Science.gov

Sample records for air-launched small missile

  1. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Mike; Munson, Mike; Teate, George

    2006-01-01

    A new testbed for hypersonic flight research is proposed. Known as the Phoenix air-launched small missile (ALSM) flight testbed, it was conceived to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of two unique and very capable flight assets: the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the NASA Dryden F-15B testbed airplane. The U.S. Navy retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an excellent opportunity for converting this valuable flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill an existing gap in the test and evaluation of current and future hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform. When launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will be valuable for the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  2. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Michael T.; Munson, Michael J.; Teate, George F.

    2007-01-01

    The Phoenix Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) flight testbed was conceived and is proposed to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 (Hughes Aircraft Company, now Raytheon Company, Waltham, Massachusetts) long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B (McDonnell Douglas, now the Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) testbed airplane. The retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an opportunity for converting this flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill the gap in the test and evaluation of hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform; when launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will assist the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite-small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  3. Supersonic aerodynamic trade data for a low-profile monoplanar missile concept. [air launched maneuvering missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.; Robins, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    A monoplanar missile concept has been studied which shows promise of improving the aerodynamic performance of air-launched missiles. This missile concept has a constant eccentricity elliptical cross-section body. Since current guidance and propulsion technologies influence missile nose and base shapes, an experimental investigation has been conducted at Mach number 2.50 to determine the effects of variations in these shapes on the missile aerodynamics. Results of these tests are presented.

  4. Converting the Minuteman missile into a small satellite launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Bill; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Humble, Greg; Mackay, Gordon; Mchaty, Rod; Pham, VU

    1993-01-01

    Due to the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) treaty between the United States and Ex-Soviet Union, 450 Minuteman 2 (MM 2) missiles were recently taken out of service. Minotaur Designs Incorporated (MDI) intends to convert the MM 2 ballistic missile from a nuclear warhead carrier into a small satellite launcher. MDI will perform this conversion by acquiring the Minuteman stages, purchasing currently available control wafers, and designing a new shroud and interfaces for the satellite. MDI is also responsible for properly integrating all systems.

  5. Converting the Minuteman missile into a small satellite launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Bill; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Humble, Greg; Mackay, Gordon; McHaty, Rod; Pham, Vu

    1993-11-01

    Due to the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) treaty between the United States and Ex-Soviet Union, 450 Minuteman 2 (MM 2) missiles were recently taken out of service. Minotaur Designs Incorporated (MDI) intends to convert the MM 2 ballistic missile from a nuclear warhead carrier into a small satellite launcher. MDI will perform this conversion by acquiring the Minuteman stages, purchasing currently available control wafers, and designing a new shroud and interfaces for the satellite. MDI is also responsible for properly integrating all systems.

  6. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  7. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  8. The Crossbow Air Launch Trade Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.; Sorensen, Kirk F.

    2006-01-01

    Effective air launching of a rocket is approached from a broad systems engineering viewpoint. The elementary reasons for why and how a rocket might be launched from a carrier aircraft are examined. From this, a carefully crafted set of guiding principles is presented. Rules are generated from a fundamental foundation, derived from NASA systems study analyses and from an academic vantage point. The Appendix includes the derivation of a revised Mass Multiplier Equation, useful in understanding the rocket equation as it applies to real vehicles, without the need of complicated weight and sizing programs. The rationale for air launching, being an enormously advantageous Earth-To-Orbit (ETO) methodology, is presented along with the realization that the appropriate air launch solution may lie in a very large class of carrier aircraft; the pod-hauler. Finally, a unique area of the system trade space is defined and branded Crossbow. Crossbow is not a specific hardware design for air launch, but represents a comprehensive vision for commercial, military and space transportation. This document serves as a starting point for future technical papers that evaluate the air launch hypotheses and assertions produced during the past several years of study on the subject.

  9. Athena: Advanced air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Corey G.; Ziemer, John; Plonka, John; Henderson, Scott; Copioli, Paul; Reese, Charles; Ullman, Christopher; Frank, Jeremy; Breslauer, Alan; Patonis, Hristos

    1994-01-01

    The infrastructure for routine, reliable, and inexpensive access of space is a goal that has been actively pursued over the past 50 years, but has yet not been realized. Current launch systems utilize ground launching facilities which require the booster vehicle to plow up through the dense lower atmosphere before reaching space. An air launched system on the other hand has the advantage of being launched from a carrier aircraft above this dense portion of the atmosphere and hence can be smaller and lighter compared to its ground based counterpart. The goal of last year's Aerospace Engineering Course 483 (AE 483) was to design a 227,272 kg (500,000 lb.) air launched space booster which would beat the customer's launch cost on existing launch vehicles by at least 50 percent. While the cost analysis conducted by the class showed that this goal could be met, the cost and size of the carrier aircraft make it appear dubious that any private company would be willing to invest in such a project. To avoid this potential pitfall, this year's AE 483 class was to design as large an air launched space booster as possible which can be launched from an existing or modification to an existing aircraft. An initial estimate of the weight of the booster is 136,363 kg (300,000 lb.) to 159,091 kg (350,000 lb.).

  10. An Air-Launched Low-Cost Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Gary C.

    2005-02-01

    The QuickReach concept is a responsive, mobile, air-launched, two-stage liquid pressure-fed rocket that is capable of placing nearly 2,000 pounds into low earth orbit. The rocket is extracted from a transport aircraft using gravity and a small drogue parachute for orientation stabilization. The design of the container holding the rocket allows the use of existing transport aircraft without any modification. Propulsion is LOX and propane using the Vapak concept for tank pressurization. Structures make use of advanced composites.

  11. Low Earth Orbit Raider (LER) winged air launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feaux, Karl; Jordan, William; Killough, Graham; Miller, Robert; Plunk, Vonn

    1989-01-01

    The need to launch small payloads into low earth orbit has increased dramatically during the past several years. The Low Earth orbit Raider (LER) is an answer to this need. The LER is an air-launched, winged vehicle designed to carry a 1500 pound payload into a 250 nautical mile orbit. The LER is launched from the back of a 747-100B at 35,000 feet and a Mach number of 0.8. Three staged solid propellant motors offer safe ground and flight handling, reliable operation, and decreased fabrication cost. The wing provides lift for 747 separation and during the first stage burn. Also, aerodynamic controls are provided to simplify first stage maneuvers. The air-launch concept offers many advantages to the consumer compared to conventional methods. Launching at 35,000 feet lowers atmospheric drag and other loads on the vehicle considerably. Since the 747 is a mobile launch pad, flexibility in orbit selection and launch time is unparalleled. Even polar orbits are accessible with a decreased payload. Most importantly, the LER launch service can come to the customer, satellites and experiments need not be transported to ground based launch facilities. The LER is designed to offer increased consumer freedom at a lower cost over existing launch systems. Simplistic design emphasizing reliability at low cost allows for the light payloads of the LER.

  12. NASA Dryden Towed Glider Air-Launch Concept

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a novel space access, rocket launching technique called the Towed Glider Air-Launch Concept. The idea is to build a relatively inexpensive, remotely...

  13. Project MAKS air-launched spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorodelov, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Space Shuttle and the U.S.S.R. Buran are large spacecraft that are designed to carry large payloads. Obviously, these powerful, expensive systems are no good for tasks that require taking small to medium sized cargoes to and from orbit. Such tasks need a reusable, orbital airplane that has a smaller cargo capacity and costs less to operate. A design involving a multipurpose aerospace system, called by its developers MAKS, satisfies those requirements entirely. The Spiral-Buran-MAKS represents a coherent, continuous chain of designs involving reusable space transportation systems. It is a two-stage complex in which the modified AN-225 Mriya carrier aircraft is employed as the first reusable stage. The second stage consists of the reusable orbital airplane and an expendable external fuel tank filled with fuel for the sustainer engines of the orbiter.

  14. Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT): Project Concept Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    An over view of research into a low cost hypersonic research flight test capability to increase the amount of hypersonic flight data to help bridge the large developmental gap between ground testing/analysis and major flight demonstrator Xplanes is provided. The major objectives included: develop an air launched missile booster research testbed; accurately deliver research payloads through programmable guidance to hypersonic test conditions; low cost; a high flight rate minimum of two flights per year and utilize surplus air launched missiles and NASA aircraft.

  15. Analysis and optimization of an air-launch-to-orbit separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohier, Henri; Piet-Lahanier, Helene; Farges, Jean-Loup

    2015-03-01

    In an air-launch-to-orbit, a space rocket is launched from a carrier aircraft. Air-launch-to-orbit appears as particularly interesting for nano- and microsatellites which are generally launched as secondary loads, that is, placed in the conventional launch vehicle's payload section with a larger primary satellite. In an air-launch-to-orbit, a small satellite can be launched alone as a primary load, away from a carrier aircraft, aboard a smaller rocket vehicle, and in doing so, benefit from more flexible dates and trajectories. One of the most important phases of the mission is the separation between the carrier aircraft and the space rocket. A flight simulator including a large number of factors of uncertainties has been especially developed to study the separation, and a safety criteria has been defined with respect to store collision avoidance. It is used for a sensitivity analysis and an optimization of the possible trajectories. The sensitivity analysis first requires a screening method to select unessential factors that can be held constant. The Morris method is amongst the most popular screening methods. It requires limited calculations, but may result in keeping constant an essential factor which would greatly affect the results of the sensitivity analysis. This paper shows that this risk can be important in spite of recent improvements of the Morris method. It presents an adaptation of this method which divides this risk by a factor of ten on a standard test function. It is based on the maximum of the elementary effects instead of their average. The method focuses the calculations on the factors with a low impact, checking the convergence of this set of factors, and uses two different factor variations instead of one. This adaptation of the Morris method is used to limit the amount of the air-launch-to-orbit simulations and simplify the uncertainty domain for analysis by Sobol's method. The aerodynamic perturbations due to wind, the parameters defining the

  16. Overview of the Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Robert E.

    1989-09-01

    The Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster is an innovative new space launch vehicle now under full-scale development in a privately-funded joint venture by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and Hercules Aerospace Company. Pegasus is a three-stage, solid-propellant, inertially-guided, all-composite winged vehicle that is launched at an altitude of 40,000 ft from its carrier aircraft. The 41,000 lb vehicle can deliver payloads as massive as 900 lb to low earth orbit. This status report on the Pegasus developemt program first details the advantages of the airborne launch concept, then describes the design and performance of the Pegasus vehicle and conlcludes with a review of the progress of the program from its conception in April 1987 through September 1989. First launch of Pegasus is scheduled for October 31, 1989, under contract to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The second flight under the DARPA contract will be held several months later.

  17. Missile sizing for ascent-phase intercept

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, D.G.; Salguero, D.E.

    1994-11-01

    A computer code has been developed to determine the size of a ground-launched, multistage missile which can intercept a theater ballistic missile before it leaves the atmosphere. Typical final conditions for the inteceptor are 450 km range, 60 km altitude, and 80 sec flight time. Given the payload mass (35 kg), which includes a kinetic kill vehicle, and achievable values for the stage mass fractions (0.85), the stage specific impulses (290 sec), and the vehicle density (60 lb/ft{sup 3}), the launch mass is minimized with respect to the stage payload mass ratios, the stage burn times, and the missile angle of attack history subject to limits on the angle of attack (10 deg), the dynamic pressure (60,000 psf), and the maneuver load (200,000 psf deg). For a conical body, the minimum launch mass is approximately 1900 kg. The missile has three stages, and the payload coasts for 57 sec. A trade study has been performed by varying the flight time, the range, and the dynamic pressure Emits. With the results of a sizing study for a 70 lb payload and q{sub max} = 35,000 psf, a more detailed design has been carried out to determine heat shield mass, tabular aerodynamics, and altitude dependent thrust. The resulting missile has approximately 100 km less range than the sizing program predicted primarily because of the additional mass required for heat protection. On the other hand, launching the same missile from an aircraft increases its range by approximately 100 km. Sizing the interceptor for air launch with the same final conditions as the ground-launched missile reduces its launch mass to approximately 1000 kg.

  18. An overview of the small engine component technology (SECT) studies. [commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile and auxiliary power applications in year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanco, M. R.; Wintucky, W. T.; Niedwiecki, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the joint NASA/Army SECT studies were to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts applicable to rotorcraft, commuter and general aviation aircraft and cruise missiles. Competitive contracts were awarded to Allison, AVCO Lycoming, Garrett, Teledyne CAE and Williams International. This paper presents an overview of the contractors' study efforts for the commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile, and auxiliary power (APU) applications with engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range. Reference aircraft, missions and engines were selected. Advanced engine configurations and cycles with projected year 2000 component technologies were evaluated and compared with a reference engine selected by the contractor. For typical commuter and rotorcraft applications, fuel savings of 22 percent to 42 percent can be attained. For $1/gallon and $2/gallon fuel, reductions in direct operating cost range from 6 percent to 16 percent and from 11 percent to 17 percent respectively. For subsonic strategic cruise missile applications, fuel savings of 38 percent to 54 percent can be achieved which allows 35 percent to 60 percent increase in mission range and life cycle cost reductions of 40 percent to 56 percent. High payoff technologies have been identified for all applications.

  19. 1. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) of universal missile building. Note earth mounding. On the far right can be seen the exit tunnel; the small "boxes" on top are the roof ventilators. This building was salvaged and sealed after site inactivation - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Universal Missile Building, Between Tactical Road South & Patrol Road, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  20. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-12-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  1. Aerothermal test results from the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Curry, Robert E.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1991-01-01

    A survey of temperature measurements at speeds through Mach 8.0 on the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched booster system is discussed. In addition, heating rates were derived from the temperature data obtained on the fuselage in the vicinity of the wing shock interaction. Sensors were distributed on the wing surfaces, leading edge, and on the wing-body fairing or fillet. Side-by-side evaluations were obtained for a variety of sensor installations. Details of the trajectory reconstruction through first-stage separation are provided. Given here are indepth descriptions of the sensor installations, temperature measurements, and derived heating rates along with interpretations of the results.

  2. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  3. Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. I.; Howell, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    This patent is for the Spin Stabilized Impulsively Controlled Missile (SSICM). SSICM is a missile configuration which employs spin stabilization, nutational motion, and impulsive thrusting, and a body mounted passive or semiactive sensor to achieve very small miss distances against a high speed moving target. SSICM does not contain an autopilot, control surfaces, a control actuation system, nor sensor stabilization gimbals. SSICM spins at a rate sufficient to provide frequency separation between body motions and inertial target motion. Its impulsive thrusters provide near instantaneous changes in lateral velocity, whereas conventional missiles require a significant time delay to achieve lateral acceleration.

  4. Conceptual design of an ascent-phase interceptor missile

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1994-11-01

    A conceptual design for an air-launched interceptor missile to defend against theater ballistic missiles is presented. The missile is designed to intercept the target while ascending, during Or just after the boost phase, before it reaches exo-atmospheric flight. The interceptor consists of a two-stage booster and a shrouded kinetic-kill vehicle. This report concentrates on the booster design required to achieve reasonable standoff ranges. The kinetic-kill vehicle and shroud (the payload) is assumed to weigh 80 lb{sub m} (36 kg) and assumed to contain guidance computers for both the kill vehicle and the booster. The interceptor missile is about 6 m long, .48 m in diameter and weighs about 900 kg. Allowing 25 sec for target detection, trajectory estimation, and interceptor launch, it can intercept 90 sec after target launch from a 220 km stand-off range at an altitude of 60 km. Trade-off studies show that the interceptor performance is most sensitive to the stage mass fractions (with the first-stage mass fraction the most important), the first-stage burn time and the payload weight.

  5. Design of a Flush Airdata System (FADS) for the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Deets, Dwain A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a design study for a pressure based Flush airdata system (FADS) on the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle. The analysis will demonstrate the feasibility of using a pressure based airdata system for the HALO and provide measurement uncertainty estimates along a candidate trajectory. The HALO is a conceived as a man-rated vehicle to be air launched from an SR-71 platform and is proposed as a testbed for an airbreathing hydrogen scramjet. A feasibility study has been performed and indicates that the proposed trajectory is possible with minimal modifications to the existing SR71 vehicle. The mission consists of launching the HALO off the top of an SR-71 at Mach 3 and 80,000 ft. A rocket motor is then used to accelerate the vehicle to the test condition. After the scramjet test is completed the vehicle will glide to a lakebed runway landing. This option provides reusability of the vehicle and scramjet engine. The HALO design will also allow for various scramjet engine and flowpath designs to be flight tested. For the HALO flights, measurements of freestream airdata are considered to be a mission critical to perform gain scheduling and trajectory optimization. One approach taken to obtaining airdata involves measurement of certain parameters such as external atmospheric winds, temperature, etc to estimate the airdata quantities. This study takes an alternate approach. Here the feasibility of obtaining airdata using a pressure-based flush airdata system (FADS) methods is assessed. The analysis, although it is performed using the HALO configuration and trajectory, is generally applicable to other hypersonic vehicles. The method to be presented offers the distinct advantage of inferring total pressure, Mach number, and flow incidence angles, without stagnating the freestream flow. This approach allows for airdata measurements to be made using blunt surfaces and significantly diminishes the heating load at the sensor. In the FADS concept a

  6. VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE WITH HATCH ON LEFT AND CONTROL PANEL ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there existed a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a point-of-departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both configurations utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V (?V) splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight refueling scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as large, relative payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility, such as variable launch site inclination and launch window; however, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  8. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there exists a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a pointof- departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both designs utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight propellant loading scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility including variable launch site inclination and launch window. However, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  9. Modular missile borne computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramseyer, R.; Arnold, R.; Applewhite, H.; Berg, R.

    1980-01-01

    The modular missile borne computer's architecture with emphasis on how that architecture evolved is discussed. A careful analysis is given of both the physical constraints and the processing requirements.

  10. Nanotechnology for missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    2004-07-01

    Nanotechnology development is progressing very rapidly. Several billions of dollars have been invested in nanoscience research since 2000. Pioneering nanotechnology research efforts have been primarily conducted at research institutions and centers. This paper identifies developments in nanoscience and technology that could provide significant advances in missile systems applications. Nanotechnology offers opportunities in the areas of advanced materials for coatings, including thin-film optical coatings, light-weight, strong armor and missile structural components, embedded computing, and "smart" structures; nano-particles for explosives, warheads, turbine engine systems, and propellants to enhance missile propulsion; nano-sensors for autonomous chemical detection; and nano-tube arrays for fuel storage and power generation. The Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) is actively collaborating with academia, industry, and other Government agencies to accelerate the development and transition of nanotechnology to favorably impact Army Transformation. Currently, we are identifying near-term applications and quantifying requirements for nanotechnology use in Army missile systems, as well as monitoring and screening research and developmental efforts in the industrial community for military applications. Combining MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology is the next step toward providing technical solutions for the Army"s transformation. Several research and development projects that are currently underway at AMRDEC in this technology area are discussed. A top-level roadmap of MEMS/nanotechnology development projects for aviation and missile applications is presented at the end.

  11. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    PubMed

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems. PMID:17748077

  12. Cost of space-based laser ballistic missile defense.

    PubMed

    Field, G; Spergel, D

    1986-03-21

    Orbiting platforms carrying infrared lasers have been proposed as weapons forming the first tier of a ballistic missile defense system under the President's Strategic Defense Initiative. As each laser platform can destroy a limited number of missiles, one of several methods of countering such a system is to increase the number of offensive missiles. Hence it is important to know whether the cost-exchange ratio, defined as the ratio of the cost to the defense of destroying a missile to the cost to the offense of deploying an additional missile, is greater or less than 1. Although the technology to be used in a ballistic missile defense system is still extremely uncertain, it is useful to examine methods for calculating the cost-exchange ratio. As an example, the cost of an orbiting infrared laser ballistic missile defense system employed against intercontinental ballistic missiles launched simultaneously from a small area is compared to the cost of additional offensive missiles. If one adopts lower limits to the costs for the defense and upper limits to the costs for the offense, the cost-exchange ratio comes out substantially greater than 1. If these estimates are confirmed, such a ballistic missile defense system would be unable to maintain its effectiveness at less cost than it would take to proliferate the ballistic missiles necessary to overcome it and would therefore not satisfy the President's requirements for an effective strategic defense. Although the method is illustrated by applying it to a space-based infrared laser system, it should be straightforward to apply it to other proposed systems.

  13. Solid rocket history at TRW Ballistic Missiles Division

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.S.; Kovacic, S.M.; Rea, E.C. )

    1992-07-01

    The development of ballistic missiles and particularly intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) by the U.S. space technology manufacturer is examined. Collaboration by the company with the U.S. Air Force is described which began in the 1950s and combined systems engineering and technical assistance. Missile products reviewed in this paper include Atlas, Thor, Titans I and II, Minuteman I, II, III, the Peacekeeper, and the small ICBM. The company developed facilities and programs to support the R and D activities for the missile products, and descriptions are given of the Space Technologies Laboratory and the Ballistic Missiles Division. Contributions to ICBM technologies by the concern include carbon-carbon nozzle materials, propellant formulation data, movable nozzles, casting techniques for large volumes of propellants, and studies of fracture mechanics. 41 refs.

  14. Hypersonic missile propulsion system

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmar, R.R.

    1998-11-01

    Pratt and Whitney is developing the technology for hypersonic components and engines. A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current development of hydrocarbon scramjets. The Air Force Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) Program has put programs in place to develop the technologies necessary to demonstrate the operability, performance and structural durability of an expendable, liquid hydrocarbon fueled scramjet system that operates from Mach 4 to 8. This program will culminate in a flight type engine test at representative flight conditions. The hypersonic technology base that will be developed and demonstrated under HyTech will establish the foundation to enable hypersonic propulsion systems for a broad range of air vehicle applications from missiles to space access vehicles. A hypersonic missile flight demonstration is planned in the DARPA Affordable Rapid Response Missile Demonstrator (ARRMD) program in 2001.

  15. Advanced missile technology. A review of technology improvement areas for cruise missiles. [including missile design, missile configurations, and aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Liepman, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    Technology assessments in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures and materials for cruise missile systems are discussed. The cruise missiles considered cover the full speed, altitude, and target range. The penetrativity, range, and maneuverability of the cruise missiles are examined and evaluated for performance improvements.

  16. 1. Northeast face of missile site control building, commonly known ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Northeast face of missile site control building, commonly known as the missile site radar building, showing open blast door #BD2. This emergency escape, at stair no. 12, is NEMP/RFI-shielded and 16" thick. The large circle in the center is the radar face, also known as the antennae array aperture. The small circle to the right of the radar face is the "Q" channel. The antennae atop the turret provided lightning protection for the building - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. The influence of the elastic vibration of the carrier to the aerodynamics of the external store in air-launch-to-orbit process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Ye, Zheng-Yin; Wu, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The separation between the carrier and store is one of the most important and difficult phases in Air-launch-to-orbit technology. Based on the previous researches, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store caused by the carrier are obvious in the earlier time during the separation. And the interference aerodynamics will be more complex when considering the elastic deformation of the carrier. Focusing on the conditions that in the earlier time during the separation, the steady and unsteady interference aerodynamic forces of the store are calculated at different angle of attacks and relative distances between the carrier and store. During the calculation, the elastic vibrations of the carrier are considered. According to the cause of formations of the interference aerodynamics, the interference aerodynamic forces of the store are divided into several components. The relative magnitude, change rule, sphere of influence and mechanism of interference aerodynamic forces components of the store are analyzed quantitatively. When the relative distance between the carrier and store is small, the interference aerodynamic forces caused by the elastic vibration of the carrier is about half of the total aerodynamic forces of the store. And as the relative distance increases, the value of interference aerodynamic forces decrease. When the relative distance is larger than twice the mean aerodynamic chord of the carrier, the values of interference aerodynamic forces of the store can be ignored. Besides, under the influence of the steady interference aerodynamic forces, the lift characteristics of the store are worse and the static stability margin is poorer.

  18. Cruise missiles should not stop START

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipis, K.

    1988-11-01

    A method for verifying a cruise-missile agreement that would be acceptable to the military, industrial, and intelligence communities in both nations must be as unintrusive as possible, while remaining immune to cheating of any significance. This is the goal of the technical solutions outlined here. The elements of a verification regime described do not require routine, intrusive, on-site visits to naval vessels, aircraft, air bases, or weapons magazines where missiles may be stored. They do not interfere with the operational readiness of the missiles, and they protect legitimate military secrets of the inspected nation. If supported by competent national technical means of verification such as those both sides already employ, with a small number of on-site challenge inspections, a combination of technical solutions and procedures such as these could be effective. They would adequately safeguard the national security and sovereignty of the participating nations while providing policymakers with the option of a treaty that limits the number of long-range nuclear cruise missiles or eliminates them completely. As discussed, there are problems that remain to be addressed, but they should not be allowed to block a U.S.-Soviet agreement significantly reducing strategic nuclear arsenals.

  19. Defending against ballistic missile attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Frelk, J.J.; Tait, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a compendium of information on the proliferation of ballistic missiles and other defense issues. This volume describes recent SDI advances in crystal clear language. It explains how the marriage of ultra-compact electronics and rocketry has created the smart bullet or brilliant pebble--a projectile with a tiny but powerful compute brain. The brilliant pebble tracks it target by sensing the heat the target emits, as a snake does when tracking a small mammal. Then, guided by its miniaturized computer brain, the brilliant pebble steers itself into the target and destroys it by force of the impact. In this latest form, the brilliant pebble even has the ability to take sightings on the stars, setting its course by celestial navigation.

  20. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  1. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  2. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Missile technology. 742.5 Section 742... BASED CONTROLS § 742.5 Missile technology. (a) License requirements. (1) In support of U.S. foreign... establish the existence of a contract. (d) Missile Technology Control Regime. Missile Technology...

  3. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Missile technology. 742.5 Section 742... BASED CONTROLS § 742.5 Missile technology. (a) License requirements. (1) In support of U.S. foreign... establish the existence of a contract. (d) Missile Technology Control Regime. Missile Technology...

  4. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Missile technology. 742.5 Section 742... BASED CONTROLS § 742.5 Missile technology. (a) License requirements. (1) In support of U.S. foreign... establish the existence of a contract. (d) Missile Technology Control Regime. Missile Technology...

  5. Countermeasures to the US National Missile Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronlund, Lisbeth

    2001-04-01

    One of the key technical questions about national missile defenses is whether they can be expected to work under real-world conditions if the attacker takes steps to defeat the defense. This talk will discuss steps that an emerging missile state could take to confuse, overwhelm, or otherwise defeat the planned US NMD system developed by the Clinton administration. It will consider three such ``countermeasures" that would be within the technical capability of a state that could develop and deploy a long-range missile capable of reaching the United States, which is the threat the NMD system is intended to defend against. The talk will be based on the April 2000 report ``Countermeasures: A Technical Evaluation of the Operational Effectiveness of the Planned US National Missile Defense System," which was co-authored by the speaker and 10 other physicists and engineers. Although the talk will refer to the ground-based NMD system under development, the conclusions are applicable to any mid-course NMD system using hit-to-kill infrared-homing interceptors, regardless of their basing mode. The three countermeasures considered are: (1) biological weapons deployed on 100 or more small bomblets, or submunitions, that would be released shortly after the boost phase; (2) nuclear warheads with anti-simulation balloon decoys, in which the attacker disguises the warhead by enclosing it in an aluminum-coated mylar balloon and releasing it along with a large number of otherwise similar but empty balloons; and (3) nuclear warheads with cooled shrouds, in which the attacker foils the kill vehicle's homing process by covering each nuclear warhead with a double-walled cone containing liquid nitrogen.

  6. Problems of National Missile Defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, John

    2000-04-01

    The currently-proposed national missile defense (NMD) is supposed to counter accidental Russian or Chinese launches of intercontinental nuclear-armed missiles, or rogue nation launches of similar nuclear missiles or of missiles armed with biological weapons, by using mid-course hit-to-kill vehicles guided by IR and radar. But it seems very likely that any nation capable of building (or buying) such a missile offense can build (or buy) effective countermeasures to NMD. These include anti-simulation decoys made of multi-layer insulation (MLI), with warheads covered in MLI sheaths so their signatures resemble those of the decoys. MLI can be effective against both passive IR and radar detection/discrimination. Biological warheads can counter any mid-course defense by releasing a great number of submunitions early in flight. Both nuclear and biological weapons can be deployed by other means, including covert ships in port; trucks; and cruise missiles. The best defense against Russian/Chinese accidental launches is assistance to these countries in improving their launch control systems.

  7. Depleted uranium investigation at missile impact sites in White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, D.M.; Purtymun, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation for residual depleted uranium was conducted at Pershing missile impact sites on the White Sands Missile Range. Subsurface core soil samples were taken at Chess, Salt Target, and Mine Impact Sites. A sampling pump was installed in a monitoring well at Site 65 where a Pershing earth penetrator was not recovered. Pumping tests and water samples were taken at this site. Chess Site, located in a gypsum flat, was the only location showing elevated levels of depleted uranium in the subsurface soil or perched groundwater. Small fragments can still be found on the surface of the impact sites. The seasonal flooding and near surface water has aided in the movement of surface fragments.

  8. Cooled and uncooled infrared detectors for missile seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, Rami; Haski, Jacob; Mizrahi, Udi; Shkedy, Lior; Shtrichman, Itay; Pinsky, Ephi

    2014-06-01

    Electro-optical missile seekers pose exceptional requirements for infrared (IR) detectors. These requirements include: very short mission readiness (time-to-image), one-time and relatively short mission duration, extreme ambient conditions, high sensitivity, fast frame rate, and in some cases small size and cost. SCD is engaged in the development and production of IR detectors for missile seeker applications for many years. 0D, 1D and 2D InSb focal plane arrays (FPAs) are packaged in specially designed fast cool-down Dewars and integrated with Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers. These cooled MWIR detectors were integrated in numerous seekers of various missile types, for short and long range applications, and are combat proven. New technologies for the MWIR, such as epi-InSb and XBn-InAsSb, enable faster cool-down time and higher sensitivity for the next generation seekers. The uncooled micro-bolometer technology for IR detectors has advanced significantly over the last decade, and high resolution - high sensitivity FPAs are now available for different applications. Their much smaller size and cost with regard to the cooled detectors makes these uncooled LWIR detectors natural candidates for short and mid-range missile seekers. In this work we will present SCD's cooled and uncooled solutions for advanced electro-optical missile seekers.

  9. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... systems (including ballistic missile systems, space launch vehicles, and sounding rockets) and unmanned air vehicle systems (including cruise missile systems, target drones, and reconnaissance drones... determined to be destined to a manned aircraft, satellite, land vehicle, or marine vessel, in...

  10. Opportunities and challenges for MEMS technology in Army missile systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.

    1999-07-01

    The military market drives the thrust for the development of robust, high performance MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices with applications such as: competent and smart munitions, aircraft and missile autopilots, tactical missile guidance, fire control systems, platform stabilization, smart structures with embedded inertial sensors, missile system health monitoring, aerodynamic flow control, and multiple intelligent small projectiles. Army missile applications will be a fertile market for MEMS products, such as MEMS-based inertial sensors. MEMS technology should significantly enhance performance and provide more robust mission capability in applications where arrays of MEMS devices are required. The Army Aviation and Missile Command Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is working diligently with other government agencies, academia, and industry to develop high performing MEMS devices to withstand shock, vibration, temperature, humidity, and long-term storage conditions often encountered by Army missile systems. The goals of the ongoing DARPA MEMS technology programs will meet a significant portion of the Army missile systems requirements. In lieu of presenting an all-inclusive review of Army MEMS applications, this paper addresses a number of opportunities and associated challenges for MEMS systems operating in military environments. Near term applications and the less mature, high-risk applications of MEMS devices are addressed.

  11. Comprehensive missile aerodynamics programs for preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, M. F. E.; Hemsch, M. J.; Sawyer, W. C.; Allen, J. M.; Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Two different classes of missile aeroprediction programs have been recently developed. The first class of programs provides rapid engineering predictions and includes MISSILE1 and MISSILE2 applicable to missile configurations with axisymmetric bodies. The second class of programs consists of the DEMON series, including a simplified version NSWCDM, designed to calculate detailed loadings acting on supersonic missiles which may have non-circular body cross sections. Both classes account for high angles of attack and track vortices from canard or wing section to the tail section. Extensive comparisons with experimental data are presented including nonlinear effects of canard control.

  12. Historical development of world wide guided missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper attempts to put in perspective the development of missiles from early history to present time. The influence of World War II in accelerating the development of guided missiles, particularly through German scientists, is discussed. The dispersion of German scientists to other countries and the coupling of their work with native talent to develop guided missiles is traced. Particular emphasis is placed on the evolution of the missile in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Since the Soviets possess what is probably the world's most complete array of dedicated missile system types, their known inventory is reviewed in some detail.

  13. Global positioning system missile test range applications

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, M.E.

    1986-06-01

    Using the Global Positioning System (GPS), a missile under test could transmit its own position, reducing radar tracking requirements while still providing three-dimensional position and velocity data with the required accuracy. This study investigated minimum package size requirements for GPS implementation on the SRAM II missile as part of the joint test assembly telemetry system. Reported GPS missile test range applications are reviewed. The two missile tracking system implementations considered are a complete GPS package onboard the missile and onboard frequency translator that retransmits the GPS satellite signals. Accuracy and operation of the two methods are compared. A functional description of the GPS is provided.

  14. The problem of missile defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Philip

    2014-05-01

    The idea of building a missile system to defend a nation from the horrors of nuclear attack first entered the public consciousness in the 1980s, when US president Ronald Reagan - backed by prominent (and controversial) scientific advisers such as the physicist Edward Teller - promoted the Strategic Defense Initiative as a supposedly impenetrable shield against the Soviet Union's nuclear arsenal.

  15. Growing Pumpkins Where Missiles Grew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loret, John

    1976-01-01

    Purposes of transforming the former Nike-Ajax missile base into a living historical homestead environmental center, resembling an 1800 Long Island village, were to build a homestead environmental center and develop materials, using homestead and pioneer skills, that could be used for education and recreation programs for the schools and community.…

  16. Historical development of worldwide guided missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of missiles from early history to present time is put in perspective. The influence of World War II in accelerating the development of guided missiles, particularly through German scientists, is discussed. The dispersion of German scientists to other countries and the coupling of their work with native talent to develop guide missiles is traced. Particular emphasis is placed on the evolution of the missile in the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. Since the Soviets possess what is probably the world's most complete array of dedicated missile system types, their known inventory is reviewed. Some philosophical observations of missile design trends and missile purposes are made as related to the interests of various countries.

  17. A ram-air-spoiler roll stabilization device for forward control cruciform missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Sawyer, W. C.; Jackson, C. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made at supersonic Mach numbers to determine the feasibility of using a ram-air-spoiler roll control device on a typical canard control missile configuration. As a basis for roll control comparisons, conventional aileron controls on the tail fins were also tested. Results are presented which indicate that the addition of nacelles on the missile tail fins resulted in satisfactory roll control effectiveness and only small changes in basic missile stability. The ram-air-spoiler roll control effectiveness is relatively constant over the range of vehicle attitudes and Mach numbers investigated.

  18. Historical review of missile aerodynamic developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    1989-01-01

    The development of missiles from early history up to about 1970 is discussed. Early unpowered missiles beyond the rock include the spear, the bow and arrow, the gun and bullet, and the cannon and projectile. Combining gunpowder with projectiles resulted in the first powered missiles. In the early 1900's, the development of guided missiles was begun. Significant advances in missile technology were made by German scientists during World War II. The dispersion of these advances to other countries following the war resulted in accelerating the development of guided missiles. In the late 1940's and early 1950's there was a proliferation in the development of missile systems in many countries. These developments were based primarily on experimental work and on relatively crude analytical techniques. Discussed here are some of the missile systems that were developed up to about 1970; some of the problems encountered; the development of an experimental data base for use with missiles; and early efforts to develop analytical methods applicable to missiles.

  19. Fire protection covering for small diameter missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Sawko, P. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Flexible intumescent protection sheeting of unusually uniform thickness were prepared from epoxy-polysulfide compositions, containing microfibers and the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid, as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,663,464, except that an ammonium salt particle size in the order of 5 to 8 microns and a fiber size of about 1/128th inch in length and 3 to 5 microns in diameter were found critical to obtain the required density of 1.46 to 1.50 g/cc. The insulation sheeting was prepared by a continuous process involving vacuum mixing, calendering, and curing under very strict conditions which depend to some extent upon the thickness of the sheet produced.

  20. Issues in national missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-01

    Strategic missiles and weapons are proliferating rapidly; thus, the US and its Allies are likely to face both capable bilateral threats and multilateral configurations with complex coalitions for which defenses could be essential for stability. Current hit-to-kill interceptor and radar and infrared detection, track, and discrimination technology should suffice for limited threats, but it is necessary to meet those threats in time while maintaining growth potential for the more sophisticated threats likely to follow. National Missile Defense faces a confusing array of threats, programs, and alternatives, but the technologies in development are clearly an appropriate first step towards any of them. They are likely to succeed in the near term; the challenge is to retain flexibility to provide needed options in the mid and long terms.

  1. Ballistic missile proliferation: An emerging threat 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler, R.G.

    1992-10-01

    This report, based solely on information available from unclassified sources, provides a coherent picture of the scope and trends of ballistic missile proliferation. The focus is on countries developing, producing, or owning ballistic missiles capable of threatening the military forces, assets, or populations of neighboring or geographically remote countries. The report also identifies other countries expected to obtain operational ballistic missile capabilities, discusses expected growth in performance, and examines the projected availability of warheads of mass destruction. The emphasis is on ballistic missiles of ranges greater than approximately 300 km, though shorter range battlefield weapons are discussed as forerunners. The assessment excludes principal U.S. allies and countries formerly in the Warsaw Pact, except where these countries have sold missiles, technology; or personnel services to developing nations in support of their missile programs.

  2. An overview of some monoplanar missile programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    A historical review is presented of some monoplanar missile systems in which the vehicle flight control was similar to that for a conventional aircraft. The review is essentially chronological, beginning prior to World War I, and includes worldwise programs. Illustrative examples of aerodynamic research with monoplanar missiles are presented including some comparisons with cruciform missiles. Some examples of current programs are presented and some particular mission applications for monoplanar systems are discussed.

  3. Technical issues in theater missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1992-05-01

    This note discusses technical issues in theater missile defenses in the terminal, midcourse, and boost phases. The first two are familiar and developed, but face fundamental countermeasures. Boost phase intercepts engage missiles when they are most vulnerable, but have been studied less for theater defense because the engagement times are short. Overall, theater missile defenses resemble strategic defenses, complicated by the tenfold shorter boost phase. 12 refs.

  4. Sidewall reflections in streamlined missile radomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, G. K.; Crockett, M. P.

    Predicted and measured patterns are presented which serve as dramatic illustrations of the 'LLoyd's mirror' effect, in which direct and reflected waves generate interference in the form of unexpected peaks and nulls in radome-enclosed receiving antenna patterns. These effects are associated with a low-gain antenna which is offset from the centerline of a streamlined tangent ogive radome intended for high-speed missile applications. Since many other airborne radome applications require that more than one antenna be located inside a radome cavity, these data furnish insight into what may be expected for offset-antenna locations. The geometrical optics approximations used to obtain reflected wave contributions are noted to be exceptionally accurate foir the small antennas considered.

  5. 5. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  6. 3. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, REAR SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, REAR SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  7. 1. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  8. 6. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, REAR AND LEFT SIDES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, REAR AND LEFT SIDES, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  9. 7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  10. 2. MISSILE ASSEMBLY BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. NIKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MISSILE ASSEMBLY BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Missile Test & Assembly Building, North of Launch Area Entrance Drive & east of Mess Hall, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  11. 2. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, LOOKING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, RIGHT SIDE, LOOKING WEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  12. 4. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, LEFT SIDE, LOOKING NORTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  13. 2. View from missile site control building (south to north) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View from missile site control building (south to north) of missile launch area, showing warhead handling building in background - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Launch Area, Within Exclusion Area, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  14. National Missile Defense: What, When, and Why?

    SciTech Connect

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2001-12-05

    The Bush Administration is steaming ahead with the deployment of the Clinton-designed mid-course hit-to-kill intercept system for national missile defense. This has serious disabilities against even the simplest strategic ballistic missiles. What is the threat to the United States from such missiles, in context? Is NMD a rational response, considering the always limited resources of the U.S. government? What are the other threats and needs? If protection is demanded against potential emerging missile states, what are the options? Answers to these questions will be provided in the talk and some are already available at the author's web site: http://www.fas.org/rlg.

  15. Test and evaluation of the tactical missile

    SciTech Connect

    Eichblatt, E.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Practical test and evaluation (T E) methods for tactical missiles are described in chapters contributed by experts. Topics addressed include missile performance criteria; flight tests; laboratory and field tests; simulations; launchers; T E of insensitive munitions; T E of reliability; testing for EM-environment effects; logistics, missile tests, and suitability evaluation; and the evaluation of weapon-system integration. To demonstrate effective T E planning strategies, the phases of a typical missile program are outlined. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  16. Application of IPAD to missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santa, J. E.; Whiting, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The application of an integrated program for aerospace-vehicle design (IPAD) to the design of a tactical missile is examined. The feasibility of modifying a proposed IPAD system for aircraft design work for use in missile design is evaluated. The tasks, cost, and schedule for the modification are presented. The basic engineering design process is described, explaining how missile design is achieved through iteration of six logical problem solving functions throughout the system studies, preliminary design, and detailed design phases of a new product. Existing computer codes used in various engineering disciplines are evaluated for their applicability to IPAD in missile design.

  17. Study of Subsonic Flow Over a TOW 2B Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Koorosh; Jamali, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the subsonic flow over a missile. In this paper, a model of TOW 2B missile is studied. Two computational approaches are being explored, namely solutions based on the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and solutions based on the inviscid flow (small disturbance theory). The simulations are performed at the Mach number of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0 at four angles of attack of 2, 4, 6 and 8 degree. Results obtained from analytical simulation are compared with numerical data. It is found that lift and drag coefficients would go up by increasing of the angle of attack and the Mach number. Trend of changes of the results that obtained from the small disturbance theory is roughly as same as the numeric solution.

  18. In-flight oxygen collection for a two-stage air-launch vehicle: integration of vehicle and separation cycle design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraete, D.; Bizzarri, D.; Hendrick, P.

    2009-09-01

    In-flight oxygen collection is a very promising technique to reduce the launch costs and improve the payload capabilities of two-stage-to-orbit semireusable launchers. Using liquid hydrogen the incoming air is deeply cooled and enriched in oxygen during the cruise phase of the first stage. The liquified enriched air is stored in the second stage which is then launched into orbit. This paper gives the result of a conceptual design of a two-stage-to-orbit air launched space vehicle. The mass, aerodynamic, and propulsive characteristics of the first stage are determined and an assessment of the influence of the collection plant performance on the subsonic first stage is made. The results for a centrifugally enhanced destillation unit are given together with the plant cycle arrangement. Integration options for the plant into the first stage are proposed and a short description of the air separation test unit and its test bench is also given.

  19. Free-flight Performance of a Rocket-boosted, Air-launched 16-inch-diameter Ram-jet Engine at Mach Numbers up to 2.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, John H; Kohl, Robert C; Jones, Merle L

    1953-01-01

    The investigation of air-launched ram-jet engines has been extended to include a study of models with a nominal design free-stream Mach number of 2.40. These models require auxiliary thrust in order to attain a flight speed at which the ram jet becomes self-accelerating. A rocket-boosting technique for providing this auxiliary thrust is described and time histories of two rocket-boosted ram-jet flights are presented. In one flight, the model attained a maximum Mach number of 2.20 before a fuel system failure resulted in the destruction of the engine. Performance data for this model are presented in terms of thrust and drag coefficients, diffuser pressure recovery, mass-flow ratio, combustion efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and over-all engine efficiency.

  20. Principles of Guided Missiles and Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of missile and nuclear weapons systems are presented in this book which is primarily prepared as the second text of a three-volume series for students of the Navy Reserve Officers' Training Corps and the Officer Candidate School. Following an introduction to guided missiles and nuclear physics, basic principles and theories are…

  1. Missile Defense and International Space Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Y.

    2002-01-01

    By the withdrawal from Anti Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty of 1972 by the United States of America, there will emerge the age of no concrete legal restrictions for ballistic missiles defense in the outer space.On the other hand, because the proliferation of ballistic missile technology has been the problem to be solved as soon as possible, we have to build new regulations for the adequate missile defense and other related activities including the use of outer space.In this paper, the implication of ABM Treaty in the Cold War era will be reviewed and the present and future situation and ideal legal scheme for missile defense and outer space usage will be considered.

  2. THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF BUILDING) SHOWING TOP OF MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. 3. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from missile site control building (southeast to northwest) of missile launch area showing universal missile building on left and warhead handling building in background. - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Launch Area, Within Exclusion Area, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  5. Implications of defenses against tactical ballistic missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Flax, A.

    1994-05-01

    The growing number of short- to medium-range ballistic missiles (SMBMs) in the inventories of many smaller states that have had recent or less recent armed conflicts with one another has been a source of concern to many countries. Inevitably this concern over ballistic missiles had been linked to their use as delivery vehicles for {open_quotes}weapons of mass destruction{close_quotes}, a category that now includes nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. But it can be argued that this categorization is not particularly useful as a point of departure for discussions of ballistic missile defense (BMD) against SMBMs.

  6. Missile rolling tail brake torque system. [simulating bearing friction on canard controlled missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for simulating varying levels of friction in the bearings of a free rolling tail afterbody on a canard-controlled missile to determine friction effects on aerodynamic control characteristics is described. A ring located between the missile body and the afterbody is utilized in a servo system to create varying levels of friction between the missile body and the afterbody to simulate bearing friction.

  7. National Missile Defense: What, When and Why?

    SciTech Connect

    Garwin, Richard L

    2009-12-05

    The Bush Administration is steaming ahead with the deployment of the Clinton-designed mid-course hit-to-kill intercept system for national missile defense. This has serious disabilities against even the simplest strategic ballistic missiles. What is the threat to the United States from such missiles, in context? Is NMD a rational response, considering the always limited resources of the U.S. government? What are the other threats and needs? If protection is demanded against potential emerging missile states, what are the options? Answers to these questions will be provided in the talk and some are already available at the author’s web site: http://www.fas.org/rlg.

  8. 15 CFR 742.5 - Missile technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Country Chart (see Supplement No. 1 to part 738 of the EAR). (2) The term “missiles” is defined as rocket systems (including ballistic missile systems, space launch vehicles, and sounding rockets) and...

  9. 43. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of air vent VIEW NORTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  10. 42. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape hatch, elevator and air vent VIEW SOUTH - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  11. 36. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail showing elevator, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail showing elevator, air ventilators and personnel entrance VIEW SOUTHEAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  12. 37. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of personnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of personnel entrance VIEW NORTH - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  13. 40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape hatch and decontamination shower VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  14. 38. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of conduit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of conduit service junction - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  15. 41. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of elevator and air vents VIEW NORTHEAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  16. 11. View from heat sink, south oblique of missile site ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View from heat sink, south oblique of missile site control building - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. 2. Missile Alert Facility, south side, view from baseball bleachers. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Missile Alert Facility, south side, view from baseball bleachers. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  18. 6. PHOTOCOPY, WATER TREATMENT PUMPING AND STORAGE BUILDING, MISSILE TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. PHOTOCOPY, WATER TREATMENT PUMPING AND STORAGE BUILDING, MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING, GENERATOR BUILDING No. 3, AND WARHEADING BUILDING OF LAUNCH AREA. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Beck Road between Nike & M Roads, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  19. 5. VIEW OF MISSILE ASSEMBLY CALLED 'FIRE HOUSE,' LOOKING NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF MISSILE ASSEMBLY CALLED 'FIRE HOUSE,' LOOKING NORTH, LOCATED NEAR GATE AT ENTRANCE TO LAUNCH AREA Marilyn Ziemer, photographer, April 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE IN CENTER WITH OPEN HATCH AT RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  2. DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF OPEN HATCH SHOWING INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AND OPEN HATCH AND DOOR ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF TUBE (AT THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB). VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Infrared tracker for a portable missile launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.

    1993-07-13

    An infrared beam tracker is described for arrangement to a housing that is unitary with a portable missile launcher, comprising: a rotating beam splitter positioned to intercept the infrared beam passing a first portion of the beam through the beam splitter along a first direction and reflecting the remaining portion along a different direction; a first infrared detector for receiving the beam reflected portion from the beam splitter and produce electric signals responsive thereto; a second infrared detector for receiving the beam portion that passes through the beam splitter and providing electric signals responsive thereto; and means interconnected to the first and second infrared detectors and responsive to the electric signals generated by said detectors for determining errors in missile flight direction and communicating course correction information to the missile.

  4. VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF INTERIOR OF MISSILE TUBE AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL SHOWING AIR COMPRESSOR TANKS AND CURVING STEEL PIECE. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF MISSILE TUBE HATCH WITH MILLED FITTINGS AT GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF MISSILE TUBE AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  9. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  10. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  11. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement between the United States, the United...

  12. 22 CFR 120.29 - Missile Technology Control Regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Missile Technology Control Regime. 120.29... DEFINITIONS § 120.29 Missile Technology Control Regime. (a) For purposes of this subchapter, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) means the policy statement among the United States, the United Kingdom,...

  13. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring using a Capacitive MEMS Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2010-04-08

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by an aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. If the duration of captive carry exposure could be recorded during the missile’s service life, several advantages could be realized. Missiles that have been exposed to durations outside the design envelop could be flagged or screened for maintenance or inspection; lightly exposed missiles could be selected for critical mission applications; and missile allocation to missions could be based on prior use to avoid overuse. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability of missiles during storage and field exposures. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the HELLFIRE II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the HELLFIRE II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode and thereby assess the overall health of the missile. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to identify captive carry, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  14. Antitank missiles night firing from Aerospatiale helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewinter, G.

    A day/night firing system for HOT antitank missiles was developed and mounted on a HAC/PAH2 helicopter, equipped with a suitably adapted sight. Night fighting requirements for a helicopter that is armed with antitank missiles are recalled. The selection of a sensor is discussed. The design of a platform in order to fulfill the observation and firing mission is described. Night antitank action is analyzed. Characteristics of a thermal imager which solves the identified problems of night firing are given.

  15. Theater missile defense programs: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J.

    1994-09-01

    The Clinton administration now calls the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) the ballistic missile defense program. But the names have simply been changed to protect the guilty - the new program exhibits substantial continuity with the old in technology and goals. While acronyms have been changed, many of the programs continued by the Clinton administration date from the Reagan or Bush eras. And most strikingly, the Clinton administrations` ambitions for a virtually perfect defense against theater ballistic missiles harken to the unattainable goals for strategic defense initially set by President Reagan over a decade ago.

  16. A Simplified Guidance for Target Missiles Used in Ballistic Missile Defence Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, N.; Kumar, I. D.; Tata, S. K.; Vaithiyanathan, V.

    2013-01-01

    A simplified guidance scheme for the target missiles used in Ballistic Missile Defence is presented in this paper. The proposed method has two major components, a Ground Guidance Computation (GGC) and an In-Flight Guidance Computation. The GGC which runs on the ground uses a missile model to generate attitude history in pitch plane and computes launch azimuth of the missile to compensate for the effect of earth rotation. The vehicle follows the pre launch computed attitude (theta) history in pitch plane and also applies the course correction in azimuth plane based on its deviation from the pre launch computed azimuth plane. This scheme requires less computations and counters In-flight disturbances such as wind, gust etc. quite efficiently. The simulation results show that the proposed method provides the satisfactory performance and robustness.

  17. Evaluation of wind/tornado-generated missile impact

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    Simplified empirical formulae and some tabular data for the design/evaluation of structure barriers to resist wind/tornado generated missiles impact are presented in this paper. The scope is limited to the missiles defined by UCRL-15910 which are to be considered for moderate and high hazard facilities only. The method presented herein are limited to consideration of local effects on the barrier, i.e., the barrier must be capable of stopping the missile, and the barrier must no cause the generation of secondary missiles due to scabbing. Overall structural response to missile impact and structural effects derived from wind pressure are not addressed in this paper.

  18. Hardware-in-the-loop tow missile system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, G.S.; Wootton, J.R.; Hobson, G.L.; Holder, D.L.

    1993-07-06

    A missile system simulator is described for use in training people for target acquisition, missile launch, and missile guidance under simulated battlefield conditions comprising: simulating means for producing a digital signal representing a simulated battlefield environment including at least one target movable therewithin, the simulating means generating an infrared map representing the field-of-view and the target; interface means for converting said digital signals to an infrared image; missile system hardware including the missile acquisition, tracking, and guidance portions thereof, said hardware sensing the infrared image to determine the location of the target in a field-of-view; and, image means for generating an infrared image of a missile launched at the target and guided thereto, the image means imposing the missile image onto the field-of-view for the missile hardware to acquire the image of the missile in addition to that of the target, and to generate guidance signals to guide the missile image to the target image, wherein the interfacing means is responsive to a guidance signal from the hardware to simulate, in real-time, the response of the missile to the guidance signal, the image means including a blackbody, laser means for irradiating the blackbody to heat it to a temperature at which it emits infrared radiation, and optic means for integrating the radiant image produced by heating the blackbody into the infrared map.

  19. The Cuban Missile Crisis. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Linda K.; McAuliffe, Mary

    1994-01-01

    Presents a secondary lesson plan based on primary sources recently released by the Central Intelligence Agency on the Cuban Missile Crisis. Provides a background essay on the event. Includes five maps and three documents, all of which have been declassified from top secret or secret status. (CFR)

  20. Nondestructive inspection of a composite missile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, O.; Chung, S.; Butera, M.; Valatka, T.; Triplett, M. H.; Godinez, V.

    2012-05-01

    Lighter weight alternatives are being sought to replace metallic components currently used in high performance aviation and missile systems. Benefits of lightweight, high strength carbon fiber reinforced composites in missile launchers and rocket motor cases include improved fuel economy, increased flight times, enhanced lethality and/or increased velocity. In this work, various nondestructive inspection techniques are investigated for the damage assessment of a composite missile launcher system for use in U.S. Army attack helicopters. The launcher system, which includes rails and a hardback, can be subject to impact damage from accidental tool drops, routine operation, and/or ballistic threats. The composite hardback and the launch rails both have complex geometries that can challenge the inspection process. Scanning techniques such as line scanning thermography, ultrasonic, and acousto-ultrasonics will be used and compared to determine damage detection accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. Results will also be compared with visual observations to determine if there is a correlation. The goal is to establish an inspection method that quickly and accurately assesses damage extent in order to minimize service time and return the missile system back into the field [1].

  1. Ring Wing for an underwater missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August, Henry; Carapezza, Edward

    Hughes Aircraft has performed exploratory wind tunnel studies of compressed carriage missile designs having extendable Ring Wing and wrap-around tail control surfaces. These force and moment data indicate that significant improvements in a missile's lift and aerodynamic efficiency can be realized. Low speed test results of these data were used to estimate potential underwater improved hydrodynamic characteristics that a Ring Wing and wrap-around tails can bring to an advanced torpedo design. Estimates of improved underwater flight performance of a heavyweight torpedo (4000 lbs.) having an extendable Ring Wing and wrap-around tails were made. The compressed volume design of this underwater missile is consistent with tube-launch constraints and techniques. Study results of this novel Ring Wing torpedo design include extended flight performance in range and endurance due to lowered speeds capable of sustaining underwater level flight. Correspondingly, reduced radiated noise for enhanced stealth qualities is projected. At high speeds, greater maneuverability and aimpoint selection can be realized by a Ring Wing underwater missile.

  2. Remote video assessment for missile launch facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.G.; Stewart, W.A.

    1995-07-01

    The widely dispersed, unmanned launch facilities (LFs) for land-based ICBMs (intercontinental ballistic missiles) currently do not have visual assessment capability for existing intrusion alarms. The security response force currently must assess each alarm on-site. Remote assessment will enhance manpower, safety, and security efforts. Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the USAF Electronic Systems Center to research, recommend, and demonstrate a cost-effective remote video assessment capability at missile LFs. The project`s charter was to provide: system concepts; market survey analysis; technology search recommendations; and operational hardware demonstrations for remote video assessment from a missile LF to a remote security center via a cost-effective transmission medium and without using visible, on-site lighting. The technical challenges of this project were to: analyze various video transmission media and emphasize using the existing missile system copper line which can be as long as 30 miles; accentuate and extremely low-cost system because of the many sites requiring system installation; integrate the video assessment system with the current LF alarm system; and provide video assessment at the remote sites with non-visible lighting.

  3. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics of missiles with square cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, G. J.; Yechout, R. T.; Daniel, D. C.; Lijewski, L. E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of quantitative and qualitative tests were conducted to expand the aerodynamic data base of square cross-section missiles. Quantitative tests included measuring forces and moments acting on square missiles, and measuring flowfield pressures on the leeward side of square missiles at various configurations and orientations in a subsonic wind tunnel. Force and moment data is presented showing the effects of variation in body corner radius, nose and fin shapes, pitch angle, and roll angle. Flowfield pressure and crossflow velocity data are presented for missiles of various pitch angles, roll angles, body corner radii, and fineness ratios (length to width ratio). In addition, flowfield data is shown along the axial length of a square missile. Qualitative tests included photographic tuft grids in the flowfield and photographing oil shear stress patterns on the surface of various missiles. These qualitative photographs are presented for various missile configurations and orientations.

  4. Rationale for wind-borne missile criteria for DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J R; Murray, R

    1999-09-01

    High winds tend to pick up and transport various objects and debris, which are referred to as wind-borne missiles or tornado missiles, depending on the type of storm. Missiles cause damage by perforating the building envelope or by collapsing structural elements such as walls, columns or frames. The primary objectives of this study are as follows: (1) to provide a basis for wind-borne or tornado missile criteria for the design and evaluation of DOE facilities, and (2) to provide guidelines for the design and evaluation of impact-resistant missile barriers for DOE facilities The first objective is accomplished through a synthesis of information from windstorm damage documentation experience and computer simulation of missile trajectories. The second objective is accomplished by reviewing the literature, which describes various missile impact tests, and by conducting a series of impact tests at a Texas Tech University facility to fill in missing information.

  5. The Fiberoptle Guided Missile (FOG-M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Paul L.

    1989-02-01

    The Fiberoptic Guided Missile (FOG-M) was developed in the U.S. Army's Research, Development, and Engineering Center (RDEC) as a demonstration system for killing armor in an infantry application. The RDEC design uses a television sensor in the nose of the missile for in-flight target acquisition, bringing the video signal down a fiberoptic link that pays out behind the missile as it flies, to a gunner securely hidden in a defiladed launch vehicle. The gunner is able to select the target on a video screen and lock on an autotracker or alternately manually track the target to impact. The system design would use a common warhead for either armor or helicopter targets. The system is currently mounted on the High Mobility, Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), containing the gunner's station, launcher, and flight missiles. The gunner's station includes the capability for detailed mission planning, digital map display based on the Defense Mapping Agency's digital map databases, and display of the air battle situation for the gunner. Automatic targeting, control of multiple missiles in the air simultaneously, navigation using a digital correlator, and autotracking of moving targets in cluttered backgrounds with gunner selectable offset tracking capability are also available. The system has a capability to train the gunner using a perspective view scene generator that mimics the video scene he would be presented during missile flight. The scene generator uses the same hardware that displays the digital map, while a simulation of the missile runs in one of the system's computer processors to accurately move the seeker presentation around the scene. All of the other hardware used in embedded training is the same as the actual firing hardware. The system concept has been chosen by the Army as the non-line-of-sight (NLOS) component of the Forward Area Air Defense System (FAADS). The initial design is being upgraded for the MIL SPEC environment to allow early operational

  6. Non-Rocket Missile Rope Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The method, installation, and estimation for delivering payload and missiles into outer space are presented. This method uses, in general, the engines and straight or closed-loop cables disposed on a planet surface. The installation consists of a space apparatus, power drive stations located along trajectory of the apparatus, the cables connected to the apparatus and to the power stations, a system for suspending the cable, and disconnected device. The drive stations accelerate the apparatus up to hypersonic speed. The estimations and computations show the possibility of making these projects a reality in a short period of time (see attached project: launcher for missiles and loads). The launch will be very cheap $1-$2 per LB. We need only light strong cable, which can be made from artificial fibers, whiskers, nanotubes, which exist in industry and scientific laboratories.

  7. Using NASTRAN to model missile inertia loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, R.; Porter, C.

    1985-01-01

    An important use of NASTRAN is in the area of structural loads analysis on weapon systems carried aboard aircraft. The program is used to predict bending moments and shears in missile bodies, when subjected to aircraft induced accelerations. The missile, launcher and aircraft wing are idealized, using rod and beam type elements for solution economy. Using the inertia relief capability of NASTRAN, the model is subjected to various acceleration combinations. It is found to be difficult to model the launcher sway braces and hooks which transmit compression only or tension only type forces respectively. A simple, iterative process was developed to overcome this modeling difficulty. A proposed code modification would help model compression or tension only contact type problems.

  8. Ballistic Missile Silo Door Monitoring Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares the cost and effectiveness of several potential options that may be used to monitor silo-based ballistic missiles. Silo door monitoring can be used to verify that warheads removed to deactivate or download silo-based ballistic missiles have not been replaced. A precedent for monitoring warhead replacement using reentry vehicle on site inspections (RV-OSIs) and using satellites has been established by START-I and START-II. However, other monitoring options have the potential to be less expensive and more effective. Three options are the most promising if high verification confidence is desired: random monitoring using door sensors; random monitoring using manned or unmanned aircraft; and continuous remote monitoring using unattended door sensors.

  9. Average deployments versus missile and defender parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    This report evaluates the average number of reentry vehicles (RVs) that could be deployed successfully as a function of missile burn time, RV deployment times, and the number of space-based interceptors (SBIs) in defensive constellations. Leakage estimates of boost-phase kinetic-energy defenses as functions of launch parameters and defensive constellation size agree with integral predictions of near-exact calculations for constellation sizing. The calculations discussed here test more detailed aspects of the interaction. They indicate that SBIs can efficiently remove about 50% of the RVs from a heavy missile attack. The next 30% can removed with two-fold less effectiveness. The next 10% could double constellation sizes. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Development of guidance laws for a variable-speed missile

    SciTech Connect

    Gazit, R.; Gutman, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The most used guidance law for short-range homing missiles is proportional navigation (PN). In PN, the acceleration command is proportional to the line-of-sight (LOS) angular velocity. Indeed, if a missile and a target move on a collision course with constant speeds, the LOS rate is zero. The speed of a highly maneuverable modern missile varies considerably during flight. The performance of PN is far from being satisfactory in that case. In this article the collision course for a variable-speed missile is analyzed and a guidance law that steers the heading of the missile to the collision course is defined. Guidance laws based on optimal control and differential game formulations are developed, and note that both optimal laws coincide with the Guidance to Collision law at impact. The performance improvement of the missile using the new guidance law as compared to PN is demonstrated. 19 refs.

  11. The North Korean missile program: How advanced is it?

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.; Kadyshev, T.

    1994-04-01

    For the past three years there have been increasing numbers of reports that North Korea is developing a 1,000-1,300-kilometer range missile generally referred to as the NoDongg-1. Pyongyang`s missile program has generated international concern because of North Korea`s potential nuclear capabilities, its proximity to South Korea and Japan and its reported missile sales to Iran, Syria and Libya. In June 1993, Japanese and South Korean wire services reported that North Korea had test fired several missiles into the Sea of Japan in late May, at least two of which were though to be NoDong-1 missiles. A missile with a 1,300-kilometer range would give North Korea the capability to reach all of Japan, and give Iran and Libya the capability to reach all of Israel.

  12. Space-based ballistic-missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Bethe, H.A.; Garwin, R.L.; Gottfried, K.; Kendall, H.W.

    1984-10-01

    This article, based on a forthcoming book by the Union for Concerned Scientists, focuses on the technical aspects of the issue of space-based ballistic-missile defense. After analysis, the authors conclude that the questionable performance of the proposed defense, the ease with which it could be overwhelmed or circumvented, and its potential as an antisatellite system would cause grievous damage to the security of the US if the Strategic Defense Initiative were to be pursued. The path toward greater security lies in quite another direction, they feel. Although research on ballistic-missile defense should continue at the traditional level of expenditure and within the constraints of the ABM Treaty, every effort should be made to negotiate a bilateral ban on the testing and use of space weapons. The authors think it is essential that such an agreement cover all altitudes, because a ban on high-altitude antisatellite weapons alone would not viable if directed energy weapons were developed for ballistic-missile defense. Further, the Star Wars program, unlikely ever to protect the entire nation against a nuclear attack, would nonetheless trigger a major expansion of the arms race.

  13. Flight testing air-to-air missiles for flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutschinski, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    The philosophy of the design of air-to-air missiles and hence of flight testing them for flutter differs from that of manned aircraft. Primary emphasis is put on analytical and laboratory evaluation of missile susceptibility to aeroelastic and aero-servo-elastic instabilities and uses flight testing for confirmation of the absence of such instabilities. Flight testing for flutter is accomplished by using specially instrumented programmed missiles, air or ground launched with a booster to reach the extreme flight conditions of tactical use, or by using guided missiles with telemetered performance data. The instrumentation and testing techniques are discussed along with the success of recent flight tests.

  14. Laser beam riding artillery missiles guidance device is designed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mingliang; Huo, Zhicheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Laser driving gun missile guidance type beam of laser information field formed by any link failure or reduced stability will directly lead to ballistic or miss out of control, and based on this, this paper designed the driving beam of laser guided missile guidance beam type forming device modulation and zoom mechanism, in order to make the missile can recognize its position in the laser beam, laser beam gun missile, by means of spatial encoding of the laser beam laser beam into information after forming device, a surface to achieve the purpose of precision guidance.

  15. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Spinning Missile with Dithering Canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2003-01-01

    A generic spinning missile with dithering canards is used to demonstrate the utility of an overset structured grid approach for simulating the aerodynamics of rolling airframe missile systems. The approach is used to generate a modest aerodynamic database for the generic missile. The database is populated with solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is used to evaluate grid resolution requirements for accurate prediction of instantaneous missile loads and the relative aerodynamic significance of angle-of-attack, canard pitching sequence, viscous effects, and roll-rate effects. A novel analytical method for inter- and extrapolation of database results is also given.

  16. 3. MAGAZINE P STAIRWAY ENCLOSURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. NIKE Missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MAGAZINE P STAIRWAY ENCLOSURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Underground Storage Magazines & Launcher-Loader Assemblies, Easternmost portion of launch area, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  17. Profile of missile-induced cardiovascular injuries in Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Abdul Gani; Lone, Gh Nabi; Hakeem, Zubair Ashraf; Dar, Abdul Majeed; Lone, Reyaz Ahmad; Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Singh, Shyam; Irshad, Ifat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Missile cardiovascular injuries have taken an epidemic proportion in Kashmir valley since the eruption of militancy in 1990. Present study was undertaken to analyse the pattern, presentation and management of missile cardiovascular injuries. Patients and Methods: Three hundred and eighty-six patients with missile cardiovascular injuries since Jan 1996 to Oct 2008 were studied retrospectively. All patients of cardiovascular injuries due to causes other than missiles were excluded from the study. Results: All patients of missile cardiac injuries were treated by primary cardiorrhaphy. Right ventricle was the most commonly affected chamber. Left anterior thoracotomy was most common approach used. Most of the patients of missile vascular group were treated by reverse saphenous vein graft or end-to-end anastomosis. Most common complication was wound infection (20.83%) followed by graft occlusion (1.94%) in missile vascular group. Amputation rate was 4.66%. Amputation rate was higher in patients with delay of >6 hours and associated fractures. Conclusion: Missile cardiac injuries should be operated early without wasting time for investigations. Clinical status at arrival, time interval till management, nature of injury and associated injuries, tell upon the mortality. Missile vascular injury needs prompt resuscitation and revascularization at the earliest. Time interval till revascularization and associated fractures has a bearing on mortality and morbidity. PMID:21769201

  18. The model of dynamics and control of modified optical scanning seeker in anti-aircraft rocket missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapinski, Daniel; Koruba, Zbigniew; Krzysztofik, Izabela

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents the concept of a modified optical scanning seeker. Programmed and tracking controls have been developed with the simultaneous influence of external interferences from the direction of self-guiding rocket missile. The numerical analysis for the proposed scanning seeker has been conducted. It appears from the conducted research that the seeker maintains accurately the set direction in space despite the occurrence of large angular accelerations of the missile. Moreover, the control of the seeker's axis is done with sufficient accuracy for self-guidance with the use of small control moments.

  19. 10. Photocopy of drawing of missile shipping container from Procedures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of drawing of missile shipping container from Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System, Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA 1956. - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  20. 12. Photocopy of drawing of underground missile storage, elevator and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of drawing of underground missile storage, elevator and ground-level launchers from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  1. 13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  2. 11. Photocopy of drawing of underground missile storage and elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of drawing of underground missile storage and elevator controls from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  3. 7. Photocopy of photograph showing four Ajax missiles in launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph showing four Ajax missiles in launch position from ARADCOM Argus pg. 14, from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, October 1, 1963 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  4. 6. Photocopy of photograph showing an Ajax and Hercules Missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph showing an Ajax and Hercules Missile from ARADCOM Argus pg. 3, from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, October 1, 1958 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  5. Paths of Target Seeking Missiles in Two Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Charles E.

    1946-01-01

    Parameters that enter into equation of trajectory of a missile are discussed. Investigation is made of normal pursuit, of constant, proportional, and line--of-sight methods of navigation employing target seeker, and of deriving corresponding pursuit paths. Pursuit paths obtained under similar conditions for different methods are compared. Proportional navigation is concluded to be best method for using target seeker installed in missile.

  6. 13. Missile site control building, third and fourth floor interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Missile site control building, third and fourth floor interior, showing east corner and former electrical equipment area, room #306. This building was salvaged and sealed in the 1970's; the lower floors also suffered flooding - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  7. 10. East oblique of missile site control building, with better ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. East oblique of missile site control building, with better view of exhaust (the taller columns) and intake shafts - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Missile Site Control Building, Northeast of Tactical Road; southeast of Tactical Road South, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  8. Aerodynamic Prediction for Supersonic Canard-Tail Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    LRCDM2 computer program developed to calculate pressure distribution at points on surfaces of complete supersonic missile. Missile comprises up to two finned sections attached to axisymmetric body of circular cross section. Includes effects of vortex shedding due to forebody and forward fins, providing more accurate rolling moments. LRCDM2 written in FORTRAN IV.

  9. Officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    Hermann Oberth (forefront) with officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama in 1956. Left to right: Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (seated); Major General H.N. Toftoy, Commanding Officer and person responsible for 'Project Paperclip,' which took scientists and engineers out of Germany after World War II to design rockets for American military use. Many of the scientists later helped to design the Saturn V rocket that took the Apollo 11 astronauts to the Moon. Dr. Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director, Development Operations Division Wernher von Braun, Director, Development Operations Division.

  10. The Clinton plan for theater missile defenses: Costs and alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Hall, R.

    1994-09-01

    Since the Gulf War, the Department of Defense has placed a high priority on developing defenses against theater ballistic missiles (TBMs). Over the past two years the Clinton administration has redirected the focus of the Ballistic Missile Organization (BMDO, formerly the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization) away from a national missile defense system and toward the development of theater missile defenses (TMDs). But the plan put forward by the administration is expensive - as much as $50 billion through the year 2010 - and it also raises several important issues about compliance with the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty. But other approaches to TMD would address some of these cost and compliance concerns, so it is worthwhile to look at several alternatives and analyze their costs and effects on capability.

  11. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, Philip E.

    2014-05-09

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  12. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Philip E.

    2014-05-01

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about 10 billion per year, and proposes to add about 5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  13. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Saurel, Richard; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Ko, Sungho

    2011-12-01

    The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008) is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009) is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile). Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  14. Modern control theory for Army missile guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travassos, R. H.; Levari, H.; Gupta, N. K.

    1982-11-01

    A Singular perturbation guidance law has been developed for medium-range surface-to-air missiles. This guidance law is a significant extension of a previously developed guidance law for short-range missiles; in medium-range intercepts, the problem of energy management should be addressed in addition to homing guidance. The mathematical formulation has been simplified by introducing separation of time scales. Target Trajectory Estimation: A recursive algorithm for estimation of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model parameters from noisy samples has been developed. Application of this algorithm to parameter estimation problems has exhibited its fast convergence and unbiasedness in the presence of noise, even with short data records. The algorithm has two versions, a Recursive Maximum Likelihood (RML) form and a Recursive Prediction Error (RPE) form, both of which possess a parallel structure that makes them highly suitable for parallel-processing implementation. Adaptive autopilots: Lattice-form algorithms have been developed for fast, recursive identification and control of time-varying systems. These algorithms have excellent numerical properties and a modular structure that makes them suitable for on-board real-time implementation.

  15. Optics At White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronczek, Ron C.; Hayslett, Charles R.

    1985-11-01

    We present an overview of the optics and optical data gathering programs conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Activities at White Sands Missile Range have always been diverse - the first test conducted there was the world's first nuclear explosion. In the forty years since that event the range has hosted a large assortment of vehicles including V2, Nike, Aerobee, Space Shuttle, Cruise, and the Copperhead. The last three of these devices illustrate the difficulty of the White Sands optical data gathering task. One is acquired in orbit, one as it crosses through a mountain pass, and one as it issues from the muzzle of a cannon. A combination of optical, radar, video, computer, and communications technology has produced a versatile system that can satisfy the data gathering requirements of most range users. Another example of the diverse optics programs at the range is the development of the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF). Because of the nature of the systems being tested, the HELSTF is full of optics and optical systems including the TRW MIRACL laser and the Hughes SEA LITE Beam Director.

  16. Innovation in Aerodynamic Design Features of Soviet Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations of some tactical and strategic missile systems developed by the former Soviet Union have been included in the basic missile research programs of the NACA/NASA. Studies of the Soviet missiles sometimes revealed innovative design features that resulted in unusual or unexpected aerodynamic characteristics. In some cases these characteristics have been such that the measured performance of the missile exceeds what might have been predicted. In other cases some unusual design features have been found that would alleviate what might otherwise have been a serious aerodynamic problem. In some designs, what has appeared to be a lack of refinement has proven to be a matter of expediency. It is a purpose of this paper to describe some examples of unusual design features of some Soviet missiles and to illustrate the effectiveness of the design features on the aerodynamic behavior of the missile. The paper draws on the experience of the author who for over 60 years was involved in the aerodynamic wind tunnel testing of aircraft and missiles with the NACA/NASA.

  17. Missiles caused by severe pressurized-water reactor accidients

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R.

    1995-07-01

    For future pressurized-water reactors, which should be designed against core-meltdown accidents, missiles generated inside the containment present a severe problem for its integrity. The masses and geometries of the missiles, as well as their velocities, may vary to a great extent. Therefore a reliable proof of the containment integrity is very difficult. In this article the potential sources of missiles are discussed, and the conclusion was reached that the generation of heavy missiles must be prevented. Steam explosions must not damage the reactor vessel head. Thus fragments of the head cannot become missiles that endanger the containment shell. Furthermore, during a melt-through failure of the reactor vessel under high pressure, the resulting forces must not catapult the whole vessel against the containment shell. Only missiles caused by hydrogen explosions may be tolerable, but shielding structures that protect the containment shell may be required. Further investigations are necessary. Finally, measures are described showing that the generation of heavy missiles can indeed be prevented. Investigations are currently being carried out that will confirm the strength of the reactor vessel head. In addition, a device for retaining the fragments of a failing reactor vessel is discussed.

  18. High performance dash on warning air mobile, missile system. [intercontinental ballistic missiles - systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, A. D.; Castellano, C. R.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An aircraft-missile system which performs a high acceleration takeoff followed by a supersonic dash to a 'safe' distance from the launch site is presented. Topics considered are: (1) technological feasibility to the dash on warning concept; (2) aircraft and boost trajectory requirements; and (3) partial cost estimates for a fleet of aircraft which provide 200 missiles on airborne alert. Various aircraft boost propulsion systems were studied such as an unstaged cryogenic rocket, an unstaged storable liquid, and a solid rocket staged system. Various wing planforms were also studied. Vehicle gross weights are given. The results indicate that the dash on warning concept will meet expected performance criteria, and can be implemented using existing technology, such as all-aluminum aircraft and existing high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines.

  19. Experimental study of ELF signatures developed by ballistic missile launch

    SciTech Connect

    Peglow, S.G.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-08

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA) and SARA, Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. These tests involved the launch of Lance missiles with a subsequent direction of F-15Es into the launch area for subsequent detection and simulated destruction of redeployed missile launchers, LLNL and SARA deployed SARN`s ELF sensors and various data acquisition systems for monitoring of basic phenomena. On 25 January 1993, a single missile launch allowed initial measurements of the phenomena and an assessment of appropriate sensor sensitivity settings as well as the appropriateness of the sensor deployment sites (e.g., with respect to man-made ELF sources such as power distributions and communication lines). On 27 January 1993, a measurement of a double launch of Lance missiles was performed. This technical report covers the results of the analysis of latter measurements. An attempt was made to measure low frequency electromagnetic signatures that may be produced during a missile launch. Hypothetical signature production mechanisms include: (1) Perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of the missile. This signature may arise from the interaction of the ambient electric field with the conducting body of the missile as well as the partially ionized exhaust plume. (2) Production of spatial, charge sources from triboelectric-like mechanisms. Such effects may occur during the initial interaction of the missile plume with the ground material and lead to an initial {open_quotes}spike{close_quotes} output, Additionally, there may exist charge transfer mechanisms produced during the exhausting of the burnt fuel oxidizer.

  20. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  1. The present status and the future of missile aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N.

    1988-01-01

    Some recent developments in the state of the art in missile aerodynamics are reviewed. Among the subjects covered are: (1) tri-service/NASA data base, (2) wing-body interference, (3) nonlinear controls, (4) hypersonic transition, (5) vortex interference, (6) airbreathers, supersonic inlets, (7) store separation problems, (8) correlation of missile data, (9) CFD codes for complete configurations, (10) engineering prediction methods, and (11) future configurations. Suggestions are made for future research and development to advance the state of the art of missile aerodynamics.

  2. Multisensor target and missile tracking for a point defense missile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stephen L.

    2003-08-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of centimetre, (I Band), millimetric (Ka band) and EO systems (daylight TV, Thermal Imager Sensors) are discussed, as applied to both the problems of acquiring and tracking naval threats, in order to achieve optimum engagements with Command to Line of Sight (CLOS) weapons. The limitations of the centimetre, millimetre and EO bands with varying target heights, seastates and visibility conditions are identified, including multipath geometry, filtering to counter multipath and utilisation of EO sensors in the Naval environment worldwide. Mechanisms of combining both Radar and EO Sensors to produce an accurate differential tracking output (target to missile), in order to control a CLOS missile are described, together with filter configurations allowing a true differential output to be produced, de-coupled from sensor sightline motion. This includes the application of sensor merging, Kalman filtering and Command Off the Line of Sight (COLOS) techniques. Finally there is a description of both an in-service and projected fire control system controlling a Point Defence Missile System (PDMS), including the results from a practical demonstration of multi-sensor tracking of an air target in a sea going environment.

  3. Fast three-dimensional k-space trajectory design using missile guidance ideas.

    PubMed

    Mir, Roberto; Guesalaga, Andres; Spiniak, Juan; Guarini, Marcelo; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2004-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) k-space trajectories are needed to acquire volumetric images in MRI. While scan time is determined by the trajectory efficiency, image quality and distortions depend on the shape of the trajectories. There are several 3D trajectory strategies for sampling the k-space using rectilinear or curve schemes. Since there is no evidence about their optimality in terms of image quality and acquisition time, a new design method based on missile guidance ideas is explored. Since air-to-air missile guidance shares similar goals and constraints with the problem of k-space trajectory design, a control approach for missiles is used to design a 3D trajectory. The k-space is divided into small cubes, and each one is treated as a target to be sampled. The main goal is to cover the entire space as quickly and efficiently as possible, with good performance under different conditions. This novel design method is compared to other trajectories using simulated and real data. As an example, a trajectory that requires 0.11 times the number of shots needed by the cylindrical 3DFT acquisition was designed. This trajectory requires more shots (1.66 times) than the stack of spirals, but behaves better under nonideal conditions, such as off-resonance and motion.

  4. Optical Kalman filtering for missile guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Neuman, C. P.; Lycas, J.

    1984-01-01

    Optical systolic array processors constitute a powerful and general-purpose set of optical architectures with high computational rates. In this paper, Kalman filtering, a novel application for these architectures, is investigated. All required operations are detailed; their realization by optical and special-purpose analog electronics are specified; and the processing time of the system is quantified. The specific Kalman filter application chosen is for an air-to-air missile guidance controller. The architecture realized in this paper meets the design goal of a fully adaptive Kalman filter which processes a measurement every 1 msec. The vital issue of flow and pipelining of data and operations in a systolic array processor is addressed. The approach is sufficiently general and can be realized on an optical or digital systolic array processor.

  5. Engineering Features Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 8. PHOTOCOPY, HEATING DRAWING FOR ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. NIKE Missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. PHOTOCOPY, HEATING DRAWING FOR ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Administration Building, East central portion of base, southeast of Mess Hall, northeast of HIPAR Equipment Building, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  7. 100. MISSILE ORDNANCE TEST FIXTURE (FLEMING UNIT) ON NORTHEAST WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. MISSILE ORDNANCE TEST FIXTURE (FLEMING UNIT) ON NORTHEAST WALL OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM (106), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles)

    SciTech Connect

    Bolonkin, A.

    1991-01-01

    A first-hand account of developments in the Soviet rocket industry is presented. The organization and leadership of the rocket and missile industry are traced from its beginning in the 1920s. The development of the Glushko Experimental Design Bureau, where the majority of Soviet rocket engines were created, is related. The evolution of Soviet rocket engines is traced in regard to both their technical improvement and their application in missiles and space vehicles. Improved Glushko engines and specialized Isaev and Kosberg engines are discussed. The difficulties faced by the Soviet missile and space program, such as the pre-Sputnik failures, the oscillation problem of 1965/1966, which exposed a weakness in Soviet ICBM missiles, and the Nedelin disaster of 1960, which cost the lives of more than 200 scientists and engineers, as well as the Commander-in-Chief of the Strategic Rocket Forces, Marshall Nedelin, are examined. 122 refs.

  9. Missile Warning Operations Center (MWOC) Beale Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Missile Warning Operations Center (MWOC) - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  10. ATLAS F MISSILE FIELDS IN THE UNITED STATES, ATLAS F ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ATLAS F MISSILE FIELDS IN THE UNITED STATES, ATLAS F- TEXAS RING OF TWELVE - Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 177, Winters, Runnels County, TX

  11. The secret of guided missile re-entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingzhong; An, Sehua

    1986-06-01

    The history and development of reentry vehicles especially as related to guided missiles is studied. The development of fiber reinforced composites to avoid the combustion of reentry vehicle heads is described. The ionization of molecules caused by high temperature friction with the air during high speed reeentry is briefly described. Reentry remote sensing as an important basis for developing configuration and predicting accuracy of point of impact of the guided missile is also discussed.

  12. Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT): System Concept Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of the Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT) is shown. The contents include: 1) Need and Goals; 2) Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed; 3) PMHT Concept; 4) Development Objectives; 5) Possible Research Payloads; 6) Possible Research Program Participants; 7) PMHT Configuration; 8) AIM-54 Internal Hardware Schematic; 9) PMHT Configuration; 10) New Guidance and Armament Section Profiles; 11) Nomenclature; 12) PMHT Stack; 13) Systems Concept; 14) PMHT Preflight Activities; 15) Notional Ground Path; and 16) Sample Theoretical Trajectories.

  13. 101. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation center, close up view of DRED (detection radar environmental display) console in operation showing target. Official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, 14 March 1963, clear as negative no. A-8803. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  14. Aerodynamics of powered missile separation from F/A-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, J. U.; Shanks, S. P.; Buning, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D dynamic 'chimera' algorithm that solves the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations over multiple moving bodies was modified to numerically simulate the aerodynamics, missile dynamics, and missile plume interactions of a missile separating from a generic wing and from an F/A-18 aircraft in transonic flow. The missile is mounted below the wing for missile separation from the wing and on the F/A-18 fuselage at the engine inlet side for missile separation from aircraft. Static and powered missile separation cases are considered to examine the influence of the missile and plume on the wing and F/A-18 fuselage and engine inlet. The aircraft and missile are at two degrees angle of attack, Reynolds number of 10 million, freestream Mach number of 1.05 and plume Mach number of 3.0. The computational results show the details of the flow field.

  15. A report on missile injuries in Cyprus 1974.

    PubMed

    Malpass, C P; Winter, J S

    1976-06-01

    This paper details the experiences of the Princess Mary's Royal Air Force Hospital, Akrotiri (TPMH), during the last 6 months of 1974. TPMH was at that time a small hospital (120 beds) with a clinical staff of 17 situated in the south of Cyprus (fig. 1). The series comprises 71 patients injured by bullets, shrapnel, bomb-blasts or mines, drawn from British personnel, United Nations Forces and the local Cypriot military and civilian population, resulting from the coup d'état of 15 July 1974 and the subsequent Turkish invasion and air attacks. The casualties were often severely wounded beyound the capabilities of the local hospitals. They were mostly admitted during a 2-week period, but many required multiple operations extending over the next 3 or 4 months, and altogether 119 operations were carried out on 41 patients at TPMH. The organization of the limited resources of the medical, nursing and supporting staff is outlined. The correct treatment of missile wounds is emphasized. Resuscitation, wound excision, splintage and delayed suture or grafting are essential. Minimal morbidity and mortality are gained by a practised approach to the compounded results of violence. PMID:1276680

  16. A decade of missile-induced vascular trauma.

    PubMed Central

    D'Sa, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    During 10 years of serious strife the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, has dealt with trauma inflicted by a wide variety of missiles. Injuries involving 316 vessels were sustained by 192 patients. A group of "knee-cappings' accounted for a large proportion of popliteal vessel injuries. A majority of patients also suffered damage to other regions of the body. Hypotension was a notable feature and several patients arrived in extremis, particularly those with injuries to a major vessel trunks and vital organs. The benefits of rapid evacuation in relation to ischaemia time are discussed. The operative management of a wide range of arterial and venous injuries is described. The use of simple and compound vein grafts allowed adequate excision of damaged vessels. The advantages of meticulous repair, timely fasciotomy, and early reintervention are reflected in the results, contributing to the small lower-lib amputation rate of 5.1%. Images fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 PMID:7055366

  17. Missile injuries of the anterior skull base.

    PubMed

    Bhatoe, Harjinder Singh

    2004-02-01

    Missile injuries of the anterior skull base usually occur during war or war-like situations. These injuries may be isolated or associated with multiple traumatic injuries. We report 23 such cases managed during military conflicts and peacekeeping operations. All were adult males. Four of these patients sustained bullet injuries; the rest were injured from shrapnel. Eighteen patients had injury to the visual apparatus with permanent blindness. Proptosis was seen in 16, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak from the wound in seven, and CSF orbitorrhea in three patients. Sixteen had irreparable injury to the eye necessitating evisceration/enucleation, and two had retrobulbar optic nerve injury. Three patients were comatose [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 3/15], and 14 had altered sensorium. Six patients were fully conscious. All were investigated by computed tomography (CT), which revealed injury to the eyeball and skull base, orbital fracture, frontal hematoma, contusion, and pneumocephalus. Seventeen patients underwent emergency surgery, and six patients were initially managed conservatively. Neurosurgical management consisted of making bifrontal flaps, craniotomy/craniectomy, debridement, and repair of the base with fascia lata. Reconstruction of the orbital rim was required in three cases. All were managed postoperatively with cerebral decongestants and antibiotics in anti-meningitic dosages. There was one death in the postoperative period; outcome was good in 16 and moderate in four patients. Twelve patients had retained intracranial splinters; three of these developed recurrent suppurative meningitis. Of the six patients initially managed conservatively, three were subsequently operated for CSF rhinorrhea. Gross communition, dural loss, and injury to the frontal scalp often preclude the use of pericranial repair of the skull base. Fascia lata is extremely useful for reconstruction and repair. Anterior cranial fossa injury probably carries a better prognosis; however, there

  18. Missile aerodynamics; Proceedings of the Conference, Monterey, CA, Oct. 31-Nov. 2, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R.; Nixon, D.; Dillenius, M.F.E.

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the development status of predictive capabilities for missile aerodynamic characteristics, the application of experimental techniques to missile-release problems, prospective high-performance missile designs, the use of lateral jet controls for missile guidance, and the integration of stores on modern tactical aircraft. Also discussed are semiempirical aerodynamic methods for preliminary design, high angle-of-attack behavior for an advanced missile, and the dynamic derivatives of missiles and fighter-type configurations at high angles-of-attack.

  19. Cryocoolers for infrared missile warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filis, Avishai; Pundak, Nachman; Zur, Yoav; Broyde, Ramon; Barak, Moshe

    2010-04-01

    The growth in world demand for infrared missile warning systems (MWS) has impelled the development of new technologies, in particular, special cryogenic coolers. Since the cryocooler is a core component in MWS RICOR has met the challenge by developing new models able to withstand high ambient temperatures above 110°C as well as harsh vibration levels, both derived from airborne fighter applications. The development focused on a cryocooler regenerator and cold finger optimization in order to achieve high cooling capacity and a thermodynamic efficiency of about 4.4% at 95°C ambient for one of the cooler models. In order to withstand harsh environmental vibration, the cold finger and outer Dewar structure have been significantly ruggedized; efficient heat sinking methods have been applied and also novel vibration isolation methods have been implemented. The electronic design concept is based on an analog controller, the PCB of which has been designed with internal heat sinking paths and special components being able to withstand ambients temperatures up to 125°C. As a final stage of development, such cryocoolers were successfully qualified by RICOR and system manufacture in harsh environmental conditions and life demonstration tests were performed.

  20. A peek at the French missile complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.A.; Marshall, M.G.

    1989-09-01

    Using a spot satellite image, Grayscale, an image analysis firm, analyzed the features of a complex on the Plateau d'Albion, where French intermediate-range ballistic missiles are thought to be deployed. The project was undertaken at the request of the Carnegie Endowment, as part of the Endowment's study of the security implications of commercial remote-sensing satellites. The area studied is in southern France, near the intersection of the Vaucluse, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, and Drome provinces. Features seen in relief on an image shown here are the foot-hills just west of the Alpes Maritimes. The French acknowledge publicly that they have deployed 18 IRBMs - all S-3s. Recognizing the military habits of regimentation and organization, we believed that these weapons might be organized into two groups of nine, which could be further divided into subgroups of three. Such subgroups could be firing battalions of a brigade, or two brigades with a division-level headquarters controlling both. On this basis, the authors selected candidate sites throughout the image for closer examination, and results are discussed.

  1. Decision support system for theater missile defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Paul; Burge, Janet; Popp, Ben

    2003-08-01

    Military services require C4I systems that support a full spectrum of operations. This is specifically relevant to the theatre missile defense (TMD) mission planning and analysis community where there have been several recent concept changes; advancements in information technology, sensors, and weapons; and expansion in the diversity and capabilities of potential adversaries. To fully support campaign development and analysis in this new environment, there is a need for systems and tools that enhance understanding of adversarial behavior, assess potential threat capabilities and vulnerabilities, perform C4I system trades, and provide methods to identify macro-level novel or emergent combat tactics and behavior derived from simpler micro-level rules. Such systems must also be interactive, collaborative, and semi-autonomous, providing the INTEL analyst with the means for exploration and potential exploitation of novel enemy behavior patterns. To address these issues we have developed an Intelligent Threat Assessment Processor (ITAP) to provide prediction and interpretation of enemy courses of actions (eCOAs) for the TMD domain. This system uses a combination of genetic algorithm-based optimization in tandem with the spatial analysis and visualization capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) geographic information system to generate and evaluate potential eCOAs.

  2. [Ballistic approach in head injuries caused by missiles].

    PubMed

    Jourdan, P; Billant, J B; Desgeorges, M

    1989-01-01

    If the missile head injury treatment is relatively well codified, wound ballistic, on the other hand, is not well known of neurosurgeons. Different means of study and tissue simulants are being listed. In face of numerous contradictory results, we shall only retain the M.L. Fackler method with 10% gelatin. Experimental results will depend on: 1. Missile parameters. For instance, in soft homogeneous tissue, one can discern shells with an uncertain path, full jacketed bullets which tumble after a variable "neck", and non jacketed missiles which cause wound through "mushrooming" and/or fragmentation effect. Buckshot wounds obey the rule "all or none". 2. Body reactions, particularly the clash with a hard material like bone, which can overturn everything described in soft tissues. These wound ballistic notions have lead us to formulate two pathogenic hypothesizes, allowing us to understand sometime case reports which had first seemed paradoxical: the brain structure, enclosed in the skull will not able to survive any major temporary cavity, the more or less deep missile pathway through the skull will be very different according to the type and energy of the missile, and to the hardness of pierced bone. PMID:2699004

  3. Ultraviolet scene simulation for missile approach warning system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giza, Robert H.; Acevedo, Paul A.; Bliss, John D.

    1997-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) extensions have been incorporated in the Real-time IR/EO Scene Simulator to support hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL) testing of UV missile warning systems. The UV extensions add capability to model missile plume signatures and off-axis atmospheric scattering in the solar blind UV spectral region (200 - 400 nm). Preliminary testing and validation of the UV rendering algorithms were performed. Simulated UV missile signatures were compared to measured static and free-flight test data. This work was performed to support the test and evaluation of modern missile warning systems at Wright labs Integrated Defensive Avionics Lab. This paper will discuss development of HWIL testing capability for UV missile warning receiver systems. Requirements for real-time UV simulation will be defined and a real-time architecture that addresses these requirements will be discussed. Specifically, the development of real- time UV rendering algorithms to support modeling of atmospherics and backgrounds to the UV solar blind wavelength region will be outlined. Issues regarding implementation of spatial UV scattering effects in a real- time rendering environment will be addressed. Development of the UV sensor model, and its potential implementation in a real-time hardware/software direct injection device will be illustrated. The results of some preliminary validation using laboratory and live firing test data will also be discussed.

  4. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  5. 47. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of elevator VIEW EAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  6. 44. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, general interior view VIEW SOUTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  7. 48. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior detail of water and hydraulic pumps VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  8. 10. Site D57 & 58L, Underground Missile Storage Structure, Type ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Site D-57 & 58-L, Underground Missile Storage Structure, Type B, Plans, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 13 December 1953 - Newport NIKE Missile Battery D-57/58, Launch Area, Newport Road, Carleton, Monroe County, MI

  9. 49. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior detail of air vent system VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  10. Tactical missile aerodynamics - Prediction methodology. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 142

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, M.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses tactical missile aerodynamic drag, drag-prediction methods for axisymmetric missile bodies, an aerodynamic heating analysis for supersonic missiles, a component buildup method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack, experimental and analytical methods for missiles with noncircular fuselages, and a vortex-cloud model for body vortex shedding and tracking. Also discussed are panel methods with vorticity effects and corrections for nonlinear compressibility, supersonic full-potential methods for missile body analysis, space-marching Euler solvers, the time-asymptotic Euler/Navier-Stokes methods for subsonic and transonic flows, 3D boundary layers on missiles, Navier-Stokes analyses of flows over slender airframes, and the interaction of exhaust plumes with missile airframes.

  11. Hardware-in-the-loop missile simulation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Hirofumi; Obana, Kazumitu; Kamiya, Masanori

    1998-07-01

    A Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation facility has been successfully contributing to the development and evaluation of missiles at the 3rd Research Center, Technical Research & Development Institute, Japan Defense Agency. This facility has two main characteristics. First, it has ability to generate both various RF target and background echoes in several frequency bands. Second, it can be used for the HWIL simulation tests of missiles which have RF/IR dual mode seekers. After the outline of this facility is presented, a technique to overcome the line-of-sight (LOS) angle limitation is proposed, because LOS angle limitation is inevitable in these HWIL simulation facilities. Moreover, a simulation method for the dual mode seeker missile is shown by using this proposed simulation technique.

  12. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  13. A Self-Adaptive Missile Guidance System for Statistical Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peery, H. Rodney

    1960-01-01

    A method of designing a self-adaptive missile guidance system is presented. The system inputs are assumed to be known in a statistical sense only. Newton's modified Wiener theory is utilized in the design of the system and to establish the performance criterion. The missile is assumed to be a beam rider, to have a g limiter, and to operate over a flight envelope where the open-loop gain varies by a factor of 20. It is shown that the percent of time that missile acceleration limiting occurs can be used effectively to adjust the coefficients of the Wiener filter. The result is a guidance system which adapts itself to a changing environment and gives essentially optimum filtering and minimum miss distance.

  14. The Pershing 2 Mobile Ballistic Surface-to-Surface Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A detailed presentation is made of the Pershing 2 missile characteristics and perforance. Development, operation, deployment and trial flights are covered. Differences between the Pershing 2 and Pershing 1A are discussed and include the former's single upper element and elongated reentry vehicle with trimming flaps. The Pershing 2, fueled by hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene powder, has an estimated maximum range of 2500 km with a 667 kg reentry vehicle. Radar mapping data are compared in the missile's correlator to a previously generated or prerecorded reference image, memorized in digital form on magnetic tape; this allows readjustment of the missile's inertial platform and a 20-40 m target strike precision. Additional data are given on the nuclear warhead, launching and reentry trajectories, and costs.

  15. Missile placement analysis based on improved SURF feature matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaida; Zhao, Wenjie; Li, Dejun; Gong, Xiran; Sheng, Qian

    2015-03-01

    The precious battle damage assessment by use of video images to analysis missile placement is a new study area. The article proposed an improved speeded up robust features algorithm named restricted speeded up robust features, which combined the combat application of TV-command-guided missiles and the characteristics of video image. Its restrictions mainly reflected in two aspects, one is to restrict extraction area of feature point; the second is to restrict the number of feature points. The process of missile placement analysis based on video image was designed and a video splicing process and random sample consensus purification were achieved. The RSURF algorithm is proved that has good realtime performance on the basis of guarantee the accuracy.

  16. A different approach to missile induced head injuries.

    PubMed

    Pabuscu, Yüksel; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ustünsöz, Bahri; Tayfun, Cem

    2003-01-01

    Missile induced head injuries can be influenced by the anatomical location of the injury, i.e. type of tissue and by the ballistic properties such as the design of the weapon and the mass, shape and construction of the projectile, as well as its velocity characteristics and trajectory angle. In the diagnostic work up of the patients with missile induced head injuries, every available modality can be used. It is important, however, to recognize that CT scan is the primary and most efficacious diagnostic tool in such patients. In this article we have identified risk factors for both morbidity and mortality in patients with missile induced head injury with excluding the patients who had also extracranial serious trauma and systemic disease. PMID:12821033

  17. Flexible missile autopilot design studies with PC-MATLAB/386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a responsive, high-bandwidth missile autopilot for airframes which have structural modes of unusually low frequency presents a challenging design task. Such systems are viable candidates for modern, state-space control design methods. The PC-MATLAB interactive software package provides an environment well-suited to the development of candidate linear control laws for flexible missile autopilots. The strengths of MATLAB include: (1) exceptionally high speed (MATLAB's version for 80386-based PC's offers benchmarks approaching minicomputer and mainframe performance); (2) ability to handle large design models of several hundred degrees of freedom, if necessary; and (3) broad extensibility through user-defined functions. To characterize MATLAB capabilities, a simplified design example is presented. This involves interactive definition of an observer-based state-space compensator for a flexible missile autopilot design task. MATLAB capabilities and limitations, in the context of this design task, are then summarized.

  18. Game theoretic target assignment approach in ballistic missile defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Mo; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Wu, Yingli

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, both Pareto game theory and learning theory algorithms are utilized in a resource management module for a practical missile interception system. The resource management module will determine how many and which antimissiles will be launched for interception. Such interception decisions are based on the number of invading missiles, availability of antimissiles, special capability of antimissiles, and realistic constraints on the movements of both invading missiles and antimissiles such as minimum turning radius, maximum velocity, fuel range, etc. Simulations demonstrate performance improvements when compared to existing strategies (i.e. random assignment), independent of guidance laws (i.e. Proportional Navigation (PN) or the Differential-Game-based Guidance Law (DGL) guidance laws) under end-game interception cases or midcourse interception situations.

  19. Missile injuries of the limbs: an Iraqi perspective.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, T A

    2006-01-01

    Missiles include pistol or rifle bullets, shell fragments, land mines, and grenades. Medium- and high-velocity missiles produce damage by laceration and crushing, shock waves, and cavitational effects. Low-velocity missiles produce damage by laceration and crushing only. Land mine injuries cause damage by the primary blast effect, secondarily by fragments, and thirdly by the effect induced by whole-body propulsion and by burns. Severity of injuries should be graded according to the degree of soft-tissue damage, bone defect or comminution, and vascular or neural injury. Among other factors, successful management of these injuries requires prompt and vigorous resuscitation, careful wound inspection, aggressive exploration, liberal débridement, and prompt removal of fragments. In addition, in these circumstances, one must stay alert for overlooked injuries and be aware of associated psychological trauma. PMID:17003203

  20. 75 FR 52732 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... of the Secretary Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense... notice that it is renewing the charter for the Missile Defense Advisory Committee (hereafter referred to... Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology & Logistics and the Director, Missile Defense...

  1. Fly-away restraint pin mechanism for the Army's PATRIOT missile system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the longitudinal restraint mechanism for the Army's Patriot missile system is reviewed. The initial design was an ordnance pin puller with a shear plane. Because of reliability problems and a desire to reduce cost, a fly-away restraint mechanism was chosen. After being manually unlocked, the restraint pin disengages the missile during launch by missile motion.

  2. The analysis of a generic air-to-air missile simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Chappell, Alan R.; Mcmanus, John W.

    1994-01-01

    A generic missile model was developed to evaluate the benefits of using a dynamic missile fly-out simulation system versus a static missile launch envelope system for air-to-air combat simulation. This paper examines the performance of a launch envelope model and a missile fly-out model. The launch envelope model bases its probability of killing the target aircraft on the target aircraft's position at the launch time of the weapon. The benefits gained from a launch envelope model are the simplicity of implementation and the minimal computational overhead required. A missile fly-out model takes into account the physical characteristics of the missile as it simulates the guidance, propulsion, and movement of the missile. The missile's probability of kill is based on the missile miss distance (or the minimum distance between the missile and the target aircraft). The problems associated with this method of modeling are a larger computational overhead, the additional complexity required to determine the missile miss distance, and the additional complexity of determining the reason(s) the missile missed the target. This paper evaluates the two methods and compares the results of running each method on a comprehensive set of test conditions.

  3. 76 FR 63541 - Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants... Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide provides licensees and...- basis hurricane and design-basis hurricane-generated missiles that a nuclear power plant should...

  4. 78 FR 70537 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Target and Missile Launch Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    .... SUMMARY: NMFS has received a request from the U.S. Navy (Navy), Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division... conducted for testing new types of targets. Missiles vary from tactical and developmental weapons to target missiles used to test defensive strategies and other weapons systems. Up to 200 missiles may be...

  5. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  6. 103. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation center, overall view of center in operation with staff at consoles. Note defcon (defense condition) display panel (upper right) showing "simulated status"activity level. Also note fiber optic display panel at upper right-center. Official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen 30 September, 1976, clear as negative no. A-14568. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Consolidation of data base for Army generalized missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenke, D. J.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Data from plume interaction tests, nose mounted canard configuration tests, and high angle of attack tests on the Army Generalized Missile model are consolidated in a computer program which makes them readily accessible for plotting, listing, and evaluation. The program is written in FORTRAN and will run on an ordinary minicomputer. It has the capability of retrieving any coefficient from the existing DATAMAN tapes and displaying it in tabular or plotted form. Comparisons of data taken in several wind tunnels and of data with the predictions of Program MISSILE2 are also presented.

  8. Advanced technology payoffs for future rotorcraft, commuter aircraft, cruise missile, and APU propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turk, M. A.; Zeiner, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    In connection with the significant advances made regarding the performance of larger gas turbines, challenges arise concerning the improvement of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1000 horsepower range. In response to these challenges, the NASA/Army-sponsored Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study was undertaken with the objective to identify the engine cycle, configuration, and component technology requirements for the substantial performance improvements desired in year-2000 small gas turbine engines. In the context of this objective, an American turbine engine company evaluated engines for four year-2000 applications, including a rotorcraft, a commuter aircraft, a supersonic cruise missile, and an auxiliary power unit (APU). Attention is given to reference missions, reference engines, reference aircraft, year-2000 technology projections, cycle studies, advanced engine selections, and a technology evaluation.

  9. Tornado missile simulation and design methodology. Volume 2: model verification and data base updates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.

    1981-08-01

    A probabilistic methodology has been developed to predict the probabilities of tornado-propelled missiles impacting and damaging nuclear power plant structures. Mathematical models of each event in the tornado missile hazard have been developed and sequenced to form an integrated, time-history simulation methodology. The models are data based where feasible. The data include documented records of tornado occurrence, field observations of missile transport, results of wind tunnel experiments, and missile impact tests. Probabilistic Monte Carlo techniques are used to estimate the risk probabilities. The methodology has been encoded in the TORMIS computer code to facilitate numerical analysis and plant-specific tornado missile probability assessments.

  10. The famous son of Ukrainian people V.I. Voznyuk who has provided launch of all ballistic missiles of the cosmodrome Kapustin Yar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, V. F.; Platonov, V. P.

    2007-12-01

    The history of the life of V.I. Voznyuk is a history of the phenomenon of the Soviet rocket progress when the engineers with experience of launch of military rocket of small radius of action were testing the ballistic missiles. The remarkable and little-known destiny of Voznuk is the history of the Soviet rocket technology experts who had a severe practical schooling of command by the military forces of the first combat missiles "Katucha" during the grim military years (including the grandiose fight in Stalingrad) and then they have continued to launch the ballistic missiles. V.I. Voznyuk worked as the chief of the first Soviet cosmodrome Kapustin Yar for almost 30 years—since the most difficult moment of its organization. He organized a launch of the first Soviet ballistic missiles R-1, R-2, R-5M of S. Korolev. This report is about the outstanding achievement of the organizing ability of V.I. Voznyuk—about the launch of a missile with a nuclear warhead in 1956. V.I. Voznyuk closes a unique chain in the world of outstanding figures of space-rocket technology who were born or lived in Ukraine from designers of missile up to the organizers of its manufacture and now up to the organizers of the tests of rockets—J. Aizenberg, V. Budnik, O. Baclanov, V. Dogujiev, M. Galasj, N. Gerasuta, V. Gluschko, B. Gubanov, A. Gudimenko, I. Ivanov, G. Kesunjko, B. Konoplev, S. Korolev, V. Kovtunenko, V. Kukuschkin, O. Makarov, A. Nedaivoda, M. Reshetniyov, Yu. Semenov, V. Sergeev, Yu. Smetanin, V. Tchelomey, D. Torchiy, V. Utkin and M. Yangel.

  11. Missile Defense: LBJ's Bid To Curb Arms Race Gains Support.

    PubMed

    Carter, L J

    1967-04-14

    In the article of 31 March on antiballistic missile defense, the last sentence of paragraph 2, p. 1654, should read: "Manpower for producing . . . but the outer limit would be about 200,000, or half the number of contractor employees and civil servants working for NASA at the peak of the Apollo program." PMID:17741142

  12. 23 CFR 660.519 - Missile installations and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... extraordinary maintenance as necessary to keep the roads serviceable and maintain adequate supporting records of... OPERATIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.519 Missile installations and...) Restoration under the contract. (1) The highway agency having jurisdiction over the road shall...

  13. 37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile guidance section, retractor cables for lock pin in front of ladder at left - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  14. 44. Upper level, left to rightground missile guidance system liquid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Upper level, left to right--ground missile guidance system liquid cooling equipment, guidance and control coupler - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  15. 43. Upper level, left to rightground missile guidance system liquid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Upper level, left to right--ground missile guidance system liquid cooling equipment, guidance and control coupler rack, programmer group - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  16. Missile Defense and Space: What's Changed? What Hasn't?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Philip E., III

    2005-04-01

    In late 2004, the Bush Administration appeared to be eager to declare a nascent operational capability at its deployment sites in Alaska and California. In early December a flight intercept test failed, as had the previous test two years earlier. By the time of the inauguration, the Administration appeared to be backing away from a formal declaration of operational capability. Where does the system stand today? What has happened in important flight tests in more recent months? What has happened to the budgets for missile defense? What has happened with boost-phase missile defense, with Patriot, with the Airborne Laser, and other missile defense programs? And how have recent programmatic and budgetary changes affected the likelihood that missile defense will be the first U.S. military program to place strike weapons in space? Philip Coyle, Senior Advisor with the Center for Defense Information and former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Test and Evaluation, will review the latest developments and describe from a technical, programmatic, and policy point of view, ``What's Changed? and What Hasn't?"

  17. 5. PRELIMINARY SKETCH OF THE GUIDED MISSILE TEST FACILITIES FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PRELIMINARY SKETCH OF THE GUIDED MISSILE TEST FACILITIES FOR TEST AREA NUMBER 2. TODAY IR IS KNOWN AS MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER'S EAST TEST AREA. HANNES LUEHRSEN COLLECTION, MSFC MASTER PLANNING OFFICE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. CMC occasional papers : a missile stability regime for South Asia.

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Feroz Hassan; Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Rajen, Gaurav

    2004-06-01

    India and Pakistan have created sizeable ballistic missile forces and are continuing to develop and enlarge them. These forces can be both stabilizing (e.g., providing a survivable force for deterrence) and destabilizing (e.g., creating strategic asymmetries). Missile forces will be a factor in bilateral relations for the foreseeable future, so restraint is necessary to curtail their destabilizing effects. Such restraint, however, must develop within an atmosphere of low trust. This report presents a set of political and operational options, both unilateral and bilateral, that decreases tensions, helps rebuild the bilateral relationship, and prepares the ground for future steps in structural arms control. Significant steps, which build on precedents and do not require extensive cooperation, are possible despite strained relations. The approach is made up of three distinct phases: (1) tension reduction measures, (2) confidence building measures, and (3) arms control agreements. The goal of the first phase is to initiate unilateral steps that are substantive and decrease tensions, establish missiles as a security topic for bilateral discussion, and set precedents for limited bilateral cooperation. The second phase would build confidence by expanding current bilateral security agreements, formalizing bilateral understandings, and beginning discussion of monitoring procedures. The third phase could include bilateral agreements limiting some characteristics of national missile forces including the cooperative incorporation of monitoring and verification.

  19. The conception, birth, and growth of a missile umbilical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordman, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The design development of the Sprint 2 and the Improved Sprint 2 Missile System umbilical system is reviewed. Unique system requirements, umbilical designs considered to meet the requirements, and the problems encountered and solutions derived during the design and development testing of the selected systems are described.

  20. 18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. LAUNCH CONTROL SUPPORT BUILDING. 'MISSILE ART' MURAL PAINTED ON INTERIOR WALL OF ELEVATOR SHAFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  1. 28. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AND CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. SHOCK ISOLATOR AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACK AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  2. 26. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBER LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AT COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE. LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  3. Photograph and Speech Related to the Cuban Missile Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredhoff, Stacey; Potter, Lee Ann

    2012-01-01

    On Sunday, October 14, 1962, an American U-2 aircraft, flying a photographic reconnaissance mission over Cuba, took 928 images (one is included with this article). The next day, analysts at the National Photographic Interpretation Center concluded that the photographs showed evidence of Soviet missile site construction in Cuba and conveyed their…

  4. When Fear Ruled: Rethinking the Cuban Missile Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Provides an insightful look at the administrative and negotiative processes that accompanied the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. Although John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev both worked to avoid nuclear war, the stress and exhaustion of the negotiating process created serious blunders. Eventually both sides backed away from nuclear annihilation. (MJP)

  5. 23 CFR 660.519 - Missile installations and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... extraordinary maintenance as necessary to keep the roads serviceable and maintain adequate supporting records of... OPERATIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS (DIRECT FEDERAL) Defense Access Roads § 660.519 Missile installations and...) Restoration under the contract. (1) The highway agency having jurisdiction over the road shall...

  6. Atmospheric Turbulence Relative to Aviation, Missile, and Space Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, Dennis W. (Editor); Frost, Walter (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to bring together various disciplines of the aviation, missile, and space programs involved in predicting, measuring, modeling, and understanding the processes of atmospheric turbulence. Working committees re-examined the current state of knowledge, identified present and future needs, and documented and prioritized integrated and cooperative research programs.

  7. MEDUSA: A concept for countering multiple targets from theater ballistic missiles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peglow, S.G.

    1994-04-01

    We feel that the concept of intercepting a fractionated threat from a tactical ballistic missile is potentially feasible and would have very high payoff for the defense. Many other concepts have been suggested to solve this problem, although they have mostly been more futuristic approaches, e.g. aircrafty based lasers. We also believe that current technologies are not likely to be adequate for the expected types of very small submunition payloads, especially in the presence of relatively simple countermeasures. The MEDUSA concept, or its clones, may very well provide a vehicle for the study of less stressing threats, e.g. separating warheads and provide a lethality enhancement for non-deployed payloads. An opportunity also exists to investigate alternative technologies, such as the explosively-formed ``disk`` idea. The use of high-precision, limited field-of-view sensor-fuzed munitions is a subject of interest in other Defense Department programs and may have application to the important area of theater missile defense.

  8. Extended nonlinear chirp scaling algorithm for highly squinted missile-borne synthetic aperture radar with diving acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rengli; Wang, Yanfei

    2016-04-01

    An extended nonlinear chirp scaling (NLCS) algorithm is proposed to process data of highly squinted, high-resolution, missile-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) diving with a constant acceleration. Due to the complex diving movement, the traditional signal model and focusing algorithm are no longer suited for missile-borne SAR signal processing. Therefore, an accurate range equation is presented, named as the equivalent hyperbolic range model (EHRM), which is more accurate and concise compared with the conventional fourth-order polynomial range equation. Based on the EHRM, a two-dimensional point target reference spectrum is derived, and an extended NLCS algorithm for missile-borne SAR image formation is developed. In the algorithm, a linear range walk correction is used to significantly remove the range-azimuth cross coupling, and an azimuth NLCS processing is adopted to solve the azimuth space variant focusing problem. Moreover, the operations of the proposed algorithm are carried out without any interpolation, thus having small computational loads. Finally, the simulation results and real-data processing results validate the proposed focusing algorithm.

  9. Peeling the onion: an heuristic overview of hit-to-kill missile defense in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCroix, Len; Kurzius, Shelby

    2005-03-01

    Researchers engaged in the development of infrared detector technologies may well benefit from a broader understanding of their products from the perspective of the end-user. An appreciation of how this technology is to be used by system designers, many of whom possess only a rudimentary understanding of quantum physics, is highly germane. Answers to questions like: "What device technology will be employed," "How will the device be used?" and "What are the impacts on signal-to-noise?" are of critical importance. In this paper, some of the fundamentals of hit-to-kill missile defense technology are examined in a largely non-mathematical context. From its "Star Wars" inception during the Reagan administration, to today"s Missile Defense Agency, the core requirement of missile defense has not changed - find the threat and destroy it before it reaches its destination. This fundamental requirement, while conceptually straightforward, is extraordinarily difficult to satisfy, and is almost exclusively dependent on our ability to detect and designate a relatively small, very fast-moving, room-temperature object, at great distances, and usually in a severe environment of shock and vibration further clouded by error and uncertainty. With an obvious bias toward passive IR detection and associated focal plane array characteristics, the flight of a fictitious interceptor is followed from launch to impact. At various points along the interceptor"s trajectory, a "peel the onion" approach is utilized to expose increasingly detailed layers of behavior, including the eventual release of the kinetic kill vehicle, and its autonomous flight to a body-to-body impact with its target. Various sources of error and their impact on the success of the mission are examined, and an overall understanding of the key features of the infrared seeker and its critical role in missile defense are ultimately developed.

  10. Novel applications of femtosecond laser in missile countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, E.; Pocholle, J. P.

    2005-11-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been widely used in laboratories for years and are now suitable for industrial applications and new military ones. Due to their very short pulse duration, they have the capability to generate intense electric fields and plasmas in targeted materials. We present here a novel scheme of missile counter-measure that is using such an intense laser source to disrupt the operation of IR guidance systems. Classical lasers for missile defense are based on thermal effects on the target whereas photons are used as the kill vehicle [1,2]. In femtosecond countermeasure, the average power is quite low, but the very intense field creates ionization effects than can damage sensitive optics and also plasma that can be used as active decoys against IR homing electronics. As the recent systems are compact and portable, an airport protection scheme is proposed to eliminate manpads threats in the vicinity of a civilian airport.

  11. Ionospheric effects of the missile destruction on December 9, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Shalimov, Sergey; Lukianova, Renata

    2014-05-01

    We report on ionosonde and meteor radar observations made in Sodankyla Geophysical Observatory (SGO, 67N, 27E, Finland) on December 9, 2009 during a test launch of the Russian solid propellant military missile. Because of the technical problem the missile was self-destroyed around 07 UT at ionospheric height (170-260 km) over the Kola Peninsula (Russia), at a distance about 500 km to east from the observatory. Products of the explosion, including long-lived ionized aluminum oxides, were spread into the large area and reached the region of SGO meteor radar observations in about 2 hours (around 09 UT). After about 3 hours (around 10 UT) a sporadic E layer presumably composed of the remains was observed close to the zenith of the SGO ionosonde. We present the data and discuss possible mechanisms accounting for both vertical and horizontal transport of the remains. Theoretical estimations suggest that the observed transport could be likely due to thermospheric turbulence.

  12. Laser-initiated ordnance for air-to-air missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumpter, David R.

    1993-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas Missile Systems Company (MDMSC) has developed a laser ignition subsystem (LIS) for air-to-air missile applications. The MDMSC subsystem is designed to activate batteries, unlock fins, and sequence propulsion system events. The subsystem includes Pyro Zirconium Pump (PZP) lasers, mechanical Safe & Arm, fiber-optic distribution system, and optically activated pyrotechnic devices (initiators, detonators, and thermal batteries). The LIS design has incorporated testability features for the laser modules, drive electronics, fiber-optics, and pyrotechnics. Several of the LIS have been fabricated and have supported thermal battery testing, integral rocket ramjet testing, and have been integrated into integral rocket ramjet flight test vehicles as part of the flight control subsystem.

  13. 7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. "AERIAL VIEW OF THE TEST AREA, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB. 8 AUG 57." In upper left corner, photo no. "8462 57" cropped out: "A-AFFTC 8 AUG 57, RETL TEST AREA" This photo is a high oblique view, showing the wing of the photo plane and Test Area 1-115. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Analyzing and designing object-oriented missile simulations with concurrency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorf, Jeffrey Allen

    2000-11-01

    A software object model for the six degree-of-freedom missile modeling domain is presented. As a precursor, a domain analysis of the missile modeling domain was started, based on the Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis (FODA) technique described by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI). It was subsequently determined the FODA methodology is functionally equivalent to the Object Modeling Technique. The analysis used legacy software documentation and code from the ENDOSIM, KDEC, and TFrames 6-DOF modeling tools, including other technical literature. The SEI Object Connection Architecture (OCA) was the template for designing the object model. Three variants of the OCA were considered---a reference structure, a recursive structure, and a reference structure with augmentation for flight vehicle modeling. The reference OCA design option was chosen for maintaining simplicity while not compromising the expressive power of the OMT model. The missile architecture was then analyzed for potential areas of concurrent computing. It was shown how protected objects could be used for data passing between OCA object managers, allowing concurrent access without changing the OCA reference design intent or structure. The implementation language was the 1995 release of Ada. OCA software components were shown how to be expressed as Ada child packages. While acceleration of several low level and other high operations level are possible on proper hardware, there was a 33% degradation of 4th order Runge-Kutta integrator performance of two simultaneous ordinary differential equations using Ada tasking on a single processor machine. The Defense Department's High Level Architecture was introduced and explained in context with the OCA. It was shown the HLA and OCA were not mutually exclusive architectures, but complimentary. HLA was shown as an interoperability solution, with the OCA as an architectural vehicle for software reuse. Further directions for implementing a 6-DOF missile modeling

  15. The conception, birth, and growth of a missile umbilical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordman, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The design development was traced for the sprint 2 and improved sprint 2 missile system (ISMS) umbilical system. The unique system requirements, umbilical designs considered to meet the requirements, and the problems encountered and solutions derived during the design, and development testing of the selected systems are described. The sprint 2 development effort consisted of design, analysis, and testing activities. The ISMS effort involved the performance of an extensive trade study to determine the optimum design to meet the ISMS conditions.

  16. The theater missile defense threat to US security

    SciTech Connect

    Keeny, S.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01

    The Clinton administration has embraced a major program to develop a family of theater missile defense (TMD) systems to protect US forces and allies overseas. The large scale of the undertaking is reflected in Congressional Budget Office estimates that currently planned development and procurement alone will cost around $50 billion through the year 2010. This figure could easily double if the proposed advanced-capability systems are actually deployed and the historical pattern of cost escalation of high-technology programs prevails.

  17. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, ED; Nicholson, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 General Dynamics demonstrated an AR&D system for members of the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware derived from the Cruise Missile and Centaur avionics systems. The object of this proof of concept demonstration was to show that all the accuracy, reliability, and operational requirements established for a spacecraft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed AR&D system.

  18. 23. "A CAPTIVE ATLAS MISSILE EXPLODED DURING THE TEST ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. "A CAPTIVE ATLAS MISSILE EXPLODED DURING THE TEST ON TEST STAND 1-A, 27 MARCH 1959, PUTTING THAT TEST STAND OUT-OF-COMMISSION. STAND WAS NOT REPAIRED FOR THE ATLAS PROGRAM BUT TRANSFERRED TO ROCKETDYNE AND MODIFIED FOR THE F-l ENGINE PROGRAM." - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 25. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. AT LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE AND LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AT COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE. RADIO TRANSMITTER AND RECEIVER RACKS AT FAR RIGHT; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT RACKS AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  20. 29. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE WITH MISSILE COMBAT CREW MEMBERS (FRONT TO BACK) LIEUTENANT KEVIN R. MCCLUNEY AND CAPTAIN JAMES L. KING, JR. AT CONSOLES. REFRIGERATOR AT RIGHT FLANKED BY RADIO EQUIPMENT (RIGHT) AND FILE CABINETS (LEFT). VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  1. Non-destructive missile seeker flight testing: HWIL in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jim; Robinson, Joe; Robinson, Richard M.

    2010-04-01

    Surface to air missile development programs typically utilize hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations when available to provide a non-destructive high volume test environment for what are typically very expensive guidance sections. The HWIL, while invaluable, hasn't been able to obviate the need for missile flight tests. Because of the great expense of these missiles the designers are only allowed to perform a fraction of the desired tests. Missile Airframe Simulation Testbed (MAST) is a program conceived by US Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) that blends the non-destructive nature of HWIL with the confidence gained from flight tests to expand the knowledge gained while reducing the development schedule of new missile programs.

  2. The proliferation of aerospace weapons technology: Ballistic missiles and the case of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossen, Terrence John

    1993-04-01

    The rationale behind the development of ballistic missile production in Brazil is examined by exploring the political, military, and economic determinants of ballistic missile demand in that country. To ascertain how Brazil developed missile production capabilities, the contributions of aerospace industries in industrialized states, the Brazilian space program, trade between less-developed countries, and illicit trade in missile technology are assessed. It is argued that missile development increasingly became a function of economic as opposed to security considerations, and that technologies transferred from developed country aerospace firms and Brazil's space program were primarily responsible for the creation of production capabilities. It is also contended that the proliferation of missile technology to Brazil was consistent with the workings of a system evident in the aerospace weapons technology market that sustains the horizontal spread of weapons production capabilities.

  3. Soviet concepts of ballistic missile defense. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seavey, K.P.

    1988-06-01

    This thesis characterizes the Soviet concept of ballistic missile defense (BMD) in order to better understand and predict future Soviet BMD decision making. The Soviet concept of BMD is fundamentally different from that in the West. Soviet BMD is clearly an integral component of a much larger Soviet strategic defense effort which consists of strategic air defense as well as passive measures, such as mobility, deep underground command and control facilities, and civil defense. As the Soviet military literature demonstrates, Soviet strategic air defense encompasses defense against a continuum of threats -- from aircraft to ballistic missiles to satellites to 'space-strike weapons'. Soviet strategic air defense weapons therefore appear optimized to counter a wide range of airborne threats. In the Soviet view, surface-to-air missiles may be a primary tactical BMD weapon. Additionally, Soviet strategic BMD weapons may be a primary Soviet anti-satellite weapon. Furthermore, manned space platforms play a particularly significant role in Soviet thinking about the future of BMD and space warfare.

  4. The art and science of missile defense sensor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, Brian K.

    2014-06-01

    A Missile Defense Sensor is a complex optical system, which sits idle for long periods of time, must work with little or no on-­board calibration, be used to find and discriminate targets, and guide the kinetic warhead to the target within minutes of launch. A short overview of the Missile Defense problem will be discussed here, as well as, the top-level performance drivers, like Noise Equivalent Irradiance (NEI), Acquisition Range, and Dynamic Range. These top-level parameters influence the choice of optical system, mechanical system, focal plane array (FPA), Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC), and cryogenic system. This paper will not only discuss the physics behind the performance of the sensor, but it will also discuss the "art" of optimizing the performance of the sensor given the top level performance parameters. Balancing the sensor sub-­systems is key to the sensor's performance in these highly stressful missions. Top-­level performance requirements impact the choice of lower level hardware and requirements. The flow down of requirements to the lower level hardware will be discussed. This flow down directly impacts the FPA, where careful selection of the detector is required. The flow down also influences the ROIC and cooling requirements. The key physics behind the detector and cryogenic system interactions will be discussed, along with the balancing of subsystem performance. Finally, the overall system balance and optimization will be discussed in the context of missile defense sensors and expected performance of the overall kinetic warhead.

  5. Worldwide missile defense and the war on terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Francis X.

    2002-07-01

    At the end of a long developmental road, dating back nearly a half-century, we are on the verge of having a defense against ballistic missiles. Starting some fifty years ago, we have initiated, and halted various programs to explore technology for missile defense. The reason for the go and stop program was the theological debate on deterrence. The issue was whether we would deter the Soviets from attacking us if we were to deploy a defense against their ballistic missiles. Our assessment was it would not, because they would expand their offensive. If you watched the President on TV after 9/11, you could sense the depth of his reaction. He is determined that it won't happen again. Furthermore, he must be conscious that this attack was the first time in nearly two centuries when an enemy caused damage in the US. He has created a new national effort to insure that it doesn't happen again. The efforts devoted to this objective are many, complex, and innovative. I will try to cover the most important activities, then describe how they are integrated to reach that objective in dynamic circumstances, of a long war.

  6. Application of a Complex Lead Compensator for a Laser Guided Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhila, M. R.; Gopika, S.; Abraham, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of a lead compensator with complex pole and complex zero for a missile. It is compared with a lead compensator with real pole and real zero. A typical laser guided missile control system is considered for the performance comparison of both the compensators. Simulation studies carried out with MATLAB brings out the scope of using complex compensator in missile guided systems.

  7. Probabilistic wind/tornado/missile analyses for hazard and fragility evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Reich, M.

    1995-10-01

    Detailed analysis procedures and examples are presented for the probabilistic evaluation of hazard and fragility against high wind, tornado, and tornado-generated missiles. In the tornado hazard analysis, existing risk models are modified to incorporate various uncertainties including modeling errors. A significant feature of this paper is the detailed description of the Monte-Carlo simulation analyses of tornado-generated missiles. A simulation procedure, which includes the wind field modeling, missile injection, solution of flight equations, and missile impact analysis, is described with application examples.

  8. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Missile Firing

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Daniel Steven; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter; Suter, Glenn; Pater, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60- A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the missile launch and detonation. The primary stressor associated with this activity was sound. Other minor stressors included the detonation impact, shrapnel, and fire. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using the Army sound contour program BNOISE2, as well as distances from the explosion to deer. Few effects data were available from related studies. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of human "disturbance" and hearing damage thresholds in units of C-weighted decibels (sound exposure level) and a distance-based No Observed Adverse Effects Level for moose and cannonfire. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the missile firing was likely for a negligible number of deer, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  9. 46. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior view of elevator system with overhead doors in open position and hydraulic shaft in left foreground VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  10. 45. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, general interior view of elevator system and wall-mounted control pad VIEW EAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  11. 50. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, view of staircase, access to personnel quarters with circular air shaft in ceiling VIEW EAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  12. Ballistic missile proliferation a national security focus for the 21st century. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.F.

    1994-04-21

    The global proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has become one of the most immediate and dangerous threats to U.S. national security. Ballistic missiles were used in four of the last six major wars. Some 190 missiles were fired by Iraqis over a six week period at Iranian cities in 1988, during the 'War of the Cities'. Iraq's firing of Scuds against coalition forces and Israel during the Gulf War provided a vivid reminder of the threat these weapons can present to the world community. During the 1980's, many Third World countries assigned a high priority to the acquisition of ballistic missiles. By 1991, more than 20 of these nations either possessed ballistic missiles or were attempting to obtain them. Today 43 nations possess ballistic missiles. Seventeen of these probably have a nuclear weapon capability, with 20 of them possessing also a chemical or biological capability. This paper seeks to: define the military challenge ballistic missiles represent; review current U.S. counter-proliferation and nonproliferation initiatives and, finally make recommendations on other potential methods or considerations to reduce ballistic missile proliferation.

  13. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  17. 33 CFR 334.1440 - Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. 334.1440 Section 334.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1440 Pacific Ocean at Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands; missile testing area. (a) The warning...

  18. Optimal guidance law for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Xia, Yuanqing

    2012-08-01

    This article considers the problem of optimal guidance laws for cooperative attack of multiple missiles based on the optimal control theory. New guidance laws are presented such that multiple missiles attack a single target simultaneously. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  19. Slender body treatment of some specialized problems associated with elliptic-cross-section missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Slender body methods were applied to some specialized problems associated with missile configurations with elliptic cross sections. Expressions are derived for computing the velocity distribution on the nose section when the ellipse eccentricity is varying longitudinally on the missile. The cross flow velocity on a triform fin section is also studied.

  20. U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 48 CFR 225.7016 - Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation. 225.7016 Section 225.7016 Federal Acquisition... Acquisition 225.7016 Restriction on Ballistic Missile Defense research, development, test, and evaluation....

  2. Computer assessment of electromagnetic means of detecting approaching cruise missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.; King, R.J.; Lytle, R.J.; Miller, E.K.

    1983-11-01

    Numerical modeling of Beverage and monopole antennas shows the fields of both antennas to have a similar dependence on range and height above ground, with the Beverage antenna having slightly greater gain in the forward direction due to its directivity. The use of multiple Beverage antennas closely spaced was found to increase the efficiency and gain in the forward direction for short Beverage antennas. For the longer antenna considered for the cruise missile radar, the decrease in directivity for two closely spaced antennas reduced the forward gain.

  3. Renewable Energy Opportunities at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; States, Jennifer C.; Warwick, William M.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2008-09-01

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewable Energy Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  4. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal... investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. As prescribed in 228.370(d), use the following clause: Accident Reporting and Investigation Involving Aircraft, Missiles, and Space...

  5. Computer aided design and manufacturing of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.; Downey, Kevin M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the propulsion concepts being investigated for future cruise missiles is advanced unducted propfans. To support the evaluation of this technology applied to the cruise missile, a joint DOD and NASA test project was conducted to design and then test the characteristics of the propfans on a 0.55-scale, cruise missile model in a NASA wind tunnel. The configuration selected for study is a counterrotating rearward swept propfan. The forward blade row, having six blades, rotates in a counterclockwise direction, and the aft blade row, having six blades, rotates in a clockwise direction, as viewed from aft of the test model. Figures show the overall cruise missile and propfan blade configurations. The objective of this test was to evaluate propfan performance and suitability as a viable propulsion option for next generation of cruise missiles. This paper details the concurrent computer aided design, engineering, and manufacturing of the carbon fiber/epoxy propfan blades as the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  6. Preventing ballistic missile proliferation: Lessons from Iraq. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Talay, B.J.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis examines the case of Iraq to assess the performance of the missile nonproliferation regime since 1970. By analyzing the methods used by Iraq to obtain missile systems and missile technology, this thesis assesses the ability of the international community to prevent ballistic missile proliferation. Understanding Iraq`s past capabilities as well as its post-war efforts to rebuild weapons programs and procurement networks, this thesis provides suggestions for improving the regime`s performance. This thesis finds that (1) prior to 1992, the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) failed in its attempts to prevent proliferation; (2) the existence of the MTCR, while necessary to slow proliferation, is not sufficient to prevent proliferation; and (3) additional enforcement is needed to counter weapons of mass destruction acquisition by resourceful and determined states.

  7. Passive millimetre wave imaging for ballistic missile launch detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Christopher J.; Salmon, Neil A.

    2008-10-01

    QinetiQ has used a suite of modelling tools to predict the millimetric plume signatures from a range of ballistic missile types, based on the accepted theory that Bremsstrahlung emission, generated by the collision of free electrons with neutral species in a rocket motor plume, is the dominant signature mechanism. Plume signatures in terms of radiation temperatures varied from a few hundred Kelvin to over one thousand Kelvin, and were predicted to be dependent on emission frequency, propellant type and missile thrust. Two types of platform were considered for the passive mmw imager launch detection system; a High Altitude Platform Station (HAPS) and a satellite based platform in low, mid and geosynchronous earth orbits. It was concluded that the optimum operating frequency for a HAPS based imager would be 35GHz with a 4.5m aperture and a sensitivity of 20mK providing visibility through 500 vertical feet of cloud. For a satellite based platform with a nadir view, the optimum frequency is 220 GHz. With such a system, in a low earth orbit at an altitude of 320km, with a sensitivity of 20mK, a 29cm aperture would be desirable.

  8. Ionospheric effects of the missile destruction on 9 December 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Shalimov, Sergey; Lukianova, Renata; Lester, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We report on ionosonde and meteor radar observations made in Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO, 67°22'N, 26°38'E, Finland) on 9 December 2009, during a test launch of the Russian solid propellant military missile. Due to a technical problem, the missile was self-destroyed around 07 UT at an ionospheric height (near 200 km altitude) over the Kola Peninsula (Russia), at a distance about 500 km to east from the observatory. Products of the explosion were spread into a large area and reached the region of SGO meteor radar observations in about 2 h (around 09 UT). After about 3 h (around 10 UT), a sporadic E layer presumably composed of the remains including long-lived metallic (aluminum and its oxides) ions, was observed near the zenith of the SGO ionosonde. We discuss possible mechanisms accounting for transport of the remains. (1) Since the event occurred during a long-lasting period of extremely low solar and magnetic activity, the ionospheric electric field was unlikely to play a substantial role in the transport of the remains and sporadic E layer formation. (2) The horizontal transport of the remains cannot be explained by the neutral winds based on empirical models. (3) Theoretical estimations suggest that the observed transport could be due to thermospheric turbulence.

  9. The optimization of an optical missile guidance tracker.

    PubMed

    Spiro, I J

    1969-07-01

    An antitank missile guidance system is described, which employs a tracker using two parallel optical paths and a pyrotechnic flare. Both optical channels are spectrally filtered; one rejects the target and views only the flare image; the other rejects the flare and views only the target. In performing the guidance tracking task, the operator superimposes the flare image on the target, thus providing steering signals to the missile. This paper describes an optimum flare as one with maximum luminous spectral emittance, minimum bandwidth, and minimum noise. Then with the selected flare as a basis, the optical components are matched individually and as an assembly to obtain maximum flare-filter system output. Calculated improvements of 100 to 250% were obtained in the performance of critical components which were reflected in the system operation and were subsequently verified by system field tests. The transmission ratios, visibility coefficients, improvement factors, and other bases for improvement are stated and discussed. Finally, the experiments performed and improvements achieved are described.

  10. Six-degree-of-freedom missile simulation using the ADI AD 100 digital computer and ADSIM simulation language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwaanenburg, Koos

    1989-01-01

    The use of an AD 100 computer and the ADSIM language in the six-degree-of-freedom digital simulation of an air-to-ground missile is illustrated. The missile is launched from a moving platform, typically a helicopter, and is capable of striking a mobile target up to 10 kilometers away. The missile could be any tactical missile. The performance numbers of the AD 100 show that it is possible to implement a high performance missile model in a real-time simulation without the problems associated with an implementation on a general purpose computer using FORTRAN.

  11. History of flight motion simulators used for hardware-in-the-loop testing of missile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, John M.; Willis, Kenneth E.

    1998-07-01

    All hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) missile simulations use motion platforms that position the missile seeker and simulated target to relative positions and motions that reproduce a live engagement. These motion platforms are usually called Flight Motion Simulators (FMS). Real-time control computers manage the engagement by simulating the aerodynamic and kinematic responses the missile anticipates, and commanding the missile and target motions to simulate the engagement. The advantages of this technique over live firings are well known: shorter development time, reduced development cost, greater variety in the test scenarios, and generation of objective, measurable, and repeatable criteria for subsystem and system evaluation. This paper focuses on the history of the FMS used in HWIL missile testing and the current applications of these systems. Systems with up to nine axes of rotary motion have been developed for infrared missile seeker simulation, and large target positioning systems have been deployed for RF and point IR target movement. As digital computers have become more powerful and semiconductor infrared scene generation systems developed, new demands have been placed on the FMS. Several of these applications are described. The use of aeroload simulators to study the response of missile aerodynamic control surfaces is also briefly described.

  12. Adaptive nonlinear control of missiles using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Michael Bryan

    Research has shown that neural networks can be used to improve upon approximate dynamic inversion for control of uncertain nonlinear systems. In one architecture, the neural network adaptively cancels inversion errors through on-line learning. Such learning is accomplished by a simple weight update rule derived from Lyapunov theory, thus assuring stability of the closed-loop system. In this research, previous results using linear-in-parameters neural networks were reformulated in the context of a more general class of composite nonlinear systems, and the control scheme was shown to possess important similarities and major differences with established methods of adaptive control. The neural-adaptive nonlinear control methodology in question has been used to design an autopilot for an anti-air missile with enhanced agile maneuvering capability, and simulation results indicate that this approach is a feasible one. There are, however, certain difficulties associated with choosing the proper network architecture which make it difficult to achieve the rapid learning required in this application. Accordingly, this technique has been further extended to incorporate the important class of feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer. These neural networks feature well-known approximation capabilities and provide an effective, although nonlinear, parameterization of the adaptive control problem. Numerical results from a six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear agile anti-air missile simulation demonstrate the effectiveness of the autopilot design based on multilayer networks. Previous work in this area has implicitly assumed precise knowledge of the plant order, and made no allowances for unmodeled dynamics. This thesis describes an approach to the problem of controlling a class of nonlinear systems in the face of both unknown nonlinearities and unmodeled dynamics. The proposed methodology is similar to robust adaptive control techniques derived for control of linear

  13. Origins of the Strategic Defense Initiative: Ballistic Missile Defense, 1944-1983. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baucom, D.R.

    1989-12-01

    America's ballistic missile defense program may be said to have its roots in the V-2 attacks on London in 1944. This document traces the development of antiballistic missile defense policy from the V-2 attacks up to President Reagan's 1983 speech announcing the new strategic defense initiative. The history follows the policy debates from the NIKE-X, SALT I and SALT II, the ABM Treaty, and SAFEGUARD through research and development innovations in the areas of computers, optical sensors, interceptors, and directed energy weapons. The emergence of political organizations and individuals who either opposed or championed ballistic missile defense is also included.

  14. Hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Cubbage, J. M.; Dillon, J. L.; Richie, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Carlson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and performance of several tactical and strategic hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed from an evolutionary perspective. A mid- and chin inlet missile design, constrained to the Navy's vertical box launcher, was investigated; a performance comparison is presented that is favorable to the mid-inlet approach. Parasol wing, confined flow field, and spatula-like cruise missile configurations were examined with strategic applications in mind. The preliminary results are encouraging with respect to aerodynamic and volumetric efficiency and choice of engine integration schemes.

  15. Digital fast pattern recognizer for autonomous target recognition and tracking for advanced missile guidance and UAV reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastbacka, Albin A.

    2003-08-01

    A digital Fast Pattern Processor (DFPP) system under development for the Naval Air Warfare Center, is funded under a SBIR, Phase III contract. It is an automatic target recognizer and tracker candidate for supersonic missile guidance and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance to meet the U.S. navy's time-critical strike objectives. The former application requires rapid processing of moderate size, real time image arrays, versus large real time image arrays for the latter case. The DFPP correlates operator selected target filters against observed imagery at 1500 correlations per second as currently implemented with programmable logic devices (PLD's) - equivalent to thirty Pentium III (1 GHz) PC's. High performance and low weight, power, size, cost of the current version make it ideal for on-board image data processing in UAV's and cruise missiles or for ground station processing. Conversion to application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology provides scalable performance to meet future ATR/ATT needs. The Sanders proprietary DFPP technology embodies a Power-FFT, which is the fastest digital fast Fourier transform (DFTT) in the world with performance exceeding supercomputers, at a small fraction of the cost, size, weight, and power. The DFPP operates under control of Sanders Correlation Image Processor (SCIP) program and enables correlation against a plethora of stored target filters (templates).

  16. The use of tags in monitoring limits on mobile missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Fetter, S.

    1987-03-01

    Three tagging systems were considered in this paper: as a supplement to on-site inspection (OSI), as a supplement to national technical means (NTM), and as a supplement to site surveillance systems. Each system would require a different type of tag, perhaps ranging from microchip tags with infrared transponders to navigation receivers. Use of tags as a supplement to OSIs may be the simplest system to implement because it places the least demands on technology. Tags may make OSI more acceptable by replacing humans with remote sensors, thereby decreasing the perceived potential for espionage. Using tags as a supplement to NTM decreases the necessity for human OSI even further, but places higher demands on technology and may affect the normal operation of deployment areas. Site surveillance systems using tags have the potential for excellent missile verification, but they may be excessively intrusive and expensive, and could have a large effect on the normal operation of declared facilities.

  17. Radar signal analysis of ballistic missile with micro-motion based on time-frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianming; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The micro-motion of ballistic missile targets induces micro-Doppler modulation on the radar return signal, which is a unique feature for the warhead discrimination during flight. In order to extract the micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile targets, time-frequency analysis is employed to process the micro-Doppler modulated time-varying radar signal. The images of time-frequency distribution (TFD) reveal the micro-Doppler modulation characteristic very well. However, there are many existing time-frequency analysis methods to generate the time-frequency distribution images, including the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Wigner distribution (WD) and Cohen class distribution, etc. Under the background of ballistic missile defence, the paper aims at working out an effective time-frequency analysis method for ballistic missile warhead discrimination from the decoys.

  18. Ballistic Missile Defense: National Security and the High Frontier of Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adragna, Steven P.

    1985-01-01

    Ballistic missile defense is discussed, and the rationale behind the proposal to place defensive weapons in space is examined. Strategic defense is a national security, political, and moral imperative. (RM)

  19. A low cost maritime control aircraft-ship-weapons system. [antiship missile defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluk, H.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the long-range antiship standoff missile is emerging as the foremost threat on the seas. Delivered by high speed bombers, surface ships, and submarines, a missile attack can be mounted against selected targets from any point on the compass. An investigation is conducted regarding the configuration of a system which could most efficiently identify and destroy standoff threats before they launch their weapons. It is found that by using ships for carrying and launching missiles, and employing aircraft with a powerful radar only for search and missile directing operations, aircraft cost and weight can be greatly reduced. The employment of V/STOL aircraft in preference to other types of aircraft makes it possible to use ships of smaller size for carrying the aircraft. However, in order to obtain an all-weather operational capability for the system, ships are selected which are still big enough to display the required stability in heavy seas.

  20. 76 FR 73600 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ..., were issued on June 2, 2009, and remain in effect until June 2, 2014 (74 FR 26580, June 3, 2009). For... acoustic monitoring or missile launches and visual monitoring of pinnipeds. The Navy submitted their...

  1. The Commercial Application of Missile/Space Technology, Parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welles, John G.; Marts, Lloyd G.; Waterman, Robert H., Jr.; Gilmore, John S.; Venuti, Robert

    1963-01-01

    This report is concerned with the transfer of technology from missile and space programs to non-missile/space applications in the United States. It presents the findings of a University of Denver Research Institute study sponsored by a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) grant awarded in November 1961. Initial stimulation for the unsolicited proposal leading to this study came from a 1960 Brookings Institution report to NASA, Proposed Studies on the Implications of Peaceful Space Activities for Human Affairs.

  2. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring and Helicopter Identification Using a Capacitive Microelectromechanical Systems Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2012-03-27

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing missile health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability, reduce life cycle costs, and increase system readiness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by a helicopter or other aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. Recording the duration of captive carry exposure during the missile’s service life can enable the implementation of predictive maintenance and resource management programs. Since the vibration imparted by each class of helicopter varies in frequency and amplitude, tracking the vibration exposure from each helicopter separately can help quantify the severity and harmonic content of the exposure. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the Hellfire II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the Hellfire II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode. To classify the vibration by class of helicopter, the CCHM analyzes the amplitude and frequency content of the vibration with the Goertzel algorithm to detect the presence of distinctive rotor harmonics. Cumulative usage data are accessible in theater from an external display; monthly usage histograms are accessible through an internal download connector. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to monitor captive carry identify and the class of helicopter, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  3. Solutions of thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations for missile configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtakdoust, Seid Hossein

    1989-12-01

    Solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations were obtained for two typical missile bodies as well as two complete missile configurations. The finite-differenced three-dimensional equations are solved using a modified NASA Ames solver code on a body-fitted curvi-linear grid system developed in conjunction with the flowfield solver. The grid program is based on the method of algebraic interpolation and is capable of generating three-dimensional grid systems for missile bodies and finned-missiles having up to eight control surfaces. The numerical procedure is based on an implicit approximate factorization algorithm employing a multi-grid approach in the simulation of flow about complex finned-missile configurations. The present procedures are proven effective in dealing with complete missile configurations flying at high angles of attack. The predicted aerodynamic loading coefficients and pressure distributions match the available wind-tunnel data with good accuracy. Flow non-linearities such as shock, streamwise and cross-flow separations, and reverse flow were detected and verified with the available experimental reports. Leading-edge separation and classical patterns of vortical flow were also numerically obtained and studied for interaction effects. The Mach number and Reynolds number effects on the convergence of the numerical process are also discussed.

  4. Missile airframe simulation testbed: MANPADS (MAST-M) for test and evaluation of aircraft survivability equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jim; Robinson, Richard; Bunt, Leslie; Robinson, Joe

    2011-06-01

    A number of techniques have been utilized to evaluate the performance of Aircraft Survivability Equipment (ASE) against threat Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS). These techniques include flying actual threat MANPADS against stationary ASE with simulated aircraft signatures, testing installed ASE systems against simulated threat signatures, and laboratory hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing with simulated aircraft and simulated missile signatures. All of these tests lack the realism of evaluating installed ASE against in-flight MANPADS on a terminal homing intercept path toward the actual ASE equipped aircraft. This limitation is due primarily to the current inability to perform non-destructive MANPADS/Aircraft flight testing. The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research and Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) is working to overcome this limitation with the development of a recoverable surrogate MANPADS missile system capable of engaging aircraft equipped with ASE while guaranteeing collision avoidance with the test aircraft. Under its Missile Airframe Simulation Testbed - MANPADS (MAST-M) program, the AMRDEC is developing a surrogate missile system which will utilize actual threat MANPADS seeker/guidance sections to control the flight of a surrogate missile which will perform a collision avoidance and recovery maneuver prior to intercept to insure non-destructive test and evaluation of the ASE and reuse of the MANPADS seeker/guidance section. The remainder of this paper provides an overview of this development program and intended use.

  5. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/9: De-Alerting Strategic Ballistic Missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Leonard W.; Edenburn, Michael W.; Fraley, Stanley K.; Trost, Lawrence C.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a framework for evaluating the technical merits of strategic ballistic missile de-alerting measures, and it uses the framework to evaluate a variety of possible measures for silo-based, land-mobile, and submarine-based missiles. De-alerting measures are defined for the purpose of this paper as reversible actions taken to increase the time or effort required to launch a strategic ballistic missile. The paper does not assess the desirability of pursuing a de-alerting program. Such an assessment is highly context dependent. The paper postulates that if de-alerting is desirable and is used as an arms control mechanism, de-alerting measures should satisfy specific cirteria relating to force security, practicality, effectiveness, significant delay, and verifiability. Silo-launched missiles lend themselves most readily to de-alerting verification, because communications necessary for monitoring do not increase the vulnerabilty of the weapons by a significant amount. Land-mobile missile de-alerting measures would be more challenging to verify, because monitoring measures that disclose the launcher's location would potentially increase their vulnerability. Submarine-launched missile de-alerting measures would be extremely challlenging if not impossible to monitor without increasing the submarine's vulnerability.

  6. Countermeasure effectiveness against an intelligent imaging infrared anti-ship missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Greer J.; Aouf, Nabil; Richardson, Mark; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2013-02-01

    Ship self defense against heat-seeking anti-ship missiles is of great concern to modern naval forces. One way of protecting ships against these threats is to use infrared (IR) offboard countermeasures. These decoys need precise placement to maximize their effectiveness, and simulation is an invaluable tool used in determining optimum deployment strategies. To perform useful simulations, high-fidelity models of missiles are required. We describe the development of an imaging IR anti-ship missile model for use in countermeasure effectiveness simulations. The missile model's tracking algorithm is based on a target recognition system that uses a neural network to discriminate between ships and decoys. The neural network is trained on shape- and intensity-based features extracted from simulated imagery. The missile model is then used within ship-decoy-missile engagement simulations, to determine how susceptible it is to the well-known walk-off seduction countermeasure technique. Finally, ship survivability is improved by adjusting the decoy model to increase its effectiveness against the tracker.

  7. Coping strategies among adolescents: Israeli Jews and Arabs facing missile attacks.

    PubMed

    Braun-Lewensohn, Orna; Sagy, Shifra; Roth, Guy

    2010-01-01

    The study examined the use of coping strategies among Israeli Jewish and Arab adolescents who faced missile attacks during the Second Lebanon War. We further explored the role of ethnicity, gender and age in explaining psychological distress and the ways in which different coping strategies relate to health outcomes in the two ethnic groups. Data were gathered from 303 Israeli adolescents (231 Jews and 72 Arabs), 12-19 years old, who filled out self-reported questionnaires among which were demographics; Adolescent Coping Scale, Scale of Psychological Distress (SPD), state anxiety and state anger. Both Jewish and Arab adolescents mostly used "problem solving" coping strategies and reported relatively low levels of psychological distress. Similarities among Jews and Arabs were indicated in the use of "problem solving" coping strategies but not in the use of "reference to others"--and "non-productive" coping strategies. Significant but small effects were indicated for gender and interaction of ethnicity and age on "psychological distress." The coping strategies explained only 35% of the variance of stress reactions for the Jewish group but 51% for the Arab group. The results are discussed against the background of an interactionist approach, considering coping as a function of interaction between the stressful war event and the individual-cultural background.

  8. Methodology for determination and use of the no-escape envelope of an air-to-air-missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank

    1988-01-01

    A large gap exists between optimal control and differential-game theory and their applications. The purpose of this paper is to show how this gap may be bridged. Missile-avoidance of realistically simulated infrared heat-seeking, fire-and-forget missile is studied. In detailed simulations, sweeping out the discretized initial condition space, avoidance methods based on pilot experience are combined with those based on simplified optimal control analysis to derive an approximation to the no-escape missile envelopes. The detailed missile equations and no-escape envelopes were then incorporated into an existing piloted simulation of air-to-air combat to generate missile firing decisions as well as missile avoidance commands. The use of these envelopes was found to be effective in both functions.

  9. Preliminary scramjet design for hypersonic airbreathing missile application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design study of a scramjet engine was conducted for a hypersonic surface to air missile (HYSAM). The definition of the engine was based upon the requirements of accelerating the HYSAM from Mach 4 at 20,000 feet to Mach 6 at 100,000 feet and the cruise conditions at Mach 6. The resulting external and internal environmental conditions were used by various engineering disciplines performing design, stress and heat transfer analysis. A detailed structural analysis was conducted along with an indepth thermal analysis. Structurally all the components within the system exhibit positive margins of safety. A feasible concept was defined which uses state-of-the-art materials and existing TMC technology. The engine basically consists of a three dimensional carbon/carbon combustor/nozzle secured to an FS-85 columbium inlet. The carbon/carbon liner is sheathed with carbon felt insulation to thermally protect the FS-85 structure and skin. The thermal analysis of the engine indicates that a thermally viable configuration exists.

  10. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  11. Missile guidance law design using adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Min; Peng, Ya-Fu

    2005-05-01

    An adaptive cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) is proposed for command to line-of-sight (CLOS) missile guidance law design. In this design, the three-dimensional (3-D) CLOS guidance problem is formulated as a tracking problem of a time-varying nonlinear system. The adaptive CMAC control system is comprised of a CMAC and a compensation controller. The CMAC control is used to imitate a feedback linearization control law and the compensation controller is utilized to compensate the difference between the feedback linearization control law and the CMAC control. The online adaptive law is derived based on the Lyapunov stability theorem to learn the weights of receptive-field basis functions in CMAC control. In addition, in order to relax the requirement of approximation error bound, an estimation law is derived to estimate the error bound. Then the adaptive CMAC control system is designed to achieve satisfactory tracking performance. Simulation results for different engagement scenarios illustrate the validity of the proposed adaptive CMAC-based guidance law.

  12. Air intakes for a probative missile of rocket ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laruelle, G.

    1984-01-01

    The methods employed to test air intakes for a supersonic guided ramjet powered missile being tested by ONERA are described. Both flight tests and wind tunnel tests were performed on instrumented rockets to verify the designs. Consideration as given to the number of intakes, with the goal of delivering the maximum pressure to the engine. The S2, S4, and S5 wind tunnels were operated at Mach nos. 1.5-3 for the tests, which were compartmentalized into fuselage-intake interaction, optimization of the intake shapes, and the intake performance. Tests were performed on the length and form of the ogive, the presence of grooves, the height of traps in the boundary layer, the types and number of intakes and the lengths and forms of diffusers. Attention was also given to the effects of sideslip, effects of the longitudinal and circumferential positions of the intakes were also examined. Near optimum performance was realized during Mach 2.2 test flights of the prototype rockets.

  13. Solar-blind ultraviolet optical system design for missile warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Huo, Furong; Zheng, Liqin

    2015-03-01

    Solar-blind region of Ultraviolet (UV) spectrum has very important application in military field. The spectrum range is from 240nm to 280nm, which can be applied to detect the tail flame from approaching missile. A solar-blind UV optical system is designed to detect the UV radiation, which is an energy system. iKon-L 936 from ANDOR company is selected as the UV detector, which has pixel size 13.5μm x 13.5 μm and active image area 27.6mm x 27.6 mm. CaF2 and F_silica are the chosen materials. The original structure is composed of 6 elements. To reduce the system structure and improve image quality, two aspheric surfaces and one diffractive optical element are adopted in this paper. After optimization and normalization, the designed system is composed of five elements with the maximum spot size 11.988μ m, which is less than the pixel size of the selected CCD detector. Application of aspheric surface and diffractive optical element makes each FOV have similar spot size, which shows the system almost meets the requirements of isoplanatic condition. If the focal length can be decreased, the FOV of the system can be enlarged further.

  14. An affinity-directed protein missile system for targeted proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Luke J.; Macartney, Thomas; Bozatzi, Polyxeni; Hornberger, Annika; Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein serves to recruit the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF1α) protein under normoxia to the CUL2 E3 ubiquitin ligase for its ubiquitylation and degradation through the proteasome. In this report, we modify VHL to engineer an affinity-directed protein missile (AdPROM) system to direct specific endogenous target proteins for proteolysis in mammalian cells. The proteolytic AdPROM construct harbours a cameloid anti-green fluorescence protein (aGFP) nanobody that is fused to VHL for either constitutive or tetracycline-inducible expression. For target proteins, we exploit CRISPR/Cas9 to rapidly generate human kidney HEK293 and U2OS osteosarcoma homozygous knock-in cells harbouring GFP tags at the VPS34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) and protein associated with SMAD1 (PAWS1, aka FAM83G) loci, respectively. Using these cells, we demonstrate that the expression of the VHL-aGFP AdPROM system results in near-complete degradation of the endogenous GFP-VPS34 and PAWS1-GFP proteins through the proteasome. Additionally, we show that Tet-inducible destruction of GFP-VPS34 results in the degradation of its associated partner, UVRAG, and reduction in levels of cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PMID:27784791

  15. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Early, M.; Dawson, R.; Zeiner, P.; Turk, M.; Benn, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study of small gas turbine engines was conducted to identify high payoff technologies for year-2000 engines and to define companion technology plans. The study addressed engines in the 186 to 746 KW (250 to 1000 shp) or equivalent thrust range for rotorcraft, commuter (turboprop), cruise missile (turbojet), and APU applications. The results show that aggressive advancement of high payoff technologies can produce significant benefits, including reduced SFC, weight, and cost for year-2000 engines. Mission studies for these engines show potential fuel burn reductions of 22 to 71 percent. These engine benefits translate into reductions in rotorcraft and commuter aircraft direct operating costs (DOC) of 7 to 11 percent, and in APU-related DOCs of 37 to 47 percent. The study further shows that cruise missile range can be increased by as much as 200 percent (320 percent with slurry fuels) for a year-2000 missile-turbojet system compared to a current rocket-powered system. The high payoff technologies were identified and the benefits quantified. Based on this, technology plans were defined for each of the four engine applications as recommended guidelines for further NASA research and technology efforts to establish technological readiness for the year 2000.

  16. Volatile organic components of air samples collected from Vertical Launch Missile capsules. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, D.V.; Knight, D.R.; Heyder, E.; Weathersby, P.K.

    1988-09-27

    Gas chromatographic/mass spectroscopic analyses are presented for the volatile organic components found in air samples collected from the inboard vents from Vertical Launch System (VLS) missile capsules aboard a 688 class submarine. Similar analyses were also conducted for a sample of the ship's high pressure air used to fill the missile tubes. A wide variety of organics was detected in the air from the missile capsules; and while no unique components have yet been identified, a significant contribution has been shown to be made by pressure-ventilation of the VLS capsules into the submarine atmosphere which is already heavily laden with volatile organic compounds. The most apparent conclusion from these preliminary analyses is that the mixtures of organic components in the air within VLS missile capsules vary greatly from capsule to capsule (and probably from time to time). Many such samples need to be investigated to provide sufficient information to judge the seriousness of the possibility of venting toxic components into the submarine atmosphere during the maintenance or firing of VLS missiles.

  17. Full-scale turbine-missile-casing tests. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Schamaun, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of two full-scale tests simulating the impact of turbine disk fragments on simple ring and shell structures that represent the internal stator blade ring and the outer housing of an 1800-rpm steam turbine casing. The objective was to provide benchmark data on both the energy-absorbing mechanisms of the impact process and, if breakthrough occured, the exit conditions of the turbine missile. A rocket sled was used to accelerate a 1527-kg (3366-lb) segment of a turbine disk, which impacted a steel ring 12.7 cm (5 in.) thick and a steel shell 3.2 cm (1.25 in.) thick. The impact velocity of about 150 m/s (492 ft/s) gave a missile kinetic energy corresponding to the energy of a fragment from a postulated failure at the design overspeed (120% of operating speed). Depending on the orientation of the missile at impact, the steel test structure either slowed the missile to 60% of its initial translational velocity or brought it almost to rest (an energy reduction of 65 and 100%, respectively). The report includes structural and finite element analysis and data interpretation, estimates of energy during impact, missile displacement and velocity histories, and selected strain gage data.

  18. Use of noise attenuation modeling in managing missile motor detonation activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Watkins, Jeffrey W; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Palmer, Glenn R

    2004-03-01

    The Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) and Blast Operation Overpressure Model (BOOM) are semiempirical sound models that are employed by the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) to predict whether noise levels from the detonation of large missile motors will exceed regulatory thresholds. Field validation of SIPS confirmed that the model was effective in limiting the number of detonations of large missile motors that could potentially result in a regulatory noise exceedance. Although the SIPS accurately predicted the impact of weather on detonation noise propagation, regulators have required that the more conservative BOOM model be employed in conjunction with SIPS in evaluating peak noise levels in populated areas. By simultaneously considering the output of both models, in 2001, UTTR detonated 104 missile motors having net explosive weights (NEW) that ranged between 14,960 and 38,938 lb without a recorded public noise complaint. Based on the encouraging results, the U.S. Department of Defense is considering expanding the application of these noise models to support the detonation of missile motors having a NEW of 81,000 lb. Recent modeling results suggest that, under appropriate weather conditions, missile motors containing up to 96,000 lb NEW can be detonated at the UTTR without exceeding the regulatory noise limit of 134 decibels (dB).

  19. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility....

  20. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility....

  1. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility. 334.1390 Section 334.1390 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; missile range facility....

  2. Elegant irrelevance: The anti-ballistic missile treaty in the new world disorder. Report for August-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, G.B.

    1994-11-15

    Concern over global proliferation of theater ballistic missiles has prompted calls for limited national and effective theater ballistic missile defense (TBMD) programs. However, the ABM Treaty, a cold war relic, is a major stumbling block to such programs because it prohibits the deployment of ABM defenses, and does not distinguish between prohibited ABM defenses and TBMD systems.

  3. 75 FR 54918 - Draft Regulatory Guide, DG-1247, “Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... August 31, 2010 (75 FR 53352), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a notice of... missile velocities must also be defined. The NRC commissioned a report, NUREG/CR 7004, on design-basis hurricane-borne missile velocities. This report describes the method used to calculate velocities...

  4. 77 FR 64564 - Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles AGENCY....221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles.'' The purpose of this ISG is to supplement the guidance regarding the application of Regulatory Guide 1.221, ``Design-Basis Hurricane and...

  5. 78 FR 31614 - Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... 2007 (ML070630003). On October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64564), the staff issued the proposed DC/COL-ISG-024... COMMISSION Implementation of Regulatory Guide 1.221 on Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles AGENCY....221, ``Design-Basis Hurricane and Hurricane Missiles for Nuclear Power Plants,'' in support of...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1390 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off the Pacific... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1390 Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at... Pacific Missile Range Facility range boats, beach markings including beach signs along the north and...

  7. Application of an advanced trajectory optimization method to ramjet propelled missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, S. W.; Fink, L. E.; Joosten, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    The mission performance characteristics of ramjet-propelled missiles are highly dependent upon the trajectory flown. Integration of the trajectory profile with the ramjet propulsion system performance characteristics to achieve optimal missile performance is very complex. Past trajectory optimization methods have been extremely problem dependent and require a high degree of familiarity to achieve success. A general computer code (CTOP) has been applied to ramjet-powered missiles to compute open-loop optimal trajectories. CTOP employs Chebyshev polynomial representations of the states and controls. This allows a transformation of the continuous optimal control problem to one of parameter optimization. With this method, the trajectory boundary conditions are always satisfied. State dynamics and path constraints are enforced via penalty functions. The presented results include solutions to minimum fuel-to-climb, minimum time-to-climb, and minimum time-to-target intercept problems.

  8. Range maximization method for ramjet powered missiles with flight path constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoettle, U. M.

    1982-03-01

    Mission performance of ramjet powered missiles is strongly infuenced by the trajectory flown. The trajectory optimization problem considered is to obtain the control time histories (i.e., propellant flow rate and angle of attack) which maximize the range of ramjet powered supersonic missiles with preset initial and terminal fight conditions and operational constraints. The approach chosen employs a parametric control model to represent the infinite-dimensional controls by a finite set of parameters. The resulting suboptimal parameter optimization problem is solved by means of nonlinear programming methods. Operational constraints on the state variables are treated by the method of penalty functions. The presented method and numerical results refer to a fixed geometry solid fuel integral rocket ramjet missile for air-to-surface or surface-to-surface missions. The numerical results demonstrate that continuous throttle capabilities increase range performance by about 5 to 11 percent when compared to more conventional throttle control.

  9. A method for simulating the atmospheric entry of long-range ballistic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, A J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    It is demonstrated with the aid of similitude arguments that a model launched from a hypervelocity gun upstream through a special supersonic nozzle should experience aerodynamic heating and resulting thermal stresses like those encountered by a long-range ballistic missile entering the earth's atmosphere. This demonstration hinges on the requirements that model and missile be geometrically similar and made of the same material, and that they have the same flight speed and Reynolds number (based on conditions just outside the boundary layer) at corresponding points in their trajectories. The hypervelocity gun provides the model with the required initial speed, while the nozzle scales the atmosphere, in terms of density variation, to provide the model with speeds and Reynolds numbers over its entire trajectory. Since both the motion and aerodynamic heating of a missile tend to be simulated in the model tests, this combination of hypervelocity gun and supersonic nozzle is termed an atmosphere entry simulator.

  10. Missile Guidance Law Based on Robust Model Predictive Control Using Neural-Network Optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Xia, Yuanqing; Su, Chun-Yi; Deng, Jun; Fu, Jun; He, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In this brief, the utilization of robust model-based predictive control is investigated for the problem of missile interception. Treating the target acceleration as a bounded disturbance, novel guidance law using model predictive control is developed by incorporating missile inside constraints. The combined model predictive approach could be transformed as a constrained quadratic programming (QP) problem, which may be solved using a linear variational inequality-based primal-dual neural network over a finite receding horizon. Online solutions to multiple parametric QP problems are used so that constrained optimal control decisions can be made in real time. Simulation studies are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness and performance of the proposed guidance control law for missile interception.

  11. Telemetry recording and reduction equipment for shipboard support of missile exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. T.; Jones, G. P.

    The Telemetry Recording and Reduction Equipment (TRRE) is designed to process both the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) telemetry data formats of existing missile designs and the pulse code modulation (PCM) data formats of evolving missile designs. Through preprogrammed telemeter formats and programmable decommutation tables, the TRRE design minimizes the required operator interface. The decommutation hardware configuration is programmed by a microprocessor. The TRRE system comprises two signal-processing chassis, a magnetic tape recorder, and an oscillograph; interfaces are provided for an external printer and spectrum analyzer. The primary purpose of the TRRE on board a ship is to document the missile firing by making a telemetry recording and providing a 'quick-look' and analysis capability at the completion of the flight.

  12. Improved manufacturing techniques for rf and laser hardening of missile domes, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlewicz, W. T.; Mann, I. B.; Martin, P. M.; Hays, D. D.; Graybeal, A. G.

    1982-07-01

    The adaptation of an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high power fusion laser applications to the case of RF and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by US Army (MICOM) is reported. RF hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06 micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings is demonstrated. The project involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat sensitive plastic domes used on laser guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals are an electrical sheet resistance of 10 ohms/square, a coated dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 ohms/square was expected to result in an RF attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  13. Tornado missile simulation and design methodology. Volume 1: simulation methodology, design applications, and TORMIS computer code. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Twisdale, L.A.; Dunn, W.L.

    1981-08-01

    A probabilistic methodology has been developed to predict the probabilities of tornado-propelled missiles impacting and damaging nuclear power plant structures. Mathematical models of each event in the tornado missile hazard have been developed and sequenced to form an integrated, time-history simulation methodology. The models are data based where feasible. The data include documented records of tornado occurrence, field observations of missile transport, results of wind tunnel experiments, and missile impact tests. Probabilistic Monte Carlo techniques are used to estimate the risk probabilities. The methodology has been encoded in the TORMIS computer code to facilitate numerical analysis and plant-specific tornado missile probability assessments. Sensitivity analyses have been performed on both the individual models and the integrated methodology, and risk has been assessed for a hypothetical nuclear power plant design case study.

  14. Analysis and compilation of missile aerodynamic data. Volume 2: Performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhalter, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A general analysis is given of the flight dynamics of several surface-to-air and two air-to-air missile configurations. The analysis involves three phases: vertical climb, straight and level flight, and constant altitude turn. Wind tunnel aerodynamic data and full scale missile characteristics are used where available; unknown data are estimated. For the constant altitude turn phase, a three degree of freedom flight simulation is used. Important parameters considered in this analysis are the vehicle weight, Mach number, heading angle, thrust level, sideslip angle, g loading, and time to make the turn. The actual flight path during the turn is also determined. Results are presented in graphical form.

  15. Fabrication of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fite, E. Brian

    1993-01-01

    This report outlines the procedures that were employed in fabricating prototype graphite-epoxy composite prop fan blades. These blades were used in wind tunnel tests that investigated prop fan propulsion system interactions with a missile airframe in order to study the feasibility of an advanced-technology-propfan-propelled missile. Major phases of the blade fabrication presented include machining of the master blade, mold fabrication, ply cutting and assembly, blade curing, and quality assurance. Specifically, four separate designs were fabricated, 18 blades of each geometry, using the same fabrication technique for each design.

  16. Exhaust plumes and their interaction with missile airframes - A new viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Sinha, N.

    1992-01-01

    The present, novel treatment of missile airframe-exhaust plume interactions emphasizes their simulation via a formal solution of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RNS) equation and is accordingly able to address the simulation requirements of novel missiles with nonconventional/integrated propulsion systems. The method is made possible by implicit RNS codes with improved artificial dissipation models, generalized geometric capabilities, and improved two-equation turbulence models, as well as by such codes' recent incorporation of plume thermochemistry and multiphase flow effects.

  17. Advancement and results in hostile fire indication using potassium line missile warning sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Joel; Montgomery, Marjorie; Hardie, Russell

    2014-06-01

    M&M Aviation has been developing and conducting Hostile Fire Indication (HFI) tests using potassium line emission sensors for the Air Force Visible Missile Warning System (VMWS) to advance both algorithm and sensor technologies for UAV and other airborne systems for self protection and intelligence purposes. Work began in 2008 as an outgrowth of detecting and classifying false alarm sources for the VMWS using the same K-line spectral discrimination region but soon became a focus of research due to the high interest in both machine-gun fire and sniper geo-location via airborne systems. Several initial tests were accomplished in 2009 using small and medium caliber weapons including rifles. Based on these results, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) funded the Falcon Sentinel program in 2010 to provide for additional development of both the sensor concept, algorithm suite changes and verification of basic phenomenology including variance based on ammunition type for given weapons platform. Results from testing over the past 3 years have showed that the system would be able to detect and declare a sniper rifle at upwards of 3km, medium machine gun at 5km, and explosive events like hand-grenades at greater than 5km. This paper will outline the development of the sensor systems, algorithms used for detection and classification, and test results from VMWS prototypes as well as outline algorithms used for the VMWS. The Falcon Sentinel Program will be outlined and results shown. Finally, the paper will show the future work for ATD and transition efforts after the Falcon Sentinel program completed.

  18. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HWIL) facility for development, test, and evaluation of multispectral missile systems: update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Scott B.; Gareri, Jeff P.

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Advanced Simulation Center (ASC) provides hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation support to Program Executive Officers (PEO) and Project Managers (PM) who are responsible for developing and fielding precision guided missiles and sub-munitions for the U.S. Army. The ASC is also engaged in cooperative HWIL simulation tasks supporting other Armed Service Agencies, NATO and other U.S. allies. HWIL simulation provides a means of exercising missile guidance and control hardware in simulated flight, wherein the missile sensors are stimulated with input signals which make the system behave as though it were in actual operation. Real-time computers are used to control the target and countermeasure signatures and battlefield scenarios. Missile flight dynamics, responding to the commands issued by the guidance and control system hardware/software, are simulated in real-time to determine the missile trajectory and to calculate target intercept conditions. The ASC consists of 10 HWIL simulation facilities developed over a period of 20 years. These facilities contain special purpose infrared and RF signal generation equipment, flight motion simulators, radiation chambers, optics, and computers. They provide in- band target signatures, countermeasures, and background scenarios in the microwave, millimeter wave, infrared and visible regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The ASC HWIL simulation facilities are an important source of test and evaluation data and have a critical role in all phases of a missile system life cycle. The development of a new generation of missile systems that use multi-spectral seekers has imposed unique and difficult requirements on ASC HWIL simulation facilities. For the past three years, the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has been developing a HWIL simulation facility to test common aperture multi-spectral missile seekers. This paper discusses the problems encountered during the

  19. Advancements in hardware-in-the-loop simulations at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A.; Jolly, Alexander C.; Mobley, Scott B.; Sholes, William J.

    2000-07-01

    A greater awareness of and increased interest in the use of modeling and simulation (M&S) has been demonstrated at many levels within the Department of Defense (DoD) and all the Armed Services agencies in recent years. M&S application is regarded as a viable means of lowering the life cycle costs of missile defense and tactical missile weapon system acquisition beginning with studies of new concepts of war-fighting through user training and post-deployment support. The Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC) of the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has an extensive history of applying all types of M&S to weapons system development and has been a particularly strong advocate of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation and test for many years. Over the past 40 years AMRDEC has developed and maintained the Advanced Simulation Center (ASC) which provides world-class, high fidelity, specific and dedicated HWIL simulation and test capabilities for the Army's missile defense and tactical missile program offices in both the infrared and radio frequency sensor domains. The ASC facility uses M&S to conduct daily HWIL missile simulations and tests to support flight tests, missile/system development, independent verification and validation of weapon system embedded software and simulations, and missile/system performance against current and future threat environments. This paper describes the ASC role, recaps the past year, describes the HWIL components and advancements, and outlines the path-ahead for the ASC in terms of both missile and complete system HWIL simulations and test with a focus on the imaging infrared systems.

  20. Composite hardbody and missile plume (CHAMP 98) IR scene generation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Dennis R.; Coker, Charles F.

    1998-07-01

    The Composite Hardbody and Missile Plume (CHAMP) program is a computer simulation used to provide time dependent high- fidelity infrared (IR) simulations of airborne vehicles. CHAMP computational algorithms are based on first principle physics that compute hardbody and exhaust plume radiation (absorption, emission, and reflection) for arbitrary vehicle operational state, position, orientation and atmospheric condition. All computations are performed as a function of time to allow complex vehicle dynamics to be simulated. Image processing functions are included to generate anti-aliased focal plane imagery. CHAMP can be utilized to simulate post-boost vehicle, re-entry vehicle, boost missile, theater missile, cruise missile, aircraft, and helicopter applications. CHAMP development is sponsored by the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware- In-the-Loop Simulator (KHILS) facility at Eglin AFB, Florida. CHAMP is routinely utilized by KHILS to support on-going hardware-in-the-loop testing of IR seekers. Many of these tests are complex and diversified. CHAMP has been structured to support these tests by employing current generation object oriented design methodologies that facilitate adaptation to specific test requirements.

  1. Tests of a Hermes A-2 Missile Body at Mach Number 4.04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmann, Edward F.; Lord, Douglas R.

    1950-01-01

    Force tests on a proposed body shape of the Hermes A-2 missile with and without longitudinal spoilers were made at Mach number 4.04. Values of normal force coefficient, pitching-moment coefficient, and center-of-pressure position were obtained.

  2. Casualties from guided missile impact in warships from another point of view.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, C F

    1991-06-01

    From Kamikaze to Exocet, by learning from history a tool for casualty calculation in modern naval warfare is available, indicating absolute casualty figures per SS guided missile hit. The figures 35 wounded and 30 killed per hit ought to be used. PMID:1852281

  3. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-186-1628, Raytheon Missile Systems Division, Bristol, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, S.; Lucas, C.

    1985-09-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for cutting-oil mists, metal working fluids, and mineral spirits at Raytheon Missile Systems Divisions, Bristol, Tennessee in July, 1985. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate the occurrence of skin rashes in Machine-Department employees.

  4. The Synthesis of Optimum Homing Missile Guidance Systems with Statistical Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Elwood C.; Smith, Gerald L.

    1959-01-01

    An analytical approach is presented which is applicable to the optimization of homing navigation guidance systems which are forced to operate in the presence of radar noise. The two primary objectives are to establish theoretical minimum miss distance performance and a method of synthesizing the optimum control system. The factors considered are: (1) target evasive maneuver, (2) radar glint noise, (3) missile maneuverability, and (4) the inherent time-varying character of the kinematics. Two aspects of the problem are considered. In the first, consideration is given only to minimization of the miss distance. The solution given cannot be achieved in practice because the required accelerations are too large. In the second, results are extended to the practical case where the limited acceleration capabilities of the missile are considered by placing a realistic restriction on the mean-square acceleration so that system operation is confined to the linear range. Although the exact analytical solution of the latter problem does not appear feasible, approximate solutions utilizing time-varying control systems can be found. One of these solutions - a range multiplication type control system - is studied in detail. It is shown that the minimum obtainable miss distance with a realistic restriction on acceleration is close to the absolute minimum for unlimited missile maneuverability. Furthermore, it is shown that there is an equivalence in performance between the homing and beam-rider type guidance systems. Consideration is given to the effect of changes in target acceleration, noise magnitude, and missile acceleration on the minimum miss distance.

  5. Military aircraft and missile technology at the Langley Research Center: A selected bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of reference material is presented on the Langley Research Center's efforts in developing advanced military aircraft and missile technology over the past twenty years. Reference material includes research made in aerodynamics, performance, stability, control, stall-spin, propulsion integration, flutter, materials, and structures.

  6. 78 FR 42430 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations Based on the 2012 Missile Technology Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Technology Control Regime (MTCR) Annex that were agreed to by MTCR member countries at the October 2012... export control arrangement among 34 nations, including most of the world's advanced suppliers of missiles... countries implement in accordance with their national export controls. The MTCR seeks to limit the risk...

  7. Fly-away restraint pin mechanism for the Army's PATRIOT missile system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the longitudinal restraint mechanism for the PATRIOT missile system is reviewed. Two approaches for the restraint pin design are discussed: an initial ordnance mechanism, and a passive fly-away mechanism. Because of reliability problems and a desire to reduce cost the fly-away restraint mechanism was chosen.

  8. Space radiation studies at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delapaz, A.

    1972-01-01

    The operation of the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor is discussed. Space radiation studies in radiobiology, dosimetry, and transient radiation effects on electronic systems and components are described. Proposed modifications to increase the capability of the facility are discussed.

  9. 76 FR 4322 - Availability of the Fiscal Year 2009 Missile Defense Agency Services Contracts Inventory Pursuant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... United States Code as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (NDAA 08... of the Secretary Availability of the Fiscal Year 2009 Missile Defense Agency Services Contracts... Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Office of Strategic Sourcing (DPAP/SS) will make available to the...

  10. 32 CFR 644.531 - Warning to public of danger in handling explosive missiles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Warning to public of danger in handling explosive missiles. 644.531 Section 644.531 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land...

  11. Using hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation to provide low-cost testing of TMD IR missile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Paone, Thad

    1998-07-01

    A greater awareness of and increased interest in the use of modeling and simulation (M&S) has been demonstrated at many levels within the Department of Defense (DoD) and all the Armed Services agencies in recent years. M&S application is regarded as a viable means of lowering the life cycle costs of theater missile defense (TMD) weapon system acquisition beginning with studies of new concepts of warfighting through user training and post-deployment support. The Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (MRDEC) of the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has an extensive history of applying all types of M&S to TMD weapon system development and has been a particularly strong advocate of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation for many years. Over the past 10 years MRDEC has developed specific and dedicated HWIL capabilities for TMD applications in both the infrared and radio frequency sensor domains. This paper provides an overview of the infrared-based TMD HWIL missile facility known as the Imaging Infrared System Simulation (I2RSS) which is used to support the Theater High Altitude Air Defense (THAAD) missile system. This facility uses M&S to conduct daily THAAD HWIL missile simulations to support flight tests, missile/system development, independent verification and validation of weapon system embedded software and simulations, and missile/system performance against current and future threat environments. This paper describes the THAAD TMD HWIL role, process, major components, HWIL verification/validation, and daily HWIL support areas in terms of both missile and complete system.

  12. Deterrence of ballistic missile systems and their effects on today's air operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    Lately, the effect-based approach has gained importance in executing air operations. Thus, it makes more successful in obtaining the desired results by breaking the enemy's determination in a short time. Air force is the first option to be chosen in order to defuse the strategic targets. However, the problems such as the defense of targets and country, radars, range…etc. becoming serious problems. At this level ballistic missiles emerge as a strategic weapon. Ultimate emerging technologies guided by the INS and GPS can also be embedded with multiple warheads and reinforced with conventional explosive, ballistic missiles are weapons that can destroy targets with precision. They have the advantage of high speed, being easily launched from every platform and not being easily detected by air defense systems contrary to other air platforms. While these are the advantages, there are also disadvantages of the ballistic missiles. The high cost, unavailability of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, and its limited effect while using conventional explosives against destroying the fortified targets are the disadvantages. The features mentioned above should be considered as limitation to the impact of the ballistic missiles. The aim is to impose the requests on enemies without starting a war with all components and to ensure better implementation of the operation functions during the air operations. In this study, effects of ballistic missiles in the future on air battle theatre will be discussed in the beginning, during the process and at the end phase of air operations within the scope of an effect-based approach.

  13. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

    1998-10-01

    The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

  14. The Effects of Plasma Shield on the Radar Cross Section of a Generic Missile in UHF Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shen

    2011-10-01

    RF Stealth is the dominant technology in today's military aircraft, and most is achieved by shape design with a few reductions achieved by RAM, but most of these effects are only valid in X band. With the popularity of UHF radar again rising, the possibility of detecting a stealth object has increased due to resonance effect, and this is difficult to decrease with previous means due to the long wavelength. A plasma shield generated in front of an object may be suitable to alter the RCS in specific band without physically changing its shape. We examine the RCS of a generic missile in UHF band, and compared it with one with a cone-shape plasma generated in front of the missile. We find the plasma effectively changes the RCS of the missile, though not necessarily smaller. The RCS of the missile with the plasma shield is now dominated by the plasma instead of the missile. The RCS is a function of the size, shape, and density of the plasma shield. For higher frequency signals like the X band radar, it can still penetrate the plasma, and sees the original RCS of the missile. Due to the relatively lower UHF frequency, the plasma density needed is lower than one in X band and thus more practical to achieve.

  15. Comparison of head-steered and aircraft-fixed infrared imagery for employing the AGM-65 Maverick missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgood, Robert K.; Wells, Maxwell J.; Meador, Douglas P.

    1995-05-01

    Eight veteran USAF fighter pilots, experienced with AGM-65 Maverick air-to-ground missiles, flew a night, low-level ground attack mission in a flight simulator equipped with a helmet-mounted display (HMD). The mission was performed by delivering five Maverick missiles against ground vehicles using either an aircraft-fixed forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor image on a head-up display (HUD) or a head-steered FLIR as the missile aiming device. Additionally, the pilots employed their weapons by two methods: fixing and launching missiles singly or in varying numbers (multiple method). The purpose of the experiment was to determine what, if any, advantage there is to employing the AGM-65 using the HMD FLIR image to slew the missile seeker onto the target versus the conventional method of using the FLIR image displayed on the HUD. With a head-steered sensor (and fixing and launching weapons singly) subjects released their weapons quicker (14.6 second interval between launches vs. 17.1 sec.), at a higher altitude (1739 feet vs. 1603 ft.), and slightly farther from the target (3.42 nautical miles vs. 3.37 nm). Furthermore, data indicated the pilots looked farther off-boresight when searching for and locking the weapon onto a target, thereby more effectively using the full field-of-regard of the missile seeker. The participants also contributed their opinions of the advantages and disadvantages of the two mechanizations.

  16. Gun burner injury: a peculiar accidental self-inflicted missile head injury.

    PubMed

    Komolafe, E O; Olateju, O S; Adeolu, A A

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to report the pattern of unusual accidental missile head injuries from the use of the locally-manufactured Dane gun, which presented at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Six illustrative patients are presented, each with a peculiar injury. All the patients except one, who died prior to surgery, had wound debridement and elevation of associated fractures with removal of the metallic foreign body. With the exception of the patient that died prior to surgical intervention, all did well without noticeable neurological deficits. Missile injury to the head is increasing. Firearm-related death is also on the increase and our environment is not exempted. Accidental injuries from stray bullets are fairly common; however, self-inflicted injuries are usually due to the improper handling of firearms, particularly by novices, suicide attempts and faulty technology of locally made firearms.

  17. Hardware-in-the-loop test facility for the standard missile-3 kinetic warhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchan, Robert M.

    2005-05-01

    The Guidance System Evaluation Laboratory of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory developed a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation facility in 2000 for the test and evaluation of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) kinetic warhead. We continue to expand on this architecture to facilitate the test of the tactically deployed SM-3 system. An overview and philosophy of the HWIL facility is described. Each of the key test equipment devices is described, along with an upgrade path that provides more accuracy and reliability, as well as increased test capability. The key components are the body dynamics simulation control computer, a scene rendering computer, a resistive-array IR scene projector, and support optics.

  18. Overview of dynamic scene projectors at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Saylor, Daniel A.; Buford, James A.

    2002-07-01

    The Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center (AMRDEC) of the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) has an extensive history of applying all types of modeling and simulation to weapon system development and has been a particularly strong advocate of hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation and test for many years. Key to the successful application of HWIL testing at AMCOM has been the use of state-of-the-art IR Scene Projector technologies. This paper describes recent advancements within the AMRDEC Advanced Simulation Center HWIL facilities with a specific emphasis on the sate of the various IRSP technologies employed. Included in these IRSP technologies are the latest Honeywell and Santa Barbara IR emitter arrays, the DMD-based IR projectors, and the laser diode array projector.

  19. Cartesian-Grid Simulations of a Canard-Controlled Missile with a Free-Spinning Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a series of simulations of a geometrically complex, canard-controlled, supersonic missile with free-spinning tail fins. Time-dependent simulations were performed using an inviscid Cartesian-grid-based method with results compared to both experimental data and high-resolution Navier-Stokes computations. At fixed free stream conditions and canard deflections, the tail spin rate was iteratively determined such that the net rolling moment on the empennage is zero. This rate corresponds to the time-asymptotic rate of the free-to-spin fin system. After obtaining spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients for the missile, the investigation seeks a fixed-tail approximation to the spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients, and examines the validity of this approximation over a variety of freestream conditions.

  20. The application of some lifting-body reentry concepts to missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of some lifting-body concepts are examined with a view to the applicability of such concepts to the design of missiles. A considerable amount of research has been done in past years with vehicle concepts suitable for manned atmospheric-entry and atmospheric flight. Some of the concepts appear to offer some novel design approaches for missiles for a variety of missions and flight profiles, including long-range orbital/reentry with transatmospheric operation for strategic penetration, low altitude penetration, and battlefield tactical. The concepts considered include right triangular pyramidal configurations, a lenticular configuration, and various 75-degree triangular planform configurations with variations in body camber and control systems. The aerodynamic features are emphasized but some observations are also made relative to other factors such as heat transfer, structures, carriage, observability, propulsion, and volumetric efficiency.

  1. Modular Open System Architecture for Reducing Contamination Risk in the Space and Missile Defense Supply Chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasly, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    To combat contamination of physical assets and provide reliable data to decision makers in the space and missile defense community, a modular open system architecture for creation of contamination models and standards is proposed. Predictive tools for quantifying the effects of contamination can be calibrated from NASA data of long-term orbiting assets. This data can then be extrapolated to missile defense predictive models. By utilizing a modular open system architecture, sensitive data can be de-coupled and protected while benefitting from open source data of calibrated models. This system architecture will include modules that will allow the designer to trade the effects of baseline performance against the lifecycle degradation due to contamination while modeling the lifecycle costs of alternative designs. In this way, each member of the supply chain becomes an informed and active participant in managing contamination risk early in the system lifecycle.

  2. Investigation on Stability in Roll of Square Section Missile at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Fan, Zhaolin; Wu, Jifei; Wu, Wenhua

    An experimental investigation of the stability in roll of a square section missile at high incidence was conducted in FL-23 wind tunnel. Dynamic motions were obtained on a square section missile that is free to rotate about its longitudinal axis. Different dynamic rolling motions were observed depending on the incidence of the model sting. These dynamic regimes include damped oscillations, quasi-limit-cycle wing-rock motion, and constant rolling. A coupling numerical method was established by solving the fluid dynamics equations and the rigid-body dynamics equations synchronously in order to predict the onset and the development of uncommented motions and then explore the unsteady movement characteristics of the aircraft. The study indicates that the aircraft loss stability at high incidence is caused by the asymmetric vertex on the level fin tip liftoff and attach alternately. The computation results are in line with the experiment results.

  3. Average-passage simulation of counter-rotating propfan propulsion systems as applied to cruise missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulac, Richard A.; Schneider, Jon C.; Adamczyk, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Counter-rotating propfan (CRP) propulsion technologies are currently being evaluated as cruise missile propulsion systems. The aerodynamic integration concerns associated with this application are being addressed through the computational modeling of the missile body-propfan flowfield interactions. The work described in this paper consists of a detailed analysis of the aerodynamic interactions between the control surfaces and the propfan blades through the solution of the average-passage equation system. Two baseline configurations were studied, the control fins mounted forward of the counter-rotating propeller and the control fins mounted aft of the counter-rotating propeller. In both cases, control fin-propfan separation distance and control fin deflection angle were varied.

  4. Does war hurt? Effects of media exposure after missile attacks on chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Sheera F; Rudich, Zvia; Shahar, Golan

    2013-03-01

    This study focused on the effects of exposure to terrorist missile attacks on the physical and mental well being of chronic pain patients. In this prospective and longitudinal design, 55 chronic pain patients treated at a specialty pain clinic completed self-report questionnaires regarding their pain, depression and anxiety pre- and post a three week missile attack on the southern region of Israel. In addition, levels of direct and indirect exposure to the attacks were measured. Results of regression analyses showed that exposure to the attacks through the media predicted an increase in pain intensity and in the sensory component of pain during the pre-post war period, but did not predict depression, anxiety or the affective component of pain. These findings contribute to the understanding of the effects of terrorism on physical and emotional distress and identify chronic pain patients as a vulnerable population requiring special attention during terrorism-related stress.

  5. A computer code (SKINTEMP) for predicting transient missile and aircraft heat transfer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Mary L.

    1994-09-01

    A FORTRAN computer code (SKINTEMP) has been developed to calculate transient missile/aircraft aerodynamic heating parameters utilizing basic flight parameters such as altitude, Mach number, and angle of attack. The insulated skin temperature of a vehicle surface on either the fuselage (axisymmetric body) or wing (two-dimensional body) is computed from a basic heat balance relationship throughout the entire spectrum (subsonic, transonic, supersonic, hypersonic) of flight. This calculation method employs a simple finite difference procedure which considers radiation, forced convection, and non-reactive chemistry. Surface pressure estimates are based on a modified Newtonian flow model. Eckert's reference temperature method is used as the forced convection heat transfer model. SKINTEMP predictions are compared with a limited number of test cases. SKINTEMP was developed as a tool to enhance the conceptual design process of high speed missiles and aircraft. Recommendations are made for possible future development of SKINTEMP to further support the design process.

  6. Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben; Gaigler, Randy; Basak, L; Root, G; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D.

    2005-05-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

  7. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a Full-Scale Model of the Hughes MX-904 Missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the stability and control characteristics of a full-size model of the Hughes MX-904 missile. Aerodynamic characteristics of the complete model through moderate ranges of angles of attack and yaw, with an additional test made through an angle of attack of 180 degrees, are presented. The effects of horizontal tail deflection are also included.

  8. A qualitative analysis of future air combat with 'fire and forget' missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinar, J.; Davidovitz, A.

    1987-01-01

    A set of previous examples have demonstrated that the two-target game formulation is adequate for modeling air-to-air combat between two aggressively motivated fighter aircraft. The present paper describes such an engagement between two aircraft of different speed but equipped with the same 'fire and forget' type guided missiles. The results of the analysis suggest a new concept of air combat tactics for future scenarios.

  9. Structural analysis of high-rpm composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carek, David A.

    1993-03-01

    Analyses were performed on a high-speed composite blade set for the Department of Defense Propfan Missile Interactions Project. The final design iteration, which resulted in the CM2D-2 blade design, is described in this report. Mode shapes, integral order excitation, and stress margins were examined. In addition, geometric corrections were performed to compensate for blade deflection under operating conditions with respect to the aerodynamic design shape.

  10. Application of fleet ballistic missile components/designs for expendable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzell, Norman E.

    This paper describes the orbital performance and configuration attributes of an expendable launch vehicle (ELV) derived from flight-qualified components. Representative logistical and programmatic data are also provided. The backbone of the ELV program described is the cost-effective use of proven Fleet Ballistic Missile components/designs coupled with other high confidence 'off-the-shelf' equipment. The ELV defined can place over a thousand pounds (1000 lb) of spacecraft (payload) into Low Earth Orbit.

  11. Test wells T27 and T28, White Sands Missile Range, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    Two test wells, T27 and T28, were drilled at White Sands Missile Range in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Army in February and March 1983. Test wells T27 and T28 were drilled as observation wells in the vicinity of the Liquid Propellant Storage Area. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs, driller 's logs, and borehole-geophysical logs from the cased wells. (USGS)

  12. Evolution of Fuel-Air and Contaminant Clouds Resulting from a Cruise Missile Explosion Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A S; Kul, A L

    2005-06-22

    A low-mach-number hydrodynamics model has been used to simulate the evolution of a fuel-air mixture and contaminant cloud resulting from the detonation of a cruise missile. The detonation has been assumed to be non-nuclear. The cloud evolution has been carried out to a time of 5.5 seconds. At this time the contaminant has completely permeated the initial fuel-air mixture cloud.

  13. The proliferation of surface-to-surface missiles and weapons of mass destruction and the emerging role of tactical missile defenses in Israel, Syria and Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    The proliferation of surface-to-surface missiles (SSMs) and weapons of mass destruction has become one of the more serious security threats to post-Cold War peace. This dissertation examines the history of proliferation within the Middle East by focusing primarily on three trend-setting countries: Israel, Syria and Iran. Building on the theoretical framework established by Lewis A. Dunn and Herman Kahn, this dissertation examines why and how Israel, Syria and Iran have procured SSMs and weapons of mass destruction. The author also includes an analysis of tactical missile defenses and their impact on proliferation trends. The final section investigates the numerous arms control treaties and supplier cartels designed to halt or slow the pace of unconventional weapons proliferation. In many instances, Iraq serves as the primary example of how well-intentioned nonproliferation efforts have fallen short. This dissertation reveals some of the major flaws in these regimes while proposing necessary improvements if nonproliferation efforts are to succeed. In conclusion, this dissertation returns to the expanded Dunn-Kahn nuclear proliferation model. By categorizing the various reasons as to why countries choose to procure unconventional weapons, a more successful nonproliferation policy can be constructed. However, this dissertation warns that without political solutions to long-term disputes in the region, western-imposed nonproliferation regimes will fail. Thus, nonproliferation policies must be accompanied or preceded by a vigorous diplomatic and political effort to solve seemingly intractable differences.

  14. Parametric Fin-Body and Fin-Plate Database for a Series of 12 Missile Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry M.

    2001-01-01

    A cooperative experimental investigation has been performed to obtain a systematic fin-body and fin-plate database for a series of 12 missile fins. These data are intended to complement and extend the information contained in the Triservice missile project and to provide a systematic set of experimental data from which fin-body interference factors can be derived. Data were obtained with the fins mounted on both an axisymmetric body and on a flat plate that was used to simulate fin-alone measurements. The experiments were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 3.95; fin deflection angles of 0 deg, 10 deg, and -10 deg; and angles of attack up to 30 deg on the body and up to 95 deg on the flat plate. The data were obtained from three-component balances attached to the fins and a six-component balance located in the axisymmetric body. The data obtained in this project are documented in tabular form in this report. In addition, selected data are presented in graphical form to illustrate the effects of the test variables. These variables are configuration angle of attack; Mach number; and fin parameters of deflection angle, planform size, taper ratio, and aspect ratio. A very limited comparison with the Triservice missile data is made to illustrate the consistency between the data from these two projects.

  15. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  16. A Homing Missile Control System to Reduce the Effects of Radome Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gerald L.

    1960-01-01

    The problem of radome diffraction in radar-controlled homing missiles at high speeds and high altitudes is considered from the point of view of developing a control system configuration which will alleviate the deleterious effects of the diffraction. It is shown that radome diffraction is in essence a kinematic feedback of body angular velocities which causes the radar to sense large apparent line-of-sight angular velocities. The normal control system cannot distinguish between the erroneous and actual line-of-sight rates, and entirely wrong maneuvers are produced which result in large miss distances. The problem is resolved by adding to the control system a special-purpose computer which utilizes measured body angular velocity to extract from the radar output true line-of-sight information for use in steering the missile. The computer operates on the principle of sampling and storing the radar output at instants when the body angular velocity is low and using this stored information for maneuvering commands. In addition, when the angular velocity is not low the computer determines a radome diffraction compensation which is subtracted from the radar output to reduce the error in the sampled information. Analog simulation results for the proposed control system operating in a coplanar (vertical plane) attack indicate a potential decrease in miss distance to an order of magnitude below that for a conventional system. Effects of glint noise, random target maneuvers, initial heading errors, and missile maneuverability are considered in the investigation.

  17. EATS and APATS telemetry antenna performance comparison in a ballistic missile terminal area support role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. F.; Blackwell, E. G.

    1981-06-01

    A comparative analysis was made of the performance of the U.S. Navy EATS multibeam phased array telemetry antenna, currently under development by Pacific Missile Test Center and the planned APATS antenna intended for use by the U.S. Air Force ARIA Fleet. The comparison was made in the context of a ballistic missile terminal area test support role for the collection of telemetry data from MK-4 and MK-12 instrumented RVs during reentry. In this comparison, two levels of upgrade were examined for the EATS antenna, one as a minimum required upgrade (dual-polarization), and the other as an upgrade with dual-polarization and increased elevation scan angle commensurate with the APATS specification. Study findings indicate that the second EATS upgrade option results in telemetry collection performance essentially equal to that of the APATS. RV telemetry blackout (SNR < 13 dB) for the EATS upgraded antenna lasted slightly longer than the blackout of the APATS antenna. Blackout is relatively unimportant in the MK-4 application, but may be more consequential in the MK-12 application. The minimum EATS antenna upgrade (dual-polarization) does not perform well for ballistic missile telemetry support, so that the full upgrade is indicated for the EATS telemetry antenna in this mission role.

  18. The Effects of Target and Missile Characteristics on Theoretical Minimum Miss Distance for a Beam-Rider Guidance System in the Presence of Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Elwood C.; Druding, Frank; Nishiura, Togo

    1959-01-01

    A study has been made to determine the relative importance of those factors which place an inherent limitation on the minimum obtainable miss distance for a beam-rider navigation system operating in the presence of glint noise and target evasive maneuver. Target and missile motions are assumed to be coplanar. The factors considered are the missile natural frequencies and damping ratios, missile steady-state acceleration capabilities, target evasive maneuver characteristics, and angular scintillation noise characteristics.

  19. Wind-tunnel investigation at supersonic speeds of a canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was made at free stream Mach numbers from 1.70 to 2.86 to determine the effects of fixed and free rolling tail fin afterbodies on the static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard controlled missile model. The effect of small canard roll and yaw control deflections was also examined. The results indicate that the fixed and free rolling tail configurations have about the same lift curve slope and longitudinal stability level at low angles of attack. For the free rolling tail configuration, the canards provide conventional roll control with no roll control reversal at low angles of attack. The free rolling tail configuration reduced induced roll due to model roll angle and canard yaw control.

  20. Keeping up with dynamics of next generation missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, Michael A.; Hauser, Robin; Hofstetter, Peter; Kägi, Martin; Meier, Matthias; Rindlisbacher, Walter; Stomas, Anastasios; Wälti, Peter

    2008-04-01

    In an effort to comply with the increasing quest for higher dynamics and increased inertia of test units modern HWIL-systems are employing increasingly larger hydraulic actuators. A new 3-axis flight motion simulator with increased performance is reviewed. Also future trends of the HWIL-systems are discussed both for hydraulic and electric actuators. Some drawbacks of hydraulic systems, including increased acoustic noise levels and extensive service and maintenance requirements from the hydraulic power unit, limited stroke of the actuators for large systems and poor small signal performance are discussed and compared to the performance of electric actuators. Can the electric actuators advantages make up for the power density performance gap?

  1. Analysis of septic morbidity following gunshot wounds to the colon: the missile is an adjuvant for abscess.

    PubMed

    Poret, H A; Fabian, T C; Croce, M A; Bynoe, R P; Kudsk, K A

    1991-08-01

    Over a 7-year period, 151 patients with gunshot wounds to the colon surviving beyond 24 hours were managed. The bullet was retained in the body in 66% and exited in 34%. Thirty-four (23%) developed major septic complications (diffuse peritonitis, 21%; intraperitoneal abscesses 24%; and extraperitoneal abdominal abscesses, 56%). The septic complication rate was 26% in the bullet-present group compared with 16% in the remainder (p less than 0.15). The increased septic rate in those with bullets present was the result of abscesses developing around the retained missile. That group with missile abscesses had a lesser degree of injury as measured by the abdominal trauma index compared with the other patients with septic complications (p less than 0.001). Fifteen (79%) of the 19 patients with missile and missile track abscesses had them develop in the psoas muscle. These abscesses occur by fecal contamination of the muscle following inoculation by the bullet, which passes through the large bowel. Computed tomography-guided and operative drainage tend to fail if the foreign body is not removed. Computed tomography-guided or operative drainage should be successful in draining missile track abscesses when the bullet has exited the patient. PMID:1831510

  2. Analysis of the Dryden Wet Bulb GLobe Temperature Algorithm for White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaQuay, Ryan Matthew

    2011-01-01

    In locations where workforce is exposed to high relative humidity and light winds, heat stress is a significant concern. Such is the case at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Heat stress is depicted by the wet bulb globe temperature, which is the official measurement used by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The wet bulb globe temperature is measured by an instrument which was designed to be portable and needing routine maintenance. As an alternative form for measuring the wet bulb globe temperature, algorithms have been created to calculate the wet bulb globe temperature from basic meteorological observations. The algorithms are location dependent; therefore a specific algorithm is usually not suitable for multiple locations. Due to climatology similarities, the algorithm developed for use at the Dryden Flight Research Center was applied to data from the White Sands Missile Range. A study was performed that compared a wet bulb globe instrument to data from two Surface Atmospheric Measurement Systems that was applied to the Dryden wet bulb globe temperature algorithm. The period of study was from June to September of2009, with focus being applied from 0900 to 1800, local time. Analysis showed that the algorithm worked well, with a few exceptions. The algorithm becomes less accurate to the measurement when the dew point temperature is over 10 Celsius. Cloud cover also has a significant effect on the measured wet bulb globe temperature. The algorithm does not show red and black heat stress flags well due to shorter time scales of such events. The results of this study show that it is plausible that the Dryden Flight Research wet bulb globe temperature algorithm is compatible with the White Sands Missile Range, except for when there are increased dew point temperatures and cloud cover or precipitation. During such occasions, the wet bulb globe temperature instrument would be the preferred method of measurement. Out of the 30

  3. Two-target game model of an air combat with fire-and-forget all-aspect missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidovitz, A.; Shinar, J.

    1989-01-01

    An air combat duel between similar aggressive fighter aircraft, both equipped with the same type of guided missiles, is formulated as a two-target differential game using the dynamic model of the game of two identical cars. Each of the identical target sets represents the effective firing envelope of an all-aspect fire-and-forget air-to-air missile. The firing range limits depend on the target aspect angle and are approximated by analytical functions. The maximum range, computed by taking into account the optimal missile avoidance maneuver of the target, determines the no-escape firing envelope. The solution consists of the decomposition of the game space into four regions: the respective winning zones of the two opponents, the draw zone, and the region where the game terminates by a mutual kill. The solution provides a new insight for future air combat analysis.

  4. Reconnaissance radiological characterization for the White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Espegren, M.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A. ); Smith, S.M. )

    1993-01-01

    This report is the result of field work performed at the former White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California. The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program tasked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in Grand Junction, Colo., with this project. The objective was to determine whether or not radioisotopes possibly associated with past Department of Defense (DOD) operations were present and within accepted background levels. The radiation survey was accomplished by performing three independent radiation surveys, both outdoors and indoors, and random soil sampling. Initially, the site was land surveyed to develop a grid block system. A background radiation investigation was performed out in the San Pedro area.

  5. Shock capturing finite difference algorithms for supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a reliable, shock capturing finite difference method to solve the Euler equations for inviscid, supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations is highly desirable. The numerical method must have a firm theoretical foundation and must be robust and efficient. It should be able to treat subsonic pockets in a predominantly supersonic flow. The method must also be easily applicable to the complex topologies of the aerodynamic configuration under consideration. The ongoing approach to this task is described and for steady supersonic flows is presented. This scheme is the basic numerical method. Results of work obtained during previous years are presented.

  6. Bumblebee program, aerodynamic data. Part 2: Flow fields at Mach number 2.0. [supersonic missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, G. A.; Cronvich, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Available flow field data which can be used in validating theoretical procedures for computing flow fields around supersonic missiles are presented. Tabulated test data are given which define the flow field around a conical-nosed cylindrical body in a crossflow plane corresponding to a likely tail location. The data were obtained at a Mach number of 2.0 for an angle of attack of 0 to 23 degrees. The data define the flow field for cases both with and without a forward wing present.

  7. Benefits of HWIL simulation to develop guidance and control systems for missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Tadashi

    2000-07-01

    The essential benefit of Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation can be summarized as that the performance of missile guidance/control system is evaluated realistically without the modeling error by using actual hardware such as seeker systems, autopilot systems and servo equipments. HWIL simulation, however, requires very expensive facilities: in these facilities, target model generators are indispensable subsystems. In this paper, a target model generator for RF/IR seeker systems is introduced, and then, two technical problems with this facility are discussed: a method to overcome the line-of-sight (LSO) angle limitation and the RF/IR dual mode seeker simulation technique.

  8. Reconnaissance radiological characterization for the White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Espegren, M.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A.; Smith, S.M.

    1993-05-01

    This report is the result of field work performed at the former White Point Nike Missile Site, San Pedro, California. The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program tasked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in Grand Junction, Colo., with this project. The objective was to determine whether or not radioisotopes possibly associated with past Department of Defense (DOD) operations were present and within accepted background levels. The radiation survey was accomplished by performing three independent radiation surveys, both outdoors and indoors, and random soil sampling. Initially, the site was land surveyed to develop a grid block system. A background radiation investigation was performed out in the San Pedro area.

  9. Pressure Recovery for Missiles with Reaction Propulsion at High Supersonic Speeds (The Efficiency of Shock Diffusers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswatitsch, K.

    1947-01-01

    The problem of the intake of air is treated for a missile flying at supersonic speeds and of changing the kinetic energy of the air into pressure with the least possible losses. Calculations are carried out concerning the results which can be attained. After a discussion of several preliminary experiments, the practical solution of the problem at hand is indicated by model experiments. The results proved very satisfactory in view of the results which had been attained previously and the values which were anticipated theoretically.

  10. Application of boost guidance to NASA sounding rocket launch operations at the White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Detwiler, D. F., Jr.; Hall, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique problems associated with launching the Black Brant V, VIII, and IX sounding rocket vehicles at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and the significance of the introduction of the S19 to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility sounding rocket program in terms of launch flexibility, improved impact dispersion, higher flight reliability, and reduced program costs. This paper also discusses salient flight results from NASA 36.011UL (the first S19 guided Black Brant launched at WSMR) and the NASA Comet Halley missions (36.010DL and 36.017DL).

  11. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a tail-control cruciform maneuverable missile with and without wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics for a winged and wingless cruciform missile configuration were examined. The configuration had an ogive-cylinder body with a 3.5 caliber forebody; an overall length-to-diameter ratio of 11.667; and had cruciform tails that were trapezoidal in planform. Tests were made both with and without 72.9 degree cruciform delta wings. The investigation was made for Mach numbers from 1.50 to 4.63, roll attitudes of 0 degrees and 45 degrees, angles of attack from -4 degrees to 22 degrees, and tail control deflections from 10 degrees to -40 degrees.

  12. Army Tactical Missile System (TACMS) Block II Insensitive Munitions Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jamie M.; Nelson, Steven G.

    2002-04-01

    The Army TACMS Block II missile system provides the soldier with long range precision fire against moving armored combat vehicles in support of deep operations beyond the capability of other currently existing munitions. As part of an ongoing IM program for the ATACMS/BAT, warhead components were subject to IM threats identified in the system's Threat Hazard Assessment. These tests were conducted to assess the reaction of the Block II warhead, containing BAT submunitions, to bullet impact, fragment impact and fast cook-off. This paper will provide a summary of the test item configurations, test setups, results and preliminary assessments.

  13. BUILDING A196 BARRACKS, SECOND FLOOR PLAN. Naval Guided Missile and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING A-196 BARRACKS, SECOND FLOOR PLAN. Naval Guided Missile and Tactical Data System School, Naval Schools Command, Mare Island, CA. Milton T. Pflueger, Architect, 580 Market Street, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 127 to 145, specification 36050/61, approved for the Bureau of Yards and Docks, October 26, 1961. Yards and Docks drawing no. 892275; DPWO drawing no. B-75275; file no. 930-CR-2. 72 cm x 98 cm. Sepia tone print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  14. BUILDING A196 BARRACKS, FIRST FLOOR PLAN. Naval Guided Missile and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BUILDING A-196 BARRACKS, FIRST FLOOR PLAN. Naval Guided Missile and Tactical Data System School, Naval Schools Command, Mare Island, California. Milton T. Pflueger, Architect, 580 Market Street, San Francisco, CA. Sheet 126 of 145, specification 36050-61, approved for the Bureau of Yards and Docks, October 26, 1961. Yards and Docks drawing no. 892274; DPWO drawing no. B-75274; file no. 930-CR-1. 72 cm x 98 xm. Sepia tone print - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Guard House & Barracks, Railroad Avenue near Eighteenth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  15. Complete analysis of steady and transient missile aerodynamic/propulsive/plume flowfield interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, B. J.; Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.; Hosangadi, A.; Kenzakowski, D. C.; Lee, R. A.

    1992-07-01

    The analysis of steady and transient aerodynamic/propulsive/plume flowfield interactions utilizing several state-of-the-art computer codes (PARCH, CRAFT, and SCHAFT) is discussed. These codes have been extended to include advanced turbulence models, generalized thermochemistry, and multiphase nonequilibrium capabilities. Several specialized versions of these codes have been developed for specific applications. This paper presents a brief overview of these codes followed by selected cases demonstrating steady and transient analyses of conventional as well as advanced missile systems. Areas requiring upgrades include turbulence modeling in a highly compressible environment and the treatment of particulates in general. Recent progress in these areas are highlighted.

  16. High angle canard missile test in the Ames 11-foot transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwind, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    Four blunted ogive-cylinder missile models with a length-to-diameter ratio of 10.4 were tested at transonic speeds and large angles of attack. The configurations are: body, body with tail panels, body with canards, and body with canards and tails. Forces and moments from the entire model and each of the eight fins were measured over the pitch range of 20 deg to 50 deg and 0 deg to 45 deg roll. Canard deflection angles between 0 deg and 15 deg were tested. Exploratory vapor screen flow visualization testing was also performed. Sample force and moment data are reported along with observations from the vapor screen tests.

  17. Experimental study of tail-span effects on a generic canard-controlled missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Dillon, James L.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a cruciform canard controlled missile configuration to determine the effects of tail span/canard span ratio on controllability. The investigation was conducted over the Mach number range of 1.75 to 3.50. Reductions of tail span/canard span ratio produced lower static margins and higher trim angle of attack. The results show that canard controls can provide pitch- and yaw-control as well as roll-control by proper selection of the tail span/canard span ratio.

  18. Remote control canard missile with a free-rolling tail brake torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted at supersonic Mach numbers to determine the static aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies. Mechanical coupling effects of the free-rolling tail afterbody were investigated using an electronic/electromagnetic brake system that provides arbitrary tail-fin brake torques with continuous measurements of tail-to-mainframe torque and tail-roll rate. Results are summarized to show the effects of fixed and free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies that include simulated measured bearing friction torques on the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics.

  19. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Described here is the small engine technology program being sponsored at the Lewis Research Center. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commuter aircraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) and Heavy-Duty Diesel Transport Technology (HDTT) programs are sponsored by DOE. The Compound Cycle Engine program is sponsored by the Army. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The HDTT, rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approaches to minimum heat rejection, or 'adiabatic' systems employing advanced materials. The AGT program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbine programs will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  20. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Small engine technology programs being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commutercraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine Program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. There is a strong element of synergism between the various programs in several respects. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The Heavy Duty Diesel Transport (HDTT), rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approached to minimum heat rejection, or adiabatic systems employing advanced materials. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbines will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  1. The synergistic roles of test and simulation in the life cycle of the Army Tactical Missile System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, David M.; Ricks, Gayle; Thomas, Tony L.

    2010-04-01

    The Army Tactical Missile System (ATACMS) has been fielded with the US Army for almost 20 years as a deep strike precision weapon, capable of engaging time critical targets at high precision under all weather conditions. This paper will describe the use of the HWIL simulation in the design of the missile, validation of the simulation, the role of the simulation in the production and test process, how the simulation is used to support system shelf life and obsolescence issues and how the simulation is used to answer critical user questions on the performance of the system.

  2. Tests of the Northrop XSSM-A-3 Missile in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: Wing Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, David

    1950-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the longitudinal stability characteristics of a full-scale Northrop XSSM-A-3 missile. Various wing modifications were investigated in an effort to provide a configuration that would maintain longitudinal stability to lift coefficients necessary for landing the missile during flight tests. The results of the tests led to the choice of a wing with an increased leading-edge radius. A short discussion of the results is presented, but no analysis of the data has been made in order to make the data available as soon as possible.

  3. Test wells TW1 and TW2, and TW3, White Sands Missile Range, Otero County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.; Pinckley, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    Three test wells, TW1, TW2, and TW3, were drilled at White Sands Missile Range in south-central New Mexico in July, August, and October 1983 as part of a joint military training program sponsored by the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army in July, August, and October 1983. The test wells were drilled as exploratory and monitoring wells for the toxic waste storage facility at White Sands Missile Range. Information obtained from these wells includes lithologic logs for all wells and borehole-geophysical logs for the cased wells. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Research strategy for the electro-optics sensors domain of the Materials and Components for Missiles Innovative Technology Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Mark; Panella, Isabella

    2010-04-01

    We describe the Materials and Components for Missile (MCM) Innovation and Technology Partnership (ITP) programme. The MCM - ITP is an Anglo-French research programme started in 2007 to encourage early stage research in future weapons technology. SELEX Galileo leads the domain related to the Electro-Optic Sensor within future guided weapons. Our objective is to capture cutting edge ideas in the research community and develop them for exploitation in future missile generations. We provide a view of two areas where we believe development of enhanced seeker capability should be focussed. Examples of current research within and outside the ITP that may be harnessed to deliver these capabilities are provided.

  5. The role of maxillofacial radiologists in gunshot injuries: a hypothesized missile trajectory in two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sansare, K; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-01-01

    Gunshot injuries are an emerging form of trauma that oral radiologists increasingly have to deal with. There are two main types of gunshot injuries: high-velocity and low-velocity bullet injuries. The outcome of high-velocity gunshot injury is usually fatal; however, a non-fatal low-velocity injury to the maxillofacial region is more likely to be encountered by the oral and maxillofacial radiologist. It is therefore important to up-to-date knowledge of ballistic science and its implications in the field of maxillofacial radiology. The ability of oral and maxillofacial radiologists to predict the missile trajectory will aid the assessment and localization of the damage caused by the bullet and its splinters. Predicting the missile trajectory may also be of help to law enforcement agencies and forensic scientists in determining the type of firearm used and direction of fire. This article, which examines two cases, attempts to highlight to the oral radiologist this emerging form of trauma and its implications. PMID:21159916

  6. Hypervelocity impact flash for missile-defense kill assessment and engagement analysis : experiments on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Reinhart, William Dodd; Lawrence, Raymond Jeffery Jr.; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2005-07-01

    Kill assessment continues to be a major problem for the nation's missile defense program. A potential approach for addressing this issue involves spectral and temporal analysis of the short-time impact flash that occurs when a kill vehicle intercepts and engages a target missile. This can provide identification of the materials involved in the impact event, which will, in turn, yield the data necessary for target identification, engagement analysis, and kill assessment. This report describes the first phases of a project under which we are providing laboratory demonstrations of the feasibility and effectiveness of this approach. We are using two major Sandia facilities, the Z-Pinch accelerator, and the two- and three-stage gas guns at the Shock Thermodynamics and Applied Research (STAR) facility. We have looked at the spectral content of impact flash at velocities up to 25 km/s on the Z-Pinch machine to establish the capability for spectroscopy for these types of events, and are looking at similar experiments at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s on the gas guns to demonstrate a similar capability for a variety of research-oriented and applied materials. The present report describes only the work performed on the Z machine.

  7. Experimental Results on the Feasibility of an Aerospike for Hypersonic Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Mitchell, Anthony M.; Boudreaux, Ellis J.

    1995-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel tests have been performed on an aerospike-protected missile dome at a Mach number of 6 to obtain quantitative surface pressure and temperature-rise data, as well as qualitative flow visualization data. These data were used to determine aerospike concept feasibility and will also provide a database to be used for calibration of computational fluid dynamics codes. Data were obtained on the hemispherical missile dome with and without an aerospike that protrudes ahead of the dome along the axisymmetric center line. Data were obtained on two models (one pressure, one temperature) in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel at a freestream Reynolds number of 8.0 x 10(exp 6) per feet and angles of attack from 0 to 40 degrees. Surface pressure and temperature-rise results indicate that the aerospike is effective for very low angles of attack (less than 5 degrees) at Mach 6. Above 5 degrees, impingement of the aerospike bow shock and the flow separation shock from the recirculation region created by the aerospike causes pressure and temperature increases on the windward side of the dome which exceed values observed in the same region with the aerospike removed. Flow characterization obtained via oil-flow and schlieren photographs provides some insight into the quantitative surface data results, including vortical flow and shock-wave impingement.

  8. Adaptive critic autopilot design of bank-to-turn missiles using fuzzy basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Kai

    2005-04-01

    A new adaptive critic autopilot design for bank-to-turn missiles is presented. In this paper, the architecture of adaptive critic learning scheme contains a fuzzy-basis-function-network based associative search element (ASE), which is employed to approximate nonlinear and complex functions of bank-to-turn missiles, and an adaptive critic element (ACE) generating the reinforcement signal to tune the associative search element. In the design of the adaptive critic autopilot, the control law receives signals from a fixed gain controller, an ASE and an adaptive robust element, which can eliminate approximation errors and disturbances. Traditional adaptive critic reinforcement learning is the problem faced by an agent that must learn behavior through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment, however, the proposed tuning algorithm can significantly shorten the learning time by online tuning all parameters of fuzzy basis functions and weights of ASE and ACE. Moreover, the weight updating law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory is capable of guaranteeing both tracking performance and stability. Computer simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive critic autopilot.

  9. Robust Image-Based Visual Servo Control of an Uncertain Missile Airframe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygun, Murat Tunca

    A nonlinear vision-based guidance law is presented for a missile-target scenario in the presence of model uncertainty and unknown target evasive maneuvers. To ease the readability of this thesis, detailed explanations of any relevant mathematical tools are provided, including stability definitions, the procedure of Lyapunov-based stability analysis, sliding mode control fundamentals, basics on visual servo control, and other basic nonlinear control tools. To develop the vision-based guidance law, projective geometric relationships are utilized to combine the image kinematics with the missile dynamics in an integrated visual dynamic system. The guidance law is designed using an image-based visual servo control method in conjunction with a sliding-mode control strategy, which is shown to achieve asymptotic target interception in the presence of the aforementioned uncertainties. A Lyapunov-based stability analysis is presented to prove the theoretical result, and numerical simulation results are provided to demonstrate the performance of the proposed robust controller for both stationary and non-stationary targets.

  10. Anti-ship missile tracking with a chirped amplitude modulation ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Brian C.; Stann, Barry L.; Ruff, William C.; Giza, Mark M.; Aliberti, Keith; Lawler, William B.

    2004-09-01

    Shipboard infrared search and track (IRST) systems can detect sea-skimming anti-ship missiles at long ranges. Since IRST systems cannot measure range and velocity, they have difficulty distinguishing missiles from slowly moving false targets and clutter. ARL is developing a ladar based on its patented chirped amplitude modulation (AM) technique to provide unambiguous range and velocity measurements of targets handed over to it by the IRST. Using the ladar's range and velocity data, false alarms and clutter objects will be distinguished from valid targets. If the target is valid, it's angular location, range, and velocity, will be used to update the target track until remediation has been effected. By using an array receiver, ARL's ladar can also provide 3D imagery of potential threats in support of force protection. The ladar development program will be accomplished in two phases. In Phase I, currently in progress, ARL is designing and building a breadboard ladar test system for proof-of-principle static platform field tests. In Phase II, ARL will build a brassboard ladar test system that will meet operational goals in shipboard testing against realistic targets. The principles of operation for the chirped AM ladar for range and velocity measurements, the ladar performance model, and the top-level design for the Phase I breadboard are presented in this paper.

  11. Research on the modeling of the missile's disturbance motion and the initial control point optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Dalin; Tang, Shengjing

    2012-11-01

    The initial trajectory design of the missile is an important part of the overall design, but often a tedious calculation and analysis process due to the large dimension nonlinear differential equations and the traditional statistical analysis methods. To improve the traditional design methods, a robust optimization concept and method are introduced in this paper to deal with the determination of the initial control point. First, the Gaussian Radial Basis Network is adopted to establish the approximate model of the missile's disturbance motion based on the disturbance motion and disturbance factors analysis. Then, a direct analytical relationship between the disturbance input and statistical results is deduced on the basis of Gaussian Radial Basis Network model. Subsequently, a robust optimization model is established aiming at the initial control point design problem and the niche Pareto genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimization is adopted to solve this optimization model. An integral design example is give at last and the simulation results have verified the validity of this method.

  12. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P. K.; Harbour, L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify component technology requirements for small, expendable gas turbine engines that would result in substantial improvements in performance and cost by the year 2000. A subsonic, 2600 nautical mile (4815 km) strategic cruise missile mission was selected for study. A baseline (state-of-the-art) engine and missile configuration were defined to evaluate the advanced technology engines. Two advanced technology engines were configured and evaluated using advanced component efficiencies and ceramic composite materials; a 22:1 overall pressure ratio, 3.85 bypass ratio twin-spool turbofan; and an 8:1 overall pressure, 3.66 bypass ratio, single-spool recuperated turbofan with 0.85 recuperator effectiveness. Results of mission analysis indicated a reduction in fuel burn of 38 and 47 percent compared to the baseline engine when using the advanced turbofan and recuperated turbofan, respectively. While use of either advanced engine resulted in approximately a 25 percent reduction in missile size, the unit life cycle (LCC) cost reduction of 56 percent for the advanced turbofan relative to the baseline engine gave it a decisive advantage over the recuperated turbofan with 47 percent LCC reduction. An additional range improvement of 10 percent results when using a 56 percent loaded carbon slurry fuel with either engine. These results can be realized only if significant progress is attained in the fields of solid lubricated bearings, small aerodynamic component performance, composite ceramic materials and integration of slurry fuels. A technology plan outlining prospective programs in these fields is presented.

  13. 78 FR 39198 - Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD... proposing to amend an existing danger zone in waters of the Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range..., and increased threat conditions. The proposed amendment would expand the existing danger zone...

  14. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic...

  15. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic...

  16. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic...

  17. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic...

  18. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch vehicles and sounding rockets) and Unmanned Air...: END-USER AND END-USE BASED § 744.3 Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic...

  19. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; guided missiles test operations area, Headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; guided missiles test operations area, Headquarters Air Proving... Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a point...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending...

  2. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending...

  3. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The Area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending...

  4. 78 FR 76060 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Kauai, Hawaii. The proposed rule was published in the July 1, 2013 issue of the Federal Register (78 FR... closure schedule on its official Navy Web site, http://www.cnic.navy.mil/PMRF/ , and Facebook page, http://www.facebook.com/PacificMissileRangeFacility . The danger zone closure schedule may also be...

  5. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; guided missiles test operations area, Headquarters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; guided missiles test operations area, Headquarters Air Proving... Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a point...

  6. 33 CFR 334.210 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided missiles test operations area. 334.210 Section 334.210 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.210 Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Tangier Island; naval guided...

  7. Cult of deterrence: A moral and strategic critique of the anti-ballistic missile treaty. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, C.S.

    1997-12-30

    Ballistic missile defense is the morally and strategically superior alternative to the current system of deterrence, provided that it is responsibly implemented. Analysis of the Just War Criteria and the utilitarian justifications of deterrence present a moral obligation to pursue the alternative strategy of missile defense as a means of defending the United States. However, the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty does not allow earnest pursuit of this alternative, despite recent efforts to exploit its loopholes and broaden its meaning beyond any reasonable limit. Moreover, deterrence can no longer provide the guarantee of security that it did during the Cold War. Offense-Defense Theory shows that revisionist states are not subject to the same calculations of effective deterrence that the Soviet Union was during that period. This strategic analysis underlies the moral evaluations and further supports missile defense. The cult of deterrence is presented as an explanation for the failure to adapt national security policy to the new international structure, as European powers failed to perceive the offense-defense balance prior to World War I. The ABM regime threatens to reproduce those same mistakes with even greater consequences.

  8. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS...

  9. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS...

  10. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS...

  11. 48 CFR 252.228-7005 - Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident reporting and investigation involving aircraft, missiles, and space launch vehicles. 252.228-7005 Section 252.228-7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1130 - Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Western Space and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1130 Pacific Ocean, Western Space and Missile Center (WSMC), Vandenberg AFB, Calif.; danger zones. (a) The area. (1) The waters of the Pacific Ocean in an area extending...

  13. Effect of tail-fin span on stability and control characteristics of a Canard-controlled missile at supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Allen, J. M.; Hernandez, G.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.60 to 3.50 to obtain the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a circular, cruciform, canard-controlled missile with variations in tail-fin span. In addition, comparisons were made with the experimental aerodynamic characteristics using three missile aeroprediction programs: MISSILE1, MISSILE2, and NSWCDM. The results of the investigation indicate that for the test Mach number range, canard roll control at low angles of attack is feasible on tail-fin configurations with tail-to-canard span ratios of less than or equal to 0.75. The conards are effective pitch and yaw control devices on each tail-fin span configuration tested. Programs MISSILE1 and MISSILE2 provide very good predictions of longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics and fair predictions of lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics at low angles of attack, with MISSILE2 predictions generally in better agreement with test data. Program NSWCDM provides good longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic predictions that improve with increases in tail-tin span.

  14. Small gas turbine engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range is significantly lower than that of large engines. Engines of this size are typically used in rotorcraft, commutercraft, general aviation, and cruise missile applications. Principal reasons for the lower efficiencies of a smaller engine are well known: component efficients are lower by as much as 8 to 10 percentage points because of size effects. Small engines are designed for lower cycle pressures and temperatures because of smaller blading and cooling limitations. The highly developed analytical and manufacturing techniques evolved for large engines are not directly transferrable to small engines. Thus, it was recognized that a focused effort addressing technologies for small engies was needed and could significantly impact their performance. Recently, in-house and contract studies were undertaken at the NASA Lewis Research Center to identify advanced engine cycle and component requirements for substantial performance improvement of small gas turbines for projected year 2000 applications. The results of both in-house research and contract studies are presented. In summary, projected fuel savings of 22 to 42 percent could be obtained. Accompanying direct operating cost reductions of 11 to 17 percent, depending on fuel cost, were also estimated. High payoff technologies are identified for all engine applications, and recent results of experimental research to evolve the high payoff technologies are described.

  15. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of dual-mode common-aperture seekers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Scott B.; Cole, John S., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    For the past three years, the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command has been developing a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation facility to test common aperture multi-spectral missile seekers. This paper discusses the problems encountered during the development of this facility, the solutions, and the resulting capability of this unique HWIL simulation facility. The Advanced Simulation Center is managed and operated by the Systems Simulation and Development Directorate of the Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

  16. Wind-tunnel investigation at Mach numbers from 1.90 to 2.86 of a canard-controlled missile with ram-air-jet spoiler roll control. [in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The efficacy of using a ram-air-jet spoiler roll control device on a typical canard-controlled missile configuration was investigated. For roll control comparisons, conventional aileron controls on the tail fins were also tested. The results indicate that the roll control of the ram-air-jet spoiler tail fins at the highest free-stream Mach number compared favorably with that of the conventional 11-70 area-ratio tail fin ailerons, each deflected 10 deg. The roll control of the tail fin ailerons decreased while that of the ram-air-jet spoiler increased with free-stream Mach number. The addition of the ram-air-jet spoiler tail fins or flow-through tip chord nacelles on the tail fins resulted in only small changes in basic missile longitudinal stability. The axial force coefficient of the operating ram-air-jet spoiler is significantly larger than that of conventional ailerons and results primarily from the total pressure behind a normal shock in front of the nacelle inlets.

  17. Biannual water-resources review, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, 1986 and 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Robert G.; Sharp, Steven C.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico in 1986 and 1987. The total groundwater withdrawal in 1986 was 565,462,500 gal and in 1987 it was 620,492,000 gal. The total groundwater withdrawal was 110,971,300 gal less in 1986 than in 1985, but 55,029,500 gal more in 1987 than in 1986. Water samples from five Post Headquarters water supply wells were collected for chemical analysis in 1986. In 1987, water samples were collected from four test wells in the Post Headquarters area for analysis of selected volatile organic compounds. Twenty-eight water samples from wells were collected for analysis of specific conductance in 1986 and 1987. (USGS)

  18. A simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Jeffery D.; Knaur, James A.; Moore, Truman W., Jr.; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Details of a simulated lightning effects test facility for testing live and inert missiles, motors, and explosive components are described. The test facility is designed to simulate the high current, continuing current, and high rate-of-rise current components of an idealized direct strike lightning waveform. The Lightning Test Facility was in operation since May, 1988, and consists of: 3 separate capacitor banks used to produce the lightning test components; a permanently fixed large steel safety cage for retaining the item under test (should it be ignited during testing); an earth covered bunker housing the control/equipment room; a charge/discharge building containing the charging/discharging switching; a remotely located blockhouse from which the test personnel control hazardous testing; and interconnecting cables.

  19. Experimental Study of Ballistic-Missile Base Heating with Operating Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettle, J. Cary

    1958-01-01

    A rocket of the 1000-pound-thrust class using liquid oxygen and JP-4 fuel as propellant was installed in the Lewis 8- by 6-foot tunnel to permit a controlled study of some of the factors affecting the heating of a rocket-missile base. Temperatures measured in the base region are presented from findings of three motor extension lengths relative to the base. Data are also presented for two combustion efficiency levels in the rocket motor. Temperature as high as 1200 F was measured in the base region because of the ignition of burnable rocket gases. combustibles that are dumped into the base by accessories seriously aggravate the base-burning temperature rise.

  20. Air-to-surface missile wound of the thorax reconstructed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch: case report.

    PubMed

    Flis, V; Antonic, J; Crnjac, A; Zorko, A

    1993-11-01

    A method of reconstructing a chest wall defect following non-guided air-to-surface missile injury is described. The wall defect was simply closed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch. The high risk of infection following use of the described method is well recognized. No infection occurred in this case. It could be stated that under the exigencies of the moment the use of prosthetic material to reconstruct the chest is not invariably followed by infection. However, when the patient is stable this latter problem can then be addressed by a variety of standard methods. It is concluded that the described method is particularly suitable in war circumstances, when it is usually necessary to attend to a large number of patients in a short period of time. PMID:8230352

  1. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia gravis in vitro and in vivo: the Guided Missile strategy.

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Adams, R N; Miagkov, A; Lu, Y; Juon, H-S; Drachman, D B

    2012-10-15

    Current immunotherapy of myasthenia gravis (MG) is often effective, but entails risks of infection and neoplasia. The "Guided Missile" strategy described here is designed to target and eliminate the individual's unique AChR-specific T cell repertoire, without otherwise interfering with the immune system. We genetically engineered dendritic cells to present AChR epitopes and simultaneously express Fas ligand in an ongoing EAMG model. In both in vitro and in vivo experiments, these engineered cells specifically killed AChR-responsive T cells without otherwise damaging the immune system. AChR antibodies were markedly reduced in the treated mice. Translation of this method to treat human MG is possible. PMID:22769060

  2. Flight testing the U.S. Navy's sea-based ballistic missile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, A. L.; Brodsky, M. T.

    1981-05-01

    The types of flight tests performed over the course of the U.S. Navy's five generations of submarine launched ballistic missile systems are outlined, and the establishment of test objectives, test planning, data reduction and analyses are discussed. Periodic flight tests under near-operational conditions provide a continuing check on the readiness of the deployed weapon system and on the health of its subsystems. In addition, flight testing is a key part of the 'graduation' exercises upon completion of crew training, performed in combination with the shakedown of new or overhauled submarines. The relationship among flight tests, ground tests and the analysis of their results is examined with stress on the important role played by ground simulation in this relationship.

  3. Local oscillator arrangement for a monopulse receiver in a semiactive missile guidance system

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, N.; Murphy, W.M.

    1993-08-03

    For use in a radar receiver for a guidance system on board a missile, such receiver is described including an intermediate frequency amplifier and a phase detector for demodulating signals out of such amplifier, an improved local oscillator arrangement comprising: (a) a voltage controlled crystal oscillator for producing an output signal; (b) frequency control means, responsive to the demodulated signals out of the phase detector, for changing the frequency of the output signal of the voltage controlled crystal oscillator; (c) frequency conversion means, responsive to the output signal of the voltage controlled crystal oscillator, for converting such signal into a comb of signals around a harmonic of the output signal of the voltage controlled crystal oscillator; (d) means for selecting one signal in the comb of signals; and (e) means, responsive to the selected signal, for generating the local oscillator signal for the intermediate frequency amplifier.

  4. Precise terrestrial time: A means for improved ballistic missile guidance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrsam, E. E.; Cresswell, S. A.; Mckelvey, G. R.; Matthews, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach developed to improve the ground instrumentation time tagging accuracy and adapted to support the Minuteman ICBM program is desired. The Timing Insertion Unit (TIU) technique produces a telemetry data time tagging resolution of one tenth of a microsecond, with a relative intersite accuracy after corrections and velocity data (range, azimuth, elevation and range rate) also used in missile guidance system analysis can be correlated to within ten microseconds of the telemetry guidance data. This requires precise timing synchronization between the metric and telemetry instrumentation sites. The timing synchronization can be achieved by using the radar automatic phasing system time correlation methods. Other time correlation techniques such as Television (TV) Line-10 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GEOS) terrestial timing receivers are also considered.

  5. Experimental determination of the inertia constants of an airplane or of a missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loiseau, H.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility to measure the inertia constants of an airplane or of a missile by a unique experimental set up without having to materialize axes of rotation was investigated. It is sufficient to suspend the structure appropriately, to obtain the six natural modes determined by the suspension and to introduce these results as data into a computer. If the structure is very flexible it is necessary to take into account the first natural modes of deformation. Experiments on rigid and flexible models led to precise results and allow consideration of full scale measurements. The final goal is to provide, by a standard ground vibration test completed by the measured characteristics of the suspension modes, the set of data necessary for flutter calculations and for the determination of all the inertia constants.

  6. Tank segmentation of infrared images with complex background for the homing anti-tank missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yulong; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan; Zhang, Baoquan

    2016-07-01

    In an effort to achieve fast and effective tank segmentation of infrared images under complex background for the homing anti-tank missile, the threshold of the maximum between-class variance method (i.e., the Otsu method) is experimentally analyzed, and the working mechanism of the Otsu method is revealed. Subsequently, a fast and effective method for tank segmentation under complex background is proposed based on the Otsu method by constraining the image background pixels and gray levels. Firstly, with the prior information of the tank, derive the equation to calculate the number of pixels of tank according to optical imaging principle, and then use the calculated tank size to constrain the image background pixels. Secondly, employ the golden section to restrict the background gray levels. Finally, use the Otsu method to implement the segmentation of the tank. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can get as an ideal result as the manual segmentation with less running time.

  7. Children's affective reactions and coping under threat of missile attack: a semiprojective assessment procedure.

    PubMed

    Zeidner, M; Klingman, A; Itskowitz, R

    1993-06-01

    This study reports on 170 Israeli school children at risk for missile attack during the Persian Gulf War. The Bar-Ilan Picture Test for Children (Itskowitz & Strauss, 1982, 1986) was specially adapted to the war situation specifically to measure children's affective reactions and coping strategies. Children with a greater sense of control and social support, and more complex defenses, tended to demonstrate better coping strategies. Children who were less defensive showed higher levels of anxiety under stress. Children scoring higher in social support showed greater perceived control over their immediate environment and more verbal expressivity with respect to the crisis situation. Girls scored higher than boys on emotional and verbal expressiveness. These data, elicited through semiprojective procedures, are consistent with much of the prior research based mainly on objective scales or self-report questionnaires. Overall, the results lend additional validity to the nexus of relations (largely established through conventional objective scales) between resources, coping, and outcomes in a naturalistic stressor situation.

  8. Adaptive neural network nonlinear control for BTT missile based on the differential geometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Yongji; Xu, Jiangsheng

    2007-11-01

    A new nonlinear control strategy incorporated the differential geometry method with adaptive neural networks is presented for the nonlinear coupling system of Bank-to-Turn missile in reentry phase. The basic control law is designed using the differential geometry feedback linearization method, and the online learning neural networks are used to compensate the system errors due to aerodynamic parameter errors and external disturbance in view of the arbitrary nonlinear mapping and rapid online learning ability for multi-layer neural networks. The online weights and thresholds tuning rules are deduced according to the tracking error performance functions by Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, which will make the learning process faster and more stable. The six degree of freedom simulation results show that the attitude angles can track the desired trajectory precisely. It means that the proposed strategy effectively enhance the stability, the tracking performance and the robustness of the control system.

  9. Calibration of IR test chambers with the missile defense transfer radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Woods, Solomon I.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Jung, Timothy M.

    2013-05-01

    The Missile Defense Transfer Radiometer (MDXR) is designed to calibrate infrared collimated and flood sources over the fW/cm2 to W/cm2 power range from 3 μm to 28μ m in wavelength. The MDXR operates in three different modes: as a filter radiometer, a Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS)-based spectroradiometer, and as an absolute cryogenic radiometer (ACR). Since 2010, the MDXR has made measurements of the collimated infrared irradiance at the output port of seven different infrared test chambers at several facilities. We present a selection of results from these calibration efforts compared to signal predictions from the respective chamber models for the three different MDXR calibration modes. We also compare the results to previous measurements made of the same chambers with a legacy transfer radiometer, the NIST BXR. In general, the results are found to agree within their combined uncertainties, with the MDXR having 30 % lower uncertainty and greater spectral coverage.

  10. Experimental study at low supersonic speeds of a missile concept having opposing wraparound tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry M.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1994-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been performed at low supersonic speeds (at Mach numbers of 1.60, and 2.16) to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics of a missile concept capable of being tube launched and controlled with a simple one-axis canard controller. This concept, which features an axisymmetric body with two planar canards and four wraparound tail fins arranged in opposing pairs, must be in rolling motion to be controllable in any radial plane with the planar canards. Thus, producing a constant rolling moment that is invariant with speed and attitude to provide the motion is desirable. Two tail-fin shaping designs, one shaved and one beveled, were evaluated for their efficiency in producing the needed rolling moments, and the results showed that the shaved fins were much more desirable for this task than the beveled fins.

  11. Effects of some geometric variations on missile aerodynamic characteristics at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of some results from tests of a wing-body general research missile model is presented for a Mach number range up to 4.63. A basic ogive-cylinder body with a length-to-diameter ratio of 10 was used to which was attached a series of wing planforms. The planforms included a family of delta wings and a family of rectangular wings having a constant root chord but varying spans so that wings of constant exposed area could be compared. In addition, a cranked-tip planform was included and a rectangular planform with reduced chord. Some results are presented for wing-body-tail configurations - one utilizing a cranked wing planform and one with wings having a constant root chord and span, but tip chords that were 0, 20, and 40 percent of the root chord.

  12. Numerical simulation of vortical flow over an elliptical-body missile at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, R. N.; Adams, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical solutions to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are given for the flow about an elliptical body missile (3:1 ellipse) at a Mach number of 2.5 and a unit Reynolds number of 6.56 x 10 to the 6th/m. At high angles of attack, the flow is dominated by large-scale free vortices which occur in the lee-side flow field due to crossflow boundary-layer separation. Emphasis is focused on the accurate prediction of the lee-side vortical flow. Solutions are presented for both symmetric and asymmetric (body rolled 45 deg) configurations at 10 deg and 20 deg angle of attack. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure coefficients and vapor-screen photographs. Excellent agreement is obtained in all cases.

  13. SmallSat Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  14. Ultra-High Temperature Materials Characterization for Space and Missile Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan; Hyers, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Numerous advanced space and missile technologies including propulsion systems require operations at high temperatures. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed to meet these needs, including refractory metal alloys, carbides, borides, and silicides. System design requires data for materials properties at operating temperatures. Materials property data are not available at the desired operating temperatures for many materials of interest. The objective of this work is to provide important physical property data at ultra-high temperatures. The MSFC Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) facility can provide measurements of thermophysical properties which include: creep strength, emissivity, density and thermal expansion. ESL uses electrostatic fields to position samples between electrodes during processing and characterization experiments. Samples float between the electrodes during studies and are free from any contact with a container or test apparatus. This provides a high purity environment for the study of high-temperature, reactive materials. ESL can be used to process a wide variety of materials including metals, alloys, ceramics, glasses and semiconductors. A system for the determination of total hemispherical emissivity is being developed for the MSFC ESL facility by AZ Technology Inc. The instrument has been designed to provide emissivity measurements for samples during ESL experiments over the temperature range 700-3400K. A novel non-contact technique for the determination of high-temperature creep strength has been developed. Data from selected ESL-based characterization studies will be presented. The ESL technique could advance space and missile technologies by advancing the knowledge base and the technology readiness level for ultra-high temperature materials. Applications include non-eroding nozzle materials and lightweight, high-temperature alloys for turbines and structures.

  15. An overview of the Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanco, M. R.; Wintucky, W. T.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the joint NASA/Army SECT Studies were to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts applicable to rotorcraft, commuter and general aviation aircraft and cruise missiles. Competitive contracts were awarded to Allison, AVCO Lycoming, Garrett, Teledyne CAE and Williams International. This paper presents an overview of the contractors' study efforts for the commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile, and auxiliary power (APU) applications with engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range. Reference aircraft, missions and engines were selected. Advanced engine configurations and cycles with projected year 2000 component technologies were evaluated and compared with a reference engine selected by the contractor. For typical commuter and rotorcraft applications, fuel savings of 22 percent to 42 percent can be attained. For $1/gallon and $2/gallon fuel, reductions in direct operating cost range from 6 percent to 16 percent and from 11 percent to 17 percent respectively. For subsonic strategic cruise missile applications, fuel savings of 38 percent to 54 percent can be achieved which allows 35 percent to 60 percent increase in mission range and life cycle cost reductions of 40 percent to 56 percent. High payoff technologies have been identified for all applications.

  16. Preliminary Low-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Some Aspects of the Aerodynamic Problems Associated with Missiles Carried Externally in Positions Near Airplane Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, William J., Jr.; Silvers, H. Norman; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1954-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation has been made of some aspects of the aerodynamic problems associated with the use of air-to-air missiles when carried externally on aircraft. Measurements of the forces and moments on a missile model for a range of positions under the mid-semispan location of a 45deg sweptback wing indicated longitudinal and lateral forces with regard to both carriage and release of the missiles. Surveys of the characteristics of the flow field in the region likely to be traversed by the missiles showed abrupt gradients in both flow angularity and in local dynamic pressure. Through the use of aerodynamic data on the isolated missile and the measured flow-field characteristics, the longitudinal forces and moments acting on the missile while in the presence of the wing-fuselage combination could be estimated with fair accuracy. Although the lateral forces and moments predicted were qualitatively correct, there existed some large discrepancies in absolute magnitude.

  17. Analysis of Rocket, Ram-Jet, and Turbojet Engines for Supersonic Propulsion of Long-Range Missles. II - Rocket Missile Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N.; Kerrebrock, Jack

    1954-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a two-stage ballistic rocket mis having a centerbody and two parallel boosters was investigated for J oxygen and ammonia-fluorine propellants. Both power-plant and missi parameters were optimized to give minimum cost on-the basis of the analysis for a range of 5500 nautical miles. After optimum values were found, each parameter was varied independently to determine its effect on performance of the missile. The missile using the ammonia-fluorine propellant weighs about one half as much as a missile using JP4-oxygen. Based on an expected unit cost of fluorine in quantity production, the ammonia-fluorine missile has a substantially lower relative cost than a JP4-oxygen missile. Optimum chamber pressures for both propellant systems and for both the centerbody and boosters were between 450 and 600 pounds per square inch. High design altitudes for the exhaust nozzle are desirable for both the centerbody and boosters. For the centerbody, the design altitude should be between 45,000 and 60,000 feet, with the value for ammonia-fluorine lower than that for JP4-oxygen. For the boosters, the design altitude should be 20,000 to 30,000 feet, with the value for the ammonia-fluorine. missile higher.

  18. US and USSR Military Aircraft and Missile Aerodynamics 1970-1980. A selected, annotated bibliography, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this selected bibliography (281 citations) is to list available, unclassified, unlimited publications which provide aerodynamic data on major aircraft and missiles currently used by the military forces of the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Technical disciplines surveyed include aerodynamic performance, static and dynamic stability, stall-spin, flutter, buffet, inlets nozzles, flap performance, and flying qualities. Concentration is on specific aircraft including fighters, bombers, helicopters, missiles, and some work on transports, which are or could be used for military purposes. The bibliography is limited to material published from 1970 to 1980. The publications herein illustrate many of the types of aerodynamic data obtained in the course of aircraft development programs and may therefore provide some guidance in identifying problems to be expected in the conduct of such work. As such, this information may be useful in planning future research programs.

  19. Counterproliferation strategy: The influence of technology, budget, and arms control on theater missile defenses. Strategic research project

    SciTech Connect

    Parlier, G.H.

    1996-05-20

    This paper describes the historical evolution of the theater missile threat during World War II and the Persian Gulf War, and analyzes current technological challenges, budgetary pressures, and arms control restraints which constrain the development and deployment of effective theater missile defenses. The impact of these trends on strategic concepts as outlined in the National Military Strategy and their implications for attaining national policy objectives is assessed. A systems approach is used to described analyze, and evaluate the effectiveness of emerging counterproliferation strategy within the framework of an ends-ways-means strategy formulation paradigm. I conclude that current trends will lead to a self-deterring strategy: resources are inadequate to support the ways we intend to achieve our national objectives. Recommendations are made to eliminate unacceptable risk and enhance the concept of `extended conventional deterrence` consistent with U.S. national values and security interests for our role in a new world order.

  20. High positive affect shortly after missile attacks and the heightened risk of posttraumatic stress disorder among Israeli adolescents.

    PubMed

    Israel-Cohen, Yael; Kashy-Rosenbaum, Gabriela; Kaplan, Oren

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that positive emotions help build psychological resources and facilitate adaptation to stress, yet few studies have considered the possible negative effects of positive emotions on stress. This study examined the relationship between high arousal, positive and negative affect, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among 503 Israeli adolescents following a period of escalated missile attacks on their city. Our findings revealed that not only negative affect, but also positive affect at very high levels exhibited 2 weeks following missile attacks were independently associated with PTSD symptoms 2½ months later (η(2) = .09, η(2) = .02, respectively). Although the literature recognizes the risk factor of negative affect on the development of PTSD, we suggest that also positive affect at high levels immediately after such experiences may be a case of emotion context insensitivity and thus a maladaptive response to trauma. Further research should examine the mechanisms associated with positive emotions and PTSD.

  1. Firearm suicide committed using an unusual combination of tandem missiles: a bullet, a nail, and a screw.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Zoran; Savic, Slobodan; Atanasijevic, Tatjana

    2007-09-01

    An interesting case of firearm suicide carried out using an unusual type of handmade weapon and a peculiar combination of tandem missiles is presented. A nail and a screw were placed in the rifle barrel ahead of a bullet, and all 3 were simultaneously discharged. The inflicted injury began with 1 common channel, which later split in 2 separate channels, both directed backwards and upwards; one was caused by the screw, ending in the epistropheal body, and the other, caused by the bullet and the nail, penetrated into the cranial cavity, where it bifurcated in 2 branches, one from the bullet, ending in the cerebellar tissue, and the other from the nail, penetrated through the brain stem. The established site of the entrance suicidal wound, the appearance of the weapon, and the unusual missiles are discussed with regard to the available references dealing with different types of nail injuries to the head.

  2. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a maneuvering canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Wind tunnel investigations were conducted on a generic cruciform canard-controlled missile configuration. The model featured fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies to provide an expanded aerodynamic data base with particular emphasis on alleviating large induced rolling moments and/or for providing canard roll control throughout the entire test angle-of-attack range. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers from 2.50 to 3.50 at a constant Reynolds number per foot of 2.00 x 10 to the 6th. Selected test results are presented to show the effects of a fixed or free-rolling tail-fin afterbody on the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of a canard-controlled missile with pitch, yaw, and roll control at model roll angles of 0 deg and 45 deg.

  3. Body-surface pressure data on two monoplane-wing missile configurations with elliptical cross sections at Mach 2.50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.; Hernandez, G.; Lamb, M.

    1983-01-01

    Tabulated body surface pressure data for two monoplane-wing missile configurations are presented and analyzed. Body pressure data are presented for body-alone, body-tail, and body-wing-tail combinations. For the lost combination, data are presented for tail-fin deflection angles of 0 deg and 30 deg to simulate pitch, yaw, and roll control for both configurations. The data cover angles of attack from -5 deg to 25 deg and angles of roll from 0 deg to 90 deg at a Mach number of 2.50 and a Reynolds number of 6.56 x 1,000,000 per meter. Very consistent, systematic trends with angle of attack and angle of roll were observed in the data, and very good symmetry was found at a roll angle of 0 deg. Body pressures depended strongly on the local body cross-section shape, with very little dependence on the upstream shape. Undeflected fins had only a small influence on the pressures on the aft end of the body; however, tail-fin deflections caused large changes in the pressures.

  4. Qualitative comparison of concurrent vertical optical turbulence profiles from an aircraft and balloons over White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Bishop, Kenneth P.

    1999-08-01

    We report simultaneous balloon-borne thermosonde/airborne constant-current anemometer measurements made over a portion of White Sands Missile Range, NM. For the first time, vertical profiles of the refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data generated from shallow slant aircraft flight paths are compared to the balloons vertical Cn2 distributions. We discuss possible adverse effects of meteorology and atmospheric velocity fluctuations. We present conclusions and make recommendations for future similar experimental efforts.

  5. Wind-tunnel studies of the effects of simulated damage on the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes and missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    In order to assess the effects on static aerodynamic characteristics of battle damage to an aircraft or missile, wind tunnel studies were performed on models from which all or parts of the wing or horizontal or vertical tail had been removed. The effects of damage on the lift, longitudinal stability, lateral stability and directional stability of a swept-wing fighter are presented, along with the effects of wing removal on the control requirements of a delta-wing fighter. Results indicate that the loss of a major part of the vertical tail will probably result in the loss of the aircraft at any speed, while the loss of major parts of the horizontal tail generally results in catastrophic instability at subsonic speeds but, at low supersonic speeds, may allow the aircraft to return to friendly territory before pilot ejection. Major damage to the wing may be sustained without the loss of aircraft or pilot. The loss of some of the aerodynamic surfaces of cruise or surface-to-air missiles may result in catastrophic instability or may permit a ballistic trajectory to be maintained, depending upon the location of the lost surface with respect to the center of gravity of the missile.

  6. Innovative self-calibration method for accelerometer scale factor of the missile-borne RINS with fiber optic gyro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Zhang, Yiming

    2016-09-19

    The calibration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is a key technique to improve the preciseness of the inertial navigation system (INS) for missile, especially for the calibration of accelerometer scale factor. Traditional calibration method is generally based on the high accuracy turntable, however, it leads to expensive costs and the calibration results are not suitable to the actual operating environment. In the wake of developments in multi-axis rotational INS (RINS) with optical inertial sensors, self-calibration is utilized as an effective way to calibrate IMU on missile and the calibration results are more accurate in practical application. However, the introduction of multi-axis RINS causes additional calibration errors, including non-orthogonality errors of mechanical processing and non-horizontal errors of operating environment, it means that the multi-axis gimbals could not be regarded as a high accuracy turntable. As for its application on missiles, in this paper, after analyzing the relationship between the calibration error of accelerometer scale factor and non-orthogonality and non-horizontal angles, an innovative calibration procedure using the signals of fiber optic gyro and photoelectric encoder is proposed. The laboratory and vehicle experiment results validate the theory and prove that the proposed method relaxes the orthogonality requirement of rotation axes and eliminates the strict application condition of the system. PMID:27661867

  7. Numerical Investigation of Aerodynamics of Canard-Controlled Missile Using Planar and Grid Tail Fins. Part 1. Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSpirito, James; Vaughn, Milton E., Jr.; Washington, W. D.

    2002-09-01

    Viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to predict the aerodynamic coefficients and flowfield around a generic canard-controlled missile configuration in supersonic flow. Computations were performed for Mach 1.5 and 3.0, at six angles of attack between 0 and 10, with 0 and 10 canard deflection, and with planar and grid tail fins, for a total of 48 cases. Validation of the computed results was demonstrated by the very good agreement between the computed aerodynamic coefficients and those obtained from wind tunnel measurements. Visualizations of the flowfield showed that the canard trailing vortices and downwash produced a low-pressure region on the starboard side of the missile that in turn produced an adverse side force. The pressure differential on the leeward fin produced by the interaction with the canard trailing vortices is primarily responsible for the adverse roll effect observed when planar fins are used. Grid tail fins improved the roll effectiveness of the canards at low supersonic speed. No adverse rolling moment was observed with no canard deflection, or at the higher supersonic speed for either tail fin type due to the lower intensity of the canard trailing vortices in these cases. Flow visualizations from the simulations performed in this study help in the understanding of the flow physics and can lead to improved canard and tail fin designs for missiles and rockets.

  8. Force, Surface Pressure, and Flowfield Measurements on a Slender Missile Configuration with Square Cross-Section at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Birch, Trevor J.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2004-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a square cross-section missile configuration has been conducted to obtain force and moment measurements, surface pressure measurements, and vapor screen flow visualization photographs for comparison with computational fluid dynamics studies conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). Tests were conducted on three configurations which included: (1) body alone, (2) body plus tail fins mounted on the missile corners, and (3) body plus tail fins mounted on the missile side. This test was conducted in test section #2 of the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 2.50 and 4.50 and at a Reynolds number of 4 million per ft. The data were obtained over an angle of attack range from -4 deg. to 24 deg. and roll angles from 0 deg. to 45 deg., i.e., from a diamond shape (as viewed from the rear) at a roll angle of 0 deg. to a square shape at 45 deg.

  9. Russia's views on cruise missiles in the context of START III

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D Y

    2000-10-30

    The abysmal state of Russia's conventional forces has caused Russia to rely on nuclear weapons to ensure its security. This reliance was formalized in Russia's military doctrine which states that nuclear weapons can be used ''in situations critical to the national security of the RF and its allies.'' In fact, most Russian security analysts believe that this dependence on nuclear weapons will remain for the foreseeable future because the economy will have to improve significantly before a conventional force build up can be contemplated. Yet, despite Russia's need to rely on nuclear weapons, even this may be problematic because its economic plight may create difficulties in maintaining its current level of nuclear forces. Thus, Russia has a keen interest in negotiating a treaty to reduce Strategic Nuclear Forces below START II levels and would prefer to go even beyond the 2,000-2,500 numbers agreed to by Presidents Yeltsin and Clinton in Helsinki in 1997. Sergei Rogov, an influential defense analyst, believes that Russia's strategic nuclear forces will fall below 1,000 warheads by 2010 irrespective of arms control agreements. Accordingly, Russia is keen to ensure rough parity with the US. To retain a credible deterrent posture at these lower levels, Russia believes that it is important to restrain US sea-launched cruise missiles (SLCM)--forces that have heretofore not been captured as strategic weapons in the START treaties. Russian officials reason that once strategic nuclear forces go to very low levels, SLCM capabilities become strategically significant. In fact, according to two well-known Russian security analysts, Anatoli Diakov and Pavel Podvig, Russia's current START III negotiating position calls for the complete elimination of all SLCMs, both nuclear and conventional. Prior to assessing Russia's position regarding cruise missiles and START III, I will examine Russia's overall view of its security position vis-a-vis the US in order to provide background for

  10. Small Space Launch: Origins & Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, T.; Delarosa, J.

    2010-09-01

    The United States Space Situational Awareness capability continues to be a key element in obtaining and maintaining the high ground in space. Space Situational Awareness satellites are critical enablers for integrated air, ground and sea operations, and play an essential role in fighting and winning conflicts. The United States leads the world space community in spacecraft payload systems from the component level into spacecraft, and in the development of constellations of spacecraft. In the area of launch systems that support Space Situational Awareness, despite the recent development of small launch vehicles, the United States launch capability is dominated by an old, unresponsive and relatively expensive set of launchers in the Expandable, Expendable Launch Vehicles (EELV) platforms; Delta IV and Atlas V. The United States directed Air Force Space Command to develop the capability for operationally responsive access to space and use of space to support national security, including the ability to provide critical space capabilities in the event of a failure of launch or on-orbit capabilities. On 1 Aug 06, Air Force Space Command activated the Space Development & Test Wing (SDTW) to perform development, test and evaluation of Air Force space systems and to execute advanced space deployment and demonstration projects to exploit new concepts and technologies, and rapidly migrate capabilities to the warfighter. The SDTW charged the Launch Test Squadron (LTS) with the mission to develop the capability of small space launch, supporting government research and development space launches and missile defense target missions, with operationally responsive spacelift for Low-Earth-Orbit Space Situational Awareness assets as a future mission. This new mission created new challenges for LTS. The LTS mission tenets of developing space launches and missile defense target vehicles were an evolution from the squadrons previous mission of providing sounding rockets under the Rocket

  11. Program LRCDM2: Improved aerodynamic prediction program for supersonic canard-tail missiles with axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillenius, Marnix F. E.

    1985-01-01

    Program LRCDM2 was developed for supersonic missiles with axisymmetric bodies and up to two finned sections. Predicted are pressure distributions and loads acting on a complete configuration including effects of body separated flow vorticity and fin-edge vortices. The computer program is based on supersonic panelling and line singularity methods coupled with vortex tracking theory. Effects of afterbody shed vorticity on the afterbody and tail-fin pressure distributions can be optionally treated by companion program BDYSHD. Preliminary versions of combined shock expansion/linear theory and Newtonian/linear theory have been implemented as optional pressure calculation methods to extend the Mach number and angle-of-attack ranges of applicability into the nonlinear supersonic flow regime. Comparisons between program results and experimental data are given for a triform tail-finned configuration and for a canard controlled configuration with a long afterbody for Mach numbers up to 2.5. Initial tests of the nonlinear/linear theory approaches show good agreement for pressures acting on a rectangular wing and a delta wing with attached shocks for Mach numbers up to 4.6 and angles of attack up to 20 degrees.

  12. Use of a compact range approach to evaluate rf and dual-mode missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Kenneth E.; Weiss, Yosef

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) system developed for testing Radio Frequency (RF), Infra-Red (IR), and Dual-Mode missile seekers. The system consists of a unique hydraulic five-axis (three seeker axes plus two target axes) Flight Motion Table (FMT), an off-axis parabolic reflector, and electronics required to generate the signals to the RF feeds. RF energy that simulates the target is fed into the reflector from three orthogonal feeds mounted on the inner target axis, at the focal point area of the parabolic reflector. The parabolic reflector, together with the three RF feeds (the Compact Range), effectively produces a far-field image of the target. Both FMT target axis motion and electronic control of the RF beams (deflection) modify the simulated line-of-sight target angles. Multiple targets, glint, multi-path, ECM, and clutter can be introduced electronically. To evaluate dual-mode seekers, the center section of the parabolic reflector is replaced with an IR- transparent, but RF-reflective section. An IR scene projector mounts to the FMT target axes, with its image focused on the intersection of the FMT seeker axes. The system eliminates the need for a large anechoic chamber and 'Target Wall' or target motion system used with conventional HWIL systems. This reduces acquisition and operating costs of the facility.

  13. Early or late guided missile in the treatment of Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Caprilli, R; Angelucci, E; Cocco, A

    2005-12-01

    Over the last few years, much light has been shed on the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Further knowledge in this field has provided a firm basis not only in the understanding of current treatment but also for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Aim of these new agents is primarily to selectively interact with the key processes of intestinal inflammation. At present, only anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha antibodies namely infliximab, is licensed for clinical practice but it is feasible to foresee that, in the near future, a larger range of these agents will become available. Herein, the most promising biological agents in the treatment of Crohn's disease are outlined, which patients would benefit from these agents and when they should be administered. Attention is focused on the early (top-down) or late (step-up) use of biological agents, which for their very targeted mechanism of action may be compared to guided missiles. As yet, early use of biological agents remains to be supported by convincing evidence, nevertheless it may be advocated as first-line therapy for newly diagnosed severe Crohn's disease patients, both adults and children. PMID:16169305

  14. Aeroelastic stability analyses of two counter rotating propfan designs for a cruise missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Lucero, John M.; Mehmed, Oral; Stefko, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Aeroelastic stability analyses were performed to insure structural integrity of two counterrotating propfan blade designs for a NAVY/Air Force/NASA cruise missile model wind tunnel test. This analysis predicted if the propfan designs would be flutter free at the operating conditions of the wind tunnel test. Calculated stability results are presented for the two blade designs with rotational speed and Mach number as the parameters. A aeroelastic analysis code ASTROP2 (Aeroelastic Stability and Response of Propulsion Systems - 2 Dimensional Analysis), developed at LeRC, was used in this project. The aeroelastic analysis is a modal method and uses the combination of a finite element structural model and two dimensional steady and unsteady cascade aerodynamic models. This code was developed to analyze single rotation propfans but was modified and applied to counterrotating propfans for the present work. Modifications were made to transform the geometry and rotation of the aft rotor to the same reference frame as the forward rotor, to input a non-uniform inflow into the rotor being analyzed, and to automatically converge to the least stable aeroelastic mode.

  15. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a 'guided missile'.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-07-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells ('guided missiles'). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based 'killer artificial antigen-presenting cell' strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:20636007

  16. Advanced Ricor cryocoolers for high-end IR missile warning systems and ruggedized platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Ilan; Riabzev, Sergey; Filis, Avishai; Gover, Dan; Perach, Adam; Regev, Itai; Segal, Victor

    2015-05-01

    The growth in world demand for infrared missile warning systems (MWS) has impelled the development of new technologies, in particular, special ruggedized cryogenic coolers. Since the cryocooler is a core component in ruggedized platforms, RICOR has met the challenge by developing new models able to withstand high ambient temperatures above 110°C, as well as harsh vibration levels, both derived from airborne fighter applications. One of the development efforts focused on a cryocooler regenerator and cold finger optimization, in order to achieve high cooling capacity at 95K FPA and the efficiency of about 5.3 % at 102 °C. In order to withstand harsh environmental vibration and high ambient temperature range, the mechanical parts of the cryocoolers were designed and tested for a high structural safety factor along with weight minimization. The electronic design concept was based on encapsulated controllers, the PCB of which has been designed with internal heat sinking paths and special components able to withstand ambient temperatures of up to 125°C. As a final stage of development, four cryocooler models (K544, K549, K527 and K508) were successfully qualified under harsh environmental conditions, both by RICOR and by system manufacturers. Also life demonstration tests were performed with these models. The cryocoolers were designed and tested successfully to meet requirements of military standards MIL- STD-704D, MIL-STD- 461E and MIL-STD-810F reflecting real mission profiles in harsh environment.

  17. A laboratory study of subjective response to sonic booms measured at White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    The Sonic Boom Simulator of the Langley Research Center was used to quantify subjective loudness response to boom signatures consisting of: (1) simulator reproductions of booms recently recorded at White Sands Missile Range; (2) idealized N-waves; and (3) idealized booms having intermediate shocks. The booms with intermediate shocks represented signatures derived from CFD predictions. The recorded booms represented those generated by F15 and T38 aircraft flyovers and represented a variety of waveforms reflecting the effects of propagation through a turbulent atmosphere. These waveforms included the following shape categories: N-waves, peaked, rounded, and U-shaped. Results showed that Perceived Level and Zwicker Loudness Level were good estimators of the loudness of turbulence modified sonic booms. No significant differences were observed between loudness responses for the several shape categories when expressed in terms of Perceived Level. Thus, Perceived Level effectively accounted for waveform differences due to turbulence. Idealized booms with intermediate shocks, however, were rated as being approximately 2.7 dB(PL) less loud than the recorded signatures. This difference was not accounted for by PL.

  18. Adaptive dynamic inversion robust control for BTT missile based on wavelet neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanfeng; Wang, Yongji; Deng, Zhixiang; Wu, Hao

    2009-10-01

    A new nonlinear control strategy incorporated the dynamic inversion method with wavelet neural networks is presented for the nonlinear coupling system of Bank-to-Turn(BTT) missile in reentry phase. The basic control law is designed by using the dynamic inversion feedback linearization method, and the online learning wavelet neural network is used to compensate the inversion error due to aerodynamic parameter errors, modeling imprecise and external disturbance in view of the time-frequency localization properties of wavelet transform. Weights adjusting laws are derived according to Lyapunov stability theory, which can guarantee the boundedness of all signals in the whole system. Furthermore, robust stability of the closed-loop system under this tracking law is proved. Finally, the six degree-of-freedom(6DOF) simulation results have shown that the attitude angles can track the anticipant command precisely under the circumstances of existing external disturbance and in the presence of parameter uncertainty. It means that the dependence on model by dynamic inversion method is reduced and the robustness of control system is enhanced by using wavelet neural network(WNN) to reconstruct inversion error on-line.

  19. Optimization of air-ejected rocket/missile geometries under validated supersonic flow field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, D.; Domínguez, D.; Gonzalo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper defines a methodology to carry out optimizations of rocket/missile geometries by means of krigingbased algorithms applied to simulations made with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The first part of the paper is focused on the validation of the open source CFD code against a well-studied 3-dimmensional test case in supersonic conditions. The impact of several turbulence models, different numerical schemes to discretize the equations and different mesh resolution levels have been analyzed demonstrating the performance of using wall functions for supersonic flow. Good agreements between numerical, theoretical and experimental results are obtained and some general guidelines are extracted. The best accuracy is obtained with SST k-omega turbulence model with meshes suitable for the use of wall functions in the boundary cells. Then, with this configuration for the simulations, an air-ejected rocket fairing is selected to apply a geometrical optimization. The selected method is kriging-based, where a statistical model is generated by means of several numerical experiments dependent on a certain number of design parameters; the final objective is to find the minimum drag coefficient for the model, keeping enough room inside the fairing to install the requested payload. This kriging-based method allows obtaining the samples in a parallel manner, looking for the optimum design at the generated metamodel and hence improving its accuracy adding new samples if needed.

  20. Kwajalein missile range, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands range reference atmosphere 0-70 km altitude

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters are essential to the research and development of missiles and aerospace vehicles. The need for realistic atmospheric models derived in a consistent manner for each of the several major test ranges was recognized in the early 1960's. An atmospheric model which is derived from statistical data for a particular geographical location is referred to as a reference atmosphere. This committee, Task MG-1, establishes RRAs Range Reference Atmospheres for the several ranges as provided by the RCC Range Commander's Council. An RRA is a model of the Earth's atmosphere over a geographical location of interest for use by DOD and other U.S. Government range users. The RRA is used to provide planning data for evaluating environmental constraints for the particular configurations of environment-sensitive systems and components being developed or undergoing tests. Using the best available upper atmosphere data base to include rawinsonde, rocketsonde and possibly other high-altitude data sources for the range location, the task is to establish a model of certain statistics for wind and thermodynamic quantities derived in a uniform manner and published in a standardized format.

  1. Potential for substitution of geothermal energy at domestic defense installations and White Sands Missile Range

    SciTech Connect

    Bakewell, C.A.; Renner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal resources that might provide substitute energy at any of 76 defense installations are identified and evaluated. The geologic characteristics and related economics of potential geothermal resources located at or near the 76 installations were estimated. The geologic assessment identified 18 installations with possible geothermal resources and 4 Atlantic Coastal Plain resource configurations that represented the alternatives available to East Coast bases. These 18 locations and 4 resource configurations, together with 2 possible resources at the White Sands Missile Range and a potential resource at Kings Bay, Georgia, were examined to determine the relative economics of substituting potential geothermal energy for part or all of the existing oil, gas, and electrical energy usage. Four of the military installations - Mountain Home, Norton, Hawthorne, and Sierra - appear to be co-located with possible geothermal resources which, if present, might provide substitute energy at or below current market prices for oil. Six additional locations - Ellsworth, Luke, Williams, Bliss, Fallon, and Twentynine Palms - could become economically attractive under certain conditions. No geothermal resource was found to be economically competitive with natural gas at current controlled prices. Generation of electric power at the locations studied is estimated to be uneconomic at present.

  2. Toward a new task assignment and path evolution (TAPE) for missile defense system (MDS) using intelligent adaptive SOM with recurrent neural networks (RNNs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Hsu; Chen, Chun-Yao; Hung, Kun-Neng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a new adaptive self-organizing map (SOM) with recurrent neural network (RNN) controller is proposed for task assignment and path evolution of missile defense system (MDS). We address the problem of N agents (defending missiles) and D targets (incoming missiles) in MDS. A new RNN controller is designed to force an agent (or defending missile) toward a target (or incoming missile), and a monitoring controller is also designed to reduce the error between RNN controller and ideal controller. A new SOM with RNN controller is then designed to dispatch agents to their corresponding targets by minimizing total damaging cost. This is actually an important application of the multiagent system. The SOM with RNN controller is the main controller. After task assignment, the weighting factors of our new SOM with RNN controller are activated to dispatch the agents toward their corresponding targets. Using the Lyapunov constraints, the weighting factors for the proposed SOM with RNN controller are updated to guarantee the stability of the path evolution (or planning) system. Excellent simulations are obtained using this new approach for MDS, which show that our RNN has the lowest average miss distance among the several techniques.

  3. Specific immunotherapy of experimental myasthenia by genetically engineered APCs: the "guided missile" strategy.

    PubMed

    Drachman, D B; Wu, J-M; Miagkov, A; Williams, M A; Adams, R N; Wu, B

    2003-09-01

    Although treatment of MG with general immunosuppressive agents is often effective, it has important drawbacks, including suppression of the immune system as a whole, with the risks of infection and neoplasia, and numerous other adverse side effects. Ideally, treatment of MG should eliminate the specific pathogenic autoimmune response to AChR, without otherwise suppressing the immune system or producing other adverse side effects. Although antibodies to AChR are directly responsible for the loss of AChRs at neuromuscular junctions in MG, the AChR antibody response is T cell-dependent, and immunotherapy directed at T cells can abrogate the autoantibody response, with resulting benefit. As in other autoimmune diseases, the T cell response in MG is highly heterogeneous. The design of specific immunotherapy must take this heterogeneity into account and target the entire repertoire of AChR-specific T cells. We describe our investigation of a novel strategy for specific immunotherapy of MG, involving gene transfer to convert antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to "guided missiles" that target AChR-specific T cells, and that induce apoptosis and elimination of those T cells. This strategy uses the ability of APCs from a given individual to present the entire spectrum of AChR epitopes unique for that individual, and thereby to target the entire repertoire of antigen-specific T cells of the same individual. Using viral vectors, we have genetically engineered the APCs to process and present the most important domain of the AChR molecule, and to express a "warhead" of Fas ligand (FasL) to eliminate the activated AChR-specific T cells with which they interact. Our results show that the APCs express the appropriate gene products, and effectively and specifically eliminate AChR-specific T cells by the Fas/FasL pathway, while sparing T cells of other specificities. PMID:14592923

  4. Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B.

    1986-01-01

    Small advanced (450 to 850 pounds thrust, 2002 to 3781 N) gas turbine engines were studied for a subsonic strategic cruise missile application, using projected year 2000 technology. An aircraft, mission characteristics, and baseline (state-of-the-art) engine were defined to evaluate technology benefits. Engine performance and configuration analyses were performed for two and three spool turbofan and propfan engine concepts. Mission and Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analyses were performed in which the candidate engines were compared to the baseline engines over a prescribed mission. The advanced technology engines reduced system LCC up to 41 percent relative to the baseline engine. Critical aerodynamic, materials, and mechanical systems turbine engine technologies were identified and program plans were defined for each identified critical technology.

  5. Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics to Large Angles of Attack of a Cruciform Missile Configuration at a Mach Number of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, J. R.

    1954-01-01

    The lift, pitching-moment, and drag characteristics of a missile configuration having a body of fineness ratio 9.33 and a cruciform triangular wing and tail of aspect ratio 4 were measured at a Mach number of 1.99 and a Reynolds number of 6.0 million, based on the body length. The tests were performed through an angle-of-attack range of -5 deg to 28 deg to investigate the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of roll angle, wing-tail interdigitation, wing deflection, and interference among the components (body, wing, and tail). Theoretical lift and moment characteristics of the configuration and its components were calculated by the use of existing theoretical methods which have been modified for application to high angles of attack, and these characteristics are compared with experiment. The lift and drag characteristics of all combinations of the body, wing, and tail were independent of roll angle throughout the angle-of-attack range. The pitching-moment characteristics of the body-wing and body-wing-tail combinations, however, were influenced significantly by the roll angle at large angles of attack (greater than 10 deg). A roll from 0 deg (one pair of wing panels horizontal) to 45 deg caused a forward shift in the center of pressure which was of the same magnitude for both of these combinations, indicating that this shift originated from body-wing interference effects. A favorable lift-interference effect (lift of the combination greater than the sum of the lifts of the components) and a rearward shift in the center of pressure from a position corresponding to that for the components occurred at small angles of attack when the body was combined with either the exposed wing or tail surfaces. These lift and center-of-pressure interference effects were gradually reduced to zero as the angle of attack was increased to large values. The effect of wing-tail interference, which influenced primarily the pitching-moment characteristics, is dependent on the distance

  6. Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics to Large Angles of Attack of a Cruciform Missile Configuration at a Mach Number of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, J Richard

    1954-01-01

    The lift, pitching-moment, and drag characteristics of a missile configuration having a body of fineness ratio 9.33 and a cruciform triangular wing and tail of aspect ratio 4 were measured at a Mach number of 1.99 and a Reynolds number of 6.0 million, based on the body length. The tests were performed through an angle-of-attack range of -5 deg to 28 deg to investigate the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of roll angle, wing-tail interdigitation, wing deflection, and interference among the components (body, wing, and tail). Theoretical lift and moment characteristics of the configuration and its components were calculated by the use of existing theoretical methods which have been modified for application to high angles of attack, and these characteristics are compared with experiment. The lift and drag characteristics of all combinations of the body, wing, and tail were independent of roll angle throughout the angle-of-attack range. The pitching-moment characteristics of the body-wing and body-wing- tail combinations, however, were influenced significantly by the roll angle at large angles of attack (greater than 10 deg). A roll from 0 deg (one pair of wing panels horizontal) to 45 deg caused a forward shift in the center of pressure which was of the same magnitude for both of these combinations, indicating that this shift originated from body-wing interference effects. A favorable lift - interference effect (lift of the combination greater than the sum of the lifts of the components) and a rearward shift in the center of pressure from a position corresponding to that for the components occurred at small angles of attack when the body was combined with either the exposed wing or tail surfaces. These lift and center-of-pressure interference effects were gradually reduced to zero as the angle of attack was increased to large values. The effect of wing-tail interference, which influenced primarily the pitching-moment characteristics, is dependent on the

  7. Component build-up method for engineering analysis of missiles at low-to-high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating the component build-up terms, with the exception of zero-lift drag, for missile airframes in steady flow and at arbitrary angles of attack and bank. The underlying and unifying bases of all these efforts are slender-body theory and its nonlinear extensions through the equivalent angle-of-attack concept. Emphasis is placed on the forces and moments which act on each of the fins, so that control cross-coupling effects as well as longitudinal and lateral-directional effects can be determined.

  8. Mach 6 experimental and theoretical stability and performance of a cruciform missile at angles of attack up to 65 degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edward R.; Johnston, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control of an axisymmetric cruciform-finned missile has been conducted at Mach 6. The angle-of-attack range extended from 20 to 65 deg to encompass maximum lift. Longitudinal stability, performance, and trim could be accurately predicted with the fins at a fin roll angle of 0 deg but not when the fins were at a fin roll angle of 45 deg. At this roll angle, windward fin choking occurred at angles of attack above 50 deg and reduced the effectiveness of the fins and caused pitch-up.

  9. Dust Plume Modeling from Ranges and Maneuver Areas on Fort Bliss and the White Sands Missile Range: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Barnard, James C.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Shaw, William J.

    2009-05-04

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating on and between the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical move-out activities occurring on the installations were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing the modeling scenarios are summarized and results of simulations conducted under these assumptions are presented for four representative meteorological periods.

  10. A new method of passive counting of nuclear missile warheads -a white paper for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher; Durham, J. Matthew; Guardincerri, Elena; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Wang, Zhehui; Fellows, Shelby; Poulson, Daniel Cris; Plaud-Ramos, Kenie Omar; Daughton, Tess Marie; Johnson, Olivia Ruth

    2015-07-31

    Cosmic ray muon imaging has been studied for the past several years as a possible technique for nuclear warhead inspection and verification as part of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty between the United States and the Russian Federation. The Los Alamos team has studied two different muon imaging methods for this application, using detectors on two sides and one side of the object of interest. In this report we present results obtained on single sided imaging of configurations aimed at demonstrating the potential of this technique for counting nuclear warheads in place with detectors above the closed hatch of a ballistic missile submarine.

  11. Test wells T21, T22, and T25, White Sands Missile Range, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Three test wells, T21, T22, and T25, were drilled at White Sands Missile Range in south-central New Mexico as part of a joint military program sponsored by the U.S. Army in September 1982. T21 and T22 were drilled as observation wells for two old landfills. T25 was drilled as an exploratory hole to obtain lithologic and borehole-geophysical data in the vicinity of the proposed replacement well for Supply Well 15. Information obtained from these wells includes borehole-geophysical and driller's logs.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications

    PubMed Central

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system. PMID:26613102

  13. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves.

  14. Temporal uncertainty analysis of human errors based on interrelationships among multiple factors: a case of Minuteman III missile accident.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hao; Tian, Jin; Zhao, Tingdi

    2016-01-01

    In traditional approaches of human reliability assessment (HRA), the definition of the error producing conditions (EPCs) and the supporting guidance are such that some of the conditions (especially organizational or managerial conditions) can hardly be included, and thus the analysis is burdened with incomprehensiveness without reflecting the temporal trend of human reliability. A method based on system dynamics (SD), which highlights interrelationships among technical and organizational aspects that may contribute to human errors, is presented to facilitate quantitatively estimating the human error probability (HEP) and its related variables changing over time in a long period. Taking the Minuteman III missile accident in 2008 as a case, the proposed HRA method is applied to assess HEP during missile operations over 50 years by analyzing the interactions among the variables involved in human-related risks; also the critical factors are determined in terms of impact that the variables have on risks in different time periods. It is indicated that both technical and organizational aspects should be focused on to minimize human errors in a long run. PMID:26360211

  15. Review of the Toxicity of the Metallic Compounds Proposed for Use in the New Green Missile Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to modernize and minimize hazards posed by the toxic components of missile propellant, the USACHPPM has been tasked to provide a comparison of the toxicity of compounds currently in use as missile propellants and the suite of compounds proposed to replace them. This report deals with the portion of this work concerning the toxicity of the organometallic compounds used in these formulations. Toxicity assessments of the organic compounds used in these formulations are published elsewhere. In general, toxicity data were available for all the metal compounds of concern or for closely related compounds that can serve as surrogates for the assessment of toxicity. We have high confidence in the reliability of these comparisons. This report is organized by element to provide the reader with an in-depth assessment with a minimum of redundancy. The narrative will first describe general concepts about the toxicity of each metal and then provide a summary of the toxicological information available for the specific compound.

  16. Trends and developments in the proliferation of ballistic missiles and weapons of mass destruction seminar, February 17, 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, B.L.; Hallenbeck, R.A.; Gill, J.M.

    1993-04-08

    This seminar provided an overview on the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons as well as missiles and missile technology, and set the stage for subsequent seminar meetings of the 1993 program. A multiplicity of factors -- different nations, regions, and capabilities -- is making dealing with proliferation increasingly complicated. Additionally, recent or upcoming world events introduce further uncertainty into proliferation calculations. These proliferation accelerators and decelerators, will greatly shape and define the overall proliferation picture. These factors combine to raise a whole new series of stability issues which require new analyses and approaches for managing proliferation in the post-Cold War era. While technology cannot alone solve the proliferation problem, a particularly promising application is in new information technologies and interactive information management systems. A proliferation information network could be used to fuse large amounts of information and data on exports; license; treaty reporting, notifications, and other obligations; dual use technologies and related scientific advances; and others information of proliferation relevance. This type of network could use readily available technologies, would be simple to use and relatively inexpensive to create and maintain, and could be made available to almost of all of the nations of the world.

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Control Actuation System with Fuzzy-PID Logic Controlled Brushless Motor Drives for Missiles Glider Applications.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Murali; Arulmozhiyal, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    A control actuation system has been used extensively in automotive, aerospace, and defense applications. The major challenges in modeling control actuation system are rise time, maximum peak to peak overshoot, and response to nonlinear system with percentage error. This paper addresses the challenges in modeling and real time implementation of control actuation system for missiles glider applications. As an alternative fuzzy-PID controller is proposed in BLDC motor drive followed by linkage mechanism to actuate fins in missiles and gliders. The proposed system will realize better rise time and less overshoot while operating in extreme nonlinear dynamic system conditions. A mathematical model of BLDC motor is derived in state space form. The complete control actuation system is modeled in MATLAB/Simulink environment and verified by performing simulation studies. A real time prototype of the control actuation is developed with dSPACE-1104 hardware controller and a detailed analysis is carried out to confirm the viability of the proposed system. PMID:26613102

  18. Modeling Techniques Used to Analyze Safety of Payloads for Generic Missile Type Weapons Systems During an Indirect Lightning Strike

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M P; Ong, M M; Crull, E W; Brown Jr., C G

    2009-07-21

    During lightning strikes buildings and other structures can act as imperfect Faraday Cages, enabling electromagnetic fields to be developed inside the facilities. Some equipment stored inside these facilities may unfortunately act as antenna systems. It is important to have techniques developed to analyze how much voltage, current, or energy dissipation may be developed over valuable components. In this discussion we will demonstrate the modeling techniques used to accurately analyze a generic missile type weapons system as it goes through different stages of assembly. As work is performed on weapons systems detonator cables can become exposed. These cables will form different monopole and loop type antenna systems that must be analyzed to determine the voltages developed over the detonator regions. Due to the low frequencies of lightning pulses, a lumped element circuit model can be developed to help analyze the different antenna configurations. We will show an example of how numerical modeling can be used to develop the lumped element circuit models used to calculate voltage, current, or energy dissipated over the detonator region of a generic missile type weapons system.

  19. Temporal uncertainty analysis of human errors based on interrelationships among multiple factors: a case of Minuteman III missile accident.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hao; Tian, Jin; Zhao, Tingdi

    2016-01-01

    In traditional approaches of human reliability assessment (HRA), the definition of the error producing conditions (EPCs) and the supporting guidance are such that some of the conditions (especially organizational or managerial conditions) can hardly be included, and thus the analysis is burdened with incomprehensiveness without reflecting the temporal trend of human reliability. A method based on system dynamics (SD), which highlights interrelationships among technical and organizational aspects that may contribute to human errors, is presented to facilitate quantitatively estimating the human error probability (HEP) and its related variables changing over time in a long period. Taking the Minuteman III missile accident in 2008 as a case, the proposed HRA method is applied to assess HEP during missile operations over 50 years by analyzing the interactions among the variables involved in human-related risks; also the critical factors are determined in terms of impact that the variables have on risks in different time periods. It is indicated that both technical and organizational aspects should be focused on to minimize human errors in a long run.

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVES RESULTING FROM THE IMPACT OF HIGH VELOCITY MISSILES ON ANIMAL TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, E. Newton; McMillen, J. Howard

    1947-01-01

    The spark shadowgram method of studying shock waves is described. It has been used to investigate the properties of such waves produced by the impact of a high velocity missile on the surface of water. The method can be adapted for study of behavior of shock waves in tissue by placing the tissue on a water surface or immersing it in water. Spark shadowgrams then reveal waves passing from tissue to water or reflected from tissue surfaces. Reflection and transmission of shock waves from muscle, liver, stomach, and intestinal wall are compared with reflection from non-living surfaces such as gelatin gel, steel, plexiglas, cork, and air. Because of its heterogeneous structure, waves transmitted by tissue are dispersed and appear as a series of wavelets. When the accoustical impedance (density x wave velocity) of a medium is less than that in which the wave is moving, reflection will occur with inversion of the wave; i.e., a high pressure wave will become a low pressure wave. This inversion occurs at an air surface and is illustrated by shadowgrams of reflection from stomach wall, from a segment of colon filled with gas, and from air-filled rubber balloons. Bone (human skull and beef ribs) shows good reflection and some transmission of shock waves. When steel is directly hit by a missile, clearly visible elastic waves pass from metal to water, but a similar direct hit on bone does not result in elastic waves strong enough to be detected by a spark shadowgram. PMID:19871617

  1. Experimental and Computational Induced Aerodynamics from Missile Jet Reaction Controls at Angles of Attack to 75 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Ashbury, Scott C.; Deere, Karen A.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine induced aerodynamic effects from jet reaction controls of an advanced air-to-air missile concept. The 75-percent scale model featured independently controlled reaction jets located near the nose and tail of the model. Aerodynamic control was provided by four fins located near the tail of the model. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.35 and 0.60, at angles of attack up to 75 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios up to 90. Jet-reaction thrust forces were not measured by the force balance but jet-induced forces were. In addition, a multiblock three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method was used to calculate the flowfield of the missile at angles of attack up to 40 deg. Results indicate that large interference effects on pitching moment were induced from operating the nose jets with the the off. Excellent correlation between experimental and computational pressure distributions and pitching moment were obtained a a Mach number of 0.35 and at angles of attack up to 40 deg.

  2. Impact angle constrained three-dimensional integrated guidance and control for STT missile in the presence of input saturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Weihong; Xiong, Shaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Considering a class of skid-to-turn (STT) missile with fixed target and constrained terminal impact angles, a novel three-dimensional (3D) integrated guidance and control (IGC) scheme is proposed in this paper. Based on coriolis theorem, the fully nonlinear IGC model without the assumption that the missile flies heading to the target at initial time is established in the three-dimensional space. For this strict-feedback form of multi-variable system, dynamic surface control algorithm is implemented combining with extended observer (ESO) to complete the preliminary design. Then, in order to deal with the problems of the input constraints, a hyperbolic tangent function is introduced to approximate the saturation function and auxiliary system including a Nussbaum function established to compensate for the approximation error. The stability of the closed-loop system is proven based on Lyapunov theory. Numerical simulations results show that the proposed integrated guidance and control algorithm can ensure the accuracy of target interception with initial alignment angle deviation and the input saturation is suppressed with smooth deflection curves. PMID:27167987

  3. The Longitudinal Stability, Control Effectiveness, and Control Hinge Moment Characteristics Obtained from a Flight Investigation of a Canard Missile Configuration at Transonic and Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niewald, Roy J; Moul, Martin T

    1950-01-01

    A 60 degree delta wing canard missile configuration was flight-tested at the Langley pilotless aircraft research station at Wallops Island, Va. The results include the longitudinal stability derivatives, control effectiveness, drag characteristics, and control-surface hinge-moment characteristics for a Mach number range of 0.7 to 1.45.

  4. Wind tunnel test results for the direction controlled antitank DCAT missile at Mach numbers from 0.64 to 2.50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, T. A.; Spring, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results are presented to show aerodynamic characteristics over the Mach number range of 0.64 to 2.50 of the DCAT missile. Data are presented showing the interference created by the rear mounted reaction control system. Two candidate fins were installed on the model during tests: a flat folding fin and a curved wrap around fin.

  5. Flight Investigation of a Roll-stabilized Missile Configuration at Varying Angles of Attack at Mach Numbers Between 0.8 and 1.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarovsky, Jacob; Gardiner, Robert A

    1957-01-01

    A missile research model was flown at supersonic speed to determine the quality of automatic roll stabilization at varying angles of attack. Aerodynamic rolling and pitching derivatives were determined from the flight record. It was concluded that the combination of the gyro-actuated automatic pilot with wing-tip ailerons provided adequate roll stabilization under conditions encountered in flight.

  6. Guided molecular missiles for tumor-targeting chemotherapy--case studies using the second-generation taxoids as warheads.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    A long-standing problem in cancer chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Therefore, the development of innovative and efficacious tumor-specific drug delivery protocols or systems is urgently needed. A rapidly growing tumor requires various nutrients and vitamins. Thus, tumor cells overexpress many tumor-specific receptors, which can be used as targets to deliver cytotoxic agents into tumors. This Account presents our research program on the discovery and development of novel and efficient drug delivery systems, possessing tumor-targeting ability and efficacy against various cancer types, especially multidrug-resistant tumors. In general, a tumor-targeting drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic warhead connected directly or through a suitable linker to form a conjugate. The conjugate, which can be regarded as a "guided molecular missile", should be systemically nontoxic, that is, the linker must be stable in blood circulation, but upon internalization into the cancer cell, the conjugate should be readily cleaved to regenerate the active cytotoxic warhead. These novel "guided molecular missiles" are conjugates of the highly potent second-generation taxoid anticancer agents with tumor-targeting molecules through mechanism-based cleavable linkers. These conjugates are specifically delivered to tumors and internalized into tumor cells, and the potent taxoid anticancer agents are released from the linker into the cytoplasm. We have successfully used omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular DHA, and monoclonal antibodies (for EGFR) as tumor-targeting molecules for the conjugates, which exhibited remarkable efficacy against

  7. Future Nanotube Commercialization Opportunities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael; Shah, Sandeep; Kaul, Raj; Zhu, Shen; Vandiver, Terry; Zimmerman, Joe E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nanotube technology has broad applicability to programs at both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). MSFC has interest in applications of nanotubes as sensors and high strength lightweight materials for propulsion system components, avionic systems, and scientific instruments. MSFC is currently pursuing internal programs to develop nanotube temperature sensors, heat pipes, and metal matrix composites. In support of these application areas MSFC is interested in growth of long nanotubes, growth of nanotubes in the microgravity environment, and nanotubes fabricated from high temperature materials such as Boron Nitride or Silicon Carbide. AMCOM is similarly interested in nanotube applications which take advantage of the nanotube thermal conductance properties, high strength, and lightweight. Applications of interest to AMCOM include rocket motor casing structures, rocket nozzles, and lightweight structure and aeronautic skins.

  8. Selected test-well data from the MX-missile siting study, Tooele, Juab, Millard, Beaver, and Iron counties, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James; Atwood, J.W.; Buettner, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water data obtained from the MX-missile siting study in western Utah are presented in this report. The test drilling was divided into two phases, verification and water resources. In the verification phase, numerous borings ranging in depth from 92 to 205 feet were made to obtain data necessary for the design of the MX-basing system. Test wells drilled for the water resources phase ranged in depth from 310 to 1,399 feet; they were designed to determine ground-water availability and to estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals planned for construction of the MX-basing system. This report includes: well-completion data, water-level measurements, and lithologic logs of selected wells. (USGS)

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of a canard-controlled missile at Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.0.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassner, D. L.; Wettlaufer, B.

    1977-01-01

    A typical missile model with nose mounted canards and cruciform tail surfaces was tested in the Ames 6- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel to determine the contributions of the component aerodynamic surfaces to the static aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.0 and Reynolds number of 1 million based on body diameter. Data were obtained at angles of attack ranging from -3 deg to 12 deg for various stages of model build-up (i.e., with and without canard and/or tail surfaces). Results were obtained both with the model unrolled and rolled 45 deg. For the canard and tail arrangements investigated, the model was trimmable at angles of attack up to about 10 deg with canard deflections of 9 deg. Also, the tail arrangements studied provided ample pitch stability. there were no appreciable effects of model roll orientation.

  10. The development of an information system master plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollo, Rolando A.; Bennett, Paul D.

    1992-03-01

    This thesis provides a general description of the communication facilities and systems currently used by the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The system interface requirements to support current range operations are identified and a description of current communications system shortfalls is provided along with recommendations for short-term improvements. A vision of the future is also provided. It suggests that PMRF adopt a coordinated, integrated, and centralized approach to range communications. Current and future communications system technologies such as digital communications, applicability of different transmission media, and application of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) are mentioned as avenues for implementing a fully integrated data, voice, and video real-time information network that will support future PMRF users' requirements.

  11. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  12. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  13. Small Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    Presents a notion of small culture as an alternative to what has become the default notion of large culture in applied linguistics, social science, and popular usage. A small-culture view of English-language curriculum settings reveals mismatches between professional-academic and organizational cultures at the mezzo level of the institution. (VWL)

  14. Performance oriented packaging testing of container, shipping and storage, guided missile, CNU-443A/E for packing group II solid hazardous materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This Performance Oriented Packaging (POP) test was conducted to ascertain whether the CNU-443A/E Guided Missile Shipping and Storage Container meets the Packing Group 11 requirements specified by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 CFR, Parts 107 through 178, dated 31 December 1991. The packaged commodity used for the test was an inert AGM-119B Guided Missile weighing 343 kg (757 pounds). This represents the current maximum commodity weight. To compensate for future growth variations in commodity and/or packaging, 35 kg (76 pounds) were added. Gross weight of the loaded container was 593 kg (1,307 pounds). The test results indicate that the container has conformed to the POP requirements.

  15. The Use of the Rolled-up Vortex Concept for Predicting Wing-tail Interference and Comparison with Experiment at Mach Number of 1.62 for a Series of Missile Configurations Having Tandem Cruciform Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, Carl E

    1952-01-01

    The method for predicting wing- tail interference whereby the trailing vortex system behind lifting wings is replaced by fully rolled-up vortices has been applied to the calculation of tail efficiency parameters, lift characteristics, and center -of-pressure locations for a series of generalized missile configurations. The calculations have been carried out with assumed and experimental vortex locations, and comparisons made with experimental data. The measured spanwise locations of the vortices for the inline case were found to be in good agreement with the asymptotic values computed from the center of gravity of the vorticity using the method of Lagerstrom and Graham. For the interdigitated configurations the measured spanwise locations were in only fair agreement with the asymptotic locations computed for the inline case. The vertical displacement of the vortices with angle of attack for both inline and interdigitated configurations was small. The method utilizing the rolled -up vortex concept was shown to give good results in the prediction of tail efficiency variations with angle of attack for inline configurations. Not as good correlation with experiment was shown for the interdigitated configurations. Complete configuration lift -curve slopes and center -of-pressure locations, obtained using t ail efficiency calculations together with the characteristics of the components obtained from available theoretical methods, showed excellent correlation with experimental results.

  16. System description and applications of the Imaging Infrared Simulation System III at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholes, William J.; Buford, James A.; Harrison, Kenneth R.; Barnette, J. S.

    2000-07-01

    A new imaging infrared hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation laboratory has been added to the already rich set of HWIL assets at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) for evaluation of weapons systems with infrared seekers. This paper provides a system description of the new laboratory, the Imaging Infrared Simulation System III (IIRSS3), and discusses the application of the facility to two different weapon systems.

  17. Development of microprocessor-based laser velocimeter and its application to measurement of jet exhausts and flows over missiles at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwell, K. E.; Farmer, W. M.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Stallings, E.

    1981-03-01

    During the past three years, personnel have developed a unique three-component laser velocimeter for the in situ measurement of particle and/or gas velocities in flow fields produced behind bodies at high angles of attack and in jet exhaust plumes. This report describes the development of the laser velocimeter and its subsequent application of the measurement of the velocity distribution and vortex structure in free jets and in flows over missiles at high angles of attack.

  18. Wind tunnel pressure study and Euler code validation of a missile configuration with 77 deg swept delta wings at supersonic speeds. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Patsy S.

    1988-01-01

    A wind-tunnel pressure study was conducted on an axisymmetric missile configuration in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The Mach numbers ranged from 1.70 to 2.86 and the angles of attack ranged from minus 4 degrees to plus 24 degrees. The computational accuracy for limited conditions of a space-marching Euler code was assessed.

  19. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Introduction and Problem Formulation for a Multiple Stressor Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Peterson, Mark J; Jones, Daniel Steven; Suter, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    An ecological risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF). The focus of the assessment was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. The problem formulation for the assessment included conceptual models for three component activities of the test, helicopter overflight, missile firing, and tracked vehicle movement, and two ecological endpoint entities, woody desert wash communities and desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) populations. An activity-specific risk assessment framework was available to provide guidance for assessing risks associated with aircraft overflights. Key environmental features of the study area include barren desert pavement and tree-lined desert washes. The primary stressors associated with helicopter overflights were sound and the view of the aircraft. The primary stressor associated with Hellfire missile firing was sound. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased ponding, infiltrationand/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. A plan for estimating integrated risks from the three military activities was included in the problem formulation.

  20. A Review of Solar-Powered Aircraft Flight Activity at the Pacific Missile Range Test Facility, Kauai, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehernberger, L. J.; Donohue, Casey; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    A series of solar-powered aircraft have been designed and operated by AeroVironment, Inc. (Monrovia, CA) as a part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) objectives to develop energy-efficient high-altitude long-endurance platforms for earth observations and communications applications. Flight operations have been conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards CA and at the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands, Kauai, HI. These aircraft flown at PMRF are named Pathfinder , Pathfinder Plus and Helios . Sizes of these three aircraft range from 560 lb with a 99-ft wingspan to 2300 lb with a 247-ft wingspan. Available payload capacity reaches approximately 200 lb. Pathfinder uses six engines and propellers: Pathfinder Plus 8; and Helios 14. The 2003 Helios fuel cell configurations used 10 engines and propellers. The PMRF was selected as a base of operations because if offers optimal summertime solar exposure, low prevailing wind-speeds on the runway, modest upper-air wind-speeds and the availability of suitable airspace. Between 1997 and 2001, successive altitude records of 71,530 ft, 80,200 ft, and 96,863 ft were established. Flight durations extended to 18 hours.