratio (SBR). As such, the SBR was one of the main contributors to the calibration uncertainty budget of the Herschel/HIFI instrument. Aims: We want to determine the HIFI instrument sideband gain ratio for all bands on a fine frequency grid and within an accuracy of a few percent. Methods: We introduce a novel technique involving in-orbit HIFI data that is bootstrapped onto standard methods involving laboratory data measurements of the SBR. We deconvolved the astronomical data to provide a proxy of the expected signal at every frequency channel, and extracted the sideband gain ratios from the residuals of that process. Results: We determine the HIFI sideband gain ratio to an accuracy varying between 1 and 4%, with degraded accuracy in higher frequency ranges, and at places where the reliability of the technique is lower. These figures were incorporated into the HIFI data processing pipeline and improved the overall flux uncertainty of the legacy data from this instrument. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a modified sideband deconvolution algorithm, using astronomical data in combination with gas cell measurements, can be used to generate an accurate and fine-granularity picture of the sideband gain ratio behaviour of a heterodyne receiver. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. Stable isotope ratios in hair and teeth reflect biologic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Qualls, Clifford; Barbic, Franca; Furlan, Raffaello; Porta, Alberto

    2007-07-25

    Biologic rhythms give insight into normal physiology and disease. They can be used as biomarkers for neuronal degenerations. We present a diverse data set to show that hair and teeth contain an extended record of biologic rhythms, and that analysis of these tissues could yield signals of neurodegenerations. We examined hair from mummified humans from South America, extinct mammals and modern animals and people, both healthy and diseased, and teeth of hominins. We also monitored heart-rate variability, a measure of a biologic rhythm, in some living subjects and analyzed it using power spectra. The samples were examined to determine variations in stable isotope ratios along the length of the hair and across growth-lines of the enamel in teeth. We found recurring circa-annual periods of slow and fast rhythms in hydrogen isotope ratios in hair and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in teeth. The power spectra contained slow and fast frequency power, matching, in terms of normalized frequency, the spectra of heart rate variability found in our living subjects. Analysis of the power spectra of hydrogen isotope ratios in hair from a patient with neurodegeneration revealed the same spectral features seen in the patient's heart-rate variability. Our study shows that spectral analysis of stable isotope ratios in readily available tissues such as hair could become a powerful diagnostic tool when effective treatments and neuroprotective drugs for neurodegenerative diseases become available. It also suggests that similar analyses of archaeological specimens could give insight into the physiology of ancient people and animals.

  16. Intelligibility of Target Signals in Sequential and Simultaneous Segregation Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    segregation is less clear. Recently, Mackersie et. al., (2001) demonstrated a strong correlation between speech reception thresholds (SRT) and tonal fusion...either alternated with or masked by noise. For example, at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), word intelligibility is not significantly altered when...the 0 Hz noise condition despite the nominally higher signal to noise ratio (0 dB versus -8 dB). This difference is consistent with previous results

  17. Adaptive Signal Detection for the Optimal Communications Receiver,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    atmospheric noise are considered. Since the liklihood ratio test nn which thp thpnrv ic: h~czaa i - DD ,*A 3 1473 EDITION OF INOV GS IS OBSOLESTE...transmitter and receiver at opposite ends of an additive noise channel can be improved (1) by increasing the ratio of signal power to noise power , (2...by changing the form of the signal while holding power constant, or (3) by designing better noise immunity into the receiver. This publication

  18. Tuning of Automatic Signal Detection Algorithms for IMS Style Infrasound Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Virginia. The synthetic signals were implanted into conventional array channel data using an implant strategy that allowed the signal to noise ratio ( SNR ...of the signal to be specified in a fashion that accounts for the spectral composition of the background. SNR values ranging from 0.01 to 100 were used...of Signal to Noise Ratio ( SNR ). RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHED In meeting this objective it was determined that the following steps constitute a workable

  19. Separation of sources in radiofrequency measurements of partial discharges using time-power ratio maps.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, R; Robles, G; Martinez-Tarifa, J M; Ardila-Rey, J

    2015-09-01

    Partial discharges measurement is one of the most useful tools for condition monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment. These phenomena can be measured on-line in radiofrequency (RF) with sensors such as the Vivaldi antenna, used in this paper, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by rejecting FM and low-frequency TV bands. Additionally, the power ratios (PR), a signal-processing technique based on the power distribution of the incoming signals in frequency bands, are used to characterize different sources of PD and electromagnetic noise (EMN). The calculation of the time length of the pulses is introduced to separate signals where the PR alone do not give a conclusive solution. Thus, if several EM sources could be previously calibrated, it is possible to detect pulses corresponding to PD activity.

  20. Some Factors Affecting Time Reversal Signal Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevorovsky, Z.; Kober, J.

    Time reversal (TR) ultrasonic signal processing is now broadly used in a variety of applications, and also in NDE/NDT field. TR processing is used e.g. for S/N ratio enhancement, reciprocal transducer calibration, location, identification, and reconstruction of unknown sources, etc. TR procedure in con-junction with nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy NEWS is also useful for sensitive detection of defects (nonlinearity presence). To enlarge possibilities of acoustic emission (AE) method, we proposed the use of TR signal reconstruction ability for detected AE signals transfer from a structure with AE source onto a similar remote model of the structure (real or numerical), which allows easier source analysis under laboratory conditions. Though the TR signal reconstruction is robust regarding the system variations, some small differences and changes influence space-time TR focus and reconstruction quality. Experiments were performed on metallic parts of both simple and complicated geometry to examine effects of small changes of temperature or configuration (body shape, dimensions, transducers placement, etc.) on TR reconstruction quality. Results of experiments are discussed in this paper. Considering mathematical similarity between TR and Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), prediction of signal reconstruction quality was possible using only the direct propagation. The results show how some factors like temperature or stress changes may deteriorate the TR reconstruction quality. It is also shown that sometimes the reconstruction quality is not enhanced using longer TR signal (S/N ratio may decrease).

  1. Sex ratio in relation to fathers' occupations.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, H O; Parker, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the sex ratio of children varies between fathers of different occupations. METHODS: The sex ratio (the ratio of the number of boys to the number of girls at birth) was calculated in relation to paternal occupation in the cohort of all 253,433 live births in Cumbria, north west England, from 1950-89. Exact binomial confidence intervals were used to estimate whether the sex ratio in each occupational category was significantly different from that for the rest of the cohort. RESULTS: There were fewer occupational categories with significantly different sex ratios at the 5% level than expected by chance alone, assuming the same binomial distribution of sexes at birth within each paternal occupation. CONCLUSIONS: Significant variation of the sex ratio with fathers' occupations was not found. There is some evidence that the sex ratio shows less variance than expected under a binomial model which assumes independence of the sex of each child; a possible explanation of this may be parental preference for limiting family size after children of both sexes have been born or some other factor which results in children within a family being more likely to be of both sexes rather than the same sex. PMID:9470894

  2. Helium isotope ratios in Ethiopian Rift basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarsi, P.; Craig, H.

    1996-11-01

    Helium isotope ratios were measured in olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts from basalts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley and Afar Depression between 6° and 15°N and 37° and 43°E. 3He/4He ratios range from 6 to 17 times the atmospheric value (RA = 1.4 × 10-6), that is, from ratios less than typical MORB (depleted mantle) helium (R/RA= 8 ± 1) to ratios similar to high-3He hotspots and to the Yellowstone hotspot (R/RA= 16.5). The high 3He/4He ratios occur all along the Ethiopian Rift and well up into the Afar Depression, with a maximum value of 17.0 RA at 8°N in the Rift Axis and a high value of 14.2 RA in the central Tat'Ali sector of the Afar Depression. The ratios decrease to MORB-like values near the edge of the Red Sea, and to sub-MORB ratios (5-6 RA) at the northern end of the Rift (Zula Peninsula) and at the southern end, at lakes Abaya and Chamo. The Ethiopian Rift provides the only continental hotspot terrain in which helium isotope ratios can be compared in detail between volcanic lavas and associated geothermal and volcanic gases, a primary motivation for this work. Comparison with our previously measured ratios in fluids and gases (range 2-15 RA) shows excellent agreement in the areas sampled for both lavas and fluids, and indicates that high-temperature volcanic fluids can be used for establishing helium isotope signatures in such terrains. The high-3He values in both fluids and basalts show that a Primitive Mantle (PM) component is required and that a Lower Mantle High-3He plume is strongly involved as a driving force in the rifting process of the East African Rift System.

  3. Signaling in myxobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Myxobacteria use soluble and cell-contact signals during their starvation-induced formation of fruiting bodies. These signals coordinate developmental gene expression with the cell movements that build fruiting bodies. Early in development, the quorum-sensing A-signal in Myxococcus xanthus helps to assess starvation and induce the first stage of aggregation. Later, the morphogenetic C-signal helps to pattern cell movement and shape the fruiting body. C-signal is a 17-kDa cell surface protein that signals by contact between the ends of two cells. The number of C-signal molecules per cell rises 100-fold from the beginning of fruiting body development to the end, when spores are formed. Traveling waves, streams, and sporulation have increasing thresholds for C-signal activity, and this progression ensures that spores form inside fruiting bodies.

  4. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  5. Isolation of strontium pools and isotope ratios in modern human hair.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Brett J; Chau, Thuan; Chesson, Lesley A; Fernandez, Diego P; Ehleringer, James R

    2013-10-10

    The elements of human hair record specific information about an individual's health, diet, and surrounding environment. Strontium isotope ratios of human hair have attracted interest as they potentially record an individual's environment. Yet, separating the external environmental signals from the internal dietary indicators has remained a challenge. Here, we examined the effects of five different hair-cleaning methodologies to determine the extent that internal and external strontium signals can be isolated from human hair. In the first study of its kind, we employed an in-line strontium purification methodology and a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to obtain high-precision strontium isotope ratio of human hair and of leachates of the different washing treatments. We found that the different applications of an individual treatment removed a consistent amount of strontium from hair and that replicate analyses showed each treatment altered the strontium isotope ratios of hair consistently. A mass-balance approach was applied to demonstrate that strontium was quantitatively removed and was accounted for in either the treated hair or the leachate. We observed that strontium isotope ratio varied as a function of treatment aggressiveness so as to suggest that there was a fine-scale structuring of strontium within hair (transverse cross-sectional variations); these variations existed as differences in strontium concentrations and isotope ratios. As a result, the Sr isotope ratio of hair and hair leachates treated with the most aggressive cleaning methods reflected the isotope ratios of the interior and total exterior strontium signatures, respectively. The results of this study indicate that external environmental strontium signals can be distinguished from the internal signals and therefore permit the application of strontium isotope ratios of modern human hair for geospatial applications.

  6. Testing the ratio of two poisson rates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kangxia; Ng, Hon Keung Tony; Tang, Man Lai; Schucany, William R

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we compare the properties of four different general approaches for testing the ratio of two Poisson rates. Asymptotically normal tests, tests based on approximate p -values, exact conditional tests, and a likelihood ratio test are considered. The properties and power performance of these tests are studied by a Monte Carlo simulation experiment. Sample size calculation formulae are given for each of the test procedures and their validities are studied. Some recommendations favoring the likelihood ratio and certain asymptotic tests are based on these simulation results. Finally, all of the test procedures are illustrated with two real life medical examples.

  7. Negative Poisson's ratio materials via isotropic interactions.

    PubMed

    Rechtsman, Mikael C; Stillinger, Frank H; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-08-22

    We show that under tension a classical many-body system with only isotropic pair interactions in a crystalline state can, counterintuitively, have a negative Poisson's ratio, or auxetic behavior. We derive the conditions under which the triangular lattice in two dimensions and lattices with cubic symmetry in three dimensions exhibit a negative Poisson's ratio. In the former case, the simple Lennard-Jones potential can give rise to auxetic behavior. In the latter case, a negative Poisson's ratio can be exhibited even when the material is constrained to be elastically isotropic.

  8. Excitation/Detection Strategies for OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Presence of Interfering Fuel Signal and Absorption Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) excitation/detection methods have been applied to obtain spatial distributions of the hydroxyl [OH] reacting intermediary and hydrocarbon [HC] primary species in laminar and turbulent combustion reactions. In this report, broadband and narrowband excitation/filtering techniques are explored to identify an optimal experimental configuration yielding significant fluorescent signal with low absorption losses. The combustion environments analyzed include 1) a laminar non-premixed methane/air flame and 2) a turbulent, non-premixed Jet-A/air fueled flame within a lean flame tube combustor. Hydrocarbon-based fuel and OH were excited via the R1 (1), R1(10) and R2(7) transitions of the A(sup 2)Epsilon(+) X(sup 2)pi(1,0) band using a broadband Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and narrowband Nd:YAG/dye laser with ultraviolet frequency extension (UVX) package. Variables tested for influence on fluorescent signal and absorption characteristics were excitation line, laser energy, exciting linewidth, combustion reactants, and test flow conditions. Results are intended to guide the transition from a dye/UVX laser to an OPO system for performing advanced diagnostics of low-emission combustion concepts.

  9. Danger signals in stroke.

    PubMed

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Sobey, Christopher G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Magnus, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Danger molecules are the first signals released from dying tissue after stroke. These danger signals bind to receptors on immune cells that will result in their activation and the release of inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators, resulting in amplification of the immune response and subsequent enlargement of the damaged brain volume. The release of danger signals is a central event that leads to a multitude of signals and cascades in the affected and neighbouring tissue, therefore providing a potential target for therapy.

  10. Staggered Costas signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Avraham; Levanon, Nadav

    1986-11-01

    A radar signal, based on coherent processing of a train of staggered Costas (1984) bursts is based on a minimum number of collocation of their individual ambiguity function sidelobe peaks. The resulting ambiguity function combines qualities of both 'thumbtack' and 'bed of nails' signals. Comparison with linear-FM, V-FM, and complementary phase coded signals is given, as well as comparison with hybrid signals consisting of both phase and frequency coding.

  11. High Resolution Double-Focusing Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Deerberg, M.; Hilkert, A.; Schlüter, H.-J.; Schwieters, J.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years isotope ratio mass spectrometry has extended to the capability of quantifying very small isotope signatures related with low abundances and simultaneously detecting molecular masses such as isotopomers and isotopologues containing clumped isotopes. Some of those applications are limited by molecular interferences like different gas molecules with the same nominal mass, e.g. Ar/O2, adducts of the same molecule or of different molecules, and very small isotope abundances. The Thermo Scientific MAT 253 ULTRA is the next generation of high precision gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which combines a 10 KV gas ionization source (Thermo Scientific MAT 253) with a double focusing multi-collector mass analyzer (Thermo Scientific Neptune) and reduces those limitations by measuring isotope ratios on a larger dynamic range with high precision. Small ion beam requirements and high sensitivity are achieved by signal-to-noise improvements through enhanced ion beam amplification in faraday cups and ion counters. Interfering backgrounds, e.g. interfering isotopologues or isobaric ions of contaminants, are dramatically decreased by a dynamic range increase combined with high evacuation leading to undisturbed ion transmission through the double-focusing analyser. Furthermore, automated gain calibration for mathematical baseline corrections, switchable detector arrays, ion source control, analyser focusing and full data export is controlled under Isodat data control. New reference/sample strategies are under investigation besides incorporation of the continuous-flow technique and its versatile inlet devices. We are presenting first results and applications of the MAT 253 Ultra.

  12. Tetrapyrrole Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles make critical contributions to a number of important processes in diverse organisms. In plants, tetrapyrroles are essential for light signaling, the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, the assimilation of nitrate and sulfate, respiration, photosynthesis, and programed cell death. The misregulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism can produce toxic reactive oxygen species. Thus, it is not surprising that tetrapyrrole metabolism is strictly regulated and that tetrapyrrole metabolism affects signaling mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In plants and algae, tetrapyrroles are synthesized in plastids and were some of the first plastid signals demonstrated to regulate nuclear gene expression. In plants, the mechanism of tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling remains poorly understood. Additionally, some of experiments that tested ideas for possible signaling mechanisms appeared to produce conflicting data. In some instances, these conflicts are potentially explained by different experimental conditions. Although the biological function of tetrapyrrole signaling is poorly understood, there is compelling evidence that this signaling is significant. Specifically, this signaling appears to affect the accumulation of starch and may promote abiotic stress tolerance. Tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling interacts with a distinct plastid-to-nucleus signaling mechanism that depends on GENOMES UNCUOPLED1 (GUN1). GUN1 contributes to a variety of processes, such as chloroplast biogenesis, the circadian rhythm, abiotic stress tolerance, and development. Thus, the contribution of tetrapyrrole signaling to plant function is potentially broader than we currently appreciate. In this review, I discuss these aspects of tetrapyrrole signaling. PMID:27807442

  13. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  14. Multiwavelength micropulse lidar in atmospheric aerosol study: signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posyniak, Michal; Malinowski, Szymon P.; Stacewicz, Tadeusz; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw

    2011-11-01

    Multiwavelength micropulse lidar (MML) designed for continuous optical sounding of the atmosphere is presented. A specific signal processing technique applying two directional Kalman filtering is introduced in order to enhance signal to noise ratio. Application of this technique is illustrated with profiles collected in course of COAST 2009 and WRNP 2010 research campaigns.

  15. Negative Poisson's Ratio in Modern Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuanwei; Chen, Lang

    2016-10-01

    Materials with negative Poisson's ratio attract considerable attention due to their underlying intriguing physical properties and numerous promising applications, particularly in stringent environments such as aerospace and defense areas, because of their unconventional mechanical enhancements. Recent progress in materials with a negative Poisson's ratio are reviewed here, with the current state of research regarding both theory and experiment. The inter-relationship between the underlying structure and a negative Poisson's ratio is discussed in functional materials, including macroscopic bulk, low-dimensional nanoscale particles, films, sheets, or tubes. The coexistence and correlations with other negative indexes (such as negative compressibility and negative thermal expansion) are also addressed. Finally, open questions and future research opportunities are proposed for functional materials with negative Poisson's ratios.

  16. Doing Mathematics with Bicycle Gear Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students examine bicycle chain-rings, cogs, and gear ratios as a means of exploring algebraic relationships, data collection, scatter plots, and lines of best fit. (KHR)

  17. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  18. Approaches to high aspect ratio triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics calculations, high aspect ratio, or stretched, triangulations are necessary to adequately resolve the features of a viscous flow around bodies. In this paper, we explore alternatives to the Delaunay triangulation which can be used to generate high aspect ratio triangulations of point sets. The method is based on a variation of the lifting map concept which derives Delaunay triangulations from convex hull calculations.

  19. Signal-to-noise ratio of temperature measurement with Cernox sensors at various supply currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, A.; Burger, B.; Ebersoldt, A.; Heidt, C.; Langhans, O.; Reiner, A.; Grohmann, S.

    2017-02-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has developed a new thermal method for flow measurement, which is particularly suitable for the application in cryogenic systems. In this method, the stability and the resolution of temperature measurement is important, rather than precision. In other words, constant offsets in temperature measurements can be ignored, and the temperature sensors can be operated at supply currents beyond their nominal design value in order to gain resolution. For this application, the performance of two CernoxTM type CX-1050-SD-HT-1.4L sensors was measured in a temperature range between 300 K and 4 K. The experiments were carried out in the calibration cryostat at the Institute for Technical Physics. Sensors were connected to a Lake Shore Model 121 current source and a Keithley 2701/E digital multimeter for voltage measurements. At constant calibration temperatures, the supply currents were varied such that the resulting voltage drops lay in-between 10 mV and 100 mV. The influence on both the noise and the temperature offset are presented.

  20. Laboratory Study of the Noticeability and Annoyance of Sounds of Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneddon, Matthew; Howe, Richard; Pearsons, Karl; Fidell, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a study of the noticeability and annoyance of intruding noises to test participants who were engaged in a distracting foreground task. Ten test participants read material of their own choosing while seated individually in front of a loudspeaker in an anechoic chamber. One of three specially constructed masking noise environments with limited dynamic range was heard at all times. A laboratory computer produced sounds of aircraft and ground vehicles as heard at varying distances at unpredictable intervals and carefully controlled levels. Test participants were instructed to click a computer mouse at any time that a noise distinct from the background noise environment came to their attention, and then to indicate their degree of annoyance with the noise that they had noticed. The results confirmed that both the noticeability of noise intrusions and their annoyance were closely related to their audibility.