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Sample records for air-liquid interface culture

  1. Water permeability of primary mouse keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpstone, M.B.; Kennedy, A.H.; Harmon, C.S.; Potts, R.O.

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the development of the epidermal permeability barrier in vitro, tritiated water (HTO) flux was measured across murine keratinocytes cultured at the air-liquid interface. Using a micro-diffusion technique, it was shown that air-liquid cultures form areas where the water diffusion is comparable to that of intact neonatal mouse skin. When water permeability is measured over a large area of the culture surface, however, significantly higher flux is obtained. These results show that under the culture conditions used, areas of water barrier comparable to intact neonatal mouse skin coexist with regions of less complete barrier formation.

  2. Primary Air-Liquid Interface Culture of Nasal Epithelium for Nasal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Xin; Jackson, Claire L; Cole, Janice L; Lackie, Peter M; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Lucas, Jane; Conway, Joy

    2016-07-01

    Nasal drug administration is a promising alternative to oral and parenteral administration for both local and systemic delivery of drugs. The benefits include its noninvasive nature, rapid absorption, and circumvention of first pass metabolism. Hence, the use of an in vitro model using human primary nasal epithelial cells could be key to understanding important functions and parameters of the respiratory epithelium. This model will enable investigators to address important and original research questions using a biologically relevant in vitro platform that mimics the in vivo nasal epithelial physiology. The purpose of this study was to establish, systematically characterize, and validate the use of a primary human nasal epithelium model cultured at the air-liquid interface for the study of inflammatory responses and drug transport and to simultaneously quantify drug effects on ciliary activity. PMID:27223825

  3. A Janus-paper PDMS platform for air-liquid interface cell culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rahim; Ochoa, Manuel; Donaldson, Amy; Parupudi, Tejasvi; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ghaemmaghami, Amir; Ziaie, Babak

    2015-05-01

    A commercially available Janus paper with one hydrophobic (polyethylene-coated) face and a hygroscopic/hydrophilic one is irreversibly bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate incorporating microfluidic channels via corona discharge surface treatment. The bond strength between the polymer-coated side and PDMS is characterized as a function of corona treatment time and annealing temperature/time. A maximum strength of 392 kPa is obtained with a 2 min corona treatment followed by 60 min of annealing at 120 °C. The water contact angle of the corona-treated polymer side decreases with increased discharge duration from 98° to 22°. The hygroscopic/hydrophilic side is seeded with human lung fibroblast cells encapsulated in a methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel to show the potential of this technology for nutrient and chemical delivery in an air-liquid interface cell culture.

  4. Barrier function of human keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Mak, V H; Cumpstone, M B; Kennedy, A H; Harmon, C S; Guy, R H; Potts, R O

    1991-03-01

    Stratum corneum (SC), the outermost and least permeable layer of skin, is the major barrier to passive transepidermal water loss. In the research described in this paper, we have used human keratinocyte cultures, grown at the air-liquid (A/L) interface, to examine the relationship between epidermal differentiation (including SC formation) and barrier function. Histologically, the A/L culture showed several markers of complete differentiation, including the presence of well-organized and defined epidermal cell layers, keratohyalin granules, and a multilayered SC. The permeability of tritiated water through epidermal cultures, which had grown for 3 weeks at the A/L interface, was measured with a microdiffusion apparatus. The results of these experiments demonstrated that: a) the human keratinocyte cultures developed a substantial barrier (i.e., a multilayered SC) to water diffusion across the entire surface. If the relative humidity of the culturing environment was lowered from 100% to around 75%, the barrier was significantly improved; b) the differentiation promoter, 1.25-dihydroxy-vitamin-D3, increased the number of SC layers and reduced water permeation through the culture; c) the nature of the keratinocyte support matrix could be altered to improve the morphology as well as the barrier function of the epidermal cultures. Overall, the observations are consistent with the relationship that is believed to exist between SC intercellular lipid content and percutaneous penetration. Confirmation of this hypothesis will further the considerable potential of human keratinocyte A/L cultures as a valuable and relevant model in which to study drug absorption and metabolism. PMID:2002253

  5. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans. PMID:27108236

  6. Characterization of Nipah virus infection in a model of human airway epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Vergara, Leoncio A; Wen, Julie W; Long, Dan; Rockx, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause lethal respiratory illness in humans. No vaccine/therapeutic is currently licensed for humans. Human-to-human transmission was previously reported during outbreaks and NiV could be isolated from respiratory secretions, but the proportion of cases in Malaysia exhibiting respiratory symptoms was significantly lower than that in Bangladesh. Previously, we showed that primary human basal respiratory epithelial cells are susceptible to both NiV-Malaysia (M) and -Bangladesh (B) strains causing robust pro-inflammatory responses. However, the cells of the human respiratory epithelium that NiV targets are unknown and their role in NiV transmission and NiV-related lung pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here, we characterized NiV infection of the human respiratory epithelium using a model of the human tracheal/bronchial (B-ALI) and small airway (S-ALI) epithelium cultured at an air-liquid interface. We show that NiV-M and NiV-B infect ciliated and secretory cells in B/S-ALI, and that infection of S-ALI, but not B-ALI, results in disruption of the epithelium integrity and host responses recruiting human immune cells. Interestingly, NiV-B replicated more efficiently in B-ALI than did NiV-M. These results suggest that the human tracheal/bronchial epithelium is favourable to NiV replication and shedding, while inducing a limited host response. Our data suggest that the small airways epithelium is prone to inflammation and lesions as well as constituting a point of virus entry into the pulmonary vasculature. The use of relevant models of the human respiratory tract, such as B/S-ALI, is critical for understanding NiV-related lung pathogenesis and identifying the underlying mechanisms allowing human-to-human transmission. PMID:26932515

  7. Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Amara L.; Marr, Linsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials in consumer products. Some of these products are likely to be aerosolized, making silver nanoparticles a high priority for inhalation toxicity assessment. To study the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles, we have exposed cultured lung cells to them at the air-liquid interface. Cells were exposed to suspensions of silver or nickel oxide (positive control) nanoparticles at concentrations of 2.6, 6.6, and 13.2 μg cm−2 (volume concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μg ml−1) and to 0.7 μg cm−2 silver or 2.1 μg cm−2 nickel oxide aerosol at the air-liquid interface. Unlike a number of in vitro studies employing suspensions of silver nanoparticles, which have shown strong toxic effects, both suspensions and aerosolized nanoparticles caused negligible cytotoxicity and only a mild inflammatory response, in agreement with animal exposures. Additionally, we have developed a novel method using a differential mobility analyzer to select aerosolized nanoparticles of a single diameter to assess the size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:23484109

  8. Growth and differentiation of primary and passaged equine bronchial epithelial cells under conventional and air-liquid-interface culture conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Horses develop recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) that resembles human bronchial asthma. Differentiated primary equine bronchial epithelial cells (EBEC) in culture that closely mimic the airway cells in vivo would be useful to investigate the contribution of bronchial epithelium in inflammation of airway diseases. However, because isolation and characterization of EBEC cultures has been limited, we modified and optimized techniques of generating and culturing EBECs from healthy horses to mimic in vivo conditions. Results Large numbers of EBEC were obtained by trypsin digestion and successfully grown for up to 2 passages with or without serum. However, serum or ultroser G proved to be essential for EBEC differentiation on membrane inserts at ALI. A pseudo-stratified muco-ciliary epithelium with basal cells was observed at differentiation. Further, transepithelial resistance (TEER) was more consistent and higher in P1 cultures compared to P0 cultures while ciliation was delayed in P1 cultures. Conclusions This study provides an efficient method for obtaining a high-yield of EBECs and for generating highly differentiated cultures. These EBEC cultures can be used to study the formation of tight junction or to identify epithelial-derived inflammatory factors that contribute to lung diseases such as asthma. PMID:21649893

  9. Evidence of increased keratinocyte proliferation in air-liquid interface cultures of non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Amsellem, C; Haftek, M; Hoyo, E; Thivolet, J; Schmitt, D

    1993-08-01

    Modern pharmacological and dermatological research requires the use of appropriate in vitro models which permit a faithful reproduction of various aspects of the in situ situation. The air-exposed culture of keratinocytes on dead de-epidermized dermis is one of the best models of in vitro epidermal differentiation known at the moment. In this study, we verified the model's validity for the reproduction of a hyperproliferative genodermatosis: non-bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma. We used subcultured epidermal keratinocytes originating from normal and ichthyotic patients. Light and electron microscopy of pathological cultures disclosed, on day 14, a terminally differentiated epidermis with a marked granular layer and hyperkeratosis which, however, was not dramatically different from the normal controls. On day 25, the normal cultures displayed an even more pronounced hyperkeratosis and hypergranulosis, whereas the reconstructed epidermis of pathological origin presented a considerable reduction of the viable non-keratinized compartment and a focal parakeratosis. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed the expression of several differentiation markers which were not observed in the immersed culture models (e.g. the desmosome- and differentiation-related antigens KM48 and G36-19). Abundant keratohyalin granules were stained with AKH1 antibody and observed even in the deep epidermal layers, but no profilaggrin-filaggrin conversion could be detected biochemically.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7506468

  10. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-01

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens. PMID:26795546

  11. Primary in vitro culture of porcine tracheal epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface as a model to study airway epithelium and Aspergillus fumigatus interactions.

    PubMed

    Khoufache, Khaled; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Rivollet, Danièle; Alliot, Annie; Allaire, Eric; Cordonnier, Catherine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Botterel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    Since the airway epithelium is the first tissue encountered by airborne fungal spores, specific models are needed to study this interaction. We developed such a model using primary porcine tracheal epithelial cells (PTEC) as a possible alternative to the use of primary human cells. PTEC were obtained from pigs and were cultivated in an air-liquid interface. Fluorescent brightener was employed to quantify the internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Potential differences (Vt) and transepithelial resistances (Rt) after challenge with the mycotoxin, verruculogen, were studied. Primers for porcine inflammatory mediator genes IL-8, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF were designed for a quantitative real-time PCR procedure to study cellular responses to challenges with A. fumigatus conidia. TEM showed the differentiation of ciliated cells and the PTEC ability to internalize conidia. The internalization rate was 21.9 ± 1.4% after 8 h of incubation. Verruculogen (10(-6) M) significantly increased Vt without having an effect on the Rt. Exposure of PTEC to live A. fumigatus conidia for 24 h induced a 10- to 40-fold increase in the mRNA levels of inflammatory mediator genes. PTEC behave similarly to human cells and are therefore a suitable alternative to human cells for studying interaction between airway epithelium and A. fumigatus. PMID:20608777

  12. Hydrodynamical entrapment of ciliates at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferracci, Jonathan; Ueno, Hironori; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    We found the new phenomenon of the entrapment of ciliates at the air-water interface, though they are not trapped by a solid interface. We first characterize the behaviours of cells at the interface by comparing it to those away from interfaces. The results showed that the cell's swimming velocity is considerably reduced at the air-water interface. In order to experimentally verify the possible physiological causes of the entrapment, we observed their behaviours in absence of positive chemotaxis for oxygen and the negative geotaxis. The results illustrated that the entrapment phenomenon was not dependent on these physiological conditions. The experiments using surfactant revealed that the entrapment phenomenon was strongly affected by the velocity-stress conditions at the interface. This fact was confirmed numerically by a boundary element method, i.e. the stress-free condition at the air-liquid interface is one of the main mechanisms of the entrapment phenomenon found in the experiments. Since the entrapment phenomenon found in this study affects the cell-cell interactions and the mass transport at the interface, the knowledge obtained in this study is useful for better understanding the complex behaviours of swimming microorganisms in nature. PhD student in the Physiological Flow Studies Laboratory.

  13. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  14. Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of an Alveolar Epithelial Cell Line to Airborne Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface: A Comparison with Conventional, Submerged Cell-Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Anke-Gabriele; Karg, Erwin; Brendel, Ellen; Hinze-Heyn, Helga; Maier, Konrad L.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Stoeger, Tobias; Schmid, Otmar

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of inhalable nanoparticles have been widely studied in vitro with pulmonary cells cultured under submerged and air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions. Submerged exposures are experimentally simpler, but ALI exposures are physiologically more realistic and hence potentially biologically more meaningful. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of human alveolar epithelial-like cells (A549) to airborne agglomerates of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles at the ALI, compared it to the response under submerged culture conditions, and provided a quantitative comparison with the literature data on different types of particles and cells. For ZnO nanoparticle doses of 0.7 and 2.5 μg ZnO/cm2 (or 0.09 and 0.33 cm2 ZnO/cm2), cell viability was not mitigated and no significant effects on the transcript levels of oxidative stress markers (HMOX1, SOD-2 and GCS) were observed. However, the transcript levels of proinflammatory markers (IL-8, IL-6, and GM-CSF) were induced to higher levels under ALI conditions. This is consistent with the literature data and it suggests that in vitro toxicity screening of nanoparticles with ALI cell culture systems may produce less false negative results than screening with submerged cell cultures. However, the database is currently too scarce to draw a definite conclusion on this issue. PMID:23484138

  15. Novel method for Ag colloidal cluster formation by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Teppei; Akimoto, Yusuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Kitazumi, Kosuke; Kajiya, Shuji; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2015-09-01

    We report a novel method for formation of sub-nanoclusters by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface. The density of plasma induced by laser ablation at the air-liquid interface should be lower than that produced by laser ablation in liquid. In the lower density plasma, the produced clusters rarely grow or aggregate into larger clusters because the collision probability is low, resulting in the formation of small clusters. Ag sub-nanoclusters were observed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These results show that low-density plasma can be applied to small-cluster formation and that laser ablation at the air-liquid interface produces a good reactive field for the formation of sub-nanoclusters. Our results highlight the importance of low-density plasma induced at the air-liquid interface for sub-nanocluster formation.

  16. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Results A novel air-liquid interface cell exposure system (ALICE) for nanoparticles in liquids is presented and validated. The ALICE generates a dense cloud of droplets with a vibrating membrane nebulizer and utilizes combined cloud settling and single particle sedimentation for fast (~10 min; entire exposure), repeatable (<12%), low-stress and efficient delivery of nanoparticles, or dissolved substances, to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface. Validation with various types of nanoparticles (Au, ZnO and carbon black nanoparticles) and solutes (such as NaCl) showed that the ALICE provided spatially uniform deposition (<1.6% variability) and had no adverse effect on the viability of a widely used alveolar human epithelial-like cell line (A549). The cell deposited dose can be controlled with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) over a dynamic range of at least 0.02-200 μg/cm2. The cell-specific deposition efficiency is currently limited to 0.072 (7.2% for two commercially available 6-er transwell plates), but a deposition efficiency of up to 0.57 (57%) is possible for better cell coverage of the exposure chamber. Dose-response measurements with ZnO nanoparticles (0.3-8.5 μg/cm2) showed significant differences in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-8) and oxidative stress (HO-1) markers when comparing submerged and air-liquid interface exposures. Both exposure methods showed no cellular response below 1 μg/cm2 ZnO, which indicates that ZnO nanoparticles are not toxic at occupationally allowed exposure levels. Conclusion The ALICE

  17. Protein denaturation by combined effect of shear and air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Maa, Y F; Hsu, C C

    1997-06-20

    The effect of shear alone on the aggregation of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase) has been found to be insignificant. This study focused on the synergetic effect of shear and gas-liquid interface on these two model proteins. Two shearing systems, the concentric-cylinder shear device (CCSD) and the rotor/stator homogenizer, were used to generate high shear (> 10(6)) in aqueous solutions in the presence of air. High shear in the presence of an air-liquid interface had no major effect on rhDNase but caused rhGH to form noncovalent aggregates. rhGH aggregation was induced by the air-liquid interface and was found to increase with increasing protein concentration and the air-liquid interfacial area. The aggregation was irreversible and exhibited a first-order kinetics with respect to the protein concentration and air-liquid interfacial area. Shear and shear rate enhanced the interaction because of its continuous generation of new air-liquid interfaces. In the presence of a surfactant, aggregation could be delayed or prevented depending upon the type and the concentration of the surfactant. The effect of air-liquid interface on proteins at low shear was examined using a nitrogen bubbling method. We found that foaming is very detrimental to rhGH even though the shear involved is low. The use of anti-foaming materials could prevent rhGH aggregation during bubbling. The superior stability exhibited by rhDNase may be linked to the higher surface tension and lower foaming tendency of its aqueous solution. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 54: 503-512, 1997. PMID:18636406

  18. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Exposure Devices for In Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cells to atmospheric pollutants at the air-liquid interface (ALI) is a more realistic approach than exposures of attached cells submerged in liquid medium. However, there is still limited understanding of the ideal ALI device design features that permit reproducible a...

  19. Oxidation of oleic acid at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura F.; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F.; Beekman, Christopher P.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Allen, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both freshwater and saltwater sources. Oleic acid monolayers at the air/water interface and at the air/sodium chloride solution interface were investigated using surface-specific, broad-bandwidth, sum frequency generation spectroscopy. Complementary techniques of infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy and surface pressure measurements taken during monolayer oxidation confirmed the sum frequency results. Using this nonlinear optical technique coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 M sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous subphase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  20. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, L. F.; Bazerbashi, M. F.; Beekman, C. P.; Hadad, C. M.; Allen, H. C.

    2006-12-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of the acyl chains is thought to be key to aerosol growth. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air- sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Using sum frequency generation spectroscopy coupled with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  1. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers at air/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Laura

    2008-03-01

    Field studies of marine and continental aerosols find that fatty acid films form on aqueous tropospheric aerosols. Oxidation of oleic acid monolayers by ozone was studied to understand the fate of fat-coated aerosols from both fresh and salt water sources. Using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, we present a molecular-level investigation of fatty acid monolayers at the air-water and air-sodium chloride solution interface and explore reactions with atmospheric oxidants by these model systems. Coupling sum frequency generation spectroscopy with a Langmuir trough, concurrent spectroscopic and thermodynamic data were collected to obtain a molecular picture of the monolayers. No substantial difference was observed between oxidation of monolayers spread on water and on 0.6 molar sodium chloride solutions. Results indicate that depending on the size of the aerosol and the extent of oxidation, the subsequent oxidation products may not remain at the surface of these films, but instead be dissolved in the aqueous sub-phase of the aerosol particle. Results also indicate that oxidation of oleic acid could produce monolayers containing species that have no oxidized acyl chains.

  2. Swimming of a model ciliate near an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Ardekani, A M

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the role of the hydrodynamic forces on a swimming microorganism near an air-liquid interface is studied. The lubrication theory is utilized to analyze hydrodynamic effects within the narrow gap between a flat interface and a small swimmer. By using an archetypal low-Reynolds-number swimming model called "squirmer," we find that the magnitude of the vertical swimming velocity is on the order of O(εlnε), where ε is the ratio of the gap width to the swimmer's body size. The reduced swimming velocity near an interface can explain experimental observations of the aggregation of microorganisms near a liquid interface. PMID:23848775

  3. Air-Liquid Interface Biofilms of Bacillus cereus: Formation, Sporulation, and Dispersion▿

    PubMed Central

    Wijman, Janneke G. E.; de Leeuw, Patrick P. L. A.; Moezelaar, Roy; Zwietering, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus was assessed using 56 strains of B. cereus, including the two sequenced strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987. Biofilm production in microtiter plates was found to be strongly dependent on incubation time, temperature, and medium, as well as the strain used, with some strains showing biofilm formation within 24 h and subsequent dispersion within the next 24 h. A selection of strains was used for quantitative analysis of biofilm formation on stainless steel coupons. Thick biofilms of B. cereus developed at the air-liquid interface, while the amount of biofilm formed was much lower in submerged systems. This suggests that B. cereus biofilms may develop particularly in industrial storage and piping systems that are partly filled during operation or where residual liquid has remained after a production cycle. Moreover, depending on the strain and culture conditions, spores constituted up to 90% of the total biofilm counts. This indicates that B. cereus biofilms can act as a nidus for spore formation and subsequently can release their spores into food production environments. PMID:17209076

  4. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Capeloto, Otávio Augusto; Zanuto, Vitor Santaella; Malacarne, Luis Carlos; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Lukasievicz, Gustavo Vinicius Bassi; Bialkowski, Stephen Edward; Astrath, Nelson Guilherme Castelli

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density. PMID:26856622

  5. Increased Transfer of a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid in Escherichia coli Biofilms at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Król, Jaroslaw E.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Rogers, Linda M.; Beyenal, Haluk; Krone, Stephen M.; Top, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    Although biofilms represent a common bacterial lifestyle in clinically and environmentally important habitats, there is scant information on the extent of gene transfer in these spatially structured populations. The objective of this study was to gain insight into factors that affect transfer of the promiscuous multidrug resistance plasmid pB10 in Escherichia coli biofilms. Biofilms were grown in different experimental settings, and plasmid transfer was monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy and plate counting. In closed flow cells, plasmid transfer in surface-attached submerged biofilms was negligible. In contrast, a high plasmid transfer efficiency was observed in a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface in an open flow cell with low flow rates. A vertical flow cell and a batch culture biofilm reactor were then used to detect plasmid transfer at different depths away from the air-liquid interface. Extensive plasmid transfer occurred only in a narrow zone near that interface. The much lower transfer frequencies in the lower zones coincided with rapidly decreasing oxygen concentrations. However, when an E. coli csrA mutant was used as the recipient, a thick biofilm was obtained at all depths, and plasmid transfer occurred at similar frequencies throughout. These results and data from separate aerobic and anaerobic matings suggest that oxygen can affect IncP-1 plasmid transfer efficiency, not only directly but also indirectly, through influencing population densities and therefore colocalization of donors and recipients. In conclusion, the air-liquid interface can be a hot spot for plasmid-mediated gene transfer due to high densities of juxtaposed donor and recipient cells. PMID:21642400

  6. Optimization of an air-liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L; Elihn, Karine

    2016-10-01

    The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm(-2) ) at cell-free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min(-1) ) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm(-2) ) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26935862

  7. Selectively dissolution-recrystallization of ZnO crystals at the air-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiulan; Masuda, Yoshitake; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    Unique morphologies of ZnO crystals were grown firstly at the air-liquid interface. The formation of bamboo leaf- and morning glory-like morphologies depended on the exposed crystal face. ZnO nanosheets were formed by selective dissolution, random diffusion, and recrystallization with a preferential orientation at the edge of pre-existing ZnO nanowhiskers, due to the local deviation of the pH value, which are derived from the volatile and highly soluble ammonia molecules at different fine regions. The high-resolution TEM and selected area electron diffraction clarified the formation mechanism.

  8. The production of drops by the bursting of a bubble at an air liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrozes, J. S.; Ligneul, P.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism arising during the bursting of a bubble at an air-liquid interface is described. A single bubble was followed from an arbitrary depth in the liquid, up to the creation and motion of the film and jet drops. Several phenomena were involved and their relative order of magnitude was compared in order to point out the dimensionless parameters which govern each step of the motion. High-speed cinematography is employed. The characteristic bubble radius which separates the creation of jet drops from cap bursting without jet drops is expressed mathematically. The corresponding numerical value for water is 3 mm and agrees with experimental observations.

  9. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials. PMID:25127447

  10. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:26385430

  11. Analysis of bacterial detachment from substratum surfaces by the passage of air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, C; Busscher, H J; van der Mei, H C

    2001-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s(-1)), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  12. Analysis of Bacterial Detachment from Substratum Surfaces by the Passage of Air-Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Cristina; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 × 106 cells cm−2 was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s−1), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  13. Lamellar Bodies Form Solid Three-dimensional Films at the Respiratory Air-Liquid Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Olmeda, Bárbara; Bertocchi, Cristina; Haller, Thomas; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for lung function. It is assembled, stored and secreted as particulate entities (lamellar body-like particles; LBPs). LBPs disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, leading to an instantaneous spreading of material and a decline in surface tension. Here, we demonstrate that the film formed by the adsorbed material spontaneously segregate into distinct ordered and disordered lipid phase regions under unprecedented near-physiological conditions and, unlike natural surfactant purified from bronchoalveolar lavages, dynamically reorganized into highly viscous multilayer domains with complex three-dimensional topographies. Multilayer domains, in coexistence with liquid phases, showed a progressive stiffening and finally solidification, probably driven by a self-driven disassembly of LBPs from a sub-surface compartment. We conclude that surface film formation from LBPs is a highly dynamic and complex process, leading to a more elaborated scenario than that observed and predicted by models using reconstituted, lavaged, or fractionated preparations. PMID:20558742

  14. Passive micromixer using by convection and surface tension effects with air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jongil; Warrick, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a passive micromixer that utilizes an air-liquid interface and surface tension effects to enhance fluid mixing via convection and Marangoni effects. Performance of the microfluidic component is tested within a passive-pumping-based device that consists of three microchannels connected in succession using passive micro-mixers. Mixing was quantified at 5 key points along the length of the device using microscope images of patterned streams of Alexa 488 fluorescent-dyed water and pure DI water flowing through the device. The passive micro-mixer mixed fluid 15–20 times more effectively than diffusion between laminar flow streams alone and is a novel micro-mixer embodiment that provides an additional strategy for removing external components from microscale devices for simpler, autonomous operation. PMID:25104979

  15. Efficiency of air/liquid interfaces in detaching bacteria from a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Gas/liquid interfaces are known to be significantly more effective than shear stress in detaching microscale colloids from substrates by inducing surface tension forces. Providing that a three-phase contact at the interface of a gas bubble, the liquid phase and the particle occurs, the magnitude of the surface tension force can potentially exceed by orders of magnitude the adhesion force, which keeps the micro particles on the surface. We investigate the ability of a moving air/liquid interface to stimulate the detachment of bacteria from a surface. Bacteria are micron-sized living organisms with strong tendency to attach to almost any substrate that they come into contact with. Attachment of bacteria on the surface is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of their growth medium, substrate, and cell surface. Moreover, once fixed on the surface, the microorganisms evolve in time to create intricate biofilm structures, which are highly challenging to be removed. The objective of this study to characterise the efficiency of this detachment process as a function of bacterial attachment as well as hydrodynamic parameters such the surface tension and the interface velocity. Swiss National Science Foundation P2ELP2-158896.

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Removal or Tyrphostin AG1478 Treatment Reduces Goblet Cells & Mucus Secretion of Epithelial Cells from Asthmatic Children Using the Air-Liquid Interface Model

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jeremy C.; Douglas, Isobel; Bell, Jennifer; Comer, David; Bailie, Keith; Skibinski, Grzegorz; Heaney, Liam G.; Shields, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Epithelial remodelling in asthma is characterised by goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus hypersecretion for which no therapies exist. Differentiated bronchial air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children display high goblet cell numbers. Epidermal growth factor and its receptor have been implicated in goblet cell hyperplasia. Objectives We hypothesised that EGF removal or tyrphostin AG1478 treatment of differentiating air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children would result in a reduction of epithelial goblet cells and mucus secretion. Methods In Aim 1 primary bronchial epithelial cells from non-asthmatic (n = 5) and asthmatic (n = 5) children were differentiated under EGF-positive (10ng/ml EGF) and EGF-negative culture conditions for 28 days. In Aim 2, cultures from a further group of asthmatic children (n = 5) were grown under tyrphostin AG1478, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, conditions. All cultures were analysed for epithelial resistance, markers of differentiation using immunocytochemistry, ELISA for MUC5AC mucin secretion and qPCR for MUC5AC mRNA. Results In cultures from asthmatic children the goblet cell number was reduced in the EGF negative group (p = 0.01). Tyrphostin AG1478 treatment of cultures from asthmatic children had significant reductions in goblet cells at 0.2μg/ml (p = 0.03) and 2μg/ml (p = 0.003) as well as mucus secretion at 2μg/ml (p = 0.04). Conclusions We have shown in this preliminary study that through EGF removal and tyrphostin AG1478 treatment the goblet cell number and mucus hypersecretion in differentiating air-liquid interface cultures from asthmatic children is significantly reduced. This further highlights the epidermal growth factor receptor as a potential therapeutic target to inhibit goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus hypersecretion in asthma. PMID:26057128

  17. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A; Fichorova, Raina N; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-01-01

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27589787

  18. Cigarette smoke alters primary human bronchial epithelial cell differentiation at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Schamberger, Andrea C.; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.; Mise-Racek, Nikica; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The differentiated human airway epithelium consists of different cell types forming a polarized and pseudostratified epithelium. This is dramatically altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by basal and goblet cell hyperplasia, and squamous cell metaplasia. The effect of cigarette smoke on human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) differentiation remains to be elucidated. We analysed whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affected primary (p)HBEC differentiation and function. pHBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and differentiation was quantified after 7, 14, 21, or 28 days by assessing acetylated tubulin, CC10, or MUC5AC for ciliated, Clara, or goblet cells, respectively. Exposure of differentiating pHBEC to CSE impaired epithelial barrier formation, as assessed by resistance measurements (TEER). Importantly, CSE exposure significantly reduced the number of ciliated cells, while it increased the number of Clara and goblet cells. CSE-dependent cell number changes were reflected by a reduction of acetylated tubulin levels, an increased expression of the basal cell marker KRT14, and increased secretion of CC10, but not by changes in transcript levels of CC10, MUC5AC, or FOXJ1. Our data demonstrate that cigarette smoke specifically alters the cellular composition of the airway epithelium by affecting basal cell differentiation in a post-transcriptional manner. PMID:25641363

  19. Characterisation of Pellicles Formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster’s Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  20. Aggregation of Puroindoline in Phospholipid Monolayers Spread at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Dubreil, L.; Vié, V.; Beaufils, S.; Marion, D.; Renault, A.

    2003-01-01

    Puroindolines, cationic and cystine-rich low molecular weight lipid binding proteins from wheat seeds, display unique foaming properties and antimicrobial activity. To unravel the mechanism involved in these properties, the interaction of puroindoline-a (PIN-a) with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) monolayers was studied by coupling Langmuir-Blodgett and imaging techniques. Compression isotherms of PIN-a/phospholipid monolayers and adsorption of PIN-a to lipid monolayers showed that the protein interacted strongly with phospholipids, especially with the anionic DPPG. The electrostatic contribution led to the formation of a highly stable lipoprotein monolayer. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy showed that PIN-a was mainly inserted in the liquid-expanded phase of the DPPC, where it formed an aggregated protein network and induced the fusion of liquid-condensed domains. For DPPG, the protein partitioned in both the liquid-expanded and liquid-condensed phases, where it was aggregated. The extent of protein aggregation was related both to the physical state of phospholipids, i.e., condensed or expanded, and to the electrostatic interactions between lipids and PIN-a. Aggregation of PIN-a at air-liquid and lipid interfaces could account for the biological and technological properties of this wheat lipid binding protein. PMID:14507728

  1. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  2. Effects and uptake of gold nanoparticles deposited at the air-liquid interface of a human epithelial airway model

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, C.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Muehlfeld, C.; Schmid, O.; Ferron, G.A.; Maier, K.L.; Gehr, P.; Lenz, A.-G.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and biology has increased rapidly in recent years. Gold NPs have advantageous properties such as chemical stability, high electron density and affinity to biomolecules, making them very promising candidates as drug carriers and diagnostic tools. However, diverse studies on the toxicity of gold NPs have reported contradictory results. To address this issue, a triple cell co-culture model simulating the alveolar lung epithelium was used and exposed at the air-liquid interface. The cell cultures were exposed to characterized aerosols with 15 nm gold particles (61 ng Au/cm{sup 2} and 561 ng Au/cm{sup 2} deposition) and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. Experiments were repeated six times. The mRNA induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFalpha, IL-8, iNOS) and oxidative stress markers (HO-1, SOD2) was measured, as well as protein induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, GM-CSF, TNFalpha, INFgamma). A pre-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed to further study the effects of particles under inflammatory conditions. Particle deposition and particle uptake by cells were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and design-based stereology. A homogeneous deposition was revealed, and particles were found to enter all cell types. No mRNA induction due to particles was observed for all markers. The cell culture system was sensitive to LPS but gold particles did not cause any synergistic or suppressive effects. With this experimental setup, reflecting the physiological conditions more precisely, no adverse effects from gold NPs were observed. However, chronic studies under in vivo conditions are needed to entirely exclude adverse effects.

  3. Aerosolized ZnO nanoparticles induce toxicity in alveolar type II epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yumei; Williams, Nolann G.; Tolic, Ana; Chrisler, William B.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Maddux, Bettye L.; Pounds, Joel G.; Laskin, Alexander; Orr, Galya

    2012-01-20

    The majority of in vitro studies characterizing the impact of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cells that line the respiratory tract were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in suspension. This approach introduces processes that are unlikely to occur during inhaled NP exposures in vivo, such as the shedding of toxic doses of dissolved ions. ZnO NPs are used extensively and pose significant sources for human exposure. Exposures to airborne ZnO NPs can induce adverse effects, but the relevance of the dissolved Zn2+ to the observed effects in vivo is still unclear. Our goal was to mimic in vivo exposures to airborne NPs and decipher the contribution of the intact NP from the contribution of the dissolved ions to airborne ZnO NP toxicity. We established the exposure of alveolar type II epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI), and compared the impact of aerosolized ZnO NPs and NPs in suspension at the same cellular doses, measured as the number of particles per cell. By evaluating membrane integrity and cell viability 6 and 24 hours post exposure we found that aerosolized NPs induced toxicity at the ALI at doses that were in the same order of magnitude as doses required to induce toxicity in submersed cultures. In addition, distinct patterns of oxidative stress were observed in the two exposure systems. These observations unravel the ability of airborne ZnO NPs to induce toxicity without the contribution of dissolved Zn2+ and suggest distinct mechanisms at the ALI and in submersed cultures.

  4. Cell deformation at the air-liquid interface induces Ca2+-dependent ATP release from lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsingh, Ronaldo; Grygorczyk, Alexandra; Solecki, Anna; Cherkaoui, Lalla Siham; Berthiaume, Yves; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    Extracellular nucleotides regulate mucociliary clearance in the airways and surfactant secretion in alveoli. Their release is exquisitely mechanosensitive and may be induced by stretch as well as airflow shear stress acting on lung epithelia. We hypothesized that, in addition, tension forces at the air-liquid interface (ALI) may contribute to mechanosensitive ATP release in the lungs. Local depletion of airway surface liquid, mucins, and surfactants, which normally protect epithelial surfaces, facilitate such release and trigger compensatory mucin and fluid secretion processes. In this study, human bronchial epithelial 16HBE14o(-) and alveolar A549 cells were subjected to tension forces at the ALI by passing an air bubble over the cell monolayer in a flow-through chamber, or by air exposure while tilting the cell culture dish. Such stimulation induced significant ATP release not involving cell lysis, as verified by ethidium bromide staining. Confocal fluorescence microscopy disclosed reversible cell deformation in the monolayer part in contact with the ALI. Fura 2 fluorescence imaging revealed transient intracellular Ca(2+) elevation evoked by the ALI, which did not entail nonspecific Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space. ATP release was reduced by ∼40 to ∼90% from cells loaded with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM and was completely abolished by N-ethylmalemide (1 mM). These experiments demonstrate that in close proximity to the ALI, surface tension forces are transmitted directly on cells, causing their mechanical deformation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic ATP release. Such a signaling mechanism may contribute to the detection of local deficiency of airway surface liquid and surfactants on the lung surface. PMID:21239538

  5. Exposure of silver-nanoparticles and silver-ions to lung cells in vitro at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) has been used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial so far. Despite the promising advantages posed by using Ag-nanoparticles (NPs), their interaction with mammalian systems is currently not fully understood. An exposure route via inhalation is of primary concern for humans in an occupational setting. Aim of this study was therefore to investigate the potential adverse effects of aerosolised Ag-NPs using a human epithelial airway barrier model composed of A549, monocyte derived macrophage and dendritic cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were exposed to 20 nm citrate-coated Ag-NPs with a deposition of 30 and 278 ng/cm2 respectively and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. To elucidate whether any effects of Ag-NPs are due to ionic effects, Ag-Nitrate (AgNO3) solutions were aerosolised at the same molecular mass concentrations. Results Agglomerates of Ag-NPs were detected at 24 h post exposure in vesicular structures inside cells but the cellular integrity was not impaired upon Ag-NP exposures. Minimal cytotoxicity, by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase, could only be detected following a higher concentrated AgNO3-solution. A release of pro-inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-8 was neither observed upon Ag-NP and AgNO3 exposures as well as was not affected when cells were pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Also, an induction of mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-8, could only be observed for the highest AgNO3 concentration alone or even significantly increased when pre-stimulated with LPS after 4 h. However, this effect disappeared after 24 h. Furthermore, oxidative stress markers (HMOX-1, SOD-1) were expressed after 4 h in a concentration dependent manner following AgNO3 exposures only. Conclusions With an experimental setup reflecting physiological exposure conditions in the human lung more realistic, the present study indicates that Ag

  6. Growth of airway epithelial cells at an air-liquid interface changes both the response to particle exposure and iron homeostasis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    RATIONALE: We tested the hypothesis that 1) relative to submerged cells, airway epithelial cells grown at an air-liquid interface and allowed to differentiate would have an altered response to particle exposure and 2) that these differences would be associated with indices of iro...

  7. Formation of mesostructured thin films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Edler, Karen J; Yang, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The growth of free-standing surfactant-templated films of inorganic oxides at the air-solution interface is an attractive route to manufacture unsupported mesostructured membranes for a range of potential applications. So far this synthesis method has been relatively neglected due to the fragility of the initial films. More recent work to understand the mechanism of formation has led to development of thicker, more robust films, as well as providing new information on the general formation mechanisms of mesoporous materials whether in film or particulate form. This review describes the properties of silica and other inorganic oxide films templated by surfactants and grown at the air-solution interface, their formation mechanisms and implications for further development of these materials. PMID:23090013

  8. Pulmonary surfactant and macrophages studied at the air/liquid interface revealed by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesford, Dana-Marie; Allen, Heather; Carlson, Tracy; Schlesinger, Larry

    2012-04-01

    The alveolus is lined with a complex mixture of lipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant (PS) that lower surface tension at the alveolar air/liquid interface. The surface area of the lung for a 70 kg adult human at total lung capacity is ˜70 m^2. The large surface area and the direct exposure to the environment with every inhalation make this organ more susceptible to invasion by viruses, bacteria, and small particles. The most abundant cell recovered in human lung lavage is the alveolar macrophage which accounts for 85% of the total. The primary function of the alveolar macrophage is to defend the lung against invasion, but also in the clearance of surfactant components in the lung. Quintero and Wright,^1 in an in vitro study observing alveolar macrophage metabolism of two lipid components dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), noted that DPPG was removed at a faster rate. The mechanism by which this process takes place is not fully understood and our aim is to investigate the interactions of macrophages with different lipids using Brewster angle microscopy. Preliminary studies suggest that THP-1 differentiated macrophages do not significantly perturb DPPC and DPPG monolayers and research utilizing alveolar macrophages is underway. The effect of PS SP-A and SP-D is also discussed.

  9. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  10. Efficient suilysin-mediated invasion and apoptosis in porcine respiratory epithelial cells after streptococcal infection under air-liquid interface conditions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fandan; Wu, Nai-Huei; Seitz, Maren; Herrler, Georg; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococci may colonize the epithelium in the airways and other entry sites. While local infection often remains asymptomatic, severe or even fatal diseases occur when streptococci become invasive and spread to different sites in the infected host. We have established porcine respiratory air-liquid interface cultures (ALI) from the porcine lung to analyze the interaction of streptococci with their primary target cells. As representative of the streptococcal family we chose Streptococcus suis (S. suis) that is not only a major swine respiratory pathogen but can also infect humans. Suilysin, a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), is an important virulence factor. By comparing a S. suis wt strain with a suilysin-deficient mutant, we demonstrate that suilysin contributes to (i) adherence to airway cells (ii) loss of ciliated cells (iii) apoptosis, and (iv) invasion. Furthermore, we show that cytolytic activity of suilysin is crucial for these effects. A striking result of our analysis was the high efficiency of S. suis-induced apoptosis and invasion upon infection under ALI conditions. These properties have been reported to be less efficient when analyzed with immortalized cells. We hypothesize that soluble effectors such as suilysin are present at higher concentrations in cells kept at ALI conditions and thus more effective. These results should be relevant also for infection of the respiratory tract by other respiratory pathogens. PMID:27229328

  11. Efficient suilysin-mediated invasion and apoptosis in porcine respiratory epithelial cells after streptococcal infection under air-liquid interface conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fandan; Wu, Nai-Huei; Seitz, Maren; Herrler, Georg; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Streptococci may colonize the epithelium in the airways and other entry sites. While local infection often remains asymptomatic, severe or even fatal diseases occur when streptococci become invasive and spread to different sites in the infected host. We have established porcine respiratory air-liquid interface cultures (ALI) from the porcine lung to analyze the interaction of streptococci with their primary target cells. As representative of the streptococcal family we chose Streptococcus suis (S. suis) that is not only a major swine respiratory pathogen but can also infect humans. Suilysin, a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), is an important virulence factor. By comparing a S. suis wt strain with a suilysin-deficient mutant, we demonstrate that suilysin contributes to (i) adherence to airway cells (ii) loss of ciliated cells (iii) apoptosis, and (iv) invasion. Furthermore, we show that cytolytic activity of suilysin is crucial for these effects. A striking result of our analysis was the high efficiency of S. suis-induced apoptosis and invasion upon infection under ALI conditions. These properties have been reported to be less efficient when analyzed with immortalized cells. We hypothesize that soluble effectors such as suilysin are present at higher concentrations in cells kept at ALI conditions and thus more effective. These results should be relevant also for infection of the respiratory tract by other respiratory pathogens. PMID:27229328

  12. Human bronchial epithelial cells exposed in vitro to cigarette smoke at the air-liquid interface resemble bronchial epithelium from human smokers

    PubMed Central

    Poussin, Carine; Weisensee, Dirk; Gebel, Stephan; Hengstermann, Arnd; Sewer, Alain; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Xiang, Yang; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-01-01

    Organotypic culture of human primary bronchial epithelial cells is a useful in vitro system to study normal biological processes and lung disease mechanisms, to develop new therapies, and to assess the biological perturbations induced by environmental pollutants. Herein, we investigate whether the perturbations induced by cigarette smoke (CS) and observed in the epithelium of smokers' airways are reproducible in this in vitro system (AIR-100 tissue), which has been shown to recapitulate most of the characteristics of the human bronchial epithelium. Human AIR-100 tissues were exposed to mainstream CS for 7, 14, 21, or 28 min at the air-liquid interface, and we investigated various biological endpoints [e.g., gene expression and microRNA profiles, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) release] at multiple postexposure time points (0.5, 2, 4, 24, 48 h). By performing a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, we observed a significant enrichment of human smokers' bronchial epithelium gene signatures derived from different public transcriptomics datasets in CS-exposed AIR-100 tissue. Comparison of in vitro microRNA profiles with microRNA data from healthy smokers highlighted various highly translatable microRNAs associated with inflammation or with cell cycle processes that are known to be perturbed by CS in lung tissue. We also found a dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 release by AIR-100 tissue 48 h after CS exposure in agreement with the known effect of CS on this collagenase expression in smokers' tissues. In conclusion, a similar biological perturbation than the one observed in vivo in smokers' airway epithelium could be induced after a single CS exposure of a human organotypic bronchial epithelium-like tissue culture. PMID:23355383

  13. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  14. A method to form semiconductor quantum dot (QD) thin films by igniting a flame at air-liquid interface: CdS and WO3.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Aarti H; Patil, Sagar H; Sathaye, Shivaram D; Patil, Kashinath R

    2015-02-01

    We reveal an easy, inexpensive, efficient one stepflame synthesis of semiconductor/metal oxide thin films at air-liquid interface, subsequently, transferred on suitable substrate. The method has been illustrated by the formation of CdS and WO3 QDs thin films. The features of the present method are (1) Growth of thin films consisting of0.5-2.0nm sized Quantum Dots (QDs)/(ultra-small nanoparticles) in a short time, at the air-liquid interface which can be suitably transferred by a well-known Blodgett technique to an appropriate substrate, (2) The method is suitable to apply layer by layer (LbL) technique to increase the film thickness as well as forming various compositions as revealed by AFM measurements. The films are characterized for their structure (SAED), morphology (TEM), optical properties (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL). Possible mechanism of formation of QDs thin film and effect of capping in case of CdS QDs is discussed. PMID:25463183

  15. The adherence of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 to stainless steel: the importance of the air-liquid interface and nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Giaouris, Efstathios D; Nychas, George-John E

    2006-12-01

    Biofilm formation on stainless steel by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 during growth in three different nutritious conditions was studied. The ability of micro-organisms to generate biofilms on the stainless steel surfaces was studied for a total period of 18 days at 20 degrees C, under three different experimental treatments: (i) growth medium (tryptone soy broth) was not refreshed (no further nutrients were provided) during the incubation period, (ii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and (iii) growth medium was renewed every 2 days and at the same time the planktonic cells from the old medium were transferred to the new fresh medium. It was found that biofilms developed better and a higher number of adherent cells (ca. 10(7) cfu/cm(2)) were recovered when the organism was grown in periodically renewed nutrient medium than when the growth medium was not refreshed. Regardless of the availability of nutrients, biofilm development was better (range 2-3 logs greater) when coupons were not totally covered by the growth medium and part of the surface was exposed to the air-liquid interface, than when coupons were submerged in the medium. The results suggest that existence of air-liquid interface and adequate nutrient conditions provide the best environment for Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 biofilm formation on stainless steel. The possible role of stationary phase planktonic cells in biofilm development by sessile/attached microbial cells is also discussed. PMID:16943077

  16. A method for growing a biofilm under low shear at the air-liquid interface using the drip flow biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Goeres, Darla M; Hamilton, Martin A; Beck, Nicholas A; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Hilyard, Jackie D; Loetterle, Linda R; Lorenz, Lindsey A; Walker, Diane K; Stewart, Philip S

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes how to grow a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm under low fluid shear close to the air-liquid interface using the drip flow reactor (DFR). The DFR can model environments such as food-processing conveyor belts, catheters, lungs with cystic fibrosis and the oral cavity. The biofilm is established by operating the reactor in batch mode for 6 h. A mature biofilm forms as the reactor operates for an additional 48 h with a continuous flow of nutrients. During continuous flow, the biofilm experiences a low shear as the media drips onto a surface set at a 10 degrees angle. At the end of 54 h, biofilm accumulation is quantified by removing coupons from the reactor channels, rinsing the coupons to remove planktonic cells, scraping the biofilm from the coupon surface, disaggregating the clumps, then diluting and plating for viable cell enumeration. The entire procedure takes 13 h of active time that is distributed over 5 d. PMID:19528953

  17. Studies of molecular monolayers at air-liquid interfaces by second harmonic generation: question of orientational phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Rasing, T.; Shen, Y.R.; Kim, M.W.; Grubb, S.; Bock, J.

    1985-06-01

    Insoluble molecular monolayers at gas-liquid interfaces provide an insight to the understanding of surfactants, wetting, microemulsions and membrane structures and offer a possibility to study the rich world of 2-dimensional phase transitions. In the interpretation of the observed properties of these systems various assumptions about the molecular orientation are often made, but so far few clear experimental data exist. In this paper we will show how optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be used to measure the molecular orientation of monolayers of surfactant molecules at water-air interfaces. By simultaneously measuring the surface pressure versus surface molecular area we can show for the first time that the observed liquid condensed-liquid expanded transition is an orientational phase transition. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  19. The CULTEX RFS: A Comprehensive Technical Approach for the In Vitro Exposure of Airway Epithelial Cells to the Particulate Matter at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Hochrainer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The EU Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) demands the implementation of alternative methods for analyzing the hazardous effects of chemicals including particulate formulations. In the field of inhalation toxicology, a variety of in vitro models have been developed for such studies. To simulate the in vivo situation, an adequate exposure device is necessary for the direct exposure of cultivated lung cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The CULTEX RFS fulfills these requirements and has been optimized for the exposure of cells to atomized suspensions, gases, and volatile compounds as well as micro- and nanosized particles. This study provides information on the construction and functional aspects of the exposure device. By using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, the technical design was optimized to realize a stable, reproducible, and homogeneous deposition of particles. The efficiency of the exposure procedure is demonstrated by exposing A549 cells dose dependently to lactose monohydrate, copper(II) sulfate, copper(II) oxide, and micro- and nanoparticles. All copper compounds induced cytotoxic effects, most pronounced for soluble copper(II) sulfate. Micro- and nanosized copper(II) oxide also showed a dose-dependent decrease in the cell viability, whereby the nanosized particles decreased the metabolic activity of the cells more severely. PMID:23509768

  20. Influence of gold species (AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-)) on self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in solutions and morphology of composite thin films fabricated at the air/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingjuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaokai; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2016-01-21

    Composite thin films doped with Au species were fabricated at an air/liquid interface via a series of steps, including the mass transfer of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) across the liquid/liquid interface between a DMF/CHCl3 solution and an aqueous solution containing either AuCl4(-) or AuCl2(-), self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in a mixed DMF-water solution, and adsorption and further self-organization of the formed aggregates at the air/liquid interface. This is a new approach for fabricating composite polymer films and can be completed within a very short time. AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-) ions were found to significantly influence the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer and the morphologies of the composite films, leading to the formation of nanowire arrays and a foam structure at the air/liquid interface, respectively, which originated from rod-like micelles and microcapsules that had formed in the respective solutions. The effect of the metal complex was analyzed based on the packing parameters of the amphiphilic polymer molecules in different microenvironments and the interactions between the pyridine groups and the metal chloride anions. In addition, these composite thin films exhibited stable and durable performance as heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroaromatics in aqueous solutions. PMID:26688280

  1. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase. PMID:25640463

  2. Bacillus anthracis spores germinate extracellularly at air-liquid interface in an in vitro lung model under serum-free conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Powell, Joshua D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Hess, Becky M.; Straub, Tim M.

    2015-07-30

    Aims: To better understand the parameters that govern spore dissemination after lung exposure using in vitro cell systems. Methods and Results: We evaluated the kinetics of uptake, germination and proliferation of B. anthracis Sterne spores in association with human primary lung epithelial cells, Calu-3, and A549 cell lines. We also analyzed the influence of various cell culture media formulations related to spore germination. Conclusions: We found negligible spore uptake by epithelial cells, but germination and proliferation of spores in the extracellular environment was evident, and was appreciably higher in A549 and Calu-3 cultures than in primary epithelial cells. Additionally, ourmore » results revealed spores in association with primary cells submerged in cell culture media germinated 1 h« less

  3. Bacillus anthracis spores germinate extracellularly at air-liquid interface in an in vitro lung model under serum-free conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Joshua D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Hess, Becky M.; Straub, Tim M.

    2015-07-30

    Aims: To better understand the parameters that govern spore dissemination after lung exposure using in vitro cell systems. Methods and Results: We evaluated the kinetics of uptake, germination and proliferation of B. anthracis Sterne spores in association with human primary lung epithelial cells, Calu-3, and A549 cell lines. We also analyzed the influence of various cell culture media formulations related to spore germination. Conclusions: We found negligible spore uptake by epithelial cells, but germination and proliferation of spores in the extracellular environment was evident, and was appreciably higher in A549 and Calu-3 cultures than in primary epithelial cells. Additionally, our results revealed spores in association with primary cells submerged in cell culture media germinated 1 h

  4. Photoinduced Directional Motions of Microparticles at Air-Liquid-Crystal Interfaces of Azobenzene-Doped Liquid-Crystal Films with Homeotropic or Homogeneous Alignment Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effects of liquid-crystal (LC) alignments on photoinduced motions of microparticles at air-LC interfaces of azobenzene-doped LC films. In homeotropically aligned LC films, the lattice spacings of pseudo-hexagonal structures of microparticles site-selectively exhibited reversible expansion or contraction on alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light. The particle motions were probably driven by photochemical deformation of LC surfaces. In homogeneously aligned films, alternating irradiation induced macroscopic convective flows followed by rapid gathering or dispersion of linear chains of microparticles. Particle motions were significantly influenced by LC alignments as well as the light wavelength.

  5. Reclaiming Aboriginal Knowledge at the Cultural Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunkaporta, Tyson; McGinty, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Many studies and papers have explored and critiqued the "what" and the "why" of working at the cultural interface of mainstream curricula and local Indigenous knowledge, but this project sought to understand the "how". Participants went beyond explorations of "cultural items" and worked in the overlap between the New South Wales Department's…

  6. Phenotypic and physiologic variability in nasal epithelium cultured from smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of air-liquid interface (ALI) culturing of mammalian airway epithelium is a recent innovation for experimental modeling of airway epithelial development, function, and pathogenic mechanisms associated with infectious agent and irritant exposure. This construct provi...

  7. Cultural Interface Theory in the Kenya Context and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maakrun, Julie; Maher, Marguerite

    2016-01-01

    Yunkaporta's (2009) pedagogical "eight ways" conceptual framework, inspired by Nakata's (2007) cultural interface theory, provided the platform for interpretation of the data in the current study. Here we considered the transferability of the framework to a current initiative in Kenya and its usefulness in preparation for an expansion of…

  8. Air-Liquid Interfaces: II. Water Structure and Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Heather; Gopalakrishnan, Sandhya; Ma, Gang; Liu, Dingfang; Levering, Lori

    2004-03-01

    Aqueous salt solutions were investigated using scanning sum frequency generation (SFG), a highly surface-selective spectroscopy, and ATR-IR and Raman spectroscopies. Water surface structure was investigated for NaF, NaCl, NaBr and NaI aqueous solutions and surface data indicate a significantly disturbed hydrogen bonding environment from that of neat water. The spectra strongly suggest the presence of bromide and iodide anions in the interfacial region in addition to an increase in interfacial depth; yet the surfaces of the sodium fluoride and chloride salt solutions do not show evidence of surface water perturbation. Ammonium chloride and sulfate, and sodium sulfate aqueous solutions were also investigated. Surface water structure varied considerably between the three salt solutions. Electric double layer effects are indicated.

  9. Examining teacher-researcher collaboration through the cultural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Wendy; Veresov, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Sharada Gade, in drawing on her long association with a mathematics teacher in Sweden, theorises the complexities of the teacher-researcher collaboration as an expansive learning activity that has developed over time. In this paper, an alternate reading of the teacher-researcher collaboration is offered, one that adds to the analysis provided by Gade, but which draws on the conceptual lens of the cultural interface. We build on Gade's theorising by further explicating the relational space that emerges when teachers and researchers come together. We argue that it is the emergence of this space that can restrain or facilitate the trajectory of collaboration.

  10. Conducting polymer as smart interfaces for cultured neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Mauricio, Ines; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Serra, Giorgio; Bianchi, Francesca

    2005-05-01

    This work is part of a research project aimed at realising conducting polymer matrices for interfacing with cultured neurons. The polymer matrix has a dual function, one as a medium for recording electrical activity; the other is chemical stimulation through the release of bioactive molecules. In this work we use poly-3-hexylthiophene as a conducting polymer matrix. To test the polymer"s ability to release molecules upon the application of a potential it was doped with glutamate (GA). GA is an important neurotransmitter, and its controlled release can be important in several medical and tissue engineering applications. Diffusional and controlled release of GA from the polymer were assessed. Biocompatibility of the samples was evaluated at each stage using neuroblastoma cell cultures.

  11. CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION DURING DIFFERENTIATION OF CULTURED HUMAN PRIMARY BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary airway epithelial cell cultures are a useful tool for the in vitro study of normal bronchial cell differentiation and function, airway disease mechanisms, and pathogens and toxin response. Growth of these cells at an air-liquid interface for several days results in the f...

  12. A Cross-Cultural Test of the Work-Family Interface in 48 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey Hill, E.; Yang, Chongming; Hawkins, Alan J.; Ferris, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This study tests a cross-cultural model of the work-family interface. Using multigroup structural equation modeling with IBM survey responses from 48 countries (N= 25,380), results show that the same work-family interface model that fits the data globally also fits the data in a four-group model composed of culturally related groups of countries,…

  13. Air Liquide builds H{sub 2} plant in Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-19

    Air Liquide will spend $18 million to build a naphtha steam reforming unit in Estarreja, Portugal that will produce 3,700 cu meters/hour of hydrogen (H{sub 2}). The new plant will raise Air Liquide`s H{sub 2} capacity at the site to 8,000 cu meters/hour. The company supplies Anilina de Portugal with H{sub 2}. In addition, Air Liquide supplies Dow Chemical with carbon monoxide used in its methylene di-para-phenylene isocyanate plant at the site. Anilina is spending Esc1.8 billion ($11.3 million) to expand aniline capacity from 60,000 m.t./year to 95,000 m.t./year by the end of 1997 and nitrobenzene from 100,000 m.t./year to 170,000 m.t./year. This year Dow will buy more than 50,000 m.t./year of aniline from the Portuguese firm for its MDI production.

  14. The Cultural Interface of Islander and Scientific Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakata, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The interface between Indigenous knowledge systems and Western scientific knowledge systems is a contested space where the difficult dialogue between us and them is often reduced to a position of taking sides. Storytelling is however a very familiar tradition in Indigenous families where we can and do translate expertly difficult concepts from one…

  15. The Language-Culture Interface in German Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramberg, Anne-Katrin

    A comparison of German and American advertising reveals differences in technique and structures. Persuasion is central in both, but the grammatical structures and illocutionary devices available in each language vary. The culture is also reflected in the type and degree to which each language uses techniques of persuasive language. The findings…

  16. Recent developments on Air Liquide advanced technologies turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcayre, Franck; Gondrand, Cecile; Drevard, Luc; Durand, Fabien; Marot, Gerard

    2012-06-01

    Air Liquide Advanced Technologies has developed for more than 40 years turboexpanders mainly for hydrogen and helium liquefiers and refrigerators and has in total more than 600 references of cryogenic turbo-expanders and cold compressors. The latest developments are presented in this paper. The key motivation of these developments is to improve the efficiency of the machines, and also to widen the range of operation. New impellers have been designed for low and high powers, the operation range is now between 200W and 200kW. The thrust bearings have been characterized in order to maximize the load which can be withstood and to increase the turbo-expander cold power. Considering low power machines, 3D open wheels have been designed and machined in order to increase the adiabatic efficiencies. A new type of machine, a turbobooster for methane liquefaction has been designed, manufactured and tested at AL-AT test facility.

  17. Lipid content and metabolism of human keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-medium interface.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Brown, B E; Monger, D J; Grayson, S; Elias, P M

    1988-07-01

    The differentiation of human keratinocytes in most culture systems is incomplete; e.g., lamellar bodies, the characteristic lipid-delivery organelles of epidermis, are not present. Moreover, their lipid profile does not reflect the distinctive composition found in cornifying epidermis. In contrast, keratinocytes that grow at an air-medium interface exhibit more complete differentiation. In this study, we compared the elaboration of lamellar bodies, the lipid content, and the lipid metabolism of human keratinocytes, cultured both under standard immersed conditions and after lifting to an air-medium interface. Whereas submerged cultures neither elaborated lamellar bodies nor displayed a lipid distribution characteristic of cornifying epidermis, lifted cultures displayed advanced cornification, elaborated lamellar bodies which were deposited in intercellular domains, and a lipid profile more typical of cornifying epidermis. Moreover, lipid biosynthesis was 5-10-fold more active in lifted than in immersed cultures, and was not inhibited by exogenous lipoproteins. These findings are consistent with recent studies that demonstrate both high rates of lipogenesis in differentiating layers of the epidermis as well as autonomy of lipogenesis from the influence of circulating lipoproteins. Thus, the lipid content and metabolism of human keratinocyte cultures, grown at an air-medium interface, demonstrate features that simulate the epidermis. PMID:2456290

  18. Hybrid System for the Inventory of the Cultural Heritage Using Voice Interface for Knowledge acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Château, Stefan Du; Boulanger, Danielle; Mercier-Laurent, Eunika

    This document presents our work on a definition and experimentation of a voice interface for cultural heritage inventory. This hybrid system includes signal processing, natural language techniques and knowledge modeling for future retrieval. We discuss the first results and present some challenges for our future work.

  19. Building Positive Relationships with Indigenous Children, Families and Communities: Learning at the Cultural Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Emma; McIntosh, Leonie; Perry, Bob; Dockett, Sue; Clayton, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Martin Nakata, this paper brings into focus the everyday complexities involved in the cultural interfaces that educators, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, negotiate in order to promote children's engagement with formal education processes. Analysis of emergent data from a recent evaluation of a preschool education…

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  1. The brain–artefact interface (BAI): a challenge for archaeology and cultural neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience provides a new approach for understanding the impact of culture on the human brain (and vice versa) opening thus new avenues for cross-disciplinary collaboration with archaeology and anthropology. Finding new meaningful and productive unit of analysis is essential for such collaboration. But what can archaeological preoccupation with material culture and long-term change contribute to this end? In this article, I introduce and discuss the notion of the brain–artefact interface (BAI) as a useful conceptual bridge between neuroplastisty and the extended mind. I argue that a key challenge for archaeology and cultural neuroscience lies in the cross-disciplinary understanding of the processes by which our plastic enculturated brains become constituted within the wider extended networks of non-biological artefacts and cultural practices that delineate the real spatial and temporal boundaries of the human cognitive map. PMID:20123661

  2. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  3. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Kuwaiti and British Citizens' Views of E-Government Interface Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladwani, Adel M.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to conceive how Web users from different cultures can be encouraged to reap the benefits of an e-government initiative when its portal is suffering from culture-indifferent interface quality. Thus far, the e-government literature not only has paid scanty attention to web evaluation issues but also has been slow to embarking on…

  4. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation—6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  5. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M; Baker, Sandy T; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L; Wolfson, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  6. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble-bursting at a compound interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Roché, Matthieu; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Gurkov, Theodor D.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-08-01

    Bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence relevant to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and ocean-atmosphere mass transfer. In the latter case, bubble-bursting leads to the dispersal of sea-water aerosols in the surrounding air. Here we show that bubbles bursting at a compound air/oil/water-with-surfactant interface can disperse submicrometre oil droplets in water. Dispersal results from the detachment of an oil spray from the bottom of the bubble towards water during bubble collapse. We provide evidence that droplet size is selected by physicochemical interactions between oil molecules and the surfactants rather than by hydrodynamics. We demonstrate the unrecognized role that this dispersal mechanism may play in the fate of the sea surface microlayer and of pollutant spills by dispersing petroleum in the water column. Finally, our system provides an energy-efficient route, with potential upscalability, for applications in drug delivery, food production and materials science.

  7. "The tempest in my mind": cultural interfaces between psychiatry and literature, 1844-1900.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, S L

    1995-01-01

    The professional literature of the first generation of American psychiatrists is replete with poetical passages drawn from the imaginative works of such English authors as Shakespeare, Byron, and Scott as well as the writings of residents of the asylums they tended. A close reading of such passages in the American Journal of Insanity (AJI), the central medium through which members of this nascent profession attempted to "popularize the study of insanity," suggests they were not simply textual ornaments or signs of the underdeveloped state of American psychiatry in the mid-nineteenth century. Indeed, literary manifestations of the imaginative minds of patients and renowned writers were scrutinized by psychiatrists seeking to advance their understanding of mental disease. Moreover, the English authors were often elevated to the status of medical experts and their poetry and prose were commended to fellow medical practitioners as sources of psychological insight. Toward the turn of the century psychiatrists' engagement with these literary forms was less pronounced in the AJI, due in large part to the impact of rising asylum populations and the coming of a culture of positivist medicine. Yet literary influences on psychiatric writing are still evident in this period, indicating the complexity of the cultural interfaces between psychiatry and literature and the importance of examining the historical processes that have served to define and distinguish the enterprise of the psychiatrist from that of the poet. PMID:7897178

  8. The interface between cultural understandings: negotiating new spaces for Pacific mental health.

    PubMed

    Mila-Schaaf, Karlo; Hudson, Maui

    2009-02-01

    This theoretical paper introduces the concept of the "negotiated space", a model developed by Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Maui Hudson and colleagues describing the interface between different worldviews and knowledge systems. This is primarily a conceptual space of intersection in-between different ways of knowing and meaning making, such as, the i Pacific indigenous reference and the dominant Western mental health paradigm of the bio-psycho-social. When developing Pacific models of care, the "negotiated space" provides room to explore the relationship between different (and often conflicting) cultural understandings of mental health and illness. The "negotiated space" is a place ofp urposive re-encounter reconstructing and re-balancing of ideas and values in complementary realignments that have resonance for Pacific peoples living in Western oriented societies. This requires making explicit the competing epistemologies of the Pacific indigenous worldviews and references alongside the bio-psycho-social and identifying the assumptions implicit in the operating logic ofe ach. This is a precursor to being empowered to negotiate, resolve and better comprehend the cultural conflict between the different understandings. This article theorises multiple patterns of possibility of resolutions and relationships within the negotiated space relevant to research, evaluation, model, service development and quality assurance within Pacific mental health. PMID:19585741

  9. Cross-Cultural Interface Design and the Classroom-Learning Environment in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chia-Lin; Su, Yelin

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether using localized interface designs would make a difference in users' learning results and their perceptions of the interface design in a classroom learning environment. This study also sought to learn more about users' attitudes toward the localized interface features. To assess the impact of using localized interfaces…

  10. Murine keratinocyte cultures grown at the air/medium interface synthesize stratum corneum lipids and recycle linoleate during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, K.C.; Swartzendruber, D.C.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T.

    1989-07-01

    In a recent investigation we showed that murine keratinocyte cultures grown at the air/medium interface in the presence of dermis exhibit morphologic differentiation comparable to that seen in vivo, including the formation of lamellar granules and stratum corneum intercellular lipid lamellae. In the present study, lifted cultures were found to more closely reproduce the lipid composition of the parent epidermal tissue than submerged cultures grown on plastic. In addition, the specific fatty acid profile of individual lipid classes in lifted cultures was, in general, remarkably well maintained in vitro. Acylceramides, which are highly enriched in linoleic acid in vivo, remained enriched in vitro; however, the linoleic acid content of the cultures was substantially lower than that in vivo, confirming previous reports of the relative essential fatty acid deficiency of standard culture media. As the lifted cultures differentiated over time, the lipid composition changed to reflect the formation of a stratum corneum with its different complement of lipids. Label from (U-/sup 14/C)linoleic acid was specifically incorporated into linoleate-containing lipids during short pulses in both submerged and lifted cultures. Changes in label distribution over a long chase period in lifted cultures indicated that linoleate was transferred from phospholipids to ceramides, providing evidence for the ''recycling'' of essential fatty acids in epidermis.

  11. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  12. Interfacing Cultured Neurons to Microtransducers Arrays: A Review of the Neuro-Electronic Junction Models.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Massobrio, Giuseppe; Martinoia, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Microtransducer arrays, both metal microelectrodes and silicon-based devices, are widely used as neural interfaces to measure, extracellularly, the electrophysiological activity of excitable cells. Starting from the pioneering works at the beginning of the 70's, improvements in manufacture methods, materials, and geometrical shape have been made. Nowadays, these devices are routinely used in different experimental conditions (both in vivo and in vitro), and for several applications ranging from basic research in neuroscience to more biomedical oriented applications. However, the use of these micro-devices deeply depends on the nature of the interface (coupling) between the cell membrane and the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer. Thus, many efforts have been oriented to improve coupling conditions. Particularly, in the latest years, two innovations related to the use of carbon nanotubes as interface material and to the development of micro-structures which can be engulfed by the cell membrane have been proposed. In this work, we review what can be simulated by using simple circuital models and what happens at the interface between the sensitive active surface of the microtransducer and the neuronal membrane of in vitro neurons. We finally focus our attention on these two novel technological solutions capable to improve the coupling between neuron and micro-nano transducer. PMID:27445657

  13. Growing a stratified, cornified primary culture of rat keratinocytes with epidermis-like water permeation barrier function.

    PubMed

    Pu, Y; Bernstein, I A; Bernstam, L I; Bronaugh, R L

    1995-04-01

    The culture of cutaneous keratinocytes grown on a Puropore nylon microporous membrane at the air-liquid interface has been shown to be similar to the epidermis in a number of molecular and morphologic characteristics but to exhibit a significantly greater degree of tritiated water permeation. Various culture conditions have been altered in an effort to improve the water barrier properties. A Kp value in the range of 5.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(3) has been obtained for 79% of the cultures a) by plating 0.9 x 10(6) viable basal cells on a piece (13-mm diameter) of membrane for 7 days of submerged growth, b) by placing two membranes on two stacked glass fiber filters (47-mm extra-thick) in a culture dish (60 mm) for 14 days of growth at the air-liquid interface, c) by replacing the growth medium, i.e., 1 ml of complete minimum essential medium (CMEM) every 24 h after lifting, d) by using 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the CMEM during the submerged culture period and 15% FBS in the CMEM during the lifted culture period, and e) by adding a dialysis membrane on top and a Puropore nylon membrane below the culture when the cultures were inserted in the permeation cell for testing. The percentage of cultures with this value for Kp can be increased to 90% if only cultures with yellow, smooth, and shiny surfaces are tested. This system should be useful as a replacement for skin in testing the cutaneous permeation of some chemicals. PMID:7795847

  14. Female genital cutting (FGC) and the ethics of care: community engagement and cultural sensitivity at the interface of migration experiences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Female Genital Cutting (FGC) anchored in a complex socio-cultural context becomes significant at the interface of access of health and social services in host countries. The practice of FGC at times, understood as a form of gender-based violence, may result in unjustifiable consequences among girls and women; yet, these practices are culturally engrained traditions with complex meanings calling for ethically and culturally sensitive health and social service provision. Intents and meanings of FGC practice need to be well understood before before any policies that criminalize and condemn are derived and implemented. FGC is addressed as a global public health issue with complex legal and ethical dimensions which impacts ability to access services, far beyond gender sensitivity. The ethics of terminology are addressed, building on the sustained controversial debate in regards to the delicate issue of conceptualization. An overview of international policies is provided, identifying the current trend of condemnation of FGC practices. Socio-cultural and ethical challenges are discussed in light of selected findings from a community-based research project. The illustrative examples provided focus on Western countries, with a specific emphasis on Canada. Discussion The examples provided converge with the literature confirming the utmost necessity to engage with the FGC practicing communities allowing for ethically sensitive strategies, reduction of harm in relation to systems of care, and prevention of the risk of systematic gendered stigmatization. A culturally competent, gender and ethically sensitive approach is argued for to ensure the provision of quality ethical care for migrant families in host countries. We argue that socio-cultural determinants such as ethnicity, migration, sex and gender need to be accounted for as integral to the social construction of FGC. Summary Working partnerships between the public health sector and community based organisations

  15. Characterization of spiral ganglion neurons cultured on silicon micro-pillar substrates for new auditory neuro-electronic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattotti, M.; Micholt, L.; Braeken, D.; Kovačić, D.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. One of the strategies to improve cochlear implant technology is to increase the number of electrodes in the neuro-electronic interface. The objective was to characterize in vitro cultures of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) cultured on surfaces of novel silicon micro-pillar substrates (MPS). Approach. SGN from P5 rat pups were cultured on MPS with different micro-pillar widths (1-5.6 μm) and spacings (0.6-15 μm) and were compared with control SGN cultures on glass coverslips by immunocytochemistry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main results. Overall, MPS support SGN growth equally well as the control glass surfaces. Micro-pillars of a particular size-range (1.2-2.4 μm) were optimal in promoting SGN presence, neurite growth and alignment. On this specific micro-pillar size, more SGN were present, and neurites were longer and more aligned. SEM pictures highlight how cells on micro-pillars with smaller spacings grow directly on top of pillars, while at wider spacings (from 3.2 to 15 μm) they grow on the bottom of the surface, losing contact guidance. Further, we found that MPS encourage more monopolar and bipolar SGN morphologies compared to the control condition. Finally, MPS induce longest neurite growth with minimal interaction of S100+ glial cells. Significance. These results indicate that silicon micro-pillar substrates create a permissive environment for the growth of primary auditory neurons promoting neurite sprouting and are a promising technology for future high-density three-dimensional CMOS-based auditory neuro-electronic interfaces.

  16. Applications of mouse airway epithelial cell culture for asthma research.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Dickinson, John D; Brody, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Primary airway epithelial cell culture provides a valuable tool for studying cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and the role of immune system factors in asthma pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the application of mouse tracheal epithelial cell cultures for the study of asthma biology. A major advantage of this system is the ability to use airway epithelial cells from mice with defined genetic backgrounds. The in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse airway epithelial cells uses the air-liquid interface condition to generate well-differentiated epithelia with characteristics of native airways. Protocols are provided for manipulation of differentiation, induction of mucous cell metaplasia, genetic modification, and cell and pathogen coculture. Assays for the assessment of gene expression, responses of cells, and analysis of specific cell subpopulations within the airway epithelium are included. PMID:23943446

  17. A Microfluidic Interface for the Culture and Sampling of Adiponectin from Primary Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, Leah A.; Brooks, Jessica C.; Hoepfner, Lauren D.; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L.; Easley, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Secreted from adipose tissue, adiponectin is a vital endocrine hormone that acts in glucose metabolism, thereby establishing its crucial role in diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disease states. Insulin exposure to primary adipocytes cultured in static conditions has been shown to stimulate adiponectin secretion. However, conventional, static methodology for culturing and stimulating adipocytes falls short of truly mimicking physiological environments. Along with decreases in experimental costs and sample volume, and increased temporal resolution, microfluidic platforms permit small-volume flowing cell culture systems, which more accurately represent the constant flow conditions through vasculature in vivo. Here, we have integrated a customized primary tissue culture reservoir into a passively operated microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fabrication of the reservoir was accomplished through unique PDMS “landscaping” above sampling channels, with a design strategy targeted to primary adipocytes to overcome issues of positive cell buoyancy. This reservoir allowed three-dimensional culture of primary murine adipocytes, accurate control over stimulants via constant perfusion, and sampling of adipokine secretion during various treatments. As the first report of primary adipocyte culture and sampling within microfluidic systems, this work sets the stage for future studies in adipokine secretion dynamics. PMID:25423362

  18. Air liquide 1.8 K refrigeration units for CERN LHC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Benoît; Gistau-Baguer, Guy M.; Caillaud, Aurélie

    2002-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be CERN's next research instrument for high energy physics. This 27 km long circular accelerator will make intensive use of superconducting magnets, operated below 2.0 K. It will thus require high capacity refrigeration below 2.0 K [1, 2]. Coupled to a refrigerator providing 18 kW equivalent at 4.5 K [3], these systems will be able to absorb a cryogenic power of 2.4 kW at 1.8 K in nominal conditions. Air Liquide has designed one Cold Compressor System (CCS) pre-series for CERN-preceding 3 more of them (among 8 in total located around the machine). These systems, making use of cryogenic centrifugal compressors in a series arrangement coupled to room temperature screw compressors, are presented. Key components characteristics will be given.

  19. Cultural perspectives on children’s tadpole drawings: at the interface between representation and production

    PubMed Central

    Gernhardt, Ariane; Rübeling, Hartmut; Keller, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated tadpole self-drawings from 183 three- to six-year-old children living in seven cultural groups, representing three ecosocial contexts. Based on assumed general production principles, the influence of cultural norms and values upon specific characteristics of the tadpole drawings was examined. The results demonstrated that children from all cultural groups realized the body-proportion effect in the self-drawings, indicating universal production principles. However, children differed in single drawing characteristics, depending on the specific ecosocial context. Children from Western and non-Western urban educated contexts drew themselves rather tall, with many facial features, and preferred smiling facial expressions, while children from rural traditional contexts depicted themselves significantly smaller, with less facial details, and neutral facial expressions. PMID:26136707

  20. Early Intervention and Culture: Preparation for Literacy. The Interface between Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eldering, Lotty, Ed.; Leseman, Paul, Ed.

    This collection of 20 papers addresses child development and early intervention issues related to literacy acquisition from a cross-cultural perspective. Titles of the papers are: (1) "Preparing Young Children for Literacy: Issues in Theory and Practice" (Lotty Eldering and Paul Leseman); (2) "Jomtien Revisited: A Plea for a Differentiated…

  1. Trends in Culturally Relevant Interface Design Features for Latino Web Site Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachau, Lori L.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of published research on designing Web-based instruction for the adult U.S. Latino population. Instructional designers need guidance on how to design culturally relevant learning environments for this audience, particularly for Latino people from Mexican heritage. The authors used content analysis to investigate the extent to which…

  2. Critical Evaluation of Air-Liquid Interface Cell Exposure Systems for in Vitro Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared various in vitro exposure systems for their ability to expose cells to particles and gases. The systems tested use different mechanisms to deliver multi-pollutants to the cells: diffusion, sedimentation, thermophoresis (THP) and electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Vari...

  3. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    SciTech Connect

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S.; Baguer, G. M. Gistau

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  4. Overview of Air Liquide refrigeration systems between 1.8 K and 200 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondrand, C.; Durand, F.; Delcayre, F.; Crispel, S.; Baguer, G. M. Gistau

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic refrigeration systems are necessary for numerous applications. Gas purification and distillation require temperatures between 15 K and 200 K depending on the application, space simulation chambers down to 15 K, superconductivity between 1.8 K and up to 75 K (magnets, cavities or HTS devices like cables, FCL, SMES, etc), Cold Neutron Sources between 15 and 20 K, etc. Air Liquide Advanced Technologies is designing and manufacturing refrigerators since 60 years to satisfy those needs. The step by step developments achieved have led to machines with higher efficiency and reliability. In 1965, reciprocating compressors and Joule Thomson expansion valves were used. In 1969, centripetal expanders began to be used. In 1980, oil lubricated screw compressors took the place of reciprocating compressors and a standard range of Claude cycle refrigerators was developed: the HELIAL series. 1980 was also the time for cryogenic centrifugal compressor development. In 2011, driven by the need for lower operational cost (high efficiency and low maintenance), cycle oil free centrifugal compressors on magnetic bearings were introduced instead of screw compressors. The power extracted by centripetal expanders was recovered. Based on this technology, a range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators has been designed for temperatures between 40 K and 150 K. On-going development will enable widening the range of Turbo-Brayton refrigerators to cryogenic temperatures down to 15 K.. Cryogenic centrifugal circulators have been developed in order to answer to an increasing demand of 4 K refrigerators able to distribute cold power.

  5. Brain death and Islam: the interface of religion, culture, history, law, and modern medicine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew C; Ziad-Miller, Amna; Elamin, Elamin M

    2014-10-01

    How one defines death may vary. It is important for clinicians to recognize those aspects of a patient's religious beliefs that may directly influence medical care and how such practices may interface with local laws governing the determination of death. Debate continues about the validity and certainty of brain death criteria within Islamic traditions. A search of PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycNet, Sociological Abstracts, DIALOGUE ProQuest, Lexus Nexus, Google, and applicable religious texts was conducted to address the question of whether brain death is accepted as true death among Islamic scholars and clinicians and to discuss how divergent opinions may affect clinical care. The results of the literature review inform this discussion. Brain death has been acknowledged as representing true death by many Muslim scholars and medical organizations, including the Islamic Fiqh Academies of the Organization of the Islamic Conference and the Muslim World League, the Islamic Medical Association of North America, and other faith-based medical organizations as well as legal rulings by multiple Islamic nations. However, consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and a sizable minority accepts death by cardiopulmonary criteria only. PMID:25287999

  6. "To Market, to Market": Exploring the Teaching-Learning Interface in Developing Intercultural Interactions from Textbook Activities--Crossing Languages and Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Anne-Marie; Mercurio, Nives

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider what happens at the "teaching-learning interface" in some Indonesian and Italian examples of classroom interactions within an intercultural orientation to languages teaching and learning. Using activities from textbooks as a starting point, we identify the underlying linguistic, cultural, and intercultural concepts with…

  7. Advances in the Lightweight Air-Liquid Composite Heat Exchanger Development for Space Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Johnston, J. Chris; Haas, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    An advanced, lightweight composite modular Air/Liquid (A/L) Heat Exchanger (HX) Prototype for potential space exploration thermal management applications was successfully designed, manufactured, and tested. This full-scale Prototype consisting of 19 modules, based on recommendations from its predecessor Engineering Development unit (EDU) but with improved thermal characteristics and manufacturability, was 11.2 % lighter than the EDU and achieves potentially a 42.7% weight reduction from the existing state-of-the-art metallic HX demonstrator. However, its higher pressure drop (0.58 psid vs. 0.16 psid of the metal HX) has to be mitigated by foam material optimizations and design modifications including a more systematic air channel design. Scalability of the Prototype design was validated experimentally by comparing manufacturability and performance between the 2-module coupon and the 19-module Prototype. The Prototype utilized the thermally conductive open-cell carbon foam material but with lower density and adopted a novel high-efficiency cooling system with significantly increased heat transfer contact surface areas, improved fabricability and manufacturability compared to the EDU. Even though the Prototype was required to meet both the thermal and the structural specifications, accomplishing the thermal requirement was a higher priority goal for this first version. Overall, the Prototype outperformed both the EDU and the corresponding metal HX, particularly in terms of specific heat transfer, but achieved 93.4% of the target. The next generation Prototype to achieve the specification target, 3,450W would need 24 core modules based on the simple scaling factor. The scale-up Prototype will weigh about 14.7 Kg vs. 21.6 Kg for the metal counterpart. The advancement of this lightweight composite HX development from the original feasibility test coupons to EDU to Prototype is discussed in this paper.

  8. Continuous delivery of biomaterials to the skin-percutaneous device interface using a fluid pump.

    PubMed

    Peramo, Antonio; Marcelo, Cynthia L; Goldstein, Steven A; Martin, David C

    2010-02-01

    We have developed an in vitro culture system composed of organotypic human skin explants interfaced with titanium rods attached to a fluid pump. This device was designed to mimic the process of natural mucosa delivery at the point where a rigid, permanent object penetrates living skin. Full thickness human breast skin explants discarded from surgeries were cultured at different time points at the air-liquid interface. The skin specimens were punctured to fit at the bottom of hollow cylindrical titanium rods. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) was delivered continuously to the specimens through the rods by using an attached fluid pump. Histological analysis of the skin explants as well as no-pump controls was then performed. Our results show substantial differences between controls, where no material was pumped at the interface of rod-skin, and specimens treated with SLS, indicating that the technique of pumping the material is effective in producing observable epithelial changes. These results suggest that an adaptation of this type of device may be useful for the treatment of complications arising from the contact between tissues and percutaneous devices in vivo. PMID:20420587

  9. Interface Directed Self Assembly of Cell-Laden Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian, Behnam; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Nichol, Jason W.; Khabiry, Masoud; Hancock, Matthew J.; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels show great promise for creating engineered tissues. However, a major shortcoming with these systems has been the inability to fabricate structures with controlled microscale features on a biologically relevant length scale. Here we demonstrate a rapid method for creating centimeter-scale, cell-laden hydrogels through the assembly of shape-controlled microgels. This was achieved by using an approach that uses the liquid-air interface of a hydrophobic solution to drive the assembly of microgels. Cell-laden microgels of specific shapes were randomly placed on the surface of a high density, hydrophobic solution and induced to aggregate and were subsequently crosslinked into macroscale tissue-like structures. The resultant assemblies were cell-laden hydrogel sheets consisting of tightly-packed ordered microgel units. In addition, a hierarchical approach created complex multi-gel building blocks which were then assembled into tissues with precise spatial control over the cell distribution. These data demonstrate that forces at an air-liquid interface can be used to self-assemble spatially controllable, co-cultured tissue-like structures. PMID:20358531

  10. Construction of an in vitro primary lung co-culture platform derived from New Zealand white rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Joshua D.; Hess, Becky M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Straub, Tim M.

    2015-05-01

    We report the construction of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) co-culture platform consisting of differentiated lung epithelial cells and monocytes from New Zealand white rabbits. Rabbit lung epithelial cells were successfully grown at air-liquid interface, produced mucus, and expressed both sialic acid alpha-2,3 and alpha-2,6. Blood-derived CD14+ monocytes were deposited above the epithelial layer resulting in the differentiation of a subset of monocytes into CD11c+ cells within the co-culture. These proof-of-concept findings provide a convenient means to comparatively study in vitro versus in vivo rabbit lung responses as they relate to inhalation or lung-challenge studies.

  11. Cells and Culture Systems Used to Model the Small Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rudra; Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather

    2016-06-01

    The pulmonary epithelium is divided into upper, lower, and alveolar (or small) airway epithelia and acts as the mechanical and immunological barrier between the external environment and the underlying submucosa. Of these, the small airway epithelium is the principal area of gas exchange and has high immunological activity, making it a major area of cell biology, immunology, and pharmaceutical research. As animal models do not faithfully represent the human pulmonary system and ex vivo human lung samples have reliability and availability issues, cell lines, and primary cells are widely used as small airway epithelial models. In vitro, these cells are mostly cultured as monolayers (2-dimensional cultures), either media submerged or at air-liquid interface. However, these 2-dimensional cultures lack a three dimension-a scaffolding extracellular matrix, which establishes the intercellular network in the in vivo airway epithelium. Therefore, 3-dimensional cell culture is currently a major area of development, where cells are cultured in a matrix or are cultured in a manner that they develop ECM-like scaffolds between them, thus mimicking the in vivo phenotype more faithfully. This review focuses on the commonly used small airway epithelial cells, their 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional culture techniques, and their comparative phenotype when cultured under these systems. PMID:27071933

  12. Mechanophysical Stimulations of Mucin Secretion in Cultures of Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Even-Tzur Davidovich, Nurit; Kloog, Yoel; Wolf, Michael; Elad, David

    2011-01-01

    Nasal epithelial cells secret mucins and are exposed in vivo to airflow-induced mechanophysical stresses, including wall shear stress (WSS), temperature, and humidity. In this work, human nasal epithelial cells cultured under air-liquid interface conditions were subjected to fields of airflow-induced oscillatory WSS at different temperature and humidity conditions. Changes in mucin secretion due to WSS were measured and the role of the cytoskeleton in mucin secretion was explored. Mucin secretion significantly increased in response to WSS in a magnitude-dependent manner with respect to static cultures and independently of the airflow temperature and humidity. In static cultures, mucin secretion decreased at high humidity with or without elevation of the temperature with respect to cultures at a comfortable climate. In cultures exposed to WSS, mucin secretion increased at high temperature with respect to cultures at comfortable climate conditions. The polymerization of actin microfilaments was shown to increase mucin secretion under WSS, whereas the dynamics of microtubule polymerization did not affect secretion. In conclusion, the data in this study show that mucin secretion is sensitive to oscillatory WSS as well as high temperature and humidity conditions. PMID:21689518

  13. A Cross-Cultural Usability Study on the Internationalization of User Interfaces Based on an Empirical Five Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakraborty, Joyram

    2009-01-01

    With the internationalization of e-commerce, it is no longer viable to design one user interface for all environments. Web-based applications and services can be accessed from all over the globe. To account for this globalization process, software developers need to understand that simply accounting for language translation of their websites for…

  14. Marangoni-driven spreading along liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S.

    2009-03-01

    Marangoni-driven spreading at gas-liquid interfaces has been studied extensively over the past years but so far the spreading kinetics along the interface between immiscible liquids has not been investigated systematically. In this study, the spreading kinetics of aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide along the interface between thick layers of water and decane has been investigated by means of two different optical visualization techniques (dye tracer and laser shadowgraphy). The spreading kinetics follows a power law where the radius r as function of time t scales as r(t )∝t3/4 indicating large similarities with Marangoni-driven spreading at air-liquid interfaces. The existing scaling law for spreading at air-liquid interfaces is based on the balance between an interfacial tension gradient and the viscous stress in the fluid layers beneath the interface. When the viscous dissipation in the two boundary layers below and above the interface is factored into the scaling law, quantitative agreement with experimental data is obtained. Marangoni-driven spreading along an interface is a fast transport mechanism. The velocity of the leading edge lies within the range of group velocities of capillary waves.

  15. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the USA" (Alisa Woodring);…

  16. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    MEENACH, SAMANTHA A.; TSORAS, ALEXANDRA N.; McGARRY, RONALD C.; MANSOUR, HEIDI M.; HILT, J. ZACH; ANDERSON, KIMBERLY W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions. PMID:26846376

  17. Oncogenic transformation of diverse gastrointestinal tissues in primary organoid culture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingnan; Nadauld, Lincoln; Ootani, Akifumi; Corney, David C.; Pai, Reetesh K.; Gevaert, Olivier; Cantrell, Michael A.; Rack, Paul G.; Neal, James T.; Chan, Carol W-M.; Yeung, Trevor; Gong, Xue; Yuan, Jenny; Wilhelmy, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Attardi, Laura D.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Hung, Kenneth E.; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Ji, Hanlee P.; Kuo, Calvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of primary organoid cultures containing epithelial and mesenchymal elements to cancer modeling holds promise for combining the accurate multilineage differentiation and physiology of in vivo systems with the facile in vitro manipulation of transformed cell lines. Here, a single air-liquid interface culture method was used without modification to engineer oncogenic mutations into primary epithelial/mesenchymal organoids from mouse colon, stomach and pancreas. Pancreatic and gastric organoids exhibited dysplasia upon KrasG12D expression and/or p53 loss, and readily generated adenocarcinoma upon in vivo transplantation. In contrast, primary colon organoids required combinatorial Apc, p53, KrasG12D and Smad4 mutations for progressive transformation to invasive adenocarcinoma-like histology in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, recapitulating multi-hit models of colorectal cancer (CRC), and versus more promiscuous transformation of small intestinal organoids. Colon organoid culture functionally validated the microRNA miR-483 as a dominant driver oncogene at the Insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2) 11p15.5 CRC amplicon, inducing dysplasia in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. These studies demonstrate the general utility of a highly tractable primary organoid system for cancer modeling and driver oncogene validation in diverse gastrointestinal tissues. PMID:24859528

  18. Sustained in vitro intestinal epithelial culture within a Wnt-dependent stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Ootani, Akifumi; Li, Xingnan; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Ho, Quoc T; Ueno, Hiroo; Toda, Shuji; Sugihara, Hajime; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Weissman, Irving L; Capecchi, Mario R; Kuo, Calvin J

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro analysis of intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable culture systems. Here we describe robust long-term methodology for small and large intestinal culture, incorporating an air-liquid interface and underlying stromal elements. These cultures showed prolonged intestinal epithelial expansion as sphere-like organoids with proliferation and multilineage differentiation. The Wnt growth factor family positively regulates proliferation of the intestinal epithelium in vivo. Accordingly, culture growth was inhibited by the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) and markedly stimulated by a fusion protein between the Wnt agonist R-spondin-1 and immunoglobulin Fc (RSpo1-Fc). Furthermore, treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine and neurogenin-3 overexpression induced goblet cell and enteroendocrine cell differentiation, respectively, consistent with endogenous Notch signaling and lineage plasticity. Epithelial cells derived from both leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein–coupled receptor-5–positive (Lgr5+) and B lymphoma moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region homolog-1–positive (Bmi1+) lineages, representing putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations, were present in vitro and were expanded by treatment with RSpo1-Fc; this increased number of Lgr5+ cells upon RSpo1-Fc treatment was subsequently confirmed in vivo. Our results indicate successful long-term intestinal culture within a microenvironment accurately recapitulating the Wnt- and Notch-dependent ISC niche. PMID:19398967

  19. Sustained in vitro intestinal epithelial culture within a Wnt-dependent stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Ootani, Akifumi; Li, Xingnan; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Ho, Quoc T; Ueno, Hiroo; Toda, Shuji; Sugihara, Hajime; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Weissman, Irving L; Capecchi, Mario R; Kuo, Calvin J

    2009-06-01

    The in vitro analysis of intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable culture systems. Here we describe robust long-term methodology for small and large intestinal culture, incorporating an air-liquid interface and underlying stromal elements. These cultures showed prolonged intestinal epithelial expansion as sphere-like organoids with proliferation and multilineage differentiation. The Wnt growth factor family positively regulates proliferation of the intestinal epithelium in vivo. Accordingly, culture growth was inhibited by the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) and markedly stimulated by a fusion protein between the Wnt agonist R-spondin-1 and immunoglobulin Fc (RSpo1-Fc). Furthermore, treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor dibenzazepine and neurogenin-3 overexpression induced goblet cell and enteroendocrine cell differentiation, respectively, consistent with endogenous Notch signaling and lineage plasticity. Epithelial cells derived from both leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor-5-positive (Lgr5(+)) and B lymphoma moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region homolog-1-positive (Bmi1(+)) lineages, representing putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations, were present in vitro and were expanded by treatment with RSpo1-Fc; this increased number of Lgr5(+) cells upon RSpo1-Fc treatment was subsequently confirmed in vivo. Our results indicate successful long-term intestinal culture within a microenvironment accurately recapitulating the Wnt- and Notch-dependent ISC niche. PMID:19398967

  20. Acetic acid bacteria from biofilm of strawberry vinegar visualized by microscopy and detected by complementing culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques.

    PubMed

    Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz

    2015-04-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) usually develop biofilm on the air-liquid interface of the vinegar elaborated by traditional method. This is the first study in which the AAB microbiota present in a biofilm of vinegar obtained by traditional method was detected by pyrosequencing. Direct genomic DNA extraction from biofilm was set up to obtain suitable quality of DNA to apply in culture-independent molecular techniques. The set of primers and TaqMan--MGB probe designed in this study to enumerate the total AAB population by Real Time--PCR detected between 8 × 10(5) and 1.2 × 10(6) cells/g in the biofilm. Pyrosequencing approach reached up to 10 AAB genera identification. The combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent molecular techniques provided a broader view of AAB microbiota from the strawberry biofilm, which was dominated by Ameyamaea, Gluconacetobacter, and Komagataeibacter genera. Culture-dependent techniques allowed isolating only one genotype, which was assigned into the Ameyamaea genus and which required more analysis for a correct species identification. Furthermore, biofilm visualization by laser confocal microscope and scanning electronic microscope showed different dispositions and cell morphologies in the strawberry vinegar biofilm compared with a grape vinegar biofilm. PMID:25475315

  1. Early-Stage Investigators and Institutional Interface: Importance of Organization in the Mentoring Culture of Today's Universities.

    PubMed

    Manson, Spero M

    2016-09-01

    Mentors have an active role in teaching mentees to scan their academic environments for the resources to advance their research careers, to assess the gaps between what's available and needed to succeed, and to develop strategies to fill these gaps. Yet achieving instrumentality is a necessary, but insufficient condition by which to accomplish the desired endpoints. Mentors and mentees must recognize that the organizations to which they belong are cultural in nature: characterized by vision, values, norms, systems, symbols, language, assumptions, beliefs, and habits. Understanding the collective behaviors and assumptions of peers and leaders in terms of the shared perceptions, thoughts, and feelings of organizational membership is essential to success. Institutions, in turn, must examine the extent to which they offer action possibilities: opportunities that promote the developmental trajectories of early stage investigators-in-training. Lack of awareness of the possible dissonance of this reality adversely affects many young faculty members. PMID:27044483

  2. A newly established culture method highlights regulatory roles of retinoic acid on morphogenesis and calcification of mammalian limb cartilage.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Eizo; Shirai, Kota; Maekubo, Kenji; Hirai, Yohei

    2015-06-01

    During mammalian embryogenesis, sclerotome-derived chondrocytes in the limb bud are arranged into a complicated bone shape with specific areas undergoing hypertrophy and calcification, creating a region-specific mineralized pattern in the cartilage. To follow chondrogenesis progression in vitro, we isolated limb cartilage from mice on embryonic day 13 (E13) and cultured it at the air-liquid interface after microsurgical removal of the ectoderm/epidermis. Explants underwent proper morphogenesis, giving rise to complete templates for limb bones in vitro. We found that region-specific calcification patterns resembling limbs of prepartum mature embryos could be induced in explants using culture medium containing high concentrations of CaCl2 (Ca), ascorbic acid (AA), and β-glycerophosphoric acid (BGP). In this culture system, excess amounts of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) severely disrupted morphogenesis and calcification patterns in limb cartilage. These effects were more pronounced in forearms than in phalanges. Although dissociated, the nascent chondrocytes in culture did not give rise to cartilage units even though augmented calcification was induced in these cell aggregates in the presence of RA. Taken together, our newly established culture system revealed that RA independently regulates three-dimensional morphogenesis and calcification. PMID:26054768

  3. Artificial Skin – Culturing of Different Skin Cell Lines for Generating an Artificial Skin Substitute on Cross-Weaved Spider Silk Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Kerstin; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Schäfer-Nolte, Franziska; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Vogt, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the field of Plastic Reconstructive Surgery the development of new innovative matrices for skin repair is in urgent need. The ideal biomaterial should promote attachment, proliferation and growth of cells. Additionally, it should degrade in an appropriate time period without releasing harmful substances, but not exert a pathological immune response. Spider dragline silk from Nephila spp meets these demands to a large extent. Methodology/Principal Findings Native spider dragline silk, harvested directly out of Nephila spp spiders, was woven on steel frames. Constructs were sterilized and seeded with fibroblasts. After two weeks of cultivating single fibroblasts, keratinocytes were added to generate a bilayered skin model, consisting of dermis and epidermis equivalents. For the next three weeks, constructs in co-culture were lifted on an originally designed setup for air/liquid interface cultivation. After the culturing period, constructs were embedded in paraffin with an especially developed program for spidersilk to avoid supercontraction. Paraffin cross- sections were stained in Haematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) for microscopic analyses. Conclusion/Significance Native spider dragline silk woven on steel frames provides a suitable matrix for 3 dimensional skin cell culturing. Both fibroblasts and keratinocytes cell lines adhere to the spider silk fibres and proliferate. Guided by the spider silk fibres, they sprout into the meshes and reach confluence in at most one week. A well-balanced, bilayered cocultivation in two continuously separated strata can be achieved by serum reduction, changing the medium conditions and the cultivation period at the air/liquid interphase. Therefore spider silk appears to be a promising biomaterial for the enhancement of skin regeneration. PMID:21814557

  4. Autologous Cell Delivery to the Skin-Implant Interface via the Lumen of Percutaneous Devices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peramo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Induced tissue regeneration around percutaneous medical implants could be a useful method to prevent the failure of the medical device, especially when the epidermal seal around the implant is disrupted and the implant must be maintained over a long period of time. In this manuscript, a novel concept and technique is introduced in which autologous keratinocytes were delivered to the interfacial area of a skin-implant using the hollow interior of a fixator pin as a conduit. Full thickness human skin explants discarded from surgeries were cultured at the air-liquid interface and were punctured to fit at the bottom of hollow cylindrical stainless steel fixator pins. Autologous keratinocytes, previously extracted from the same piece of skin and cultured separately, were delivered to the specimens thorough the interior of the hollow pins. The delivered cells survived the process and resembled undifferentiated epithelium, with variations in size and shape. Viability was demonstrated by the lack of morphologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. Although the cells did not form organized epithelial structures, differentiation toward a keratinocyte phenotype was evident immunohistochemically. These results suggest that an adaptation of this technique could be useful for the treatment of complications arising from the contact between skin and percutaneous devices in vivo. PMID:24955931

  5. In vitro bioartificial skin culture model of tissue rejection and inflammatory/immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Strande, L F; Foley, S T; Doolin, E J; Hewitt, C W

    1997-06-01

    We hypothesized that an in vitro bioartificial skin rejection model using living LSEs grown in tissue culture could be developed for the study of autologous, allogenic, and/or xenogeneic inflammatory/immune mechanisms and topical immunosuppressive drugs. Human fibroblasts were mixed with type 1 rat-tail collagen to form a matrix (4 to 5 days), on which human keratinocytes were seeded. After a keratinocyte monolayer formed, CT cultures were raised to the air-liquid interface for continued growth. In the REJ LSE model, immunocytes isolated from human blood were seeded on top of the NHEK monolayer at the time of air-lifting. Thickness measurements of the acellular keratin and keratinocyte layers, and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratios, in both CT and REJ were made using digital image analysis. Immunostaining with anticytokeratin demonstrated a viable, keratin-producing epidermal layer; staining with anti-TGF-beta suggested a role for this cytokine in the rejection or wound-healing process. The LSE appeared histologically similar to normal human epidermis. Immunocytes added to the REJ cultures caused an obvious rejection response and were clearly identifiable in the gels as CD45+ staining cells. The LSE model appears promising for the study of immune/inflammatory mechanisms, thermal injury, screening antirejection agents that might be applied topically and as an in vitro replacement for skin graft studies in animals. PMID:9193551

  6. Reconstruction of Auto-Tissue-Engineered Lamellar Cornea by Dynamic Culture for Transplantation: A Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haoyun; Wang, Xiaoran; Xiao, Jianhui; Duan, Hucheng; Li, Naiyang; Li, Chaoyang; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Ying; Song, Yiyue; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Wang, Zhichong

    2014-01-01

    To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC) for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05). Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3−, P63+, ABCG2+) compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63−, ABCG2−). Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5%) was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p<0.05). The levels of trans-epithelial electrical resistance, light transmittance and areal modulus variation in ATELC-Dynamic all reached those of NLC (p>0.05). Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function. PMID:24705327

  7. Reconstruction of auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea by dynamic culture for transplantation: a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Zhou, Qiang; Duan, Haoyun; Wang, Xiaoran; Xiao, Jianhui; Duan, Hucheng; Li, Naiyang; Li, Chaoyang; Wan, Pengxia; Liu, Ying; Song, Yiyue; Zhou, Chenjing; Huang, Zheqian; Wang, Zhichong

    2014-01-01

    To construct an auto-tissue-engineered lamellar cornea (ATELC) for transplantation, based on acellular porcine corneal stroma and autologous corneal limbal explants, a dynamic culture process, which composed of a submersion culture, a perfusion culture and a dynamic air-liquid interface culture, was performed using appropriate parameters. The results showed that the ATELC-Dynamic possessed histological structure and DNA content that were similar to native lamellar cornea (NLC, p>0.05). Compared to NLC, the protein contents of zonula occludens-1, desmocollin-2 and integrin β4 in ATELC-Dynamic reached 93%, 89% and 73%, respectively. The basal cells of ATELC-Dynamic showed a better differentiation phenotype (K3-, P63+, ABCG2+) compared with that of ATELC in static air-lift culture (ATELC-Static, K3+, P63-, ABCG2-). Accordingly, the cell-cloning efficiency of ATELC-Dynamic (9.72±3.5%) was significantly higher than that of ATELC-Static (2.13±1.46%, p<0.05). The levels of trans-epithelial electrical resistance, light transmittance and areal modulus variation in ATELC-Dynamic all reached those of NLC (p>0.05). Rabbit lamellar keratoplasty showed that the barrier function of ATELC-Dynamic was intact, and there were no signs of epithelial shedding or neovascularization. Furthermore, the ATELC-Dynamic group had similar optical properties and wound healing processes compared with the NLC group. Thus, the sequential dynamic culture process that was designed according to corneal physiological characteristics could successfully reconstruct an auto-lamellar cornea with favorable morphological characteristics and satisfactory physiological function. PMID:24705327

  8. Impact assessment of repeated exposure of organotypic 3D bronchial and nasal tissue culture models to whole cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Diana; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Dulize, Remi; Baumer, Karine; Iskandar, Anita; Boue, Stephanie; Martin, Florian; Kostadinova, Radina; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Frentzel, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has a major impact on lung biology and may result in the development of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms of disease development, it would be important to examine the impact of CS exposure directly on lung tissues. However, this approach is difficult to implement in epidemiological studies because lung tissue sampling is complex and invasive. Alternatively, tissue culture models can facilitate the assessment of exposure impacts on the lung tissue. Submerged 2D cell cultures, such as normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell cultures, have traditionally been used for this purpose. However, they cannot be exposed directly to smoke in a similar manner to the in vivo exposure situation. Recently developed 3D tissue culture models better reflect the in vivo situation because they can be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Their basal sides are immersed in the culture medium; whereas, their apical sides are exposed to air. Moreover, organotypic tissue cultures that contain different type of cells, better represent the physiology of the tissue in vivo. In this work, the utilization of an in vitro exposure system to expose human organotypic bronchial and nasal tissue models to mainstream CS is demonstrated. Ciliary beating frequency and the activity of cytochrome P450s (CYP) 1A1/1B1 were measured to assess functional impacts of CS on the tissues. Furthermore, to examine CS-induced alterations at the molecular level, gene expression profiles were generated from the tissues following exposure. A slight increase in CYP1A1/1B1 activity was observed in CS-exposed tissues compared with air-exposed tissues. A network-and transcriptomics-based systems biology approach was sufficiently robust to demonstrate CS-induced alterations of xenobiotic metabolism that were similar to those observed in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells obtained from smokers. PMID:25741927

  9. Impact Assessment of Repeated Exposure of Organotypic 3D Bronchial and Nasal Tissue Culture Models to Whole Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Diana; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Dulize, Remi; Baumer, Karine; Iskandar, Anita; Boue, Stephanie; Martin, Florian; Kostadinova, Radina; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Frentzel, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has a major impact on lung biology and may result in the development of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms of disease development, it would be important to examine the impact of CS exposure directly on lung tissues. However, this approach is difficult to implement in epidemiological studies because lung tissue sampling is complex and invasive. Alternatively, tissue culture models can facilitate the assessment of exposure impacts on the lung tissue. Submerged 2D cell cultures, such as normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell cultures, have traditionally been used for this purpose. However, they cannot be exposed directly to smoke in a similar manner to the in vivo exposure situation. Recently developed 3D tissue culture models better reflect the in vivo situation because they can be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Their basal sides are immersed in the culture medium; whereas, their apical sides are exposed to air. Moreover, organotypic tissue cultures that contain different type of cells, better represent the physiology of the tissue in vivo. In this work, the utilization of an in vitro exposure system to expose human organotypic bronchial and nasal tissue models to mainstream CS is demonstrated. Ciliary beating frequency and the activity of cytochrome P450s (CYP) 1A1/1B1 were measured to assess functional impacts of CS on the tissues. Furthermore, to examine CS-induced alterations at the molecular level, gene expression profiles were generated from the tissues following exposure. A slight increase in CYP1A1/1B1 activity was observed in CS-exposed tissues compared with air-exposed tissues. A network-and transcriptomics-based systems biology approach was sufficiently robust to demonstrate CS-induced alterations of xenobiotic metabolism that were similar to those observed in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells obtained from smokers. PMID:25741927

  10. Lipid supplemented medium induces lamellar bodies and precursors of barrier lipids in cultured analogues of human skin.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S T; Williams, M L

    1993-08-01

    Barrier function of cultured skin substitutes (CSS) is required for their effective use in clinical treatment of skin wounds, and for percutaneous absorption in vitro. Arachidonic, palmitic, oleic, and linoleic free fatty acids, in conjunction with the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol acetate (lipid supplements, "LS"), were added to nutrient media of CSS to provide precursors of epidermal barrier lipids. CSS were composed of human keratinocytes (HK), fibroblasts (HF), and collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates, and were incubated for 14 d submerged or lifted to the air-liquid interface in media based on MCDB 153 +/- LS. Duplicate samples (30 cm2) were harvested and the epidermal analogue was analyzed for total protein, total DNA, total lipid, lipid fractions including acylglucosylceramide (AGC), and presence of lamellar bodies. Significant increases (p < 0.05) were detected between CSS incubated in +LS medium for total lipid, total DNA, ceramide, glucosylceramide, triglycerides, and diglycerides. AGC and lamellar bodies were detected only in epithelia of CSS incubated in +LS medium. These data show that free fatty acids, vitamin E, and lifting of CSS promote increased epithelial morphogenesis compared to CSS cultured submerged without lipid supplements. Presence of lamellar bodies and AGC suggests enhanced production in vitro of barrier-associated epidermal lipids. PMID:8345218

  11. Interleukin-13 induces goblet cell differentiation in primary cell culture from Guinea pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mitsuko; Tamaoki, Jun; Takeyama, Kiyoshi; Nakata, Junko; Nagai, Atsushi

    2002-11-01

    The Th2 cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, bind to IL-4Ralpha, and cause goblet cell metaplasia/hyperplasia with increased mucin expression in vivo. However, there is not enough evidence that these cytokines directly induce mucin production in vitro. In this study, primary epithelial cells from guinea pig trachea were cultured at an air-liquid interface, and immediately after achieving confluence at Day 7 they were treated with human recombinant IL-4 or IL-13 for 14 d. IL-13-treated cells consisted of a large number of fully mature goblet cells with a smaller number of ciliated cells. Secretory granules of the goblet cells were positive for both periodic acid-Schiff and toluidine blue, and showed exocytosis. By contrast, IL-4 failed to induce goblet cell differentiation. The electric resistances of IL-13-treated cells were lower than those of IL-4-treated cells and nontreated cells, suggesting leaky epithelia. MUC5AC protein level in cell lysates measured by ELISA was several-fold higher in IL-13-treated cells than in nontreated cells, whereas the level in IL-4-treated cells was not changed. These data suggest that human recombinant IL-13, but not IL-4, can induce differentiation into mature goblet cells that produce MUC5AC protein in guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells in vitro. PMID:12397012

  12. Establishment of 3D organotypic cultures using human neonatal epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Li, Amy; Rossi, Ralph; Kaur, Pritinder

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes an ex vivo three-dimensional coculture system optimized to study the skin regenerative ability of primary human keratinocytes grown at the air-liquid interface on collagen matrices embedded with human dermal fibroblasts. An option for enrichment of keratinocyte stem cells and their progeny using fluorescence-activated cell sorting is also provided. Initially, dermal equivalents, comprising human passaged fibroblasts seeded in a collagen matrix, are grown on porous filters (3 mum) placed in transwells. After 1 week, primary human keratinocytes are seeded on this base. One week later, an air-lift transition is performed, leading to the differentiation of the keratinocytes, which are macroscopically visible as artificial skin after a couple of days. The cultures can be harvested 1 week after the air-lift and processed for immunohistochemistry or gene expression analysis. The overall procedure can be completed in 3 weeks, including the preparation of the dermal equivalent and the seeding of the primary keratinocytes. PMID:17401352

  13. Evaluation of Differentiated Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Culture Systems for Asthma Research

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ceri E.; Torr, Elizabeth E.; Mohd Jamili, Nur H.; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Sayers, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate primary (human bronchial epithelial cells, HBEC) and non-primary (Calu-3, BEAS-2B, BEAS-2B R1) bronchial epithelial cell culture systems as air-liquid interface- (ALI-) differentiated models for asthma research. Ability to differentiate into goblet (MUC5AC+) and ciliated (β-Tubulin IV+) cells was evaluated by confocal imaging and qPCR. Expression of tight junction/adhesion proteins (ZO-1, E-Cadherin) and development of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) were assessed. Primary cells showed localised MUC5AC, β-Tubulin IV, ZO-1, and E-Cadherin and developed TEER with, however, a large degree of inter- and intradonor variation. Calu-3 cells developed a more reproducible TEER and a phenotype similar to primary cells although with diffuse β-Tubulin IV staining. BEAS-2B cells did not differentiate or develop tight junctions. These data highlight the challenges in working with primary cell models and the need for careful characterisation and selection of systems to answer specific research questions. PMID:22287976

  14. Air/Liquid-pressure and heartbeat-driven flexible fiber nanogenerators as a micro/nano-power source or diagnostic sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Zetang; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2011-01-01

    We present a new approach for fabricating flexible fiber nanogenerators (FNGs) that can be used for smart shirts, flexible electronics, and medical applications. These FNGs are based on carbon fibers that are covered cylindrically by textured zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. Once subjected to uni-compression by applying a pressure, the cylindrical ZnO thin film is under a compressive strain, resulting in a macroscopic piezopotential across its inner and exterior surfaces owing to the textured structure of the film, which is the driving force for generating an electric current in the external load. Using such a structure, an output peak voltage of 3.2 V and average current density of 0.15 μA cm(-2) are demonstrated. The FNGs rely on air pressure, so that it can work in a non-contact mode in cases of rotating tires, flowing air/liquid, and even in blood vessels. Pressure-driven FNGs added to a syringe show potential to harvest energy in blood vessels, gas pipes, and oil pipes, as long as there is a fluctuation in pressure (or turbulence). Heart-pulse driven FNGs can serve as ultrasensitive sensors for monitoring the behavior of the human heart, which may possibly be applied to medical diagnostics as sensors and measurement tools. PMID:21080378

  15. A new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to evaluate pulmonary drug absorption for metered dose dry powder formulations.

    PubMed

    Hein, Stephanie; Bur, Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Absorption studies with aerosol formulation delivered by metered dose inhalers across cell- and tissue-based in vitro models of the pulmonary epithelia are not trivial due to the complexity of the processes involved: (i) aerosol generation and deposition, (ii) drug release from the carrier, and (iii) absorption across the epithelial air-blood barrier. In contrast to the intestinal mucosa, pulmonary epithelia are only covered by a thin film of lining fluid. Submersed cell culture systems would not allow to studying the deposition of aerosol particles and their effects on this delicate epithelial tissue. We developed a new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to mimic the inhalation of a single metered aerosol dose and its subsequent deposition on filter-grown pulmonary epithelial cell monolayers exposed to an air-liquid interface. The reproducibility of deposition of these dry powder aerosols and subsequent drug transport across Calu-3 monolayers with commercially available dry powder inhalers containing salbutamol sulphate or budesonide could be demonstrated. In the context of developing new dry powder aerosol formulations, PADDOCC appears as a useful tool, allowing reducing animal testing and faster translation into clinical trials. PMID:20951200

  16. Direct particle-to-cell deposition of coarse ambient particulate matter increases the production of inflammatory mediators from cultured human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John; Dailey, Lisa; Walters, Glenn; Devlin, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of cultured cells to particulate matter air pollution is usually accomplished by collecting particles on a solid matrix, extracting the particles from the matrix, suspending them in liquid, and applying the suspension to cells grown on plastic and submerged in medium. The objective of this work was to develop a more physiologically and environmentally relevant model of air pollutant deposition on cultures of human primary airway epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the toxicology of inhaled particulate matter depends strongly on both the particulate dispersion state and the mode of delivery to cells. Our exposure system employs a combination of unipolar charging and electrostatic force to deposit particles directly from the air onto cells grown at an air-liquid interface in a heated, humidified exposure chamber. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to concentrated, coarse ambient particulate matter in this system expressed increased levels of inflammatory biomarkers at 1 hour following exposure and relative to controls exposed to particle-free air. More importantly, these effects are seen at particulate loadings that are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than levels applied using traditional in vitro systems. PMID:19603682

  17. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozbun, Michelle A.; Patterson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol for growing differentiating epithelial tissues, whose structure and function mimics many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique, pioneered by Asslineau and Pruniéras (Asselineau and Prunieras 1984) and modified by Kopan et al. (Kopan et al. 1987), involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname “raft” cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, as well as keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single step virus growth

  18. The effects on bronchial epithelial mucociliary cultures of coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter from an underground railway station.

    PubMed

    Loxham, Matthew; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca J; Cooper, Matthew J; Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J; Dennison, Patrick W; Howarth, Peter H; Cassee, Flemming R; Teagle, Damon A H; Palmer, Martin R; Davies, Donna E

    2015-05-01

    We have previously shown that underground railway particulate matter (PM) is rich in iron and other transition metals across coarse (PM10-2.5), fine (PM2.5), and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.18) fractions and is able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there is little knowledge of whether the metal-rich nature of such particles exerts toxic effects in mucus-covered airway epithelial cell cultures or whether there is an increased risk posed by the ultrafine fraction. Monolayer and mucociliary air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were exposed to size-fractionated underground railway PM (1.1-11.1 µg/cm(2)) and release of lactate dehydrogenase and IL-8 was assayed. ROS generation was measured, and the mechanism of generation studied using desferrioxamine (DFX) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by RT-qPCR. Particle uptake was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Underground PM increased IL-8 release from PBECs, but this was diminished in mucus-secreting ALI cultures. Fine and ultrafine PM generated a greater level of ROS than coarse PM. ROS generation by ultrafine PM was ameliorated by DFX and NAC, suggesting an iron-dependent mechanism. Despite the presence of mucus, ALI cultures displayed increased HO-1 expression. Intracellular PM was observed within vesicles, mitochondria, and free in the cytosol. The results indicate that, although the mucous layer appears to confer some protection against underground PM, ALI PBECs nonetheless detect PM and mount an antioxidant response. The combination of increased ROS-generating ability of the metal-rich ultrafine fraction and ability of PM to penetrate the mucous layer merits further research. PMID:25673499

  19. The Effects on Bronchial Epithelial Mucociliary Cultures of Coarse, Fine, and Ultrafine Particulate Matter From an Underground Railway Station

    PubMed Central

    Loxham, Matthew; Morgan-Walsh, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Blume, Cornelia; Swindle, Emily J.; Dennison, Patrick W.; Howarth, Peter H.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Palmer, Martin R.; Davies, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that underground railway particulate matter (PM) is rich in iron and other transition metals across coarse (PM10–2.5), fine (PM2.5), and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.18) fractions and is able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, there is little knowledge of whether the metal-rich nature of such particles exerts toxic effects in mucus-covered airway epithelial cell cultures or whether there is an increased risk posed by the ultrafine fraction. Monolayer and mucociliary air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) were exposed to size-fractionated underground railway PM (1.1–11.1 µg/cm2) and release of lactate dehydrogenase and IL-8 was assayed. ROS generation was measured, and the mechanism of generation studied using desferrioxamine (DFX) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by RT-qPCR. Particle uptake was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Underground PM increased IL-8 release from PBECs, but this was diminished in mucus-secreting ALI cultures. Fine and ultrafine PM generated a greater level of ROS than coarse PM. ROS generation by ultrafine PM was ameliorated by DFX and NAC, suggesting an iron-dependent mechanism. Despite the presence of mucus, ALI cultures displayed increased HO-1 expression. Intracellular PM was observed within vesicles, mitochondria, and free in the cytosol. The results indicate that, although the mucous layer appears to confer some protection against underground PM, ALI PBECs nonetheless detect PM and mount an antioxidant response. The combination of increased ROS-generating ability of the metal-rich ultrafine fraction and ability of PM to penetrate the mucous layer merits further research. PMID:25673499

  20. Knockdown of Drosha in human alveolar type II cells alters expression of SP-A in culture: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Silveyra, Patricia; Chroneos, Zissis C; DiAngelo, Susan L; Thomas, Neal J; Noutsios, Georgios T; Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Howrlylak, Judie A; Umstead, Todd M; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in surfactant metabolism and lung innate immunity. SP-A is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells (ATII), one of the two cell types of the distal lung epithelium (ATII and ATI). We have shown that miRNA interactions with sequence polymorphisms on the SP-A mRNA 3′UTRs mediate differential expression of SP-A1 and SP-A2 gene variants in vitro. In the present study, we describe a physiologically relevant model to study miRNA regulation of SP-A in human ATII. For these studies, we purified and cultured human ATII on an air-liquid interface matrix (A/L) or plastic wells without matrix (P). Gene expression analyses confirmed that cells cultured in A/L maintained the ATII phenotype for over 5 days, whereas P-cultured cells differentiated to ATI. When we transfected ATII with siRNAs to inhibit the expression of Drosha, a critical effector of miRNA maturation, the levels of SP-A mRNA and protein increased in a time dependent manner. We next characterized cultured ATII and ATI by studying expression of 1,066 human miRNAs using miRNA PCR arrays. We detected expression of >300 miRNAs with 24 miRNAs differentially expressed in ATII vs. ATI, 12 of which predicted to bind SP-A 3′UTRs, indicating that these may be implicated in SP-A downregulation in ATI. Thus, miRNAs not only affect SPA expression, but also may contribute to the maintenance of the ATII cell phenotype and/or the trans-differentiation of ATII to ATI cells, and may represent new molecular markers that distinguish ATII and ATI. PMID:25058539

  1. Knockdown of Drosha in human alveolar type II cells alters expression of SP-A in culture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Silveyra, Patricia; Chroneos, Zissis C; DiAngelo, Susan L; Thomas, Neal J; Noutsios, Georgios T; Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Howrylak, Judie A; Umstead, Todd M; Floros, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in surfactant metabolism and lung innate immunity. SP-A is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II (ATII) cells, one of the two cell types of the distal lung epithelium (ATII and ATI). We have shown that miRNA interactions with sequence polymorphisms on the SP-A mRNA 3'UTRs mediate differential expression of SP-A1 and SP-A2 gene variants in vitro. In the present study, we describe a physiologically relevant model to study miRNA regulation of SP-A in human ATII. For these studies, we purified and cultured human ATII on an air-liquid interface matrix (A/L) or plastic wells without matrix (P). Gene expression analyses confirmed that cells cultured in A/L maintained the ATII phenotype for over 5 days, whereas P-cultured cells differentiated to ATI. When we transfected ATII with siRNAs to inhibit the expression of Drosha, a critical effector of miRNA maturation, the levels of SP-A mRNA and protein increased in a time dependent manner. We next characterized cultured ATII and ATI by studying expression of 1,066 human miRNAs using miRNA PCR arrays. We detected expression of >300 miRNAs with 24 miRNAs differentially expressed in ATII versus ATI, 12 of which predicted to bind SP-A 3'UTRs, indicating that these may be implicated in SP-A downregulation in ATI. Thus, miRNAs not only affect SP-A expression, but also may contribute to the maintenance of the ATII cell phenotype and/or the trans-differentiation of ATII to ATI cells, and may represent new molecular markers that distinguish ATII and ATI. PMID:25058539

  2. Hyperbolic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-28

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature. PMID:23030106

  3. Hyperbolic Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Fluid interfaces, such as soap films, liquid droplets, or lipid membranes, are known to give rise to several special geometries, whose complexity and beauty continue to fascinate us, as observers of the natural world, and challenge us as scientists. Here I show that a special class of surfaces of constant negative Gaussian curvature can be obtained in fluid interfaces equipped with an orientational ordered phase. These arise in various soft and biological materials, such as nematic liquid crystals, cytoskeletal assemblies, or hexatic colloidal suspensions. The purely hyperbolic morphology originates from the competition between surface tension, that reduces the area of the interface at the expense of increasing its Gaussian curvature, and the orientational elasticity of the ordered phase, that in turn suffers for the distortion induced by the underlying curvature.

  4. Nepal and the Americas: Can Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Signals Be Detected There That Yield Information About Culturally Dictated Spiritual Values, and Can Computers Interface Their Assessment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Sanjita; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2002-10-01

    Nepal has a particularly rich tradition of culturally developed views on the material and spiritual worlds, and also has a powerful natural environment that may generate EMFs in conjunction with natural phenomena. We have an interest in determining whether these can be detected by portable technological means, and recording such data on notebook-type computers for analysis and evaluation. One goal is to assess whether historic Native Americans, such as Maine's and New Hampshire's Molly Ockett, may have been motivated in their selection of special, and perhaps, to them, "sacred" sites for their attention and as possible burial sites. Some of these may have been chosen on the basis of the EMFs that seem to emanate from them, and their assessment of what they meant to their worldviews. Do some Amerindians consider the EMF and reincarnation as requiring their rejection of material aspects of existence? Could other traditional cultures, or even suicidal terrorists, be sensitive to "information" they may receive from the EMF?

  5. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns. PMID:27090820

  6. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns. PMID:27090820

  7. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns.

  8. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface. PMID:27389283

  9. Soft Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles de Gennes, Pierre; Edwards, Introduction By Sam

    1997-04-01

    Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, died in 1984. Dirac's college, St. John's of Cambridge, generously endowed annual lectures to be held at Cambridge University in his memory. This volume contains a much expanded version of the 1994 Dirac Lecture by Nobel Laureate Pierre Gilles de Gennes. The book presents an impressionistic tour of the physics of soft interfaces. Full of insight and interesting asides, it not only provides an accessible introduction to this topic, but also lays down many markers and signposts that will be of interest to researchers in physics or chemistry. Features discussions of wetting and dewetting, the dynamics of different types of interface and adhesion and polymer/polymer welding.

  10. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  11. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Carole; Gebel, Stephan; Poussin, Carine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Sewer, Alain; Weisensee, Dirk; Hengstermann, Arnd; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using complementary computational approaches and an integrated mRNA–microRNA (miRNA) analysis. The main cellular pathways perturbed by CS exposure were related to stress responses (oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism), inflammation (inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and the interferon gamma-dependent pathway), and proliferation/differentiation. Within post-exposure periods up to 48 hours, a transient kinetic response was observed at lower CS doses, whereas higher doses resulted in more sustained responses. In conclusion, this systems toxicology approach has potential for product testing according to “21st Century Toxicology”. PMID:25788831

  12. Impact Assessment of Cigarette Smoke Exposure on Organotypic Bronchial Epithelial Tissue Cultures: A Comparison of Mono-Culture and Coculture Model Containing Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Anita R; Xiang, Yang; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Leroy, Patrice; Kuehn, Diana; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-09-01

    Organotypic 3D cultures of epithelial cells are grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and resemble the in vivo counterparts. Although the complexity of in vivo cellular responses could be better manifested in coculture models in which additional cell types such as fibroblasts were incorporated, the presence of another cell type could mask the response of the other. This study reports the impact of whole cigarette smoke (CS) exposure on organotypic mono- and coculture models to evaluate the relevancy of organotypic models for toxicological assessment of aerosols. Two organotypic bronchial models were directly exposed to low and high concentrations of CS of the reference research cigarette 3R4F: monoculture of bronchial epithelial cells without fibroblasts (BR) and coculture with fibroblasts (BRF) models. Adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1/1B1 activity, tissue histology, and concentrations of secreted mediators into the basolateral media, as well as transcriptomes were evaluated following the CS exposure. The results demonstrated similar impact of CS on the AK-based cytotoxicity, CYP1A1/1B1 activity, and tissue histology in both models. However, a greater number of secreted mediators was identified in the basolateral media of the monoculture than in the coculture models. Furthermore, annotation analysis and network-based systems biology analysis of the transcriptomic profiles indicated a more prominent cellular stress and tissue damage following CS in the monoculture epithelium model without fibroblasts. Finally, our results indicated that an in vivo smoking-induced xenobiotic metabolism response of bronchial epithelial cells was better reflected from the in vitro CS-exposed coculture model. PMID:26085348

  13. Early Childhood Education at the Cultural Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Marguerite; Buxton, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The "Early Years Learning Framework for Australia" emphasises that children's own identity is constructed within their given context of family and community. This article presents the findings of a multiple case study project undertaken within five remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, Australia. Community Elders were…

  14. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxidemore » during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.« less

  15. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxide during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.

  16. Structural organization of liquid crystals at liquid crystal-air interface: Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity and computational simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadati, Monirosadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Bu, Wei; Sevgen, Emre; Liang, Zhu; Erol, Cem; Taheri Qazvini, Nader; Rahimi, Mohammad; Lin, Binhua; Roux, Benoit; Schlossman, Mark; de Pablo, Juan J.

    Numerous applications of liquid crystals (LC) rely on control of molecular orientation at an interface. However, little is known about the precise molecular structure of such interfaces. In this work, we have performed synchrotron X-ray reflectivity measurements accompanied by an advanced theoretical and computational analysis to study the structural organization of liquid crystals at the air-liquid crystal interface. The X-ray reflectivity was measured from two nematic (5CB) and smectic (8CB) liquid crystals at several temperatures, in the nematic phase and above the nematic-isotropic transition. Our computational simulations and X-ray reflectivity results indicate that in the case of 8CB nematic phase, incipient bulk smectic fluctuations are pinned at the interface to form temperature-dependent multilayers at the interface. Such layers can extend far from the interface. However, the interface of 5CB in the nematic phase exhibits a relatively small number of layers. These measurements will be extended to the study of the LC-aqueous electrolyte interfaces to understand the effects of electrostatic interactions and external stimuli on the interfacial anchoring energy and LC orientational ordering.

  17. Ordered and disordered colloidal particle monolayers at liquid crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei-Shao; Lohr, Matthew; Gharbi, Mohamed Amine; Stebe, Kathleen; Yodh, A. G.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate ordered colloidal particle monolayers at the air/liquid-crystal (LC) interface. Specifically, silica microparticles are treated with DMOAP to create homeotropic anchoring of LC mesogens at their surfaces. These particles are then spread on an air-exposed interface of the LC 5CB. Macroscopic ordered patterns of these microparticles form due to long-range interactions between particles that are mediated by elastic deformations of the underlying LC. Different confinement conditions lead to various self-assembled patterns ranging from hexagonal lattices to chain-like dipole formations. Using dark-field video microscopy, we track and analyze the dynamics of the colloidal particles in the hexagonal crystal packing, deriving mean squared displacements, phonon modes and density of states, etc., under several conditions. Further, heating of the nematic LC into its isotropic phase enables us to observe melting dynamics of this unusual quasi-2D crystal. The investigations provide insight into crystalline packings controlled by liquid-crystal mediated colloidal interactions. This work is funded by NSF Grant DMR12-05463, PENN MRSEC Grant DMR11-20901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  18. Revisiting a many-body model for water based on a single polarizable site: From gas phase clusters to liquid and air/liquid water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Flament, Jean-Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2013-09-01

    We present a revised version of the water many-body model TCPE [M. Masella and J.-P. Flament, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)], which is based on a static three charge sites and a single polarizable site to model the molecular electrostatic properties of water, and on an anisotropic short range many-body energy term specially designed to accurately model hydrogen bonding in water. The parameters of the revised model, denoted TCPE/2013, are here developed to reproduce the ab initio energetic and geometrical properties of small water clusters (up to hexamers) and the repulsive water interactions occurring in cation first hydration shells. The model parameters have also been refined to reproduce two liquid water properties at ambient conditions, the density and the vaporization enthalpy. Thanks to its computational efficiency, the new model range of applicability was validated by performing simulations of liquid water over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, as well as by investigating water liquid/vapor interfaces over a large range of temperatures. It is shown to reproduce several important water properties at an accurate enough level of precision, such as the existence liquid water density maxima up to a pressure of 1000 atm, the water boiling temperature, the properties of the water critical point (temperature, pressure, and density), and the existence of a "singularity" temperature at about 225 K in the supercooled regime. This model appears thus to be particularly well-suited for characterizing ion hydration properties under different temperature and pressure conditions, as well as in different phases and interfaces.

  19. Revisiting a many-body model for water based on a single polarizable site: from gas phase clusters to liquid and air/liquid water systems.

    PubMed

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Flament, Jean-Pierre; Masella, Michel

    2013-09-21

    We present a revised version of the water many-body model TCPE [M. Masella and J.-P. Flament, J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9105 (1997)], which is based on a static three charge sites and a single polarizable site to model the molecular electrostatic properties of water, and on an anisotropic short range many-body energy term specially designed to accurately model hydrogen bonding in water. The parameters of the revised model, denoted TCPE/2013, are here developed to reproduce the ab initio energetic and geometrical properties of small water clusters (up to hexamers) and the repulsive water interactions occurring in cation first hydration shells. The model parameters have also been refined to reproduce two liquid water properties at ambient conditions, the density and the vaporization enthalpy. Thanks to its computational efficiency, the new model range of applicability was validated by performing simulations of liquid water over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, as well as by investigating water liquid/vapor interfaces over a large range of temperatures. It is shown to reproduce several important water properties at an accurate enough level of precision, such as the existence liquid water density maxima up to a pressure of 1000 atm, the water boiling temperature, the properties of the water critical point (temperature, pressure, and density), and the existence of a "singularity" temperature at about 225 K in the supercooled regime. This model appears thus to be particularly well-suited for characterizing ion hydration properties under different temperature and pressure conditions, as well as in different phases and interfaces. PMID:24070292

  20. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products. PMID:25046638

  1. Media independent interface. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A Media Independent Interface (MII) is specified, using current standards in the industry. The MII is described in hierarchical fashion. At the base are IEEE/International Standards Organization (ISO) documents (standards) which describe the functionality of the software modules or layers and their interconnection. These documents describe primitives which are to transcent the MII. The intent of the MII is to provide a universal interface to one or more Media Access Contols (MACs) for the Logical Link Controller and Station Manager. This interface includes both a standardized electrical and mechanical interface and a standardized functional specification which defines the services expected from the MAC.

  2. A Pilot Study of the Interface Design of Cross-Cultural Web Sites through Usability Testing of Multilanguage Web Sites and Determining the Preferences of Taiwanese and American Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, David Tawei; Chang, Chia-Chi

    2014-01-01

    By conducting usability testing on a multilanguage Web site, this study analyzed the cultural differences between Taiwanese and American users in the performance of assigned tasks. To provide feasible insight into cross-cultural Web site design, Microsoft Office Online (MOO) that supports both traditional Chinese and English and contains an almost…

  3. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  4. Water at Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Björneholm, Olle; Hansen, Martin H; Hodgson, Andrew; Liu, Li-Min; Limmer, David T; Michaelides, Angelos; Pedevilla, Philipp; Rossmeisl, Jan; Shen, Huaze; Tocci, Gabriele; Tyrode, Eric; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Werner, Josephina; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2016-07-13

    The interfaces of neat water and aqueous solutions play a prominent role in many technological processes and in the environment. Examples of aqueous interfaces are ultrathin water films that cover most hydrophilic surfaces under ambient relative humidities, the liquid/solid interface which drives many electrochemical reactions, and the liquid/vapor interface, which governs the uptake and release of trace gases by the oceans and cloud droplets. In this article we review some of the recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge of the properties of aqueous interfaces and discuss open questions and gaps in our understanding. PMID:27232062

  5. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specificmore » fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.« less

  6. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air–liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica A.; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2013-12-02

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. In conclusion, together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes

  7. Microconical interface fitting and interface grasping tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernhardt, Michael L. (Inventor); Wightman, William D. (Inventor); Johnston, Alistair P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A small and light weight microconical interface fitting may be attached to the surface of a space vehicle or equipment to provide an attachment device for an astronaut or robot to capture the space vehicle or equipment. The microconical interface fitting of the present invention has an axisymmetrical conical body having a base portion with a torque reaction surface for preventing rotation of the interface grasping tool; a cavitated, sunken or hollowed out intermediate locking portion which has a cavity shaped for receiving the latches of the grasping tool and an upper guiding portion for guiding the grasping tool into axial alignment with the microconical interface fitting. The capture is accomplished with an interface grasping tool. The grasping tool comprises an outer sleeve with a handle attached, an inner sleeve which may be raised and lowered within the outer sleeve with a plurality of latches supported at the lower end and a cam to raise and lower the inner sleeve. When the inner sleeve is at its lowest position, the latches form the largest diameter opening for surrounding the microconical fitting and the latches form the smallest diameter or a locking, grasping position when raised to the highest position within the outer sleeve. The inner sleeve may be at an intermediate, capture position which permits the latches to be biased outwardly when contacting the microconical fitting under very low forces to grasp the fitting and permits capture (soft docking) without exact alignment of the fitting and the tool.

  8. Turbomachine Interface Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    Sealing interfaces and coatings, like lubricants, are sacrificial, giving up their integrity for the benefit of the component. Clearance control is a major issue in power systems turbomachine design and operational life. Sealing becomes the most cost-effective way to enhance system performance. Coatings, films, and combined use of both metals and ceramics play a major role in maintaining interface clearances in turbomachine sealing and component life. This paper focuses on conventional and innovative materials and design practices for sealing interfaces.

  9. The kinked interface crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzer, Joerg

    1992-05-01

    Two methods for the numerical solution of the integral equation describing the kinked interface crack, one proposed by Erdogan et al. (1973) and the other by Theokaris and Iokimidis (1979), are examined. The method of Erdogan et al. is then used to solve the equation in order to determine the kinking angle of the interface crack. Results are presented for two material combinations, aluminum/epoxy and glass/ceramic, under uniaxial tension in the direction normal to the interface.

  10. Persistent interface fluid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We present an unusual case of persistent interface fluid that would not resolve despite normal intraocular pressure and corneal endothelial replacement with Descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty. Dissection, elevation, and repositioning of the laser in situ keratomileusis flap were required to resolve the interface fluid. Circumferential corneal graft-host margin scar formation acting as a mechanical strut may have been the cause of the intractable interface fluid. PMID:18655997

  11. Popeye Project: ROV interface

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, C.R.; Hernandez, D.A.; Hickok, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) interface with the Popeye Project Subsea System. It describes the ROV-related plans, design philosophies, intervention tasks, tooling/equipment requirements, testing activities, and offshore installation experiences. Early identification and continuous consideration of the ROV interfaces significantly improved the overall efficiency of equipment designs and offshore operations. The Popeye Project helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deep water subsea production systems.

  12. Multimodal neuroelectric interface development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Wheeler, Kevin R.; Jorgensen, Charles C.; Rosipal, Roman; Clanton, Sam T.; Matthews, Bryan; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Matthews, Robert; Krupka, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We are developing electromyographic and electroencephalographic methods, which draw control signals for human-computer interfaces from the human nervous system. We have made progress in four areas: 1) real-time pattern recognition algorithms for decoding sequences of forearm muscle activity associated with control gestures; 2) signal-processing strategies for computer interfaces using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals; 3) a flexible computation framework for neuroelectric interface research; and d) noncontact sensors, which measure electromyogram or EEG signals without resistive contact to the body.

  13. TSF Interface Package

    SciTech Connect

    2004-03-01

    A collection of packages of classes for interfacing to sparse and dense matrices, vectors and graphs, and to linear operators. TSF (via TSFCore, TSFCoreUtils and TSFExtended) provides the application programmer interface to any number of solvers, linear algebra libraries and preconditioner packages, providing also a sophisticated technique for combining multiple packages to solve a single problem. TSF provides a collection of abstract base classes that define the interfaces to abstract vector, matrix and linear soerator objects. By using abstract interfaces, users of TSF are not limiting themselves to any one concrete library and can in fact easily combine multiple libraries to solve a single problem.

  14. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  15. Interface Conductance Modal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Henry, Asegun

    2015-03-01

    Reliably and quantitatively calculating the conductance of phonons across an interface between two materials has been one of the major unresolved questions in thermal transport physics for the last century. Theories have been presented in this regard, but their predictive power is limited. A new formalism to extract the modal contributions to thermal interface conductance with full inclusion of temperature dependent anharmonicity and all of the atom level topography is presented. The results indicate that when two materials are joined a new set of vibrational modes are required to correctly describe the transport across the interface. The new set of vibrational modes is inconsistent with the physical picture described by phonon gas model (PGM), because some of the most important modes are localized and non-propagating and therefore do not have a well-defined velocity nor do they impinge on the interface. Among these new modes, certain classifications emerge, as most modes extend at least partially into the other material. Localized interfacial modes are also present and exhibit a high conductance contribution on a per mode basis by strongly coupling to other types of vibrational modes. We apply our formalism to different interfaces and present thermal interface conductance accumulation functions, two-dimensional cross-correlation matrices, and a quantitative determination of the contributions arising from inelastic effects. The provided new perspective on interface thermal transport can open new gates towards deeper understanding of phonon-phonon and electron-phonon interactions around interfaces.

  16. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  17. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  18. Interfaces in Perovskite Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Hans M; Kim, Dae Ho; Rouleau, Christopher M

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in film synthesis have made it possible to investigate the properties of well-controlled interfaces in perovskite metal-oxides. A review of published experimental data and computational results indicate that so far most interfaces that have been analyzed in ferroelectric materials - while necessary to impose large lattice strain on the polar material - contribute little to the ferroelectricity and may instead be detrimental to the desired properties. In contrast, a very different situation arises at interfaces that show changes in the electronic configuration as a consequence of a compositional discontinuity. Data is shown for LaMnO3/SrTiO 3 superlattices as an example of electronic effects that produce enhanced properties, further illustrating the richness of interfacial properties that can be obtained at interfaces (as shown in numerous published results for different but related interfaces).

  19. Urine culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  20. Stool Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bacterial Culture, stool; Feces Culture Formal name: Enteric Pathogens Culture, stool Related tests: Ova and Parasite Exam , ... Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli , Widal Test , Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  1. Fecal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Stool culture; Culture - stool ... stool tests are done in addition to the culture, such as: Gram stain of stool Fecal smear ... Giannella RA. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis and bacterial food poisoning. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  2. Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  3. Operator interface for vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  4. Scalable coherent interface

    SciTech Connect

    Alnaes, K.; Kristiansen, E.H. ); Gustavson, D.B. ); James, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface (IEEE P1596) is establishing an interface standard for very high performance multiprocessors, supporting a cache-coherent-memory model scalable to systems with up to 64K nodes. This Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) will supply a peak bandwidth per node of 1 GigaByte/second. The SCI standard should facilitate assembly of processor, memory, I/O and bus bridge cards from multiple vendors into massively parallel systems with throughput far above what is possible today. The SCI standard encompasses two levels of interface, a physical level and a logical level. The physical level specifies electrical, mechanical and thermal characteristics of connectors and cards that meet the standard. The logical level describes the address space, data transfer protocols, cache coherence mechanisms, synchronization primitives and error recovery. In this paper we address logical level issues such as packet formats, packet transmission, transaction handshake, flow control, and cache coherence. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  5. TSF Interface Package

    2004-03-01

    A collection of packages of classes for interfacing to sparse and dense matrices, vectors and graphs, and to linear operators. TSF (via TSFCore, TSFCoreUtils and TSFExtended) provides the application programmer interface to any number of solvers, linear algebra libraries and preconditioner packages, providing also a sophisticated technique for combining multiple packages to solve a single problem. TSF provides a collection of abstract base classes that define the interfaces to abstract vector, matrix and linear soeratormore » objects. By using abstract interfaces, users of TSF are not limiting themselves to any one concrete library and can in fact easily combine multiple libraries to solve a single problem.« less

  6. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  7. Polarizable Ions at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yan

    2009-04-01

    A nonperturbative theory is presented which allows us to calculate the solvation free energy of polarizable ions near water-vapor and water-oil interfaces. The theory predicts that larger halogen anions are adsorbed at the interface, while the alkali metal cations are repelled from it. The density profiles calculated theoretically are similar to those obtained using molecular dynamics simulations with polarizable force fields.

  8. Performance Application Programming Interface

    2005-10-31

    PAPI is a programming interface designed to provide the tool designer and application engineer with a consistent interface and methodology for use of the performance counter hardware found in most major microprocessors. PAPI enables software engineers to see, in near real time, the relation between software performance and processor events. This release covers the hardware dependent implementation of PAPI version 3 for the IBM BlueGene/L (BG/L) system.

  9. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  10. Interfaces: nanometric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, T. J.

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanometric size particles in a matrix to form dielectric composites shows promise of materials (nanodielectrics) with new and improved properties. It is argued that the properties of the interfaces between the particles and the matrix, which will themselves be of nanometric dimensions, will have an increasingly dominant role in determining dielectric performance as the particle size decreases. The forces that determine the electrical and dielectric properties of interfaces are considered, with emphasis on the way in which they might influence composite behaviour. A number of examples are given in which interfaces at the nanometric level exercise both passive and active control over dielectric, optical and conductive properties. Electromechanical properties are also considered, and it is shown that interfaces have important electrostrictive and piezoelectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that the process of poling, namely subjecting macroscopic composite materials to electrical stress and raised temperatures to create piezoelectric materials, can be explained in terms of optimizing the collective response of the nanometric interfaces involved. If the electrical and electromechanical features are coupled to the long-established electrochemical properties, interfaces represent highly versatile active elements with considerable potential in nanotechnology.

  11. MER SPICE Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayfi, Elias

    2004-01-01

    MER SPICE Interface is a software module for use in conjunction with the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and the SPICE software system of the Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (SPICE is used to acquire, record, and disseminate engineering, navigational, and other ancillary data describing circumstances under which data were acquired by spaceborne scientific instruments.) Given a Spacecraft Clock value, MER SPICE Interface extracts MER-specific data from SPICE kernels (essentially, raw data files) and calculates values for Planet Day Number, Local Solar Longitude, Local Solar Elevation, Local Solar Azimuth, and Local Solar Time (UTC). MER SPICE Interface was adapted from a subroutine, denoted m98SpiceIF written by Payam Zamani, that was intended to calculate SPICE values for the Mars Polar Lander. The main difference between MER SPICE Interface and m98SpiceIf is that MER SPICE Interface does not explicitly call CHRONOS, a time-conversion program that is part of a library of utility subprograms within SPICE. Instead, MER SPICE Interface mimics some portions of the CHRONOS code, the advantage being that it executes much faster and can efficiently be called from a pipeline of events in a parallel processing environment.

  12. Serial interface controller

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, A.

    1995-04-14

    The idea of building a Serial Interface Controller (SIC) proposed by Paul O`Connor, Instrumentation Division, BNL is to determine the feasibility of incorporating a Serial Interface Controlled CMOS IC`s for charge amplification, shaping, analog storage and multiplexing used in particle detectors for high energy physics experiments. The serial data pumped into the CMOS ICs will be used to control many circuit parameters like digitally controlled gain, shaping time, precision preamplifier calibration circuits and many other parameters like timing discriminators mode of operation. The SIC board built will be tested on a Serial Interface Controlled Digital - to - Analog Convertor, which follows either Motorola`s SPI/QSPI or National Semiconductors Microwire interface technique. The DAC chosen for this was MAXIM`s MAX537, a Quad, 12-bit DAC. The function of this controller can be achieved by using some on-shelf micro-controllers like the Motorola`s MC68HC11, which offers dedicated SPI ports. The drawback encountered in using this controller is the overhead involved in putting together an user interface where the user can dynamically change its settings and load the SIC device. This is very critical in testing fewer number of CMOS IC`s having SIC. The SIC board described here takes care of this dynamic user interface issue.

  13. Learning Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    Adult and continuing education in the arts can and does play a role in the development of cultural identity. Dimensions of culture include ethnicity, location, age, social class, and time. This definition of culture leads to the conclusion that cultures are generally small and are dynamic rather than static. Research shows that individuals in what…

  14. Culture matters.

    PubMed

    Arif, Zeba

    Zebaa Arif reflects on changes during her career as a mental health nurse in relation to cultural care issues: Cultural awareness is becoming embedded in patient care. All aspects of care are influenced by cultural beliefs and should form part of assessment. Leadership is essential in influencing cultural care, as is organisational commitment. PMID:16262169

  15. Approach and landing test network interface processor interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design requirements are established for all external or interproject interfaces to the Network Interface Processor located in Building 30 at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. In addition to external interfaces, software/hardware and special interfaces are also described.

  16. The Culture Gap among Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilian, Crawford

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the cultural gap between teachers who are computer literate and those who are not. Highlights include traditional teaching methods; surface reasons for not using computers, including high cost, complexity, hostile interface, and rapid obsolescence; the opportunity for students to become independent lifelong learners with the Internet;…

  17. Environmental materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig.

  18. Wettability alteration by novel betaines at polymer-aqueous solution interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song-Shuang; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Gong, Qing-Tao; Jin, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Lan; Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Sui

    2015-11-01

    The wettability of alkyl carboxylbetaine (18C) and alkyl sulfobetaine (18S) at polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surfaces have been investigated and the different physicochemical parameters such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension, contact angle, surface excess, adhesional tension and work of adhesion have been estimated. The results show that the contact angle of 18C and 18S for both solids keep almost a constant value in a wide range of surfactant concentration, but the sharp decrease of contact angle appears after CMC of individual surfactant solution because of the continued increase in surfactant molecules adsorption at solid-liquid interface above CMC, which is quite different from traditional surfactants reported in the literature. In addition, 18C has significantly lower contact angle values on PTFE at high concentrations. For PTFE and PMMA there is a linear relationship existing between the adhesional and surface tension in a range of certain concentrations for all investigated surfactants. The values of slope suggest that adsorption of 18C and 18S at PTFE/PMMA-liquid interfaces are less than that at air-liquid, and the orientation of the surfactant molecules at PTFE-liquid and PMMA-liquid interfaces should not be the same. Moreover, the decrease of PTFE-liquid interfacial tension has been observed while the PMMA-liquid interfacial tension increases at first and decreases afterwards for 18C and 18S. Especially for PTFE, the decrease of γSL for 18C is larger than that for 18S, which indicates that 18S molecules may be vertical orientation due to steric effect while the hemimicelle has been formed for 18C at the PTFE interface. On the other hand, the addition of surfactant molecules will adsorb onto monolayer at PMMA surface again through hydrophobic interaction with hydrophilic group toward the bulk phase of solution above CMC.

  19. [Emergency Department Interfaces].

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Emergency Departments ED may be an exceptionally good example of an interface within a hospital. EDs have no patients of their own but pass them over to other institutions, either to specialist departments within the hospital or to primary care providers. Moreover, many doctors, nurses, attendants and institutions take part in the care of emergency department patients, and thus the number of its interfaces is very high. The characteristics of working in an ED, for example shortage of time, high work load, taking care of several patients at the same time and frequently crowding, may compromise the transfer of information via interfaces, sometimes including even vital data. The best way to secure handoff of information may be the formalization and standardization of this process, assuring patient safety and quality of care. Further study is required. PMID:26710198

  20. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  1. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  2. Magnetic multilayer interface anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ni/Mo and Ni/V multilayer magnetic anisotropy has been investigated as a function of Ni layer thickness, frequency and temperature. Variable frequency ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements show, for the first time, significant frequency dependence associated with the multilayer magnetic anisotropy. The thickness dependence allows one to extract the interface contribution from the total anisotropy. Temperature dependent FMR (9 GHz) and room temperature magnetization indicate that strain between Ni and the non-magnetic layers is contributing significantly to the source of the interface anisotropy and the state of the interfacial magnetization. In order to examine the interface properties of other transition metal multilayer systems, investigations on Fe/Cu are underway and CoCr/Ag is being proposed. ESR measurements have been reported on Gd substituted YBaCuO superconductors and a novel quasi-equilibrium method has been developed to determine quickly and precisely the ransition temperature.

  3. Urban water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, M. O.; Hinkelmann, R.; Nützmann, G.; Jekel, M.; Singer, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nehls, T.; Barjenbruch, M.

    2014-06-01

    Urban water systems consist of large-scale technical systems and both natural and man-made water bodies. The technical systems are essential components of urban infrastructure for water collection, treatment, storage and distribution, as well as for wastewater and runoff collection and subsequent treatment. Urban aquatic ecosystems are typically subject to strong human influences, which impair the quality of surface and ground waters, often with far-reaching impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems and water users. The various surface and subsurface water bodies in urban environments can be viewed as interconnected compartments that are also extensively intertwined with a range of technical compartments of the urban water system. As a result, urban water systems are characterized by fluxes of water, solutes, gases and energy between contrasting compartments of a technical, natural or hybrid nature. Referred to as urban water interfaces, boundaries between and within these compartments are often specific to urban water systems. Urban water interfaces are generally characterized by steep physical and biogeochemical gradients, which promote high reaction rates. We hypothesize that they act as key sites of processes and fluxes with notable effects on overall system behaviour. By their very nature, urban water interfaces are heterogeneous and dynamic. Therefore, they increase spatial heterogeneity in urban areas and are also expected to contribute notably to the temporal dynamics of urban water systems, which often involve non-linear interactions and feedback mechanisms. Processes at and fluxes across urban water interfaces are complex and less well understood than within well-defined, homogeneous compartments, requiring both empirical investigations and new modelling approaches at both the process and system level. We advocate an integrative conceptual framework of the urban water system that considers interfaces as a key component to improve our fundamental

  4. Cultural Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience issues from the apparently incompatible combination of neuroscience and cultural psychology. A brief literature sampling suggests, instead, several preliminary topics that demonstrate proof of possibilities: cultural differences in both lower-level processes (e.g. perception, number representation) and higher-order processes (e.g. inferring others’ emotions, contemplating the self) are beginning to shed new light on both culture and cognition. Candidates for future cultural neuroscience research include cultural variations in the default (resting) network, which may be social; regulation and inhibition of feelings, thoughts, and actions; prejudice and dehumanization; and neural signatures of fundamental warmth and competence judgments. PMID:23874143

  5. Nonlinear optics at interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.K.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of surface nonlinear optics are explored in this thesis. The first part is a theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear intraction of surface plasmons and bulk photons at metal-dielectric interfaces. The second part is a demonstration and study of surface enhanced second harmonic generation at rough metal surfaces. A general formulation for nonlinear interaction of surface plasmons at metal-dielectric interfaces is presented and applied to both second and third order nonlinear processes. Experimental results for coherent second and third harmonic generation by surface plasmons and surface coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are shown to be in good agreement with the theory.

  6. Modal Interfaces in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. Alvey

    1974-01-01

    Hawaii, an archipelago where transportation distances are short but the interfaces are many, seeks elimination of modal changes by totally-submerged hydrofoil craft operating at the water surface directly between tourist resort destinations, by dual mode rapid transit vehicles operating directly between the deplaning bridges at Honolulu International Airport and hotel porte-cochere at Waikiki, by demand responsive vehicles for collection and distribution operating on fixed guideways for line haul, and by roll-on/roll-off inter-island ferries for all models of manually operated ground vehicles. The paper also describes facilitation of unavoidable interfaces by innovative sub-systems.

  7. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  8. Optical encryption interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An analog optical encryption system based on phase scrambling of two-dimensional optical images and holographic transformation for achieving large encryption keys and high encryption speed. An enciphering interface uses a spatial light modulator for converting a digital data stream into a two dimensional optical image. The optical image is further transformed into a hologram with a random phase distribution. The hologram is converted into digital form for transmission over a shared information channel. A respective deciphering interface at a receiver reverses the encrypting process by using a phase conjugate reconstruction of the phase scrambled hologram.

  9. Profile Interface Generator

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allowsmore » semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.« less

  10. Profile Interface Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allows semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.

  11. Unstable nonlocal interface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Matteo; Cuerno, Rodolfo; Castro, Mario

    2009-06-26

    Nonlocal effects occur in many nonequilibrium interfaces, due to diverse physical mechanisms like diffusive, ballistic, or anomalous transport, with examples from flame fronts to thin films. While dimensional analysis describes stable nonlocal interfaces, we show the morphologically unstable condition to be nontrivial. This is the case for a family of stochastic equations of experimental relevance, paradigmatically including the Michelson-Sivashinsky system. For a whole parameter range, the asymptotic dynamics is scale invariant with dimension-independent exponents reflecting a hidden Galilean symmetry. The usual Kardar-Parisi-Zhang nonlinearity, albeit irrelevant in that parameter range, plays a key role in this behavior. PMID:19659099

  12. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  13. Repellent Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Considers defining "culture," noting how it is difficult to define because those individuals defining it cannot separate themselves from it. Relates these issues to student writing and their writing improvement. Addresses violence in relation to culture. (SG)

  14. Direct Manipulation Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Edwin L.; And Others

    This paper presents a cognitive account of both the advantages and disadvantages of direct manipulation interfaces, i.e., the use of icons to manipulate and interact directly with data rather than writing programs or calling on a set of statistical subroutines. Two underlying phenomena that give rise to the sensation of directness are identified.…

  15. Interfacing with a DMM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Jim

    1985-01-01

    Suggests purchasing a digital multimer (DMM) with an IEEE-488 option to interface an instrument to a microcomputer, indicating that a DMM is well protected from overloads and is easy to connect. An example of its use in an experiment involving hydrolysis of tertiary butyl alcohol (with program listing) is given. (JN)

  16. A Thermistor Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Gary D.; Dowden, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the use of a precalibrated stainless steel thermistor, interfaced with an Apple computer, in chemistry experiments. Discusses the advantages of "instant" temperature readings in experiments requiring that readings be taken at certain intervals. Outlines such an experiment which investigates freezing point depressions. (TW)

  17. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  18. Videodisc-Computer Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean

    1984-01-01

    Lists microcomputer-videodisc interfaces currently available from 26 sources, including home use systems connected through remote control jack and industrial/educational systems utilizing computer ports and new laser reflective and stylus technology. Information provided includes computer and videodisc type, language, authoring system, educational…

  19. the EXFOR interface

    2011-03-10

    The x4i package is an interface to the EXFOR nuclear data library. It simplifies retrieval of EXFOR entries and can automatically parse them, allowing one to extract cross-section (and other) data in a simple, plot-able format. x4i also understands and can parse the entire reaction string, allowing one to build a strategy for processing the data

  20. Virtual interface environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1988-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture is under development for use as a multipurpose interface environment. Initial applications of the system are in telerobotics, data-management and human factors research. System configuration and research directions are described.

  1. Culture Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Bridget Fitzgerald

    1998-01-01

    One way to break down barriers and promote understanding among English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and mainstream students is to establish culture clubs. Culture clubs involve frequent exchange of information about social, academic, and cultural topics in extracurricular settings. They are a critical component of ESL programs. The article explains…

  2. Teaching Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrath, Douglas R.

    The study of a foreign language is the study of another culture. Cultural involvement begins as learners progress from grammar to the actual use of language. Culture includes the ideas, customs, skills, arts, and tools of a people and influences both cognitive and affective behavior. It should be introduced as part of the total language…

  3. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  4. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae genes expression in biofilms cultured under static conditions and in a drip-flow apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the Gram-negative bacterium responsible for porcine pleuropneumonia. This respiratory infection is highly contagious and characterized by high morbidity and mortality. The objectives of our study were to study the transcriptome of A. pleuropneumoniae biofilms at different stages and to develop a protocol to grow an A. pleuropneumoniae biofilm in a drip-flow apparatus. This biofilm reactor is a system with an air-liquid interface modeling lung-like environment. Bacteria attached to a surface (biofilm) and free floating bacteria (plankton) were harvested for RNA isolation. Labelled cDNA was hybridized to a microarray to compare the expression profiles of planktonic cells and biofilm cells. Results It was observed that 47 genes were differentially expressed (22 up, 25 down) in a 4 h-static growing/maturing biofilm and 117 genes were differentially expressed (49 up, 68 down) in a 6h-static dispersing biofilm. The transcriptomes of a 4 h biofilm and a 6 h biofilm were also compared and 456 genes (235 up, 221 down) were identified as differently expressed. Among the genes identified in the 4 h vs 6h biofilm experiment, several regulators of stress response were down-regulated and energy metabolism associated genes were up-regulated. Biofilm bacteria cultured using the drip-flow apparatus differentially expressed 161 genes (68 up, 93 down) compared to the effluent bacteria. Cross-referencing of differentially transcribed genes in the different assays revealed that drip-flow biofilms shared few differentially expressed genes with static biofilms (4 h or 6 h) but shared several differentially expressed genes with natural or experimental infections in pigs. Conclusion The formation of a static biofilm by A. pleuropneumoniae strain S4074 is a rapid process and transcriptional analysis indicated that dispersal observed at 6 h is driven by nutritional stresses. Furthermore, A. pleuropneumoniae can form a biofilm under low

  5. PREFACE: Water at interfaces Water at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, P.; Rovere, M.

    2010-07-01

    This special issue is devoted to illustrating important aspects and significant results in the field of modeling and simulation of water at interfaces with solutes or with confining substrates, focusing on a range of temperatures from ambient to supercooled. Understanding the behavior of water, in contact with different substrates and/or in solutions, is of pivotal importance for a wide range of applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry. Simulations of confined and/or interfacial water are also relevant for testing how different its behavior is with respect to bulk water. Simulations and modeling in this field are of particular importance when studying supercooled regions where water shows anomalous properties. These considerations motivated the organization of a workshop at CECAM in the summer of 2009 which aimed to bring together scientists working with computer simulations on the properties of water in various environments with different methodologies. In this special issue, we collected a variety of interesting contributions from some of the speakers of the workshop. We have roughly classified the contributions into four groups. The papers of the first group address the properties of interfacial and confined water upon supercooling in an effort to understand the relation with anomalous behavior of supercooled bulk water. The second group deals with the specific problem of solvation. The next group deals with water in different environments by considering problems of great importance in technological and biological applications. Finally, the last group deals with quantum mechanical calculations related to the role of water in chemical processes. The first group of papers is introduced by the general paper of Stanley et al. The authors discuss recent progress in understanding the anomalies of water in bulk, nanoconfined, and biological environments. They present evidence that liquid water may display 'polymorphism', a property that can be present in

  6. Easy-to-use interface

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M M; Blattner, D O; Tong, Y

    1999-04-01

    Easy-to-use interfaces are a class of interfaces that fall between public access interfaces and graphical user interfaces in usability and cognitive difficulty. We describe characteristics of easy-to-use interfaces by the properties of four dimensions: selection, navigation, direct manipulation, and contextual metaphors. Another constraint we introduced was to include as little text as possible, and what text we have will be in at least four languages. Formative evaluations were conducted to identify and isolate these characteristics. Our application is a visual interface for a home automation system intended for a diverse set of users. The design will be expanded to accommodate the visually disabled in the near future.

  7. Interface Configuration Experiment: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1993-09-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) was carried out on USML-1 to investigate liquid-gas interfaces in certain rotationally-symmetric containers having prescribed, mathematically derived shapes. These containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric interfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. Furthermore, it can be shown that none of these interfaces can be stable. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum reoriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, in accordance with the mathematical theory.

  8. Interface Configuration Experiment: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark

    1994-01-01

    The Interface Configuration Experiment (ICE) was carried out on USML-1 to investigate liquid-gas interfaces in certain rotationally-symmetric containers having prescribed, mathematically derived shapes. These containers have the property that they admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium rotationally-symmetric interfaces for a given liquid volume and contact angle. Furthermore, it can be shown that none of these interfaces can be stable. It was found, after the containers were filled in orbit, that an initial equilibrium interface from the symmetric continuum re-oriented, when perturbed, to a stable interface that was not rotationally symmetric, in accordance with the mathematical theory.

  9. Cross-cultural organizational behavior.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Michele J; Erez, Miriam; Aycan, Zeynep

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews research on cross-cultural organizational behavior (OB). After a brief review of the history of cross-cultural OB, we review research on work motivation, or the factors that energize, direct, and sustain effort across cultures. We next consider the relationship between the individual and the organization, and review research on culture and organizational commitment, psychological contracts, justice, citizenship behavior, and person-environment fit. Thereafter, we consider how individuals manage their interdependence in organizations, and review research on culture and negotiation and disputing, teams, and leadership, followed by research on managing across borders and expatriation. The review shows that developmentally, cross-cultural research in OB is coming of age. Yet we also highlight critical challenges for future research, including moving beyond values to explain cultural differences, attending to levels of analysis issues, incorporating social and organizational context factors into cross-cultural research, taking indigenous perspectives seriously, and moving beyond intracultural comparisons to understand the dynamics of cross-cultural interfaces. PMID:17044797

  10. Thyra Abstract Interface Package

    2005-09-01

    Thrya primarily defines a set of abstract C++ class interfaces needed for the development of abstract numerical atgorithms (ANAs) such as iterative linear solvers, transient solvers all the way up to optimization. At the foundation of these interfaces are abstract C++ classes for vectors, vector spaces, linear operators and multi-vectors. Also included in the Thyra package is C++ code for creating concrete vector, vector space, linear operator, and multi-vector subclasses as well as other utilitiesmore » to aid in the development of ANAs. Currently, very general and efficient concrete subclass implementations exist for serial and SPMD in-core vectors and multi-vectors. Code also currently exists for testing objects and providing composite objects such as product vectors.« less

  11. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scates, C.R.; Hickok, D.D.; Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  12. Standard interface file handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  13. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  14. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  15. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  16. Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals. PMID:25014785

  17. The THOSE remote interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klawon, Kevin; Gold, Josh; Bachman, Kristen

    2013-05-01

    The DIA, in conjunction with the Army Research Lab (ARL), wants to create an Unmanned Ground Sensor (UGS) controller that is (a) interoperable across all controller platforms, (b) capable of easily adding new sensors, radios, and processes and (c) backward compatible with existing UGS systems. To achieve this, a Terra Harvest controller was created that used Java JRE 1.6 and an Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGi) platform, named Terra Harvest Open Software Environment (THOSE). OSGi is an extensible framework that provides a modularized environment for deploying functionality in "bundles". These bundles can publish, discover, and share services available from other external bundles or bundles provided by the controller core. With the addition of a web GUI used for interacting with THOSE, a natural step was then to create a common remote interface that allows 3rd party real-time interaction with the controller. This paper provides an overview of the THOSE system and its components as well as a description of the architectural structure of the remote interface, highlighting the interactions occurring between the controller and the remote interface and its role in providing a positive user experience for managing UGSS functions.

  18. Eye-voice-controlled interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Floyd A., III; Iavecchia, Helene P.; Ross, Lorna V.; Stokes, James M.; Weiland, William J.

    1986-01-01

    The Ocular Attention-Sensing Interface System (OASIS) is an innovative human-computer interface which utilizes eye movement and voice commands to communicate messages between the operator and the system. This report initially describes some technical issues relevant to the development of such an interface. The results of preliminary experiments which evaluate alternative eye processing algorithms and feedback techniques are presented. Candidate interface applications are also discussed.

  19. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of

  20. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  1. Graphic Interfaces and Online Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percival, J. Mark

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the growing importance of the use of Graphic User Interfaces (GUIs) with microcomputers and online services. Highlights include the development of graphics interfacing with microcomputers; CD-ROM databases; an evaluation of HyperCard as a potential interface to electronic mail and online commercial databases; and future possibilities.…

  2. POLYMERIC INTERFACES FOR STACK MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been performed on the use of polymeric interfaces for in situ continuous stack monitoring of gaseous pollutants. Permeabilities of candidate interface materials to SO2 were measured at temperatures from ambient to 200C, and the results were used to design interfaces ...

  3. Productivity issues at organizational interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The need for close interdependence between large numbers of diverse and specialized work groups makes the Space Program extremely vulnerable to loss of productivity at organizational interfaces. Trends within the program also suggest that the number and diversity of interfaces will grow in the near term. Continued maintenance of R&D excellence will require that interface performance issues be included in any future productivity improvement effort. The types and characteristics of organizational interfaces are briefly presented, followed by a review of factors which impact their productivity. Approaches to assessing and improving interface effectiveness are also discussed.

  4. Fracture behavior across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, E. S.; Evans, J. P.; Jeppson, T. N.

    2011-12-01

    Faults and fracture networks at depth are important fluid pathways, especially in fine-grained, low permeability seal lithologies. Discontinues in sealing lithologies can create seal bypass systems, leading to the failure of CO2 geosequestration sites or hydrocarbon traps. We characterize the occurrence of and changes in discontinuity patterns and the associated changes in elastic moduli across sedimentologic interfaces to document the importance of these discontinuities for fluid management in the subsurface and potential for re-activation in high-pressure injection scenarios. We evaluate well-exposed, fine-grained, low-permeability Mesozoic and Paleozoic units that are seals of potential CO2 repositories on the Colorado Plateau and show evidence for open fractures and fluid flow in the subsurface. Field observations document changes in fracture distributions across lithologic boundaries allowing us to identify mechano-stratigraphic units and focus on the effect of lithologic interfaces on fracture distribution. An interface marks the boundary between facies in a seal and in this study the fractures are shown to deflect or arrest at the interface. In outcrop fracture intensity varies in from 1 to 18 fractures per meter and fracture apertures range from mm to cm. The mineralized fractures often have associated alteration halos along their boundaries; their general orientation follows that of discontinuities within the underlying reservoir facies or adjacent faults. The recognition of these changes in fracture distribution is important for forward modeling of fluid flow and risk management. Studying the occurrence of and changes in fracture patterns from outcrops and scaling it up for use in modeling at a field scale is difficult due to the lack of direct correlation between outcrop observations and subsurface data. Due to the size and amount of data needed to model fluid flow at the field scale the meso-scale (cm to m) variability of rock properties is often

  5. NESSUS/NASTRAN Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, Harry; Riha, David

    1996-01-01

    The NESSUS probabilistic analysis computer program has been developed with a built-in finite element analysis program NESSUS/FEM. However, the NESSUS/FEM program is specialized for engine structures and may not contain sufficient features for other applications. In addition, users often become well acquainted with a particular finite element code and want to use that code for probabilistic structural analysis. For these reasons, this work was undertaken to develop an interface between NESSUS and NASTRAN such that NASTRAN can be used for the finite element analysis and NESSUS can be used for the probabilistic analysis. In addition, NESSUS was restructured such that other finite element codes could be more easily coupled with NESSUS. NESSUS has been enhanced such that NESSUS will modify the NASTRAN input deck for a given set of random variables, run NASTRAN and read the NASTRAN result. The coordination between the two codes is handled automatically. The work described here was implemented within NESSUS 6.2 which was delivered to NASA in September 1995. The code runs on Unix machines: Cray, HP, Sun, SGI and IBM. The new capabilities have been implemented such that a user familiar with NESSUS using NESSUS/FEM and NASTRAN can immediately use NESSUS with NASTRAN. In other words, the interface with NASTRAN has been implemented in an analogous manner to the interface with NESSUS/FEM. Only finite element specific input has been changed. This manual is written as an addendum to the existing NESSUS 6.2 manuals. We assume users have access to NESSUS manuals and are familiar with the operation of NESSUS including probabilistic finite element analysis. Update pages to the NESSUS PFEM manual are contained in Appendix E. The finite element features of the code and the probalistic analysis capabilities are summarized.

  6. User interface concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redhed, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Three possible goals for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) are: (1) a computational fluid dynamics (as opposed to aerodynamics) algorithm development tool; (2) a specialized research laboratory facility for nearly intractable aerodynamics problems that industry encounters; and (3) a facility for industry to use in its normal aerodynamics design work that requires high computing rates. The central system issue for industry use of such a computer is the quality of the user interface as implemented in some kind of a front end to the vector processor.

  7. NESSUS/NASTRAN Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, Harry; Riha, David

    1996-01-01

    The NESSUS and NASTRAN computer codes were successfully integrated. The enhanced NESSUS code will use NASTRAN for the structural Analysis and NESSUS for the probabilistic analysis. Any quantities in the NASTRAN bulk data input can be random variables. Any NASTRAN result that is written to the output2 file can be returned to NESSUS as the finite element result. The interfacing between NESSUS and NASTRAN is handled automatically by NESSUS. NESSUS and NASTRAN can be run on different machines using the remote host option.

  8. Adhesion at metal interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A basic adhesion process is defined, the theory of the properties influencing metallic adhesion is outlined, and theoretical approaches to the interface problem are presented, with emphasis on first-principle calculations as well as jellium-model calculations. The computation of the energies of adhesion as a function of the interfacial separation is performed; fully three-dimensional calculations are presented, and universality in the shapes of the binding energy curves is considered. An embedded-atom method and equivalent-crystal theory are covered in the framework of issues involved in practical adhesion.

  9. Access Interface Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fager, Susan; Beukelman, David R.; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jakobs, Tom; Baker, John

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices to support their communication often have physical movement challenges that require alternative methods of access. Technology that supports access, particularly for those with the most severe movement deficits, have expanded substantially over the years. The purposes of this article are to review the state of the science of access technologies that interface with augmentative and alternative communication devices and to propose a future research and development agenda that will enhance access options for people with limited movement capability due to developmental and acquired conditions. PMID:22590797

  10. Cultural Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  11. Ryukyuan Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands of Japan, of which Okinawa is the best known, possess a lengthy history and a sophisticated cultural background, an exploration of which helps to shed light on this area and on mainland Japan. This document is an exposition of Ryukuan culture. Divided into eight sections, the areas covered include: (1) Historical perspective;…

  12. Bronchoscopic culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... a laboratory exam to check a piece of tissue or fluid from the lungs for infection-causing germs. ... Culture - bronchoscopic ... used to get a sample ( biopsy ) of lung tissue or fluid. The sample ... a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ...

  13. Graphene-Based Interfaces Do Not Alter Target Nerve Cells.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Scaini, Denis; León, Verónica; Vázquez, Ester; Cellot, Giada; Privitera, Giulia; Lombardi, Lucia; Torrisi, Felice; Tomarchio, Flavia; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Bosi, Susanna; Ferrari, Andrea C; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2016-01-26

    Neural-interfaces rely on the ability of electrodes to transduce stimuli into electrical patterns delivered to the brain. In addition to sensitivity to the stimuli, stability in the operating conditions and efficient charge transfer to neurons, the electrodes should not alter the physiological properties of the target tissue. Graphene is emerging as a promising material for neuro-interfacing applications, given its outstanding physico-chemical properties. Here, we use graphene-based substrates (GBSs) to interface neuronal growth. We test our GBSs on brain cell cultures by measuring functional and synaptic integrity of the emerging neuronal networks. We show that GBSs are permissive interfaces, even when uncoated by cell adhesion layers, retaining unaltered neuronal signaling properties, thus being suitable for carbon-based neural prosthetic devices. PMID:26700626

  14. Matched Interface and Boundary Method for Elasticity Interface Problems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bao; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Elasticity theory is an important component of continuum mechanics and has had widely spread applications in science and engineering. Material interfaces are ubiquity in nature and man-made devices, and often give rise to discontinuous coefficients in the governing elasticity equations. In this work, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method is developed to address elasticity interface problems. Linear elasticity theory for both isotropic homogeneous and inhomogeneous media is employed. In our approach, Lamé’s parameters can have jumps across the interface and are allowed to be position dependent in modeling isotropic inhomogeneous material. Both strong discontinuity, i.e., discontinuous solution, and weak discontinuity, namely, discontinuous derivatives of the solution, are considered in the present study. In the proposed method, fictitious values are utilized so that the standard central finite different schemes can be employed regardless of the interface. Interface jump conditions are enforced on the interface, which in turn, accurately determines fictitious values. We design new MIB schemes to account for complex interface geometries. In particular, the cross derivatives in the elasticity equations are difficult to handle for complex interface geometries. We propose secondary fictitious values and construct geometry based interpolation schemes to overcome this difficulty. Numerous analytical examples are used to validate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of the present MIB method for elasticity interface problems with both small and large curvatures, strong and weak discontinuities, and constant and variable coefficients. Numerical tests indicate second order accuracy in both L∞ and L2 norms. PMID:25914439

  15. Examining Teacher-Researcher Collaboration through the Cultural Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, Wendy; Veresov, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    Sharada Gade, in drawing on her long association with a mathematics teacher in Sweden, theorises the complexities of the teacher-researcher collaboration as an expansive learning activity that has developed over time. In this paper, an alternate reading of the teacher-researcher collaboration is offered, one that adds to the analysis provided by…

  16. Make Your Museum Talk: Natural Language Interfaces for Cultural Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boiano, Stefania; Gaia, Giuliano; Caldarini, Morgana

    A museum can talk to its audience through a variety of channels, such as Web sites, help desks, human guides, brochures. A considerable effort is being made by museums to integrate these different means. The Web site can be designed to be reachable or even updateable from visitors inside the museum via touchscreen and wireless devices. But these…

  17. Two cultures? Experiences at the physics-biology interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfield, John J.

    2014-10-01

    ‘I didn’t really think of this as moving into biology, but rather as exploring another venue in which to do physics.’ John Hopfield provides a personal perspective on working on the border between physical and biological sciences.

  18. Rebraiding Photovoice: Methodological Métissage at the Cultural Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Photovoice, the most prevalent participatory visual research methodology utilised within social science research, has begun making its way into Indigenous contexts in light of its critical and pedagogical potential. However, this potential is not always actualised as the assumptions that undergird photovoice are often the same ones that…

  19. Chemical structure of interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interfacial structure of silicon/dielectric and silicon/metal systems is particularly amenable to analysis using a combination of surface spectroscopies together with a variety of chemical structures of Si/SiO2, Si/SiO2Si3N4, Si/Si2N2O, Si/SiO2/Al, and Si/Native Oxide interfaces using high resolution (0.350 eV FWHM) X ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The general structure of these dielectric interfaces entails a monolayer chemical transition layer at the Si/dielectric boundary. Amorphous Si substrates show a wide variety of hydrogenated Si and Si(OH) sub x states that are not observed in thermal oxidation of single crystal material. Extended SiO2 layers greater than 8 A in thickness are shown to be stoichiometric SiO2, but to exhibit a wide variety of local network structures. In the nitrogen containing systems, an approach to stoichiometric oxynitride compounds with interesting impurity and electron trapping properties are seen. In native oxides, substantial topographical nonuniformity in oxide thickness and composition are found. Analysis of metal/oxide interfacial layers is accomplished by analytical removal of the Si substrate by UHV XeF2 dry etching methods.

  20. Mysteries at Ice Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Samuel C., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Michael Faraday noted that ``two pieces of thawing ice, if put together, adhere and become one...the effect will take place in air, or in water, or in vacuo." Why? He proposed that ``a particle of water, which could retain the liquid state whilst touching ice only on one side, could not retain the liquid state if it were touched by ice on both sides."footnote M. Faraday, Proc. Roy. Soc. London 10, 440 (1860) The existence of special properties at interfaces of ice is generally agreed and has important environmental consequences.(J. G. Dash, H. Fu, and J. S. Wettlaufer, Rep. Prog. Phys. 58), 115 (1995) Why do different experiments infer different properties for this layer? Impurities and electric fields at the interfaces may be responsible for some of the variations in experimental results.footnote V. F. Petrenko, U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Report 94-22 (1994) Some background on the physical properties of ice will be discussed, including recent force microscopy measurements done at the University of Washington.footnote C.R. Slaughterbeck, E.W. Kukes, B. Pittenger, D.J. Cook, P.C. Williams, V.L. Eden, S.C. Fain, Jr., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. (in press) Supported by NSF Grant DMR-91-19701.

  1. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  2. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  3. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith D.; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  4. Cultural History and Cultural Materialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Historicism critiques cultural history and cultural materialism as a methodology for literary analysis. Questions the finality of interpretation, how original values change, and whether dramatic history implies actual history. Using Shakespearean plays, analyzes the power and politics of a play in relation to its audience; posits that cultural…

  5. Flexible DCP interface. [environmental sensor and signal conditioning interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; Schimmelpfenning, H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A user of an ERTS data collection system (DCS) must supply the sensors and signal-conditioning interface. The electronic interface must be compatible with the NASA-furnished data collection platform. A universal signal-conditioning system for use with a wide range of environmental sensors is described. The interface is environmentally and electronically compatible with the DCP and has operated satisfactorily for a complete winter wheat growing season in Kansas.

  6. Computational Studies of Structures and Dynamics of 1, 3-Dimethylimidazolim Salt Liquid and their Interfaces Using Polarizable Potential Models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tsun-Mei; Dang, Liem X.

    2009-03-12

    The structures, thermodynamics, dynamical properties of bulk and air/liquid interfaces of three ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium [dmim]+, Cl-, Br-, and I- are studied using molecular dynamics techniques. In bulk melts, the radial distribution functions reveal a significant long-range structural correlation in these ionic liquids. From the angular distribution analysis, the imidazolium rings are found to lie parallel to each other at short distances, consistent with the structures observed in the crystal state. The single-ion dynamics are studied via mean-square-displacements, velocity and orientational correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients and reorientational times are found to be much smaller than H2O. We also observe that anion size plays an important role in the dynamics of ionic liquids. The computed density profiles of the ionic liquid/vapor interface exhibit oscillatory behavior, indicative of surface layering at the interface. Further analysis reveals that the [dmim]+ ions show preferred orientation at the interface with the ring parallel to the surface and methyl group attached to the ring pointing into the vapor phase. The computed surface tensions indicated small differences between these ionic liquids and are inline with recent experimental measurements. The calculated potential drops of these ionic liquids are found to be small and negative. These results could imply that the cation dipoles are likely to orient in the plane that parallel to the surface normal axis. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  7. Nuclear data interface retrospective

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Interface (NDI) code library and data formats are the standards for multigroup nuclear data at Los Alamos National Laboratory. NDI's analysis, design, implementation, testing, integration, and maintenance required a ten person-year and ongoing effort by the Nuclear Data Team. Their efforts provide a unique, contemporary experience in producing a standard component library. In reflection upon that experience at NDI's decennial, we have identified several factors critical to NDI's success: it addressed real problems with appropriate simplicity, it fully supported all users, it added extra value through the code to the raw nuclear data, and its team went the distance from analysis through maintenance. In this report we review these critical success factors and discuss their implications for future standardization projects.

  8. Electron hydration: interface shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakovskaya, Yulia V.; Stepanov, Nikolai F.

    2001-08-01

    Interface water cluster anions (H 2O) n- ( n ⩽ 12 ) composed of two to four fragments are simulated in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation with the second order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory corrections taken into account with the 6-31++G ** basis set either augmented or not with the floating center of eight s functions. A linear dependence of the circumsphere radius involving central molecules of the anions on 1/ n provides an estimate of the excess electron radius in condensed water (about 2.5 Å). Vertical detachment energies, approximated with linear dependences on n-1/3, are extrapolated to the values around 3.4 eV for bulk water.

  9. Porphyrins at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auwärter, Willi; Écija, David; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V.

    2015-02-01

    Porphyrins and other tetrapyrrole macrocycles possess an impressive variety of functional properties that have been exploited in natural and artificial systems. Different metal centres incorporated within the tetradentate ligand are key for achieving and regulating vital processes, including reversible axial ligation of adducts, electron transfer, light-harvesting and catalytic transformations. Tailored substituents optimize their performance, dictating their arrangement in specific environments and mediating the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures. Here we review the current understanding of these species at well-defined interfaces, disclosing exquisite insights into their structural and chemical properties, and also discussing methods by which to manipulate their intramolecular and organizational features. The distinct characteristics arising from the interfacial confinement offer intriguing prospects for molecular science and advanced materials. We assess the role of surface interactions with respect to electronic and physicochemical characteristics, and describe in situ metallation pathways, molecular magnetism, rotation and switching. The engineering of nanostructures, organized layers, interfacial hybrid and bio-inspired systems is also addressed.

  10. Human-computer interface

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  11. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus. ... Culture - esophageal ... A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is ... or viruses. Other tests may be done to determine what medicine ...

  12. Endocervical culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... There, they are placed in a special dish (culture). They are then watched to see if bacteria, virus, or fungus grow. Further tests may be done to identify the specific organism and determine the best treatment.

  13. Bile culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... lab. There, it is placed in a special dish called a culture medium to see if bacteria, ... bacteria, virus, or fungus grew in the laboratory dish. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly among ...

  14. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... lab. There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, ... means that no germs grew in the laboratory dish. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  15. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  16. Gastric culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test or procedure preparation (3 to 6 years) School age test or procedure preparation (6 to 12 ... immune system. The final results of the gastric culture test may take several weeks. Your provider will ...

  17. Intelligent interface design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Intelligent interface concepts and systematic approaches to assessing their functionality are discussed. Four general features of intelligent interfaces are described: interaction efficiency, subtask automation, context sensitivity, and use of an appropriate design metaphor. Three evaluation methods are discussed: Functional Analysis, Part-Task Evaluation, and Operational Testing. Design and evaluation concepts are illustrated with examples from a prototype expert system interface for environmental control and life support systems for manned space platforms.

  18. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  19. The Common Communication Interface (CCI)

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, Galen M; Atchley, Scott; Dillow, David A; Geoffray, Patrick; Bosilca, George; Squyres, Jeffrey M; Minnich, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    There are many APIs for connecting and exchanging data between network peers. Each interface varies wildly based on metrics including performance, portability, and complexity. Specifically, many interfaces make design or implementation choices emphasizing some of the more desirable metrics (e.g., performance) while sacrificing others (e.g., portability). As a direct result, software developers building large, network-based applications are forced to choose a specific network API based on a complex, multi-dimensional set of criteria. Such trade-offs inevitably result in an interface that fails to deliver some desirable features. In this paper, we introduce a novel interface that both supports many features that have become standard (or otherwise generally expected) in other communication interfaces, and strives to export a small, yet powerful, interface. This new interface draws upon years of experience from network-oriented software development best practices to systems-level implementations. The goal is to create a relatively simple, high-level communication interface with low barriers to adoption while still providing important features such as scalability, resiliency, and performance. The result is the Common Communications Interface (CCI): an intuitive API that is portable, efficient, scalable, and robust to meet the needs of network-intensive applications common in HPC and cloud computing.

  20. mREST Interface Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCartney, Patrick; MacLean, John

    2012-01-01

    mREST is an implementation of the REST architecture specific to the management and sharing of data in a system of logical elements. The purpose of this document is to clearly define the mREST interface protocol. The interface protocol covers all of the interaction between mREST clients and mREST servers. System-level requirements are not specifically addressed. In an mREST system, there are typically some backend interfaces between a Logical System Element (LSE) and the associated hardware/software system. For example, a network camera LSE would have a backend interface to the camera itself. These interfaces are specific to each type of LSE and are not covered in this document. There are also frontend interfaces that may exist in certain mREST manager applications. For example, an electronic procedure execution application may have a specialized interface for configuring the procedures. This interface would be application specific and outside of this document scope. mREST is intended to be a generic protocol which can be used in a wide variety of applications. A few scenarios are discussed to provide additional clarity but, in general, application-specific implementations of mREST are not specifically addressed. In short, this document is intended to provide all of the information necessary for an application developer to create mREST interface agents. This includes both mREST clients (mREST manager applications) and mREST servers (logical system elements, or LSEs).

  1. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-01

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  2. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  3. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  4. Entrainment across density interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, M. A.; Carrillo, A.; Mahjoub, O. B.

    2010-05-01

    The structure of non-homogeneous turbulence affected by stratification and rotation is investigated both by means of laboratory and numerical experiments. The experiments investigate zero mean flow across a stably stratified density interface and are used to quantify the entrainment, the mixing efficiency and different types of dominant instability and the topological aspects of the turbulent cascades detected both horizontally and vertically [1,2]. Grid turbulence in a rotating stratified two layer system is measured with PIV as well as with sonic velocimetry. Observations of the horizontal and vertical velocity energy spectra as well as the structure functions are used to estimate local mixedness, entrainment and intermittency [3,4]. The method of estimation of the average eddy diffusivity from the time series images of a sharp density interface marked by fluoresceine also take anisotropy into account. but on the long run, horizontal ( and 2D type flow such as [5]) flow directions will average out so using a single integral length scale defined in Sanchez and Redondo(1998) varying in height will be enough together with the internal frequency. The method of calculating vertical fluxes in time allows to estimate different intermittency parameters as a function of local instability e.g. Kelvin/Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor or Holbmoe[6-8]. Different concentration interfaces show different fractal dimensions, that are also a power function of the local Richardson number, this may be due to different levels of intermittency and thus different spectra, which are not necessarily inertial nor in equilibrium [8,9]. [1] Sanchez M.A. and Redondo J.M.Observations from Grid Stirred Turbulence. Applied Scientific Research 59, 191-204. 1998. [2] Redondo, J.M. and Cantalapiedra I.R. Mixing in Horizontally Heterogeneous Flows . Jour. Flow Turbulence and Combustion. 51, 217-222. 1993. [3] Castilla R, Redondo J.M., Gamez P.J., Babiano A. Coherent vortices and Lagrangian Dynamics in 2D

  5. Interface effects on nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Brad Richard

    2009-12-01

    Nanoelectronics consist of devices with active electronic components on the nanometer length scale. At such dimensions most, if not all, atoms or molecules composing the active device region must be on or near a surface. Also, materials effectively confined to two dimensions, or when subject to abrupt boundary conditions, generally do not behave the same as materials inside three dimensional, continuous structures. This dissertation is a quantitative determination of how surfaces and interfaces in organic nanoelectronic devices affect properties such as charge transport, electronic structure, and material fluctuations. Si/SiO2 is a model gate/gate dielectric for organic thin film transistors, therefore proper characterization and measurement of the effects of the SiO2/organic interface on device structures is extremely important. I fabricated pentacene thin film transistors on Si/SiO2 and varied the conduction channel thickness from effectively bulk (˜40nm) to 2 continuous conducting layers to examine the effect of substrate on noise generation. The electronic spectral noise was measured and the generator of the noise was determined to be due to the random spatial dependence of grain boundaries, independent of proximity to the gate oxide. This result led me to investigate the mechanisms of pentacene grain formation, including the role of small quantities of impurities, on silicon dioxide substrates. Through a series of nucleation, growth and morphology studies, I determined that impurities assist in nucleation on SiO2, decreasing the stable nucleus size by a third and increasing the overall number of grains. The pentacene growth and morphology studies prompted further exploration of pentacene crystal growth on SiO2. I developed a method of making atomically clean ultra-thin oxide films, with surface chemistry and growth properties similar to the standard thick oxides. These ultra-thin oxides were measured to be as smooth as cleaned silicon and then used as

  6. Self-Checking Memory Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M. W.; Rennels, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Memory-interface integrated circuit not only detects errors in data from other circuits but also detects errors within itself. Memory-interface chip encodes 16-bit words with Hamming code for single-error correction or double-error detection. Chip used in fault-tolerant computers under development by NASA.

  7. Polysilicon thin films and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kamins, T. ); Raicu, B. ); Thompson, C.V. )

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a symposium on polysilicon thin films and interfaces, held as part of the 1990 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting. Topics covered include: crystal grown fo silicon and germanium wafers for photovoltaic devices, microanalysis of tungsten silicide interface, thermal processing of polysilicon thin films, and electrical and optical properties of polysilicon sheets for photovoltaic devices.

  8. Rare-event recorder interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kuts, V.N.

    1984-03-01

    The author describes an interface for a BPA2-95 analog-digital computer with PL-80 and a Perfomom 30 perferator for rare event recording. This interface allows the height of each pulse that passes through the analog-digital converter to be recorded on punch tape. A series of three block diagrams illustrates in thorough detail the system described.

  9. Interface To The SURE Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to SURE Tool (ASSIST) computer program is interface program enabling reliability engineers to design large semi-Markov mathematical models accurately. Language enables efficient description of large, complicated systems. Also offers, as part of bundled package with SURE and PAWS/STEM, two other reliable analysis programs developed by Systems Validation Methods group at Langley Research Center.

  10. Integrating and Interfacing Library Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of local library online systems that integrate several functions covers functional integration, benefits of integrated systems, turnkey systems, minicomputer and microcomputer-based systems, interfacing automated systems, types of interfaces, linking homogenous and heterogeneous systems, role of vendors, library applications, linking…

  11. XTOD - XES Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J

    2005-09-07

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS XTOD System (WBS No.1.5) and the LCLS XES (WBS No.1.6). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Subsystems that connect at or cross the boundary are identified.

  12. Online Remote Sensing Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawhead, Joel

    2007-01-01

    BasinTools Module 1 processes remotely sensed raster data, including multi- and hyper-spectral data products, via a Web site with no downloads and no plug-ins required. The interface provides standardized algorithms designed so that a user with little or no remote-sensing experience can use the site. This Web-based approach reduces the amount of software, hardware, and computing power necessary to perform the specified analyses. Access to imagery and derived products is enterprise-level and controlled. Because the user never takes possession of the imagery, the licensing of the data is greatly simplified. BasinTools takes the "just-in-time" inventory control model from commercial manufacturing and applies it to remotely-sensed data. Products are created and delivered on-the-fly with no human intervention, even for casual users. Well-defined procedures can be combined in different ways to extend verified and validated methods in order to derive new remote-sensing products, which improves efficiency in any well-defined geospatial domain. Remote-sensing products produced in BasinTools are self-documenting, allowing procedures to be independently verified or peer-reviewed. The software can be used enterprise-wide to conduct low-level remote sensing, viewing, sharing, and manipulating of image data without the need for desktop applications.

  13. Next Generation Search Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roby, W.; Wu, X.; Ly, L.; Goldina, T.

    2015-09-01

    Astronomers are constantly looking for easier ways to access multiple data sets. While much effort is spent on VO, little thought is given to the types of User Interfaces we need to effectively search this sort of data. For instance, an astronomer might need to search Spitzer, WISE, and 2MASS catalogs and images then see the results presented together in one UI. Moving seamlessly between data sets is key to presenting integrated results. Results need to be viewed using first class, web based, integrated FITS viewers, XY Plots, and advanced table display tools. These components should be able to handle very large datasets. To make a powerful Web based UI that can manage and present multiple searches to the user requires taking advantage of many HTML5 features. AJAX is used to start searches and present results. Push notifications (Server Sent Events) monitor background jobs. Canvas is required for advanced result displays. Lesser known CSS3 technologies makes it all flow seamlessly together. At IPAC, we have been developing our Firefly toolkit for several years. We are now using it to solve this multiple data set, multiple queries, and integrated presentation problem to create a powerful research experience. Firefly was created in IRSA, the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu). Firefly is the core for applications serving many project archives, including Spitzer, Planck, WISE, PTF, LSST and others. It is also used in IRSA's new Finder Chart and catalog and image displays.

  14. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specificallymore » designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.« less

  15. User interface enhancement report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Gangel, J.; Shields, G.; Fala, G.

    1985-01-01

    The existing user interfaces to TEMPUS, Plaid, and other systems in the OSDS are fundamentally based on only two modes of communication: alphanumeric commands or data input and grapical interaction. The latter are especially suited to the types of interaction necessary for creating workstation objects with BUILD and with performing body positioning in TEMPUS. Looking toward the future application of TEMPUS, however, the long-term goals of OSDS will include the analysis of extensive tasks in space involving one or more individuals working in concert over a period of time. In this context, the TEMPUS body positioning capability, though extremely useful in creating and validating a small number of particular body positions, will become somewhat tedious to use. The macro facility helps somewhat, since frequently used positions may be easily applied by executing a stored macro. The difference between body positioning and task execution, though subtle, is important. In the case of task execution, the important information at the user's level is what actions are to be performed rather than how the actions are performed. Viewed slightly differently, the what is constant over a set of individuals though the how may vary.

  16. Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-18

    Fishes and marine mammals may suffer a range of potential effects from exposure to intense underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities such as pile driving, shipping, sonars, and underwater blasting. Several underwater sound recording (USR) devices have been built to acquire samples of the underwater sound generated by anthropogenic activities. Software becomes indispensable for processing and analyzing the audio files recorded by these USRs. The new Aquatic Acoustic Metrics Interface Utility Software (AAMI) is specifically designed for analysis of underwater sound recordings to provide data in metrics that facilitate evaluation of the potential impacts of the sound on aquatic animals. In addition to the basic functions, such as loading and editing audio files recorded by USRs and batch processing of sound files, the software utilizes recording system calibration data to compute important parameters in physical units. The software also facilitates comparison of the noise sound sample metrics with biological measures such as audiograms of the sensitivity of aquatic animals to the sound, integrating various components into a single analytical frame.

  17. Power User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  18. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  19. Ultrasonic characterization of metallic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.D. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    A set of diffusion bonded copper samples was prepared at different temperatures and times, allowing the bonding to proceed across the planar interfaces. To obtain a second set, interfaces were roughened to various degrees followed by diffusion bonding at a designated time/temperature condition. On all samples, ultrasonic reflection coefficient (R) maps of the bonded interfaces were obtained over a broad frequency range. In addition, the bond strengths, ..sigma.., of the interfaces were determined, thus providing an empirical ..sigma..-R correlation. Nearly all of the specimens tested failed along the interfaces, exposing fracture planes with distinctive features indicating originally bonded and unbonded areas. These features, examined metallographically, allowed for the successful testing of the ''distributed spring model'' by Baik and Thompson (J. NDE 4, 177, 1984). This model was used as an intermediate step in the development of a bond strength model to explain the observed ..sigma..-R correlation, the beginnings of which are discussed. 32 refs., 22 figs.

  20. Microsegregation in Peltier interface demarcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabo, Y.; Nguyen Thi, H.; Coriell, S. R.; McFadden, G. B.; Li, Q.; Billia, B.

    2000-06-01

    Experimental results on solute microsegregation induced by Peltier interface demarcation (PID) technique during directional solidification of Bi-1 wt% Sb alloys are presented. These data are compared with the results of numerical simulation and the theory of PID is revisited. It is shown that the Peltier coefficient previously determined using Peltier pulsing has been underestimated. The quantity of interface cooling absorbed by limited Bi-growth kinetics is comparable to that covered by solute depletion, and can even be dominant for very short pulses, so that the commonly made assumption of local equilibrium at the solid-liquid interface (i.e. usual hypothesis of constant interface temperature during pulse marking for pure systems) should be abandoned and the right dependence of interface temperature on solidification velocity be included in the model. Finally, two conditions to select systems capable of efficient marking by PID microsegregation are deduced and the effects of applied current in the first instants of electric pulse clarified.

  1. Doxycycline inhibits bone resorption by human interface membrane cells from aseptically loose hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Ong, S M; Taylor, G J S

    2003-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may have a role in the process of aseptic loosening. Doxycycline has been shown to inhibit MMPs. Our aim was to investigate the potential pharmacological effect of doxycycline on aseptic loosening. We used radiolabelled mouse calvariae cultured with human interface membrane cells from aseptically loosened hips. Bone resorption was confirmed in this model. The effect of doxycycline was assessed by culturing dead radiolabelled bone discs with cells from the interface membrane with doxycycline. The control group consisted of the same culture system without doxycycline. Supernatant 45calcium and the total 45calcium remaining in the bone discs at the completion of the culture were used to measure osteolysis. We found that doxycycline can inhibit osteolysis at the interface membrane of aseptically loosened hips. This may have therapeutic implications for the treatment of patients with aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. PMID:12729128

  2. Multimodal Neuroelectric Interface Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trejo, Leonard J.; Wheeler, Kevin R.; Jorgensen, Charles C.; Totah, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project aims to improve performance of NASA missions by developing multimodal neuroelectric technologies for augmented human-system interaction. Neuroelectric technologies will add completely new modes of interaction that operate in parallel with keyboards, speech, or other manual controls, thereby increasing the bandwidth of human-system interaction. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of real-time electromyographic (EMG) pattern recognition for a direct neuroelectric human-computer interface. We recorded EMG signals from an elastic sleeve with dry electrodes, while a human subject performed a range of discrete gestures. A machine-teaming algorithm was trained to recognize the EMG patterns associated with the gestures and map them to control signals. Successful applications now include piloting two Class 4 aircraft simulations (F-15 and 757) and entering data with a "virtual" numeric keyboard. Current research focuses on on-line adaptation of EMG sensing and processing and recognition of continuous gestures. We are also extending this on-line pattern recognition methodology to electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. This will allow us to bypass muscle activity and draw control signals directly from the human brain. Our system can reliably detect P-rhythm (a periodic EEG signal from motor cortex in the 10 Hz range) with a lightweight headset containing saline-soaked sponge electrodes. The data show that EEG p-rhythm can be modulated by real and imaginary motions. Current research focuses on using biofeedback to train of human subjects to modulate EEG rhythms on demand, and to examine interactions of EEG-based control with EMG-based and manual control. Viewgraphs on these neuroelectric technologies are also included.

  3. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.C.

    2006-05-16

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures ({alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear

  4. Practicing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shawna; Sternod, Brandon M.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of continuous global immigration to the United States, several microcultures coexist within the country. Today's classroom should provide an interface where individuals from different cultural backgrounds have the potential for sharing a rich place of learning--a place where the teacher embraces and celebrates individual differences,…

  5. Hydroponic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  6. Cultural Themes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 10 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American cultural themes. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin in…

  7. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  8. Intelligent virtual interfaces for telerobotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Maybury, Mark T.; Mitchell, Richard B.

    1992-11-01

    One promise of telerobotics is the ability to interact in environments that are distant (e.g., deep sea or deep space), dangerous (e.g., nuclear, chemical, or biological environments), or inaccessible by humans for political or legal reasons. A key component to such interactions are sophisticated human-computer interfaces that can replicate sufficient information about a local environment to permit remote navigation and manipulation. This environment replication can, in part, be provided by technologies such as virtual reality. In addition, however, telerobotic interfaces may need to enhance human-machine interaction to assist users in task performance, for example, governing motion or manipulation controls to avoid obstacles or to restrict interaction with certain objects (e.g., avoiding contact with a live mine or a deep sea treasure). Thus, effective interactions within remote environments require intelligent virtual interfaces to telerobotic devices. In part to address this problem, MITRE is investigating virtual reality architectures that will enable enhanced interaction within virtual environments. Key components to intelligent virtual interfaces include spoken language processing, gesture recognition algorithms, and more generally, task recognition. In addition, these interfaces will eventually have to take into account properties of the user, the task, and discourse context to be more adaptive to the current situation at hand. While our work has not yet investigated the connection of virtual interfaces to external robotic devices, we have begun developing the key components for intelligent virtual interfaces for information and training systems.

  9. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  10. Polymers at Surfaces and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Interfaces between solids, liquids, and gases play an important role in a wide range of practical applications and have been a subject of scientific interest since Poisson showed in 1831 that the order parameter of liquids near interfaces must deviate considerably from its bulk value. In particular, polymers at surfaces and interfaces have been a subject of extensive theoretical, experimental and computational studies for a long time due to their use in many diverse applications ranging from antifouling coatings to flexible electronic devices. Understanding the structure and thermodynamic properties of polymers at surfaces and interfaces is thus an area of fundamental and current technological interest. Although encouraging experimental progress has been made over the years in understanding the molecular structure of polymers in contact with various environments, selectively probing their structure and dynamics at surfaces and interfaces has been extremely difficult. Computer simulations, especially molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have proven over the years to be an invaluable tool in providing molecular details at interfaces that are usually lacking in the experimental data. In this talk, I'll give an overview of some previous simulation efforts to understand the structure and dynamics of polymers at surfaces and buried interfaces. I will conclude by presenting our current and ongoing work on combining ab initio calculations and MD simulations with Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Spectroscopy to study polymer surfaces. This approach demonstrates the future role of MD in surface science. Work supported by NSF (DMR0847580 and DMR1410290) and Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

  11. Cultural ergonomics in interactional and experiential design: conceptual framework and case study of the Taiwanese twin cup.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Long; Chen, Si-Jing; Hsiao, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Rungtai

    2016-01-01

    Cultural ergonomics is an approach that considers interaction- and experience-based variations among cultures. Designers need to develop a better understanding of cultural ergonomics not just to participate in cultural contexts but also to develop interactive experiences for users. Cultural ergonomics extends our understanding of cultural meaning and our ability to utilize such understanding for design and evaluate everyday products. This study aims to combine cultural ergonomics and interactive design to explore human-culture interaction in user experiences. The linnak is a typical Taiwanese aboriginal cultural object. This study examined the cultural meaning and operational interface of the linnak, as well as the scenarios in which it is used in interaction and user experiences. The results produced a cultural ergonomics interface for examining the manner in which designers communicate across cultures as well as the interweaving of design and culture in the design process. PMID:26360216

  12. ARINC 653 Interface in RTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufino, J.; Filipe, S.; Coutinho, M.; Santos, S.; Windsor, J.

    2007-08-01

    The ARINC 653 specification is assuming a key role in the provision of a standard operating system interface for safety-critical applications in the aeronautic market and it is foreseen to acquire a similar status on the space market. The ARINC 653 application interface is inde- pendent from the underlying hardware and from a given operating system implementation. This paper describes how RTEMS, the Real-Time Executive for Multiproces- sor Systems, can be adapted to offer the application interface and the functionality required by the ARINC 653 standard. The use of RTEMS is highly relevant given its qualification for on-board software of unmanned space programs.

  13. Virtual optical interfaces for transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Renaud; Kress, Bernard; Fontaine, Joseph-Joel

    2009-05-01

    Today, the ever increasing number of controls in automobile and aviation cockpits leads to the cluttering of various interfaces (keyboards, switches, panels, etc...). LCD touch screens have proved to be a good alternative to reduce cluttering by reconfiguring in real time different interfaces, appearing on demand as they are needed by the user. However, the underlying screen still remains cumbersome and fragile glass device. We present a novel way to produce virtual consoles and interfaces by projecting diffractive images and sensing the position of the fingers by the use of IR diffractive optics.

  14. Aqueous Solutions and their Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-04-02

    Preface of the special issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry in conjunction with the international workshop "Aqueous Solutions and their Interfaces". The topics include the structure of liquid water, the analysis of X-ray and neutron scattering experimental data, the vibrational spectroscopy of liquid water, the structure and spectroscopy of aqueous interfaces and the development of theoretical approaches to model the structure and spectra of liquid water and interfaces. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  15. Active colloids at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malgaretti, P; Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S

    2016-05-01

    If an active Janus particle is trapped at the interface between a liquid and a fluid, its self-propelled motion along the interface is affected by a net torque on the particle due to the viscosity contrast between the two adjacent fluid phases. For a simple model of an active, spherical Janus colloid we analyze the conditions under which translation occurs along the interface and we provide estimates of the corresponding persistence length. We show that under certain conditions the persistence length of such a particle is significantly larger than the corresponding one in the bulk liquid, which is in line with the trends observed in recent experimental studies. PMID:27025167

  16. Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Automated remote fluid servicing will be necessary for future space missions, as future satellites will be designed for on-orbit consumable replenishment. In order to develop an on-orbit remote servicing capability, a standard interface between a tanker and the receiving satellite is needed. The objective of the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) program is to design, fabricate, and functionally demonstrate compliance with all design requirements for an automated fluid interface system. A description and documentation of the Fairchild AFIS design is provided.

  17. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  18. Antisite defects at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanghui; Millis, Andrew

    We use ab initio calculations to estimate formation energies of cation (transition metal) antisite defects at oxide interfaces and to understand the basic physical effects that drive or suppress the formation of these defects. We find that antisite defects are favored in systems with substantial charge transfer across the interface, while Jahn-Teller distortions and itinerant ferromagnetism can prevent antisite defects and help stabilize atomically sharp interfaces. Our results enable identification of classes of systems that are more and less susceptible to the formation of antisite defects and motivate a range of experimental studies and further theoretical calculations to further explicate the oxide interface systems. This research was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1120296 (H. Chen) and DOE-ER-046169 (A. J. Millis).

  19. SKITTER/implement mechanical interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, John Wilson, III; Cone, Alan E.; Garolera, Frank J.; German, David; Lindabury, David Peter; Luckado, Marshall Cleveland; Murphey, Craig; Rowell, John Bryan; Wilkinson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    SKITTER (Spacial Kinematic Inertial Translatory Tripod Extremity Robot) is a three-legged transport vehicle designed to perform under the unique environment of the moon. The objective of this project was to design a mechanical interface for SKITTER. This mechanical latching interface will allow SKITTER to use a series of implements such as drills, cranes, etc., and perform different tasks on the moon. The design emphasized versatility and detachability; that is, the interface design is the same for all implements, and connection and detachment is simple. After consideration of many alternatives, a system of three identical latches at each of the three interface points was chosen. The latching mechanism satisfies the design constraints because it facilitates connection and detachment. Also, the moving parts are protected from the dusty environment by housing plates.

  20. Superfluid Interfaces in Quantum Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burovski, Evgeni; Kozik, Evgeni; Kuklov, Anatoly; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2005-04-01

    One scenario for the nonclassical moment of inertia of solid 4He discovered by Kim and Chan [Nature (London), NATUAS, 0028-0836 427, 225 (2004), 10.1038/nature02220] is the superfluidity of microcrystallite interfaces. On the basis of the most simple model of a quantum crystal—the checkerboard lattice solid—we show that the superfluidity of interfaces between solid domains can exist in a wide range of parameters. At strong enough interparticle interaction, a superfluid interface becomes an insulator via a quantum phase transition. Under the conditions of particle-hole symmetry, the transition is of the standard U(1) universality class in 3D, while in 2D the onset of superfluidity is accompanied by the interface roughening, driven by fractionally charged topological excitations.

  1. Brain-Computer Interface Workshop

    NASA Video Gallery

    At a g.tec-sponsored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) workshop at the National Institute of Aerospace in Hampton, Va., volunteers were able to spell out words on a computer screen using using a g.tec...

  2. Colloids at NAPL-Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Thomas; Metz, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids in subsurface are relevant in the scope of contaminated sites as well as for enhanced oil recovery. In both cases colloids and engineered nanoparticles are applied to increase the efficiency of NAPL removal. Particle tracking experiments using fluoresecent latex beads and opaque particles have been run in micromodels mimicking the pore structure of subsurface media. The results show that the interface between NAPL and water is highly dynamic, especially in its early stage. There is a distinct circular flow pattern at the interface, effectively increasing the interfacial area. Concentration gradients measured with Raman Microspectrometry at low Peclet numbers suggest that the mass transfer of dissolved contaminants from the NAPL into the water is highly affected by the interface dynamics. On the other hand the interfaces themselves are less accessible, which has implications for the remediation of contaminated sites.

  3. The HEASARC graphical user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Jacobs, P.; Oneel, B.

    1992-01-01

    An OSF/Motif-based graphical user interface has been developed to facilitate the use of the database and data analysis software packages available from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). It can also be used as an interface to other, similar, routines. A small number of tables are constructed to specify the possible commands and command parameters for a given set of analysis routines. These tables can be modified by a designer to affect the appearance of the interface screens. They can also be dynamically changed in response to parameter adjustments made while the underlying program is running. Additionally, a communication protocol has been designed so that the interface can operate locally or across a network. It is intended that this software be able to run on a variety of workstations and X terminals.

  4. Blasting, graphical interfaces and Unix

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, S.

    1993-11-01

    A discrete element computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code) was developed to simulate blast-induced rock motion. To simplify the complex task of entering material and explosive design parameters as well as bench configuration, a full-featured graphical interface has been developed. DMC is currently executed on both Sun SPARCstation 2 and Sun SPARCstation 10 platforms and routinely used to model bench and crater blasting problems. This paper will document the design and development of the full-featured interface to DMC. The development of the interface will be tracked through the various stages, highlighting the adjustments made to allow the necessary parameters to be entered in terms and units that field blasters understand. The paper also discusses a novel way of entering non-integer numbers and the techniques necessary to display blasting parameters in an understandable visual manner. A video presentation will demonstrate the graphics interface and explains its use.

  5. Blasting, graphical interfaces and Unix

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, S.

    1994-12-31

    A discrete element computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code) was developed to simulate blast-induced rock motion. To simplify the complex task of entering material and explosive design parameters as well as bench configuration, a full-featured graphical interface has been developed. DMC is currently executed on both Sun SPARCstation 2 and Sun SPARCstation 10 platforms and routinely used to model bench and crater blasting problems. This paper will document the design and development of the full-featured interface to DMC. The development of the interface will be tracked through the various stages, highlighting the adjustments made to allow the necessary parameters to be entered in terms and units that field blasters understand. The paper also discusses a novel way of entering non-integer numbers and the techniques necessary to display blasting parameters in an understandable visual manner. A video presentation will demonstrate the graphics interface and explains its use.

  6. Interfacing Microcomputers with Laboratory Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes development of microcomputer-controlled gamma scintillation spectrometer and chromatographic data analyzer, including design and construction of interface electronics and production of software. Includes diagrams of electric circuits and project evaluation indicating that both instruments functioned as intended. (JN)

  7. Sandia ATM SONET Interface Logic

    1994-07-21

    SASIL is used to program the EPLD's (Erasable Programmable Logic Devices) and PAL's (Programmable Array Logic) that make up a large percentage of the Sandia ATM SONET Interface (OC3 version) for the INTEL Paragon.

  8. Culture Theory and American Cultural Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, John J.

    This paper addresses three questions related to cultural geography--(1) do cultural geographers have a serious interest in culture theory? (2) is there some indication in the ways in which cultural geographers have traditionally approached their subject which has given rise to an apparent lack of concern with the implications of culture theory?…

  9. Interfacing with an EVA Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2011-01-01

    A NASA spacesuit under the EVA Technology Domain consists of a suit system; a PLSS; and a Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) system. Ross described the basic functions, components, and interfaces of the PLSS, which consists of oxygen, ventilation, and thermal control subsystems; electronics; and interfaces. Design challenges were reviewed from a packaging perspective. Ross also discussed the development of the PLSS over the last two decades.

  10. Coal-shale interface detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coal-shale interface detector for use with coal cutting equipment is described. The detector consists of a reciprocating hammer with an accelerometer to measure the impact of the hammer as it penetrates the ceiling or floor surface of a mine. Additionally, a pair of reflectometers simultaneously view the same surface, and the outputs from the accelerometer and reflectometers are detected and jointly registered to determine when an interface between coal and shale is being cut through.

  11. Coal-shale interface detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P. H.; Burch, J. L.; Drost, E. J.; Stein, R. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A penetrometer for coal-shale interface detection is presented. It is used with coal cutting equipment consisting of a reciprocating hammer, having an accelerometer mounted thereon to measure the impact of the hammer as it penetrates the ceiling or floor surface of a mine. Additionally, a pair of reflectometers simultaneously view the same surface, and the outputs from the accelerometer and reflectometers are detected and jointly registered to determine when an interface between coal and shale is being cut through.

  12. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  13. Satellite services handbook. Interface guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Satellite interfaces for on orbit servicing, both manned and unmanned are identified, and is intended to be used by designers of space vehicles, both foreign and domestic. A primary concern is for design of interfaces with the astronaut in the loop, especially extravehicular activity, but also intravehicular activity and operations that are remote but have man-in-the-loop. The main emphasis is on servicing in low earth orbits from the Space Shuttle and also from the Space Station or other platforms.

  14. Retained gas sampler interface volume

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.

    1997-10-01

    The maximum Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) interface volume was determined; this volume can trap contamination gases during the sampling process. A new technique (helium backfill) for eliminating contamination gases from the RGS sampler interface volume is described, and verification testing reported. Also demonstrated was that RGS data obtained prior to the introduction of the new helium backfill technique can be compensated for air contamination using the measured oxygen concentration and normal air composition.

  15. Satellite services handbook. Interface guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-12-01

    Satellite interfaces for on orbit servicing, both manned and unmanned are identified, and is intended to be used by designers of space vehicles, both foreign and domestic. A primary concern is for design of interfaces with the astronaut in the loop, especially extravehicular activity, but also intravehicular activity and operations that are remote but have man-in-the-loop. The main emphasis is on servicing in low earth orbits from the Space Shuttle and also from the Space Station or other platforms.

  16. The theory of interface slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Interface slicing is a new tool which was developed to facilitate reuse-based software engineering, by addressing the following problems, needs, and issues: (1) size of systems incorporating reused modules; (2) knowledge requirements for program modification; (3) program understanding for reverse engineering; (4) module granularity and domain management; and (5) time and space complexity of conventional slicing. The definition of a form of static program analysis called interface slicing is addressed.

  17. Cultural neurolinguistics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2010-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research — cultural neurolinguistics — that examines systematic cross-cultural/crosslinguistic variations in the neural networks of languages. We first briefly describe general brain networks for written and spoken languages. We then discuss language-specific brain regions by highlighting differences in neural bases of different scripts (logographic vs. alphabetic scripts), orthographies (transparent vs. nontransparent orthographies), and tonality (tonal vs. atonal languages). We also discuss neural basis of second language and the role of native language experience in second-language acquisition. In the last section, we outline a general model that integrates culture and neural bases of language and discuss future directions of research in this area. PMID:19874968

  18. Hydrophobic effect at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual basis for hydrophobic effects in bulk water and at aqueous interfaces have similar conceptual basis but often manifests itself differently. Using a wide range of computer simulations as the basis, I will review different forms of hydrophobic effects at a variety of interfaces starting from simple liquid-vapor and water-oil interfaces and progressing to water-membrane interfaces. I will start with discussing how water is organized at different interfaces, stressing both similarities and differences. The main thread is that, as in the bulk liquid, hydrophobic effects have profound influence on conformational equilibria and organization of both small molecules and macromolecules, but the result of this influence is quite different. Specifically, it will be shown that many small, but not necessarily amphiphilic molecules tend to accumulate at the interface and, and this tendency will be explained. Furthermore, I will show that many short peptides that are disordered in water spontaneously fold into well-defined structures in the interfacial environment. Biological implications of this self-organizing effect will be discussed.

  19. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  20. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air–liquid interface cytotoxicity test

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  1. Surfactant Lipids at the Host-Environment Interface. Metabolic Sensors, Suppressors, and Effectors of Inflammatory Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Michael B; Summer, Ross S

    2016-05-01

    The lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant is unlike that of any other body fluid. This extracellular lipid reservoir is also uniquely susceptible by virtue of its direct and continuous exposure to environmental oxidants, inflammatory agents, and pathogens. Historically, the greatest attention has been focused on those biophysical features of surfactant that serve to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface. More recently, surfactant lipids have also been recognized as bioactive molecules that maintain immune quiescence in the lung but can also be remodeled by the inhaled environment into neolipids that mediate key roles in inflammation, immunity, and fibrosis. This review focuses on the roles in inflammatory and infectious lung disease of two classes of native surfactant lipids, glycerophospholipids and sterols, and their corresponding oxidized species, oxidized glycerophospholipids and oxysterols. We highlight evidence that surfactant composition is sensitive to circulating lipoproteins and that the lipid milieu of the alveolus should thus be recognized as susceptible to diet and common systemic metabolic disorders. We also discuss intriguing evidence suggesting that oxidized surfactant lipids may represent an evolutionary link between immunity and tissue homeostasis that arose in the primordial lung. Taken together, the emerging picture is one in which the unique environmental susceptibility of the lung, together with its unique extracellular lipid requirements, may have made this organ both an evolutionary hub and an engine for lipid-immune cross-talk. PMID:26859434

  2. Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Kênia; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    Business Performer-Centered Design of User Interfaces is a new design methodology that adopts business process (BP) definition and a business performer perspective for managing the life cycle of user interfaces of enterprise systems. In this methodology, when the organization has a business process culture, the business processes of an organization are firstly defined according to a traditional methodology for this kind of artifact. These business processes are then transformed into a series of task models that represent the interactive parts of the business processes that will ultimately lead to interactive systems. When the organization has its enterprise systems, but not yet its business processes modeled, the user interfaces of the systems help derive tasks models, which are then used to derive the business processes. The double linking between a business process and a task model, and between a task model and a user interface model makes it possible to ensure traceability of the artifacts in multiple paths and enables a more active participation of business performers in analyzing the resulting user interfaces. In this paper, we outline how a human-perspective is used tied to a model-driven perspective.

  3. Osteoclasts in the interface with electrospun hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Pasuri, Jenni; Holopainen, Jani; Kokkonen, Hanna; Persson, Maria; Kauppinen, Kyösti; Lehenkari, Petri; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2015-11-01

    Electrospinning is a method to produce lightweight, resorbable and bioinspired scaffolds for tissue engineering. Here we investigated the influence of electrospun hydroxyapatite fibers (HA) on macrophages and osteoclasts. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and human bone marrow derived primary osteoclasts (hOC) were cultured with electrospun HA fibers embedded in Matrigel. Cell morphology and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) were analyzed using macrophages. Both fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the cell morphology differed on the various materials (HA fibers on Matrigel, pure Matrigel and a glass control). Control macrophages were activated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but electrospun HA did not provoke an inflammatory response. Cytokine secretion detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also supported this observation. LPS, but not HA fibers, stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 secretion by macrophages at the 2 day time point. After 4 days in culture there was an increasing trend in cytokine secretion in the HA fiber samples. Human bone marrow myeloid precursor cells were able to fuse and differentiate on the fibrous mineral scaffold to form functional multinuclear osteoclasts that were able to resorb the HA nanofibers. This indicates that osteoclasts do not necessarily need a continuous bone surface but osteoclast ruffled border membranes can form a resorption interface with a fibrous mineral scaffold. PMID:26342323

  4. Culture et medias (Culture and the Media).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abastado, Claude

    1982-01-01

    The traditional conception of pluralistic culture is contrasted with a new, separate form of culture: mass media culture. Its components are noted: medium, message, "mosaic," and strategy, and methodology for its study is discussed. (MSE)

  5. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    still over-parametrized, this choice of model space contains far fewer parameters than before, thus easing the computational burden, in some cases, of the optimization problem. And most importantly, the associated finite element discretization is aligned with the abrupt changes in material properties associated with lithologic boundaries as well as the interface between buried cultural artifacts and the surrounding Earth. In section 4, algorithms and tools are described that associate a smooth interface surface to a given triangulation. In particular, the tools support surface refinement and coarsening. Section 5 describes some preliminary results on the application of interface identification methods to some model problems in geophysical inversion. Due to time constraints, the results described here use the GNU Triangulated Surface Library for the manipulation of surface meshes and the TetGen software library for the generation of tetrahedral meshes.

  6. Theory of Interface States at Silicon / Transition - - Silicide Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hunhwa

    The Si/NiSi(,2)(111) interface is of both fundamental and techno- logical interest: From the fundamental point of view, it is the best characterized of all semiconductor/metal interfaces, with two well-determined geometries (A and B) involving nearly perfect bonding. (This is because Si and NiSi(,2) have nearly the same lattice spacing.) Consequently, a theoretical treatment of this system makes sense--as it would not for messier systems--and one can have some confidence that the theoretical predictions are relevant to experimental observa- tions. From the technological point of view, Si/NiSi(,2) is representative of the class of semiconductor/metal interfaces that are currently of greatest interest in regard to electronic devices--Si/transition -metal-silicide interfaces. The calculations of this dissertation are for the intrinsic interface states of Si/NiSi(,2)-A geometry. These calculations also provide a foundation for later studies of defects at this interface, and for studies of other related systems, such as CoSi(,2). The calculations employ empirical tight-binding Hamiltonians for both Si and NiSi(,2) (with the parameters fitted to prior calculations of the bulk band structures, which appear to be in agreement with the available experimental data on bulk Si and NiSi(,2)). They also employ Green's function techniques--in particular, the subspace Hamiltonian technique. Our principal results are the following: (1) Interface state disper- sion curves are predicted along the symmetry lines (')(GAMMA)(')M, (')M(')K and (')K(')(GAMMA) of the surface Brillouin zone. (2) A prominent band of interface states is found which disperses downward from an energy within the Si band gap to an energy below the Si valence band edge E(,(upsilon)) as the planar wavevector (')k increases from (')(GAMMA) ((')k = 0) to (')M or (')K (symmetry points at boundary of the surface Brillouin zone). This band of inter- face states should be observable. It produces a peak in the surface

  7. Fluxes across a thermohaline interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, M.; Lueck, R. G.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of velocity and temperature microstructure and hydrography were made with a towed vehicle moving in and around a single interface in a double-diffusive staircase. The interface was traversed 222 times in a saw-tooth pattern over a track 35 km long. The salinity and potential temperature and density in the mixed layers adjacent to the interface were spatially uniform except for one 8 km long anomaly. The rate of dissipation of kinetic energy was uniformly low in the interface and in the mixed layers, except for one section 600 m long where a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generated turbulence. For the non-turbulent section of the interface, the mean rate of dissipation was 30.2 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the mixed layers and 9.5 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the interface. The non-dimensional dissipation rate, ɛ/vN 2, was almost always less than 16 in the interface and therfore, there was no turblent buoyancy flux according to ROHRet al. (1988, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 195, 77-111). The average double-diffusive flux of buoyancy by heat was 3.6 × 10 -10 W kg -1. Under certain assumptions the ratio of the flux of buoyancy by heat and salt can be estimated to be 0.53 ± 0.10, in good agreement with laboratory and theoretical estimates for salt fingers. The average Cox number was about 8 in the interface, consistent with the theories of STERN (1975, Ocean circulation physics, Academic Press) and KUNZE (1987, Journal of Marine Research, 45 533-556), but displayed an inverse dependence on the vertical temperature gradient which was not predicted. As a result, the flux of buoyancy, as well as the individual contributions by heat and salt, were independent of the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the buoyancy frequency. The length of the turbulent section of the interface was only 1.7% of the total length observed. However, the turbulence was intense—the mean rate of dissipation was 2.5 × 10 -8 W kg -1—and may have sufficiently enhanced the flux of heat to

  8. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  9. XML Translator for Interface Descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroson, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program defines an XML schema for specifying the interface to a generic FPGA from the perspective of software that will interact with the device. This XML interface description is then translated into header files for C, Verilog, and VHDL. User interface definition input is checked via both the provided XML schema and the translator module to ensure consistency and accuracy. Currently, programming used on both sides of an interface is inconsistent. This makes it hard to find and fix errors. By using a common schema, both sides are forced to use the same structure by using the same framework and toolset. This makes for easy identification of problems, which leads to the ability to formulate a solution. The toolset contains constants that allow a programmer to use each register, and to access each field in the register. Once programming is complete, the translator is run as part of the make process, which ensures that whenever an interface is changed, all of the code that uses the header files describing it is recompiled.

  10. A UNIX interface to supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    McBryan, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    We describe a convenient interface between UNIX-based work-stations or minicomputers, and supercomputers such as the CRAY series machines. Using this interface, the user can issue commands entirely on the UNIX system, with remote compilation, loading and execution performed on the supercomputer. The interface is not a remote login interface. Rather the domain of various UNIX utilities such as compilers, archivers and loaders are extended to include the CRAY. The user need know essentially nothing about the CRAY operating system, commands or filename restrictions. Standard UNIX utilities will perform CRAY operations transparently. UNIX command names and arguments are mapped to corresponding CRAY equivalents, suitable options are selected as needed, UNIX directory tree filenames are coerced to allowable CRAY names and all source and output files are automatically transferred between the machines. The primary purpose of the software is to allow the programmer to benefit from the interactive features of UNIX systems including screen editors, software maintenance utilities such as make and SCCS and in general to avail of the large set of UNIX text manipulation features. The interface was designed particularly to support development of very large multi-file programs, possibly consisting of hundreds of files and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. All CRAY source is kept on the work-station. We have found that using the software, the complete program development phase for a large CRAY application may be performed entirely on a work-station.

  11. DIRAC: Secure web user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casajus Ramo, A.; Sapunov, M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally the interaction between users and the Grid is done with command line tools. However, these tools are difficult to use by non-expert users providing minimal help and generating outputs not always easy to understand especially in case of errors. Graphical User Interfaces are typically limited to providing access to the monitoring or accounting information and concentrate on some particular aspects failing to cover the full spectrum of grid control tasks. To make the Grid more user friendly more complete graphical interfaces are needed. Within the DIRAC project we have attempted to construct a Web based User Interface that provides means not only for monitoring the system behavior but also allows to steer the main user activities on the grid. Using DIRAC's web interface a user can easily track jobs and data. It provides access to job information and allows performing actions on jobs such as killing or deleting. Data managers can define and monitor file transfer activity as well as check requests set by jobs. Production managers can define and follow large data productions and react if necessary by stopping or starting them. The Web Portal is build following all the grid security standards and using modern Web 2.0 technologies which allow to achieve the user experience similar to the desktop applications. Details of the DIRAC Web Portal architecture and User Interface will be presented and discussed.

  12. Interface dynamics of competing tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podewitz, Nils; Jülicher, Frank; Gompper, Gerhard; Elgeti, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Tissues can be characterized by their homeostatic stress, i.e. the value of stress for which cell division and cell death balance. When two different tissues grow in competition, a difference of their homeostatic stresses determines which tissue grows at the expense of the second. This then leads to the propagation of the interface separating the tissues. Here, we study structural and dynamical properties of this interface by combining continuum theory with mesoscopic simulations of a cell-based model. Using a simulation box that moves with the interface, we find that a stationary state exists in which the interface has a finite width and propagates with a constant velocity. The propagation velocity in the simulations depends linearly on the homeostatic stress difference, in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions. This agreement is also seen for the stress and velocity profiles. Finally, we analyzed the interface growth and roughness as a function of time and system size. We estimated growth and roughness exponents, which differ from those previously obtained for simple tissue growth.

  13. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  14. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  15. Culture collections.

    PubMed

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. PMID:22569518

  16. EVA-glass interface bond stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The ethylene vinyl acetate/glass interface bond stability was investigated. Special methods to determine the structure of polymer/glass interface were developed. Structural changes related to hydrothermal degradation of polymer/glass interface are examined. Methods to inhibit the degradation reaction which occur at polymer/glass interface are developed.

  17. A Mixed Methodological Analysis of the Role of Culture in the Clinical Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; McLeod, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Even though literature indicates that particular cultural groups receive more severe diagnoses at disproportionate rates, there has been minimal research that addresses how culture interfaces specifically with clinical decision making. This mixed methodological study of 41 counselors indicated that cultural characteristics of both counselors and…

  18. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  19. Flow in presence of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunati, I.

    2011-12-01

    Although most physical properties and empirical laws are well defined and experimentally tested only for homogeneous systems, being able to solve environmental problems requires dealing with systems that are inherently heterogeneous. This is particularly true for applications in hydrogeology, where properties (such as permeability) can vary over orders of magnitude. The most challenging cases are those of flow in presence of interfaces, i.e., region characterized by sharp and abrupt contrasts in properties or state. Interfaces require a special treatment, both conceptually and numerically (e.g., quantity such as pressure can become discontinuous), and must be accurately described because of the important phenomena that can take place (e.g., reaction or instability) and influence the behavior of the system at large scales. We discuss the problems related with an accurate description of the propagation of a fluid-fluid interface in a pore geometry, and with the evolution of an unstable front between two fluids of different densities.

  20. Holographic interface-particle potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, Koichi; Tanida, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We consider two mathcal{N} = {4} supersymmetric gauge theories connected by an interface and the gravity dual of this system. This interface is expressed by a fuzzy funnel solution of Nahm's equation in the gauge theory side. The gravity dual is a probe D5-brane in AdS5 × S 5. The potential energy between this interface and a test particle is calculated in both the gauge theory side and the gravity side by the expectation value of a Wilson loop. In the gauge theory it is evaluated by just substituting the classical solution to the Wilson loop. On the other hand it is done by the on-shell action of the fundamental string stretched between the AdS boundary and the D5-brane in the gravity. We show the gauge theory result and the gravity one agree with each other.

  1. Interfacing with the Computational Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience is just beginning to understand the neural computations that underlie our remarkable capacity to learn new motor tasks. Studies of natural movements have emphasized the importance of concepts such as dimensionality reduction within hierarchical levels of redundancy, optimization of behavior in the presence of sensorimotor noise and internal models for predictive control. These concepts also provide a framework for understanding the improvements in performance seen in myoelectric-controlled interface (MCI) and brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigms. Recent experiments reveal how volitional activity in the motor system combines with sensory feedback to shape neural representations and drives adaptation of behavior. By elucidating these mechanisms, a new generation of intelligent interfaces can be designed to exploit neural plasticity and restore function after neurological injury. PMID:21659037

  2. Conjugated Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaneck, W. R.; Stafstrom, S.; Brédas, J. L.

    2003-10-01

    The authors illustrate the basic physics and materials science of conjugated polymers and their interfaces, particularly, but not exclusively, as they are applied to polymer-based light emitting diodes. The approach is to describe the basic physical and associated chemical principles that apply to these materials, which in many instances are different from those that apply to their inorganic counterparts. The main aim of the authors is to highlight specific issues and properties of polymer surfaces and interfaces that are relevant in the context of the emerging field of polymer-based electronics in general, and polymer-based light emitting diodes in particular. Both theoretical and experimental methods used in the study of these systems are discussed. This book will be of interest to graduate students and research workers in departments of physics, chemistry, electrical engineering and materials sciences studying polymer surfaces and interfaces and their application in polymer-based electronics.

  3. Swimming bacteria at complex interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Diego; Lauga, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms such as bacteria often move in confined geometries. Such confinement can be caused by the presence of solid boundaries, free surfaces, or liquid interfaces. It is well established that confinement affects significantly locomotion, generating additional forces and torques on the bacteria. In the presence of a solid boundary (imposing a no-slip condition), microorganisms using helical propulsion undergo circular motion (clockwise in the case of E. coli). Conversely, close to a free (no-shear) surface the circular motion is reversed. However, realistic interfaces are complex, and experimental results do not always agree with theoretical predictions. In this work, we show, using analytical modeling, how different complex interfaces affect a nearby bacterium and modify its swimming kinematics. IUSTI UMR 7343, Polytech Marseille, France.

  4. Usable Interface Design for Everyone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Lozano, Carlos; Salcines, Enrique García; Sainz de Abajo, Beatriz; Burón Fernández, F. Javier; Ramírez, José Miguel; Recellado, José Gabriel Zato; Montoya, Rafael Sanchez; Bell, John; Marin, Francisco Alcantud

    When designing "interfaces for everyone" for interactive systems, it is important to consider factors such as cost, the intended market, the state of the environment, etc. User interfaces are fundamental for the developmental process in any application, and its design must be contemplated from the start. Of the distinct parts of a system (hardware and software), it is the interface that permits the user access to computer resources. The seven principles of "Universal Design" or "Design for Everyone" focus on a universal usable design, but at the same time acknowledge the influences of internal and external factors. Structural changes in social and health services could provide an increase in the well-being of a country's citizens through the use of self-care programming and proactive management/prevention of disease. Automated home platforms can act as an accessibility instrument which permits users to avoid, compensate, mitigate, or neutralize the deficiencies and dependencies caused by living alone.

  5. Multi-robot control interface

    DOEpatents

    Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  6. Opening the Culture Door.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Barbara; Rasminsky, Judy Sklar

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that child care providers must collaborate with children's families in order to better understand their culture and their child, and to successfully deal with challenging behavior issues. Addresses: (1) culture definition; (2) culture and identity; (3) cultural differences; (4) seeing culture; (5) child care and school culture; (6) moving…

  7. Anthropomorphizing the User Interface: A Case for Interface Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marshall G.

    Anthropomorphism can be defined as the attribution of human characteristics or behavior to inanimate objects. People give names to their automobiles and computers as a way to relate to complicated pieces of technology that they use regularly, but do not fully understand. Software designers may claim that their interfaces are intuitive, but in…

  8. Immersed interface methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeVeque, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Bube, K.P.

    1996-11-01

    Cartesian grid methods encompass a wide variety of techniques used to solve partial differential equations in more than one space dimension on uniform Cartesian grids even when the underlying geometry is complex and not aligned with the grid. The authors` groups work on Immersed Interface Methods (IIM) was originally motivated by the desire to understand and improve the ``Immersed Boundary Method``, developed by Charles Peskin to solve incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in complicated geometries with moving elastic boundaries. This report briefly discusses the development of the Immersed Interface Methods and gives examples of application of the method in solving several partial differential equations.

  9. The dynamic interface: A review

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rachna; Kapoor, Daljit

    2015-01-01

    The implant-to-tissue interface is an extremely dynamic region of interaction. Generally, a surgical procedure is performed on a patient to insert a foreign material into the bone, and the body is called on to “heal” the wound. The time schedule crucial for a healing process that is expected to result in restitution ad integrum must be determined with respect to the condition of the individual patient and tissue to be treated. There are various factors responsible for the formation of an adequate bone–implant interface. A comprehensive review of the response of bone to implant is described. PMID:26539385

  10. User interfaces to expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Expert Systems are becoming increasingly popular in environments where the user is not well versed in computers or the subject domain. They offer expert advice and can also explain their lines of reasoning. As these systems are applied to highly technical areas, they become complex and large. Therefore, User Systems Interfaces (USIs) become critical. This paper discusses recent technologies that can be applied to improved user communication. In particular, bar menus/graphics, mouse interfaces, touch screens, and voice links will be highlighted. Their applications in the context of SOFTMAN (The Software Manager Apprentice) a knowledge-based system are discussed. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  12. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  13. Interface standards for computer equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The ability to configure data systems using modules provided by independent manufacturers is complicated by the wide range of electrical, mechanical, and functional characteristics exhibited within the equipment provided by different manufacturers of computers, peripherals, and terminal devices. A number of international organizations were and still are involved in the creation of standards that enable devices to be interconnected with minimal difficulty, usually involving only a cable or data bus connection that is defined by the standard. The elements covered by an interface standard are covered and the most prominent interface standards presently in use are identified and described.

  14. Marketing across Cultures: Tools for Cultural Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    The concept of cultural universals, the basic needs shared by people around the world, is a critical concept in assessing the impact of culture on decisions about the international marketing of goods and services. In most cases, international marketers have little need to understand all the ways in which their culture differs from the culture of…

  15. Hispanic Culture and Relational Cultural Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Traditional personality theories do not consider the impact of culture on personality development. Yet, to provide culturally relevant services to the increasing Hispanic population in the U.S., more culturally relevant theories must be identified. This paper presents Relational Cultural Theory (RCT) as an alternative model to understanding…

  16. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  17. Isolation of Leukocytes from the Human Maternal-fetal Interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Plazyo, Olesya; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by the infiltration of leukocytes in the reproductive tissues and at the maternal-fetal interface (decidua basalis and decidua parietalis). This interface is the anatomical site of contact between maternal and fetal tissues; therefore, it is an immunological site of action during pregnancy. Infiltrating leukocytes at the maternal-fetal interface play a central role in implantation, pregnancy maintenance, and timing of delivery. Therefore, phenotypic and functional characterizations of these leukocytes will provide insight into the mechanisms that lead to pregnancy disorders. Several protocols have been described in order to isolate infiltrating leukocytes from the decidua basalis and decidua parietalis; however, the lack of consistency in the reagents, enzymes, and times of incubation makes it difficult to compare these results. Described herein is a novel approach that combines the use of gentle mechanical and enzymatic dissociation techniques to preserve the viability and integrity of extracellular and intracellular markers in leukocytes isolated from the human tissues at the maternal-fetal interface. Aside from immunophenotyping, cell culture, and cell sorting, the future applications of this protocol are numerous and varied. Following this protocol, the isolated leukocytes can be used to determine DNA methylation, expression of target genes, in vitro leukocyte functionality (i.e., phagocytosis, cytotoxicity, T-cell proliferation, and plasticity, etc.), and the production of reactive oxygen species at the maternal-fetal interface. Additionally, using the described protocol, this laboratory has been able to describe new and rare leukocytes at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26067211

  18. Intelligent interfaces for expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A.; Wang, Lui

    1988-01-01

    Vital to the success of an expert system is an interface to the user which performs intelligently. A generic intelligent interface is being developed for expert systems. This intelligent interface was developed around the in-house developed Expert System for the Flight Analysis System (ESFAS). The Flight Analysis System (FAS) is comprised of 84 configuration controlled FORTRAN subroutines that are used in the preflight analysis of the space shuttle. In order to use FAS proficiently, a person must be knowledgeable in the areas of flight mechanics, the procedures involved in deploying a certain payload, and an overall understanding of the FAS. ESFAS, still in its developmental stage, is taking into account much of this knowledge. The generic intelligent interface involves the integration of a speech recognizer and synthesizer, a preparser, and a natural language parser to ESFAS. The speech recognizer being used is capable of recognizing 1000 words of connected speech. The natural language parser is a commercial software package which uses caseframe instantiation in processing the streams of words from the speech recognizer or the keyboard. The systems configuration is described along with capabilities and drawbacks.

  19. Coal-rock interface detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, S. D.; Crouch, C. E.; Jones, E. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coal-rock interface detector is presented which employs a radioactive source and radiation sensor. The source and sensor are separately and independently suspended and positioned against a mine surface of hydraulic pistons, which are biased from an air cushioned source of pressurized hydraulic fluid.

  20. Microcomputer to Multichannel Analyzer Interface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Roger N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) in which the front end is connected to a microcomputer through a custom interface. Thus an MCA System of 1024 channel resolution, programmable in Basic rather than in machine language and having moderate cost, is achieved. (Author/SK)

  1. Graphical fiber shaping control interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Eric T.; Ninomiya, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present an improved graphical user interface for defining single-pass novel shaping techniques on glass processing machines that allows for streamlined process development. This approach offers unique modularity and debugging capability to researchers during the process development phase not usually afforded with similar scripting languages.

  2. Strength Development At Thermoset Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wool, R. P.; Raghavan, J.

    1997-03-01

    A basic set of 10 polymer-polymer matrix interfaces has been identified to play a vital role in the technical apects of composite manufacturing, repair, recycling, welding and joining of thermoset matrix composites. A model vinyl ester resin was used in compact tension experiments with side-A and side-B, to determine the fracture energy G. Surprisingly, G was very small compared to the virgin strength (co-cured side-A with side-B) when liquid resin in side A was cured against previously cured side-B. Apparently, the chain extension reactions were not sufficient to achieve sufficient molecular connectivity at the interface. Several methods of repair were explored for fractured specimens, the most successful being the use of polystyrene connector chains at the interface with a molecular weight near M = 200,000. However, the complete virgin strength was never recovered, despite several chemical treatments, including crack healing. Strength results for all 10 interfaces, subjected to a variety of chemical treatments and surface preparation techniques are presented.

  3. Gluing Soft Interfaces by Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Dobrynin, Andrey

    Using a combination of the molecular dynamics simulations and scaling analysis we studied reinforcement of interface between two soft gel-like materials by spherical nanoparticles. Analysis of the simulations shows that the depth of penetration of a nanoparticle into a gel is determined by a balance of the elastic energy of the gel and nanoparticle deformations and the surface energy of nanoparticle/gel interface. In order to evaluate work of adhesion of the reinforced interface, the potential of mean force for separation of two gels was calculated. These simulations showed that the gel separation proceeds through formation of necks connecting nanoparticle with two gels. The shapes of the necks are controlled by a fine interplay between nanoparticle/gel surface energies and elastic energy of the neck deformation. Our simulations showed that by introducing nanoparticles at soft interfaces, the work required for separation of two gels could be 10-100 times larger than the work of adhesion between two gels without nanoparticle reinforcement. These results provide insight in understanding the mechanism of gluing soft gels and biological tissues by nano- and micro-sized particles. NSF DMR-1409710.

  4. Willow: a uniform search interface.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchell, D S; Freedman, M M; Jordan, W E; Lightfoot, E M; Heyano, S; Libbey, P A

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Willow Project is to develop a uniform search interface that allows a diverse community of users to retrieve information from heterogeneous network-based information resources. Willow separates the user interface from the database management or information retrieval system. It provides a graphic user interface to a variety of information resources residing on diverse hosts, and using different search engines and idiomatic query languages through networked-based client-server and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocols. It is based on a "database driver'' model, which allows new database hosts to be added without altering Willow itself. Willow employs a multimedia extension mechanism to launch external viewers to handle data in almost any form. Drivers are currently available for a local BRS/SEARCH system and the Z39.50 protocol. Students, faculty, clinicians, and researchers at the University of Washington are currently offered 30 local and remote databases via Willow. They conduct more than 250,000 sessions a month in libraries, medical centers and clinics, laboratories, and offices, and from home. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is implementing Willow as its uniform search interface to Z39.50 hosts. PMID:8750388

  5. Interface Reconstruction with Directional Walking

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, J

    2009-05-22

    Young's interface reconstruction with three-dimensional arbitrary mesh, in general, is rather tedious to implement compared to the case of a regular mesh. The main difficulty comes from the construction of a planar facet that bounds a certain volume inside a cell. Unlike the five basic configurations with a Cartesian mesh, there can be a great number of different configurations in the case of a general mesh. We represent a simple method that can derive the topology/geometry of the intersection of arbitrary planar objects in a uniform way. The method is based on a directional walking on the surface of objects, and links the intersection points with the paths of the walking naturally defining the intersection of objects. The method works in both two and three dimensions. The method does not take advantage of convexity, thus decomposition of an object is not necessary. Therefore, the solution with this method will have a reduced number of edges and less data storage, compared with methods that use shape decomposition. The treatment is general for arbitrary polyhedrons, and no look-up tables are needed. The same operation can easily be extended for curved geometry. The implementation of this new algorithm shall allow the interface reconstruction on an arbitrary mesh to be as simple as it is on a regular mesh. Furthermore, we exactly compute the integral of partial cell volume bounded by quadratic interface. Therefore, interface reconstruction with higher than second order accuracy can be achieved on an arbitrary mesh.

  6. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  7. Brush/Fin Thermal Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.; Seaman, Christopher L.; Ellman, Brett M.

    2004-01-01

    Brush/fin thermal interfaces are being developed to increase heat-transfer efficiency and thereby enhance the thermal management of orbital replaceable units (ORUs) of electronic and other equipment aboard the International Space Station. Brush/fin thermal interfaces could also be used to increase heat-transfer efficiency in terrestrial electronic and power systems. In a typical application according to conventional practice, a replaceable heat-generating unit includes a mounting surface with black-anodized metal fins that mesh with the matching fins of a heat sink or radiator on which the unit is mounted. The fins do not contact each other, but transfer heat via radiation exchange. A brush/fin interface also includes intermeshing fins, the difference being that the gaps between the fins are filled with brushes made of carbon or other fibers. The fibers span the gap between intermeshed fins, allowing heat transfer by conduction through the fibers. The fibers are attached to the metal surfaces as velvet-like coats in the manner of the carbon fiber brush heat exchangers described in the preceding article. The fiber brushes provide both mechanical compliance and thermal contact, thereby ensuring low contact thermal resistance. A certain amount of force is required to intermesh the fins due to sliding friction of the brush s fiber tips against the fins. This force increases linearly with penetration distance, reaching 1 psi (6.9 kPa) for full 2-in. (5.1 cm) penetration for the conventional radiant fin interface. Removal forces can be greater due to fiber buckling upon reversing the sliding direction. This buckling force can be greatly reduced by biasing the fibers at an angle perpendicularly to the sliding direction. Means of containing potentially harmful carbon fiber debris, which is electrically conductive, have been developed. Small prototype brush/fin thermal interfaces have been tested and found to exhibit temperature drops about onesixth of that of conventional

  8. Culture and Technologies for Social Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qinying; Fussell, Susan R.; Agarwal, Sheetal K.; Kumar, Arun; Nanavati, Amit A.; Rajput, Nitendra; Pan, Yingxin

    While social activities and user requirements clearly vary across cultures, we are far from having a systematic understanding of culture’s role in the design, development and use of social technologies. This workshop will bring together a mix of HCI researchers and practitioners, social scientists and psychologists who are interested in areas of social technologies and culture, in order to (a) examine the design and use of technologies for social interaction in different cultures to date; (b) explore various viewpoints on the key issues for future research; (c) outline various approaches and identify some basic guidelines for understanding cultural impacts in building social technologies as well as user interfaces and (d) foster new collaborations in the community.

  9. A sharp interface method for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingyu; Deng, Xiao-Long

    2015-12-01

    A sharp interface method (SIM) for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been developed to simulate two-phase flows with clear interfaces. The level set function is introduced to capture the interface implicitly. The interface velocity is used to evolve the level set function. The smoothness of the level set function helps to improve the accuracy of the interface curvature. Material discontinuity across the interface is dealt with by the ghost fluid method. The interface states are calculated by applying the jump conditions and are extended to the corresponding ghost fluid particles. The ghost fluid method helps to get smooth and stable calculation near the interface. The performance of the developed method is validated by benchmark tests. The developed SIM for SPH can be applied to simulate low speed two-phase flows of high density ratios with clear interface accurately and stably.

  10. MIB Galerkin method for elliptic interface problems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kelin; Zhan, Meng; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-12-15

    Material interfaces are omnipresent in the real-world structures and devices. Mathematical modeling of material interfaces often leads to elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) with discontinuous coefficients and singular sources, which are commonly called elliptic interface problems. The development of high-order numerical schemes for elliptic interface problems has become a well defined field in applied and computational mathematics and attracted much attention in the past decades. Despite of significant advances, challenges remain in the construction of high-order schemes for nonsmooth interfaces, i.e., interfaces with geometric singularities, such as tips, cusps and sharp edges. The challenge of geometric singularities is amplified when they are associated with low solution regularities, e.g., tip-geometry effects in many fields. The present work introduces a matched interface and boundary (MIB) Galerkin method for solving two-dimensional (2D) elliptic PDEs with complex interfaces, geometric singularities and low solution regularities. The Cartesian grid based triangular elements are employed to avoid the time consuming mesh generation procedure. Consequently, the interface cuts through elements. To ensure the continuity of classic basis functions across the interface, two sets of overlapping elements, called MIB elements, are defined near the interface. As a result, differentiation can be computed near the interface as if there is no interface. Interpolation functions are constructed on MIB element spaces to smoothly extend function values across the interface. A set of lowest order interface jump conditions is enforced on the interface, which in turn, determines the interpolation functions. The performance of the proposed MIB Galerkin finite element method is validated by numerical experiments with a wide range of interface geometries, geometric singularities, low regularity solutions and grid resolutions. Extensive numerical studies confirm the

  11. Technique for converting non-conforming hexahedral-to-hexahedral interfaces into conforming interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Shepherd, Jason F.; Ledoux, Frank; Shimada, Kenji; Merkley, Karl G.; Carbonera, Carlos

    2013-03-05

    A technique for conforming an interface between a first mesh and a second mesh is disclosed. A first interface surface in the first mesh and a second interface surface in the second mesh residing along the interface are identified. The first and second interface surfaces are initially non-conforming along the interface. Chords within the first and second interface surfaces that fall within a threshold separation distance of each other are paired. Sheets having chords that reside within the first or second interface surfaces are recursively inserted into or extracted from one or both of the first and second meshes until all remaining chords within the first interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the second interface surface and all remaining chords within the second interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the first interface surface.

  12. ACPYPE - AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ACPYPE (or AnteChamber PYthon Parser interfacE) is a wrapper script around the ANTECHAMBER software that simplifies the generation of small molecule topologies and parameters for a variety of molecular dynamics programmes like GROMACS, CHARMM and CNS. It is written in the Python programming language and was developed as a tool for interfacing with other Python based applications such as the CCPN software suite (for NMR data analysis) and ARIA (for structure calculations from NMR data). ACPYPE is open source code, under GNU GPL v3, and is available as a stand-alone application at http://www.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype and as a web portal application at http://webapps.ccpn.ac.uk/acpype. Findings We verified the topologies generated by ACPYPE in three ways: by comparing with default AMBER topologies for standard amino acids; by generating and verifying topologies for a large set of ligands from the PDB; and by recalculating the structures for 5 protein–ligand complexes from the PDB. Conclusions ACPYPE is a tool that simplifies the automatic generation of topology and parameters in different formats for different molecular mechanics programmes, including calculation of partial charges, while being object oriented for integration with other applications. PMID:22824207

  13. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  14. Universal sensor interface module (USIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Don; Torres, A.; Wynn, John

    1999-01-01

    A universal sensor interface model (USIM) is being developed by the Raytheon-TI Systems Company for use with fields of unattended distributed sensors. In its production configuration, the USIM will be a multichip module consisting of a set of common modules. The common module USIM set consists of (1) a sensor adapter interface (SAI) module, (2) digital signal processor (DSP) and associated memory module, and (3) a RF transceiver model. The multispectral sensor interface is designed around a low-power A/D converted, whose input/output interface consists of: -8 buffered, sampled inputs from various devices including environmental, acoustic seismic and magnetic sensors. The eight sensor inputs are each high-impedance, low- capacitance, differential amplifiers. The inputs are ideally suited for interface with discrete or MEMS sensors, since the differential input will allow direct connection with high-impedance bridge sensors and capacitance voltage sources. Each amplifier is connected to a 22-bit (Delta) (Sigma) A/D converter to enable simultaneous samples. The low power (Delta) (Sigma) converter provides 22-bit resolution at sample frequencies up to 142 hertz (used for magnetic sensors) and 16-bit resolution at frequencies up to 1168 hertz (used for acoustic and seismic sensors). The video interface module is based around the TMS320C5410 DSP. It can provide sensor array addressing, video data input, data calibration and correction. The processor module is based upon a MPC555. It will be used for mode control, synchronization of complex sensors, sensor signal processing, array processing, target classification and tracking. Many functions of the A/D, DSP and transceiver can be powered down by using variable clock speeds under software command or chip power switches. They can be returned to intermediate or full operation by DSP command. Power management may be based on the USIM's internal timer, command from the USIM transceiver, or by sleep mode processing management

  15. Command Interface ASIC - Analog Interface ASIC Chip Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Baldes; Jaffe, Burton; Burke, Gary; Lung, Gerald; Pixler, Gregory; Plummer, Joe; Katanyoutanant,, Sunant; Whitaker, William

    2003-01-01

    A command interface application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and an analog interface ASIC have been developed as a chip set for remote actuation and monitoring of a collection of switches, which can be used to control generic loads, pyrotechnic devices, and valves in a high-radiation environment. The command interface ASIC (CIA) can be used alone or in combination with the analog interface ASIC (AIA). Designed primarily for incorporation into spacecraft control systems, they are also suitable for use in high-radiation terrestrial environments (e.g., in nuclear power plants and facilities that process radioactive materials). The primary role of the CIA within a spacecraft or other power system is to provide a reconfigurable means of regulating the power bus, actuating all valves, firing all pyrotechnic devices, and controlling the switching of power to all switchable loads. The CIA is a mixed-signal (analog and digital) ASIC that includes an embedded microcontroller with supporting fault-tolerant switch control and monitoring circuitry that is capable of connecting to a redundant set of interintegrated circuit (I(sup 2)C) buses. Commands and telemetry requests are communicated to the CIA. Adherence to the I(sup 2)C bus standard helps to reduce development costs by facilitating the use of previously developed, commercially available components. The AIA is a mixed-signal ASIC that includes the analog circuitry needed to connect the CIA to a custom higher powered version of the I(sup 2)C bus. The higher-powered version is designed to enable operation with bus cables longer than those contemplated in the I(sup 2)C standard. If there are multiple higher-power I(sup 2)C-like buses, then there must an AIA between the CIA and each such bus. The AIA includes two identical interface blocks: one for the side-A I(sup 2)C clock and data buses and the other for the side B buses. All the AIAs on each side are powered from a common power converter module (PCM). Sides A and B

  16. Water Tank with Capillary Air/Liquid Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Smith, Frederick; Edeen, Gregg; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A bladderless water tank (see figure) has been developed that contains capillary devices that allow it to be filled and emptied, as needed, in microgravity. When filled with water, the tank shields human occupants of a spacecraft against cosmic radiation. A membrane that is permeable by air but is hydrophobic (neither wettable nor permeable by liquid water) covers one inside surface of the tank. Grooves between the surface and the membrane allow air to flow through vent holes in the surface as the tank is filled or drained. A margin of wettable surface surrounds the edges of the membrane, and all the other inside tank surfaces are also wettable. A fill/drain port is located in one corner of the tank and is covered with a hydrophilic membrane. As filling begins, water runs from the hydrophilic membrane into the corner fillets of the tank walls. Continued filling in the absence of gravity will result in a single contiguous air bubble that will be vented through the hydrophobic membrane. The bubble will be reduced in size until it becomes spherical and smaller than the tank thickness. Draining the tank reverses the process. Air is introduced through the hydrophobic membrane, and liquid continuity is maintained with the fill/drain port through the corner fillets. Even after the tank is emptied, as long as the suction pressure on the hydrophilic membrane does not exceed its bubble point, no air will be drawn into the liquid line.

  17. ELECTRONIC COMPONENT COOLING ALTERNATIVES: COMPRESSED AIR & LIQUID NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to evaluate tools used to troubleshoot circuit boards with known or suspected thermally intermittent components. ailure modes for thermally intermittent components are typically mechanical defects, such as cracks in solder paths or joints, or broken bon...

  18. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Thierry; Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the ``dividing surface,'' as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a ``thermometer,'' and can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases.

  19. Is structural interface standardization beneficial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombert, W. E.

    1983-11-01

    Factors applicable to fixed angle, large field and fixed angle, large building flat plate photovoltaic (PV) generator arrays are discussed in the context of standardization. It is concluded that structural interface standardization may be highly desirable in any one major project, but not at this time in the overall PV industry. Attempts to mandate such standardization will act as a deterrent to long-range improvements. In specific projects, structural standardization should be defined at the largest practical interface, leaving the maximum possible freedom to the module and array manufacturer. There is a corollary area, however, where detailed standards would benefit the industry; the matter of Standard Practices. Work being done towards definition of acceptable/desirable practices in materials, finishes, fastening and locking methods, grounding techniques, lightning protection, etc., and in handling the environmental ranges, should be continued.

  20. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics.

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics. PMID:27300960

  2. Virtual Frame Buffer Interface Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Thomas L.

    1990-01-01

    Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as generic frame buffer with specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write codes that run unmodified on all supported hardware. Converts generic commands to actual device commands. Consists of definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines called by application programs. Developed in FORTRAN 77 for DEC VAX 11/780 or DEC VAX 11/750 computer under VMS 4.X.

  3. Auditory interfaces: The human perceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, H. Steven

    1991-01-01

    A brief introduction to the basic auditory abilities of the human perceiver with particular attention toward issues that may be important for the design of auditory interfaces is presented. The importance of appropriate auditory inputs to observers with normal hearing is probably related to the role of hearing as an omnidirectional, early warning system and to its role as the primary vehicle for communication of strong personal feelings.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  5. Multiple man-machine interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, L.; Cook, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple man machine interfaces inherent in military pilot training, their social implications, and the issue of possible negative feedback were explored. Modern technology has produced machines which can see, hear, and touch with greater accuracy and precision than human beings. Consequently, the military pilot is more a systems manager, often doing battle against a target he never sees. It is concluded that unquantifiable human activity requires motivation that is not intrinsic in a machine.

  6. Tire/runway friction interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  7. Software handlers for process interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercaw, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Process interfaces are developed in an effort to reduce the time, effort, and money required to install computer systems. Probably the chief obstacle to the achievement of these goals lies in the problem of developing software handlers having the same degree of generality and modularity as the hardware. The problem of combining the advantages of modular instrumentation with those of modern multitask operating systems has not been completely solved, but there are a number of promising developments. The essential principles involved are considered.

  8. Intelligence and culture: how culture shapes what intelligence means, and the implications for a science of well-being.

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Robert J; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between culture and intelligence. The main message of the paper is that intelligence cannot fully or even meaningfully be understood outside its cultural context. Behaviour that is considered intelligent in one culture may be considered unintelligent in another culture, and vice versa. Moreover, people in different cultures have different implicit (folk) theories of intelligence, so may not even mean the same thing by the word. The relationships between different aspects of intelligence can vary across cultures, with correlations that are positive in one setting proving to be negative in another. The paper opens with a general discussion of issues regarding the relationship between the two concepts. It then describes the theory of successful intelligence, which motivates our work on the interface between culture and intelligence. Finally, the article draws some conclusions. PMID:15347533

  9. Intelligence and culture: how culture shapes what intelligence means, and the implications for a science of well-being.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robert J; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2004-09-29

    This paper discusses the relationship between culture and intelligence. The main message of the paper is that intelligence cannot fully or even meaningfully be understood outside its cultural context. Behaviour that is considered intelligent in one culture may be considered unintelligent in another culture, and vice versa. Moreover, people in different cultures have different implicit (folk) theories of intelligence, so may not even mean the same thing by the word. The relationships between different aspects of intelligence can vary across cultures, with correlations that are positive in one setting proving to be negative in another. The paper opens with a general discussion of issues regarding the relationship between the two concepts. It then describes the theory of successful intelligence, which motivates our work on the interface between culture and intelligence. Finally, the article draws some conclusions. PMID:15347533

  10. Chiral magnetism at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Mohit

    2014-03-01

    There are tantalizing hints of magnetism at the n-type LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, but the experimental evidence remains controversial in view of some of the differences between different samples and probes. I will argue that if magnetism exists at interfaces, symmetry arguments imply chiral interactions that lead to a spiral ground state in zero external field and skyrmion crystals for H ≠ 0 . I will next present a microscopic model that provides a possible mechanism for the formation of local moments. I will show that the coupling of these moments to itinerant electrons leads to ferromagnetic double exchange together with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions and an easy-plane ``compass'' anisotropy, which arise from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) due to the lack of inversion symmetry at the interface. The compass term, often ignored in the literature on chiral magnetism, is shown to play a crucial role in determining the magnetic ground state. I will compare our results with existing torque magnetometry data on LAO/STO and try to reconcile it with scanning SQUID magnetometry. Finally, I will present the phase diagram in a field and show that easy-plane anisotropy stabilizes an unexpectedly large skyrmion crystal phase and describe its properties. (Work done in collaboration with Sumilan Banerjee, Onur Erten, Daniel Kestner and James Rowland). Supported by DOE-BES DE-SC0005035, NSF-DMR-1006532 and NSF MRSEC DMR-0820414.

  11. Detonation interaction with an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, D. H.; Shepherd, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Detonation interaction with an interface was investigated, where the interface separated a combustible from an oxidizing or inert mixture. The ethylene-oxygen combustible mixture had a fuel-rich composition to promote secondary combustion with the oxidizer in the turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) that resulted from the interaction. Sharp interfaces were created by using a nitro-cellulose membrane to separate the two mixtures. The membrane was mounted on a wood frame and inserted in the experimental test section at a 45° angle to the bulk flow direction. The membrane was destroyed by the detonation wave. The interaction resulted in a transmitted and reflected wave at a node point similar to regular shock refraction. A detonation refraction analysis was carried out to compare with the measured shock angles. It was observed that the measured angle is consistently lower than the predicted value. An uncertainty analysis revealed possible explanations for this systematic variation pointing to factors such as the incident wave curvature and the role of the nitro-cellulose diaphragm. Analysis of the TMZ and Mach stem formed from the reflection of the transmitted shock wave off the solid boundary were carried out and found to justify the size and strength of these features as a function of the test gas composition. The role of secondary combustion in the TMZ was also investigated and found to have a small influence on the wave structure.

  12. Revisiting cultural awareness and cultural relevancy.

    PubMed

    Abi-Hashem, Naji

    2015-10-01

    Comments on the original article by Christopher et al. (see record 2014-20055-001) regarding critical cultural awareness. The more insights and exploration of the meaning and influence of culture we receive, the better. There is no single treatment of any personal or collective culture(s) that can be inherently complete or totally exhaustive. New hermeneutics and skills are always needed, appreciated, and refreshing. PMID:26436315

  13. Microprocessor-based interface for oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Ocean floor imaging system incorporates five identical microprocessor-based interface units each assigned to specific sonar instrument to simplify system. Central control module based on same microprocessor eliminates need for custom tailoring hardware interfaces for each instrument.

  14. Formal specification of human-computer interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auernheimer, Brent

    1990-01-01

    A high-level formal specification of a human computer interface is described. Previous work is reviewed and the ASLAN specification language is described. Top-level specifications written in ASLAN for a library and a multiwindow interface are discussed.

  15. Reinventing the energy modelling-policy interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Neil; Fais, Birgit; Daly, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    Energy modelling has a crucial underpinning role for policy making, but the modelling-policy interface faces several limitations. A reinvention of this interface would better provide timely, targeted, tested, transparent and iterated insights from such complex multidisciplinary tools.

  16. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  17. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  18. Routine sputum culture

    MedlinePlus

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  19. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  20. Lymph node culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  1. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  2. Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian; Tulbert, Beth

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of culturally diverse students are discussed in terms of language, culture, and socioeconomic factors. Meeting the educational needs of culturally diverse students can involve interactive teaming of professionals; parent involvement; and providing appropriate services, assessment, curriculum, and instruction. (JDD)

  3. Popular Culture and English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Hilary Taylor

    1987-01-01

    Explores the origins and elements of popular culture--noting that English instruction and popular culture need not be mutually exclusive, and that selected materials from popular culture may serve goals of the English curriculum without compromising them. (NKA)

  4. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  5. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Valone, Steven M; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Germann, T. C.

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  6. Relaxation, Structure, and Properties of Semicoherent Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, S.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Materials containing a high density of interfaces are promising candidates for future energy technologies because interfaces acting as sources, sinks, and barriers for defects can improve mechanical and irradiation properties of materials. A semicoherent interface widely occurring in various materials is composed of a network of misfit dislocations and coherent regions separated by misfit dislocations. In this article, we review the relaxation mechanisms, structure, and properties of (111) semicoherent interfaces in face-centered cubic structures.

  7. INL Multi-Robot Control Interface

    2005-03-30

    The INL Multi-Robot Control Interface controls many robots through a single user interface. The interface includes a robot display window for each robot showing the robot’s condition. More than one window can be used depending on the number of robots. The user interface also includes a robot control window configured to receive commands for sending to the respective robot and a multi-robot common window showing information received from each robot.

  8. Interfaces in novel electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fude

    Materials are now an important constraint of Si-based devices. One of the most serious problems is now the field effect transistor (FET) gate dielectric. It is desirable to find high-K dielectrics to replace Si02 so that a physically thicker gate dielectric can be used and then the tunneling effect can be reduced or avoided. Very recently, more interest has been shown in the La-based materials. In this study, a main part of effort was put on amorphous LaScO3 and La2O3/SiO2 alloys grown on Si (001) substrate. We have demonstrated that amorphous high-K oxide layers can be deposited directly on Si substrate as gate dielectrics for CMOS devices. However, oxygen diffusion through the high-K layers and reaction with Si substrate increased the EOT and the interface roughness at 1000°C. So possible oxygen sources at 1000°C need to be eliminated. All these results give us a deep understanding about the promising La-based oxides as the next generation gate dielectric. Compared to the mature Si industry, III-nitrides had not earned a most respected place in modern devices until recently. Unlike silicon and other traditional materials, III-nitrides are particularly suitable for high-frequency, high-power and high-temperature applications. Unfortunately, the choice of appropriate substrate materials for III-nitrides is still one of the biggest issues to be solved. Sapphire offers a compromise as the most widely used substrate material to date. And much remains to be known about the interface structures and GaN inversion domain boundaries (IDBs). In this study, we tried to determine these interface structures and GaN-IDBs. To the GaN films on c-sapphire with a low temperature AIN (LT-AIN) nucleation layer, the interface atomic structure of LT-AIN on c-sapphire and the exact 3-D geometry of AIN pits were determined for the first time. The GaN IDBs were also studied in detail. A transition region with mixed polarities was found with the convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED

  9. Properties of interfaces of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanich, R. J.; Bergman, L.; Turner, K. F.; van der Weide, J.; Humphreys, T. P.

    1993-04-01

    Results related to two different interface aspects involving diamond are described: (1) the initial states of CVD diamond film growth, and (2) the negative electron affinity and formation of metal-diamond interfaces. The surface and interface properties are probed with STM, Raman scattering/photoluminescence and angle-resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS). STM measurements of diamond nuclei on Si after various plasma growth processes show both flat and hillocked structures characteristics of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional growth modes, respectively. STS measurements show distinct I- V characteristics of the nuclei and the substrate. The presence of optical defects and the diamond quality are studied with micro-Raman/photoluminescence measurements. The results indicate an increased density of impurity-related defects during the initial stages of growth. The interface properties of Ti on natural crystal (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) surfaces are studied with ARUPS using 21.2 eV HeI emission. Prior to deposition the diamond (1 1 1) is chemically cleaned, and a sharp (0.5 eV FWHM) peak is observed at the position of the conduction band minimum, indicating a negative electron affinity surface. After a subsequent argon plasma clean this peak disappears, while the spectrum shows a shift of 0.5 eV towards higher energies. Upon sub-monolayer titanium deposition on (1 1 1) diamond, the negative electron affinity peak reappears. Further titanium depositions causes this titanium-induced negative electron affinity peak to be attenuated, indicating that the emission originates from the interface. A similar experiment, done on the diamond (1 0 0) surface, however, does not result in a negative electron affinity. By determining the relative positions of the diamond valence band edge and the titanium Fermi level, the Schottky barrier height of titanium on diamond is measured. A model, based on the Schottky barrier height of titanium on diamond, and the work function of titanium, is

  10. Towards automation of user interface design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gastner, Rainer; Kraetzschmar, Gerhard K.; Lutz, Ernst

    1992-01-01

    This paper suggests an approach to automatic software design in the domain of graphical user interfaces. There are still some drawbacks in existing user interface management systems (UIMS's) which basically offer only quantitative layout specifications via direct manipulation. Our approach suggests a convenient way to get a default graphical user interface which may be customized and redesigned easily in further prototyping cycles.

  11. Properties of interfaces and transport across them.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, H

    2000-01-01

    Much of the biological activity in cell cytoplasm occurs in compartments some of which may be formed, as suggested in this book, by phase separation, and many of the functions of such compartments depend on the transport or exchange of molecules across interfaces. Thus a fundamentally based discussion of the properties of phases, interfaces, and diffusive transport across interfaces has been given to further elucidate these phenomena. An operational criterion for the width of interfaces is given in terms of molecular and physical arguments, and the properties of molecules inside phases and interfaces are discussed in terms of molecular arguments. In general, the properties of the interface become important when the molecules diffusing across are smaller than the width of the interface. Equilibrium partitioning, Donnan phenomena, and electrochemical potentials at interfaces are also discussed in detail. The mathematical expressions for modeling transport across interfaces are discussed in detail. These describe a practical and detailed model for transport across interfaces. For molecules smaller than the width of the interface, this includes a detailed model for diffusion inside the interface. Last, the question of the time scale for phase formation and equilibration in biological systems is discussed. PMID:10610364

  12. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  13. Indigenous Research: Three Researchers Reflect on Their Experiences at the Interface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minniecon, Deanne; Franks, Naomi; Heffernan, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Utilising Nakata's (2007) description of the "cultural interface", two Indigenous researchers and one non-Indigenous researcher examine their development of Indigenous research in and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities conducted from within an institution of higher education. The authors reflect on their experiences in…

  14. Interface solitons in thermal nonlinear media

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xuekai; Yang Zhenjun; Lu Daquan; Hu Wei

    2011-05-15

    We demonstrate the existence of fundamental and dipole interface solitons in one-dimensional thermal nonlinear media with a step in linear refractive index. Fundamental interface solitons are found to be always stable and the stability of dipole interface solitons depends on the difference in linear refractive index. The mass center of interface solitons always locates in the side with higher refractive index. The two intensity peaks of dipole interface solitons are unequal except under some specific conditions, which is different from their counterparts in uniform thermal nonlinear media.

  15. Intelligent subsystem interface for modular hardware system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krening, Douglas N. (Inventor); Lannan, Gregory B. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneiderwind, Robert A. (Inventor); Caffrey, Robert T. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A single chip application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which provides a flexible, modular interface between a subsystem and a standard system bus. The ASIC includes a microcontroller/microprocessor, a serial interface for connection to the bus, and a variety of communications interface devices available for coupling to the subsystem. A three-bus architecture, utilizing arbitration, provides connectivity within the ASIC and between the ASIC and the subsystem. The communication interface devices include UART (serial), parallel, analog, and external device interface utilizing bus connections paired with device select signals. A low power (sleep) mode is provided as is a processor disable option.

  16. TAXI Interface Demultiplexes Proprietarily Formatted Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newnan, Bruce G.; Ahiport, Steven F.

    2001-01-01

    The 'TAXI Direct-to-Disk' interface is a special purpose interface unit for demultiplexing of data from a Racal Storeplex (or equivalent) multichannel recorder onto one or more hard disks that reside in, and/or are controlled by, a personal computer (PC). The acronym 'TAXI' signifies transparent asynchronous transceiver interface. The TAXI interface was developed for original use in capturing data from instrumentation on a test stand in a NASA rocket testing facility. The installation of the TAXI interface, in conjunction with other modifications, causes the transfer of data to take place in real time, so that the data are immediately available for review during or after the test.

  17. Transient aspects of stream interface signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, N.U.; Shodhan, S.; Forsyth, R.J.; Burton, M.E.; Gosling, J.T.; Fitzenreiter, R.J.; Lepping, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    Although stream interfaces are steady-state, corotating boundaries between slow and fast solar wind, their signatures are sometimes associated with transient features. Here the authors illustrate two modes of association: interfaces trailing interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) at 1 AU and interfaces within ICMEs in the range 4--5 AU. The former are readily understood as boundaries between transient slow wind and steady-state fast wind, where the ICMEs add variability to the interface signatures. The latter are puzzling and may be related to evolution of interfaces.

  18. Dislocation punching from ceramic/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taya, M. ); Mori, T. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    Relaxation of misfit strains at interfaces between two different materials by dislocation punching is studied analytically by focusing on two types of interfaces: planar and nonplanar. As an example of planar type interface, the case of metal coating/ceramic substrate system is studied while ceramic filler/metal matrix composite system is examined as an example of a nonplanar interface. Based on the present analytical model, the condition for dislocation punching for each interface is established. Validity of the dislocation punching model is verified by comparing the analytical results with limited experimental results, resulting in a good agreement.

  19. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Indira

    Thermal interfaces are key to ensure the reliable performance of many semiconductor, energy and electronic systems. High thermal conductivity (k), low elastic modulus (E) interface materials are required to dissipate heat and relieve thermo-mechanical stresses. The aim of this thesis is to develop compliant, high k nanocomposite materials for thermal interface applications utilizing nanostructured networks. Realizing high k nanocomposites is a challenge because of difficulties in incorporating high fractions of uniformly dispersed nanofillers and countering low filler-matrix interfacial conductance, while retaining a low elastic modulus. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that these issues are obviated by using < 5 volume % sub-10-nm cold welded gold nanowire fillers to obtain an unprecedented 30-fold increase in polydimethylsiloxane thermal conductivity that is 6-fold higher than previously reported nanocomposites at low nanofiller loadings and exceeds theoretical predictions. The nanowire diameter and aspect ratio are key to obtain cold-welded networks that enhance k at low filler fractions, while fostering low E. Along with high k, tailoring high thermal contact conductance G c is crucial for many applications. This thesis reveals a critical correlation between the rheological behavior of a high k gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its thermal contact conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite k is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in Gc. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize heterointerfaces with nanowire filled high k nanocomposite materials. Another important finding of this thesis is that nanowire networks can result in mechanical

  20. Culture and Chronic Illness: Raising Children with Disabling Conditions in a Culturally Diverse World. Papers presented at an Invitational Conference (Racine, Wisconsin, June 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pediatrics, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special supplement presents two background papers, three working papers, and key recommendations from a conference on culture and chronic illness in childhood. The meeting had as its goal the identification of the state of knowledge on the interface among culture, chronic illness, child development, and family functioning, for the purpose of…

  1. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  2. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Helmholtz solitons at nonlinear interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Curto, J; Chamorro-Posada, P; McDonald, G S

    2007-05-01

    Reflection and refraction of spatial solitons at dielectric interfaces, accommodating arbitrarily angles of incidence, is studied. Analysis is based on Helmholtz soliton theory, which eliminates the angular restriction associated with the paraxial approximation. A novel generalization of Snell's law is discovered that is valid for collimated light beams and the entire angular domain. Our new theoretical predictions are shown to be in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations. New qualitative features of soliton refraction and limitations of previous paraxial analyses are highlighted. PMID:17410257

  4. Avalanche dynamics of elastic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Slowly driven elastic interfaces, such as domain walls in dirty magnets, contact lines wetting a nonhomogeneous substrate, or cracks in brittle disordered material proceed via intermittent motion, called avalanches. Here we develop a field-theoretic treatment to calculate, from first principles, the space-time statistics of instantaneous velocities within an avalanche. For elastic interfaces at (or above) their (internal) upper critical dimension d≥d(uc) (d(uc)=2,4 respectively for long-ranged and short-ranged elasticity) we show that the field theory for the center of mass reduces to the motion of a point particle in a random-force landscape, which is itself a random walk [Alessandro, Beatrice, Bertotti, and Montorsi (ABBM) model]. Furthermore, the full spatial dependence of the velocity correlations is described by the Brownian-force model (BFM) where each point of the interface sees an independent Brownian-force landscape. Both ABBM and BFM can be solved exactly in any dimension d (for monotonous driving) by summing tree graphs, equivalent to solving a (nonlinear) instanton equation. We focus on the limit of slow uniform driving. This tree approximation is the mean-field theory (MFT) for realistic interfaces in short-ranged disorder, up to the renormalization of two parameters at d=d(uc). We calculate a number of observables of direct experimental interest: Both for the center of mass, and for a given Fourier mode q, we obtain various correlations and probability distribution functions (PDF's) of the velocity inside an avalanche, as well as the avalanche shape and its fluctuations (second shape). Within MFT we find that velocity correlations at nonzero q are asymmetric under time reversal. Next we calculate, beyond MFT, i.e., including loop corrections, the one-time PDF of the center-of-mass velocity u[over ·] for dimension d

  5. EXPRESS Pallet Payload Interface Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Alan C.

    2004-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the EXPRESS Pallet Space Station payload interface requirements is shown. The topics include: 1) External Payload Sites; 2) EXPRESS Pallet with Six Payload Envelopes; 3) EXPRESS Pallet in Payload Bay Representative Layout; 4) EXPRESS Pallet Installation SSRMS positions pallet for PAS mating on S3 truss; 5) EXPRESS Pallet Major Components; 6) EXPRESS Pallet Adapter; 7) EXPRESS Pallet Center Location Payload Envelope; 8) Envelope Restriction for EXPRESS Pallet Corner Payload Locations; 9) EXPRESS Pallet-PAS Truss Configuration; and 10) EXPRESS Pallet Payload Services and Specifications.

  6. Praxis input/output interface

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, R.E.; Evans, A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This document is intended as an introduction to the use of RMS facilities via Praxis (this interface hereafter called Praxis-RMS). It is presumed that the reader is familiar with Praxis conventions as well as with RMS use (at the MACRO level). Since Praxis-RMS was designed to be functionally equivalent to MACRO-RMS, the explanations follow the pattern of the DEC MACRO-RMS documentation (particularly the programmer's reference manual). A complete list of the procedures that make up Praxis-RMS appears at the end of this document (with parameters), along with the constants (grouped by type) that can be used as actual parameters.

  7. Gloved Human-Machine Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard (Inventor); Olowin, Aaron (Inventor); Hannaford, Blake (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Certain exemplary embodiments can provide a system, machine, device, manufacture, circuit, composition of matter, and/or user interface adapted for and/or resulting from, and/or a method and/or machine-readable medium comprising machine-implementable instructions for, activities that can comprise and/or relate to: tracking movement of a gloved hand of a human; interpreting a gloved finger movement of the human; and/or in response to interpreting the gloved finger movement, providing feedback to the human.

  8. The patient-sensor interface

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, G. S.

    1970-01-01

    During the assessment of monitoring equipment on acute medical cases in a general ward, a quantitative investigation of technical faults revealed that 44% of these occurred at the patient-sensor interface. While the attachment of the equipment was accepted by the patient and was suitable for application by nursing staff, this degree of technical breakdown indicates that more progress is necessary in the design of this aspect of monitoring equipment before it is possible to have a reliable system. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5476136

  9. Gestural interfaces for immersive environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolis, Todd

    2014-02-01

    We are witnessing an explosion of new forms of Human Computer Interaction devices lately for both laboratory research and home use. With these new affordance in user interfaces (UI), how can gestures be used to improve interaction for large scale immersive display environments. Through the investigation of full body, head and hand tracking, this paper will discuss various modalities of gesture recognition and compare their usability to other forms of interactivity. We will explore a specific implementation of hand gesture tracking within a large tiled display environment for use with common collaborative media interaction activities.

  10. Physical significance of interfaces on fracture growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.; Guo, Q. )

    1993-08-01

    Details of the interfaces between two geologic materials are normally neglected in predicting the growth of hydraulic fractures. In addition, perfect bonding is assumed across the interface. However, due to a combination of reasons, the perfect bonding assumption is violated to various degrees. Assessment for potential slippage is important to fracture-growth modeling. As a fracture approaches an interface, both mode I (for a fracture crossing the interface) and mode II (for a fracture extending in the interface) stress-intensity factors need to be evaluated. Should the interface properties be such that the mode I stress-intensity factor reach the critical value, the fracture will cross the interface. Should the converse happen and the mode II stress-intensity factor become critical, slippage along the interface will occur. If both the critical stress intensity factors are reached simultaneously, both fractures across the interface and slippage will occur. Good description of the interface material is needed to model the fracturing process. Methodology to model the physical significance of interfaces for calculating two-dimensional fracture growth includes descriptions of applications to oil/gas recovery and the injection of contaminants in isolated formations.

  11. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  12. Cultural Energy & Grassroots Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleymeyer, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses how cultural vitality drives successful community development. Links cultural, community, and environmental values. Examines successes and failures of programs attempting to link culture and development in Panama, Ecuador, and Colombia. Examines role of cultural self-examination for creating new development paradigm. Examines prospects…

  13. Developing Cultural Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matikainen, Tiina; Duffy, Carolyn B.

    2000-01-01

    Provides ways of developing students' awareness of cultural patterns among the different cultures of the world. Describes a lesson in which students learn about basic attitudes different cultures have toward three cultural value dimensions: the role of the individual in society, power distance, and time orientation. (Author/VWL)

  14. The Concept of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, John

    1987-01-01

    National identity and schooling are predicated on a particular yet ill-defined view of culture. To counter "popular" and "high" culture polarizations and arguments for cultural pluralism, this paper proposes that curricula be designed for student access to forms and symbols defining Australian culture through discourse and artistic…

  15. HPT: The Culture Factor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Roger M.; Wittkuhn, Klaus D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the challenges in managing performance across national cultures and within changing corporate cultures. Describes two human performance technology tools that can help performance consultants understand different cultures and provide the basis for successful management action: the culture audit and the systems model that can be adapted…

  16. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Many teachers have only a cursory understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy, and their efforts to bridge the cultural gap often fall short. Culturally relevant pedagogy is a term that describes effective teaching in culturally diverse classrooms. It can be a daunting idea to understand and implement. Yet people tend to appreciate culturally…

  17. Many Forms of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  18. Does Culture Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Objects to current preoccupations with culture (particularly race) in psychology and education, suggesting that it is unethical to let culture influence decision making. Notes the paucity of empirical evidence of statistical interactions between treatment and culture in psychotherapy or teaching and culture in education. Concludes that without…

  19. Popular Culture and Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ray B., Ed.; Ambrosetti, Ronald J., Ed.

    The seven essays in this publication, including four read at the fall 1969 American Studies Association meeting, attempt to present both the nature of popular culture study and a guide for teachers of popular culture courses. Papers are (1) "Popular Culture: Notes toward a Definition" by Ray B. Browne; (2) "Can Popular Culture Save American…

  20. The interactive digital video interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    A frequent complaint in the computer oriented trade journals is that current hardware technology is progressing so quickly that software developers cannot keep up. A example of this phenomenon can be seen in the field of microcomputer graphics. To exploit the advantages of new mechanisms of information storage and retrieval, new approaches must be made towards incorporating existing programs as well as developing entirely new applications. A particular area of need is the correlation of discrete image elements to textural information. The interactive digital video (IDV) interface embodies a new concept in software design which addresses these needs. The IDV interface is a patented device and language independent process for identifying image features on a digital video display and which allows a number of different processes to be keyed to that identification. Its capabilities include the correlation of discrete image elements to relevant text information and the correlation of these image features to other images as well as to program control mechanisms. Sophisticated interrelationships can be set up between images, text, and program control mechanisms.

  1. Probing the Buried Magnetic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqing; Zhou, Qionghua; Chen, Qian; Niu, Daxin; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jinlan; van der Laan, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Understanding magnetism in ferromagnetic metal/semiconductor (FM/SC) heterostructures is important to the development of the new-generation spin field-effect transistor. Here, we report an element-specific X-ray magnetic circular dichroism study of the interfacial magnetic moments for two FM/SC model systems, namely, Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, which was enabled using a specially designed FM1/FM2/SC superstructure. We observed a robust room temperature magnetization of the interfacial Co, while that of the interfacial Ni was strongly diminished down to 5 K because of hybridization of the Ni d(eg) and GaAs sp(3) states. The validity of the selected method was confirmed by first-principles calculations, showing only small deviations (<0.02 and <0.07 μB/atom for Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, respectively) compared to the real FM/SC interfaces. Our work proved that the electronic structure and magnetic ground state of the interfacial FM2 is not altered when the topmost FM2 is replaced by FM1 and that this model is applicable generally for probing the buried magnetic interfaces in the advanced spintronic materials.. PMID:26887429

  2. Continuous Liquid Interface Production (CLIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumbleston, John

    Continuous liquid interface production (CLIP) can rapidly produce 3D parts using a range of polymeric materials. A DLP-based form of additive manufacturing, CLIP proceeds via projecting a sequence of UV images through an oxygen-permeable, UV-transparent window below a liquid resin bath. A thin uncured liquid layer, or dead zone, is created above the window and maintains a liquid interface below the advancing part. Above the dead zone, the curing part is drawn out of the resin bath creating suction forces that renew reactive liquid resin. The dead zone is created due to oxygen inhibition of photopolymerization, a process that is traditionally a nuisance in other photopolymerization applications. However, for CLIP oxygen inhibition and creation of the dead zone allows for a continuous mode of printing where UV exposure, resin renewal, and part elevation are conducted simultaneously. This continual process is fundamentally different from traditional bottom-up stereolithography printers where these steps must be conducted in separate and discrete steps. Furthermore, the relatively gentle nature of CLIP due to the established dead zone enables the use of unique materials with a wide range of mechanical properties. This presentation will showcase the CLIP technology and provide a detailed picture of interactions between different resin and process parameters. New applications for 3D printing that span the micro- to macro-scale enabled by CLIP's combination of unique materials and part production speed will also be presented.

  3. Brain Computer Interfaces, a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas-Alonso, Luis Fernando; Gomez-Gil, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a hardware and software communications system that permits cerebral activity alone to control computers or external devices. The immediate goal of BCI research is to provide communications capabilities to severely disabled people who are totally paralyzed or ‘locked in’ by neurological neuromuscular disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brain stem stroke, or spinal cord injury. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of BCIs, looking at the different steps that form a standard BCI: signal acquisition, preprocessing or signal enhancement, feature extraction, classification and the control interface. We discuss their advantages, drawbacks, and latest advances, and we survey the numerous technologies reported in the scientific literature to design each step of a BCI. First, the review examines the neuroimaging modalities used in the signal acquisition step, each of which monitors a different functional brain activity such as electrical, magnetic or metabolic activity. Second, the review discusses different electrophysiological control signals that determine user intentions, which can be detected in brain activity. Third, the review includes some techniques used in the signal enhancement step to deal with the artifacts in the control signals and improve the performance. Fourth, the review studies some mathematic algorithms used in the feature extraction and classification steps which translate the information in the control signals into commands that operate a computer or other device. Finally, the review provides an overview of various BCI applications that control a range of devices. PMID:22438708

  4. Body language user interface (BLUI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Arthur W.; Olmsted, Coert

    1998-07-01

    We analyze a 3D skeletal representation of the user in spatial and temporal domains as a tool necessary to recognizing the gestures of drawing, picking and grabbing. The mechanisms of visual perception that are called upon in the imaginative process of artistic creation use those same tactile and kinesthetic pathways and structures in the brain which are employed when we manipulate the 3D world. We see, in fact, with our sensual bodies as well as with our eyes. Our interface is built on an analysis of pointing and gesturing and how they related to the perception of form in space. We report on our progress in implementing a body language user interface for artistic computer interaction, i.e., an human/computer interaction based on an analysis of how an artist uses her body in the act of creation. Using two synchronous TV cameras, we have videotaped an environment into which an artist moves, assumes a canonical (Da Vinci) pose and subsequently makes a series of simple gestures. The video images are processed to generate an animated 3D skeleton that corresponds to the skeleton of the artist. The locus of the path taken by the drawing hand is the source of a trace of particles. Our presentation shows the two simultaneous videos, the associated animated 3D skeleton, that skeleton as an instance of motion capture for a constrained model of a human skeleton and the trace of the path taken by the drawing hand.

  5. Micromachined devices for interfacing neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Beutel, Hansjoerg; Blau, Cornelia; Meyer, Joerg-Uwe

    1998-07-01

    Micromachining technologies were established to fabricate microelectrode arrays and devices for interfacing parts of the central or peripheral nervous system. The devices were part of a neural prosthesis that allows simultaneous multichannel recording and multisite stimulation of neurons. Overcoming the brittle mechanics of silicon devices and challenging housing demands close to the nerve we established a process technology to fabricate light-weighted and highly flexible polyimide based devices. Platinum and iridium thin-film electrodes were embedded in the polyimide. With reactive ion etching we got the possibility to simply integrate interconnections and to form nearly arbitrary outer shapes of the devices. We designed multichannel devices with up to 24 electrodes in the shape of plates, hooks and cuffs for different applications. In vitro tests exhibited stable electrode properties and no cytotoxicity of the materials and the devices. Sieve electrodes were chronically implanted in rats to interface the regenerating sciatic nerve. After six months, recordings and stimulation of the nerve via electrodes on the micro-device proved functional reinnervation of the limb. Concentric circular structures were designed for a retina implant for the blind. In preliminary studies in rabbits, evoked potentials in the visual cortex corresponded to stimulation sites of the implant.

  6. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine. PMID:19535562

  7. Interfacing neurons with carbon nanotubes: (re)engineering neuronal signaling.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Cellot, Giada; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylindrically shaped nanostructures made by sheets of graphene rolled up to form hollow tubes. Owing to their unique range of thermal, electronic, and structural properties, CNTs have been rapidly developing as a technology platform for biological and medical applications, including those designed to develop novel neuro-implantable devices. Depending on their structure, CNTs combine an incredible strength with an extreme flexibility. Further, these materials exhibit physical and chemical properties which allow them to efficiently conduit electrical current in electrochemical interfaces. CNTs can be organized in scaffolds made up of small fibers or tubes with diameters similar to those of neural processes such as axons and dendrites. Recently, CNT scaffolds have been found to promote growth, differentiation, and survival of neurons and to modify their electrophysiological properties. These features make CNTs an attractive material for the design of nano-bio hybrid systems able to govern cell-specific behaviors in cultured neuronal networks. The leading scope of this short review is to highlight how nanotube scaffolds can impact on neuronal signaling ability. In particular, we will focus on the direct and specific interactions between this synthetic nanomaterial and biological cell membranes, and on the ability of CNTs to improve interfaces developed to record or to stimulate neuronal activity. CNTs hold the potential for the development of innovative nanomaterial-based neurological implants. Therefore, it is particularly relevant to improve our knowledge on the impact on neuronal performance of interfacing nerve cells with CNTs. PMID:21867808

  8. Cultural Approaches to Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article first introduces some main ideas behind culture and parenting and next addresses philosophical rationales and methodological considerations central to cultural approaches to parenting, including a brief account of a cross-cultural study of parenting. It then focuses on universals, specifics, and distinctions between form (behavior) and function (meaning) in parenting as embedded in culture. The article concludes by pointing to social policy implications as well as future directions prompted by a cultural approach to parenting. PMID:22962544

  9. [Charge generation and separation at liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenthal, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    The research is divided into 3 parts: (1)Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) and Monolayer Structure. Picosecond lasers are combined by difference frequency mixing in a nonlinear crystal to generate picosecond, tunable IR pulses, which are used to study orientation of C[double bond]N and CD[sub 3] chromosphores (head group and tail) on lipid monolayers CD[sub 3](CH[sub 2])[sub 21]CN at air/water interface. (2)Femtosecond Dynamics. The femtosecond colliding pulse mode locked laser is being modified to carry out pump-second harmonic (SH) probe studies at liquid interfaces. Picosecond SH knowhow of intermolecular energy transfer, excited state isomerization, and rotational motions at interfaces is now being applied to femtosecond scale. Aromatics adsorbed at air/water interface, generated changes in SH probe signal and their decay back to original value. If the laser is tightly focussed at interface, multiphoton absorption processes occur which destroy the sample; this effect will be exploited. (3)Interface Potential and Acid-Base Equilibria. The interface potential is a key to charge transport; using SHG, we plan to measure the pKa of organic acids at interfaces. In these studies at silica/aqueous interface, the water molecules extending from the interface into the bulk (about 50[Angstrom]) were strongly polarized by SiO[sup [minus

  10. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Indira

    Thermal interfaces are key to ensure the reliable performance of many semiconductor, energy and electronic systems. High thermal conductivity (k), low elastic modulus (E) interface materials are required to dissipate heat and relieve thermo-mechanical stresses. The aim of this thesis is to develop compliant, high k nanocomposite materials for thermal interface applications utilizing nanostructured networks. Realizing high k nanocomposites is a challenge because of difficulties in incorporating high fractions of uniformly dispersed nanofillers and countering low filler-matrix interfacial conductance, while retaining a low elastic modulus. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that these issues are obviated by using < 5 volume % sub-10-nm cold welded gold nanowire fillers to obtain an unprecedented 30-fold increase in polydimethylsiloxane thermal conductivity that is 6-fold higher than previously reported nanocomposites at low nanofiller loadings and exceeds theoretical predictions. The nanowire diameter and aspect ratio are key to obtain cold-welded networks that enhance k at low filler fractions, while fostering low E. Along with high k, tailoring high thermal contact conductance G c is crucial for many applications. This thesis reveals a critical correlation between the rheological behavior of a high k gold-nanowire-filled polydimethylsiloxane nanocomposite and its thermal contact conductance with copper. At a critical filler fraction, an abrupt increase in the nanocomposite k is accompanied by a liquid-solid transition and a multifold decrease in Gc. These concurrent changes are attributed to nanowire percolation network formation and pre-cure polymer gelation that inhibits the formation of conformal void-free interfaces. These findings will be important for designing processing sequences to realize heterointerfaces with nanowire filled high k nanocomposite materials. Another important finding of this thesis is that nanowire networks can result in mechanical

  11. In vitro generation of a multilayered osteochondral construct with an osteochondral interface using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and a silk peptide-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Shi, Pujiang; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Ch

    2016-04-01

    Tissue engineering of a biological osteochondral multilayered construct with a cartilage-interface subchondral bone layer is a key challenge. This study presented a rabbit bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/silk fibroin scaffold-based co-culture approach to generate tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts with an interface. BMSC-seeded scaffolds were first cultured separately in osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation media. The two differentiated pieces were then combined using an RADA self-assembling peptide and subsequently co-cultured. Gene expression, histological and biochemical analyses were used to evaluate the multilayered structure of the osteochondral graft. A complete osteochondral construct with a cartilage-subchondral bone interface was regenerated and BMSCs were used as the only cell source for the osteochondral construct and interface regeneration. Furthermore, in the intermediate region of co-cultured samples, hypertrophic chondrogenic gene markers type X collagen and MMP-13 were found on both chondrogenic and osteogenic section edges after co-culture. However, significant differences gene expression profile were found in distinct zones of the construct during co-culture and the section in the intermediate region had significantly higher hypertrophic chondrocyte gene expression. Biochemical analyses and histology results further supported this observation. This study showed that specific stimulation from osteogenic and chondrogenic BMSCs affected each other in this co-culture system and induced the formation of an osteochondral interface. Moreover, this system provided a possible approach for generating multilayered osteochondral constructs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23413023

  12. Music Teaching as Culture: Introducing the "Pontes" Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Alda

    2005-01-01

    The "pontes" (bridges) approach may be viewed as a teaching guide for action in music education. It may help music teachers to articulate the different aspects that surround the teaching-learning process, especially those related to cultural interfaces, such as: the student's personal characteristics, the elements and essence of the sociocultural…

  13. Voice knowledge acquisition system for the management of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Château, Stefan; Boulanger, Danielle; Mercier-Laurent, Eunika

    This document presents our work on a definition and experimentation of a voice interface for cultural heritage inventory. This hybrid system includes signal processing, natural language techniques and knowledge modeling for future retrieval. We discuss the first results and give some points on future work.

  14. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer. PMID:26100908

  15. Tactual interfaces: The human perceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    Increasingly complex human-machine interactions, such as in teleoperation or in virtual environments, have necessitated the optimal use of the human tactual channel for information transfer. This need leads to a demand for a basic understanding of how the human tactual system works, so that the tactual interface between the human and the machine can receive the command signals from the human, as well as display the information to the human, in a manner that appears natural to the human. The tactual information consists of two components: (1) contact information which specifies the nature of direct contact with the object; and (2) kinesthetic information which refers to the position and motion of the limbs. This paper is mostly concerned with contact information.

  16. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung -Geun; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr₀̣.₂Ti₀.₈O₃-LaNiO₃ where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, inmore » one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  17. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    PubMed

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD. PMID:25300121

  18. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  19. Kinetic interfaces of patchy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N. A. M.; Dias, C. S.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    We study the irreversible adsorption of patchy particles on substrates in the limit of advective mass transport. Recent numerical results show that the interface roughening depends strongly on the particle attributes, such as, patch-patch correlations, bond flexibility and strength of the interactions, uncovering new absorbing phase transitions. Here, we revisit these results and discuss in detail the transitions. In particular, we present new evidence that the tricritical point, observed in systems of particles with flexible patches, is in the tricritical directed percolation universality class. A scaling analysis of the time evolution of the correlation length for the aggregation of patchy particles with distinct bonding energies confirms that the critical regime is in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang with quenched disorder universality class.

  20. Kinetic interfaces of patchy particles.

    PubMed

    Araújo, N A M; Dias, C S; Telo da Gama, M M

    2015-05-20

    We study the irreversible adsorption of patchy particles on substrates in the limit of advective mass transport. Recent numerical results show that the interface roughening depends strongly on the particle attributes, such as, patch-patch correlations, bond flexibility and strength of the interactions, uncovering new absorbing phase transitions. Here, we revisit these results and discuss in detail the transitions. In particular, we present new evidence that the tricritical point, observed in systems of particles with flexible patches, is in the tricritical directed percolation universality class. A scaling analysis of the time evolution of the correlation length for the aggregation of patchy particles with distinct bonding energies confirms that the critical regime is in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang with quenched disorder universality class. PMID:25923051

  1. Optical to optical interface device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, D. S.; Vohl, P.; Nisenson, P.

    1972-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary model of an optical-to-optical (noncoherent-to-coherent) interface device for use in coherent optical parallel processing systems are described. The developed device demonstrates a capability for accepting as an input a scene illuminated by a noncoherent radiation source and providing as an output a coherent light beam spatially modulated to represent the original noncoherent scene. The converter device developed under this contract employs a Pockels readout optical modulator (PROM). This is a photosensitive electro-optic element which can sense and electrostatically store optical images. The stored images can be simultaneously or subsequently readout optically by utilizing the electrostatic storage pattern to control an electro-optic light modulating property of the PROM. The readout process is parallel as no scanning mechanism is required. The PROM provides the functions of optical image sensing, modulation, and storage in a single active material.

  2. General purpose intelligent sensor interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an intelligent sensor system that will simplify the design and development of expert systems that use sensors of physical phenomena as a source of input data. This phase of the research concentrated on the integration of image processing sensors with expert system environments. The anticipated result of this research is the ability to design systems in which the user will not need to be an expert in such areas as image processing algorithms, local area networks, image processor hardware selection or interfacing, or television cameras selection. The user will be able to access data from video sensors through standard expert system statements without any need to know about the sensor hardware or software.

  3. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam–Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer. PMID:26100908

  4. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung -Geun; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr₀̣.₂Ti₀.₈O₃-LaNiO₃ where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  5. Development of a simulated smart pump interface.

    PubMed

    Elias, Beth L; Moss, Jacqueline A; Shih, Alan; Dillavou, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Medical device user interfaces are increasingly complex, resulting in a need for evaluation in clinicallyaccurate settings. Simulation of these interfaces can allow for evaluation, training, and use for research without the risk of harming patients and with a significant cost reduction over using the actual medical devices. This pilot project was phase 1 of a study to define and evaluate a methodology for development of simulated medical device interface technology to be used for education, device development, and research. Digital video and audio recordings of interface interactions were analyzed to develop a model of a smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface. This model was used to program a high-fidelity simulated smart intravenous medication infusion pump user interface on an inexpensive netbook platform. PMID:24189715

  6. Network interface unit design options performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is presented of three design options for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) onboard Data Management System (DMS) Network Interface Unit (NIU). The NIU provides the interface from the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) local area network (LAN) to the DMS processing elements. The FDDI LAN provides the primary means for command and control and low and medium rate telemetry data transfers on board the SSF. The results of this analysis provide the basis for the implementation of the NIU.

  7. Moment of Fluid Interface Reconstruction with Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Jemison, Matthew B.

    2012-08-15

    A moving system made up of multiple fluids (e.g. air and water) may be defined by an evolving interface with a changing topology. MOF uses a piecewise linear interface reconstruction to numerically model deforming boundaries. Given a volume fraction V and reference centroid x for a material in cell {Omega}, we seek to find an interface {Gamma} that exactly captures V and minimizes error in x. This differs from Volume of Fluid methods.

  8. New User Interface Capabilities for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Latest technologies promise new control system User Interface (UI) features and greater interoperability of applications. New developments using Java and Eclipse aim to unify diverse control systems and make communication between applications seamless. Web based user interfaces can improve portability and remote access. Modern programming tools improve efficiency, support testing and facilitate shared code. This paper will discuss new developments aimed at improving control system interfaces and their development environment.

  9. Small computer interface to a stepper motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Fred A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A Commodore VIC-20 computer has been interfaced with a stepper motor to provide an inexpensive stepper motor controller. Only eight transistors and two integrated circuits compose the interface. The software controls the parallel interface of the computer and provides the four phase drive signals for the motor. Optical sensors control the zeroing of the 12-inch turntable positioned by the controller. The computer calculates the position information and movement of the table and may be programmed in BASIC to execute automatic sequences.

  10. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOEpatents

    Coffland, Douglas R.

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  11. Recent work on material interface reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Mosso, S.J.; Swartz, B.K.

    1997-12-31

    For the last 15 years, many Eulerian codes have relied on a series of piecewise linear interface reconstruction algorithms developed by David Youngs. In a typical Youngs` method, the material interfaces were reconstructed based upon nearly cell values of volume fractions of each material. The interfaces were locally represented by linear segments in two dimensions and by pieces of planes in three dimensions. The first step in such reconstruction was to locally approximate an interface normal. In Youngs` 3D method, a local gradient of a cell-volume-fraction function was estimated and taken to be the local interface normal. A linear interface was moved perpendicular to the now known normal until the mass behind it matched the material volume fraction for the cell in question. But for distorted or nonorthogonal meshes, the gradient normal estimate didn`t accurately match that of linear material interfaces. Moreover, curved material interfaces were also poorly represented. The authors will present some recent work in the computation of more accurate interface normals, without necessarily increasing stencil size. Their estimate of the normal is made using an iterative process that, given mass fractions for nearby cells of known but arbitrary variable density, converges in 3 or 4 passes in practice (and quadratically--like Newton`s method--in principle). The method reproduces a linear interface in both orthogonal and nonorthogonal meshes. The local linear approximation is generally 2nd-order accurate, with a 1st-order accurate normal for curved interfaces in both two and three dimensional polyhedral meshes. Recent work demonstrating the interface reconstruction for curved surfaces will /be discussed.

  12. Cultural Molding: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module introduces the student to cultural molding, the idea that most human behavior can be traced to enculturation and exposure rather than to a socio-biological explanation of human behavior. Following a brief description of socialization,…

  13. Cultural Literacy: Negotiating Language, Culture, and Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ellen Riojas; Flores, Belinda Bustos

    2007-01-01

    Our schools see increasing numbers of students who reflect the wide diversity of this country's population, but too often these differences--culture, language, socioeconomic backgrounds, ethnicity are viewed from negative or deficit perspectives when they are, in fact, the cultural capital that enriches discussion, broadens viewpoints, and…

  14. 75 FR 57081 - Revised Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...On November 6, 2009, the NRC published a draft policy statement,'' Safety Culture Policy Statement,'' in the Federal Register (FRN) (74 FR 57525; NRC ADAMS Accession Number ML093030375).\\1\\ The Statement of Policy (SOP) contained in the FRN focuses on the interface of nuclear safety and security in a positive safety culture, and highlights the Commission's expectation that all licensees and......

  15. A septate polycarbonate cell culture unit used for Plasmodium falciparum and hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Thélu, J; Ambroise-Thomas, P

    1988-01-01

    A new material, makrolon, is used for the construction of a large-scale cell culture vessel. It is strong, light, transparent, thermostable, septate and inexpensive. Several independent vessels of 500 ml each can be stacked. It has been used for Plasmodium falciparum and hybridoma cultures, where frequent renewal of the medium and a large gas/liquid interface are required. PMID:3068844

  16. On Building a Search Interface Discovery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, Denis

    A huge portion of the Web known as the deep Web is accessible via search interfaces to myriads of databases on the Web. While relatively good approaches for querying the contents of web databases have been recently proposed, one cannot fully utilize them having most search interfaces unlocated. Thus, the automatic recognition of search interfaces to online databases is crucial for any application accessing the deep Web. This paper describes the architecture of the I-Crawler, a system for finding and classifying search interfaces. The I-Crawler is intentionally designed to be used in the deep web characterization surveys and for constructing directories of deep web resources.

  17. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering. PMID

  18. A Device for Long-Term Perfusion, Imaging, and Electrical Interfacing of Brain Tissue In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Nathaniel J.; Vernekar, Varadraj N.; Potter, Steve M.; Vukasinovic, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Distributed microelectrode array (MEA) recordings from consistent, viable, ≥500 μm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3-D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step toward the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long) brain slice preparations. PMID:27065793

  19. Permeation of Therapeutic Drugs in Different Formulations across the Airway Epithelium In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Stranzinger, Sandra; Dzidic, Neira; Salar-Behzadi, Sharareh; Mohr, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary drug delivery is characterized by short onset times of the effects and an increased therapeutic ratio compared to oral drug delivery. This delivery route can be used for local as well as for systemic absorption applying drugs as single substance or as a fixed dose combination. Drugs can be delivered as nebulized aerosols or as dry powders. A screening system able to mimic delivery by the different devices might help to assess the drug effect in the different formulations and to identify potential interference between drugs in fixed dose combinations. The present study evaluates manual devices used in animal studies for their suitability for cellular studies. Methods Calu-3 cells were cultured submersed and in air-liquid interface culture and characterized regarding mucus production and transepithelial electrical resistance. The influence of pore size and material of the transwell membranes and of the duration of air-liquid interface culture was assessed. Compounds were applied in solution and as aerosols generated by MicroSprayer IA-1C Aerosolizer or by DP-4 Dry Powder Insufflator using fluorescein and rhodamine 123 as model compounds. Budesonide and formoterol, singly and in combination, served as examples for drugs relevant in pulmonary delivery. Results and Conclusions Membrane material and duration of air-liquid interface culture had no marked effect on mucus production and tightness of the cell monolayer. Co-application of budesonide and formoterol, applied in solution or as aerosol, increased permeation of formoterol across cells in air-liquid interface culture. Problems with the DP-4 Dry Powder Insufflator included compound-specific delivery rates and influence on the tightness of the cell monolayer. These problems were not encountered with the MicroSprayer IA-1C Aerosolizer. The combination of Calu-3 cells and manual aerosol generation devices appears suitable to identify interactions of drugs in fixed drug combination products on

  20. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. Corresponding to structural energies of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces. PMID:26611639