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Sample records for air-launched space booster

  1. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  2. GRYPHON: Air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-06-01

    The project chosen for the winter semester Aero 483 class was the design of a next generation Air Launched Space Booster. Based on Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus concept, the goal of Aero 483 was to design a 500,000 pound air launched space booster capable of delivering 17,000 pounds of payload to Low Earth Orbit and 8,000 pounds of payload to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit. The resulting launch vehicle was named the Gryphon. The class of forty senior aerospace engineering students was broken down into eight interdependent groups. Each group was assigned a subsystem or responsibility which then became their field of specialization. Spacecraft Integration was responsible for ensuring compatibility between subsystems. This group kept up to date on subsystem redesigns and informed those parties affected by the changes, monitored the vehicle's overall weight and dimensions, and calculated the mass properties of the booster. This group also performed the cost/profitability analysis of the Gryphon and obtained cost data for competing launch systems. The Mission Analysis Group was assigned the task of determining proper orbits, calculating the vehicle's flight trajectory for those orbits, and determining the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle. The Propulsion Group chose the engines that were best suited to the mission. This group also set the staging configurations for those engines and designed the tanks and fuel feed system. The commercial satellite market, dimensions and weights of typical satellites, and method of deploying satellites was determined by the Payloads Group. In addition, Payloads identified possible resupply packages for Space Station Freedom and identified those packages that were compatible with the Gryphon. The guidance, navigation, and control subsystems were designed by the Mission Control Group. This group identified required tracking hardware, communications hardware telemetry systems, and ground sites for the location of the Gryphon

  3. Athena: Advanced air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Corey G.; Ziemer, John; Plonka, John; Henderson, Scott; Copioli, Paul; Reese, Charles; Ullman, Christopher; Frank, Jeremy; Breslauer, Alan; Patonis, Hristos

    1994-01-01

    The infrastructure for routine, reliable, and inexpensive access of space is a goal that has been actively pursued over the past 50 years, but has yet not been realized. Current launch systems utilize ground launching facilities which require the booster vehicle to plow up through the dense lower atmosphere before reaching space. An air launched system on the other hand has the advantage of being launched from a carrier aircraft above this dense portion of the atmosphere and hence can be smaller and lighter compared to its ground based counterpart. The goal of last year's Aerospace Engineering Course 483 (AE 483) was to design a 227,272 kg (500,000 lb.) air launched space booster which would beat the customer's launch cost on existing launch vehicles by at least 50 percent. While the cost analysis conducted by the class showed that this goal could be met, the cost and size of the carrier aircraft make it appear dubious that any private company would be willing to invest in such a project. To avoid this potential pitfall, this year's AE 483 class was to design as large an air launched space booster as possible which can be launched from an existing or modification to an existing aircraft. An initial estimate of the weight of the booster is 136,363 kg (300,000 lb.) to 159,091 kg (350,000 lb.).

  4. Overview of the Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Robert E.

    1989-09-01

    The Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster is an innovative new space launch vehicle now under full-scale development in a privately-funded joint venture by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and Hercules Aerospace Company. Pegasus is a three-stage, solid-propellant, inertially-guided, all-composite winged vehicle that is launched at an altitude of 40,000 ft from its carrier aircraft. The 41,000 lb vehicle can deliver payloads as massive as 900 lb to low earth orbit. This status report on the Pegasus developemt program first details the advantages of the airborne launch concept, then describes the design and performance of the Pegasus vehicle and conlcludes with a review of the progress of the program from its conception in April 1987 through September 1989. First launch of Pegasus is scheduled for October 31, 1989, under contract to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The second flight under the DARPA contract will be held several months later.

  5. Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, Antonio L.; Knutson, Martin A.

    1995-01-01

    Pegasus is a satellite-launching space rocket dropped from a B52 carrier aircraft instead of launching vertically from a ground pad. Its three-year, privately-funded accelerated development was carried out under a demanding design-to-nonrecurring cost methodology, which imposed unique requirements on its flight test program, such as the decision not to drop an inert model from the carrier aircraft; the number and type of captive and free-flight tests; the extent of envelope exploration; and the decision to combine test and operational orbital flights. The authors believe that Pegasus may be the first vehicle where constraints in the number and type of flight tests to be carried out actually influenced the design of the vehicle. During the period November 1989 to February of 1990 a total of three captive flight tests were conducted, starting with a flutter clearing flight and culminating in a complete drop rehearsal. Starting on April 5, 1990, two combination test/operational flights were conducted. A unique aspect of the program was the degree of involvement of flight test personnel in the early design of the vehicle and, conversely, of the design team in flight testing and early flight operations. Various lessons learned as a result of this process are discussed throughout this paper.

  6. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-12-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  7. Design of an airborne launch vehicle for an air launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Chin; Choi, Rich; Cohen, Scott; Dumont, Brian; Gibin, Mauricius; Jorden, Rob; Poth, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a carrier vehicle for an air launched space booster. This airplane is capable of carrying a 500,000 pound satellite launch system to an altitude over 40,000 feet for launch. The airplane features a twin fuselage configuration for improved payload and landing gear integration, a high aspect ratio wing for maneuverability at altitude, and is powered by six General Electric GE-90 engines. The analysis methods used and the systems employed in the airplane are discussed. Launch costs are expected to be competitive with existing launch systems.

  8. Aerothermal test results from the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Curry, Robert E.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1991-01-01

    A survey of temperature measurements at speeds through Mach 8.0 on the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched booster system is discussed. In addition, heating rates were derived from the temperature data obtained on the fuselage in the vicinity of the wing shock interaction. Sensors were distributed on the wing surfaces, leading edge, and on the wing-body fairing or fillet. Side-by-side evaluations were obtained for a variety of sensor installations. Details of the trajectory reconstruction through first-stage separation are provided. Given here are indepth descriptions of the sensor installations, temperature measurements, and derived heating rates along with interpretations of the results.

  9. The Crossbow Air Launch Trade Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.; Sorensen, Kirk F.

    2006-01-01

    Effective air launching of a rocket is approached from a broad systems engineering viewpoint. The elementary reasons for why and how a rocket might be launched from a carrier aircraft are examined. From this, a carefully crafted set of guiding principles is presented. Rules are generated from a fundamental foundation, derived from NASA systems study analyses and from an academic vantage point. The Appendix includes the derivation of a revised Mass Multiplier Equation, useful in understanding the rocket equation as it applies to real vehicles, without the need of complicated weight and sizing programs. The rationale for air launching, being an enormously advantageous Earth-To-Orbit (ETO) methodology, is presented along with the realization that the appropriate air launch solution may lie in a very large class of carrier aircraft; the pod-hauler. Finally, a unique area of the system trade space is defined and branded Crossbow. Crossbow is not a specific hardware design for air launch, but represents a comprehensive vision for commercial, military and space transportation. This document serves as a starting point for future technical papers that evaluate the air launch hypotheses and assertions produced during the past several years of study on the subject.

  10. Space Shuttle booster recovery planning.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    At the initiation of the Space Shuttle Program, recoverable solid rocket boosters were base-lined, with an estimated savings of 30 per cent over expendable solid rockets. Present studies indicate that the solid rocket boosters in the 142-inch diameter range can be recovered using state-of-the-art recovery systems. Marshall Space Flight Center is conducting extensive studies to establish the most cost effective recovery system for the present Shuttle boosters. Model drop testing, in various facilities, and structural load testing are being conducted with model sizes ranging from 6 inches to 120 inches in diameter.

  11. The Pegasus air-launched space booster payload interfaces and processing procedures for small optical payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, Marty; Harris, Gary; Whitmeyer, Charlie

    1991-01-01

    Pegasus and the PegaStar integrated spacecraft bus are described, and an overview of integration and launch operations is provided. Payload design issues include payload volume and mass capability, payload interfaces, and design loads. Vehicle and payload processing issues include integration and handling methods, facilities, contamination control, and launch operations. It is noted that Pegasus provides small satellite users with a cost-effective means for delivering payloads into the specific orbits at the optimal time to meet the most demanding mission requirements. PegaStar provides a flexible cost-effective means for providing long-term on-orbit support while minimizing total program risk and cost.

  12. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design, operation, testing and recovery procedures of the reusable solid rocket boosters (SRB) are given. Using a composite PBAN propellant, they will provide the primary thrust (six million pounds maximum at 20 s after ignition) within a 3 g acceleration constraint, as well as thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle. The drogues were tested to a load of 305,000 pounds, and the main parachutes to 205,000. Insulation in the solid rocket motor (SRM) will be provided by asbestos-silica dioxide filled acrylonitrile butadiene rubber ('asbestos filled NBR') except in high erosion areas (principally in the aft dome), where a carbon-filled ethylene propylene diene monomer-neopreme rubber will be utilized. Furthermore, twenty uses for the SRM nozzle will be allowed by its ablative materials, which are principally carbon cloth and silica cloth phenolics.

  13. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Kimberly F.; Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for human space flight and scientific missions beyond Earth orbit. NASA is executing this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology to ready an initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability for launch in 2017, and then employing a block upgrade approach to evolve a 130-t capability after 2021. A key component of the SLS acquisition plan is a three-phased approach for the first-stage boosters. The first phase is to expedite the 70-t configuration by completing development of the Space Shuttle heritage 5-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) for the initial flights of SLS. Since no existing boosters can meet the performance requirements for the 130-t class SLS, the next phases of the strategy focus on the eventual development of advanced boosters with an expected thrust class potentially double the current 5-segment solid rocket booster capability of 3.88 million pounds of thrust each. The second phase in the booster acquisition plan is the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) effort, for which contracts were awarded beginning in 2012 after a full and open competition, with a stated intent to reduce risks leading to an affordable advanced booster. NASA has awarded ABEDRR contracts to four industry teams, which are looking into new options for liquid-fuel booster engines, solid-fuel-motor propellants, and composite booster structures. Demonstrations and/or risk reduction efforts were required to be related to a proposed booster concept directly applicable to fielding an advanced booster. This paper will discuss the status of this acquisition strategy and its results toward readying both the 70 t and 130 t configurations of SLS. The third and final phase will be a full and open

  14. Space shuttle booster separation motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The separation characteristics of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRBs) are introduced along with the system level requirements for the booster separation motors (BSMs). These system requirements are then translated into specific motor requirements that control the design of the BSM. Each motor component is discussed including its geometry, material selection, and fabrication process. Also discussed is the propellant selection, grain design, and performance capabilities of the motor. The upcoming test program to develop and qualify the motor is outlined.

  15. Preliminary analysis for a Mach 8 crossflow transition experiment on the Pegasus (R) space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Leslie; Richards, W. Lance; Monaghan, Richard C.; Quinn, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A boundary-layer transition is proposed for a future flight mission of the air-launched Pegasus space booster. The flight experiment requires attaching a glove assembly to the wing of the first-stage booster. The glove design consists of a spring and hook attachment system which allows for thermal growth of a steel 4130 skin. The results from one- and two-dimensional thermal analyses of the initial design are presented. Results obtained from the thermal analysis using turbulent flow conditions showed a maximum temperature of approximately 305 C and a chordwise temperature gradient of less than 8.9 C/cm for the critical areas in the upper glove skin. The temperatures obtained from these thermal analyses are well within the required temperature limits of the glove.

  16. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is seeking to reinvigorate the national space program and recapture the public s interest in human space exploration by developing missions to the Moon, near-earth asteroids, Lagrange points, Mars, and beyond. The would-be successor to the Space Shuttle, NASA s Constellation Program, planned to take humans back to the Moon by 2020, but due to budgetary constraints was cancelled in 2010 in search of a more "affordable, sustainable, and realistic" concept2. Following a number of studies, the much anticipated Space Launch System (SLS) was unveiled in September of 2011. The SLS core architecture consists of a cryogenic first stage with five Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and a cryogenic second stage using a new J-2X engine3. The baseline configuration employs two 5-segment solid rocket boosters to achieve a 70 metric ton payload capability, but a new, more capable booster system will be required to attain the goal of 130 metric tons to orbit. To this end, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center recently released a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) entitled "Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction." The increased emphasis on affordability is evident in the language used in the NRA, which is focused on risk reduction "leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS" and "enabling competition" to "enhance SLS affordability. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to perform an independent assessment of the elements that make up an affordable and realistic path forward for the SLS booster system, utilizing advanced design methods and technology evaluation techniques. The goal is to identify elements that will enable a more sustainable development program by exploring the trade space of heavy lift booster systems and focusing on affordability, operability, and reliability at the system and subsystem levels5. For this study

  17. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  18. Hydrogen-augmented space boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, S.K.; Ferguson, D.C.; Merrill, C.E.; Thompson, D.D.; Ennix, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Performance gains available through injecting hydrogen into a burning solid rocket motor were investigated in a total of 19 tests. The test bed was a 32-kg Bates (for ballistic test and evaluation system) motor modified to allow injections of gaseous hydrogen into either the aft or head-end. Results demonstrated that, with the TPH-1148 solid propellant, hydrogen injections leads to a 10-percent higher specific impulse than the baseline (no hydrogen) firings, with very little loss in efficiency with head-end injection, an increase in motor chamber pressure, and a substantial reduction of nozzle throat erosion (especially with an aft-end injection). Flight analysis calculations using a Space Shuttle example indicate that the addition of hydrogen can increase polar orbit payloads by a factor of two.

  19. Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) study is to identify candidate engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) to identify and evaluate candidate LOX/HC engine configurations for the Advanced Space Transportation System for an early 1995 IOC and a late 2000 IOC; (2) to select one optimum engine for each time period; 3) to prepare a conceptual design for each configuration; (4) to develop a technology plan for the 2000 IOC engine; and, (5) to prepare preliminary programmatic planning and analysis for the 1995 IOC engine.

  20. Space-charge compensation in proton boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Alexey Burov; William Foster; Vladimir Shiltsev

    2001-06-26

    Recently, it was proposed to use negatively charged electron beams for compensation of beam-beam effects due to protons in the Tevatron collider. We show that a similar compensation is possible in space-charge dominated low energy proton beams. The idea has a potential of several-fold increase of the FNAL Booster beam brightness. Best results will be obtained using three electron lenses around the machine circumference, using co-moving electron beam with time structure and profile approximately to the proton beam. This technique, if feasible, will be more cost effective than the straightforward alternative increasing the energy of the injection linac.

  1. SRB dewatering set. [space shuttle boosters revcovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The system components and operation of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) dewatering set are described. The SRB dewatering set consists of a nozzle plug, control console, remote control unit, power distribution unit, umbilical cable, interconnect cables, and various handling and storage items. The nozzle plug (NP) is a remotely controlled, tethered underwater vehicle that is launched from the retrieval vessel (RV) by a crane, descends down the side of the SRB, and is positioned below the SRB nozzle. A TV camera mounted at the top of the NP central core is used by the control console operator to visually guide the NP during descent and docking. The NP is then driven up and locked into the nozzle. Compressed air is passed through the umbilical from the RV, through the NP and into the SRB motor. The water inside the SRB is expelled causing the SRB to rotate to a near horizontal attitude on the surface of the water.

  2. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster dewatering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishel, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    After the launch of the Space Shuttle, the two solid rocket boosters (SRB's) are jettisoned into the ocean where they float in a spar (vertical) mode. It is cost effective to recover the SRB's. A remote controlled submersible vehicle has been developed to aid in their recovery. The vehicle is launched from a support ship, maneuvered to the SRB, then taken to depth and guided into the rocket nozzle. It then dewaters the SRB, using compressed air from the ship, and seals the nozzle. When dewatered, the SRB floats in a log (horizontal) mode and can be towed to port for reuse. The design of the remote controlled vehicle and its propulsion system is presented.

  3. Space Shuttle Five-Segment Booster (Short Course)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stanley R.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA is considering upgrading the Space Shuttle by adding a fifth segment (FSB) to the current four-segment solid rocket booster. Course materials cover design and engineering issues related to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) raised by the addition of a fifth segment to the rocket booster. Topics cover include: four segment vs. five segment booster, abort modes, FSB grain design, erosive burning, enhanced propellant burn rate, FSB erosive burning model development and hardware configuration.

  4. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 3: Booster vehicle modifications and ground systems definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A definition of the expendable second stage and space shuttle booster separation system is presented. Modifications required on the reusable booster for expendable second stage/payload flight and the ground systems needed to operate the expendable second stage in conjuction with the space shuttle booster are described. The safety, reliability, and quality assurance program is explained. Launch complex operations and services are analyzed.

  5. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study is to contribute to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were to identify engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost, and to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on full-scale development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  6. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Joins Propulsion Park Display

    NASA Video Gallery

    A crane lifts a space shuttle solid rocket booster into its final position in the “propulsion park” outside Building 4205, the Propulsion Research & Development Laboratory at the Marshall Cente...

  7. Booster recovery following premature space shuttle stage separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Abort criteria necessary to satisfy space shuttle program requirements to include intact vehicle abort capability are discussed. Intact abort implies the ability of the booster and orbiter to separate and both continue flight to a safe landing, with a full payload aboard the orbiter. Obviously, the requirement to separate early along the ascent trajectory presupposes critical operational problems that are probably booster problems and may preclude booster recovery. On the other hand, some critical problems while mated can become manageable when separated and should result in full booster recovery. All critical orbiter problems fall into this category; since stage separation without orbiter thrust is a capability of some separation system concepts, booster stage recovery following separation is a requirement.

  8. NASA Dryden Towed Glider Air-Launch Concept

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a novel space access, rocket launching technique called the Towed Glider Air-Launch Concept. The idea is to build a relatively inexpensive, remotely...

  9. The StarBooster System: A Cargo Aircraft for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Hubert P.; Dula, Arthur M.; McLaughlin, Don; Frassanito, John; Andrews, Jason (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Starcraft Boosters has developed a different approach for lowering the cost of access to space. We propose developing a new aircraft that will house an existing expendable rocket stage. This vehicle, termed StarBooster, will be the first stage of a family of launch vehicles. By combining these elements, we believe we can reduce the cost and risk of fielding a new partially reusable launch system. This report summarizes the work performed on the StarBooster concept since the company's inception in 1996. Detailed analyses are on-going and future reports will focus on the maturation of the vehicle and system design.

  10. Solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials development. [space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1978-01-01

    A complete run log of all tests conducted in the NASA-MSFC hot gas test facility during the development of materials for the space shuttle solid rocket booster thermal protection system are presented. Lists of technical reports and drawings generated under the contract are included.

  11. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  12. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  13. Economics of the solid rocket booster for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines economics of the solid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle. Costs have been held down by adapting existing technology to the 146 in. SRB selected, with NASA reducing the cost of expendables and reusing the expensive nonexpendable hardware. Drop tests of Titan III motor cases and nozzles proved that boosters can survive water impact at vertical velocities of 100 ft/sec so that SRB components can be reused. The cost of expendables was minimized by selecting proven propellants, insulation, and nozzle ablatives of known costs; the propellant has the lowest available cost formulation, and low cost ablatives, such as pitch carbon fibers, will be used when available. Thus, the use of proven technology and low cost expendables will make the SRB an economical booster for the Space Shuttle.

  14. Weight control of a large space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metheny, Gary R.

    1989-05-01

    The Titan IV vehicle, a stretching of the Titan III to possess longer fuel and oxidizer tanks on both stages while retaining the constant, 10-ft diameter, would have to withstand larger P-equivalent loads due to the increased weight of skin, stringer, and frame structure strengthening. Upon analysis, it was established that increased vehicle and payload fairing lengths imparted a large bending moment to the booster at design Q-alpha total flight conditions, so that stiffness rather than axial load became the design driver. Weight problems thus incurred were addressed by critical structural element analyses using target weight vs stress margin comparisons. Items were thus identified for successful weight reduction treatment.

  15. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Addendum: Design definition document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Gas generator engine characteristics and results of engine configuration refinements are discussed. Updated component mechanical design, performance, and manufacturing information is provided. The results are also provided of ocean recovery studies and various engine integration tasks. The details are provided of the maintenance plan for the Space Transportation Booster Engine.

  16. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The performance requirements, preliminary designs, and development program plans for an airborne recovery system for the space shuttle solid rocket booster are discussed. The analyses performed during the study phase of the program are presented. The basic considerations which established the system configuration are defined. A Monte Carlo statistical technique using random sampling of the probability distribution for the critical water impact parameters was used to determine the failure probability of each solid rocket booster component as functions of impact velocity and component strength capability.

  17. A Unique Hybrid Propulsion System Design for Large Space Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Frederick C.

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the application of hybrid rocket propulsion technology to large space boosters. Safety, reliability, cost, and performance comprised the evaluation criteria, in order of relative importance, for this study. The effort considered the so called classic hybrid design approach versus a novel approach which utilizes a fuel-rich gas generator for the fuel source. Other trades included various fuel/oxidizer combinations, pressure-fed versus pump fed oxidizer delivery systems, and reusable versus expandable booster systems. Following this initial trade study, a point design was generated. A gas generated-type fuel grain with pump fed liquid oxygen comprised the basis of this point design. This design study provided a mechanism for considering the means of implementing the gas generator approach for further defining details of the design. Subsequently, a system trade study was performed which determined the sensitivity of the design to various design parameters and predicted optimum values for these same parameters. The study concluded that a gas generator hybrid booster design offers enhanced safety and reliability over current of proposed solid booster designs while providing equal or greater performance levels. These improvements can be accomplished at considerably lower cost than for the liquid booster designs of equivalent capability.

  18. Space shuttle solid rocket booster redesign and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The redesigned solid rocket motor of the Space Shuttle is described. Improvements over the model that led to the loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger are outlined. Scale and full-size tests carried out to verify the quality of the redesign are described. A unique feature of the test program is the introduction of deliberate flaws into some test articles. Post-flight evaluation of the redesigned boosters show excellent results.

  19. Landau damping of space-charge dominated Fermilab Booster beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space-charge making Landau damping impossible. However, it is shown that the bunching structure of the beam reduces the mean space-charge tune shift. As a result, the beam can be stabilized by suitable octupole-driven tune spread.

  20. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Michael T.; Munson, Michael J.; Teate, George F.

    2007-01-01

    The Phoenix Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) flight testbed was conceived and is proposed to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 (Hughes Aircraft Company, now Raytheon Company, Waltham, Massachusetts) long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B (McDonnell Douglas, now the Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) testbed airplane. The retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an opportunity for converting this flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill the gap in the test and evaluation of hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform; when launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will assist the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite-small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  1. The Aquila Launch Vehicle - A hybrid propulsion space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittie, Kirk J.; Estey, Paul N.; Kniffen, R. J.

    1991-10-01

    The Aquila Launch Vehicle is the first low-cost hybrid rocket propulsion space booster capable of placing 1450-kg payloads into LEO with high availability and reliability, as well as unprecedented levels of production, ground, and flight operations safety. Since hybrid rockets cannot explode, they may be readily manufactured in light-industrial production facilities. Polar-orbit operations with commercial and government-project payloads are scheduled to begin from Vandenberg AFB in 1995.

  2. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Debris Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Kristin; Kanner, Howard; Yu, Weiping

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia Accident revealed a fundamental problem of the Space Shuttle Program regarding debris. Prior to the tragedy, the Space Shuttle requirement stated that no debris should be liberated that would jeopardize the flight crew and/or mission success. When the accident investigation determined that a large piece of foam debris was the primary cause of the loss of the shuttle and crew, it became apparent that the risk and scope of - damage that could be caused by certain types of debris, especially - ice and foam, were not fully understood. There was no clear understanding of the materials that could become debris, the path the debris might take during flight, the structures the debris might impact or the damage the impact might cause. In addition to supporting the primary NASA and USA goal of returning the Space Shuttle to flight by understanding the SRB debris environment and capability to withstand that environment, the SRB debris assessment project was divided into four primary tasks that were required to be completed to support the RTF goal. These tasks were (1) debris environment definition, (2) impact testing, (3) model correlation and (4) hardware evaluation. Additionally, the project aligned with USA's corporate goals of safety, customer satisfaction, professional development and fiscal accountability.

  3. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Mike; Munson, Mike; Teate, George

    2006-01-01

    A new testbed for hypersonic flight research is proposed. Known as the Phoenix air-launched small missile (ALSM) flight testbed, it was conceived to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of two unique and very capable flight assets: the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the NASA Dryden F-15B testbed airplane. The U.S. Navy retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an excellent opportunity for converting this valuable flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill an existing gap in the test and evaluation of current and future hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform. When launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will be valuable for the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Lightweight Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Dean; Runkle, Roy E.

    1995-01-01

    The cancellation of the Advanced Solid Rocket Booster Project and the earth-to-orbit payload requirements for the Space Station dictated that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) look at performance enhancements from all Space Transportation System (STS) elements (Orbiter Project, Space Shuttle Main Engine Project, External Tank Project, Solid Rocket Motor Project, & Solid Rocket Booster Project). The manifest for launching of Space Station components indicated that an additional 12-13000 pound lift capability was required on 10 missions and 15-20,000 pound additional lift capability is required on two missions. Trade studies conducted by all STS elements indicate that by deleting the parachute Recovery System (and associated hardware) from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBS) and going to a lightweight External Tank (ET) the 20,000 pound additional lift capability can be realized for the two missions. The deletion of the parachute Recovery System means the loss of four SRBs and this option is two expensive (loss of reusable hardware) to be used on the other 10 Space Station missions. Accordingly, each STS element looked at potential methods of weight savings, increased performance, etc. As the SRB and ET projects are non-propulsive (i.e. does not have launch thrust elements) their only contribution to overall payload enhancement can be achieved by the saving of weight while maintaining adequate safety factors and margins. The enhancement factor for the SRB project is 1:10. That is for each 10 pounds saved on the two SRBS; approximately 1 additional pound of payload in the orbiter bay can be placed into orbit. The SRB project decided early that the SRB recovery system was a prime candidate for weight reduction as it was designed in the early 1970s and weight optimization had never been a primary criteria.

  5. Cathodic protection deployment on space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection (anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composite (motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack at coating damage locations due primarily to galvanic coupling with the carbon/carbon nozzle. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper highlights the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information are included regarding the evaluation and application of inorganic zinc rich primers to provide anode area on the aluminum structures.

  6. Nonlinear shell analysis of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, N. F., Jr.; Gillian, R. E.; Nemeth, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a 'snapshot picture' of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  7. Cathodic Protection Deployment on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, Lee M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection(anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composites(motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack due primarily to the galvanic couple to the carbon/carbon nozzle at coating damage locations. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper will highlight the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information will be included regarding the evaluation and deployment of inorganic zinc rich primers as anode area on the aluminum structures.

  8. Nonlinear shell analyses of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  9. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  10. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  11. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 4: Detail mass properties data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Mass properties data are presented to describe the characteristics of an expendable second stage with a reusable space shuttle booster. The final mass characteristics of the vehicle configurations for three specified payloads are presented in terms of weight, center of gravity, and mass moments of inertia. Three basic subjects are the integrated vehicle system, the expendable second stage, and the booster modifications.

  12. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 12: Design data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The general and design criteria for the expendable second stage of the reusable space shuttle booster are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) trajectory development, (2) aerodynamic heating on basic payloads, (3) vehicle configurations, trajectory, and heat regimes, (4) orbit maneuvering system, (5) structural analysis, and (6) booster loads and structural sizing.

  13. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Plans for conducting Phase C/D for a solid rocket motor booster vehicle are presented. Methods for conducting this program with details of scheduling, testing, and program management and control are included. The requirements of the space shuttle program to deliver a minimum cost/maximum reliability booster vehicle are examined.

  14. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; May, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) formally initiated the Space Launch System (SLS) development in September 2011, with the approval of the program s acquisition plan, which engages the current workforce and infrastructure to deliver an initial 70 metric ton (t) SLS capability in 2017, while using planned block upgrades to evolve to a full 130 t capability after 2021. A key component of the acquisition plan is a three-phased approach for the first stage boosters. The first phase is to complete the development of the Ares and Space Shuttle heritage 5-segment solid rocket boosters (SRBs) for initial exploration missions in 2017 and 2021. The second phase in the booster acquisition plan is the Advanced Booster Risk Reduction and/or Engineering Demonstration NASA Research Announcement (NRA), which was recently awarded after a full and open competition. The NRA was released to industry on February 9, 2012, with a stated intent to reduce risks leading to an affordable advanced booster and to enable competition. The third and final phase will be a full and open competition for Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDT&E) of the advanced boosters. There are no existing boosters that can meet the performance requirements for the 130 t class SLS. The expected thrust class of the advanced boosters is potentially double the current 5-segment solid rocket booster capability. These new boosters will enable the flexible path approach to space exploration beyond Earth orbit (BEO), opening up vast opportunities including near-Earth asteroids, Lagrange Points, and Mars. This evolved capability offers large volume for science missions and payloads, will be modular and flexible, and will be right-sized for mission requirements. NASA developed the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction NRA to seek industry participation in reducing risks leading to an affordable advanced booster that meets the SLS performance requirements

  15. NASA's Space Launch System Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and Risk Reduction Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd; Dumbacher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) formally initiated the Space Launch System (SLS) development in September 2011, with the approval of the program s acquisition plan, which engages the current workforce and infrastructure to deliver an initial 70 metric ton (t) SLS capability in 2017, while using planned block upgrades to evolve to a full 130 t capability after 2021. A key component of the acquisition plan is a three-phased approach for the first stage boosters. The first phase is to complete the development of the Ares and Space Shuttle heritage 5-segment solid rocket boosters for initial exploration missions in 2017 and 2021. The second phase in the booster acquisition plan is the Advanced Booster Risk Reduction and/or Engineering Demonstration NASA Research Announcement (NRA), which was recently awarded after a full and open competition. The NRA was released to industry on February 9, 2012, and its stated intent was to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster and to enable competition. The third and final phase will be a full and open competition for Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDT&E) of the Advanced Boosters. There are no existing boosters that can meet the performance requirements for the 130 t class SLS. The expected thrust class of the Advanced Boosters is potentially double the current 5-segment solid rocket booster capability. These new boosters will enable the flexible path approach to space exploration beyond Earth orbit, opening up vast opportunities including near-Earth asteroids, Lagrange Points, and Mars. This evolved capability offers large volume for science missions and payloads, will be modular and flexible, and will be right-sized for mission requirements. NASA developed the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction NRA to seek industry participation in reducing risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the SLS performance requirements. Demonstrations and

  16. Data on ocean conditions for space shuttle booster recovery criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Empirical data are presented on the probable sea states that will be encountered by the booster recovery forces. Such data are required to establish the criteria for the recovery equipment and procedures

  17. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Volume 2: Design definition document and environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study is to contribute to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were: (1) to identify engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost, and (2) to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on Full-Scale Development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  18. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, development, production, and launch support analysis for determining the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle are discussed. Specific program objectives considered were: (1) definition of engine designs to satisfy the performance and configuration requirements of the various vehicle/booster concepts, (2) definition of requirements to produce booster stages at rates of 60, 40, 20, and 10 launches per year in a man-rated system, and (3) estimation of costs for the defined SRM booster stages.

  19. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The factors affecting the choice of the 156 inch diameter, parallel burn, solid propellant rocket engine for use with the space shuttle booster are presented. Primary considerations leading to the selection are: (1) low booster vehicle cost, (2) the largest proven transportable system, (3) a demonstrated design, (4) recovery/reuse is feasible, (5) abort can be easily accomplished, and (6) ecological effects are minor.

  20. Propulsion technology needs for advanced space transportation systems. [orbit maneuvering engine (space shuttle), space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Plans are formulated for chemical propulsion technology programs to meet the needs of advanced space transportation systems from 1980 to the year 2000. The many possible vehicle applications are reviewed and cataloged to isolate the common threads of primary propulsion technology that satisfies near term requirements in the first decade and at the same time establish the technology groundwork for various potential far term applications in the second decade. Thrust classes of primary propulsion engines that are apparent include: (1) 5,000 to 30,000 pounds thrust for upper stages and space maneuvering; and (2) large booster engines of over 250,000 pounds thrust. Major classes of propulsion systems and the important subdivisions of each class are identified. The relative importance of each class is discussed in terms of the number of potential applications, the likelihood of that application materializing, and the criticality of the technology needed. Specific technology programs are described and scheduled to fulfill the anticipated primary propulsion technology requirements.

  1. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 1: Booster configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. This is Volume 1 (Part 1) of the report -- Booster Configuration.

  2. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 1: Booster configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. This is Volume 1 (Part 2) of the report -- Booster Configuration.

  3. Expendable Second Stage Reusable Space Shuttle Booster. Volume 10: Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technology requirements for the expendable second stage of the space shuttle booster system are discussed. The primary objective of the expendable second stage (ESS) program is to define a low-cost system for placing large payloads, such as the space station or reusable nuclear shuttle, into low earth orbit. The proposed concept is to utilize a modified Saturn 5 second stage (S-2) in conjunction with the space shuttle reusable booster. The ESS retains the major S-2 structure, modified for attachment to the space shuttle booster, and incorporates both Saturn and shuttle developed propulsion and avionics hardware. No major technology breakthroughs are required to develop this ESS system. Technology application and implementation efforts in selected areas, however, should be conducted in support of the ESS detail design and development phase. The selected ESS system incorporates recovery of propulsion and avionics hardware by the shuttle orbiter for ESS reuse to minimize cost.

  4. Space shuttle program solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The recovery of the Solid Rocket Boosters presented a major challenge. The SRB represents the largest payload ever recovered and presents the added complication that it is continually emitting hot gases and burning particles of insulation and other debris. Some items, such as portions of the nozzle, are large enough to burn through the nylon parachute material. The SRB Decelerator Subsystem program was highly successful in that no SRB has been lost as a result of inadequate performance of the DSS.

  5. Limits on the transverse phase space density in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Holmes, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    Recent results on intensity and transverse density limitations in the Fermilab 8-GeV Booster are presented. The evidence suggests that the limits are set by incoherent space-charge effects at low energy. Data are interpreted in terms of the space-charge tune shift and possible means of improving performance further are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Space Transportation Booster Engine Configuration Study. Volume 3: Program Cost estimates and work breakdown structure and WBS dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine Configuration Study is to contribute to the ALS development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were: (1) to identify engine development configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost; and (2) to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on Full-Scale Development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  7. Inviscid and Viscous CFD Analysis of Booster Separation for the Space Launch System Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalle, Derek J.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Chan, William M.; Lee, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents details of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the Space Launch System during solid-rocket booster separation using the Cart3D inviscid and Overflow viscous CFD codes. The discussion addresses the use of multiple data sources of computational aerodynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and trajectory simulations for this critical phase of flight. Comparisons are shown between Cart3D simulations and a wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and further comparisons are shown between Cart3D and viscous Overflow solutions for the flight vehicle. The Space Launch System (SLS) is a new exploration-class launch vehicle currently in development that includes two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) modified from Space Shuttle hardware. These SRBs must separate from the SLS core during a phase of flight where aerodynamic loads are nontrivial. The main challenges for creating a separation aerodynamic database are the large number of independent variables (including orientation of the core, relative position and orientation of the boosters, and rocket thrust levels) and the complex flow caused by exhaust plumes of the booster separation motors (BSMs), which are small rockets designed to push the boosters away from the core by firing partially in the direction opposite to the motion of the vehicle.

  8. NASA's Space Launch System: Developing the World's Most Powerful Solid Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Journey to Mars has begun. Indicative of that challenge, this will be a multi-decadal effort requiring the development of technology, operational capability, and experience. The first steps are under way with more than 15 years of continuous human operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and development of commercial cargo and crew transportation capabilities. NASA is making progress on the transportation required for deep space exploration - the Orion crew spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket that will launch Orion and large components such as in-space stages, habitat modules, landers, and other hardware necessary for deep-space operations. SLS is a key enabling capability and is designed to evolve with mission requirements. The initial configuration of SLS - Block 1 - will be capable of launching more than 70 metric tons (t) of payload into low Earth orbit, greater mass than any other launch vehicle in existence. By enhancing the propulsion elements and larger payload fairings, future SLS variants will launch 130 t into space, an unprecedented capability that simplifies hardware design and in-space operations, reduces travel times, and enhances the odds of mission success. SLS will be powered by four liquid fuel RS-25 engines and two solid propellant five-segment boosters, both based on space shuttle technologies. This paper will focus on development of the booster, which will provide more than 75 percent of total vehicle thrust at liftoff. Each booster is more than 17 stories tall, 3.6 meters (m) in diameter and weighs 725,000 kilograms (kg). While the SLS booster appears similar to the shuttle booster, it incorporates several changes. The additional propellant segment provides additional booster performance. Parachutes and other hardware associated with recovery operations have been deleted and the booster designated as expendable for affordability reasons. The new motor incorporates new avionics, new propellant

  9. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Database Development and Uncertainty Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Dalle, Derek J.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Gomez, Reynaldo J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of the aerodynamic database for the Space Launch System (SLS) booster separation environment has presented many challenges because of the complex physics of the ow around three independent bodies due to proximity e ects and jet inter- actions from the booster separation motors and the core stage engines. This aerodynamic environment is dicult to simulate in a wind tunnel experiment and also dicult to simu- late with computational uid dynamics. The database is further complicated by the high dimensionality of the independent variable space, which includes the orientation of the core stage, the relative positions and orientations of the solid rocket boosters, and the thrust lev- els of the various engines. Moreover, the clearance between the core stage and the boosters during the separation event is sensitive to the aerodynamic uncertainties of the database. This paper will present the development process for Version 3 of the SLS booster separa- tion aerodynamic database and the statistics-based uncertainty quanti cation process for the database.

  10. Achieving Space Shuttle Abort-to-Orbit Using the Five-Segment Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, Joe; Ess, Robert; Sauvageau, Don

    2003-01-01

    The Five-Segment Booster design concept was evaluated by a team that determined the concept to be feasible and capable of achieving the desired abort-to-orbit capability when used in conjunction with increased Space Shuttle main engine throttle capability. The team (NASA Johnson Space Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ATK Thiokol Propulsion, United Space Alliance, Lockheed-Martin Space Systems, and Boeing) selected the concept that provided abort-to-orbit capability while: 1) minimizing Shuttle system impacts by maintaining the current interface requirements with the orbiter, external tank, and ground operation systems; 2) minimizing changes to the flight-proven design, materials, and processes of the current four-segment Shuttle booster; 3) maximizing use of existing booster hardware; and 4) taking advantage of demonstrated Shuttle main engine throttle capability. The added capability can also provide Shuttle mission planning flexibility. Additional performance could be used to: enable implementation of more desirable Shuttle safety improvements like crew escape, while maintaining current payload capability; compensate for off nominal performance in no-fail missions; and support missions to high altitudes and inclinations. This concept is a low-cost, low-risk approach to meeting Shuttle safety upgrade objectives. The Five-Segment Booster also has the potential to support future heavy-lift missions.

  11. Space shuttle solid rocket booster water entry cavity collapse loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, R. T.; Rawls, E. A.; Kross, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Solid rocket booster cavity collapse flight measurements included external pressures on the motor case and aft skirt, internal motor case pressures, accelerometers located in the forward skirt, mid-body area, and aft skirt, as well as strain gages located on the skin of the motor case. This flight data yielded applied pressure longitudinal and circumferential distributions which compare well with model test predictions. The internal motor case ullage pressure, which is below atmospheric due to the rapid cooling of the hot internal gas, was more severe (lower) than anticipated due to the ullage gas being hotter than predicted. The structural dynamic response characteristics were as expected. Structural ring and wall damage are detailed and are considered to be attributable to the direct application of cavity collapse pressure combined with the structurally destabilizing, low internal motor case pressure.

  12. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 5: Operations and resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The operations and resources required to support the expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster are analyzed. The subjects discussed are: (1) operations plan, (2) facilities utilization and manufacturing plan, (3) engineering and development plan, (4) test plan, (5) logistics and maintenance plan, and (6) program management plan.

  13. Atlas booster which will lift Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper into space arrives at Cape Canaveral, Fla.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The Atlas vehicle 130D which will lift Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper into space arrives at Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch vehicle is a one-and-a-half stage, liquid propellant launch vehicle with five engines: 2 booster engines, 1 sustainer engine, and 2 small vernier engines. These engines produce a total thrust of approximately 360,000 pounds.

  14. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix B: Prime item development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The specifications for the performance, design, development, and test requirements of the P2-156, S3-156, and S6-120 space shuttle booster solid rocket motors are presented. The applicable documents which form a part of the specifications are listed.

  15. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program planning acquisition functions for the development of the solid propellant rocket engine for the space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) program management, (2) contracts administration, (3) systems engineering, (4) configuration management, and (5) maintenance engineering. The plans for manufacturing, testing, and operations support are included.

  16. The Use of Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum (IVD) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of the use of ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD) for use in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Topics considered include: schematics of ion vapor deposition system, production of ion vapor deposition system, IVD vs. cadmium coated drogue ratchets, corrosion exposure facilities and tests, seawater immersion facilities and tests and continued research and development issues.

  17. Unsteady aerodynamic analysis of space shuttle vehicles. Part 3: Booster interference effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the interference flow field on the space-shuttle boost configuration has been made. The results show that the interference effects can dominate the shuttle aerodynamics. Vortices shed from shock-induced flow separations on the forward portion of the vehicle affect the aerodynamic loads on the aft portion of the booster. Thus, the forebody and aft-body flow fields are coupled. This coupling and the associated time lag due to the finite convection speed of the vortices furnish a mechanism whereby the unsteady aerodynamics can cause undamping of certain low frequency elastic modes of the booster. A preliminary order-of-magnitude analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the shuttle booster indicates that negative aerodynamic damping could occur for at least one bending mode and be of sufficient magnitude to dominate the structural damping. The implication of these results, (with the possibility of undamped oscillations leading to structural failure), is serious enough to warrant further, more detailed analysis.

  18. Expendable Second Stage Reusable Space Shuttle Booster. Volume 9; Preliminary System Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The specification for establishing the requirements for the system performance, design, development, and ground and flight operations of the expendable second stage on a reusable space shuttle booster system is presented. The basic specification is that the system shall be capable of placing payloads in excess of 100,000 pounds into earth orbit. In addition, the expendable second stage provides a multimission, economical, large capability system suitable for a variety of space missions in the 1980 time period.

  19. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix E: Environmental impact statement, solid rocket motor, space shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the combustion products resulting from the solid propellant rocket engines of the space shuttle booster is presented. Calculation of the degree of pollution indicates that the only potentially harmful pollutants, carbon monoxide and hydrochloric acid, will be too diluted to constitute a hazard. The mass of products ejected during a launch within the troposphere is insignificant in terms of similar materials that enter the atmosphere from other sources. Noise pollution will not exceed that obtained from the Saturn 5 launch vehicle.

  20. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportion System (STS) systems study. Appendix D: Trade study summary for the liquid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Trade studies plans for a number of elements in the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) component of the Space Transportation System (STS) are given in viewgraph form. Some of the elements covered include: avionics/flight control; avionics architecture; thrust vector control studies; engine control electronics; liquid rocket propellants; propellant pressurization systems; recoverable spacecraft; cryogenic tanks; and spacecraft construction materials.

  1. Achieving Space Shuttle ATO Using the Five-Segment Booster (FSB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Donald R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort to identify approaches to improve the safety and reliability of the Space Shuttle system, a Five-Segment Booster (FSB) design was conceptualized as a replacement for the current Space Shuttle boosters. The FSB offers a simple, unique approach to improve astronaut safety and increase performance margin. To determine the feasibility of the FSB, a Phase A study effort was sponsored by NASA and directed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. This study was initiated in March of 1999 and completed in December of 2000. The basic objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of the FSB design concept and also estimate the cost and scope of a full-scale development program for the FSB. In order to ensure an effective and thorough evaluation of the FSB concept, four team members were put on contract to support various areas of importance in assessing the overall feasibility of the design approach.

  2. EVENT DRIVEN AUTOMATIC STATE MODIFICATION OF BNL'S BOOSTER FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY SOLAR PARTICLE SIMULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, D.; BINELLO, S.; HARVEY, M.; MORRIS, J.; RUSEK, A.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2005-05-16

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The NSRL makes use of heavy ions in the range of 0.05 to 3 GeV/n slow extracted from BNL's AGS Booster. NASA is interested in reproducing the energy spectrum from a solar flare in the space environment for a single ion species. To do this we have built and tested a set of software tools which allow the state of the Booster and the NSRL beam line to be changed automatically. In this report we will describe the system and present results of beam tests.

  3. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The development of an expendable second stage for use with a reusable space shuttle booster is discussed. The configuration of a low-cost, reusable multipurpose space transportation system for the 1980 time period is presented. A system capable of economically placing payloads in earth orbit which are larger and heavier than can be carried in the shuttle orbiter cargo bay is defined. The ESS/reusable shuttle system is complementary to the space shuttle system and provides mission flexibility to permit economical expansion of the overall space program.

  4. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 1: Summary. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. E.; Lemon, R. S.; Jaggers, R. F.; Wilson, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamics and control, stability, and guidance analyses are summarized for the asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design studies, performed in conjunction with space shuttle planning. The mathematical models developed for use in rigid body and flexible body versions of the NASA JSC space shuttle functional simulator are briefly discussed, along with information on the following: (1) space shuttle stability analysis using equations of motion for both pitch and lateral axes; (2) the computer program used to obtain stability margin; and (3) the guidance equations developed for the space shuttle powered flight phases.

  5. Space Launch System Booster Separation Aerodynamic Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Pinier, Jeremy T.; Chan, David T.; Crosby, William A.

    2016-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a 0.009 scale model of the Space Launch System (SLS) was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel to characterize the aerodynamics of the core and solid rocket boosters (SRBs) during booster separation. High-pressure air was used to simulate plumes from the booster separation motors (BSMs) located on the nose and aft skirt of the SRBs. Force and moment data were acquired on the core and SRBs. These data were used to corroborate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations that were used in developing a booster separation database. The SRBs could be remotely positioned in the x-, y-, and z-direction relative to the core. Data were acquired continuously while the SRBs were moved in the axial direction. The primary parameters varied during the test were: core pitch angle; SRB pitch and yaw angles; SRB nose x-, y-, and z-position relative to the core; and BSM plenum pressure. The test was conducted at a free-stream Mach number of 4.25 and a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot.

  6. Wind tunnel tests of space shuttle solid rocket booster insulation material in the aerothermal tunnel c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, A. S.; Nutt, K. W.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of the space shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Insulation were conducted in the von Karman Gas Dynamics Facility Tunnel C. For these tests, Tunnel C was run at Mach 4 with a total temperature of 1100-1440 and a total pressure of 100 psia. Cold wall heating rates were changed by varying the test article support wedge angle. Selected results are presented to illustrate the test techniques and typical data obtained.

  7. State Machine Modeling of the Space Launch System Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Joshua A.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System is a Shuttle-derived heavy-lift vehicle currently in development to serve as NASA's premiere launch vehicle for space exploration. The Space Launch System is a multistage rocket with two Solid Rocket Boosters and multiple payloads, including the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. Planned Space Launch System destinations include near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, and Lagrange points. The Space Launch System is a complex system with many subsystems, requiring considerable systems engineering and integration. To this end, state machine analysis offers a method to support engineering and operational e orts, identify and avert undesirable or potentially hazardous system states, and evaluate system requirements. Finite State Machines model a system as a finite number of states, with transitions between states controlled by state-based and event-based logic. State machines are a useful tool for understanding complex system behaviors and evaluating "what-if" scenarios. This work contributes to a state machine model of the Space Launch System developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The Space Launch System Solid Rocket Booster avionics and ignition subsystems are modeled using MATLAB/Stateflow software. This model is integrated into a larger model of Space Launch System avionics used for verification and validation of Space Launch System operating procedures and design requirements. This includes testing both nominal and o -nominal system states and command sequences.

  8. Simulation of space charge effects and transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.; MacLachlan, J.

    1987-03-01

    The longitudinal phase space program ESME, modified for space charge and wall impedance effects, has been used to simulate transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster. The simulations yield results in reasonable quantitative agreement with measured parameters. They further indicate that a transition jump scheme currently under construction will significantly reduce emittance growth, while attempts to alter machine impedance are less obviously beneficial. In addition to presenting results, this paper points out a serious difficulty, related to statistical fluctuations, in the space charge calculation. False indications of emittance growth can appear if care is not taken to minimize this problem.

  9. BOOSTER MAIN MAGNET POWER SUPPLY IMPROVEMENTS FOR NASA SPACE RADIATION LABORATORY AT BNL

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS,I.BROWN,K.A.GLENN,J.W.MCNERNEY,A., MORRIS, J., SANDBERG,J., SAVATTERI, S.

    2003-05-12

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, under contract from NASA, is a new experimental facility, taking advantage of heavy-ion beams from the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) Booster accelerator, to study radiation effect on humans, for prolonged space missions beyond the protective terrestrial magnetosphere. This paper describes the modifications and operation of the Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) for NSRL applications. The requirement is to run up to 1 sec flattops as high as 5000 Amps with 25% duly cycle. The controls for the Main Magnet Power Supply were modified, including the Booster Main Magnet application program, to enable flattop operation with low ripple and spill control. An active filter (AF) consisting of a {+-}120 volts, {+-}700 Amps power supply transformer coupled through a filter choke, in series with the Main Magnet voltage, was added to the system to enable further ripple reduction during the flattops. We will describe the spill servo system, designed to provide a uniform beam current, during the flattop. Results from system commissioning will be presented.

  10. NDE of thermal protection system for space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Potential nondestructive test (NDE) methods were evaluated for detecting debonds and weak bonds in the thermal protection system (TPS) for the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. The primary thermal protection material is a sprayable, thick epoxy coating that is filled with lightweight and thermal insulating materials. Test panels were fabricated with a wide variety of hidden realistic defects, including contact debonds and weak bonds. Nondestructive test results were obtained. Candidate NDE methods evaluated for booster production applications include laser interferometry (e.g., electronic shearography), infrared thermography, radiography (e.g., computed tomography), acousto-ultrasonics, mechanical/acoustic impedance, ultrasonics, acoustic emission, and the tap test. Capabilities, advantages, disadvantages, and relative performances in defect detection of each test method for TPS bonding applications are reported. Electronic shearography NDE was technically the superior method for detecting debonds.

  11. Summary of results of parametric studies of space shuttle booster, orbiter, and launch vehicle concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D.; Buchholz, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental parametric studies of space shuttle booster, orbiter and launch vehicle aerodynamics are described. During this study over 1700 hours of experimental wind tunnel tests were conducted on several versions of the shuttle booster, orbiter and launch vehicle. Fifteen separate tests were conducted in three different test facilities. Due to the number of test programs conducted and the time required for test preparation, analysis of the test data has been limited to that required to drive the experimental program. A brief description of each of the experimental tests conducted including the test purpose and approach is included. Several test models were designed and fabricated in support of the experimental program. These models are described.

  12. USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venuto, Charles

    1987-01-01

    In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

  13. USBI Booster Production Company's Hazardous Waste Management Program at the Kennedy Space Center, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuto, Charles

    1987-05-01

    In response to the hazardous-waste generating processes associated with the launch of the Space Shuttle, a hazardous waste management plan has been developed. It includes waste recycling, product substitution, waste treatment, and waste minimization at the source. Waste material resulting from the preparation of the nonmotor segments of the solid rocket boosters include waste paints (primer, topcoats), waste solvents (methylene chloride, freon, acetone, toluene), waste inorganic compounds (aluminum anodizing compound, fixer), and others. Ways in which these materials are contended with at the Kennedy Space Center are discussed.

  14. Project MAKS air-launched spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorodelov, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Space Shuttle and the U.S.S.R. Buran are large spacecraft that are designed to carry large payloads. Obviously, these powerful, expensive systems are no good for tasks that require taking small to medium sized cargoes to and from orbit. Such tasks need a reusable, orbital airplane that has a smaller cargo capacity and costs less to operate. A design involving a multipurpose aerospace system, called by its developers MAKS, satisfies those requirements entirely. The Spiral-Buran-MAKS represents a coherent, continuous chain of designs involving reusable space transportation systems. It is a two-stage complex in which the modified AN-225 Mriya carrier aircraft is employed as the first reusable stage. The second stage consists of the reusable orbital airplane and an expendable external fuel tank filled with fuel for the sustainer engines of the orbiter.

  15. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  16. Water impact laboratory and flight test results for the space shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    A series of water impact tests was conducted using full-scale segment representations of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) aft skirt structure. The baseline reinforced structural design was tested as well as various alternative design concepts. A major portion of the test program consisted of evaluating foam as a load attenuation material. Applied pressures and response strains were measured for impact velocities from 40 feet per second (ft/s) to 110 ft/s. The structural configurations, test articles, test results, and flight results are described.

  17. Redesign of solid rocket booster/external tank attachment ring for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, Harvey G., Jr. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An improved design concept is presented for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB)/external tank (ET) attachment ring structural component. This component picks up three struts which attach the aft end of each SRB to the ET. The concept is a partial ring with carefully tapered ends to distribute fastener loads safely into the SRB. Extensive design studies and analyses were performed to arrive at the concept. Experiments on structural elements were performed to determine material strength and stiffness characteristics. Materials and fabrication studies were conducted to determine acceptable tolerances for the design concept. An overview is provided of the work along with conclusions and major recommendations.

  18. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  19. Characterization of large 2219 aluminum alloy hand forgings for the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, and stress corrosion properties of four types of 2219-T852 aluminum alloy hand forgings are presented. Weight of the forgings varied between 450 and 3500 lb at the time of heat treatment and dimensions exceeded the maximum covered in existing specifications. The forgings were destructively tested to develop reliable mechanical property data to replace estimates employed in the design of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and to establish minimum guaranteed properties for structural refinement and for entry into specification revisions. The report summarizes data required from the forgers and from the SRB Structures contractor.

  20. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  1. Update on Risk Reduction Activities for a Liquid Advanced Booster for NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Doering, Kimberly B; Meadows, Robert G.; Lariviere, Brian W.; Graham, Jerry B.

    2015-01-01

    The stated goals of NASA's Research Announcement for the Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) are to reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS; and enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Dynetics, Inc. and Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) formed a team to offer a wide-ranging set of risk reduction activities and full-scale, system-level demonstrations that support NASA's ABEDRR goals. For NASA's SLS ABEDRR procurement, Dynetics and AR formed a team to offer a series of full-scale risk mitigation hardware demonstrations for an affordable booster approach that meets the evolved capabilities of the SLS. To establish a basis for the risk reduction activities, the Dynetics Team developed a booster design that takes advantage of the flight-proven Apollo-Saturn F-1. Using NASA's vehicle assumptions for the SLS Block 2, a two-engine, F-1-based booster design delivers 150 mT (331 klbm) payload to LEO, 20 mT (44 klbm) above NASA's requirements. This enables a low-cost, robust approach to structural design. During the ABEDRR effort, the Dynetics Team has modified proven Apollo-Saturn components and subsystems to improve affordability and reliability (e.g., reduce parts counts, touch labor, or use lower cost manufacturing processes and materials). The team has built hardware to validate production costs and completed tests to demonstrate it can meet performance requirements. State-of-the-art manufacturing and processing techniques have been applied to the heritage F-1, resulting in a low recurring cost engine while retaining the benefits of Apollo-era experience. NASA test facilities have been used to perform low-cost risk-reduction engine testing. In early 2014, NASA and the Dynetics Team agreed to move additional large liquid oxygen/kerosene engine work under Dynetics' ABEDRR contract. Also led by AR, the

  2. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  3. Analysis and optimization of an air-launch-to-orbit separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohier, Henri; Piet-Lahanier, Helene; Farges, Jean-Loup

    2015-03-01

    In an air-launch-to-orbit, a space rocket is launched from a carrier aircraft. Air-launch-to-orbit appears as particularly interesting for nano- and microsatellites which are generally launched as secondary loads, that is, placed in the conventional launch vehicle's payload section with a larger primary satellite. In an air-launch-to-orbit, a small satellite can be launched alone as a primary load, away from a carrier aircraft, aboard a smaller rocket vehicle, and in doing so, benefit from more flexible dates and trajectories. One of the most important phases of the mission is the separation between the carrier aircraft and the space rocket. A flight simulator including a large number of factors of uncertainties has been especially developed to study the separation, and a safety criteria has been defined with respect to store collision avoidance. It is used for a sensitivity analysis and an optimization of the possible trajectories. The sensitivity analysis first requires a screening method to select unessential factors that can be held constant. The Morris method is amongst the most popular screening methods. It requires limited calculations, but may result in keeping constant an essential factor which would greatly affect the results of the sensitivity analysis. This paper shows that this risk can be important in spite of recent improvements of the Morris method. It presents an adaptation of this method which divides this risk by a factor of ten on a standard test function. It is based on the maximum of the elementary effects instead of their average. The method focuses the calculations on the factors with a low impact, checking the convergence of this set of factors, and uses two different factor variations instead of one. This adaptation of the Morris method is used to limit the amount of the air-launch-to-orbit simulations and simplify the uncertainty domain for analysis by Sobol's method. The aerodynamic perturbations due to wind, the parameters defining the

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket booster nozzle flexible seal pivot point dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) uses an omniaxial flexible seal for vectoring the nozzle. This flexible seal, being built under the technical management of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is the first ever to be used on a manned spacecraft booster. Since no test history on the particular type of flexible seal being used was available and since flexible seal dynamics characteristics affect many vehicle hardware design and manufacture requirements, a rigorous test program to assess the integrity and operating characteristics of the seal was developed and executed. Vector requirements of the SRM flexible seal and results of subscale and full-scale prototype seal verification tests are included. The advantages of an improved method of calculating actuator stroke versus vector angle and pressure over the more classical method of calculating actuator strokes using pivot point envelopes are discussed. Results presented show that the SRM seal design will satisfy flight requirements.

  5. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. The presence of structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang, substantial enough to prevent the O-ring seals from eliminating hot gas flow through the joints, has emerged as a likely cause of the vehicle failure. This paper presents results of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint recently flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters.

  6. An analysis of the booster plume impingement environment during the space shuttle nominal staging maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Penny, M. M.; Greenwood, T. F.; Fossler, I. H.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the plume impingement heating on the space shuttle booster afterbody resulting from the space shuttle orbiter engine plumes was conducted. The 1/100-scale model tests consisted of one and two orbiter engine firings on a flat plate, a flat plate with a fin, and a cylinder model. The plume impingement heating rates on these surfaces were measured using thin film heat transfer gages. Results indicate the engine simulation is a reasonable approximation to the two engine configuration, but more tests are needed to verify the plume model of the main engine configuration. For impingment, results show models experienced laminar boundary layer convective heating. Therefore, tests at higher Reynolds numbers are needed to determine impingment heating.

  7. Using PHM to measure equipment usable life on the Air Force's next generation reusable space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, A.

    The U.S. Air Force procures many launch vehicles and launch vehicle services to place their satellites at their desired location in space. The equipment on-board these satellite and launch vehicle often suffer from premature failures that result in the total loss of the satellite or a shortened mission life sometimes requiring the purchase of a replacement satellite and launch vehicle. The Air Force uses its EELV to launch its high priority satellites. Due to a rise in the cost of purchasing a launch using the Air Force's EELV from 72M in 1997 to as high as 475M per launch today, the Air Force is working to replace the EELV with a reusable space booster (RSB). The RSB will be similar in design and operations to the recently cancelled NASA reusable space booster known as the Space Shuttle. If the Air Force uses the same process that procures the EELV and other launch vehicles and satellites, the RSB will also suffer from premature equipment failures thus putting the payloads at a similar high risk of mission failure. The RSB is expected to lower each launch cost by 50% compared to the EELV. The development of the RSB offers the Air Force an opportunity to use a new reliability paradigm that includes a prognostic and health management program and a condition-based maintenance program. These both require using intelligent, decision making self-prognostic equipment The prognostic and health management program and its condition-based maintenance program allows increases in RSB equipment usable life, lower logistics and maintenance costs, while increasing safety and mission assurance. The PHM removes many decisions from personnel that, in the past resulted in catastrophic failures and loss of life. Adding intelligent, decision-making self-prognostic equipment to the RSB will further decrease launch costs while decreasing risk and increasing safety and mission assurance.

  8. Space Launch System NASA Research Announcement Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; Craig, Kellie D.

    2011-01-01

    The intent of the Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction (ABEDRR) effort is to: (1) Reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS (2) Enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability. Key Concepts (1) Offerors must propose an Advanced Booster concept that meets SLS Program requirements (2) Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction must relate to the Offeror s Advanced Booster concept (3) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) will not be prescriptive in defining Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction

  9. Asymmetrical booster guidance and control system design study. Volume 3: Space shuttle vehicle SRB actuator failure study. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. E.; Lemon, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of single actuator failures on the space shuttle solid rocket booster required the analysis of both square pattern and diamond pattern actuator configurations. It was determined that for failures occuring near or prior to the region of maximum dynamic pressure, control gain adjustments can be used to achieve virtually nominal mid-boost vehicle behavior. A distinct worst case failure condition was established near staging that could significantly delay staging. It is recommended that the square pattern be retained as a viable alternative to the baseline diamond pattern because the staging transient is better controlled resulting in earlier staging.

  10. Creation of an Upper Stage Trajectory Capability Boundary to Enable Booster System Trade Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Ptrick; Coulon, Adam; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of trajectory optimization is important in all space missions. The solution of this problem enables one to specify the optimum thrust steering program which should be followed to achieve a specified mission objective, simultaneously satisfying the constraints.1 It is well known that whether or not the ascent trajectory is optimal can have a significant impact on propellant usage for a given payload, or on payload weight for the same gross vehicle weight.2 Consequently, ascent guidance commands are usually optimized in some fashion. Multi-stage vehicles add complexity to this analysis process as changes in vehicle properties in one stage propagate to the other stages through gear ratios and changes in the optimal trajectory. These effects can cause an increase in analysis time as more variables are added and convergence of the optimizer to system closure requires more analysis iterations. In this paper, an approach to simplifying this multi-stage problem through the creation of an upper stage capability boundary is presented. This work was completed as part of a larger study focused on trade space exploration for the advanced booster system that will eventually form a part of NASA s new Space Launch System.3 The approach developed leverages Design of Experiments and Surrogate Modeling4 techniques to create a predictive model of the SLS upper stage performance. The design of the SLS core stages is considered fixed for the purposes of this study, which results in trajectory parameters such as staging conditions being the only variables relevant to the upper stage. Through the creation of a surrogate model, which takes staging conditions as inputs and predicts the payload mass delivered by the SLS upper stage to a reference orbit as the response, it is possible to identify a "surface" of staging conditions which all satisfy the SLS requirement of placing 130 metric tons into low-Earth orbit (LEO).3 This identified surface represents the 130 metric ton

  11. Space shuttle solid rocket booster main parachute damage reduction team report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, G.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the findings of the space shuttle solid rocket booster main parachute damage reduction team. The purpose of the team was to investigate the causes of main parachute deployment damage and to recommend methods to eliminate or substantially reduce the damage. The team concluded that the two primary causes of significant damage during deployment are vent entanglement and contact of the parachutes with the main parachute support structure. As an inexpensive but effective step towards damage reduction, the team recommends modification of the parachute packing procedure to eliminate vent entanglement. As the most effective design change, the team recommends a pilot chute-deployed soft-pack system. Alternative concepts are also recommended that provide a major reduction in damage at a total cost lower than the pilot chute-deployed soft pack.

  12. Structural and mechanical design challenges of space shuttle solid rocket boosters separation and recovery subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodis, W. R.; Runkle, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) subsystems for reuse posed some unique and challenging design considerations. The separation of the SRBs from the cluster (orbiter and external tank) at 150,000 ft when the orbiter engines are running at full thrust meant the two SRBs had to have positive separation forces pushing them away. At the same instant, the large attachments that had reacted launch loads of 7.5 million pounds thrust had to be servered. These design considerations dictated the design requirements for the pyrotechnics and separation rocket motors. The recovery and reuse of the two SRBs meant they had to be safely lowered to the ocean, remain afloat, and be owed back to shore. In general, both the pyrotechnic and recovery subsystems have met or exceeded design requirements. In twelve vehicles, there has only been one instance where the pyrotechnic system has failed to function properly.

  13. Structural analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket booster/external tank attach ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    1988-01-01

    An External Tank (ET) attach ring is used in the Space Shuttle System to transfer lateral loads between the ET and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Following the Challenger (51-L) accident, the flight performance of the ET attach ring was reviewed, and negative margins of safety and failed bolts in the attach ring were subsequently identified. The analyses described in this report were performed in order to understand the existing ET attach ring structural response to motor case internal pressurization as well as to aid in an ET attach ring redesign effort undertaken by NASA LaRC. The finite element model as well as the results from linear and nonlinear static structural analyses are described.

  14. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  15. Alternate propellants for the space shuttle solid rocket booster motors. [for reducing environmental impact of launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    As part of the Shuttle Exhaust Effects Panel (SEEP) program for fiscal year 1973, a limited study was performed to determine the feasibility of minimizing the environmental impact associated with the operation of the solid rocket booster motors (SRBMs) in projected space shuttle launches. Eleven hypothetical and two existing limited-experience propellants were evaluated as possible alternates to a well-proven state-of-the-art reference propellant with respect to reducing emissions of primary concern: namely, hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3). The study showed that it would be possible to develop a new propellant to effect a considerable reduction of HCl or Al2O3 emissions. At the one extreme, a 23% reduction of HCl is possible along with a ll% reduction in Al2O3, whereas, at the other extreme, a 75% reduction of Al2O3 is possible, but with a resultant 5% increase in HCl.

  16. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Decelerator Subsystem Drop Test 3 - Anatomy of a failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Woodis, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A test failure dramatically points out a design weakness or the limits of the material in the test article. In a low budget test program, with a very limited number of tests, a test failure sparks supreme efforts to investigate, analyze, and/or explain the anomaly and to improve the design such that the failure will not recur. The third air drop of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System experienced such a dramatic failure. On air drop 3, the 54-ft drogue parachute was totally destroyed 0.7 sec after deployment. The parachute failure investigation, based on analysis of drop test data and supporting ground element test results is presented. Drogue design modifications are also discussed.

  17. Preliminary 2-D shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional shell model of an entire solid rocket booster (SRB) has been developed using the STAGSC-1 computer code and executed on the Ames CRAY computer. The purpose of these analyses is to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for the SRB when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. The mechanical loading conditions for the full SRB arise from the external tank (ET) attachment points, the solid rocket motor (SRM) pressure load, and the SRB hold down posts. The ET strut loads vary with time after the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) ignition. The SRM internal pressure varies axially by approximately 100 psi. Static analyses of the full SRB are performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. The field and factory joints are modeled by using equivalent stiffness joints instead of detailed models of the joint. As such, local joint behavior cannot be obtained from this global model.

  18. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 3: Cost estimating data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Cost estimating data for the 156 inch diameter, parallel burn solid rocket propellant engine selected for the space shuttle booster are presented. The costing aspects on the baseline motor are initially considered. From the baseline, sufficient data is obtained to provide cost estimates of alternate approaches.

  19. Water impact test of aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of water impact loads tests using aft skirt end ring, and mid ring segments of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) are examined. Dynamic structural response data is developed and an evaluation of the model in various configurations is presented. Impact velocities are determined for the SRB with the larger main chute system. Various failure modes are also investigated.

  20. Booster Sessions Enhance the Long-Term Effectiveness of Spaced Retrieval in Older Adults with Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; Hawley, Karri S.; Jackson, Erin M.; Boudreaux, Emily O.

    2009-01-01

    Six older adults with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) were trained to recall a name-face association using the spaced retrieval technique. In this study, we retested these persons in a 6-month follow-up program. For half of the participants, three booster sessions were administered at 6, 12, and 18 weeks after original training to promote…

  1. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix E: Pressure-fed booster test bed for the liquid rocket booster study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The stress analysis/structural design of the Pressure-Fed Booster Engine Test Bed using the existing F-1 Test Facility Test Stand at Huntsville, Alabama is described. The analysis has been coded and set up for solution on NASTRAN. A separate stress program was established to take the NASTRAN output and perform stress checks on the members. Joint checks and other necessary additional checks were performed by hand. The notes include a brief description of other programs which assist in reproducing and reviewing the NASTRAN results. The redesign of the test stand members and the stress analysis was performed per the A.I.S.C. Code. Loads on the stand consist of the loaded run tanks; wind loads; seismic loads; live loads consisting of snow and ice: live and dead loads of steel; and loaded pressurant bottle. In combining loads, wind loads and seismic loads were each combined with full live loads. Wind and seismic loads were not combined. No one third increase in allowables was taken for the environmental loads except at decks 147 and 214, where the increase was used when considering the stay rods, brackets and stay beams. Wind and seismic loads were considered from each of the four coordinate directions (i.e. N,S,E,W) to give eight basic conditions. The analysis was run with the pressurant tank mounted at level 125. One seismic condition was also run with the tank mounted at levels 169 and 214. No failures were noted with mounting at level 169, but extensive deck failure with mounting at level 214 (the loadsets used are included on the tape, but no detailed results are included in the package). Decking support beams at levels 147 and 214 are not included in the model. The stress program thus does not reduce strut lengths to the length between support beams (the struts are attached to the beams at intersection points) and gives stress ratios larger than one for some of the struts. The affected members were therefore checked by hand.

  2. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix D: Recovery and reuse 156-inch diameter solid rocket motor booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The baseline for a space shuttle configuration utilizing two parallel-burn, 156-in.-diameter SRMs with three segments and techroll seal movable nozzles is presented. The concept and general economic benefits of SRM recovery are equally valid for the series-burn SRMs, provided that those SRMs are also designed for the same strength, stiffness, segmentation, and interchangeability as the present design, and that those SRMs are also recovered as individual units. Feasibility studies were initiated to investigate SRM recoverability. These studies were based upon recovery of the SRM boosters for the Titan 3C. Ground rules precluded SRM modification that required significant changes in motor qualification or schedule. Even with this restriction, the study determined that the recoverable booster concept was completely feasible, both technically and economically. Parachute recovery has been selected as the best method, principally because it can accomplish the task with a minimum development cost and time to achieve operational recovery status. This system affords the highest probability for achieving large cost reductions.

  3. Low Earth Orbit Raider (LER) winged air launch vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feaux, Karl; Jordan, William; Killough, Graham; Miller, Robert; Plunk, Vonn

    1989-01-01

    The need to launch small payloads into low earth orbit has increased dramatically during the past several years. The Low Earth orbit Raider (LER) is an answer to this need. The LER is an air-launched, winged vehicle designed to carry a 1500 pound payload into a 250 nautical mile orbit. The LER is launched from the back of a 747-100B at 35,000 feet and a Mach number of 0.8. Three staged solid propellant motors offer safe ground and flight handling, reliable operation, and decreased fabrication cost. The wing provides lift for 747 separation and during the first stage burn. Also, aerodynamic controls are provided to simplify first stage maneuvers. The air-launch concept offers many advantages to the consumer compared to conventional methods. Launching at 35,000 feet lowers atmospheric drag and other loads on the vehicle considerably. Since the 747 is a mobile launch pad, flexibility in orbit selection and launch time is unparalleled. Even polar orbits are accessible with a decreased payload. Most importantly, the LER launch service can come to the customer, satellites and experiments need not be transported to ground based launch facilities. The LER is designed to offer increased consumer freedom at a lower cost over existing launch systems. Simplistic design emphasizing reliability at low cost allows for the light payloads of the LER.

  4. Axisymmetric shell analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Anderson, Melvin S.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger (STS 51-L) accident led to an intense investigation of the structural behavior of the solid rocket booster (SRB) tang and clevis field joints. Results are presented of axisymmetric shell analyses that parametrically assess the structural behavior of SRB field joints subjected to quasi-steady-state internal pressure loading for both the original joint flown on mission STS 51-L and the redesigned joint flown for the first time after the STS 51-L accident on the Space Shuttle Discovery. Discussion of axisymmetric shell modeling issues and details is presented and a generic method for simulating contact between adjacent shells of revolution is described. Results are presented that identify the performance trends of the joints for a wide range of joint parameters. An important finding is that the redesigned joint exhibits significantly smaller O-ring gap changes and much less sensitivity to joint clearances than the original joint. For a wide range of joint parameters, the result presented indicate that the redesigned joint provides a much better pressure seal than the original joint.

  5. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix C: Battery report for the liquid rocket booster TVC actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The actuators for control of engine valves and gimbals for a booster require 165 kW or more peak power at 270 volts direct current (VDC) during the 2 or 3 minutes of first stage ascent; other booster devices require much less power at 28 VDC. It is desired that a booster supply its own electrical power and satisfy redundancy requirements of the Solid Rocket Booster Shuttle, when applicable. The power of a Liquid Rocket Booster is therefore provided by two subsystems: Actuator Battery Power (270 VDC) Subsystem for the engine actuators, and Electrical Power and Distribution (28 VDC) Subsystem, to power everything else. Boosters will receive no electrical power from Orbiter, only commands and data, according to current plans. It was concluded that nine 30 volt silver-zinc batteries-in-series be used to provide the 270 volt, 37 kW average (165 kW peak).

  6. Booster separation motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, testing, evaluation and flight qualification of the space shuttle booster separation motor is discussed. Delivery of flight hardware to support the research and development flights of the space shuttle is discussed.

  7. Next generation earth-to-orbit space transportation systems: Unmanned vehicles and liquid/hybrid boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The United States civil space effort when viewed from a launch vehicle perspective tends to categorize into pre-Shuttle and Shuttle eras. The pre-Shuttle era consisted of expendable launch vehicles where a broad set of capabilities were matured in a range of vehicles, followed by a clear reluctance to build on and utilize those systems. The Shuttle era marked the beginning of the U.S. venture into reusable space launch vehicles and the consolidation of launch systems used to this one vehicle. This led to a tremendous capability, but utilized men on a few missions where it was not essential and compromised launch capability resiliency in the long term. Launch vehicle failures, between the period of Aug. 1985 and May 1986, of the Titan 34D, Shuttle Challenger, and the Delta vehicles resulted in a reassessment of U.S. launch vehicle capability. The reassessment resulted in President Reagan issuing a new National Space Policy in 1988 calling for more coordination between Federal agencies, broadening the launch capabilities and preparing for manned flight beyond the Earth into the solar system. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA are jointly assessing the requirements and needs for this nations's future transportation system. Reliability/safety, balanced fleet, and resiliency are the cornerstone to the future. An insight is provided into the current thinking in establishing future unmanned earth-to-orbit (ETO) space transportation needs and capabilities. A background of previous launch capabilities, future needs, current and proposed near term systems, and system considerations to assure future mission need will be met, are presented. The focus is on propulsion options associated with unmanned cargo vehicles and liquid booster required to assure future mission needs will be met.

  8. Space shuttle: MSFC booster (B-005) low speed static stability and landing investigation, high speed grit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heim, D. E.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel investigation on the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) booster configuration of the space shuttle system is discussed. Tests were conducted in the MSFC 14" x 14" trisonic wind tunnel. Parameters investigated include; (1) a landing study at Mach number of .3 with the booster at three discrete heights above a ground plane (maximum height above ground plane was six inches) and: (2) a static stability study at subsonic Mach numbers, which included eleven deflections of 0, 10, 20 and 30 degrees with canard deflections of 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees. Both a trapezoidial and a delta shaped canard were investigated at the above conditions; a grit size study was made over the entire Mach range from .3 to 5.0.

  9. Space Shuttle solid rocket booster initial water impact loads and dynamics - Analysis, tests, and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kross, D. A.; Kiefling, L. A.; Murphy, N. C.; Rawls, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    A series of scale model tests, finite element dynamic response analyses and full scale segment tests have been performed for purposes of developing design criteria for the initial water impact loading conditions applied to the internal stiffener rings located in the aft skirt portion of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). In addition, flight experience has yielded information relative to structural reinforcement requirements. This paper discusses the test and analysis methods and summarizes significant results. It is noted that, although scale model test data are valuable for identifying trends, they have shortcomings concerning definition of full scale design loads criteria. Also, the frequently used static equivalent loads definition approach is not applicable for this type impact loading condition applied to an aft skirt type structure. Various types of ring structural fixes, including the addition of selected types of foam, are presented as well as associated full scale segment test results. Depending on the type and contour shape of the foam, reductions on applied pressures and peak measured strains over 50 percent are noted.

  10. Computation of the space shuttle solid rocket booster nozzle start-up transient flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, M.C.; Wilmoth, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The first NASA Space Shuttle flight (STS-1) produced an overpressure wave that exceeded preflight predictions by as much as 5 to 1. This second overpressure wave occurred just after the solid rocket booster (SRB) igniter wave. To understand this overpressure phenomenon, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken. Both the SRB static firing test and STS-1 geometries were studied for two-dimensional, inviscid and viscous flow. The inviscid calculations did not produce significant second overpressure waves. However, the viscous calculations did produce second overpressure waves that qualitatively agree with experiment. These overpressure waves were present in both the static firing test and STS-1 geometries. This second overpressure wave is generated by the motion of the boundary layer separation point and the subsequent radial motion of the exhaust jet during the start-up of the SRB nozzle flow. The presence of the mobile launch platform exhaust hole wall amplifies this wave, but does not appear to be the source of any additional overpressure waves. The lack of good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment indicates that other overpressure sources, not accounted for by this simulation, may be present.

  11. Computation of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster nozzle start-up transient flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The first NASA Space Shuttle flight (STS-1) produced an overpressure wave that exceeded preflight predictions by as much as 5 to 1. This second overpressure wave occurred just after the solid rocket booster (SRB) igniter wave. To understand this overpressure phenomenon, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken. Both the SRB static firing test and STS-1 geometries were studied for two-dimensional, inviscid and viscous flow. The inviscid calculations did not produce significant second overpressure waves. However, the viscous calculations did produce second overpressure waves that qualitatively agree with experiment. These overpressure waves were present in both the static firing test and STS-1 geometries. This second overpressure wave is generated by the motion of the boundary layer separation point and the subsequent radial motion of the exhaust jet during the start-up of the SRB nozzle flow. The presence of the mobile launch platform exhaust hole wale amplifies this wave, but does not appear to be the source of any additional overpressure waves. The lack of good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment indicates that other overpressure sources, not accounted for by this simulation, may be present.

  12. Fracture tolerance analysis of the solid rocket booster servo-actuator for the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.H.; Ghadiali, N.D.; Zahoor, A.; Wilson, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of the fracture tolerance of three components of the thrust vector control servo-actuator for the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle are described. These components were considered as being potentially fracture critical and therefore having the potential to fall short of a desired service life of 80 missions (that is, a service life factor of 4.0 on a basic service life of 20 missions). Detailed stress analysis of the rod end, cylinder, and feedback link components was accomplished by three-dimensional finite-element stress analysis methods. A dynamic structural model of the feedback system was used to determine the dynamic inertia loads and reactions to apply to the finite-element model of the feedback link. Twenty mission stress spectra consisting of lift-off, boost, re-entry, and water impact mission segments were developed for each component based on dynamic loadings. Most components were determined to have the potential of reaching a service life of 80 missions or service life factor of 4.0. 22 refs.

  13. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 1: Analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the factors which determined the selection of the solid rocket propellant engines for the space shuttle booster is presented. The 156 inch diameter, parallel burn engine was selected because of its transportability, cost effectiveness, and reliability. Other factors which caused favorable consideration are: (1) recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings, (2) abort can be easily accomplished. and (3) ecological effects are acceptable.

  14. Development of forward and aft separation bolts for the NASA Space Shuttle solid rocket booster separation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, H.; Williams, V.

    1979-01-01

    A program is underway to design, develop, fabricate, and qualify large high-load forward and aft separation bolts for the Space Shuttle; the bolts will serve as attachment between two solid rocket boosters and the external tank. This paper reviews bolt development, with emphasis on the scaling of components, the use of high strength maraging steel for the internal components, and the use of lead as a hydraulic fluid.

  15. Space shuttle program. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 2: Expendable second stage vehicle definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A definition of the expendable second stage for use with the reusable space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) expendable second stage design, (2) structural subsystem, (3) propulsion subsystem, (4) avionics subsystems, (5) recovery and deorbit subsystem, and (6) expendable second stage vehicle installation, assembly, and checkout.

  16. Ram booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Vance D. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter Ray (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is a space launch system and method to propel a payload bearing craft into earth orbit. The invention has two, or preferably, three stages. The upper stage has rocket engines capable of carrying a payload to orbit and provides the capability of releasably attaching to the lower, or preferably, middle stage. Similar to the lower stage, the middle stage is a reusable booster stage that employs all air breathing engines, is recoverable, and can be turned-around in a short time between missions.

  17. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  18. Feasibility study using large ribbon parachutes, retrorockets, and hydrodynamic attenuation to recover liquid rocket boosters for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, William B.; Wailes, William K.

    1989-01-01

    A new three-phase approach to recovery of the large liquid rocket boosters being studied for the Space Shuttle is proposed. The concept consists of a cluster of larger ribbon parachutes, retrorockets, and spar mode flotation. The two inert liquid rocket boosters weighing 115,000 lb to 183,000 lb descend from high altitude in a side-on coning attitude to 16,000 ft altitude where a cluster of large ribbon parachutes are deployed. The terminal velocity near water landing is 80 ft/sec. Retrorockets are used to decrease the velocity to about 40 ft/sec. The third phase is opening of the front end of the cylindrical rocket case to allow flooding to cushion impact and allow vertical flotation in the spar mode keeping the four expensive liquid rocket engines dry.

  19. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix A: Stress analysis report for the pump-fed and pressure-fed liquid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Pressure effects on the pump-fed Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) of the Space Transportation System are examined. Results from the buckling tests; bending moments tests; barrel, propellant tanks, frame XB1513, nose cone, and intertank tests; and finite element examination of forward and aft skirts are presented.

  20. Test report for 120-inch-diameter Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) model tests. [floating and towing characteristics of space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    The space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB's) will be jettisoned to impact in the ocean within a 200-mile radius of the launch site. Tests were conducted at Long Beach, California, using a 12-inch diameter Titan 3C model to simulate the full-scale characteristics of the prototype SRB during retrieval operations. The objectives of the towing tests were to investigate and assess the following: (1) a floating and towing characteristics of the SRB; (2) need for plugging the SRB nozzle prior to tow; (3) attach point locations on the SRB; (4) effects of varying the SRB configuration; (5) towing hardware; and (6) difficulty of attaching a tow line to the SRB in the open sea. The model was towed in various sea states using four different types and varying lengths of tow line at various speeds. Three attach point locations were tested. Test data was recorded on magnetic tape for the tow line loads and for model pitch, roll, and yaw characteristics and was reduced by computer to tabular printouts and X-Y plots. Profile and movie photography provided documentary test data.

  1. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix B: Liquid rocket booster acoustic and thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The ascent thermal environment and propulsion acoustic sources for the Martin-Marietta Corporation designed Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRB) to be used with the Space Shuttle Orbiter and External Tank are described. Two designs were proposed: one using a pump-fed propulsion system and the other using a pressure-fed propulsion system. Both designs use LOX/RP-1 propellants, but differences in performance of the two propulsion systems produce significant differences in the proposed stage geometries, exhaust plumes, and resulting environments. The general characteristics of the two designs which are significant for environmental predictions are described. The methods of analysis and predictions for environments in acoustics, aerodynamic heating, and base heating (from exhaust plume effects) are also described. The acoustic section will compare the proposed exhaust plumes with the current SRB from the standpoint of acoustics and ignition overpressure. The sections on thermal environments will provide details of the LRB heating rates and indications of possible changes in the Orbiter and ET environments as a result of the change from SRBs to LRBs.

  2. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) Systems Definition Handbook presents the analyses and design data developed during the study. The Systems Definition Handbook (SDH) contains three major parts: the LRB vehicles definition; the Pressure-Fed Booster Test Bed (PFBTB) study results; and the ALS/LRB study results. Included in this volume are the results of all trade studies; final configurations with supporting rationale and analyses; technology assessments; long lead requirements for facilities, materials, components, and subsystems; operational requirements and scenarios; and safety, reliability, and environmental analyses.

  3. Mission operation center of the Lavochkin scientific production association: Work with the interorbital space booster "Fregat"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevich, Yu. V.; Zefirov, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the history of the Lavochkin Association Mission Operation Center (Laspace MOC), the reasons for its building, purposes and objectives to support Fregat multipurpose rocket booster (FMRB) launch tracking, as well as the basic principles of information exchange. Hardware and software are described in detail.

  4. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 5, appendices E thru H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary parametric studies were performed to establish size, weight and packaging arrangements for aerodynamic decelerator devices that could be used for recovery of the expended solid propellant rocket motors used in the launch phase of the Space Shuttle System. Computations were made using standard engineering analysis techniques. Terminal stage parachutes were sized to provide equilibrium descent velocities for water entry that are presently thought to be acceptable without developing loads that could exceed the boosters structural integrity. The performance characteristics of the aerodynamic parachute decelerator devices considered are based on analysis and prior test results for similar configurations and are assumed to be maintained at the scale requirements of the present problem.

  5. Space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. Volume 2: SRB water impact Monte Carlo computer program, user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The HD 220 program was created as part of the space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery system definition. The model was generated to investigate the damage to SRB components under water impact loads. The random nature of environmental parameters, such as ocean waves and wind conditions, necessitates estimation of the relative frequency of occurrence for these parameters. The nondeterministic nature of component strengths also lends itself to probabilistic simulation. The Monte Carlo technique allows the simultaneous perturbation of multiple independent parameters and provides outputs describing the probability distribution functions of the dependent parameters. This allows the user to determine the required statistics for each output parameter.

  6. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2, book 3, addendum 1: Cost estimating data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    A second iteration of the program baseline configuration and cost for the solid propellant rocket engines used with the space shuttle booster system is presented. The purpose of the study was to ensure that total program costs were complete and to review areas where costs might be overly conservative and could be reduced. Labor and material were analyzed in more depth, more definition was prepared to separate recurring from nonrecurring costs, and the operations portions of the engine and stage were separated into more identifiable activities.

  7. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) Systems Study. Amendment 13: Orientation meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: LRB study results summary -- Feb. 1989; LRB study results -- Jan. 1990; Shuttle configuration with booster options; LRB study results -- Sept. 1990; LRB statement of work tasks; ground rules and assumptions; study flow of design, manufacturing/production, and test program/certification; study products; study schedule; and candidate 1.5 stage engine arrangements.

  8. Space shuttle solid rocket booster sting interference wind tunnel test analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conine, B.; Boyle, W.

    1981-01-01

    Wind tunnel test results from shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) sting interference tests were evaluated, yielding the general influence of the sting on the normal force and pitching moment coefficients and the side force and yawing moment coefficients. The procedures developed to determine the sting interference, the development of the corrected aerodynamic data, and the development of a new SRB aerodynamic mathematical model are documented.

  9. Space shuttle: Pressure investigation of a space shuttle launch configuration consisting of a delta-wing orbiter and a swept-wing booster with canard and tip fans (M equals 0.6 to 1.3). Volume 1, part A: Booster data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampy, J. M.; Blackwell, K. L.; Gomillion, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests to determine the pressure distribution on a space shuttle launch configuration consisting of a delta wing orbiter and a swept wing booster with canard and tip fins were conducted. Pressure data were obtained for the combined orbiter and booster and for the booster alone at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.3, angles of attack from minus 8 degrees to plus 10 degrees, and sideslip angles from minus 6 degrees to plus 6 degrees. Pressure data were also obtained for the booster alone without canard at Mach numbers of 0.9 and 1.1. The pressure taps were distributed primarily over the booster upper surface and the orbiter lower surface.

  10. CFD Simulation of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle with Booster Separation Motor and Reaction Control System Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, L. M.; Vicker, D.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate a very complicated flow field encountered during the space shuttle ascent. The flow field features nozzle plumes from booster separation motor (BSM) and reaction control system (RCS) jets with a supersonic incoming cross flow at speed of Mach 4. The overset Navier-Stokes code OVERFLOW, was used to simulate the flow field surrounding the entire space shuttle launch vehicle (SSLV) with high geometric fidelity. The variable gamma option was chosen due to the high temperature nature of nozzle flows and different plume species. CFD predicted Mach contours are in good agreement with the schlieren photos from wind tunnel test. Flow fields are discussed in detail and the results are used to support the debris analysis for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) task.

  11. Second Generation Flyback Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is a computer generated image of a Shuttle launch utilizing 2nd generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) flyback boosters, a futuristic concept that is currently undergoing study by NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Propulsion Office, managed by the Marshall Space Fight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, working in conjunction with the Agency's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Currently, after providing thrust to the Space Shuttle, the solid rocket boosters are parachuted into the sea and are retrieved for reuse. The SLI is considering vehicle concepts that would fly first-stage boosters back to a designated landing site after separation from the orbital vehicle. These flyback boosters would be powered by several jet engines integrated into the booster capable of providing over 100,000 pounds of thrust. The study will determine the requirements for the engines, identify risk mitigation activities, and identify costs associated with risk mitigation and jet engine development and production, as well as determine candidate jet engine options to pursue for the flyback booster.

  12. Second Generation Flyback Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is a computer generated image of a Shuttle in flight utilizing 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) with flyback boosters, a futuristic concept that is currently undergoing study by NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) Propulsion Office, managed by the Marshall Space Fight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, working in conjunction with the Agency's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Currently, after providing thrust to the Space Shuttle, the solid rocket boosters are parachuted into the sea and are retrieved for reuse. The SLI is considering vehicle concepts that would fly first-stage boosters back to a designated landing site after separation from the orbital vehicle. These flyback boosters would be powered by several jet engines integrated into the booster capable of providing over 100,000 pounds of thrust. The study will determine the requirements for the engines, identify risk-mitigation activities, and identify costs associated with risk mitigation and jet engine development and production, as well as determine candidate jet engine options to pursue for the flyback booster.

  13. Expendable second stage reusable space shuttle booster. Volume 2: Technical summary. Book 1: Expendable second stage/reusable booster system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A systems analysis of the expendable second stage/reusable booster system is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) mission/system requirements, (2) spacecraft performance, (3) trajectories, (4) aerodynamics, (5) stability and control, (6) loads, (7) heating, and (8) acoustic environment.

  14. Evaluation of boron-epoxy-reinforced titanium tubular truss for application to a space shuttle booster thrust structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corvelli, N.; Carri, R.

    1972-01-01

    Results of a study to demonstrate the applicability of boron-epoxy-composite-reinforced titanium tubular members to a space shuttle booster thrust structure are presented and discussed. The experimental results include local buckling of all-composite and composite-reinforced-metal cylinders with low values of diameter-thickness ratio, static tests on composite-to-metal bonded step joints, and a test to failure of a boron-epoxy-reinforced titanium demonstration truss. The demonstration truss failed at 118 percent of design ultimate load. Test results and analysis for all specimens and the truss are compared. Comparing an all-titanium design and a boron-epoxy-reinforced-titanium (75 percent B-E and 25 percent Ti) design for application to the space shuttle booster thrust structure indicates that the latter would weigh approximately 24 percent less. Experimental data on the local buckling strength of cylinders with a diameter-thickness ratio of approximately 50 are needed to insure that undue conservatism is not used in future designs.

  15. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-eulerian Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  16. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  17. Vibration characteristics of 1/8-scale dynamic models of the space-shuttle solid-rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leadbetter, S. A.; Stephens, W.; Sewall, J. L.; Majka, J. W.; Barret, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Vibration tests and analyses of six 1/8 scale models of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters are reported. Natural vibration frequencies and mode shapes were obtained for these aluminum shell models having internal solid fuel configurations corresponding to launch, midburn (maximum dynamic pressure), and near endburn (burnout) flight conditions. Test results for longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies are compared with analytical predictions derived from thin shell theory and from finite element plate and beam theory. The lowest analytical longitudinal, torsional, bending, and shell vibration frequencies were within + or - 10 percent of experimental values. The effects of damping and asymmetric end skirts on natural vibration frequency were also considered. The analytical frequencies of an idealized full scale space shuttle solid rocket boosted structure are computed with and without internal pressure and are compared with the 1/8 scale model results.

  18. The effect of space-charge and wake fields in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, James; Spentzouris, Linda; McCarron, Daniel; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. We critically examine the approximations used in the literature for the coupling impedance in laminated chambers and find that most of them are not justified because the wall surface impedance is large. A comparison between the flat and the circular geometry impedance is presented. We use the wake fields calculated for the Fermilab Booster laminated magnets in realistic beam simulations using the Synergia code. We find good agreement between our calculation of the coherent tune shift at injection energy and the experimental measurements. In this paper we calculate the impedance and the wake functions for laminated structures with parallel-planes and circular geometries. First the coupling impedance is derived as a function of the wall surface impedance. Then the surface impedance is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations inside the lamination and the crack regions. We find that the commonly used resistive-wall approximations, good for metallic pipes with small surface impedance, are not valid in the laminated structures where the surface impedance is large. Realistic Synergia simulations of the Booster machine with wake fields predict transverse coherent tune shifts in good agreement with the experiment.

  19. EDIN design study alternate space shuttle booster replacement concepts. Volume 1: Engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demakes, P. T.; Hirsch, G. N.; Stewart, W. A.; Glatt, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a recoverable liquid rocket booster (LRB) system to replace the existing solid rocket booster (SRB) system for the shuttle was studied. Historical weight estimating relationships were developed for the LRB using Saturn technology and modified as required. Mission performance was computed using February 1975 shuttle configuration groundrules to allow reasonable comparison of the existing shuttle with the study designs. The launch trajectory was constrained to pass through both the RTLS/AOA and main engine cut off points of the shuttle reference mission 1. Performance analysis is based on a point design trajectory model which optimizes initial tilt rate and exoatmospheric pitch profile. A gravity turn was employed during the boost phase in place of the shuttle angle of attack profile. Engine throttling add/or shutdown was used to constrain dynamic pressure and/or longitudinal acceleration where necessary. Four basic configurations were investigated: a parallel burn vehicle with an F-1 engine powered LRB; a parallel burn vehicle with a high pressure engine powered LRB; a series burn vehicle with a high pressure engine powered LRB. The relative sizes of the LRB and the ET are optimized to minimize GLOW in most cases.

  20. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there exists a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a pointof- departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both designs utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight propellant loading scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility including variable launch site inclination and launch window. However, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  1. Air Launch: Examining Performance Potential of Various Configurations and Growth Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Eric D.; Creech, Dennis M.; Philips, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a high-level analysis of various air launch vehicle configurations, objectively determining maximum launch vehicle payload while considering carrier aircraft capabilities and given dimensional constraints. With the renewed interest in aerial launch of low-earth orbit payloads, referenced by programs such as Stratolaunch and Spaceship2, there existed a need to qualify the boundaries of the trade space, identify performance envelopes, and understand advantages and limiting factors of designing for maximum payload capability. Using the NASA/DARPA Horizontal Launch Study (HLS) Point Design 2 (PD-2) as a point-of-departure configuration, two independent design actions were undertaken. Both configurations utilized a Boeing 747-400F as the carrier aircraft, LOX/RP-1 first stage and LOX/LH2 second stage. Each design was sized to meet dimensional and mass constraints while optimizing propellant loads and stage delta V (?V) splits. All concepts, when fully loaded, exceeded the allowable Gross Takeoff Weight (GTOW) of the aircraft platform. This excess mass was evaluated as propellant/fuel offload available for a potential in-flight refueling scenario. Results indicate many advantages such as large, relative payload delivery of approximately 47,000 lbm and significant mission flexibility, such as variable launch site inclination and launch window; however, in-flight cryogenic fluid transfer and carrier aircraft platform integration are substantial technical hurdles to the realization of such a system configuration.

  2. Structural optimization of an alternate design for the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.; Rogers, James L., Jr.; Chang, Kwan J.

    1987-01-01

    A structural optimization procedure is used to determine the shape of an alternate design for the Shuttle's solid rocket booster field joint. In contrast to the tang and clevis design of the existing joint, this alternate design consists of two flanges bolted together. Configurations with 150 studs of 1 1/8 in diameter and 135 studs of 1 3/16 in diameter are considered. Using a nonlinear programming procedure, the joint weight is minimized under constraints on either von Mises or maximum normal stresses, joint opening and geometry. The procedure solves the design problem by replacing it by a sequence of approximate (convex) subproblems; the pattern of contact between the joint halves is determined every few cycles by a nonlinear displacement analysis. The minimum weight design has 135 studs of 1 3/16 in diameter and is designed under constraints on normal stresses. It weighs 1144 lb per joint more than the current tang and clevis design.

  3. Structural optimization of an alternate design for the space shuttle solid rocket booster field joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J.-F. M.; Chang, K. J.; Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A structural optimization procedure is used to determine the shape of an alternate design for the shuttle solid rocket booster field joint. In contrast to the tang and clevis design of the existing joint, this alternate design consists of two flanges bolted together. Configurations with 150 studs of 1 1/8 in. diameter and 135 studs of 1 3/16 in. diameter are considered. Using a nonlinear programming procedure, the joint weight is minimized under constraints on either von Mises or maximum normal stresses, joint opening and geometry. The procedure solves the design problem by replacing it by a sequence of approximate (convex) subproblems; the pattern of contact between the joint halves is determined every few cycles by a nonliner displacement analysis. The minimum weight design has 135 studs of 1 3/16 in. diameter and is designed under constraints on normal stresses. It weighs 1144 lb per joint more than the current tang and clevis design.

  4. EDIN design study alternate space shuttle booster replacement concepts. Volume 2: Design simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demakes, P. T.; Hirsch, G. N.; Stewart, W. A.; Glatt, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Historical weight estimating relationships were developed for the liquid rocket booster (LRB) using Saturn technology, and modified as required to support the EDIN05 study. Mission performance was computed using February 1975 shuttle configuration groundrules to allow reasonable comparison of the existing shuttle with the EDIN05 designs. The launch trajectory was constrained to pass through both the RTLS/AOA and main engine cut-off points. Performance analysis was based on a point design trajectory model which optimized initial tilt rate and exo-atmospheric pitch profile. A gravity turn was employed during the boost phase in place of the shuttle angle-of-attack profile. Engine throttling add/or shutdown was used to constrain dynamic pressure and/or longitudinal acceleration where necessary.

  5. Methods for data reduction and loads analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster model water impact tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The methodology used to predict full scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) water impact loads from scale model test data is described. Tests conducted included 12.5 inch and 120 inch diameter models of the SRB. Geometry and mass characteristics of the models were varied in each test series to reflect the current SRB baseline configuration. Nose first and tail first water entry modes were investigated with full-scale initial impact vertical velocities of 40 to 120 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 60 ft/sec., and off-vertical angles of 0 to plus or minus 30 degrees. The test program included a series of tests with scaled atmospheric pressure.

  6. A coupled fluid-structure dynamic analysis for water impact loads. [for Space Shuttle recoverable booster design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herting, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper a nonlinear transient, hydroelastic method is developed for response analysis of the Space Shuttle recoverable booster on water impact. At each time step, coupled equations of fluid flow and structure dynamics are solved with an iterative, self-correcting process. Rigid body motions are represented by large angle equations. Local deformations are represented by a NASTRAN-generated model of the three-dimensional structure. The fluid is represented by series solutions of the potential flow equation which include the effects of the local structure motions. The resulting water loads and structural stresses obtained will aid in qualification of the final structural design. Comparisons are made to experimental impact data to validate the method.

  7. Space shuttle: Determination of the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.; Buchholz, R.; Allen, E. C. JR.; Dehart, J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the aerodynamic interference between the space shuttle orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket booster on a 0.004 scale ascent configuration. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree sideslip. A sideslip range of minus 10 to plus 10 degrees at zero degree angle of attack was also tested. The Mach number range was varied from 0.6 to 4.96 with Reynolds number varying between 4.9 and 6.8 times one million per foot.

  8. Space Launch System (SLS) Program Overview NASA Research Announcement (NRA) Advanced Booster (AB) Engineering Demonstration and Risk Reduction (EDRR) Industry Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.

    2011-01-01

    SLS is a national capability that empowers entirely new exploration for missions of national importance. Program key tenets are safety, affordability, and sustainability. SLS builds on a solid foundation of experience and current capacities to enable a timely initial capability and evolve to a flexible heavy-lift capability through competitive opportunities: (1) Reduce risks leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS (2) Enable competition by mitigating targeted Advanced Booster risks to enhance SLS affordability and performance The road ahead promises to be an exciting journey for present and future generations, and we look forward to working with you to continue America fs space exploration.

  9. Space shuttle vehicle rocket plume impingement study for separation analysis. Tasks 2 and 3: Definition and preliminary plume impingement analysis for the MSC booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Penny, M. M.; Prozan, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a space shuttle plume impingement study for the Manned Spacecraft Center configuration. This study was conducted as two tasks which were to (1) define the orbiter main stage engine exhaust plume flow field, and (2) define the plume impingement heating, force and resulting moment environments on the booster during the staging maneuver. To adequately define these environments during the staging maneuver and allow for deviation from the nominal separation trajectory, a multitude of relative orbiter/booster positions are analyzed which map the region that contains the separation trajectories. The data presented can be used to determine a separation trajectory which will result in acceptable impingement heating rates, forces, and the resulting moments. The data, presented in graphical form, include the effect of roll, pitch and yaw maneuvers for the booster. Quasi-steady state analysis methods were used with the orbiter engine operating at full thrust. To obtain partial thrust results, simple ratio equations are presented.

  10. Design of experiments based variation mode and effect analysis of a conceptual air launched SLV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Amer Farhan; Zeeshan, Qasim; Kamran, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Conceptual design stage is where the knowledge about the variation in system is still quite vague and herein we intend to analyze and compare various probable design concepts for Air Launched SLV by the use of basic variation mode and effect analysis. In this paper we present a methodology for the Variation Mode and Effect Analysis using Latin Hypercube Sampling based Design of Experiments for the conceptual Air launched Satellite Launch Vehicle. Variations are induced in the Control Variables based on knowledge and experience. The methodology is used to quantify the effect of Noise Factors on the performance of a conceptual Air Launched SLV. The insertion altitude of the Air Launched SLV is the Key Performance Indicator. Preliminary results of the performance and analysis for the simulated experiments are presented here. The performance of the proposed procedure has been tested and, thus, validated by the Air Launched SLV design problem. The Design of Experiment based Variation mode and effect analysis approach is intended for initial conceptual design purposes, thus, providing an immediate insight to the performance of the system in general and quantification of the sensitivity of the key performance indicator in particular, subject to the variations in noise factors prior to the detailed design phase.

  11. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the Space Launch System Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle.

  12. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight LO2 Tank. Part 1; Bahavior Under Booster Ascent Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Results of linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle superlightweight (SLWT) external liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank for an important early booster ascent loading condition are presented. These results for thin-walled linear elastic shells that are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads illustrate an important type of response mode that may be encountered in the design of other liquid-fuel launch vehicles. Linear bifurcation analyses are presented that predict several nearly equal eigenvalues that correspond to local buckling modes in the forward ogive section of the LO2 tank. In contrast, the nonlinear response phenomenon is shown to consist of short-wavelength bending deformations in the forward ogive and barrel sections of the LO2 tank that growing amplitude in a stable manner increasing load. Imperfection sensitivity analyses are presented that show that the presence of several nearly equal eigenvalues does not lead to a premature general instability mode for the forward ogive section. For the linear bifurcation and nonlinear analyses, the results show that accurate predictions of the response of the shield generally require a large-scale, high-fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that the SLWT LO2 tank can support loads in excess of approximately 2.6 times the values of the operational loads considered.

  13. Design data book phase A/B study for a pressure fed engine on a reusable space shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary engineering definition information is presented for a liquid pressure-fed reusable booster engine. The material is reported in three separate sections which include: (1) program and baseline data, (2) critical trade studies summary, and (3) methodology.

  14. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Pegasus Air-Launched Booster and Comparisons with Predicted and Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, M. N.; Engelund, Walter C.; Mendenhall, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics were obtained for the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations over a Mach number range from 1.6 to 6 and angles of attack from -4 to +24 degrees. Angle of sideslip was varied from -6 to +6 degrees, and control surfaces were deflected to obtain elevon, aileron, and rudder effectiveness. Experimental data for the Pegasus configuration are compared with engineering code predictions performed by Nielsen Engineering & Research, Inc. (NEAR) in the aerodynamic design of the Pegasus vehicle, and with results from the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS) code. Comparisons of experimental results are also made with longitudinal flight data from Flight #2 of the Pegasus vehicle. Results show that the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the Pegasus and Pegasus XL configurations are similar, having the same lift-curve slope and drag levels across the Mach number range. Both configurations are longitudinally stable, with stability decreasing towards neutral levels as Mach number increases. Directional stability is negative at moderate to high angles of attack due to separated flow over the vertical tail. Dihedral effect is positive for both configurations, but is reduced 30-50 percent for the Pegasus XL configuration because of the horizontal tail anhedral. Predicted longitudinal characteristics and both longitudinal and lateral-directional control effectiveness are generally in good agreement with experiment. Due to the complex leeside flowfield, lateral-directional characteristics are not as well predicted by the engineering codes. Experiment and flight data are in good agreement across the Mach number range.

  15. Pretest Plan for a Quarter Scale AFT Segment of the SRB Filament Wound Case in the NSWC Hydroballistics Facility. [space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adoue, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    In support of preflight design loads definition, preliminary water impact scale model are being conducted of space shuttle rocket boosters. The model to be used as well as the instrumentation, test facilities, and test procedures are described for water impact tests being conducted at test conditions to simulate full-scale initial impact at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec. zero horizontal velocity, and angles of 0,5, and 10 degrees.

  16. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A technical analysis of the solid propellant rocket engines for use with the space shuttle is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) solid rocket motor stage recovery, (2) environmental effects, (3) man rating of the solid propellant rocket engines, (4) system safety analysis, (5) ground support equipment, and (6) transportation, assembly, and checkout.

  17. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 3, appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A systems requirements analysis for the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle was conducted. The systems analysis was developed to define the physical and functional requirements for the systems and subsystems. The operations analysis was performed to identify the requirements of the various launch operations, mission operations, ground operations, and logistic and flight support concepts.

  18. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The technical requirements for the solid propellant rocket engine to be used with the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) propulsion system definition, (2) solid rocket engine stage design, (3) solid rocket engine stage recovery, (4) environmental effects, (5) manrating of the solid rocket engine stage, (6) system safety analysis, and (7) ground support equipment.

  19. Space shuttle solid rocket booster cost-per-flight analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A cost per flight computer model is described which considers: traffic model, component attrition, hardware useful life, turnaround time for refurbishment, manufacturing rates, learning curves on the time to perform tasks, cost improvement curves on quantity hardware buys, inflation, spares philosophy, long lead, hardware funding requirements, and other logistics and scheduling constraints. Additional uses of the model include assessing the cost per flight impact of changing major space shuttle program parameters and searching for opportunities to make cost effective management decisions.

  20. Technical report analysis and design: Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1, supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and design effort was conducted as part of the study of solid rocket motor for a space shuttle booster. The 156-inch-diameter, parallel burn solid rocket motor was selected as its baseline because it is transportable and is the most cost-effective, reliable system that has been developed and demonstrated. The basic approach was to concentrate on the selected baseline design, and to draw from the baseline sufficient data to describe the alternate approaches also studied. The following conclusions were reached with respect to technical feasibility of the use of solid rocket booster motors for the space shuttle vehicle: (1) The 156-inch, parallel-burn baseline SRM design meets NASA's study requirements while incorporating conservative safety factors. (2) The solid rocket motor booster represents a cost-effective approach. (3) Baseline costs are conservative and are based on a demonstrated design. (4) Recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings. (5) Abort can be accomplished successfully. (6) Ecological effects are acceptable.

  1. Space shuttle: Static stability and control investigation of NR/GD delta wing booster (B-20) and delta wing orbiter (134-D), volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C., Jr.; Eder, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations have been made on a .0035 scale model North American Rockwell/General Dynamics version of the space shuttle in the NASA/MSFC 14 x 14 Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel. Static stability and control data were obtained on the delta wing booster alone (B-20) and with the delta wing orbiter (134D) mounted in various positions on the booster. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded over an angle of attack range from -10 to 24 deg at 0 and 6 deg sideslip angles and from -10 to +10 deg sideslip at 0 deg angle of attack. Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 4.96.

  2. The Use af Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum (IVD) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.

    2002-01-01

    The USA LLC Materials & Processes (M&P) Engineering Department had recommended the application and evaluation of Ion Vapor Deposition (IVD) aluminum to SRB Hardware for corrosion protection and elimination of hazardous materials and processes such as cadmium plating. IVD is an environmentally friendly process that has no volatile organic compounds (VOCs), or hazardous waste residues. It lends itself to use with hardware exposed to corrosive seacoast environments as found at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Florida. Lifting apparatus initially coated with cadmium plating for corrosion protection; was stripped and successfully re-coated with IVD aluminum after the cadmium plating no longer protected the GSE from corrosion, Since then, and after completion of a significant test program, the first flight application of the IVD Aluminum process on the Drogue Parachute Ratchet Assembly is scheduled for 2002.

  3. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study, volume 2, addendum 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of developing and producing a launch vehicle from an external tank (ET) and an engine module that mounts inline to the tankage at the aft end and contains six space transportation main engines (STME), was assessed. The primary mission of this launch vehicle would be to place a PLS (personnel launch vehicle) into a low earth orbit (LEO). The vehicle tankage and the assembly of the engine module, was evaluated to determine what, if any, manufacturing/production impacts would be incurred if this vehicle were built along side the current ET at Michoud Assembly Facility. It was determined that there would be no significant impacts to produce seven of these vehicles per year while concurrently producing 12 ETs per year. Preliminary estimates of both nonrecurring and recurring costs for this vehicle concept were made.

  4. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and close-out procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Booster Separation Motor (BSM) Test Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This photograph depicts a hot fire test of the Shuttle Booster Separation Motor (BSM) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) test stand 116. The objective of the test was to test the aft heat seal in flight configuration. The function of the motor is to separate the Shuttle vehicle from the boosters that carry it into space.

  6. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 5: Space shuttle powered explicit guidance. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggers, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    An optimum powered explicit guidance algorithm capable of handling all space shuttle exoatospheric maneuvers is presented. The theoretical and practical basis for the currently baselined space shuttle powered flight guidance equations and logic is documented. Detailed flow diagrams for implementing the steering computations for all shuttle phases, including powered return to launch site (RTLS) abort, are also presented. Derivation of the powered RTLS algorithm is provided, as well as detailed flow diagrams for implementing the option. The flow diagrams and equations are compatible with the current powered flight documentation.

  7. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Appendix C: Recovery and reuse 120-inch diameter solid rocket motor boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A baseline for a space shuttle configuration utilizing four parallel-burn 120-in. diameter SRMS is presented. Topics discussed include parachute system sequence, recovery system development profile, parachute container, and segment and closure recovery operations. A cost analysis for recovery of the SRM stage is presented. It is concluded that from the standpoint of minimum cost and development, parachutes are the best means of achieving SRM recovery. Major SRM components can be reused safely.

  8. Solid Rocket Booster-Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This illustration is a cutaway of the solid rocket booster (SRB) sections with callouts. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  9. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  10. Shuttle Upgrade Using 5-Segment Booster (FSB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Donald R.; Huppi, Hal D.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In support of NASA's continuing effort to improve the over-all safety and reliability of the Shuttle system- a 5-segment booster (FSB) has been identified as an approach to satisfy that overall objective. To assess the feasibility of a 5-segment booster approach, NASA issued a feasibility study contract to evaluate the potential of a 5-segment booster to improve the overall capability of the Shuttle system, especially evaluating the potential to increase the system reliability and safety. In order to effectively evaluate the feasibility of the 5-segment concept, a four-member contractor team was established under the direction of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC provided the overall program oversight and integration as well as program contractual management. The contractor team consisted of Thiokol, Boeing North American Huntington Beach (BNA), Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) and United Space Alliance (USA) and their subcontractor bd Systems (Control Dynamics Division, Huntsville, AL). United Space Alliance included the former members of United Space Booster Incorporated (USBI) who managed the booster element portion of the current Shuttle solid rocket boosters. Thiokol was responsible for the overall integration and coordination of the contractor team across all of the booster elements. They were also responsible for all of the motor modification evaluations. Boeing North American (BNA) was responsible for all systems integration analyses, generation of loads and environments. and performance and abort mode capabilities. Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems (LMMSS) was responsible for evaluating the impacts of any changes to the booster on the external tank (ET), and evaluating any design changes on the external tank necessary to accommodate the FSB. USA. including the former USBI contingent. was responsible for evaluating any modifications to facilities at the launch site as well as any booster component design modifications.

  11. Space shuttle: Aerodynamic characteristics of various MDAC space shuttle ascent configurations with parallel burn pressure-fed and SRM boosters. Volume 1: Tanks T1 and T2 ascent configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Various space shuttle ascent configurations were tested in a trisonic wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics. The ascent configuration consisted of a NASA/MSC 040 orbiter in combination with various HO centerline tank and booster geometries. The aerodynamic interference between components of the space shuttle and the effect on the orbiter aerodynamics was determined. The various aerodynamic configurations tested were: (1) centerline HO tanks T1 and T2, (2) centerline HO tank T3, and (3) centerline HO tank H4.

  12. Crucial Booster Test Fires Up in Utah

    NASA Video Gallery

    A booster for the most powerful rocket in the world, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), successfully fired up Tuesday for its second qualification ground test at Orbital ATK's test facilities in Pro...

  13. Testing of Environmentally Preferable Aluminum Pretreatments and Coating Systems for Use on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, C.; Raley, R.; Zook, L.

    2001-01-01

    The solid rocket booster (SRB) has historically used a chromate conversion coating prior to protective finish application. After conversion coating, an organic paint system consisting of a chromated epoxy primer and polyurethane topcoat is applied. An overall systems approach was selected to reduce waste generation from the coatings application and removal processes. While the most obvious waste reduction opportunity involved elimination of the chromate conversion coating, several other coating system configurations were explored in an attempt to reduce the total waste. This paper will briefly discuss the use of a systems view to reduce waste generation from the coating process and present the results of the qualification testing of nonchromated aluminum pretreatments and alternate coating systems configurations.

  14. Lightning tests and analyses of tunnel bond straps and shielded cables on the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druen, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of the tests and analyses described in this report are as follows: (1) determine the lightning current survivability of five alternative changed designs of the bond straps which electrically bond the solid rocket booster (SRB) systems tunnel to the solid rocket motor (SRM) case; (2) determine the amount of reduction in induced voltages on operational flight (OF) tunnel cables obtained by a modified design of tunnel bond straps (both tunnel cover-to-cover and cover-to-motor case); (3) determine the contribution of coupling to the OF tunnel cables by ground electrical and instrumentation (GEI) cables which enter the systems tunnel from unshielded areas on the surfaces of the motor case; and (4) develop a model (based on test data) and calculate the voltage levels at electronic 'black boxes' connected to the OF cables that run in the systems tunnel.

  15. Some aspects of user needs for an air-launched, expendable free-drifting buoy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    Research objectives were determined based on user's needs in which an airlaunched, free-drifting buoy would significantly contribute to the accomplishment of these objectives. The objectives were formulated through discussions with individuals representing federal and state agencies and universities. The most immediate need was in continental shelf oceanography which required data to characterize circulation in a localized mesoscale region. A tentative plan for the North Carolina Outfall Study was presented. Data from air-launched, expendable free-drifting buoys would be used in this study not only to characterize the circulation off the North Carolina coast, but also to provide data by which a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model could be verified.

  16. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of an Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM used on both of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of the Space Shuttle. A number of lots of the BSM insulator in 1998-99 exhibited surface cracks and/or crazing. Each insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive. Induced insulator stresses from adhesive cure are likely greatest where the insulator/adhesive contour is the greatest, thus showing increased insulator surface cracking in this area. Thermal analysis testing by Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) was performed on one each of the two vendor BSM insulators previously bonded that exhibited the surface cracking. The TMA data from the film/fiber technique yielded the most meaningful results, with thin insulator surface samples containing cracks having roughly the same modulus (stiffness) as thin insulator bulk samples just underneath.

  17. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of a Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM of each of the two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle. Each cured insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive, and some of the curved areas in the rubber may have significant residual stresses. A number of recently bonded NBR insulators have shown fine surface cracks, and stressed insulator areas may be aging at a faster rate than unstressed areas, thus hastening the surface cracking. Thermal analysis data on both vendor insulators by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) through a temperature/frequency sweep from 24 to 74 C have shown a higher flexural storage modulus and Arrhenius activation energy for the stressed area than for the unstressed area. Other thermal analysis techniques are being used to study the insulator surface vs. bulk interior for better understanding this anomaly.

  18. Feasibility of using neutron radiography to inspect the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt, forward skirt and frustum. Part 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. P.; Bader, J. W.; Brenizer, J. S.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle's solid rocket boosters (SRB) include components made primarily of aluminum that are parachuted back for retrieval from the ocean and refurbished for repeated usage. Nondestructive inspection methods used on these aging parts to reduce the risk of unforeseen problems include x-ray, ultrasonics, and eddy current. Neutron radiography tests on segments of an SRB component show that entrapped moisture and naturally occurring aluminum corrosion can be revealed by neutron radiography even if present in only small amounts. Voids in sealant can also be evaluated. Three alternatives are suggested to follow-up this study: (1) take an SRB component to an existing neutron radiography system; (2) take an existing mobile neutron radiography system to the NASA site; or (3) plan a dedicated system custom designed for NASA applications.

  19. Feasibility of using neutron radiography to inspect the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt, forward skirt and frustum. Part 1: Summary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, J. P.; Bader, J. W.; Brenizer, J. S.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The space shuttle's solid rocket boosters (SRB) include components made primarily of aluminum that are parachuted back for retrieval from the ocean and refurbished for repeated usage. Nondestructive inspection methods used on these aging parts to reduce the risk of unforeseen problems include x-ray, ultrasonics, and eddy current. Neutron radiography tests on segments of an SRB component show that entrapped moisture and naturally occurring aluminum corrosion can be revealed by neutron radiography even if present in only small amounts. Voids in sealant can also be evaluated. Three alternatives are suggested to follow-up this study: (1) take an SRB component to an existing neutron radiography system; (2) take an existing mobile neutron radiography system to the NASA site; or (3) plan a dedicated system custom designed for NASA applications.

  20. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. In this view the access panel on the Forward Skirt is removed and you can see a small portion of the interior of the Forward Skirt. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  1. General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Solid Rocket Booster's (SRB) Solid Rocket Motor Segments in the Surge Building of the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building and subsequent mounting and assembly on the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a fully assembled Solid Rocket Booster sitting atop the Mobile Launch Platform in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Aerothermal test results from the second flight of the Pegasus booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Moes, Timothy R.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1992-01-01

    A survey of temperature, heat-flux, and pressure measurements was obtained at speeds through Mach 8.0 on the second flight of the Pegasus air-launched space booster system. All sensors were distributed on the wing-body fairing or fillet. Sensors included thin foil-gauge thermocouples installed near the surface within the thermal protection system. Thermocouples were also installed on the surface of nonablating plugs. The resulting temperature time history allowed derivation of convective heat flux. In addition, commercially available calorimeters were installed on the fillet at selected locations. Calorimeters exhibited a larger change in measured heat flux than collocated nonablating plugs in response to particular events. Similar proportional variations in heat flux across different regions of the fillet were detected by both the calorimeters and nonablating plugs. Pressure ports were installed on some nonablating plugs to explore the effects of port protrusion and high-frequency noise on pressure requirements. The effect of port protrusion on static-pressure measurements was found to decrease with increasing Mach number. High-frequency noise suppression was found to be desirable but not required on any future flight.

  4. Design of a Flush Airdata System (FADS) for the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Deets, Dwain A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a design study for a pressure based Flush airdata system (FADS) on the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle. The analysis will demonstrate the feasibility of using a pressure based airdata system for the HALO and provide measurement uncertainty estimates along a candidate trajectory. The HALO is a conceived as a man-rated vehicle to be air launched from an SR-71 platform and is proposed as a testbed for an airbreathing hydrogen scramjet. A feasibility study has been performed and indicates that the proposed trajectory is possible with minimal modifications to the existing SR71 vehicle. The mission consists of launching the HALO off the top of an SR-71 at Mach 3 and 80,000 ft. A rocket motor is then used to accelerate the vehicle to the test condition. After the scramjet test is completed the vehicle will glide to a lakebed runway landing. This option provides reusability of the vehicle and scramjet engine. The HALO design will also allow for various scramjet engine and flowpath designs to be flight tested. For the HALO flights, measurements of freestream airdata are considered to be a mission critical to perform gain scheduling and trajectory optimization. One approach taken to obtaining airdata involves measurement of certain parameters such as external atmospheric winds, temperature, etc to estimate the airdata quantities. This study takes an alternate approach. Here the feasibility of obtaining airdata using a pressure-based flush airdata system (FADS) methods is assessed. The analysis, although it is performed using the HALO configuration and trajectory, is generally applicable to other hypersonic vehicles. The method to be presented offers the distinct advantage of inferring total pressure, Mach number, and flow incidence angles, without stagnating the freestream flow. This approach allows for airdata measurements to be made using blunt surfaces and significantly diminishes the heating load at the sensor. In the FADS concept a

  5. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster Frustum and Nose Cap assembly undergoing preparations and assembly procedures in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes and the Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  7. Reentry aerodynamic characteristics of a space shuttle solid rocket booster model 449 tested in MSFC 14 by 14 inch TWT (SA26F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Braddock, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Force tests of a 0.563 percent scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) model, MSFC Model 449, were conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center 14 x 14 inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel. There were a total of 134 runs (pitch polars) made. Test Mach numbers were 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.96, 2.74, 3.48, 4.00, 4.45, and 4.96; test angles of attack ranged from minus 10 degrees to 190 degrees; test Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.9 million per foot to 7.1 million per foot; and test roll angles were 0, 45, 90, and 135 degrees. The model was tested with three different engine nozzle/skirts. Two of these engine configurations differed from each other in the magnitude of the volume inside the nozzle and skirt. The third engine configuration had part of the nozzle removed. The model was tested with an electrical tunnel in combination with separation rockets of two different heights.

  8. Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) for the Space Transportation System (STS) systems study. Appendix F: Performance and trajectory for ALS/LRB launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    By simply combining two baseline pump-fed LOX/RP-1 Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs) with the Denver core, a launch vehicle (Option 1 Advanced Launch System (ALS)) is obtained that can perform both the 28.5 deg (ALS) mission and the polar orbit ALS mission. The Option 2 LRB was obtained by finding the optimum LOX/LH2 engine for the STS/LRB reference mission (70.5 K lb payload). Then this engine and booster were used to estimate ALS payload for the 28.5 deg inclination ALS mission. Previous studies indicated that the optimum number of STS/LRB engines is four. When the engine/booster sizing was performed, each engine had 478 K lb sea level thrust and the booster carried 625,000 lb of useable propellant. Two of these LRBs combined with the Denver core provided a launch vehicle that meets the payload requirements for both the ALS and STS reference missions. The Option 3 LRB uses common engines for the cores and boosters. The booster engines do not have the nozzle extension. These engines were sized as common ALS engines. An ALS launch vehicle that has six core engines and five engines per booster provides 109,100 lb payload for the 28.5 deg mission. Each of these LOX/LH2 LRBs carries 714,100 lb of useable propellant. It is estimated that the STS/LRB reference mission payload would be 75,900 lb.

  9. Pegasus Rocket Booster Being Prepared for X-43A/Hyper-X Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration. The body of the vehicle itself forms critical elements of the engine. The forebody acts as part of the intake for airflow and the aft section serves as the nozzle. The X-43A vehicles were manufactured by Micro Craft, Inc., Tullahoma, Tennessee. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Chandler, Arizona, built the Pegasus rocket booster used to launch the X-43 vehicles. For the Dryden research flights, the Pegasus rocket booster and attached X-43 will be air launched by Dryden's B-52 'Mothership.' After release from the B-52, the booster will accelerate the X-43A vehicle to the established test conditions (Mach 7 to 10) at an altitude of approximately 100,000 feet where the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power and preprogrammed control.

  10. Pegasus Rocket Booster Being Prepared for X-43A/Hyper-X Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    rocket powered, so they must carry both fuel and oxygen for propulsion. Scramjet technology-based vehicles need to carry only fuel. By eliminating the need to carry oxygen, future hypersonic vehicles will be able to carry heavier payloads. Another unique aspect of the X-43A vehicle is the airframe integration. The body of the vehicle itself forms critical elements of the engine. The forebody acts as part of the intake for airflow and the aft section serves as the nozzle. The X-43A vehicles were manufactured by Micro Craft, Inc., Tullahoma, Tennessee. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Chandler, Arizona, built the Pegasus rocket booster used to launch the X-43 vehicles. For the Dryden research flights, the Pegasus rocket booster and attached X-43 will be air launched by Dryden's B-52 'Mothership.' After release from the B-52, the booster will accelerate the X-43A vehicle to the established test conditions (Mach 7 to 10) at an altitude of approximately 100,000 feet where the X-43 will separate from the booster and fly under its own power and preprogrammed control.

  11. Space shuttle: Static stability and control investigation of NR/GD delta wing booster (B-20) and delta wing orbiter (134D), volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, E. C., Jr.; Eder, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Test results of booster and orbiter models of various component buildup configurations are reported. Dataset Collation Sheets, which give a complete summary of the configurations, are presented along with a description of the test facility. Data reduction procedures are described.

  12. Booster aerodynamic heating: Test support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.; Reardon, J. E.; Fuller, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    Several technical areas were encompassed in providing support for booster thermal environment test work. These areas included: (1) cavity flow heating, (2) rarefied flow heating, and (3) impulse operated model research and testing. Cavity flow heating problems were studied with respect to the proposed altitude control motors for the space shuttle. Available literature on this subject was reviewed and analytical predictive methods were summarized for use in planning testing work. Rarefied flow heating data was reviewed and correlated. The study showed the importance of considering rarefied flow conditions in launch thermal environment prediction. Impulse operated model research and testing was conducted to provide a basis for understanding and designing such models for booster thermal environment testing.

  13. Supersonic aerodynamic trade data for a low-profile monoplanar missile concept. [air launched maneuvering missile design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, E. B.; Robins, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    A monoplanar missile concept has been studied which shows promise of improving the aerodynamic performance of air-launched missiles. This missile concept has a constant eccentricity elliptical cross-section body. Since current guidance and propulsion technologies influence missile nose and base shapes, an experimental investigation has been conducted at Mach number 2.50 to determine the effects of variations in these shapes on the missile aerodynamics. Results of these tests are presented.

  14. Study of solid rocket motor for space, shuttle booster, volume 2, book 4 appendices B thru D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The mass properties and related data for the solid propellant rocket engine for use with the space shuttle are presented. Data for three solid propellant rocket engines are provided. The three designs considered are: (1) baseline parallel burn, (2) optional parallel burn, and (3) baseline series burn. Layouts of the respective designs to show design and dimensional data are included.

  15. Asymmetrical booster ascent guidance and control system design study. Volume 2: SSFS math models - Ascent. [space shuttle development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. E.; Lemon, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The engineering equations and mathematical models developed for use in the space shuttle functional simulator (SSFS) are presented, and include extensive revisions and additions to earlier documentation. Definitions of coordinate systems used by the SSFS models and coordinate tranformations are given, along with documentation of the flexible body mathematical models. The models were incorporated in the SSFS and are in the checkout stage.

  16. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 2 book 2: Supporting research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The baseline SRM design for the space shuttle employs proven technology based on actual motor firings. Supporting research and technology are therefore required only to address system technology that is specific to the shuttle requirements, and that is needed for optimization of design features. Eight programs are recommended to meet these requirements.

  17. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  18. Developing the World's Most Powerful Solid Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Journey to Mars has begun. Indicative of that challenge, this will be a multi-decadal effort requiring the development of technology, operational capability, and experience. The first steps are underway with more than 15 years of continuous human operations aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and development of commercial cargo and crew transportation capabilities. NASA is making progress on the transportation required for deep space exploration - the Orion crew spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket that will launch Orion and large components such as in-space stages, habitat modules, landers, and other hardware necessary for deep-space operations. SLS is a key enabling capability and is designed to evolve with mission requirements. The initial configuration of SLS - Block 1 - will be capable of launching more than 70 metric tons (t) of payload into low Earth orbit, greater mass than any other launch vehicle in existence. By enhancing the propulsion elements and larger payload fairings, future SLS variants will launch 130 t into space, an unprecedented capability that simplifies hardware design and in-space operations, reduces travel times, and enhances two solid propellant five-segment boosters, both based on space shuttle technologies. This paper will focus on development of the booster, which will provide more than 75 percent of total vehicle thrust at liftoff. Each booster is more than 17 stories tall, 3.6 meters (m) in diameter and weighs 725,000 kilograms (kg). While the SLS booster appears similar to the shuttle booster, it incorporates several changes. The additional propellant segment provides additional booster performance. Parachutes and other hardware associated with recovery operations have been deleted and the booster designated as expendable for affordability reasons. The new motor incorporates new avionics, new propellant grain, asbestos-free case insulation, a redesigned nozzle, streamlined manufacturing

  19. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs) replacing Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle program. The major findings are given. The most significant conclusion is that LRBs offer significantly safety and performance advantages over the SRBs currently used by the STS without major impact to the ongoing program.

  20. Booster double harmonic setup notes

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-02-17

    The motivation behind implementing a booster double harmonic include the reduced transverse space charge force from a reduced peak beam current and reduced momentum spread of the beam, both of which can be achieved from flattening the RF bucket. RF capture and acceleration of polarized protons (PP) is first set up in the single harmonic mode with RF harmonic h=1. Once capture and acceleration have been set up in the single harmonic mode, the second harmonic system is brought on and programmed to operate in concert with the single harmonic system.

  1. An air launched, highly responsive military transatmospheric vehicle (TAV), based on existing aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampsten, Kenneth R.

    1996-03-01

    A novel vehicle design is presented that minimizes Research Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) cost. The proposed TAV can satisfy a broad range of military mission applications for the 21st century. TAV deployment is provided by a Rockwell B-1B bomber. Pre-launch orientation of the vehicle is centerline, underneath the B-1B forward weapon bays. Launch occurs at 30,000 ft, Mach 0.90, and at a flight path angle of 15-20 degrees. The TAV is a Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) vehicle utilizing Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and RP-1 (kerosene) propellants. The reusable upper stage, or TAV, incorporates a 130 cubic foot payload bay for mission specific equipment. The booster can either be expended, or potentially recovered for reuse. TAV reentry relies on a biconic aeroshell for the hypersonic flight phase and a parafoil for the subsonic, terminal recovery phase. Nominal mission performance is between 1,150-1,800 lbs of payload into a 100 nmi circular orbit.

  2. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt, Frustum and Nose Cap mated assembly undergoing final preparations in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the electrical, data, telemetry and safety systems terminal which connects to the Aft Skirt Assembly systems via the Systems Tunnel that runs the length of the Rocket Motor. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  4. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Forward Skirt sitting on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center while being prepared for mating with the Frustum-Nose Cap Assembly and the Forward Rocket Motor Segment. The prominent feature in this view is the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting which mates up with the Forward Thrust Attach Fitting of the External Tank (ET) at the ends of the SRB Beam that runs through the ET's Inter Tank Assembly. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Nose Caps mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as they are being prepared for attachment to the SRB Frustum. The Nose Cap contains the Pilot and Drogue Chutes that are deployed prior to the main chutes as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Lithium cell tests at Marshall Space Flight Center. [batteries for range safety and frustrum location aid in the shuttle solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschal, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Three 18 AH Li-CF batteries with a polypropylene separator and using dimethyl sulfite in Li as F6 for the electrolyte will be placed in each shuttle solid rocket booster for range safety and frustrum location aid. Mechanical vibration, acceleration, random and design vibration, and discharge evaluation tests are discussed.

  7. Electron cloud in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Simulations of the Fermilab Booster reveal a substantial electron-cloud buildup both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, when the second-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is discussed.

  8. Officials Stand Before Mercury-Redstone Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This photograph shows a group of officials standing before a Mercury-Redstone booster at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Among those in the photograph are astronauts James Lovell, Walter Schirra, and Gus Grissom. Also pictured is Joachim Kuettner who managed responsibilities of MSFC's Mercury-Redstone program.

  9. Solid Rocket Booster Structural Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The structural test article to be used in the solid rocket booster (SRB) structural and load verification tests is being assembled in a high bay building of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment.

  10. Superconducting racetrack booster for the ion complex of MEIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Yu; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kovalenko, A.; Derbenev, Ya S.; Lin, F.; Morozov, V. S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-02-01

    The current design of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) project at Jefferson lab features a single 8 GeV/c figure-8 booster based on super-ferric magnets. Reducing the circumference of the booster by switching to a racetrack design may improve its performance by limiting the space charge effect and lower its cost. We consider problems of preserving proton and deuteron polarizations in a superconducting racetrack booster. We show that using magnets based on hollow high-current NbTi composite superconducting cable similar to those designed at JINR for the Nuclotron guarantees preservation of the ion polarization in a racetrack booster up to 8 GeV/c. The booster operation cycle would be a few seconds that would improve the operating efficiency of the MEIC ion complex.

  11. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  12. Closeup view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Frustum mounted on ground support equipment in the Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center as it is being prepared to be mated with the Nose Cap and Forward Skirt. The Frustum contains the three Main Parachutes, Altitude Switches and forward booster Separation Motors. The Separation Motors burn for one second to ensure the SRBs drift away from the External Tank and Orbiter at separation. The three main parachutes are deployed to reduce speed as the SRBs descend to a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean where they are recovered refurbished and reused. In this view the assembly is rotated so that the four Separation Motors are in view and aligned with the approximate centerline of the image. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Shuttle Liquid Fly Back Booster Configuration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, T. J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys the basic configuration options available to a Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB), integrated with the Space Shuttle system. The background of the development of the LFBB concept is given. The influence of the main booster engine (BME) installations and the Fly Back Engine (FBE) installation on the aerodynamic configurations are also discussed. Limits on the LFBB configuration design space imposed by the existing Shuttle flight and ground elements are also described. The objective of the paper is to put the constrains and design space for an LFBB in perspective. The object of the work is to define LFBB configurations that significantly improve safety, operability, reliability and performance of the Shuttle system and dramatically lower operations costs.

  14. Shuttle Liquid Fly Back Booster Configuration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, Thomas J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys the basic configuration options available to a Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB), integrated with the Space Shuttle system. The background of the development of the LFBB concept is given. The influence of the main booster engine (BME) installations and the fly back engine (FBE) installation on the aerodynamic configurations are also discussed. Limits on the LFBB configuration design space imposed by the existing Shuttle flight and ground elements are also described. The objective of the paper is to put the constrains and design space for an LFBB in perspective. The object of the work is to define LFBB configurations that significantly improve safety, operability, reliability and performance of the Shuttle system and dramatically lower operations costs.

  15. 39. VIEW OF CHRYSLER WORKERS LOADING A SATURN IB BOOSTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. VIEW OF CHRYSLER WORKERS LOADING A SATURN IB BOOSTER INTO THE EAST POSITION ON THE STATIC TEST TOWER. AS THE MAIN CONTRACTOR OF THE SATURN IB BOOSTER, CHRYSLER TOOK OVER OPERATIONS OF THE EAST POSITION OF THE STATIC TEST TOWER IN 1963. THAT SAME YEAR, THE WEST POSITION OF THE TEST TOWER WAS MODIFIED (AS SEEN IN THE PHOTO) FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TESTS OF THE SATURN V BOOSTER'S ENGINE, THE F-1. MARCH 1963, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. X-43A hypersonic research aircraft mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. FIRST X-43A MATED TO BOOSTER -- The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Mating of the X-43A and its specially-designed adapter to the first stage of the booster rocket marks a major milestone in the Hyper-X hypersonic research program. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., for NASA. The booster, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va., will accelerate the X-43A after the X-43A booster 'stack' is air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership. The X-43A will separate from the rocket at a predetermined altitude and speed and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it impacts into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10 (seven and 10 times the speed of sound respectively) with the first tentatively scheduled for early summer of 2001. The X-43A is powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine, and will use the underbody of the aircraft to form critical elements of the engine. The forebody shape helps compress the intake airflow, while the aft section acts as a nozzle to direct thrust. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by an air-breathing scramjet engine.

  17. Solid rocket booster water impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1982-01-01

    Water impact drop tests were performed on the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB). Peak water impact pressures and pressure/time traces were measured for various impact velocities using a two-dimensional, full-scale SRB aft skirt internal ring model. Passive burst disc-type pressure transducers were calibrated for use on flight SRB's. The effects on impact pressure of small ring configuration changes and application of thermal protection system cork layers were found to be negligible.

  18. Closeup view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of the External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters at the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Center. Note the Hydrogen Vent Arm extending out from the Fixed Service Structure at attached to the Intertank segment of the External Tank. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  19. Test Report for MSFC Test No. 83-2: Pressure scaled water impact test of a 12.5 inch diameter model of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster filament wound case and external TVC PCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Water impact tests using a 12.5 inch diameter model representing a 8.56 percent scale of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster configuration were conducted. The two primary objectives of this SRB scale model water impact test program were: 1. Obtain cavity collapse applied pressure distributions for the 8.56 percent rigid body scale model FWC pressure magnitudes as a function of full-scale initial impact conditions at vertical velocities from 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities from 0 to 45 ft/sec, and angles from -10 to +10 degrees. 2. Obtain rigid body applied pressures on the TVC pod and aft skirt internal stiffener rings at initial impact and cavity collapse loading events. In addition, nozzle loads were measured. Full scale vertical velocities of 65 to 85 ft/sec, horizontal velocities of 0 to 45 ft/sec, and impact angles from -10 to +10 degrees simulated.

  20. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A close-up of an experimental drag chute deploying in a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover

  1. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A rear view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  2. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An aerial view of NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploying an experimental drag chute just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid

  3. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An experimental drag chute deploys amidst a cloud of dust behind NASA's B-52 research aircraft just after landing on Rogers Dry Lake, adjacent to the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space

  4. B-52 Testing Developmental Space Shuttle Drag Chute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's B-52 research aircraft deploys an experimental drag chute just after landing the runway at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. The B-52's tests led to the development of a drag chute to help the Space Shuttle land more safely and easily. NASA B-52, Tail Number 008, is an air launch carrier aircraft, 'mothership,' as well as a research aircraft platform that has been used on a variety of research projects. The aircraft, a 'B' model built in 1952 and first flown on June 11, 1955, is the oldest B-52 in flying status and has been used on some of the most significant research projects in aerospace history. Some of the significant projects supported by B-52 008 include the X-15, the lifting bodies, HiMAT (highly maneuverable aircraft technology), Pegasus, validation of parachute systems developed for the space shuttle program (solid-rocket-booster recovery system and the orbiter drag chute system), and the X-38. The B-52 served as the launch vehicle on 106 X-15 flights and flew a total of 159 captive-carry and launch missions in support of that program from June 1959 to October 1968. Information gained from the highly successful X-15 program contributed to the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo human spaceflight programs as well as space shuttle development. Between 1966 and 1975, the B-52 served as the launch aircraft for 127 of the 144 wingless lifting body flights. In the 1970s and 1980s, the B-52 was the launch aircraft for several aircraft at what is now the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, to study spin-stall, high-angle-of attack, and maneuvering characteristics. These included the 3/8-scale F-15/spin research vehicle (SRV), the HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) research vehicle, and the DAST (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing). The aircraft supported the development of parachute recovery systems used to recover the space shuttle solid rocket booster casings. It also

  5. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  6. Counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniz, Thomas Ory (Inventor); Orlando, Robert Joseph (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A counterrotatable booster compressor assembly for a gas turbine engine having a counterrotatable fan section with a first fan blade row connected to a first drive shaft and a second fan blade row axially spaced from the first fan blade row and connected to a second drive shaft, the counterrotatable booster compressor assembly including a first compressor blade row connected to the first drive shaft and a second compressor blade row interdigitated with the first compressor blade row and connected to the second drive shaft. A portion of each fan blade of the second fan blade row extends through a flowpath of the counterrotatable booster compressor so as to function as a compressor blade in the second compressor blade row. The counterrotatable booster compressor further includes a first platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a first location so as to form an inner flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor and a second platform member integral with each fan blade of the second fan blade row at a second location so as to form an outer flowpath for the counterrotatable booster compressor.

  7. A study of two statistical methods as applied to shuttle solid rocket booster expenditures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.; Huang, Y.; Graves, M.

    1974-01-01

    The state probability technique and the Monte Carlo technique are applied to finding shuttle solid rocket booster expenditure statistics. For a given attrition rate per launch, the probable number of boosters needed for a given mission of 440 launches is calculated. Several cases are considered, including the elimination of the booster after a maximum of 20 consecutive launches. Also considered is the case where the booster is composed of replaceable components with independent attrition rates. A simple cost analysis is carried out to indicate the number of boosters to build initially, depending on booster costs. Two statistical methods were applied in the analysis: (1) state probability method which consists of defining an appropriate state space for the outcome of the random trials, and (2) model simulation method or the Monte Carlo technique. It was found that the model simulation method was easier to formulate while the state probability method required less computing time and was more accurate.

  8. Feasibility of recovering a one million-pound booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toni, R. A.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of reusing spacecraft and launch vehicles is currently exemplified by the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the two recoverable and reusable solid rocket boosters (SRBs) which are part of its launch system. It is shown that it is possible to recover launch systems weighing as much as one million pounds at reasonable impact velocities using a hybrid parachute-retrorocket recovery system. The new Kevlar materials, which have a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than nylon materials, make it possible to recover a one-million-pound booster for a reasonable weight penalty. The selected input parameters to the parachute weight equation result in an accurate estimation of the current Space Shuttle solid rocket booster parachute recovery system.

  9. Brake power servo booster

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Shimamura, M.

    1988-04-19

    A brake power servo booster is described comprising: a power piston; a power piston return spring; at least two shells enclosing at least a portion of the power piston and defining a constant pressure chamber and a variable pressure chamber; a master cylinder for controlling the application of hydraulic pressure to a brake mechanism; an input shaft; a hollow cylindrical member integrally connected to the input shaft, a stopper member for limiting movement of the hollow cylindrical member in the second direction, a hollow output shaft integrally connected at one end thereof to the power piston; a connecting member integrally connected to the other end of the output shaft and slidably disposed inside the hollow cylindrical member, a valve member, a valve return spring for urging and valve member towards the first and second valve seats; and a key member provided between the connecting member and the hollow cylindrical member for allowing relative displacement between the connecting member and the hollow cylindrical member in the first and second directions within a predetermined range.

  10. New corrector system for the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, E.J.; Drennan, C.C.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lackey, J.R.; Makarov, A.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We present an ambitious ongoing project to build and install a new corrector system in the Fermilab 8 GeV Booster. The system consists of 48 corrector packages, each containing horizontal and vertical dipoles, normal and skew quadrupoles, and normal and skew sextupoles. Space limitations in the machine have motivated a unique design, which utilizes custom wound coils around a 12 pole laminated core. Each of the 288 discrete multipole elements in the system will have a dedicated power supply, the output current of which is controlled by an individual programmable ramp. This paper describes the physics considerations which drove the design, as well as issues in the control of the system.

  11. Multiturn injection of EBIS ions in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.

    2010-09-01

    4 rather than fewer turns is that this allows the beam to be distributed over a larger area of the Booster acceptance, thereby reducing the space charge force on the beam particles.

  12. Simulation of proton RF capture in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Khiari, F.Z.; Luccio, A.U.; Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    RF capture of the proton beam in the AGS Booster has been simulated with the longitudinal phase-space tracking code ESME. Results show that a capture in excess of 95% can be achieved with multiturn injection of a chopped beam.

  13. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  14. Observation and correction of resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Ahrens, L.; Glenn, J.W.; Lee, Y.Y.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.

    1993-06-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. Therefore, the beam is spread over may lower order resonance lines and the stopbands have to be corrected to minimize the amplitude growth by proper compensation of the driving harmonics resulting from random errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster, and the establishment of a favorable operating point at high intensity are discussed.

  15. Measured longitudinal beam impedance of booster gradient magnets

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp and Brian J. Fellenz

    2001-08-24

    The Booster gradient magnets have no vacuum pipe which forces the beam image current to flow along the laminated pole tips. Both D and F style magnets were measured with a stretched wire to determine the longitudinal beam impedance caused by these laminations. Results are compared to calculations done 30 years ago. The inductive part of the magnet impedance is interesting because it partially compensates for the negative inductance effects of space charge on the beam. An R/L circuit consisting of 37K{center_dot} in parallel with between 40 and 100uH is a reasonable approximation to the total impedance of Booster magnet laminations.

  16. Debris control design achievements of the booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stringent debris control requirements imposed on the design of the Space Shuttle booster separation motor are described along with the verification program implemented to ensure compliance with debris control objectives. The principal areas emphasized in the design and development of the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) relative to debris control were the propellant formulation and nozzle closures which protect the motors from aerodynamic heating and moisture. A description of the motor design requirements, the propellant formulation and verification program, and the nozzle closures design and verification are presented.

  17. Booster Synchrotron RF System Upgrade for SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghyun; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    Recent progress at the SPEAR3 includes the increase in stored current from 100 mA to 200 mA and top-off injection to allow beamlines to stay open during injection. Presently the booster injects 3.0 GeV beam to SPEAR3 three times a day. The stored beam decays to about 150 mA between the injections. The growing user demands are to increase the stored current to the design value of 500 mA, and to maintain it at a constant value within a percent or so. To achieve this goal the booster must inject once every few minutes. For improved injection efficiency, all RF systems at the linac, booster and SPEAR3 need to be phase-locked. The present booster RF system is basically a copy of the SPEAR2 RF system with 358.5 MHz and 40 kW peak RF power driving a 5-cell RF cavity for 1.0 MV gap voltage. These requirements entail a booster RF system upgrade to a scaled down version of the SPEAR3 RF system of 476.3 MHz with 1.2 MW cw klystron output power capabilities. We will analyze each subsystem option for their merits within budgetary and geometric space constraints. A substantial portion of the system will come from the decommissioned PEP-II RF stations.

  18. New pulsed orbit bump magnets for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Lackey, J.R.; Carson, J.A.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Makarov, A.; Prebys, E.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The beam from the Fermilab Linac is injected onto a bump in the closed orbit of the Booster Synchrotron where a carbon foil strips the electrons from the Linac's negative ion hydrogen beam. Although the Booster itself runs at 15 Hz, heat dissipation in the orbit bump magnets has been one limitation to the fraction of the cycles that can be used for beam. New 0.28 T pulsed dipole magnets have been constructed that will fit into the same space as the old ones, run at the full repetition rate of the Booster, and provide a larger bump to allow a cleaner injection orbit. The new magnets use a ferrite in the yoke rather than laminated steel.

  19. The Solid Rocket Booster Auxiliary Power Unit: Meeting the Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The thrust vector control systems of the solid rocket boosters are turbine-powered, electrically controlled hydraulic systems which function through hydraulic actuators to gimbal the nozzles of the solid rocket boosters and provide vehicle steering for the Space Shuttle. Turbine power for the thrust vector control systems is provided through hydrazine fueled auxiliary power units which drive the hydraulic pumps. The solid rocket booster auxiliary power unit resulted from trade studies which indicated significant advantages would result if an existing engine could be found to meet the program goal of 20 missions reusability and adapted to meet the seawater environments associated with ocean landings. During its maturation, the auxiliary power unit underwent many design iterations and provided its flight worthiness through full qualification programs both as a component and as part of the thrust vector control system. More significant, the auxiliary power unit has successfully completed six Shuttle missions.

  20. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  1. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  2. 78 FR 21555 - Signal Booster Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...In this document, the Federal Communications Commission (Commission) amends its rules concerning signal boosters for consumer and industrial use in effort to enhance wireless coverage for consumers, particularly in rural, underserved, and difficult-to-serve areas by broadening the availability of signal boosters while ensuring that boosters do not adversely affect wireless...

  3. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate signal boosters on channels listed in § 22.531...

  4. Single bunch instabilities of the RHIC booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.

    1986-02-01

    In this paper, we try to estimate the stability limits and impedances of the Brookhaven RHIC booster. Some important data on the booster are shown. From the stability limits and impedances, it is clear that the booster is safe against either fast microwave instabilities or slow mode-colliding single bunch instabilities. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Ocean recovery of Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junker, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Cost effective recovery of the expended Space-Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB) from the ocean will result in significant overall cost savings to the Space Shuttle Program. The ocean recovery mission begins with the dispatching of the recovery team to the predicted splashdown area. The SRBs, drogue parachutes and main parachutes must be tracked, located, retrieved, and transported to land where they will be refurbished and recycled for reuse. Trade studies to be conducted will consider the recovery mission requirements and weigh the advantages, disadvantages and costs of various candidate recovery systems. Major parameters effecting the selection of the final system will ensure that the system will meet overall objectives. Large- and small-scale SRB model testing has been conducted to establish characteristics of SRBs during water entry, floating free and under tow.

  6. Designing for solid rocket booster reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevins, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle Program has been designed to be recovered, refurbished, and reused up to 19 times on subsequent launches. The design modifications to the SRB to incorporate this capability include the addition of a parachute recovery system and minor structural modifications to the nose cone, forward skirt, aft skirt, and solid rocket motor structures for withstanding the water impact loading. In addition, the detail design of subsystem hardware requires careful attention to corrosion prevention and facility of refurbishment operations. A cost analysis comparing the reusable SRB with an expendable version shows a substantial reduction in Space Shuttle cost per flight is achieved with the reusable design approach.

  7. Placement Of O-Rings In Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Brief report proposes to modify placement of O-ring seals in joints of Solid Rocket Booster of Space Shuttle. Modified joint and seal essentially "inside-out" version of old joint and seal. O-rings placed between outer side of tang and clevis. Joint rotation pushes tang harder against O-rings, thereby making even tighter seal. Proposal derived from analysis of Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, attributed to failure of these O-ring seals.

  8. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques on a Hypalon Paint Coating for the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    White Hypalon paint is brush-applied as a moisture barrier coating over cork surfaces on each of the two Space Shuttle SRBs. Fine cracks have been observed in the Hypalon coating three times historically on laboratory witness panels, but never on flight hardware. Samples of the cracked and standard ("good") Hypalon were removed from witness panel cork surfaces, and were tested in 1998 by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), TMA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) thermal analysis techniques. The TGA data showed that at 700C, where only paint pigment solids remain, the cracked material had about 9 weight percent more material remaining than the standard material, probably indicating incomplete mixing of the paint before it was brush-applied to produce the cracked material. Use of the TMA film/fiber technique showed that the average modulus (stiffness) vs. temperature was about 3 to 6 times higher for the cracked material than for the standard material. The TMA data also showed that an increase in coating thickness for the cracked Hypalon was not a factor in the anomaly.

  9. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques on a Hypalon Paint Coating for the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    White Hypalon paint is brush-applied as a moisture barrier coating over cork surfaces on each of the two Space Shuttle SRBS. Fine cracks have been observed in the Hypalon coating three times historically on laboratory witness panels, but never on flight hardware. Recent samples of the cracked and standard ("good") Hypalon were removed from cork surfaces and were tested by Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Thermomechanical (TMA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) thermal analysis techniques. The TGA data showed that at 700 C, where only paint pigment solids remain, the cracked material had about 9 weight percent more material remaining than the standard material, probably indicating incomplete mixing of the paint before it was brush-applied to produce the cracked material. Use of the TMA film tension method showed that the average static modulus vs. temperature was about 3 to 6 times higher for the cracked material than for the standard material, indicating a much higher stiffness for the cracked Hypalon. The TMA data also showed than an increased coating thickness for the cracked Hypalon was not a factor in the anomaly.

  10. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket nestled under the wi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket are nestled under the wing of NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft during pre-flight systems testing at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  11. Ares I First Stage Booster Deceleration System: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ron; Hengel, John E.; Wolf, Dean

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the Congressional NASA Authorization Act enacted a new space exploration program, the "Vision for Space Exploratien". The Constellation Program was formed to oversee the implementation of this new mission. With an intent not simply to support the International Space Station, but to build a permanent outpost on the Moon and then travel on to explore ever more distant terrains, the Constellation Program is supervising the development of a brand new fleet of launch vehicles, the Ares. The Ares lineup will include two new launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. A crew exploration vehicle, Orion, will be launched on the Ares I. It will be capable of docking with the Space Station, the lunar lander, Altair, and the Earth Departure Stage of Ares V. The Ares V will be capable of lifting both large-scale hardware and the Altair into space. The Ares First Stage Team is tasked with developing the propulsion system necessary to liftoff from the Earth and loft the entire Ares vehicle stack toward low Earth orbit. The Ares I First Stage booster is a 12-foot diameter, five-segment, reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle's four segment reusable solid rocket booster (SRB). It is separated from the Upper Stage through the use of a Deceleration Subsystem (DSS). Booster Tumble Motors are used to induce the pitch tumble following separation from the Upper Stage. The spent Ares I booster must be recoverable using a parachute deceleration system similar to that of the Shuttle SRB heritage system. Since Ares I is much heavier and reenters the Earth's atmosphere from a higher altitude at a much higher velocity than the SRB, all of the parachutes must be redesigned to reliably meet the operational requisites of the new launch vehicles. This paper presents an overview of this new booster deceleration system. It includes comprehensive detail of the parachute deceleration system, its design and deployment sequences

  12. Analysis of quasi-hybrid solid rocket booster concepts for advanced earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Rapp, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quasi-hybrid solid rocket boosters for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. Thermochemical calculations were conducted to determine the effect of liquid hydrogen addition, solids composition change plus liquid hydrogen addition, and the addition of an aluminum/liquid hydrogen slurry on the theoretical performance of a PBAN solid propellant rocket. The space shuttle solid rocket booster was used as a reference point. All three quasi-hybrid systems theoretically offer higher specific impulse when compared with the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. However, based on operational and safety considerations, the quasi-hybrid rocket is not a practical choice for near-term Earth-to-orbit booster applications. Safety and technology issues pertinent to quasi-hybrid rocket systems are discussed.

  13. Review of superconducting booster linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, D. W.

    1993-04-01

    Several superconducting boosters have been built and more are planned or under construction. These all use a number of independently phased resonators to permit acceleration of a wide variety of ion masses. For heavy ions, vhf frequencies are involved, and operation of the superconductors at 4.3 K, the normal boiling point of He, is practical. (Because fundamental losses in superconductors depend on frequency, some electron accelerators using much higher frequencies require colder resonators.) For boosters the resonator technology has evolved toward the use of quarter wave resonators with straight loading arms. The superconducting material is either niobium or lead. The latter is deposited as a film on copper, while the former may be sheet metal, may be bonded to copper, or may be (in principle) applied as a film on copper. The trade-offs involved and the successes of the various techniques are discussed. The rf must be controlled accurately both with regard to amplitude and phase. Because of the high unloaded Q of the resonators, additional loading is provided at some temperature well above that of the superconductor, in order to increase the bandwidth to a manageable point. Most boosters provide active control of phase by shifting the driving phase, although at least one system uses a frequency switching technique. Cross talk between independent resonator control systems must be avoided. The cryogenic systems have evolved toward a system based on a large helium refrigerator using turbine expansion and providing gas cooling to heat shields. Conservative design provides excess capacity beyond the expected requirements of the accelerator. Cryogenic distribution must be done carefully to avoid losses, and the system should be designed with capacity to match that of anticipated upgrades of the refrigerator. Most boosters use an approximately periodic focusing system with radial phase advance near 90° per unit cell. At Legnaro, however, waist to waist focusing is

  14. Design and fabrication of a multi-element corrector magnet for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.; Drennan, C.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, David J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lackey, J.R.; Prebys, E.J.; Schlabach, P.; Velev, G.V.; Walbridge, D.G.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    A new package of six corrector elements has been designed to better control the beam position, tune, and chromaticity in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It incorporates both normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets. These new corrector magnets will be installed in the Fermilab Booster ring in place of old style corrector elements. A severe space restriction and rapid slew rate have posed special challenges. The magnet design, construction, and performance are presented.

  15. Atlas SOHO Booster and Centaur Erection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The launch vehicle for the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission is a two stage Atlas-IIAS (Atlas/Centaur). The Atlas, consists of a solid rocket booster stage powered by four Thiokol Castor IVA solid rocket boosters (SRB) and a core vehicle stage (booster and sustainer) powered by Rocketdyne MA-5A liquid propellant engines (RP-1 fuel and liquid oxygen). The multiple firing Centaur is powered by two Pratt and Whitney (RL10A-4) liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen engines with extendible nozzles. This video shows the erection of the Atlas booster and transportation (to 36-B launching pad) and erection of the Centaur.

  16. A Linac afterburner to supercharge the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M Ankenbrandt et al.

    2002-10-21

    A Linac Afterburner is proposed to raise the energy of the beam injected into the Femrilab Booster from 400 MeV to about 600 MeV, thereby alleviating the longitudinal and transverse space-charge effects at low energy that currently limit its performance. The primary motivation is to increase the integrated luminosity of the Tevatron Collider in Run II, but other future programs would also recap substantial benefits. The estimated cost is $23M.

  17. Analysis of emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Huang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2006-05-01

    Multi-particle simulations are performed to study emittance growth in the Fermilab Booster. Analysis shows that the source of vertical emittance growth comes mostly from random errors in skew quadrupoles in the presence of a strong transverse space-charge force. [1] Random errors in dipole rolls and the Montague resonance do contribute but to lesser extent. The effect of random errors in the quadrupoles is small because the betatron envelope tunes are reasonably far away from the half-integer stopband.

  18. IPNS enriched uranium booster target

    SciTech Connect

    Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Since startup in 1981, IPNS has operated on a fully depleted /sup 238/U target. With the booster as in the present system, high energy protons accelerated to 450 MeV by the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron are directed at the target and by mechanisms of spallation and fission of the uranium, produce fast neutrons. The neutrons from the target pass into adjacent moderator where they slow down to energies useful for spectroscopy. The target cooling systems and monitoring systems have operated very reliably and safely during this period. To provide higher neutron intensity, we have developed plans for an enriched uranium (booster) target. HETC-VIM calculations indicate that the target will produce approx.90 kW of heat, with a nominal x5 gain (k/sub eff/ = 0.80). The neutron beam intensity gain will be a factor of approx.3. Thermal-hydraulic and heat transport calculations indicate that approx.1/2 in. thick /sup 235/U discs are subject to about the same temperatures as the present /sup 238/U 1 in. thick discs. The coolant will be light demineralized water (H/sub 2/O) and the coolant flow rate must be doubled. The broadening of the fast neutron pulse width should not seriously affect the neutron scattering experiments. Delayed neutrons will appear at a level about 3% of the total (currently approx.0.5%). This may affect backgrounds in some experiments, so that we are assessing measures to control and correct for this (e.g., beam tube choppers). Safety analyses and neutronic calculations are nearing completion. Construction of the /sup 235/U discs at the ORNL Y-12 facility is scheduled to begin late 1985. The completion of the booster target and operation are scheduled for late 1986. No enriched uranium target assembly operating at the projected power level now exists in the world. This effort thus represents an important technological experiment as well as being a ''flux enhancer''.

  19. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  20. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Booster Main Engine Selection Criteria for the Liquid Fly-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Richard M.; Rothschild, William J.; Christensen, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Fly-Back Booster (LFBB) Program seeks to enhance the Space Shuttle system safety, performance and economy of operations through the use of an advanced, liquid propellant Booster Main Engine (BME). There are several viable BME candidates that could be suitable for this application. The objective of this study was to identify the key Criteria to be applied in selecting among these BME candidates. This study involved an assessment of influences on the overall LFBB utility due to variations in the candidate rocket-engines characteristics. This includes BME impacts on vehicle system weight, performance, design approaches, abort modes, margins of safety, engine-out operations, and maintenance and support concepts. Systems engineering analyses and trade studies were performed to identify the LFBB system level sensitivities to a wide variety of BME related parameters. This presentation summarizes these trade studies and the resulting findings of the LFBB design teams regarding the BME characteristics that most significantly affect the LFBB system. The resulting BME choice should offer the best combination of reliability, performance, reusability, robustness, cost, and risk for the LFBB program.

  2. Booster Main Engine Selection Criteria for the Liquid Fly-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Richard M.; Rothschild, William J.; Christensen, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Fly-Back Booster (LFBB) Program seeks to enhance the Space Shuttle system safety performance and economy of operations through the use of an advanced, liquid propellant Booster Main Engine (BME). There are several viable BME candidates that could be suitable for this application. The objective of this study was to identify the key criteria to be applied in selecting among these BME candidates. This study involved an assessment of influences on the overall LFBB utility due to variations in the candidate rocket engines' characteristics. This includes BME impacts on vehicle system weight, perfortnance,design approaches, abort modes, margins of safety, engine-out operations, and maintenance and support concepts. Systems engineering analyses and trade studies were performed to identify the LFBB system level sensitivities to a wide variety of BME related parameters. This presentation summarizes these trade studies and the resulting findings of the LFBB design teams regarding the BME characteristics that most significantly affect the LFBB system. The resulting BME choice should offer the best combination of reliability, performance, reusability, robustness, cost, and risk for the LFBB program.

  3. Space shuttle phase B. Volume 2: Technical summary, addendum A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to analyze the characteristics and performance data for the booster vehicles to be used with the space shuttle operations. It was determined that the single pressure-fed booster offered the lowest program cost per flight of the pressure-fed booster arrangements studied. The fly back booster required the highest peak annual funding and highest program cost. It was recommended that the pressure-fed booster, series burn with liquid oxygen phase, be continued for further study. The flyback booster study was discontinued. Both solid and liquid propelled booster vehicles with 14 by 45 foot and 15 by 60 foot payload orbiters were considered.

  4. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION MONITOR FOR NSLS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    PINAYEV, I.; SHAFTAN, T.

    2005-11-04

    NSLS booster diagnostics consisted of tune measurement system, system for turn-by-turn measurement on the electron beam, and beam intensity monitor, which is not absolutely calibrated. We present design and implementation of synchrotron light monitor for the booster, which expands diagnostics capabilities. The system allows to measure an orbit, beam sizes and coupling of the electron beam along the ramp.

  5. 47 CFR 22.527 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal boosters. 22.527 Section 22.527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.527 Signal boosters. Licensees may install and operate...

  6. BOOSTER CHLORINATION FOR MANAGING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster chlorination is an approach to residual maintenance in which chlorine is applied at strategic locations within the distribution system. Situations in which booster chlorination may be most effective for maintaining a residual are explained informally in the context of a ...

  7. 47 CFR 20.21 - Signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... connection to the phone). (D) Power Limits. A booster's uplink power must not exceed 1 watt composite... at a level of +25 dBm per channel (assume a small, lightly loaded cell) and measuring the total... commercial mobile radio service system may operate a Consumer Signal Booster for personal use under...

  8. Atlas Centaur Rocket With Reusable Booster Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed modification of Atlas Centaur enables reuse of booster engines. Includes replacement of current booster engines with engine of new design in which hydrogen used for both cooling and generation of power. Use of hydrogen in new engine eliminates coking and clogging and improves performance significantly. Primary advantages: reduction of cost; increased reliability; and increased payload.

  9. Booster's coupled bunch damper upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Pellico and D. W. Wildman

    2003-08-14

    A new narrowband active damping system for longitudinal coupled bunch (CB) modes in the Fermilab Booster has recently been installed and tested. In the past, the Booster active damper system consisted of four independent front-ends. The summed output was distributed to the 18, h=84 RF accelerating cavities via the RF fan-out system. There were several problems using the normal fan-out system to deliver the longitudinal feedback RF. The high power RF amplifiers normally operate from 37 MHz to 53 MHz whereas the dampers operate around 83MHz. Daily variations in the tuning of the RF stations created tuning problems for the longitudinal damper system. The solution was to build a dedicated narrowband, Q {approx} 10, 83MHz cavity powered with a new 3.5kW solid-state amplifier. The cavity was installed in June 2002 and testing of the amplifier and damper front-end began in August 2002. A significant improvement has been made in both operational stability and high intensity beam damping. At present there are five CB modes being damped and a sixth mode module is being built. The new damper hardware is described and data showing the suppression of the coupled-bunch motion at high intensity is presented.

  10. Solid rocket booster retrieval operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Solid Rocket Booster Retrieval operations are discussed in detail. The recovery of expended boosters and associated hardware without damage attributable to retrieval procedures is the main goal. The retrieval force consists tof ship's personnel and retrieval team members, each of whom has been trained and is highly skilled in multi-faceted operations. The retrieval force is equipped with two specially-built, highly maneuverable ships outfitted with parachute reels, retrieval cranes, towing winches, large volume-low pressure air compressors, SCUBA diving gear, inflatable boats with outboard motors and diver-operated SRB dewatering devices. The two ships are deployed in sufficient time to conduct an electronic and visual search of the impact area prior to launch. Upon search completeion, each ship takes station a safe distance from the predetermined impact point initiating both visual and electronic search in the direction of flight path, ensuring SRB acquisition at splashdown. When safe, the ships enter the impact area and commence recovery of all floating flight hardware which is subsequently returned to the Disassembly Facility for refurbishment and reuse. Retrieval techniques have evolved in parallel with equipment and flight hardware configuration changes. Additional changes have been initiated to improve personnel safety.

  11. Liquid Rocket Booster Study. Volume 2, Book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The recommended Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) concept is shown which uses a common main engine with the Advanced Launch System (ALS) which burns LO2 and LH2. The central rationale is based on the belief that the U.S. can only afford one big new rocket engine development in the 1990's. A LO2/LH2 engine in the half million pound thrust class could satisfy STS LRB, ALS, and Shuttle C (instead of SSMEs). Development costs and higher production rates can be shared by NASA and USAF. If the ALS program does not occur, the LO2/RP-1 propellants would produce slight lower costs for and STS LRB. When the planned Booster Engine portion of the Civil Space Transportation Initiatives has provided data on large pressure fed LO2/RP-1 engines, then the choice should be reevaluated.

  12. Design optimization of gas generator hybrid propulsion boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight U.; Fink, Lawrence E.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a contract study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specified optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  13. Design Optimization of Gas Generator Hybrid Propulsion Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Phillips, Dwight; Fink, Larry

    1990-01-01

    A methodology used in support of a study for NASA/MSFC to optimize the design of gas generator hybrid propulsion booster for uprating the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) is presented. The objective was to compare alternative configurations for this booster approach, optimizing each candidate concept on different bases, in order to develop data for a trade table on which a final decision was based. The methodology is capable of processing a large number of independent and dependent variables, adjusting the overall subsystems characteristics to arrive at a best compromise integrated design to meet various specific optimization criteria subject to selected constraints. For each system considered, a detailed weight statement was generated along with preliminary cost and reliability estimates.

  14. Ignition Transients of Large Segmented Solid Rocket Boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.

    1976-01-01

    A model is described which provides a means for analyzing the complexities of ignition transients and pressure peaks of large, high performance, segmented solid rocket boosters. The method accounts for: (1) temporal and spatial development of the flow field set up by the head end igniter discharge, (2) ignition and flame spreading coupled to chamber flow, (3) the steep velocity, pressure, and temperature gradients that occur during the early phases of ignition, and (4) the interactions that produce ignition spikes (i.e., compression of chamber gases during pressurization, erosive burning, and mass added effect of igniter discharge). The technique differs from earlier models in that the flow interactions between the slots and main chamber are accounted for, and the original computer program for monolithic motors is improved. The procedures were used to predict the ignition transients of the current design for the space shuttle booster.

  15. Liquid Rocket Booster Integration Study. Volume 2: Study synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the study summary of the five volume series.

  16. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the executive summary of the five volume series.

  17. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 5, part 1: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is the appendices of the five volume series.

  18. Effects of atmospheric models on space shuttle trajectories and aerodynamic heating.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, O. E.; Redus, J. R.; Forney, J. A.; Dash, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the respective contributions from the atmospheric physicist, trajectory analyst, and aerothermodynamist to the design problem underlying the selection of the space-shuttle booster mode to be developed, i.e., either expendable booster, recoverable booster, or flyback booster, and the configuration and composite configuration. The interrelationships between atmospheric variables, trajectory parameters, and aerodynamic heating loads are discussed.

  19. Survey of Advanced Booster Options for Potential Shuttle Derivative Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L.; Ryan, Richard; Threet, Ed; Kennedy, James W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A never-ending major goal for the Space Shuttle program is to continually improve flight safety, as long as this launch system remains in operational service. One of the options to improve system safety and to enhance vehicle performance as well, that has been seriously studied over the past several decades, is to replace the existing strap-on four segment solid rocket boosters (SRB's) with more capable units. A number of booster upgrade options have been studied in some detail, ranging from five segment solids through hybrids and a wide variety of liquid strap-ons (both pressure and pump fed with various propellants); all the way to a completely reusable liquid fly back booster (complete with air breathing engines for controlled landing and return). All of these possibilities appear to offer improvements in varying degrees; and each has their strengths and weaknesses from both programmatic and technical points of view. The most beneficial booster upgrade/design, if the shuttle program were to continue long enough to justify the required investment, would be an approach that greatly increased both vehicle and crew safety. This would be accomplished by increasing the minimum range/minimum altitude envelope that would readily allow abort to orbit (ATO), possibly even to zero/zero, and possibly reduce or eliminate the Return to Launch Site (RTLS) and even the Trans Atlantic Landing (TAL) abort mode requirements. This paper will briefly survey and discuss all of the various booster'upgrade options studied previously, and compare their relative attributes. The survey will explicitly discuss, in summary comparative form, options that include: five segment solids; several hybrid possibilities; pressure and/or pump-fed liquids using either LO2/kerosene, H2O/kerosene and LO2/J2, any of which could be either fully expendable, partly or fully reusable; and finally a fully reusable liquid fly back booster system, with a number of propellant and propulsion system options

  20. Five-Segment Reusable Solid Rocket Booster Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvageau, Don

    1999-01-01

    The Five Segment Reusable Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) feasibility status is presented in viewgraph form. The Five Segment Booster (FSB) objective is to provide a low cost, low risk approach to increase reliability and safety of the Shuttle system. Topics include: booster upgrade requirements; design summary; reliability issues; booster trajectories; launch site assessment; and enhanced abort modes.

  1. Emittance dilution and halo creation during the first milliseconds after injection at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    During the past year, the Fermilab Booster has been pushed to record intensities in order to satisfy the needs of the Tevatron collider and neutrino programs. This high intensity makes the study of space-charge effects and halo formation highly relevant to optimizing Booster performance. We present measurements of beam width evolution, halo formation, and coherent tune shifts, emphasizing the experimental techniques used and the calibration of the measuring devices. We also use simulations utilizing the 3D space-charge code Synergia to study the physical origins of these effects.

  2. Booster Applications Facility report, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes studies and planning performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel at the request of NASA for the design, construction and operation of experimental areas and facilities for utilization of ion beams from the BNL Booster synchrotron particle accelerator. These facilities would be primarily utilized to simulate space radiation for radiobiological research, shielding studies and detector calibrations. The feasibility of such a project has been established, preliminary designs and cost estimates have been developed and a formal proposal can be submitted pending DOE concurrence. The main body of this report consists of the material presented by BNL during the meeting with a NASA appointed Panel on December 10 and 11, 1990. The individual speakers have provided brief summaries of their talks and explanations of their figures. In addition there are two appendices. One, contains detailed discussion of the shared mode of operation and the corresponding beam compatibility tables. The second appendix contains cost estimate details. An executive summary on budgets and schedules has been added, containing possible phased construction and outfitting scenarios and the corresponding expense and commitment profiles as well as new operational cost estimates. Material contained in the executive summary reflects the correction of some errors and new studies performed in response to the NASA Panel suggestions.

  3. Booster 6-GeV study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Pellico, William A.; Lackey, James; Padilla, Rene; Norem, J.; /Argonne

    2004-12-01

    Since a wider aperture has been obtained along the Booster beam line, this opens the opportunity for Booster running a higher intensity beam than ever before. Sooner or later, the available RF accelerating voltage will become a new limit for the beam intensity. Either by increasing the RFSUM or by reducing the accelerating rate can achieve the similar goal. The motivation for the 6-GeV study is to gain the relative accelerating voltage via a slower acceleration.

  4. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket mounted to NASA's NB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. One of the major goals of the Hyper-X program is flight validation of airframe-integrated, air-breathing propulsion system, which so far have only been tested in ground facilities, such as wind tunnels. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds above Mach 5 (five times the speed of sound). The X-43A design uses the underbody of the aircraft to form critical elements of the engine. The forebody shape helps compress the intake airflow, while the aft section acts as a nozzle to direct thrust. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va., will accelerate the X-43A after the X-43A/booster 'stack' is air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership. The X-43A will separate from the rocket at a predetermined altitude and speed and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  5. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle is lowered into the waters of the Atlantic during a test of a new booster retrieval method. A one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  6. Survey and alignment of the Fermilab Booster Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Kyle, John; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab Booster is a fast-cycling synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400 MeV to 8 GeV of kinetic energy for injection into the Main Injector and for use by all of the Lab's physics programs. The Booster was originally built in 1970. In 2004, as part of the Booster upgrade, a decision was made to upgrade the Booster survey network by densification with monuments and to survey the main Booster components using modern survey and alignment instruments. This paper discusses the survey and alignment methodology employed for the Booster Accelerator upgrade.

  7. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem verification test (V-2) report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the verification testing sequence V-2 performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. A detailed history of the hot firings plus additional discussion of the auxiliary power unit and the hydraulic component performance is presented. The test objectives, data, and conclusions are included.

  8. Simulation of a programmed frequency shift near extraction from the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.; Kerns, Q.

    1987-03-01

    The longitudinal phase space program ESME has been used to simulate the effects of a linear shift in RF frequency away from that appropriate for the accelerator guide field. This shift takes place in the new Booster low level RF and is used to position the particle bunches in Main Ring buckets in a reproducible fashion. Shifts in frequency are found to generate synchrotron oscillations; however, the simulations show that these can be reduced to acceptable levels by introduction of jumps in RF phase preceding the programmed frequency changes. Lowering the RF voltage near extraction from the Booster, a desirable operational feature, has also been investigated.

  9. Development and evaluation of an ablative closeout material for solid rocket booster thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    A trowellable closeout/repair material designated as MTA-2 was developed and evaluated for use on the Solid Rocket Booster. This material is composed of an epoxy-polysulfide binder and is highly filled with phenolic microballoons for density control and ablative performance. Mechanical property testing and thermal testing were performed in a wind tunnel to simulate the combined Solid Rocket Booster trajectory aeroshear and heating environments. The material is characterized by excellent thermal performance and was used extensively on the Space Shuttle STS-1 and STS-2 flight hardware.

  10. Hybrid boosters for future launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargies, E.; Lo, R. E.

    There is a striking similarity in the design of the US Space Transportation System, the European ARI-ANE 5P and the Japanese II-II: they all use a high energy cryogenic core stage along with two large solid propellant rocket boosters (SRB's) in order to provide for a high lift-off thrust level. Prior to last years disasters with Challenger and Titan it was widely held that SRB's were cheap, uncomplicated and safe. Even before the revelation by these accidents of severe safety hazards, shuttle operations demonstrated that the SRB's were by no means as cheap as reusable systems ought to be. In addition, they became known as sources of considerable environmental pollution. In contrast, hybrid rocket propulsion systems offer the following potential advantages: • much higher savety level (TNT equivalent almost zero, shut-down capability in case of ignition failure of one unit, inert against unbonding) • choice of non-toxic propellant combinations • equal or higher specific performance For these reasons, system analysis were carried out to examine hybrids as potential alternative to SRB's. Various analytical tools (mass- and performance models, trajectory simulation etc.) were developed for parametrical studies of hybrid propulsion systems. Special attention was devoted to the well-known primary concern of hybrids: geometrical design of the solid fuel grain and regression rate of the ablating surface. Experimental data were used as input wherever possible. In 1985 first studies were carried out to find possible fields of application for hybrid rocket engines. A mass model and a performance model for hybrid rocket motors were developed, taking into account the peculiarities of hybrid combustion as there are i.e. low regression rate and shifting mixture ratio during operation. After some analytical work was done, hybrids proved to be a promising alternative to SRB's. Compared with solids, hybrids offer many advantages.

  11. Hybrid booster strap-ons for the next generation launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittie, K. J.; McKinney, B.

    1993-06-01

    Currently, national planners are involved with the analysis and design of the Next Generation Launch Vehicle. During the latest studies of the proposed Spacelifter launch vehicle, a core vehicle was proposed that would utilize strap-on boosters to provide a wide range of payload capability into low Earth orbit. In such a scenario, a hybrid rocket motor provides a premier design option for the strap-on booster due to the hybrid's inherent safety, operational flexibility and low-cost. This paper describes the features of the hybrid motor that make it the choice for the next generation space boosters. Strap-on booster designs are presented that meet the mission goals of 20,000 to 50,000 pounds to low Earth orbit. A development plan is presented that provides a flight demonstration of a high-thrust large scale hybrid and allows scaling from the present state-of-the-art 250,000 pound thrust boosters to those needed for the next generation systems. A program schedule and rough order of magnitude cost data are presented.

  12. Summary of Booster Development and Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Elizabeth G.; Harry, Herbert H.; Hartline, Ernest L.; Hooks, Daniel E.; Johnson, Carl E.; Morris, John S.; Novak, Alan M.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Sanders, Victor E.; Scovel, Christina A.; Lorenz, Thomas; Wright, Mark; Botcher, Tod; Marx, Erin; Gibson, Kevin

    2012-06-21

    This report outlines booster development work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2007 to present. The booster is a critical link in the initiation train of explosive assemblies, from complex devices like nuclear weapons to conventional munitions. The booster bridges the gap from a small, relatively sensitive detonator to an insensitive, but massive, main charge. The movement throughout the explosives development community is to use more and more insensitive explosive components. With that, more energy is needed out of the booster. It has to initiate reliably, promptly, powerfully and safely. This report is divided into four sections. The first provides a summary of a collaborative effort between LANL, LLNL, and AWE to identify candidate materials and uniformly develop a testing plan for new boosters. Important parameters and the tests required to measure them were defined. The nature of the collaboration and the specific goals of the participating partners has changed over time, but the booster development plan stands on its own merit as a complete description of the test protocol necessary to compare and qualify booster materials, and is discussed in its entirety in this report. The second section describes a project, which began in 2009 with the Department of Defense to develop replacement booster formulations for PBXN-7. Replacement of PBXN-7 was necessary because it contained Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), which was becoming unavailable to the DoD and because it contained Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), which was sensitive and toxic. A LANL-developed explosive, Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF), was an important candidate. This project required any replacement formulation be a drop-in replacement in existing munitions. This project was timely, in that it made use of the collaborative booster development project, and had the additional constraint of matching shock sensitivity. Additionally it needed to be a safety improvement, and a performance

  13. Aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of TBC shuttle booster AR-11981-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, E. R.; Watts, L. L.; Ainsworth, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model of the Boeing Company space shuttle booster configuration 3 was tested in the MSFC 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel. This test was proposed to fill-in the original test run schedule as well as to investigate the aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of the booster with three wing configurations not previously tested. The configurations tested included: (1) a cylindrical booster body with an axisymmetric nose, (2) clipped delta canards that had variable incidence from 0 deg to -60 deg, (3) different aft body mounted wing configurations, (4) two vertical fin configurations, and (5) a Grumman G-3 orbiter configuration. Tests were conducted over a Mach range from 0.6 to 5.0.

  14. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 1: Engineering description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The space shuttle solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) is made up of analytical and functional simulation techniques linked together so that a single pass through the model will predict the performance of the propulsion elements of a space shuttle solid rocket booster. The available options allow the user to predict static test performance, predict nominal and off nominal flight performance, and reconstruct actual flight and static test performance. Options selected by the user are dependent on the data available. These can include data derived from theoretical analysis, small scale motor test data, large motor test data and motor configuration data. The user has several options for output format that include print, cards, tape and plots. Output includes all major performance parameters (Isp, thrust, flowrate, mass accounting and operating pressures) as a function of time as well as calculated single point performance data. The engineering description of SRB-II discusses the engineering and programming fundamentals used, the function of each module, and the limitations of each module.

  15. Viscoelastic propellant effects on Space Shuttle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.

    1981-01-01

    The program of solid propellant research performed in support of the space shuttle dynamics modeling effort is described. Stiffness, damping, and compressibility of the propellant and the effects of many variables on these properties are discussed. The relationship between the propellant and solid rocket booster dynamics during liftoff and boost flight conditions and the effects of booster vibration and propellant stiffness on free free solid rocket booster modes are described. Coupled modes of the shuttle system and the effect of propellant stiffness on the interfaces of the booster and the external tank are described. A finite shell model of the solid rocket booster was developed.

  16. 5. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  17. Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying highcapacity ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Interior of Deluge Water Booster Station displaying high-capacity electrically driven water pumps for fire fighting service - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Booster Station, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  19. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  20. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... narrowband channel that the booster is designed to amplify. Class B broadband signal boosters must meet the... equipment may cause to other systems. Normal co-channel transmissions will not be considered as...

  1. 6. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2 INTERIOR, FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2 INTERIOR, FACING WEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  2. 3. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1 INTERIOR, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1 INTERIOR, FACING EAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 2. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING NORTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING NORTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 4. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 2, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  5. 10. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  6. 9. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3 INTERIOR, FACING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3 INTERIOR, FACING NORTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  7. 1. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING SOUTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 1, FACING SOUTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  8. 12. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 INTERIOR, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 INTERIOR, FACING SOUTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  9. 7. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING NORTHWEST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING NORTHWEST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. 8. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 3, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. 11. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING SOUTHEAST Nevada ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4, FACING SOUTHEAST - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  12. 13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF BOOSTER STATION 4 CHLORINATOR INTERIOR, FACING NORTH - Nevada Test Site, Frenchman Flat Test Facility, Well Five Booster Stations, Intersection of 5-03 Road & Short Pole Line Road, Area 5, Frenchman Flat, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  13. Radiation issues in the Fermilab booster magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The demands of the Fermilab neutrino program will require the lab's 30+ year old 8 GeV Booster to deliver higher intensities than it ever has. Total proton throughput is limited by radiation damage and activation due to beam loss in the Booster tunnel. Of particular concern is the epoxy resin that acts as the insulation in the 96 combined function lattice magnets. This paper describes a simulation study to determine the integrated radiation dose to this epoxy and a discussion of the potential effects.

  14. Booster propulsion/vehicle impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, Vincent; Dunn, Michael; Fink, Lawrence; Phillips, Dwight; Wetzel, Eric

    1988-01-01

    The use of hydrogen RP-1, propane, and methane as fuels for booster engines of launch vehicles is discussed. An automated procedure for integrated launch vehicle, engine sizing, and design optimization was used to define two stage and single stage concepts for minimum dry weight. The two stage vehicles were unmanned and used a flyback booster and partially reusable orbiter. The single stage designs were fully reusable, manned flyback vehicles. Comparisons of these vehicle designs, showing the effects of using different fuels, as well as sensitivity and trending data, are presented. In addition, the automated design technique utilized for the study is described.

  15. Beam Diagnosis and Lattice Modeling of the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2005-09-01

    A realistic lattice model is a fundamental basis for the operation of a synchrotron. In this study various beam-based measurements, including orbit response matrix (ORM) and BPM turn-by-turn data are used to verify and calibrate the lattice model of the Fermilab Booster. In the ORM study, despite the strong correlation between the gradient parameters of adjacent magnets which prevents a full determination of the model parameters, an equivalent lattice model is obtained by imposing appropriate constraints. The fitted gradient errors of the focusing magnets are within the design tolerance and the results point to the orbit offsets in the sextupole field as the source of gradient errors. A new method, the independent component analysis (ICA) is introduced to analyze multiple BPM turn-by-turn data taken simultaneously around a synchrotron. This method makes use of the redundancy of the data and the time correlation of the source signals to isolate various components, such as betatron motion and synchrotron motion, from raw BPM data. By extracting clean coherent betatron motion from noisy data and separates out the betatron normal modes when there is linear coupling, the ICA method provides a convenient means to measure the beta functions and betatron phase advances. It also separates synchrotron motion from the BPM samples for dispersion function measurement. The ICA method has the capability to separate other perturbation signals and is robust over the contamination of bad BPMs. The application of the ICA method to the Booster has enabled the measurement of the linear lattice functions which are used to verify the existing lattice model. The transverse impedance and chromaticity are measured from turn-by-turn data using high precision tune measurements. Synchrotron motion is also observed in the BPM data. The emittance growth of the Booster is also studied by data taken with ion profile monitor (IPM). Sources of emittance growth are examined and an approach to cure

  16. Space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A space vehicle having an improved ascent configuration for use in traveling in space is presented. Components of the vehicle are: (1) a winged orbiter having an elongater fuselage and rearwardly directed main engines fixed to the fuselage; (2) an elongated tank assembly of an improved configuration disposed forwardly of the fuselage and connected with the main engines of the vehicle for supplying liquid propellants; and (3) a booster stage comprising a pair of integrated solid rocket boosters connected with the orbiter immediately beneath the fuselage and extended in substantial parallelism.

  17. What A Booster Club Can Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidinger, George

    This speech was presented at the 1976 American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation national convention by the principal of an Iowa high school. It discusses the development and effectiveness of the Jefferson High School Booster Club which was developed by an interested parent and has been quite successful. The club has assisted…

  18. Magnetic Booster Fast Ignition Macron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedwardt Winterberg

    2007-10-01

    Fast Impact ignition using the magnetic booster target concept is studied for isentropic compression and for thermonuclear micro-detonation. Fast ignition of a dense beam-magnetized cylindrical pure D target by multi-megampere GeV proton beams generated with a Super Marx Generator is studied. Shear flow stabilization of think cylindrical axial current confined DT detonation targets.

  19. Implementing radial motion to the booster simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    It's a puzzle that high intensity beams prefer a particular radial motion during transition in the Booster, and the result of removing such a radial motion is to increase the transition loss. In order to understand this observation, the radial motion should be taken into account in the longitudinal simulation.

  20. Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

  1. 78 FR 29062 - Signal Booster Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... FR 21555, April 11, 2013, a document in the Signal Boosters proceeding, WT Docket No. 10-4, which... 78 FR 21555, April 11, 2013 regarding certain FCC rules governing radiofrequency radiation exposure... Register of 78 FR 21555, April 11, 2013. This document does not change any of the other rule amendments...

  2. Analysis of the staging maneuver and booster glideback guidance for a two-stage, winged, fully reusable launch vehicle. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naftel, J. Christopher; Powell, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    One of the promising launch concepts that could replace the current space shuttle launch system is a two-stage, winged, vertical-takeoff, fully reusable launch vehicle. During the boost phase of ascent, the booster provides propellant for the orbiter engines through a cross-feed system. When the vehicle reaches a Mach number of 3, the booster propellants are depleted and the booster is staged and glides unpowered to a horizontal landing at a launch site runway. Two major design issues for this class of vehicle are the staging maneuver and the booster glideback. For the staging maneuver analysis, a technique was developed that provides for a successful separation of the booster from the orbiter over a wide range of staging angles of attack. A longitudinal flight control system was developed for control of the booster during the staging maneuver. For the booster glide back analysis, a guidance algorithm was developed that successfully guides the booster from the completion of the staging maneuver to a launch site runway while encountering many off-nominal atmospheric, aerodynamic, and staging conditions.

  3. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  4. Impedance simulation for LEReC booster cavity transformed from ERL gun cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2015-11-24

    Wake impedance induced energy spread is a concern for the low energy cooling electron beam. The impedance simulation of the booster cavity for the LEReC projection is presented in this report. The simulation is done for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. The space charge impedance in the first case is discussed. For impedance budget consideration of the electron machine, only simulation of the geometrical impedance in the latter case is necessary since space charge is considered separately.

  5. Commercial winged booster to launch satellites from B-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covault, Craig

    1988-06-01

    A newly developed commercial winged space booster, the Pegasus, which will launch satellites from a B-52, is described. The booster will be able to launch a 600 lb, 72 in long craft into a 250 nm equatorial orbit. The Pegasus is 49.2 ft long with a 22 ft wing span and a weight of 40,000 lb. The winged design allows for an angle of attack of 20 degrees and a supersonic lift over drag ratio of 4:1. It operates with three solid rocket motors and will be launched from a B-52 at an altitude of 40,000 ft. The first motor provides an average of 112,000 lbs of thrust for about 82 seconds; burnout occurs at 208,000 ft and Mach 8.7. The third stage provides 9,000 lbs of thrust for 65 seconds, accelerating the vehicle into 25,000 fps orbital velocity. The first launch will be a 400 lb relay satellite targeted for July 1989 over the Pacific Ocean. Future launches will be possible from any site and will cost 10 million dollars. The Pegasus can also carry a 1500 payload at high altitude Mach cruise flights that do not achieve orbit, providing data to validate spaceplane conceptual fluid dynamic codes generated by computer.

  6. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At left, a manipulator arm on a one-man submarine demonstrates its ability to cut tangled parachute riser lines and place a Diver Operator Plug (top right) inside a mock solid rocket booster nozzle (center). Known as DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  7. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  8. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Diver Operator Plug (DOP) is being pulled down into the ocean by a newly designed one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000. The activity is part of an operation to attach the plug to a mockup of a solid rocket booster nozzle. DeepWorker 2000 is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach the DOP to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  9. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    From the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships, a crane lowers a one-man submarine into the ocean near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Called DeepWorker 2000, the sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  10. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After a successful dive, the one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is lifted from Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla., onto the deck of the Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  11. Pressure-Equalizing Cradle for Booster Rocket Mounting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutan, Elbert L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A launch system and method improve the launch efficiency of a booster rocket and payload. A launch aircraft atop which the booster rocket is mounted in a cradle, is flown or towed to an elevation at which the booster rocket is released. The cradle provides for reduced structural requirements for the booster rocket by including a compressible layer, that may be provided by a plurality of gas or liquid-filled flexible chambers. The compressible layer contacts the booster rocket along most of the length of the booster rocket to distribute applied pressure, nearly eliminating bending loads. Distributing the pressure eliminates point loading conditions and bending moments that would otherwise be generated in the booster rocket structure during carrying. The chambers may be balloons distributed in rows and columns within the cradle or cylindrical chambers extending along a length of the cradle. The cradle may include a manifold communicating gas between chambers.

  12. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 3, appendices 2-5: PPIP, transition plan, AMOS plan, and environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This Preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PPIP) was used to examine the feasibility of replacing the current Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle with Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs). The need has determined the implications of integrating the LRB with the Space Transportation System as the earliest practical date. The purpose was to identify and define all elements required in a full scale development program for the LRB. This will be a reference guide for management of the LRB program, addressing such requirement as design and development, configuration management, performance measurement, manufacturing, product assurance and verification, launch operations, and mission operations support.

  13. Tune measurement in the NSLS booster synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.; Nawrocky, R.

    1993-07-01

    The NSLS booster synchrotron can accelerate an electron beam from approximately 80 to 750 MeV in 0.7 sec. The betatron tunes can change during acceleration by as much as 0.1 units, causing beam loss as they cross resonance lines. Precise measurements with a conventional swept spectrum analyzer have always been difficult because of the rapid variation of tune as the magnets are ramped. We are now using a system based on a Tektronix 3052 digital spectrum analyzer that can obtain a complete frequency spectrum over a 10 MHz bandwidth in 200 {mu}sec. Betatron oscillations are stimulated for the measurements by applying white noise to the beam through stripline electrodes. We will describe the instrumentation, our measurements of tune as a function time during the acceleration cycle, and the resulting improvements to the booster operation.

  14. Numerically controlled oscillator for the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.L.; Ducar, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    In order to improve the stability of the Fermilab Booster low level rf system, a numerically controlled oscillator system is being constructed. Although the system has not been implemented to date, the design is outlined in this paper. The heart of the new system consists of a numerically synthesized frequency generator manufactured by the Sciteq Company. The 3 Ghz/sec rate and 30 to 53 MHz range of the Booster frequency program required the design of a CAMAC based, fast-cycling (1 MHz), 65K X 32 bit, digital function generator. A 1 MHz digital adder and 12 bit analog to digital converter will be used to correct small program errors by phase locking the oscillator to the beam. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Development of Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A.

    2015-01-30

    The development of magnetic cogging is part of the Fermilab Booster upgrade within the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The Booster is going to send 2.25E17 protons/hour which is almost double the present flux, 1.4E17 protons/hour to the Main Injector (MI) and Recycler (RR). The extraction kicker gap has to synchronize to the MI and RR injection bucket in order to avoid a beam loss at the rising edge of the extraction and injection kickers. Magnetic cogging is able to control the revolution frequency and the position of the gap using the magnetic field from dipole correctors while radial position feedback keeps the beam at the central orbit. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss due to the orbit changes and reduce beam energy loss when the gap is created. The progress of the magnetic cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  16. The AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardullo, D.J.; Abola, A.; Beadle, E.R.; Smith, G.A.; Thomas, R.; Van Zwienen, W.; Warkentien, R.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    To accelerate both protons and heavy ions, the AGS Booster requires a broadband (multi-octave) beam position monitoring system with a dynamic range spanning several orders of magnitude (2 {times} 10{sup 10} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} particles per pulse). System requirements include the ability to acquire single turn trajectory and average orbit information with {plus minus} 0.1 mm resolution. The design goal of {plus minus} 0.5 mm corrected accuracy requires that the detectors have repeatable linear performance after periodic bakeout at 300 {degree}C. The system design and capabilities of the Booster Beam Position Monitor will be described, and initial results presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  17. An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.00548 scale model (model no. 486) of the space shuttle 146-inch diameter solid rocket booster at angels of attack from 113 deg to 180 deg in the AEDC PWT 4-foot transonic wind tunnel (SA16F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation (SA16F) was conducted in the AEDC PWT 4T to determine the entry static stability of a 0.00548 scale space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). The primary objective was to improve the definition of the aerodynamic characteristics in the angle of attack range beyond 90 deg in the vicinity of the entry trim point. The SRB scale model consisted of the reentry configuration with all major protuberances. A simulated heat shield around the engine nozzle was also included. Data were obtained for a 60 deg side mounted sting and a straight nose mounted sting. The angle of attack range for the side mounted sting was 113 deg to 147 deg and for the nose mounted sting 152 deg to 187 deg. The Mach number range consisted of 0.4 to 1.2 at roll angles of 0 and 90 deg. The resulting 6-component aerodynamic force data was presented as the variation of coefficients with angle of attack for each Mach number and roll angle.

  18. Results from the AGS Booster transverse damper

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, D.; Brennan, M.; Meth, M.; Roser, T.

    1993-01-01

    To reach the design intensity of 1.5 [times] 10[sup 13] protons per pulse in the AGS Booster, transverse coupled bunch instabilities with an estimated growth rate of 1500s[sup [minus]1] have to be dampened. A prototype transverse damper has been tested successfully using a one turn digital delay and closed orbit suppression implemented in a programmable gate array. An updated damper, which includes an algorithm to optimize damping for a changing betatron rune, will also be presented.

  19. Results from the AGS Booster transverse damper

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, D.; Brennan, M.; Meth, M.; Roser, T.

    1993-06-01

    To reach the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per pulse in the AGS Booster, transverse coupled bunch instabilities with an estimated growth rate of 1500s{sup {minus}1} have to be dampened. A prototype transverse damper has been tested successfully using a one turn digital delay and closed orbit suppression implemented in a programmable gate array. An updated damper, which includes an algorithm to optimize damping for a changing betatron rune, will also be presented.

  20. SNS RING STUDY AT THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS, L.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; FEDOTOV, A.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LUCCIO, A.; MALITSKY, N.; ROSER, T.; WENG, W.T.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.; REECE, K.; WANG, J.G.

    2000-06-30

    During the g-2 run at the BNL AGS in early 2000, a 200 MeV storage-ring-like magnetic cycle has been set-up and tuned at the Booster in preparing for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring study. In this article, we report the progress of the machine set-up, tuning, some preliminary studies, and the future plan.

  1. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  2. Engine protection system for recoverable rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jr., Jerry A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A rocket engine protection system for a recoverable rocket booster which is arranged to land in a salt water body in substantially a nose down attitude. The system includes an inflatable bag which is stowed on a portion of a flat annular rim of the aft skirt of the booster. The bag is hinged at opposing sides and is provided with springs that urge the bag open. The bag is latched in a stowed position during launch and prior to landing for recovery is unlatched to permit the bag to be urged open and into sealing engagement with the rim. A source of pressurized gas further inflates the bag and urges it into sealing engagement with the rim of the skirt where it is locked into position. The gas provides a positive pressure upon the interior of the bag to preclude entry of salt water into the skirt and into contact with the engine. A flotation arrangement may assist in precluding the skirt of the booster from becoming submerged.

  3. Momentum Cogging at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Drennan, C.; Pellico, W.A.; Triplett, K.; Waller, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Booster has an upgrade plan called the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The flux throughput goal is 2E17 protons/hour which, is almost double the present flux, 1.1E17 protons/hour. The beam loss in the machine is going to be an issue. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV and extracts to the Main Injector (MI). The current cogging process synchronizes the extraction kicker gap to the MI by changing radial position of the beam during the cycle. The gap creation occurs at about 700 MeV, which is about 6 ms into the cycle. The cycle-to-cycle variations of the Booster are larger at lower energy. However, changing the radial position at low energy for cogging is limited because of aperture. Momentum cogging is able to move the gap creation to an earlier time by using dipole correctors and radial position feedback, and is able to control the revolution frequency and radial position at the same time. The new cogging is expected to reduce beam loss and not be limited by aperture. The progress of the momentum cogging system development is going to be discussed in this paper.

  4. Performance and measurements of the AGS and Booster beams

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1996-06-01

    In May 1995, the AGS reached its upgrade intensity goal of 6{times}10{sup 13} ppp, the highest world intensity record for a proton synchrotron on a single pulse basis. At the same time, the Booster reached 2.2{times}10{sup 13} ppp surpassing the design goal of 1.5{times}10{sup 13} ppp due to the introduction of second harmonic cavity during injection. The critical accelerator manipulations, such as resonance stopband corrections, second harmonics cavity, direct rf feedback, gamma-transition jump, longitudinal phase space dilution, and transverse instability damping, will be described as well as some beam measurements. Possible future intensity and brightness upgrades will also be reported. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. StarBooster Demonstrator Cluster Configuration Analysis/Verification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeTurris, Dianne J.

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the flight dynamics of the cluster configuration of two first stage boosters and upper-stage, flight-testing of subsonic sub-scale models has been undertaken using two glideback boosters launched on a center upper-stage. Three high power rockets clustered together were built and flown to demonstrate vertical launch, separation and horizontal recovery of the boosters. Although the boosters fly to conventional aircraft landing, the centerstage comes down separately under its own parachute. The goal of the project has been to collect data during separation and flight for comparison with a six degree of freedom simulation. The configuration for the delta wing canard boosters comes from a design by Starcraft Boosters, Inc. The subscale rockets were constructed of foam covered in carbon or fiberglass and were launched with commercially available solid rocket motors. The first set of boosters built were 3-ft tall with a 4-ft tall centerstage, and two additional sets of boosters were made that were each over 5-ft tall with a 7.5 ft centerstage. The rocket cluster is launched vertically, then after motor bum out the boosters are separated and flown to a horizontal landing under radio-control. An on-board data acquisition system recorded data during both the launch and glide phases of flight.

  6. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem test report (D-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1978-01-01

    The results of the sequence of tests performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem are presented. The operational characteristics of the thrust vector control subsystem components, as determined from the tests, are discussed. Special analyses of fuel consumption, basic steady state characteristics, GN2 spin, and actuator displacement were reviewed which will aid in understanding the performance of the auxiliary power unit. The possibility of components malfunction is also discussed.

  7. REUSABLE PROPULSION ARCHITECTURE FOR SUSTAINABLE LOW-COST ACCESS TO SPACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph; Frame, Kyle L.; Dankanich, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Two transportation architecture changes are presented at either end of a conventional two-stage rocket flight: 1) Air launch using a large, conventional, pod hauler design (i.e., Crossbow)ans 2) Momentum exchange tether (i.e., an in-space asset like MXER). Air launch has ana analytically justified cost reduction of approx. 10%, but its intangible benefits suggest real-world operations cost reductions much higher: 1) Inherent launch safety; 2) Mission Risk Reduction; 3) Favorable payload/rocket limitations; and 4) Leveraging the aircraft for other uses (military transport, commercial cargo, public outreach activities, etc.)

  8. The low energy booster project status

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, G.W.

    1993-05-01

    In order to achieve the required injection momentum, the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has an accelerator chain comprised of a Linear Accelerator and three synchrotrons. The Low Energy Booster (LEB) is the first synchrotron in this chain. The LEB project has made significant progress in the development of major subsystems and conventional construction. This paper briefly reviews the performance requirements of the LEB and describes significant achievements in each of the major subsystem areas. Highlighted among these achievements are the LEB foreign collaborations with the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) located in Novosibirsk, Russia.

  9. Transition crossing simulation at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Pellico, W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The demand in high intensity and low emittance of the beam extracted from the Booster requires a better control over the momentum spread growth and bunch length shortening at transition crossing, in order to prevent beam loss and coupled bunch instability. Since the transition crossing involves both longitudinal and transverse dynamics, the recently modified 3-D STRUCT code provides an opportunity to numerically investigate the different transition crossing schemes in the machine environment, and apply the results of simulation to minimize the beam loss and emittance growth operationally.

  10. Credit BG. Northwest facade of Building 4504 (Deluge Water Booster ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Northwest facade of Building 4504 (Deluge Water Booster Station) is in view at left, with 500,000 gallon water tank (Building 4503) at right. Fenced electrical substation in view between the above structures is Building 4510. Building 4505 is in background - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Booster Station, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 47 CFR 22.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 22.9 Section 22.9 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Scope and Authority § 22.9 Operation of certificated signal boosters. Individuals and non-individuals may...

  12. Results from commissioning the AGS Booster orbit system

    SciTech Connect

    Bleser, E.

    1993-06-01

    This note reports results from the commissioning of three systems in the AGS Booster. The beam position monitor system, which works to a relative accuracy of 0.36 millimeters; the uncorrected Booster orbit, which has quite large excursions; and the passive eddy current correction system, which eliminates all but a few percent of the eddy current dipole effect.

  13. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed...

  14. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed...

  15. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operate this device. You MUST register Class B signal boosters (as defined in 47 CFR 90.219) online at www... initially adjust a signal booster. Distributed Antenna System (DAS). A network of spatially separated antenna nodes connected to a common source via a transport medium that provides wireless service within...

  16. 47 CFR 90.219 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operate this device. You MUST register Class B signal boosters (as defined in 47 CFR 90.219) online at www... initially adjust a signal booster. Distributed Antenna System (DAS). A network of spatially separated antenna nodes connected to a common source via a transport medium that provides wireless service within...

  17. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed...

  18. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed...

  19. 47 CFR 101.151 - Use of signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of signal boosters. 101.151 Section 101.151 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.151 Use of signal boosters. Private operational-fixed...

  20. Compensation of dogleg effect in Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaobiao Huang; Sho Ohnuma

    2003-10-06

    The edge focusing of dogleg magnets in Fermilab Booster has been causing severe distortion to the horizontal linear optics. The doglegs are vertical rectangular bends, therefore the vertical edge focusing is canceled by body focusing and the overall effect is focusing in the horizontal plane. The maximum horizontal beta function is changed from 33.7m to 46.9m and maximum dispersion from 3.19m to 6.14m. Beam size increases accordingly. This is believed to be one of the major reasons of beam loss. In this technote we demonstrate that this effect can be effectively corrected with Booster's quadrupole correctors in short straight sections (QS). There are 24 QS correctors which can alter horizontal linear optics with negligible perturbation to the vertical plane. The currents of correctors are determined by harmonic compensation, i.e., cancellation of dogleg's harmonics that are responsible for the distortion with that of QS correctors. By considering a few leading harmonics, the ideal lattice can be partly restored. For the current dogleg layout, maximum {beta}{sub x} is reduced to 40.6m and maximum D{sub x} is reduced to 4.19m. This scheme can be useful after the dogleg in section No.3 is repositioned. In this case it can bring {beta}{sub x} from 40.9m down to 37.7m, D{sub x} from 4.57m to 4.01m.

  1. A Method for Sizing Booster Charges in Pyrotechnic Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1998-01-01

    Since no generally accepted guidelines exist on sizing booster charges to assure functional margins in pyrotechnically actuated devices, a study was conducted to provide an approach to meet this need. An existing pyrovalve was modified from a single cartridge input to a dual-cartridge input with a booster charge. The objectives of this effort were to demonstrate an energy-based functional margin approach for sizing booster charges, and to determine booster charge energy delivery characteristics in this valve. Functional margin was demonstrated by determining the energy required to actuate the valve through weight drop tests for comparison to the energy delivered by the cartridge and booster charge in firings in the modified valve. The results of this study indicated that this energy-based approach fully met the study objectives, showing its usefulness for this and possibly other pyrotechnic devices.

  2. A new one-man submarine is tested as vehicle for solid rocket booster retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    - The one-man submarine known as DeepWorker 2000 is tested in Atlantic waters near Cape Canaveral, Fla. Nearby are divers; inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 will be used in a demonstration during retrieval operations after the upcoming STS-101 launch. The submarine pilot will demonstrate capabilities to cut tangled parachute riser lines using a manipulator arm and attach a Diver Operator Plug to extract water and provide flotation for the booster. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  3. CFD Assessment of Forward Booster Separation Motor Ignition Overpressure on ET XT 718 Ice/Frost Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejnil, Edward; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics assessment of the forward booster separation motor ignition over-pressure was performed on the space shuttle external tank X(sub T) 718 ice/frost ramp using the flow solver OVERFLOW. The main objective of this study was the investigation of the over-pressure during solid rocket booster separation and its affect on the local pressure and air-load environments. Delta pressure and plume impingement were investigated as a possible contributing factor to the cause of the debris loss on shuttle missions STS-125 and STS-127. A simplified computational model of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle was developed consisting of just the external tank and the solid rocket boosters with separation motor nozzles and plumes. The simplified model was validated by comparison to full fidelity computational model of the Space Shuttle without the separation motors. Quasi steady-state plume solutions were used to calibrate the thrust of the separation motors. Time-accurate simulations of the firing of the booster-separation motors were performed. Parametric studies of the time-step size and the number of sub-iterations were used to find the best converged solution. The computed solutions were compared to previous OVERFLOW steady-state runs of the separation motors with reaction control system jets and to ground test data. The results indicated that delta pressure from the overpressure was small and within design limits, and thus was unlikely to have contributed to the foam losses.

  4. Ariane 3 European launcher strap-on booster development, qualification and flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, M.; Vari, E.

    1985-07-01

    Ariane 3 is an improved version of the European Ariane launcher System obtained by adding two solid propellant Strap-on boosters. This modification increases the payload from 2175 Kg placed into geostationary transfer orbit. The Strap-on booster, loaded with 7,3 metric tons of solid propellant each and providing a maximum thrust of 730 KN, has been developed and qualified at SNIA BPD, Defence and Space Division, Colleferro, Italy. The program started in late 1979 and the first flight of the new Ariane 3 version took place successfully on 4 August 1984. This paper presents the configuration of the motor and describes the main steps of the design, development and qualification program. The first flight data are then compared with the qualification data.

  5. Exploring the Solid Rocket Boosters and Properties of Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Amy

    2007-01-01

    I worked for the United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) with the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Materials and Process engineers (M&P). I was assigned a project in which I needed to research and collect chemical and physical properties information, material safety data sheets (MSDS), and other product information from the vendor's websites and existing "inhouse" files for a select group of materials used in building and refurbishing the SRBs. This information was then compiled in a report that summarized the information collected. My work site was at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This allowed for many opportunities to visit and tour sites operated by NASA, by USA, and by the Air Force. This included the vehicle assembly building (VAB), orbital processing facilities (OPF), the crawler with the mobile launch pad (MLP), and the SRB assembly and refurbishment facility (ARF), to name a few. In addition, the launch, of STS- 117 took place within the first week of employment allowing a day by day following of that mission including post flight operations for the SRBs. Two Delta II rockets were also launched during these 7 weeks. The sights were incredible and the operations witnessed were amazing. I learned so many things I never knew about the entire program and the shuttle itself. The entire experience, especially my work with the SRB materials, inspired my plan for implementation into the classroom.

  6. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 6, appendix 10: Vehicle systems effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Three tasks were undertaken by Eagle Engineering as a part of the Liquid Rocket Booster (LRB) study. Task 1 required Eagle to supply current data relative to the Space Shuttle vehicle and systems affected by an LRB substitution. Tables listing data provided are presented. Task 2 was to evaluate and compare shuttle impacts of candidate LRB configuration in concert with overall trades of analysis activity. Three selected configurations with emphasis on flight loads, separation dynamics, and cost comparison are presented. Task 3 required the development of design guidelines and requirements to minimize impacts to the Space Shuttle system from all LRB substitution. Results are presented for progress to date.

  7. Probabilistic Structural Analysis of the Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt External Fitting Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.; Peck, Jeff; Ayala, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    NASA has funded several major programs (the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods Project is an example) to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods and tools for engineers to apply in the design and assessment of aerospace hardware. A probabilistic finite element software code, known as Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress, is used to determine the reliability of a critical weld of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt. An external bracket modification to the aft skirt provides a comparison basis for examining the details of the probabilistic analysis and its contributions to the design process. Also, analysis findings are compared with measured Space Shuttle flight data.

  8. Booster vaccination: the role of reduced antigen content vaccines as a preschool booster.

    PubMed

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Trucchi, Cecilia; Conversano, Michele; Zivelonghi, Giambattista; Zoppi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The need for boosters for tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, and polio, starting from preschool age, is related to the waning immune protection conferred by vaccination, the elimination/reduction of natural boosters due to large-scale immunization programs, and the possibility of reintroduction of wild agents from endemic areas. Taking into account the relevance of safety/tolerability in the compliance with vaccination among the population, it have been assessed whether today enough scientific evidences are available to support the use of dTap-IPV booster in preschool age. The review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed search engine. A total of 41 works has been selected; besides, the documentation produced by the World Health Organization, the European Centre for Disease Control, and the Italian Ministry of Health has been consulted. Many recent papers confirm the opportunity to use a low antigenic dose vaccine starting from 4 to 6 years of age. There is also evidence that 10 years after immunization the rate of seroprotected subjects against diphtheria does not differ significantly between those vaccinated with paediatric dose (DTaP) or reduced dose (dTaP or dTap) product. The dTpa vaccine is highly immunogenic for diphtheria toxoids regardless of prior vaccination history (2 + 1 and 3 + 1 schedules). PMID:24678509

  9. Shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Park, O. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Additional results and a revised and improved computer program listing from the shuttle rocket booster computational fluid dynamics formulations are presented. Numerical calculations for the flame zone of solid propellants are carried out using the Galerkin finite elements, with perturbations expanded to the zeroth, first, and second orders. The results indicate that amplification of oscillatory motions does indeed prevail in high frequency regions. For the second order system, the trend is similar to the first order system for low frequencies, but instabilities may appear at frequencies lower than those of the first order system. The most significant effect of the second order system is that the admittance is extremely oscillatory between moderately high frequency ranges.

  10. Clustered Lance Booster (CLB) feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    Loral Vought (LV) was requested to investigate the feasibility of clustering four Lance propulsion systems as the first stage of a two-stage target vehicle. Two vehicle configurations were considered, both using the Clustered Lance Booster (CLB) as the first stage. On one configuration, the second stage will be the 40-inch diameter Liquid Fueled Target (LFT-40), which was the subject of an LTV Aerospace and Defense Company study in 1991. This configuration is designated as the CLB/LFT-40. The second stage of the other configuration will be a modified Lance having the same external shape as the Lance missile (22-inch diameter). This configuration is designated as the CLB/LFT-22.

  11. Status of the AGC Booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    To meet the needs of new experiments in high energy and nuclear physics, a rapid-cycling Booster for the AGS has been under construction at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues that need special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. And finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The AGS Booster beam loss monitor system

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, E.R.; Bennett, G.W.; Witkover, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    A beam loss monitor system has been developed for the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster accelerator, and is designed for use with intensities of up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons and carbon to gold ions at 50-3 {times} 10{sup 9} ions per pulse. This system is a significant advance over the present AGS system by improving the sensitivity, dynamic range, and data acquisition. In addition to the large dynamic range achievable, it is adaptively shifted when high losses are detected. The system uses up to 80 argon filled ion chambers as detectors, as well as newly designed electronics for processing and digitizing detector outputs. The hardware simultaneously integrates each detector output, interfaces to the beam interrupt systems, and digitizes all 80 channels to 21 bits at 170 KHz. This paper discuses the design, construction, and operation of the system. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Technology for low cost solid rocket boosters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciepluch, C.

    1971-01-01

    A review of low cost large solid rocket motors developed at the Lewis Research Center is given. An estimate is made of the total cost reduction obtainable by incorporating this new technology package into the rocket motor design. The propellant, case material, insulation, nozzle ablatives, and thrust vector control are discussed. The effect of the new technology on motor cost is calculated for a typical expandable 260-in. booster application. Included in the cost analysis is the influence of motor performance variations due to specific impulse and weight changes. It is found for this application that motor costs may be reduced by up to 30% and that the economic attractiveness of future large solid rocket motors will be improved when the new technology is implemented.

  14. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  15. Power flow control using quadrature boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, Sandeep N.

    A power system that can be controlled within security constraints would be an advantage to power planners and real-time operators. Controlling flows can lessen reliability issues such as thermal limit violations, power stability problems, and/or voltage stability conditions. Control of flows can also mitigate market issues by reducing congestion on some lines and rerouting power to less loaded lines or onto preferable paths. In the traditional control of power flows, phase shifters are often used. More advanced methods include using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) Controllers. Some examples include Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitors, Synchronous Series Static Compensators, and Unified Power Flow Controllers. Quadrature Boosters (QBs) have similar structures to phase-shifters, but allow for higher voltage magnitude during real power flow control. In comparison with other FACTS controllers QBs are not as complex and not as expensive. The present study proposes to use QBs to control power flows on a power system. With the inclusion of QBs, real power flows can be controlled to desired scheduled values. In this thesis, the linearized power flow equations used for power flow analysis were modified for the control problem. This included modifying the Jacobian matrix, the power error vector, and calculating the voltage injected by the quadrature booster for the scheduled real power flow. Two scenarios were examined using the proposed power flow control method. First, the power flow in a line in a 5-bus system was modified with a QB using the method developed in this thesis. Simulation was carried out using Matlab. Second, the method was applied to a 30-bus system and then to a 118-bus system using several QBs. In all the cases, the calculated values of the QB voltages led to desired power flows in the designated line.

  16. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  17. Propulsion system advances that enable a reusable Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, E. L.; Rothschild, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the booster propulsion system for the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB). This includes, system requirements, design approach, concept of operations, reliability, safety and cost assumptions. The paper summarizes the findings of the Boeing propulsion team that has been studying the LFBB feasibility as a booster replacement for the Space Shuttle. This paper will discuss recent advances including a new generation of kerosene and oxygen rich pre-burner staged combustion cycle main rocket engines. The engine reliability and safety is expected to be much higher than current standards by adding extra operating margins into the design and normally operating the engines at 75% of engine rated power. This allows for engine out capability. The new generation of main engines operates at significantly higher chamber pressure than the prior generation of gas generator cycle engines. The oxygen rich pre-burner engine cycle, unlike the fuel rich gas generator cycle, results in internally self-cleaning firings which facilitates reusability. Maintenance is further enhanced with integrated health monitoring to improve safety and turn-around efficiency. The maintainability of the LFBB LOX/kerosene engines is being improved by designing the vehicle/engine interfaces for easy access to key engine components.

  18. Propulsion System Advances that Enable a Reusable Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Edward L.; Rothschild, William J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the booster propulsion system for the Liquid Fly Back Booster (LFBB). This includes, system requirements, design approach, concept of operations, reliability, safety and cost assumptions. The paper summarizes the findings of the Boeing propulsion team that has been studying the LFBB feasibility as a booster replacement for the Space Shuttle. This paper will discuss recent advances including a new generation of kerosene and oxygen rich pre-burner staged combustion cycle main rocket engines. The engine reliability and safety is expected to be much higher than current standards by adding extra operating margins into the design and normally operating the engines at 75% of engine rated power. This allows for engine out capability. The new generation of main engines operates at significantly higher chamber pressure than the prior generation of gas generator cycle engines. The oxygen rich pre-burner engine cycle, unlike the fuel rich gas generator cycle, results in internally self-cleaning firings which facilitates reusability. Maintenance is further enhanced with integrated health monitoring to improve safety and turn-around efficiency. The maintainability of the LFBB LOX / kerosene engines is being improved by designing the vehicle/engine interfaces for easy access to key engine components.

  19. UPGRADING THE CEBAF INJECTOR WITH A NEW BOOSTER, HIGHER VOLTAGE GUN, AND HIGHER FINAL ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Kazimi, Arne Freyberger, Alicia Hofler, Andrew Hutton, Fay Hannon

    2012-07-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator at Jefferson Lab will be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV in the next few years. To meet the requirement of the new machine and to take the opportunity to improve the beam quality, the CEBAF injector will be upgraded with a higher voltage gun, a new booster, and a new accelerating RF module. The CEBAF injector creates and accelerates three beams at different currents simultaneously. The beams are interleaved, each at one third of the RF frequency, traveling through the same beam line. The higher voltage gun will lower the space charge effects. The new booster with optimized beam dynamics will complete the bunching process and provide initial acceleration matched to the new gun voltage. Using our latest SRF design, the new booster has significantly lower x/y coupling effects that should improve our beam setup and operation for the highly sensitive parity experiments scheduled for the CEBAF's future. Finally, the new accelerating RF module will roughly double the injector final energy to match the rest of the 12 GeV accelerator. In this paper we will provide more detail about this upgrade.

  20. Five-Segment Booster (FSB) Abort to Orbit (ATO) Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Mark; Sauvageau, Donald R.; Hines, Mark; Geiser, Norman L.; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Five Segment Booster (FSB) concept has been evolving for a number of years as a means to enhance the overall safety and reliability of the Space Shuttle system by minimizing the need to fly the more challenging Return to Launch Site (RTLS) and Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) abort profiles. The initial evaluation of the FSB concept was conducted in 1996 to determine the feasibility of the FSB in achieving transatlantic abort leading TAL from the pad, thus eliminating the return to launch site (RTLS) abort mode. The initial study was conducted by ATK Thiokol and did show the potential for the FSB to eliminate the RTLS abort mode. Later Rockwell (now Boeing) conducted a similar study utilizing FSB performance characteristics and verified that the FSB could indeed achieve TAL from the pad, thereby eliminating the necessity for the RTLS abort. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the details of the enhancements achieved through the internally funded study conducted by Boeing and ATK Thiokol. To better understand the enhancements that were addressed as part of this follow-on study, some background on what was achieved in the Phase A study is appropriate.

  1. Hybrid propulsion for launch vehicle boosters: A program status update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, R. L.; Boardman, T. A.; Claflin, S. E.; Harwell, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Results obtained in studying the origin and suppression of large-amplitude pressure oscillations in a 24 in. diameter hybrid motor using a liquid oxygen/hydroxylterminated polybutadiene/polycyclopentadiene propellant system are discussed. Tests conducted with liquid oxygen flow rates varying from 10 to 40 lbm/sec were designed to gauge the effectiveness of various vaporization chamber flow fields, injector designs, and levels of heat addition in suppressing high-frequency longitudinal mode oscillations. Longitudinal acoustic modes did not arise in any tests. However, initial testing revealed the presence of high-amplitude, sinusoidal, nonacoustic oscillations persisting throughout the burn durations. Analysis showed this to be analogous to chug mode instability in liquid rocket engines brought about by a coupling of motor combustion processes and the liquid oxygen feed system. Analytical models were developed and verified by test data to predict the amplitude and frequency of feed-system-coupled combustion pressure oscillations. Subsequent testing showed that increasing the feed system impedance eliminated the bulk mode instability. This paper documents the work completed to date in performance of the Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Launch Vehicle Boosters Program (NAS8-39942) sponsored by NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

  2. Slip-stacking Dynamics and the 20 Hz Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffery; Zwaska, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly doubles the proton intensity. The Proton Improvement Plan II intensity upgrades require a reduction in slip-stacking losses by approximately a factor of 2. We study the single-particle dynamics that determine the stability of slip-stacking particles. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We show the particle loss as a function of time. We calculate the injection efficiency as a function of longitudinal emittance and aspect-ratio. We demonstrate that the losses from RF single particle dynamics can be reduced by a factor of 4-10 (depending on beam parameters) by upgrading the Fermilab Booster from a 15-Hz cycle-rate to a 20-Hz cycle-rate. We recommend a change in injection scheme to eliminate the need for a greater momentum aperture in the Fermilab Recycler.

  3. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  4. The APS booster synchrotron: Commissioning and operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, S.V.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was constructed to provide a large user community with intense and high brightness synchrotron radiation at x-ray wavelengths. A 7-GeV positron beam is used to generate this light. Acceleration of the beam from 450 MeV to 7 GeV is accomplished at a 2-Hz repetition rate by the booster synchrotron. Commissioning of the booster began in the second quarter of 1994 and continued on into early 1995. The booster is now routinely used to provide beam for the commissioning of the APS storage ring. Reported here are our commissioning and operational experiences with the booster synchrotron.

  5. 38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, LANCES, AND FUME HOODS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  6. 21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF CLARK OXYGEN BOOSTER COMPRESSOR IN THE HIGH PURITY OXYGEN BUILDING LOOKING SOUTH. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Fuel & Utilities Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  7. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 4: Program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    All subprograms or routines associated with the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model are indexed in this computer listing. An alphanumeric list of each routine in the index is provided in a table of contents.

  8. The qualification of the shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, C. A.; Fisher, K. M.; Eoff, W.

    1978-01-01

    Four booster separation motors (BSM) located at each end of every solid rocket booster (SRB) provide the needed side force to separate the boosters from the external tank at booster burnout. Four BSMs at the top of the SRB are located in a box pattern in the nose cone frustum. The four BSMs at the aft end of the SRB are arranged side-by-side on the SRB aft skirt. Aspects of BSM design and performance are considered, taking into account a motor design/performance summary, the case design, the insulation, the grain design, the nozzle/aft closure design, the ignition system, the propellant, and the motor assembly. Details of motor testing are also discussed, giving attention to development testing, qualification testing, and flight testing.

  9. Aerodynamic separation and glideback of a Mach 3 staged booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftel, J. C.; Powell, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    A study has been conducted of the staging maneuver for a two-stage, vertical-takeoff, launch vehicle and the subsequent glideback of the booster to a launch site runway. The booster and orbiter are both winged, fully reusable, and have liquid rocket main propulsion. for the staging maneuver, which nominally occurs at Mach 3, a flight control system and separation technique were devised which produced successful separations over a wide range of staging angles of attack. A guidance algorithm was developed for the unpowered glide-back of the booster from the completion of the staging maneuver to touchdown on a runway in the vicinity of the launch site. Using this guidance technique, the booster successfully touched down on the runway while being subjected to a wide range of seasonal and perturbed atmospheric conditions with and without wids as well as errors in staging state conditions and errors in predicted aerodynamics.

  10. SIMULATIONS OF TRANSVERSE STACKING IN THE NSLS-II BOOSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac and a 3 GeV booster. The linac needs to deliver 15 nC in 80 - 150 bunches to the booster every minute to achieve current stability goals in the storage ring. This is a very stringent requirement that has not been demonstrated at an operating light source. We have developed a scheme to transversely stack two bunch trains in the NSLS-II booster in order to alleviate the charge requirements on the linac. This scheme has been outlined previously. In this paper we show particle tracking simulations of the tracking scheme. We show simulations of the booster ramp with a stacked beam for a variety of lattice errors and injected beam parameters. In all cases the performance of the proposed stacking method is sufficient to reduce the required charge from the linac. For this reason the injection system of the NSLS-II booster is being designed to include this feature. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac and a 3 GeV booster. The injectors must provide 7.5nC in bunch trains 80-150 bunches long every minute for top off operation of the storage ring. Top off then requires that the linac deliver 15nC of charge once losses in the injector chain are taken into consideration. This is a very stringent requirement that has not been demonstrated at an operating light source. For this reason we have developed a method to transversely stack two bunch trains in the booster while maintaining the charge transport efficiency. This stacking scheme has been discussed previously. In this paper we show the simulations of the booster ramp with a single bunch train in the booster. Then we give a brief overview of the stacking scheme. Following, we show the results of stacking two bunch trains in the booster with varying beam emittances and train separations. The behavior of the beam through the ramp is examined showing that it is possible to stack two bunch trains in the booster.

  11. Fermilab's Booster Correction Element Power Supply Silicon Temperature Rise

    SciTech Connect

    Krafczyk, G.; Jensen, C.; Pfeffer, H.; Warchol, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Fermilab is in the process of upgrading its Booster Correction Element System to include full field correction element magnets to correct position and chromaticity throughout the booster cycle. For good reliability of the switchmode power supplies designed to power the magnets, it is important to limit both the maximum temperature and the repetitive temperature cycling of the silicon junctions of the switching elements. We will describe how we measured these parameters and the results of our measurements.

  12. Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the space shuttle program is presented, with emphasis on its application to the use of space for commercial, scientific, and defense needs. The following aspects of the program are discussed: description of the flight system (orbiter, external tank, solid rocket boosters) and mission profile, direct benefits related to life on earth (both present and expected), description of the space shuttle vehicle and its associated supporting systems, economic impacts (including indirect benefits such as lower inflation rates), listing of participating organizations.

  13. Perpendicular Biased Ferrite Tuned Cavities for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Awida, Mohamed; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Pellico, William; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Terechkine, Iouri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-07-01

    The aging Fermilab Booster RF system needs an upgrade to support future experimental program. The important feature of the upgrade is substantial enhancement of the requirements for the accelerating cavities. The new requirements include enlargement of the cavity beam pipe aperture, increase of the cavity voltage and increase in the repetition rate. The modification of the present traditional parallel biased ferrite cavities is rather challenging. An alternative to rebuilding the present Fermilab Booster RF cavities is to design and construct new perpendicular biased RF cavities, which potentially offer a number of advantages. An evaluation and a preliminary design of the perpendicular biased ferrite tuned cavities for the Fermilab Booster upgrade is described in the paper. Also it is desirable for better Booster performance to improve the capture of beam in the Booster during injection and at the start of the ramp. One possible way to do that is to flatten the bucket by introducing second harmonic cavities into the Booster. This paper also looks into the option of using perpendicularly biased ferrite tuners for the second harmonic cavities.

  14. Air Force Reusable Booster System: A Quick-look, Design Focused Modeling and Cost Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method and an initial analysis of the costs of a reusable booster system (RBS) as envisioned by the US Department of Defense (DoD) and numerous initiatives that form the concept of Operationally Responsive Space (ORS). This paper leverages the knowledge gained from decades of experience with the semi-reusable NASA Space Shuttle to understand how the costs of a military next generation semi-reusable space transport might behave in the real world - and how it might be made as affordable as desired. The NASA Space Shuttle had a semi-expendable booster, that being the reusable Solid Rocket MotorslBoosters (SRMlSRB) and the expendable cryogenic External Tank (ET), with a reusable cargo and crew capable orbiter. This paper will explore DoD concepts that invert this architectural arrangement, using a reusable booster plane that flies back to base soon after launch, with the in-space elements of the launch system being the expendable portions. Cost estimating in the earliest stages of any potential, large scale program has limited usefulness. As a result, the emphasis here is on developing an approach, a structure, and the basic concepts that could continue to be matured as the program gains knowledge. Where cost estimates are provided, these results by necessity carry many caveats and assumptions, and this analysis becomes more about ways in which drivers of costs for diverse scenarios can be better understood. The paper is informed throughout with a design-for-cost philosophy whereby the design and technology features of the proposed RBS (who and what, the "architecture") are taken as linked at the hip to a desire to perform a certain mission (where and when), and together these inform the cost, responsiveness, performance and sustainability (how) of the system. Concepts for developing, acquiring, producing or operating the system will be shown for their inextricable relationship to the "architecture" of the system, and how these too relate to costs

  15. Some understandings on radial motion at transition in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    The transition crossing is space charge dominated in the Fermilab Booster. Since the longitudinal space charge forces are defocusing below transition and focusing above transition, they generate the mismatch at transition, which causes the longitudinal emittance growth above transition. It's proved by numerical simulation that such mismatch can be partially compensated by a particular radial motion at transition, which is operationally favored by the high intensity beam. The transition crossing in Booster is space charge dominated. Usually, the nonlinear chromatic effect can cause the emittance growth during transition because particles with different energies cross transition at different times. The transition time is set by the synchronous particle; below transition, particles with positive energies relative to the synchronous particle become unstable since they are in the wrong phase, and above transition, particles with negative energies are unstable. The dependence of the transition energy upon the momentum deviation can be adjusted via different sextupole corrector settings such that the emittance growth due to the chromatic nonlinear effect can be greatly reduced. Fortunately, at the corrector setting of I{sub sextl} = -97 A and I{sub sexts} = 97 A, the dependence can be removed, see Figure 1. Space charge forces are mainly responsible for the longitudinal emittance growth at transition.

  16. A rookie's guide to Booster operations. Booster technical note no. 231

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    1998-09-29

    The purpose of the Booster is to act as an injector for the AGS. It accelerates both protons and other ions. Proton acceleration is distinguished from the acceleration of other ions for several reasons. First, the experimental physics associated with protons, called High Energy Physics is different than that associated with other Ions, called Heavy Ion Physics. From the machine perspective, the process of injection of so called Heavy Ions (ions which are not protons), is distinctly different, from that of protons. A different preinjector, or injector for the Booster, is used for each case. For Protons, a 200 MeV Linear accelerator (The Linac) serves as a preinjector; for Heavy Ions, the Tandem Van De Graaf (The Tandem) is the preinjector. An attribute of the circulating beam which determines to a large degree what problems and what type of machine setup is involved is the beam intensity. The author's focus in this guide is on trying to convey the knowledge and experience involved in the operation of the Booster. Many of the problems encountered can be traced back to equipment failures, often power supplies. Although diagnostics are used, there can also be issues with the controls system itself. Problems with the controls system and prevent fixing or even finding a problem with a machine. The issue of improving a machines' performance can often involve trial and error and observations. The hard part is finding the relationships between things in the day to day operation of the machine. Abstractions about physics, information about controls and instrumentation, and purely empirical observations of how the machine behaves are all part of it.

  17. Booster propulsion/vehicle impact study, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P.; Satterthwaite, S.; Carson, C.; Schnackel, J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the final report in a study examining the impact of launch vehicles for various boost propulsion design options. These options included: differing boost phase engines using different combinations of fuels and coolants to include RP-1, methane, propane (subcooled and normal boiling point), and hydrogen; variable and high mixture ratio hydrogen engines; translating nozzles on boost phase engines; and cross feeding propellants from the booster to second stage. Vehicles examined included a fully reusable two stage cargo vehicle and a single stage to orbit vehicle. The use of subcooled propane as a fuel generated vehicles with the lowest total vehicle dry mass. Engines with hydrogen cooling generated only slight mass reductions from the reference, all-hydrogen vehicle. Cross feeding propellants generated the most significant mass reductions from the reference two stage vehicle. The use of high mixture ratio or variable mixture ratio hydrogen engines in the boost phase of flight resulted in vehicles with total dry mass 20 percent greater than the reference hydrogen vehicle. Translating nozzles for boost phase engines generated a heavier vehicle. Also examined were the design impacts on the vehicle and ground support subsystems when subcooled propane is used as a fuel. The most significant cost difference between facilities to handle normal boiling point versus subcooled propane is 5 million dollars. Vehicle cost differences were negligible. A significant technical challenge exists for properly conditioning the vehicle propellant on the ground and in flight when subcooled propane is used as fuel.

  18. [Booster vaccination against Bordella pertussis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Esteves-Jaramillo, Alejandra; Gómez Altamirano, César Misael; Esparza Aguilar, Marcelino; López-Collada, Vesta L Richardson

    2012-05-01

    During the last decades, the incidence of whopping cough, has been rising worldwide, despite the high coverage of the immunization programs. The highest mortality is found among children under 6 month of age, who are too young to have completed a primary vaccination series with three doses the pertussis vaccine, nevertheless this disease also affects adolescents and adults, who may only manifest mild symptomatology. Hence they do not get diagnosed or treated, becoming a potential community source of infection for young children. In order to prevent this transmission, the recommendation of vaccinating adolescents and adults, including of women in child bearing age, was issued. Nevertheless the immunization coverage among these populations was low. Postpartum vaccination was also recommended, but recent evidence have shown that the antibody levels in breast milk are detectable at least a week after immunization, allowing a window of opportunity for the infection in the newborn. Finally, it has been suggested that a booster dose against Bordetella pertussis, given to pregnant women is safe and immunogenic. Therefore, the antibody transferred across the placenta and through breast milk, could protect the product in the early stages of life. PMID:23301426

  19. NSRL Extraction Bump Control in the Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,L.

    2008-10-01

    Due to inadequacies in the user interface of the booster orbit control system, a number of new tools were developed. The first priority was an accurate calculation of the winding currents given specific displacements at each extraction septa. Next, the physical limits of the power supplies ({+-}600 amps) needed to be taken into account. In light of this limit, a system is developed that indicates to the user what the allowed values of one bump parameter are once the other two have been specified. Finally, techniques are developed to account for the orbit behavior once power supplies are requested to exceed their {+-}600 amp limit. This includes a recalculation of bump parameters and a calculation of the amplitude of the residuals. Following this, possible areas for further development are outlined. These techniques were computationally developed in Mathematica and tested in the Methodical Accelerator Design (MAD) program before they were implemented into the control system. At the end, a description of the implementation of these techniques in a new interface is described. This includes a depiction of the appearance and functionality of the graphical user interface, a description of the input and output flow, and an outline of how each important calculation is performed.

  20. Multiphase booster ups production from subsea well

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The Rogn South subsea well has the world`s first commercial subsea multiphase boosting system. The well produces to A/S Norske Shell`s Draugen field, in the Norwegian Sea. The Smubs (Shell multiphase underwater booster station) provides additional energy to transport a mixture of gas and liquids over long distances. This reduces the back pressure on the reservoir to potentially enhance both production and recovery. In-house Shell International Petroleum Maatschappij B.V. (SIPM) has studied estimated facility costs and performance for a multiphase boosting system for a typical small (50 million bbl) field between 20--50 km from a host facility in water depths between 150--1,000 m. The studies showed that technical costs per barrel of oil produced could be cut by up to 30% compared to conventional technology. The Smubs main features are: A single retrievable cartridge that houses all active components susceptible to wear; No orientation requirements for the pump cartridge unit; No orientation requirements for the pump cartridge unit; Hydraulically set and tested seals; and Vertical installation and retrieval with a single tool, and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) only for a monitoring.

  1. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control V-2 off-nominal testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the V-2 off nominal test sequence performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control (SRB TVC) system are reported. The TVC subsystem was subjected to 19 off nominal test conditions. The test sequence consisted of: 8 burp starts, 30 hot firings, 14 GN2 spin tests, and 3 servicing passive system tests. It is concluded that the TVC subsystem operated nominally in response to the given commands and test conditions. Test objectives, detail results, and data are included.

  2. HPLC Characterization of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resole Resin Used in Fabrication of Shuttle Booster Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    A reverse phase High Performance Liquid Chromatographic method was developed to rapidly fingerprint a phenol-formaldehyde resole resin similar to Durite(R) SC-1008. This resin is used in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composite materials from which Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster nozzles are manufactured. A knowledge of resin chemistry is essential to successful composite processing and performance. The results indicate that a high quality separation of over 35 peaks in 25 minutes were obtained using a 15 cm Phenomenex LUNA C8 bonded reverse phase column, a three-way water-acetonitrile-methanol nonlinear gradient, and LTV detection at 280 nm.

  3. The design and performance estimates for the propulsion module for the booster of a TSTO vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Maldonado, Jaime J.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA study of the propulsion systems for possible low-risk replacements for the Space Shuttle is presented. Results of preliminary studies to define the USAF two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) concept to deliver 10,000 pounds to low polar orbit are described. The booster engine module consists of an over/under turbine bypass engines/ramjet engine design for acceleration from takeoff to the staging point of Mach 6.5 and approximately 100,000 feet altitude. Propulsion system performance and weight are presented with preliminary mission study results of vehicle size.

  4. The design and performance estimates for the propulsion module for the booster of a TSTO vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Maldonado, Jaime J.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA study of propulsion systems for possible low-risk replacements for the Space Shuttle is presented. Results of preliminary studies to define the USAF two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) concept to deliver 10,000 pounds to low polar orbit are described. The booster engine module consists of an over/under turbine bypass engines/ramjet engine design for acceleration from takeoff to the staging point of Mach 6.5 and approximately 100,000 feet altitude. Propulsion system performance and weight are presented with preliminary mission study results of vehicle size.

  5. Space transportation propulsion USSR launcher technology, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Space transportation propulsion U.S.S.R. launcher technology is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: Energia background (launch vehicle summary, Soviet launcher family) and Energia propulsion characteristics (booster propulsion, core propulsion, and growth capability).

  6. Space shuttle ascent flight turbulence response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A totally reusable space shuttle configuration has been analyzed during ascent flight to determine its response to atmospheric turbulence. Responses in the form of booster and orbiter body accelerations and booster wing root shear, bending moment and turque were obtained due to random and quasi-square-wave discrete turbulence. The configuration was also analyzed with booster aerodynamic surfaces removed to simulate an expendable booster. Symmetric and antisymmetric analyses were performed. Propellant sloshing, gust penetration, and automatic control system effects were included. It was found that the symmetric responses were generally higher than the antisymmetric ones. The stability augmentation system tended to lower the booster accelerations in the symmetric case, while increasing the orbiter accelerations.

  7. First results of proton injection commissioning of the AGS Booster synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Luccio, A.; Skelly, J.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Weng, W.T.; Witkover, R.

    1991-01-01

    Beam performance for the injection phase of proton beam commissioning of the AGS Booster synchrotron will be presented. The beam from the 200 MeV Linac is transported through a new beam line into the Booster. This Linac-to Booster (LTB) beam line includes a 126{degree} bend and brings the injected beam onto the Booster injection orbit through the backleg of a main ring dipole magnet. Transfer of beam from the Linac to the Booster, spiralling beam and closing the orbit in the Booster ring are discussed. Injection and transport through one sector of the ring has been accomplished. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Understanding and improving the Fermilab booster high field orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.; Ketcham, L.; Moore, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    This note is an account of the authors' effort in both understanding the Booster high field orbit and controlling it through displacements of the main combined function magnets. We were able to achieve the second goal with considerable accuracy while having limited success with the first, due to insufficient knowledge of the Booster dynamics. This work was initiated in Spring 1987 with the orbit control via magnet moves the chief purpose. A series of magnet moves in 1987 and 1988 resulting from this study testified to its reliability. The understanding of the Booster orbit in general remains an ongoing process in which we keep modifying our model with the hope of eventually having a quantitative grasp of the closed orbit and being able to manipulate it with more flexibility and accuracy. In this paper we give a brief description of the Booster environment in which the magnet moves are carried out, together with background information concerning the magnet moves. The method we use is discussed. The result of the moves is documented, and our effort to understand the Booster high field orbit is given a detailed account. 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Characterization of the exhaust particulates in the ground cloud and high-altitude plume of large solid-propellant booster rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Bowyer, J. M.; Varsi, G.; Laue, E. G.; Gauldin, R.

    1980-01-01

    The report is concerned with the characterization of Al2O3 particles in the atmosphere. These particles comprise one of the major combustion products of the rocket propellant employed in the Space Shuttle boosters. A ground cloud and stratospheric plume are considered. It is concluded that the typical residence times in the atmosphere are much longer than earlier estimates have indicated.

  10. Materials and processes for shuttle engine, external tank, and solid rocket booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Shuttle flight system is composed of the Orbiter, an External Tank (ET) that contains the ascent propellant to be used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB). The ET is expended on each launch; the Orbiter and SRB's are reusable. It is the requirement for reuse which poses the exciting new materials and processes challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle. A brief description of the Space Shuttle and the mission profile is given. The Shuttle configuration is then described with emphasis on the SSME, ET, and SRB. The materials selection, tracking, and control system used to assure reliability and to minimize cost are described, and salient features and challenges in materials and processes associated with the SSME, ET, and SRB are subsequently discussed.

  11. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Working near the top of a solid rocket booster, NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up SRB cables to a Cirris Signature Touch 1 cable tester. From left are Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jim Silviano (back to camera) and Jeff Suter, with USA. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  12. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building, United Space Alliance SRB technician Frank Meyer pulls cables out of the solid rocket booster system tunnel. Cable end covers are in a box near his feet. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  13. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up solid rocket booster cables to a Cirris Signature Touch 1 cable tester. From left are Loren Atkinson and Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jeff Suter, with USA. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  14. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- United Space Alliance SRB technician Jim Glass conducts a Flex test on a cable on the solid rocket booster at left. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  15. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Working near the top of a solid rocket booster, NASA and United Space Alliance SRB technicians hook up SRB cables to a CIRRUS computer for testing. From left are Jim Glass, with USA, performing a Flex test on the cable; Steve Swichkow, with NASA, and Jim Silviano, with USA, check the results on a computer. The SRB is part of Space Shuttle Atlantis, rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  16. Workers in the VAB test SRB cables on STS-98 solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- United Space Alliance SRB technician Richard Bruns attaches a cable end cover to a cable pulled from the solid rocket booster on Space Shuttle Atlantis. The Shuttle was rolled back from Launch Pad 39A in order to conduct tests on the SRB cables. A prior extensive evaluation of NASA'''s SRB cable inventory on the shelf revealed conductor damage in four (of about 200) cables. Shuttle managers decided to prove the integrity of the system tunnel cables already on Atlantis before launching. Workers are conducting inspections, making continuity checks and conducting X-ray analysis on the cables. The launch has been rescheduled no earlier than Feb. 6.

  17. Nuclear power in space

    SciTech Connect

    Aftergood, S. ); Hafemeister, D.W. ); Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N. ); Primack, J.R. )

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space.

  18. Left atrial booster function in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, Fred P.; Shaver, James A.; Thompson, Mark E.; Leonard, James J.

    1970-01-01

    This study was designed to assess atrial booster pump action in valvular heart disease and to dissect booster pump from reservoir-conduit functions. In five patients with aortic stenosis and six with mitral stenosis, sequential atrioventricular (A-V) pacing was instituted during the course of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Continuous recording of valvular gradient allowed estimation of flow for each cardiac cycle by transposition of the Gorlin formula. Left ventricular ejection time and left ventricular stroke work in aortic stenosis or left ventricular mean systolic pressure in mitral stenosis were also determined. Control observations were recorded during sequential A-V pacing with well-timed atrial systole. Cardiac cycles were then produced with no atrial contraction but undisturbed atrial reservoir function by intermittently interrupting the atrial pacing stimulus during sequential A-V pacing. This intervention significantly reduced valvular gradient, flow, left ventricular ejection time, and left ventricular mean systolic pressure or stroke work. Cardiac cycles were then produced with atrial booster action eliminated by instituting synchronous A-V pacing. The resultant simultaneous contraction of the atrium and ventricle not only eliminated effective atrial systole but also placed atrial systole during the normal period of atrial reservoir function. This also significantly reduced all the hemodynamic measurements. However, comparison of the magnitude of change from these two different pacing interventions showed no greater impairment of hemodynamic state when both booster pump action and reservoir function were impaired than when booster pump action alone was impaired. The study confirms the potential benefit of well placed atrial booster pump action in valvular heart disease in man. PMID:5449701

  19. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented.

  20. The Booster to AGS beam transfer fast kicker systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Bunicci, J.; Soukas, A.V.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1992-08-01

    The Brookhaven AGS Booster has a very successful commissioning period in June 1991. The third phase of that commissioning was a beam extraction test. The Booster extraction fast kicker (F3) deflected a 1.2 GeV proton beam from the Booster circulating orbit into the extraction septum aperture, partially down the extraction line to a temporary beam stop. Now, the Booster is committed to the AGS operations program for both heavy ion and proton beams. Thus, the Booster extraction and the corresponding AGS injection systems must operate routinely up to a pulse repetition frequency of 7.5 Hertz, and up to a beam energy of 1.5 Gev. The injection fast kicker is located in the A5 section of the AGS ring and is used to deflect the proton or heavy ion beam into its final AGS closed orbit. A distinctive feature of the AGS injection fast kicker modulators is the tail-bitting function required for proton beam injection. This enables the system to produce a fast current fall time to go along with the high current pulse amplitude with a fast rise time. The AGS injection fast kicker system has three pulse modulators, and each modulator consists of two thyratrons. The main PFN thyratrons switch on the current, and the tail bitting thyratrons are used to force the magnet current to decrease rapidly. Two digital pulse delay generators are used to align the main thyratrons and the tail bitting thyratrons respectively. The system has been tested and installed. The final commissioning of the Booster to AGS beam transfer line and injection is currently being undertaken. In this article, the system design, realization techniques and performance data will be presented.

  1. Finite Element Simulation of Solid Rocket Booster Separation Motors During Motor Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu. Weiping; Crane, Debora J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the toughest challenges facing Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engineers is to ensure that any design changes made to the Shuttle-Derived Booster Separation Motors (BSM) for future space exploration vehicles is able to withstand the increasingly hostile motor firing environment without cracking its critical component - the graphite throat. This paper presents a critical analysis methodology and techniques for assessing effects of BSM design changes with great accuracy and precision. For current Space Shuttle operation, the motor firing occurs at SRB separation - approximately 125 seconds after Shuttle launch at an altitude of about 28 miles. The motor operation event lasts about two seconds, however, the surface temperature of the graphite throat increases approximately 3400 F in less than one second with a corresponding increase in surface pressure of approximately 2200 pounds per square inch (psi) in less than one-tenth of a second. To capture this process fully and accurately, a two-phase sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical finite element approach was developed. This method allows the time- and location-dependent pressure fields to interact with the spatial-temporal thermal fields throughout the operation. The material properties of graphite throat are orthotropic and temperature-dependent. The analysis involves preload and multiple body contacts.

  2. Initiation Capacity of a Specially Shaped Booster Pellet and Numerical Simulation of Its Initiation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Shuang; Hu, Shuang-Qi; Cao, Xiong; Zhang, Jian-Ren

    2014-01-01

    The insensitive main charge explosive is creating new requirements for the booster pellet of detonation trains. The traditional cylindrical booster pellet has insufficient energy output to reliably initiate the insensitive main charge explosive. In this research, a concave spherical booster pellet was designed. The initiation capacity of the concave spherical booster pellet was studied using varied composition and axial steel dent methods. The initiation process of the concave spherical booster pellet was also simulated by ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The results showed that using a concave spherical booster allows a 42% reduction in the amount of explosive needed to match the initiation capacity of a conventional cylindrical booster of the same dimensions. With the other parameters kept constant, the initiation capacity of the concave spherical booster pellet increases with decreased cone angle and concave radius. The numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Multi-Physics Analysis of the Fermilab Booster RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awida, M.; Reid, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Lebedev, V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    After about 40 years of operation the RF accelerating cavities in Fermilab Booster need an upgrade to improve their reliability and to increase the repetition rate in order to support a future experimental program. An increase in the repetition rate from 7 to 15 Hz entails increasing the power dissipation in the RF cavities, their ferrite loaded tuners, and HOM dampers. The increased duty factor requires careful modelling for the RF heating effects in the cavity. A multi-physic analysis investigating both the RF and thermal properties of Booster cavity under various operating conditions is presented in this paper.

  4. Space Shuttle redesign status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Vance D.

    1986-01-01

    NASA has conducted an extensive redesign effort for the Space Shutle in the aftermath of the STS 51-L Challenger accident, encompassing not only Shuttle vehicle and booster design but also such system-wide factors as organizational structure, management procedures, flight safety, flight operations, sustainable flight rate, and maintenance safeguards. Attention is presently given to Solid Rocket Booster redesign features, the Shuttle Main Engine's redesigned high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbopumps, the Shuttle Orbiter's braking and rollout (landing gear) system, the entry control mode of the flight control system, a 'split-S' abort maneuver for the Orbiter, and crew escape capsule proposals.

  5. New Approaches in Reuseable Booster System Life Cycle Cost Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 2012 life cycle cost (LCC) study of hybrid Reusable Booster Systems (RBS) conducted by NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The work included the creation of a new cost estimating model and an LCC analysis, building on past work where applicable, but emphasizing the integration of new approaches in life cycle cost estimation. Specifically, the inclusion of industry processes/practices and indirect costs were a new and significant part of the analysis. The focus of LCC estimation has traditionally been from the perspective of technology, design characteristics, and related factors such as reliability. Technology has informed the cost related support to decision makers interested in risk and budget insight. This traditional emphasis on technology occurs even though it is well established that complex aerospace systems costs are mostly about indirect costs, with likely only partial influence in these indirect costs being due to the more visible technology products. Organizational considerations, processes/practices, and indirect costs are traditionally derived ("wrapped") only by relationship to tangible product characteristics. This traditional approach works well as long as it is understood that no significant changes, and by relation no significant improvements, are being pursued in the area of either the government acquisition or industry?s indirect costs. In this sense then, most launch systems cost models ignore most costs. The alternative was implemented in this LCC study, whereby the approach considered technology and process/practices in balance, with as much detail for one as the other. This RBS LCC study has avoided point-designs, for now, instead emphasizing exploring the trade-space of potential technology advances joined with potential process/practice advances. Given the range of decisions, and all their combinations, it was necessary to create a model of the original model

  6. New Approaches in Reusable Booster System Life Cycle Cost Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a 2012 life cycle cost (LCC) study of hybrid Reusable Booster Systems (RBS) conducted by NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The work included the creation of a new cost estimating model and an LCC analysis, building on past work where applicable, but emphasizing the integration of new approaches in life cycle cost estimation. Specifically, the inclusion of industry processes/practices and indirect costs were a new and significant part of the analysis. The focus of LCC estimation has traditionally been from the perspective of technology, design characteristics, and related factors such as reliability. Technology has informed the cost related support to decision makers interested in risk and budget insight. This traditional emphasis on technology occurs even though it is well established that complex aerospace systems costs are mostly about indirect costs, with likely only partial influence in these indirect costs being due to the more visible technology products. Organizational considerations, processes/practices, and indirect costs are traditionally derived ("wrapped") only by relationship to tangible product characteristics. This traditional approach works well as long as it is understood that no significant changes, and by relation no significant improvements, are being pursued in the area of either the government acquisition or industry?s indirect costs. In this sense then, most launch systems cost models ignore most costs. The alternative was implemented in this LCC study, whereby the approach considered technology and process/practices in balance, with as much detail for one as the other. This RBS LCC study has avoided point-designs, for now, instead emphasizing exploring the trade-space of potential technology advances joined with potential process/practice advances. Given the range of decisions, and all their combinations, it was necessary to create a model of the original model

  7. FNAL Booster intensity, extraction, and synchronization control for collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ducar, R.J.; Lackey, J.R.; Tawzer, S.R.

    1987-03-01

    Booster operation for collider physics is considerably different than for fixed target operation. Various scenarios for collider physics, machine studies, and P-Bar targeting may require that the intensity vary from 5E10 PPP to 3E12 PPP at a 15 Hertz machine cycle rate. In addition to the normal Booster single turn extraction mode, collider operations require that the Booster inject into the Main Ring a small number of beam bunches for coalescing into a single high intensity bunch. These bunches must be synchronized such that the center bunch arrives in the RF bucket which corresponds to the zero phase of the coalescing cavity. The system implemented has the ability to deliver a precise fraction of the available 84 Booster beam bunches to Main Ring or to the P-Bar Debuncher via the newly installed AP-4 beam line for tune-up and studies. It is required that all of the various intensity and extraction scenarios be accommodated with minimal operator intervention.

  8. Progress and status of the AGS Booster project

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T. )

    1989-01-01

    New physics opportunities, such as: rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demand that a rapid-cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The circumference of the Booster ring is one-quarter that of the AGS. Three modes of operation for various particles are envisioned. For unpolarized protons, four Booster pulses would be injected at a 7.5 Hz repetition rate within a 400 ms flat bottom of the AGS, enabling the present 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp to be increased to 6 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp. The protons would be accelerated to 1.5 GeV although the bending capability provided for heavy ions would eventually allow protons to be accelerated to 2.5 GeV. For heavy ions the rep rates is about 1 Hz and only one pulse would be injected into the AGS. For polarized protons 20 or so pulses can be stored in the Booster ring before injecting them into the AGS. Provisions for mixed modes of operation into a super cycle has been provided for future needs. In this paper, the lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed and major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Effectiveness of an Electronic Booster Session Delivered to Mandated Students.

    PubMed

    Linowski, Sally A; DiFulvio, Gloria T; Fedorchak, Diane; Puleo, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    College student drinking continues to be a problem in the United States. Students who have violated campus alcohol policy are at particularly high risk for dangerous drinking. While Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) has been found to be an effective strategy in reducing high-risk drinking and associated consequences, questions remain about ways to further reduce risk or sustain changes associated with a face-to face intervention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a computer-delivered personalized feedback (electronic booster) delivered to policy violators who completed a mandated BASICS program. At 3-month post-intervention, 346 participants (60.4% male and 39.6% female) were randomized to one of two conditions: assessment only (n = 171) or electronic booster feedback (n = 175). Follow-up assessments were given to all participants at 3, 6, and 12-month post-initial intervention. Both groups showed reductions in drinking after the in-person BASICS intervention, but no additional reductions were seen with the addition of an electronic booster session. Findings suggest that although brief motivational interventions delivered in person to mandated students have been shown to be effective with mandated students, there is no additional benefit from an electronic booster session delivered 3-month post-intervention for this population. PMID:26857563

  10. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Main and booster fans. 57.8518 Section 57.8518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ventilation Surface and Underground § 57.8518 Main and...

  11. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Main and booster fans. 57.8518 Section 57.8518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... shall be tested at least within 2-hours of the discovery of the fan failure, and at least every...

  12. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Main and booster fans. 57.8518 Section 57.8518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... shall be tested at least within 2-hours of the discovery of the fan failure, and at least every...

  13. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Main and booster fans. 57.8518 Section 57.8518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... shall be tested at least within 2-hours of the discovery of the fan failure, and at least every...

  14. Year 5 Booster Units. The National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England).

    The eight units of work in this document are designed to complement existing literacy booster units. Each unit is based on teaching objectives from the National Literacy Strategy Framework. They have been produced with the help of Year 5 teachers and have been trialled with pupils in a range of schools. The units support teachers' work with Year 5…

  15. History of the ZGS 500 MeV booster.

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; Martin; R.; Kustom, R.

    2006-05-09

    The history of the design and construction of the Argonne 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron from 1969 to 1982 is described. This accelerator has since been in steady use for the past 25 years to power the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).

  16. Injection of large transverse emittance EBIS beams in booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.

    2011-10-10

    During the commissioning of EBIS beams in Booster in November 2010 and in April, May and June 2011, it was found that the transverse emittances of the EBIS beams just upstream of Booster were much larger than expected. Beam emittances of 11{pi} mm milliradians had been expected, but numbers 3 to 4 times larger were measured. Here and throughout this note the beam emittance, {pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}, is taken to be the area of the smallest ellipse that contains 95% of the beam. We call this smallest ellipse the beam ellipse. If the beam distribution is gaussian, the rms emittance of the distribution is very nearly one sixth the area of the beam ellipse. The normalized rms emittance is the rms emittance times the relativistic factor {beta}{gamma} = 0.06564. This amounts to 0.12{pi} mm milliradians for the 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse. In [1] we modeled the injection and turn-by-turn evolution of an 11{pi} mm milliradian beam ellipse in the horizontal plane in Booster. It was shown that with the present injection system, up to 4 turns of this beam could be injected and stored in Booster without loss. In the present note we extend this analysis to the injection of larger emittance beams. We consider only the emittance in the horizontal plane. Emittance in the vertical plane and the effects of dispersion are treated in [2].

  17. 47 CFR 27.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 27.9 Section 27.9 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 27.9 Operation of certificated...

  18. 47 CFR 27.9 - Operation of certificated signal boosters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of certificated signal boosters. 27.9 Section 27.9 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 27.9 Operation of certificated...

  19. Alignment and Aperture Scan at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Lackey, J.; Marsh, W.; Pellico, W.; Still, D.; Triplet, K.; Waller, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Booster is currently in the process of an intensity upgrade referred to as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP). The goal of PIP is to have the Booster provide a proton beam flux of 2 x 10{sup 17} protons/hour. This is almost double the current operation of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} protons/hour. Beam losses in the machine due to the increased flux will create larger integrated doses on aperture limiting components that will need to be mitigated. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at a rep rate of 15hz and then extracts beam to the Main Injector. Several percent of the beam is lost within 3 msec after injection in the early part of acceleration. The aperture at injection energy was recently measured using corrector scans. Along with magnet survey data and aperture scan data a plan to realign the magnets in the Booster was developed and implemented in May 2012. The beam studies, analysis of the scan and alignment data, and the result of the magnet moves are presented.

  20. Liquid flyback booster pre-phase: A study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W.; Ankney, W.; Bell, J.; Berning, M.; Bryant, L.; Bufkin, A.; Cain, L.; Caram, J.; Cockrell, B.; Curry, D.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a flyback booster has been around since early in the shuttle program. The original two-stage shuttle concepts used a manned flyback booster. These boosters were eliminated from the program for funding and size reasons. The current shuttle uses two Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM's), which are recovered and refurbished after each flight; this is one of the major cost factors of the program. Replacement options have been studied over the past ten years. The conclusion reached by the most recent study is that the liquid flyback booster (LFBB) is the only competitive option from a life-cycle cost perspective. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and practicality of LFBB's. The study provides an expansion of the recommendations made during the aforementioned study. The primary benefits are the potential for enhanced reusability and a reduction of recurring costs. The potential savings in vehicle turnaround could offset the up-front costs. Development of LFBB's requires a commitment to the shuttle program for 20 to 30 years. LFBB's also offer enhanced safety and abort capabilities. Currently, any failure of an RSRM can be considered catastrophic, since there are no intact abort capabilities during the burn of the RSRM's. The performance goal of the LFBB's was to lift a fully loaded orbiter under optimal conditions, so as not to be the limiting factor of the performance capability of the shuttle. In addition, a final benefit is the availability of growth paths for applications other than shuttle.

  1. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This users manual for the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) contains descriptions of the model, the program options, the required program inputs, the program output format and the program error messages. SRB-II is written in FORTRAN and is operational on both the IBM 370/155 and the MSFC UNIVAC 1108 computers.

  2. 30 CFR 57.8518 - Main and booster fans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., or adjustments. (b) In the event of main or booster fan failure due to a malfunction, accident, power failure, or other such unplanned or unscheduled event: (1) The air quality in the affected active workings shall be tested at least within 2-hours of the discovery of the fan failure, and at least every...

  3. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly assigned into either a booster…

  4. Spacecraft and Their Boosters. Aerospace Education I. Instructor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the textbook entitled "Spacecraft and their Boosters," published in the Aerospace Education I series. Specific guidelines are provided for teachers on each chapter included in the textbook. The guidelines are organized in nine categories: objectives, behavioral objectives, textbook outline, orientation,…

  5. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  6. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 3, part 1: Study products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is part one of the study products section of the five volume series.

  7. Liquid rocket booster integration study. Volume 3: Study products. Part 2: Sections 8-19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The impacts of introducing liquid rocket booster engines (LRB) into the Space Transportation System (STS)/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch environment are identified and evaluated. Proposed ground systems configurations are presented along with a launch site requirements summary. Prelaunch processing scenarios are described and the required facility modifications and new facility requirements are analyzed. Flight vehicle design recommendations to enhance launch processing are discussed. Processing approaches to integrate LRB with existing STS launch operations are evaluated. The key features and significance of launch site transition to a new STS configuration in parallel with ongoing launch activities are enumerated. This volume is part two of the study products section of the five volume series.

  8. Abdominal Injuries in Belt-Positioning Booster Seats

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Ghati, Yoganand

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that booster seats reduce the risk of abdominal injuries by improving the fit of the seat belt on young children and encouraging better posture and compatibility with the vehicle seat. Recently, several studies have reported cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children questioning the protective effects of these restraints. The objective of this study was to examine cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children through parametric modeling to gain a thorough understanding of the injury causation scenarios. The Partners for Child Passenger Safety and CIREN in-depth crash investigation databases were queried to identify children in belt-positioning booster seats with abdominal injuries. The injury causation scenarios for these injuries were delineated using the CIREN Biotab method. The cases were modeled, using MADYMO with variations in key parameters, to determine the ranges of loads and loading rates for the abdomen and thorax. A parametric study was completed examining the influence of pretensioners and load limiters on the injury metrics obtained. Query of the two databases revealed three cases involving abdominal injuries to booster seated children. Children in two of the cases sustained a thoracic injury (AIS 3/AIS 4) in addition to their abdominal injuries (AIS 2) and review of these cases pointed to the role of shoulder belt loading in the injury causation. Modeling of these cases revealed chest compressions and accelerations of 30–53 mm and 41–89 g, respectively and abdominal deflection and velocity of 7.0–13.3 mm and 1.2–2.2 m/s, respectively. Parametric study suggested that coupling shoulder belt load limiting and lap belt buckle pretensioning resulted in improved chest and abdominal metrics while reducing head excursion, indicating that these technologies may provide injury reduction potential to pediatric rear seat occupants. PMID:20184845

  9. Mechanical Solitaire Thrombectomy with Low-Dose Booster Tirofiban Injection

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Duck-Ho; Jeong, Hae Woong; Ha, Sam Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent has been associated with a high recanalization rate and favorable clinical outcome in intra-arterial thrombolysis. To achieve a higher recanalization rate for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy, we used an intra-arterial low-dose booster tirofiban injection into the occluded segment after stent deployment. We report the safety and recanalization rates for mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with a low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Materials and Methods Between February and March 2013, 13 consecutive patients underwent mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. The occlusion sites included the proximal middle cerebral artery (5 patients), the internal carotid artery (5 patients), the top of the basilar artery (2 patients) and the distal middle cerebral artery (M2 segment, 1 patient). Six patients underwent bridge treatment, including intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Tirofiban of 250 µg was used in all patients except one (500 µg). All occluded vessels were recanalized after 3 attempts at stent retrieval (1 time, n=9; 2 times, n=2; 3 times, n=2). Results Successful recanalization was achieved in all patients (TICI 3, n=8; TICI 2b, n=5). Procedural complications developed in 3 patients (subarachnoid hemorrhage, n=2; hemorrhagic transformation, n=1). Mortality occurred in one patient with a basilar artery occlusion due to reperfusion brain swelling after mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy with low-dose booster tirofiban injection. Favorable clinical outcome (mRS≤2) was observed in 8 patients (61.5%). Conclusion Our modified mechanical Solitaire thrombectomy method using a low-dose booster tirofiban injection might enhance the recanalization rate with no additive hemorrhagic complications. PMID:27621948

  10. Hypersonic aerothermal characteristics of a manned low finenes ratio shuttle booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernot, P. T.; Throckmorton, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of a winged booster model having canards and an ascent configuration comprised of the booster mounted in tandem with an orbiter model has been conducted at Mach 10.2 in the continuous flow hypersonic tunnel. Longitudinal and lateral directional force characteristics were obtained over angle of attack ranges of -12 deg to 60 deg for the booster and -11 deg to 11 deg for the ascent configuration. Interference heating effects on the booster using the phase-change coating technique were determined at 0 deg angle of attack. Some oil flow photographs of the isolated booster and orbiter and ascent configuration are also presented.

  11. Space shuttle: Stability and control effectiveness at high and low angles of attack and effects of variations in engine shround, fin, and drag petal configurations for the Boeing 0.008899-scale pressure-fed ballistic recoverable booster, model 979-160

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. L.; Obrien, R. G.; Oiye, M. Y.; Vanderleest, S.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were carried out in the Boeing transonic and supersonic wind tunnels on a 0.008899-scale model of a proposed pressure-fed ballistic recoverable booster (BRB) configuration. The purpose of the test program was to determine the stability and control effectiveness of the basic configuration at high and low angles of attack, and to conduct parametric studies of various engine shroud, fin, and drag petal configurations. Six-component force data and base pressure data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.35 to 4.0 at angles of attack of -5 to 25 and 55 to 85 at zero degrees sideslip and over a sideslip range of -10 to +10 at angles of attack ranging from -10 to 72.5. Two-component force data were also obtained with a fin balance on selected runs.

  12. Solid Rocket Booster Large Main and Drogue Parachute Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, Courtenay B.; Hengel, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The parachutes on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) are the means for decelerating the SRB and allowing it to impact the water at a nominal vertical velocity of 75 feet per second. Each SRB has one pilot, one drogue, and three main parachutes. About four minutes after SRB separation, the SRB nose cap is jettisoned, deploying the pilot parachute. The pilot chute then deploys the drogue parachute. The drogue chute provides initial deceleration and proper SRB orientation prior to frustum separation. At frustum separation, the drogue pulls the frustum from the SRB and allows the main parachutes that are mounted in the frustum to unpack and inflate. These chutes are retrieved, inspected, cleaned, repaired as needed, and returned to the flight inventory and reused. Over the course of the Shuttle Program, several improvements have been introduced to the SRB main parachutes. A major change was the replacement of the small (115 ft. diameter) main parachutes with the larger (136 ft. diameter) main parachutes. Other modifications were made to the main parachutes, main parachute support structure, and SRB frustum to eliminate failure mechanisms, improve damage tolerance, and improve deployment and inflation characteristics. This reliability analysis is limited to the examination of the SRB Large Main Parachute (LMP) and drogue parachute failure history to assess the reliability of these chutes. From the inventory analysis, 68 Large Main Parachutes were used in 651 deployments, and 7 chute failures occurred in the 651 deployments. Logistic regression was used to analyze the LMP failure history, and it showed that reliability growth has occurred over the period of use resulting in a current chute reliability of R = .9983. This result was then used to determine the reliability of the 3 LMPs on the SRB, when all must function. There are 29 drogue parachutes that were used in 244 deployments, and no in-flight failures have occurred. Since there are no

  13. Freedom Star to Image SpaceX Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Freedom Star, a former space shuttle solid rocket booster recovery ship, is now a floating high tech camera and radar platform that will be stationed in the North Atlantic to track and capture ...

  14. A nonlinear analysis of the EHF booster

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.; Shi, D.

    1987-01-01

    We have analyzed particle motion at 1.2 GeV with assumption of nonlinearities arising from non-linear space charge forces and from the lattice sextupoles which are tuned to cancel the machine chromaticity. In the first case the motion is as expected and there are no problems as long as the x and y betatron tunes are separated by an integer or more. In the second case the motion is stable so long as the betatron amplitudes do not exceed values corresponding to beam normalized emittance of 100 mm-mr; when this occurs the effects of fifth-order betatron resonances are observed. 3 refs.

  15. Preliminary study of AC power feeders for AGS booster

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.

    1992-07-17

    It has been proposed that the AGS Heavy Ion/Proton Booster be excited directly from the electric power distribution system without intervening an energy storage buffer such as an MG set or a magnetic energy buffer. The average power requirement of the AGS Booster is less than many single-loads presently housed on the lab site. However, the power swing will be the largest single pulsating load on the lab site. The large power swings will impact on the power grid producing utility-line disturbances such as voltage fluctuations and harmonic generation. Thus, it is necessary to carefully evaluate the quality of the electric power system resulting from the interconnection, such that the utility system is not degraded either on the lab site or at LILCO`s substation.

  16. Preliminary study of AC power feeders for AGS booster

    SciTech Connect

    Meth, M.

    1992-07-17

    It has been proposed that the AGS Heavy Ion/Proton Booster be excited directly from the electric power distribution system without intervening an energy storage buffer such as an MG set or a magnetic energy buffer. The average power requirement of the AGS Booster is less than many single-loads presently housed on the lab site. However, the power swing will be the largest single pulsating load on the lab site. The large power swings will impact on the power grid producing utility-line disturbances such as voltage fluctuations and harmonic generation. Thus, it is necessary to carefully evaluate the quality of the electric power system resulting from the interconnection, such that the utility system is not degraded either on the lab site or at LILCO's substation.

  17. Fermilab booster ion profile monitor system using LABVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chen, D.; Crisp, J.

    1995-05-05

    The new Booster Ion Profile Monitor has been implemented to simultaneously capture both horizontal and vertical profiles at a once-per-turn sample rate, throughout a Booster cycle. The system uses LabVIEW software running on a MacIntosh Quadra 650 talking to both VME and CAMAC hardware. Microchannel plate voltage is turned on just prior to making a measurement and automatically turned off when the measurement is complete. This action allows using a high gain while preserving microchannel plate lifetime. The data captured may be archived for later analysis. Current analysis available include position, emittance/sigma, 2D color intensity plot of raw data, and single turn profiles for any turn during the cycle. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Fermilab Booster Operational Status: Beam Loss and Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Robert C.

    2002-12-01

    Beam loss reduction and control challenges confronting the Fermilab Booster are presented in the context of the current operational status. In Summer 2002 the programmatic demand for 8 GeV protons will increase to 5E20/year. This is an order of magnitude above recent high rates and nearly as many protons as the machine has produced in its entire 30-year lifetime. Catastrophic radiation damage to accelerator components must be avoided, maintenance in an elevated residual radiation environment must be addressed, and operation within a tight safety envelope must be conducted to limit prompt radiation in the buildings and grounds around the Booster. Diagnostic and performance tracking improvements, enhanced orbit control, and a beam loss collimation/localization system are essential elements in the approach to achieving the expected level of performance and are described here.

  19. Fermilab Booster Transition Crossing Simulations and Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C. M.; Tan, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Fermilab Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV at 15 Hz. In the PIP (Proton Improvement Plan) era, it is required that Booster deliver 4.2 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse to extraction. One of the obstacles for providing quality beam to the users is the longitudinal quadrupole oscillation that the beam suffers from right after transition. Although this oscillation is well taken care of with quadrupole dampers, it is important to understand the source of these oscillations in light of the PIP II requirements that require 6.5 x $10^{12}$ protons per pulse at extraction. This paper explores the results from machine studies, computer simulations and solutions to prevent the quadrupole oscillations after transition.

  20. Injection system of teh SSC Medium Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, N.; Gerig, R.; McGill, J.; Brown, K.

    1994-04-01

    The Medium Energy Booster (MEB) is the third of the SSCL accelerators and the largest of the resistive magnet synchrotrons. It accelerates protons from an injection momentum of 12 GeV/c to a top momentum of 200 GeV/c. A beam injection system has been designed to inject the beam transferred from the Low Energy Booster onto the MEB closed orbit in the MEB injection insertion region. The beam is injected via a vertical bending Lambertson septum magnet and a horizontal kicker with appropriate matching and very little beam loss and emittance dilution. The beam optics of the injection system is described in this paper. The required parameters of the Lambertson septum magnet and the injection kicker are given.

  1. Going Boldly Beyond: Progress on NASA's Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Jody; Crumbly, Chris

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System is implementing an evolvable configuration approach to system development in a resource-constrained era. Legacy systems enable non-traditional development funding and contribute to sustainability and affordability. Limited simultaneous developments reduce cost and schedule risk. Phased approach to advanced booster development enables innovation and competition, incrementally demonstrating affordability and performance enhancements. Advanced boosters will provide performance for the most capable heavy lift launcher in history, enabling unprecedented space exploration benefiting all of humanity.

  2. Space Transportation in the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of Space Transportation in the New Millennium. Pictures are shown of the space shuttle lift Off, rocket motion, the space shuttle main engine, the space shuttle external tank, the space shuttle solid rocket booster, the X-33, X-34, X-37, X-38, magnetic levitation, the rbcc, nuclear thermal propulsion, anti-matter propulsion system, the NTP or anti-matter concept vehicles, and the Space Elevator.

  3. Construction and early commissioning results of the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Ahrens, L.; Damm, R.; McNerney, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    The AGS Booster synchrotron has been designed to accelerate protons from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV and heavy ions from several MeV per nucleon to several hundred MeV per nucleon for all the nuclei up to gold. The design requirements and measurements results of major accelerator components and systems are presented. The early commissioning results of the injection is also presented. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Propellant Management in Booster and Upper Stage Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.

    1997-01-01

    A summary review of some of the technical issues which surround the design of the propulsion systems for Booster and Upper Stage systems are presented. The work focuses on Propellant Geyser, Slosh, and Orientation. A brief description of the concern is given with graphics which help the reader to understand the physics of the situation. The most common solutions to these problems are given with there respective advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This annotated subject guide to Web sites and additional resources focuses on space and astronomy. Specifies age levels for resources that include Web sites, CD-ROMS and software, videos, books, audios, and magazines; offers professional resources; and presents a relevant class activity. (LRW)

  6. Designing an RF thruster booster unit with TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancellotti, Vito; Vecchi, Giuseppe; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2007-11-01

    Electromagnetic (RF) plasma-based propulsion systems have gained increasing interest, as able to yield continuous thrust and controllable and wide-ranging exhaust velocities. An RF plasma thruster essentially features a plasma source, a booster unit and a magnetic nozzle. The usual choice for the booster is the ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), a well-established technology in fusion experiments to convey RF powers to magnetized plasmas. To help design the booster unit, TOPICA was extended to deal with magnetized cylindrical inhomogeneous plasmas [1]. The latter required a new module in charge of solving Maxwell's equations within the plasma to obtain the pertinent Green's function in the Fourier domain, i.e. the relation between the transverse magnetic and electric fields at the air-plasma interface. Calculating the antenna impedance---and hence the plasma loading---relies on an integral-equation formulation and subsequent finite-element weighted-residual scheme to evaluate the current density distribution on the conducting bodies and at the air-plasma interface. In this work the design of an ICRH stage with TOPICA is discussed. [1] V. Lancellotti et al. (2007) Proc. Joint Propulsion Conf. AIAA-2007-5129

  7. BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Burrill, Andrew; Anders, W; Frahm, A.; Knobloch, Jens; Neumann, Axel; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Turlington, Larry D.

    2014-12-01

    The bERLinPro project, a 100 mA, 50 MeV superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for the purpose of studying the technical challenges and physics of operating a high current, c.w., 1.3 GHz ERL. This machine will utilize three unique SRF cryomodules for the injector, booster and linac module respectively. The booster cryomodule will contain three 2-cell SRF cavities, based on the original design by Cornell University, and will be equipped with twin 115 kW RF power couplers in order to provide the appropriate acceleration to the high current electron beam. This paper will review the status of the fabrication of the 4 booster cavities that have been built for this project by Jefferson Laboratory and look at the challenges presented by the incorporation of fundamental power couplers capable of delivering 115 kW. The test plan for the cavities and couplers will be given along with a brief overview of the cryomodule design.

  8. The STS-93 external tank and booster stack is moved under lightning wire protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank nears the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it will sit underneath the lightning shield wires strung from the roof of the VAB for protection. The stack is temporarily being stored outside while repair work is being done inside on the hail-damaged external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. Discovery was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The STS-93 stack is expected to be moved back into the VAB after Discovery returns to the pad. The scheduled date for launch of mission STS-96 is no earlier than May 27. STS-93 is targeted for launch on July 22, carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  9. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, William H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design and analysis was completed for a SLEEC (Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) which could be incorporated on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Studies were completed which predicted weights and performance increases and development plans were prepared for the full-scale bench and static test of SLEEC. In conjunction with the design studies, a series of supporting analyses were performed to assure the validity and feasibility of performance, fabrication, cost, and reliability for the selected design. The feasibility and required amounts of bench, static firing, and flight tests considered necessary for the successful incorporation of SLEEC on the Shuttle SRBs were determined. Preliminary plans were completed which define both a follow on study effort and a development program.

  10. A Perpendicular Biased 2nd Harmonic Cavity for the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C. Y.; Dey, J.; Madrak, R. L.; Pellico, W.; Romanov, G.; Sun, D.; Terechkine, I.

    2015-07-13

    A perpendicular biased 2nd harmonic cavity is currently being designed for the Fermilab Booster. Its purpose cavity is to flatten the bucket at injection and thus change the longitudinal beam distribution so that space charge effects are decreased. It can also with transition crossing. The reason for the choice of perpendicular biasing over parallel biasing is that the Q of the cavity is much higher and thus allows the accelerating voltage to be a factor of two higher than a similar parallel biased cavity. This cavity will also provide a higher accelerating voltage per meter than the present folded transmission line cavity. However, this type of cavity presents technical challenges that need to be addressed. The two major issues are cooling of the garnet material from the effects of the RF and the cavity itself from eddy current heating because of the 15 Hz bias field ramp. This paper will address the technical challenge of preventing the garnet from overheating.

  11. Testing and environmental exposure of parachute materials for the solid rocket booster decelerator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, B. K.

    1978-01-01

    Static tests and evaluation of nonmetallic materials for use in parachutes for recovery of solid rocket boosters used in the space shuttle program are reported. Literature survey and manufacturer and vendor contacts led to the choice of nylon as the fabric most capable of withstanding the extreme loads and environmental conditions during repeated use. The material tests included rupture strength, elongation, abrasion resistance, shrinkage, environmental exposure, and degradation levels. Rinsing and drying procedures were also investigated and a salt-free level for nylon recommended in preparation for reuse. In all possible cases, worst-case conditions were used (e.g., inflation loads, seawater exposure for 3 days per drop-recovery, etc.).

  12. The STS-93 external tank and booster stack sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site waiting for lightning shield wires to be installed on the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the background. The stack is being temporarily stored outside the VAB while Space Shuttle Discovery undergoes repair to hail damage in High Bay 1. Discovery was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The STS-93 stack will be moved under the wires at the VAB for protection until Discovery returns to the pad, later this week. The scheduled date for launch of mission STS-96 is no earlier than May 27. STS-93 is targeted for launch on July 22, carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  13. Computational and Experimental Unsteady Pressures for Alternate SLS Booster Nose Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braukmann, Gregory J.; Streett, Craig L.; Kleb, William L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Glass, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) predictions of the unsteady transonic flow about a Space Launch System (SLS) configuration were made with the Fully UNstructured Three-Dimensional (FUN3D) flow solver. The computational predictions were validated against results from a 2.5% model tested in the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Unitary Plan Facility. The peak C(sub p,rms) value was under-predicted for the baseline, Mach 0.9 case, but the general trends of high C(sub p,rms) levels behind the forward attach hardware, reducing as one moves away both streamwise and circumferentially, were captured. Frequency of the peak power in power spectral density estimates was consistently under-predicted. Five alternate booster nose shapes were assessed, and several were shown to reduce the surface pressure fluctuations, both as predicted by the computations and verified by the wind tunnel results.

  14. The Repair and Return to Flight of Solid Rocket Booster Forward Skirt Serial Number 20022

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.; Jones, C. S.; Honeycutt, J. H., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    On April 5, 1991, a solid rocket booster (SRB) forward skirt serial number (S/N) 20022 sustained buckling damage during water impact after the launch of Space Transportation System Flight 37 (STS-37). As of that date, five forward skirts had been lost during water impact. Repair attempts began with the least damaged skirt available (S/N 20022). Sp ecial hydraulic tooling was used to remove buckled areas of the skirt. Afterwards, its aft clevis pinholes were found to be out of alignment with the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) check gauge, but weld passes were used to correct this condition. Meanwhile, USA Analytics generated mechanical property data for buckled and subsequently debuckled material. Their analysis suggested that structural integrity might be improved by adding stringer reinforcements, stiffeners, to the aft bay section of the skirt. This improvement was recommended as a fleet modification to be implemented on a case-by-case basis.

  15. Effects of natural environment on first generation solid rocket booster thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    The effort to demonstrate, by real-time exposure, the effects of the natural environment at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, upon the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) is summarized, and that the overall SRB TPS configuration is verified to meet all requirements for resistance to the conditions associated with outdoor weathering, including: solar radiation; temperature; humidity; precipitation; wind; sand/dust abrasion; static electricity; salt spray; fungus; and atmospheric oxidants. The evaluation criterion for this project was based upon flatwise tensile properties, visual inspection, color change, and thermal performance. Based upon the evaluation of the changes in these properties, it is concluded that properly applied and topcoat-protected TPS can satisfactorily withstand the conditions of the natural environment at KSC for exposures up to six months.

  16. Space Shuttle Atmospheric ascent flight dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patha, J. T.; Noess, K. A.; Lines, M. V.

    1972-01-01

    The atmospheric ascent flight phase of the mated composite booster and orbiter is discussed. The composite recoverable space shuttle booster and orbiter exhibits unique flight control characteristics. This uniqueness results from large lifting surfaces and aerodynamic and structural assymetrics. An effective load relief technique reduces aerodynamic loads on both the booster and the orbiter. Reducing aerodynamic loads permits decreasing the structural weight of the lifting and stabilizing surfaces. An orbiter payload penalty is caused by trajectory deviations resulting from load relief. However, the net effect of an effective load relief technique is an increase in payload capability. Atmospheric launch dynamics investigations have been carried out for different configuration types, which include expendable, straight wing, delta wing, and ballistic recoverable boosters.

  17. A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Thrust Imbalance for the RSRMV Booster During Both the Ignition Transient and Steady State Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Crowder, Winston; Steadman, Todd E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of statistical analyses performed to predict the thrust imbalance between two solid rocket motor boosters to be used on the Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. Two legacy internal ballistics codes developed for the Space Shuttle program were coupled with a Monte Carlo analysis code to determine a thrust imbalance envelope for the SLS vehicle based on the performance of 1000 motor pairs. Thirty three variables which could impact the performance of the motors during the ignition transient and thirty eight variables which could impact the performance of the motors during steady state operation of the motor were identified and treated as statistical variables for the analyses. The effects of motor to motor variation as well as variations between motors of a single pair were included in the analyses. The statistical variations of the variables were defined based on data provided by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the upgraded five segment booster and from the Space Shuttle booster when appropriate. The results obtained for the statistical envelope are compared with the design specification thrust imbalance limits for the SLS launch vehicle

  18. Ariane 5 solid rocket booster dynamic behavior with respect to pressure oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, G.; Bouvier, F.; Mastrangelo, G.; Robert, E.

    2011-10-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the Ariane 5 Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) excited by internal pressure oscillations. These pressure oscillations have sliding frequencies close to acoustic natural frequencies and changing amplitudes. Because the modal behavior of the booster is also continuously changing during the flight due to propellant burning, predictions with finite-element (FE) modeling (modal analyses, harmonic and transient responses) are necessary to predict and understand the dynamic behavior of the booster.

  19. Space Shuttle Propulsion System Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welzyn, Ken; VanHooser, Katherine; Moore, Dennis; Wood, David

    2011-01-01

    This session includes the following sessions: (1) External Tank (ET) System Reliability and Lessons, (2) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), Reliability Validated by a Million Seconds of Testing, (3) Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Reliability via Process Control, and (4) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Reliability via Acceptance and Testing.

  20. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.