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Sample records for air-purifying particulate respirators

  1. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description. (a) Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators utilize the wearer's...

  2. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description. (a) Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators utilize the wearer's...

  3. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description. (a) Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators utilize the wearer's...

  4. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components. (a) Each non-powered air-purifying particulate...

  5. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components. (a) Each non-powered air-purifying particulate...

  6. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. (a) The respirator manufacturer, as part of...

  7. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. (a) The respirator manufacturer, as part of...

  8. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. (a) The respirator manufacturer, as part of...

  9. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inhalation pressure to draw the ambient air through the air-purifying filter elements (filters) to remove... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying...

  10. 42 CFR 84.170 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inhalation pressure to draw the ambient air through the air-purifying filter elements (filters) to remove... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.170 Non-powered air-purifying...

  11. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. 84.179 Section 84.179 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered...

  12. 42 CFR 84.179 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; filter identification. 84.179 Section 84.179 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.179 Non-powered...

  13. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., mouthpiece with noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit; (3) Harness; (4) Attached blower; and (5... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered...

  14. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., mouthpiece with noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit; (3) Harness; (4) Attached blower; and (5... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered...

  15. 42 CFR 84.171 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., mouthpiece with noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit; (3) Harness; (4) Attached blower; and (5... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Non-powered air-purifying particulate respirators... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.171 Non-powered...

  16. Powered, air-purifying particulate respirator filter penetration by a DOP aerosol.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen; Moyer, Ernest; Jensen, Paul

    2006-11-01

    In 1995, new certification requirements for all nonpowered, air-purifying particulate filter respirators were put in place when 42 CFR 84 replaced 30 CFR 11. However, the certification requirements for all other classes of respirators, including powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs), were transferred to 42 CFR 84 from 30 CFR 11 without major changes. Since the inception of 42 CFR 84, researchers have learned that the efficiency of electrostatic filter media, in contrast with mechanical filter media, can be rapidly degraded by oil aerosols. Further, confusion may exist among respirator users, since electrostatic PAPR filters have the same magenta color assigned to high-efficiency filters for nonpowered particulate respirators that have been tested and certified for use against oil aerosols (i.e., P100 filters). Users may expect that the magenta color of certified PAPR filters indicates suitability for use against oil aerosols. This may not be the case. To illustrate the potential degradation of electrostatic PAPR filters, new filters certified under 42 CFR 84 were tested using a TSI model 8122 Automated Respirator Tester against charged and neutralized DOP aerosols with intermittent loading schedules. The performance of a magenta-colored electrostatic PAPR filter--one for which the manufacturer's user instructions appropriately indicates is not suitable for use in oily environments--was compared with the performance of several mechanical PAPR filters. In tests against both DOP aerosols, the electrostatic PAPR filter showed a significant decrease in performance at DOP loadings exceeding 400 mg, whereas mechanical filters showed no significant change in the performance except at extremely high loadings. The decreased performance of the electrostatic PAPR filter was found to be significantly greater when tested against a neutralized DOP aerosol when compared with a charged DOP aerosol. While laboratory tests show that the filtration efficiency of this electrostatic

  17. 78 FR 69361 - Development of Inward Leakage Standards for Half-Mask Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Particulate Respirators AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS. ACTION: Reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: On September 17, 2013, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) located within the Department of Health...

  18. 78 FR 54432 - Development of Inward Leakage Standards for Half-Mask Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Particulate Respirators AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS. ACTION: Request for comment and notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces a public meeting...

  19. Nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-certified particulate air-purifying filtering facepiece respirators: evaluation by light scattering photometric and particle number-based test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test methods employ charge neutralized NaCl or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols to measure filter penetration levels of air-purifying particulate respirators photometrically using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester at 85 L/min. A previous study in our laboratory found that widely different filter penetration levels were measured for nanoparticles depending on whether a particle number (count)-based detector or a photometric detector was used. The purpose of this study was to better understand the influence of key test parameters, including filter media type, challenge aerosol size range, and detector system. Initial penetration levels for 17 models of NIOSH-approved N-, R-, and P-series filtering facepiece respirators were measured using the TSI 8130 photometric method and compared with the particle number-based penetration (obtained using two ultrafine condensation particle counters) for the same challenge aerosols generated by the TSI 8130. In general, the penetration obtained by the photometric method was less than the penetration obtained with the number-based method. Filter penetration was also measured for ambient room aerosols. Penetration measured by the TSI 8130 photometric method was lower than the number-based ambient aerosol penetration values. Number-based monodisperse NaCl aerosol penetration measurements showed that the most penetrating particle size was in the 50 nm range for all respirator models tested, with the exception of one model at ~200 nm size. Respirator models containing electrostatic filter media also showed lower penetration values with the TSI 8130 photometric method than the number-based penetration obtained for the most penetrating monodisperse particles. Results suggest that to provide a more challenging respirator filter test method than what is currently used for respirators containing electrostatic media, the test method should utilize a sufficient number

  20. Nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-certified particulate air-purifying filtering facepiece respirators: evaluation by light scattering photometric and particle number-based test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2012-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test methods employ charge neutralized NaCl or dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols to measure filter penetration levels of air-purifying particulate respirators photometrically using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester at 85 L/min. A previous study in our laboratory found that widely different filter penetration levels were measured for nanoparticles depending on whether a particle number (count)-based detector or a photometric detector was used. The purpose of this study was to better understand the influence of key test parameters, including filter media type, challenge aerosol size range, and detector system. Initial penetration levels for 17 models of NIOSH-approved N-, R-, and P-series filtering facepiece respirators were measured using the TSI 8130 photometric method and compared with the particle number-based penetration (obtained using two ultrafine condensation particle counters) for the same challenge aerosols generated by the TSI 8130. In general, the penetration obtained by the photometric method was less than the penetration obtained with the number-based method. Filter penetration was also measured for ambient room aerosols. Penetration measured by the TSI 8130 photometric method was lower than the number-based ambient aerosol penetration values. Number-based monodisperse NaCl aerosol penetration measurements showed that the most penetrating particle size was in the 50 nm range for all respirator models tested, with the exception of one model at ~200 nm size. Respirator models containing electrostatic filter media also showed lower penetration values with the TSI 8130 photometric method than the number-based penetration obtained for the most penetrating monodisperse particles. Results suggest that to provide a more challenging respirator filter test method than what is currently used for respirators containing electrostatic media, the test method should utilize a sufficient number

  1. In-mask aerosol sampling for powered air purifying respirators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.Y.U.; Sega, K.; Rubow, K.L.; Lenhart, S.W.; Myers, W.R.

    1984-04-01

    A system for sampling aerosols in the facepiece of a powered air purifying respirator has been described. The system consists of a sampling inlet mounted on the respiratory facepiece, a filter cassette and a personal sampling pump. The theoretical and practical considerations leading to the design of the sampling inlet have been discussed and experimental data presented showing the efficiency of the inlet as a function of particle size and sampling flow rate. The in-mask sampling system has been designed for powered air purifying respirators.

  2. Powered air-purifying respirator study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    da Roza, R.A.; Cadena-Fix, C.A.; Kramer, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    Three brands of powered air-purifying respirators were subjected to a simulated-work-place study. They were worn by six human subjects while working at 80% of their cardiac reserve on a treadmill. The air flow into the respirator was controlled to match that of a respirator with a newly charged battery and with various stages of battery discharge and filter plugging. The simulation took place in a large quantitative fit test chamber containing PEG 400 aerosol. The penetration of aerosol into the breathing zone of the respirator, the pressure in it, and the air flow were monitored while the subject was warming up as well as during the 80% tests. The exercises recommended in ANSI Z88.2 for helmets were also used after the 80% tests were completed. The subjects were tested clean shaven, with three days' growth of stubble, and with a two-month beard growth. A striking result was that the aerosol penetration into the two-helmet respirators increased dramatically as the subjects work rate increased. On the other hand, penetration into the half mask did not change with work rate. The penetration increased as the air flow was decreased in all cases for the helmets and for beard and stubble cases for the half mask. However, for he tight-fitting half mask on a clean-shaven face, the average penetration stayed below 0.001 for all flows. 18 figs, 5 tabs.

  3. Physiologically acceptable resistance of an air purifying respirator.

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E; Warkander, Dan E

    2011-12-01

    Physiologically acceptable limits of inspiratory impediment for air purifying respirators (APRs) were sought.Measurements on 30 subjects included pressure in, and flow through, an APR, and respiratory and cardiovascular variables. Exercise with and without APR included ladder climbing, load lift and transfer, incremental running and endurance running, with endurance at 85% peak oxygen uptake. Resistance that did not alter minute ventilation (VE) was judged acceptable long-term. Acceptable short-term impediments were deduced from end exercise conditions. Proposed long-term limits are inspiratory work of breathing per tidal volume (WOBi/VT) ≤ 0.9 kPa and peak inspiratory pressure (P (i) peak) ≤1.2 kPa. Proposed short-term limits are: for VE ≤110 L min(-1), WOBi/VT ≤1.3 kPa and P (i) peak ≤ 1.8 kPa; and for VE >130 L min(-1), WOBi/VT ≤1.6 kPa. A design relation among VE, pressure–flow coefficients of an APR, and WOBi/VT is proposed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This work generalises results from one APR by considering the altered physiological parameters related to factors inhibiting exercise. Simple expressions are proposed to connect bench-test parameters to the relation between ventilation and work of breathing. Population-based recommendations recognise that those who need more air flow can also generate higher pressures. PMID:22103726

  4. Reusability study with organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.; Kissane, R.

    1997-11-01

    The question often arises about the reusability of organic vapor adsorption beds, such as air- purifying respirator cartridges, after periods of storage without use (airflow). The extremes of practice are: (1) use once and discard or (2) reuse multiple times assuming the protection is still afforded. The goal is to develop data and a model to provide guidance to decide when reuse is acceptable. They have studied the loss of protection of a commercial organic vapor cartridge after storage for varying periods of time. Three vapors (ethyl acetate, methylene chloride, and hexane) were individually loaded onto test cartridges using a breathing pump. Extents of loading, times of loading, and vapor concentrations were varied. After selected periods of storage the cartridges were again challenged with the same vapor concentration. The increases in concentration of a vapor in the effluent air (simulated breaths) from a cartridge immediately upon reuse depended on the storage period, the extent of loading during initial use, the volatility of the vapor, and the water vapor adsorbed, but not much on the vapor concentration.

  5. Estimating reusability of organic air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O; Snyder, Jay L

    2011-10-01

    Reuse of organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges after a job or shift can provide economy and energy savings. However, standards and manufacturers' guidance discourage reuse, presumably due to a lack of quantitative objective exposure and use information. Storage and simulated reuse laboratory studies and modeling have been done to provide such information. Two important parameters of breakthrough curves, midpoint time (related to adsorption capacity) and midpoint slope (related to adsorption rate), have been shown to be unchanged during storage for reuse. Extrapolations to smaller breakthrough concentrations and times can be made from this reference breakthrough and time. Significant step increases in breakthrough concentration upon cartridge reuse have been observed in some cases. Values of immediate breakthrough concentrations upon reuse (IBURs) have been measured and correlated. The Dubinin/Radushkevich adsorption isotherm equation has been used to estimate maximum IBURs, which depend on many factors, including conditions and duration of first use. An empirical equation describing rate of approach to maximum IBUR as a function of storage time has been developed to provide intermediate IBUR estimates, which are also very dependent on the vapor identity and extent of first-use loading. Using these equations, IBUR estimates with appropriate safety factors can be compared with the allowable breakthrough concentration to help the Industrial Hygienist make reusability decisions. PMID:21936700

  6. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for tight-fitting... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride...

  7. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for tight-fitting... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride...

  8. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for tight-fitting... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride...

  9. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for tight-fitting... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride...

  10. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for tight-fitting... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride...

  11. Using Air-Purifying Respirators. Module 9. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using air-purifying respirators. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) describing how air flows through an…

  12. Speech intelligibility while wearing full-facepiece air-purifying respirators.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Karen M; Barker, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Intelligible speech communication while wearing air-purifying respirators is critical for law enforcement officers, particularly when they are communicating with each other or the public. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) requires a 70% overall performance rating to pass speech intelligibility certification for commercial chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear air-purifying respirators. However, the speech intelligibility of certified respirators is not reported and the impact on operational performance is unknown. The objective of this effort was to assess the speech intelligibility of 12 certified air-purifying respirators and to predict their impact on operational performance. The NIOSH respirator certification standard testing procedures were followed. Regression equations were fit to data from studies that examined the impact of degraded speech intelligibility on operational performance of simple and complex missions. The impact of the tested respirators on operational performance was estimated from these equations. Performance ratings observed for each respirator were: MSA Millennium (90%), 3M FR-M40 (88%), MSA Ultra Elite (87%), Scott M110 (86%), North 5400 (85%), Scott M120 (85%), Avon C50 (84%), Avon FM12 (84%), Survivair Optifit (81%), Drager CDR 4500 (81%), Peltor-AOSafety M-TAC (79%), and 3M FR-7800B (78%). The Millennium and FR-M40 had statistically significantly higher scores than the FR-7800B. The Millennium also scored significantly higher than the M-TAC. All of the tested respirators were predicted to have little impact on simple and complex mission performance times and on simple mission success rate. However, the regression equations showed that 75% of missions that require complex communications would be completed while wearing the Millennium, FR-M40, or Ultra Elite but that only 60% would be completed successfully while wearing the FR-7800B. These results suggest that some certified respirators may have

  13. Exercise performance while wearing a tight-fitting powered air purifying respirator with limited flow.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur T; Mackey, Kathryn R; Scott, William H; Koh, Frank C; Chiou, Ken Y H; Phelps, Stephanie J

    2005-07-01

    Sixteen subjects exercised at 80-85% of maximal aerobic capacity on a treadmill while wearing a tight-fitting, FRM40-Turbo Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR). The PAPR was powered by a DC power supply to give flow rates of 0%, 30%, 66%, 94%, and 100% of rated maximum blower capacity of 110 L/min. As flow rate was reduced, so was performance time. There was a 20% reduction in performance time as blower flow changed from 100% to 0% of maximum. Significant differences in breathing apparatus comfort and facial thermal comfort were found as flow rate varied. It was concluded that inadequate blower flow rate decreases performance time, facial cooling, and respirator comfort. PMID:16020100

  14. Performance of a full facepiece, air-purifying respirator against lead aerosols in a workplace environment.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry; Bidwell, Jeanne

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated workplace performance of a full facepiece, negative pressure, air-purifying respirator with P100 filters in a lead refining plant. Air samples for lead were collected inside and outside the respirators worn by workers who were properly trained and quantitatively fit tested. Trained observers assisted in the study to ensure sample validity. Three to four pairs of air samples per day were collected from each worker for a total of 52 valid sample sets. Lead was found on all the outside samples, and concentrations were below the detection limit for all but one of the inside samples. The single measurable inside sample yielded a workplace protection factor (WPF) of 297. WPFs for the rest of the samples were estimated using the assumption that lead was present at the detection limit for the in-facepiece samples. Calculated WPFs were rounded down to the nearest 100 then subjected to a rank and percentile function. The 5th percentile WPF was approximately 900 using this approach. These WPFs exceed the assigned protection factor (APF) of 50 for this respirator class recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and listed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. These results support the APF of 50 for this respirator and indicate the respirator provided adequate protection as used in this study. PMID:17175515

  15. The prediction of recommended energy expenditure for an 8 h work-day using an air-purifying respirator.

    PubMed

    Sulotto, F; Romano, C; Dori, S; Piolatto, G; Chiesa, A; Ciacco, C; Scansetti, G

    1993-12-01

    Thirty railway workers executed maximal, or near maximal, stress tests with and without the use of a half mask air-purifying respirator (Spasciani 85 A1 P1) fitted with two combined filters for simultaneous protection from organic vapours and particulate matter. The pressure-flow characteristics of inspiratory and expiratory resistance at airflows in the range 0-90 l.min-1 were established by a continuous flow method on one test mask. Significant differences were found by paired t-test between the two exercises (with and without use of mask), showing reduced values with use of the mask, for breath frequency, ventilation rate, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, maximal oxygen uptake, percentage of maximal voluntary ventilation used at the maximal exercise ventilation. No significant differences were found for tidal volume, respiratory quotient, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold, and duration of exercise. The predicted energy expenditure recommended for an 8 h work shift, corresponding to 40% of maximal oxygen uptake, is found to be reduced working with respirator and is significantly different from that observed during stress test without mask. The average ventilation rate at this workload is below 25 l.min-1, with predicted inspiratory mouth pressure equal to, or less than, 20 mm H2O. This maximal inspiratory mouth pressure is proposed as a safety limit for prolonged work using a respirator, with a recommended energy expenditure close to 40% of maximal oxygen uptake. PMID:8287854

  16. Elastomeric, half-facepiece, air-purifying respirator performance in a lead battery plant.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry; McCullough, Nicole V

    2010-01-01

    This workplace protection factor (WPF) study of a half facepiece air-purifying respirator with P100 filters was done in a lead battery manufacturing plant. Paired air samples for lead were collected inside and outside respirators worn by workers who were properly trained and quantitatively fit tested. Of the 45 valid sample sets, only four had detectable lead on the inside sample. WPFs were calculated for these sample pairs by dividing the outside sample lead concentration (C(o)) by the inside concentration (C(i)). For the remaining 41 sample pairs, the detection limit for lead was used to calculate a maximum estimated C(i) concentration. The C(o) for each of these sample pairs was divided by the C(i) estimate to obtain a minimum WPF value. All the WPFs were rounded down to two significant figures, resulting in values ranging from 12 to > 2500. A rank and percentile procedure resulted in a 50th percentile WPF of 270 and a lower 5th percentile estimate > 50. These WPFs exceed the assigned protection factor of 10 for half facepieces published by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. This study's results support the APF of 10 and indicate the respirator provided appropriate protection as it was used in this study. The comparability of the two analytical methods commonly used together in WPF studies was also evaluated. The samples collected outside the respirators were analyzed for lead by proton-induced X-ray emission analysis (PIXE) followed by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). While the two methods were highly correlated (r(2) = 0.965), the mean PIXE lead mass was approximately 45% higher than the mean ICP value. This systematic bias was explained by the assumptions used to interpret the PIXE analytical results. When WPF studies use ICP and PIXE for C(o) and C(i) samples, respectively, the calculated WPF values are conservative estimates of respirator performance. PMID:19904659

  17. Estimating service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges for reactive gas removal.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to estimate service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges that remove gases reactively from flowing air. Most gases, because of their high volatility and low polarizability, are not effectively removed by physical adsorption on activated carbon. Models previously developed for toxic organic vapors cannot estimate service lives of cartridges for toxic gases. Often, an activated carbon is impregnated with a chemical to enhance gas removal by chemical reaction(s). The kinds of reactions, types and amounts of impregnants, and effects of the presence of water vary; therefore, the model requires user inputs of gas capacity and water effect parameters. Ideally, these should be available from manufacturers of the cartridges. If they are not, they can be extracted from measured breakthrough times using this model. The key to this model is the observation that adsorption rates of gases can be adequately quantified by the same correlations that have been reported for organic vapors. The resulting model has been used to correlate and predict breakthrough times for several common toxic gases. PMID:16012083

  18. Workplace protection factor measurements on powered air-purifying respirators at a secondary lead smelter - test protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.R.; Peach, M.J. III; Alldender, J.

    1984-04-01

    A study was conducted at a secondary smelter to evaluate the workplace performance of the 3M Model W-344 and Racal Model AH3 powered air-purifying respirators (PAPR) equipped with helmets and high efficiency filters. The research protocol developed for obtaining leakage measurements in the field provides for proper respirator fitting, use, wear, maintenance and worker supervision, all of which are problems commonly associated with data acquisition when field testing respirators. The protocol proved to be very workable, even though it required extensive worker and equipment monitoring. Based upon the successful implementation of this protocol, the performance of these PAPRs should be indicative of their best performance under the workplace conditions experienced in this study. This research protocol is proposed as a model for conducting field studies on other types of respirators as well as the basis on which to develop new and improved field test procedures. The results of one such study are presented in a comparison paper.

  19. Evaluation of the rationale for concurrent use of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators during aerosol-generating medical procedures.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Raymond J

    2008-03-01

    The concurrent use of N95 filtering facepiece respirators with powered air-purifying respirators during aerosol-generating medical procedures in patients with severe respiratory pathogens has been promoted as offering additional protection against infectious agents. The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of this additional respiratory equipment upon protection and personal performance. The presumed additive protective effect of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator used concurrently with a powered air-purifying respirator has not been subjected to rigorous scientific investigation. The burden imposed by additional respiratory protective equipment should not be discounted, and the potentially minor contribution to protection may be offset by the negative impact on personal performance. Novel uses of protective equipment occasionally are spawned during crisis situations, but their generalized applicability to healthcare workers should ultimately be evidence-based. PMID:18313516

  20. Carbon tetrachloride replacement compounds for organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridge and activated carbon testing--a review.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Smith, S J; Wood, G O

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews efforts by researchers and organizations around the world to identify chemicals as substitutes for carbon tetrachloride in measuring activated carbon activity (adsorption capacity) or organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridge (or other packed carbon bed) breakthrough times. Such measurements usually are done to determine if a minimum performance standard is met. Different criteria have been established, supporting data developed and used, and conclusions reached. This article presents relevant published, unpublished, obscure, and recalculated data which the reader can use to make a choice of replacement chemical and testing conditions. No recommendations for a specific replacement chemical are endorsed or promoted in this review. PMID:11549144

  1. Summary report, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection evaluation of full-face air-purifying respirators for wildland fire fighting use

    SciTech Connect

    Beason, D.G.; Johnson, J.S.; Foote, K.L.; Weaver, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    Wildland fire suppression personnel employed by the CDF do not currently have the equipment to protect themselves from the short-term acute affects of smoke from wildland fires. In addition, no regulations exist that specify appropriate respiratory protection and the current air-purifying respirator technology and carbon monoxide monitoring has not been adapted to fit wildland fire suppression requirements. This three-year limited study evaluated the ability of wildland fire fighters to perform their normal job function while wearing full-face air-purifying respirators. In the first two years of this study we designed, developed and field tested a prototype ``smart`` air-purifying respirator which incorporated a real-time carbon monoxide monitor into a commercial full-face respirator.` Data on carbon monoxide exposure while fighting wildland fires was collected. During the third year of this study we evaluated eight different commercially available full-face air-purifying respirators equipped with a variety of cartridges. Apparatus to aid the fire fighter in carrying the respirator and carbon monoxide personal monitor was designed and fabricated. A smoke exposure test method was developed and a laboratory study on the penetration of smoke through respirator cartridges was conducted.

  2. Special article: personal protective equipment for care of pandemic influenza patients: a training workshop for the powered air purifying respirator.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Bonnie M; Kerchberger, John P

    2010-10-01

    Virulent respiratory infectious diseases may present a life-threatening risk for health care professionals during aerosol-generating procedures, including endotracheal intubation. The 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) brings this concern to the immediate forefront. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated that, when performing or participating in aerosol-generating procedures on patients with virulent contagious respiratory diseases, health care professionals must wear a minimum of the N95 respirator, and they may wish to consider using the powered air purifying respirator (PAPR). For influenza and other diseases transmitted by both respiratory and contact modes, protective respirators must be combined with contact precautions. The PAPR provides 2.5 to 100 times greater protection than the N95, when used within the context of an Occupational Safety and Health Administration-compliant respiratory protection program. The relative protective capability of a respirator is quantified using the assigned protection factor. The level of protection designated by the APF can only be achieved with appropriate training and correct use of the respirator. Face seal leakage limits the protective capability of the N95 respirator, and fit testing does not assure the ability to maintain a tight face seal. The protective capability of the PAPR will be defeated by improper handling of contaminated equipment, incorrect assembly and maintenance, and improper don (put on) and doff (take off) procedures. Stress, discomfort, and physical encumbrance may impair performance. Acclimatization through training will mitigate these effects. Training in the use of PAPRs in advance of their need is strongly advised. "Just in time" training is unlikely to provide adequate preparation for groups of practitioners requiring specialized personal protective equipment during a pandemic. Employee health departments in hospitals may not presently have a PAPR training program in place

  3. Inhalation exposure of lead in brass foundry workers: the evaluation of the effectiveness of a powered air-purifying respirator and engineering controls.

    PubMed

    Que Hee, S S; Lawrence, P

    1983-10-01

    The protection that a powered air-purifying respirator afforded to ladle and furnace attendants who were exposed to lead, copper and zinc fumes in a brass foundry was found by measuring metal levels at the lapel and at nose level inside the respirator. Respirator fit was evaluated by use of a hot-wire anemometer at the face/Tyvek seal interfaces, and at the exit of the respirator. Effective protection factors for lead ranged from 1.05 to 67. Ergonomic factors and engineering controls are also discussed. PMID:6650396

  4. An extended equation for rate coefficients for adsorption of organic vapors and gases on activated carbons in air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, G O; Lodewyckx, P

    2003-01-01

    Organic vapor adsorption rates in air-purifying respirator cartridges (and other packed beds of activated carbon granules) need to be known for estimating service lives. The correlation of Lodewyckx and Vansant [AIHAJ 61:501-505 (2000)] for mass transfer coefficients for organic vapor adsorption onto activated carbon was tested with additional data from three sources. It was then extended to better describe all the data, including that for gases. The additional parameter that accomplished this was the square root of molar equilibrium capacity of the vapor or gas on the carbon. This change, along with skew corrections when appropriate, resulted in better correlations with all experimental rate coefficients. PMID:14521430

  5. Effects of a powered air-purifying respirator intervention on indium exposure reduction and indium related biomarkers among ITO sputter target manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chen, Chang-Yuh; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) worn by the workers, and to investigate the effect of this application on exposure and preclinical effects in terms of workplace measuring and biomarker monitoring in ITO sputter target manufacturing plants and workers, respectively. Fifty-four workers were recruited and investigated from 2010-2012, during which PAPRs were provided to on-site workers in September 2011. Each worker completed questionnaires and provided blood and urine samples for analysis of biomarkers of indium exposure and preclinical effects. Area and personal indium air samples were randomly collected from selected worksites and from participants. The penetration percentage of the respirator (concentration inside respirator divided by concentration outside respirator) was 6.6%. Some biomarkers, such as S-In, SOD, GPx, GST, MDA, and TMOM, reflected the decrease in exposure and showed lower levels, after implementation of PAPRs. This study is the first to investigate the efficacy of PAPRs for reducing indium exposure. The measurement results clearly showed that the implementation of PAPRs reduces levels of indium-related biomarkers. These findings have practical applications for minimizing occupational exposure to indium and for managing the health of workers exposed to indium.

  6. Effects of a powered air-purifying respirator intervention on indium exposure reduction and indium related biomarkers among ITO sputter target manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chen, Chang-Yuh; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) worn by the workers, and to investigate the effect of this application on exposure and preclinical effects in terms of workplace measuring and biomarker monitoring in ITO sputter target manufacturing plants and workers, respectively. Fifty-four workers were recruited and investigated from 2010-2012, during which PAPRs were provided to on-site workers in September 2011. Each worker completed questionnaires and provided blood and urine samples for analysis of biomarkers of indium exposure and preclinical effects. Area and personal indium air samples were randomly collected from selected worksites and from participants. The penetration percentage of the respirator (concentration inside respirator divided by concentration outside respirator) was 6.6%. Some biomarkers, such as S-In, SOD, GPx, GST, MDA, and TMOM, reflected the decrease in exposure and showed lower levels, after implementation of PAPRs. This study is the first to investigate the efficacy of PAPRs for reducing indium exposure. The measurement results clearly showed that the implementation of PAPRs reduces levels of indium-related biomarkers. These findings have practical applications for minimizing occupational exposure to indium and for managing the health of workers exposed to indium. PMID:26771526

  7. Effects of air temperatures and humidities on efficiencies and lifetimes of air-purifying chemical respirator cartridges tested against methyl iodide.

    PubMed

    Wood, G O

    1985-05-01

    Methyl iodide penetration curves through three types of respirator cartridges and canisters were determined at several temperatures to identify the significance of temperatures of testing and use. Three charcoal types showed similar results: triethylenediamine (5% TEDA-impregnated, (2% TEDA + 5% KI3)-impregnated, and unimpregnated. Penetration curves were shifted at higher temperatures in the range 25-38 degrees C, keeping relative humidity constant in the range 50-70%, but allowing absolute humidities to increase correspondingly. These shifts were such that penetrations were increased and service lives were decreased significantly (4-15% per degrees C). At constant water vapor concentration, service life of the (2% TEDA + 5% KI3)-impregnated charcoal increased with temperature, illustrating the complexity of temperature effects. For one case (5% TEDA) using cartridges at humidity equilibrium, temperature and humidity effects were sorted out. Until these effects are better understood, air-purifying respirator cartridge and canister testing should be done at conditions more representative of possible use and at more closely controlled temperatures. PMID:4003276

  8. Effects of air temperatures and humidities on efficiencies and lifetimes of air-purifying chemical respirator cartridges tested against methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1985-05-01

    Methyl iodide penetration curves through three types of respirator cartridges and canisters were determined at several temperatures to identify the significance of temperatures of testing and use. Three charcoal types showed similar results: triethylenediamine (5% TEDA-impregnated, (2% TEDA + 5% KI/sub 3/)-impregnated, and unimpregnated. Penetration curves were shifted at higher temperatures in the range 25-38/sup 0/C, keeping relative humidity constant in the range 50-70%, but allowing absolute humidities to increase correspondingly. These shifts were such that penetrations were increased and service lives were decreased significantly (4-15% per /sup 0/C). At constant water vapor concentration, service life of the (2% TEDA + 5% KI/sub 3/)-impregnated charcoal increased with temperature, illustrating the complexity of temperature effects. For one case (5% TEDA) using cartridges at humidity equilibrium, temperature and humidity effects were sorted out. Until these effects are better understood, air-purifying respirator cartridge and canister testing should be done at conditions more representative of possible use and at more closely controlled temperatures.

  9. Criteria and test methods for certifying air-purifying respirator cartridges and canisters against radioiodine. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.; Valdez, F.O.; Gutschick, V.

    1983-08-01

    A project has been completed which provides experimental data and recommendations for establishing a standard test procedure and acceptance criteria for air-purifying respirator cartridges and canisters used for airborne radioiodine. Previous experimental work with methyl iodide vapor was extended to generate elemental iodine and measure its removal by charcoals. A special apparatus was constructed and used to simultaneously measure penetrations of radioiodine and normal iodine vapor species through beds of various charcoals. Normal methyl iodide (I-27) was selected as the most representative vapor species for testing and its limitations were identified. Effects of testing and use conditions (bed depth, contact time, concentration, relative humidity, temperature, flowrate, and flow cycling) were studied to identify testing requirements. Temperature and simulated breathing flow cycling were shown to have much more significance than was previously realized. Recommendations for testing and approval include considering the effects of all these parameters. An apparatus designed and built for testing has been delivered to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. In one related study the desorption of triethylenediamine (TEDA), a charcoal impregnant for organic iodide removal, was found to be insignificant at normal canister use conditions. 17 references, 28 figures, 21 tables.

  10. Performance of an improperly sized and stretched-out loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirator: Manikin-based study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; McKay, Roy T; Yermakov, Michael; Kim, Jinyong; Reponen, Tiina; He, Xinjian; Kimura, Kazushi; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the protection level offered by a Powered Air-Purifying Respirator (PAPR) equipped with an improperly sized or stretched-out loose-fitting facepiece using constant and cyclic flow conditions. Improperly sized PAPR facepieces of two models as well as a stretched-out facepiece were tested. These facepieces were examined in two versions: with and without exhaust holes. Loose-fitting facepieces (size "large") were donned on a small manikin headform and challenged with sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol particles in an exposure chamber. Four cyclic flows with mean inspiratory flows (MIFs) of 30, 55, 85, and 135 L/min were applied using an electromechanical Breathing Recording and Simulation System (BRSS). The manikin Fit Factor (mFF) was determined as the ratio of aerosol concentrations outside (Cout) to inside (Cin) of the facepiece, measured with a P-Trak condensation particle counter (CPC). Results showed that the mFF decreased exponentially with increasing MIF. The mFF values of the stretched-out facepiece were significantly lower than those obtained for the undamaged ones. Facepiece type and MIF were found to significantly affect the performance of the loose-fitting PAPR. The effect of the exhaust holes was less pronounced and depended on the facepiece type. It was concluded that an improperly sized facepiece might potentially offer relatively low protection (mFF < 250) at high to strenuous workloads. The testing was also performed at a constant inhalation flow to explore the mechanism of the particle-facepiece interaction. Results obtained with cyclic flow pattern were consistent with the data generated when testing the loose-fitting PAPR under constant flow conditions. The time-weighted average values of mFF calculated from the measurements conducted under the constant flow regime were capable of predicting the protection under cyclic flow regime. The findings suggest that program administrators need to equip employees

  11. Natural Air Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  12. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it...

  13. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. Dust, fume, and mist respirators will be tested in accordance with the... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. Dust, fume, and mist respirators will be tested in accordance with the... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. Dust, fume, and mist respirators will be tested in accordance with the... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  19. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.206 Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or...

  20. Effective capture of respirable sized particulates using electrostatic precipitator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, K.R.; Sanyal, A.

    1999-11-01

    The electrostatic precipitator widely used for the prevention of particulate pollution from industrial sources, can also be effective, when correctly sized and operated, for the collection of respirable fine particulates. That is, those below some 2 micron diameter, particularly of heavy metals which tend to be cumulative and hence injurious to health. Following a review of the basic principles of operation of electrostatic precipitators, specifically addressed to the capture of fine particulates, an outline of the various types of equipment used for collecting solid and liquid (mist) particulates will be discussed. Finally some typical precipitator applications will be illustrated, together with suggestions as to how efficiencies can be further increased to meet compliance with any potential future changes in legislation.

  1. Home Air Purifiers Eradicate Harmful Pathogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center funded the University of Madison-Wisconsin to develop ethylene scrubbers to keep produce fresh in space. Akida Holdings of Jacksonville, Florida, licensed the technology and developed Airocide, an air purifier that can kill airborne pathogens. Previously designed for industrial spaces, there is now a specially designed unit for home use.

  2. Air Purifiers Eliminate Pathogens, Preserve Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA-funded researchers produced an ethylene reduction device for a plant growth unit. KES Science & Technology Inc., a Kennesaw, Georgia-based company specializing in sustaining perishable foods, licensed the ethylene scrubbing technology. KES partnered with Akida Holdings, of Jacksonville, Florida, which now markets the NASA-developed technology as AiroCide. According to the company, it is the only air purifier that completely destroys airborne bacteria, mold, fungi, mycotoxins, viruses, volatile organic compounds (like ethylene), and odors. What?s more, the devices have no filters that need changing and produce no harmful byproducts, such as the ozone created by some filtration systems.

  3. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... filters; performance requirements; general. 84.1157 Section 84.1157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... with particulate filters; performance requirements; general. Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters and the individual components of each such device shall, as appropriate, meet...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  5. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or having attached to them, filters for protection against particulates will be tested in accordance with...

  6. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or having attached to them, filters for protection against particulates will be tested in accordance with...

  7. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or having attached to them, filters for protection against particulates will be tested in accordance with...

  8. 42 CFR 84.206 - Particulate tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Particulate tests; respirators with filters... filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing, or having attached to them, filters for protection against particulates will be tested in accordance with...

  9. Identifying dominant sources of respirable suspended particulates in Guangzhou, China

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Dai, W.; Wang, X.S.; Cui, M.M.; Su, H.; Xie, S.D.; Zhang, Y.H.

    2008-09-15

    Respirable suspended particulates (RSP, i.e., particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 {mu} m or less) were measured in 2004 and 2005 at seven sites in the rapidly developing Guangzhou area of China. The average RSP concentration was 126 {mu} g m{sup -3}, a high level that could be very harmful to human health. The chemical species composition of the RSP, including organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble ions, and elemental compositions, was also analyzed. The organics and sulfate may be the major components of RSP mass concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to identify the sources of RSP as secondary sulfates (32%), secondary nitrates (6%), biomass burning (15%), coal fly ash/cement (18%), sea salt (3%), crustal dust (5%), vehicle exhaust (6%), and coal-fired power plants (3%). Reducing coal combustion and controlling vehicle emissions would alleviate RSP pollution, as most of the precursors were components of coal burning emissions and vehicular exhaust.

  10. Respirator selection for clandestine methamphetamine laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gary O; Bronder, Gregory D; Larson, Scott A; Parker, Jay A; Metzler, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    First responders to illicit drug labs may not always have SCBA protection available. Air-purifying respirators using organic vapor cartridges with P-100 filters may not be sufficient. It would be better to use a NIOSH-approved CBRN respirator with its required multi-purpose cartridge system, which includes a P-100 filter. This would remove all the primary drug lab contaminants—organic vapors, acid gases, ammonia, phosphine, iodine, and airborne meth particulates. To assure the proper selection and use of a respirator, it is recommended that the contaminants present be identified and quantified and the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134 respirator protection program requirements followed. PMID:22571884

  11. Pulmonary phospholipidosis in rats respiring air containing diesel particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Eskelson, C.D.; Chvapil, M.; Strom, K.A.; Vostal, J.J.

    1987-12-01

    Rats chronically exposed to diesel particulates (dp) or given intratracheally a single dose of dp show increased levels of phospholipids in the lungs and in pulmonary lavage fluid. Pulmonary phospholipidosis is accompanied by increase lecithin levels and by increased palmitate content in lecithin of both lungs and pulmonary lavage fluid. A de novo increase of pulmonary and hepatic phospholipid (PL) formation was detected 5 days after rats were treated with dp. The authors hypothesize that a dp-stressed lung releases a pulmonary lipogenic factor (PLF), which stimulates hepatic lipogenesis. This was further tested by an in vitro study in which primary cultures of free hepatocytes were incubated with (2-/sup 14/C)acetate and various molecular weight fractions of a pulmonary homogenate from rats. The results from these studies indicated that in rat lung homogenates a PLF exists of greater than 100,000 Da molecular mass. The results also indicate that respired air containing a dp concentration of greater than 750 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air would result in a mild phospholipidosis in the lung, whereas a dp dose in respired air of 250 ..mu..g dp/m/sup 3/ of air for 2 years did not alter pulmonary PL content in rats.

  12. Comparison of nanoparticle filtration performance of NIOSH-approved and CE-marked particulate filtering facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2009-03-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and European Norms (ENs) employ different test protocols for evaluation of air-purifying particulate respirators commonly referred to as filtering facepiece respirators (FFR). The relative performance of the NIOSH-approved and EN-certified 'Conformité Européen' (CE)-marked FFR is not well studied. NIOSH requires a minimum of 95 and 99.97% efficiencies for N95 and P100 FFR, respectively; meanwhile, the EN requires 94 and 99% efficiencies for FFRs, class P2 (FFP2) and class P3 (FFP3), respectively. To better understand the filtration performance of NIOSH- and CE-marked FFRs, initial penetration levels of N95, P100, FFP2 and FFP3 respirators were measured using a series of polydisperse and monodisperse aerosol test methods and compared. Initial penetration levels of polydisperse NaCl aerosols [mass median diameter (MMD) of 238 nm] were measured using a method similar to the NIOSH respirator certification test method. Monodisperse aerosol penetrations were measured using silver particles for 4-30 nm and NaCl particles for 20-400 nm ranges. Two models for each FFR type were selected and five samples from each model were tested against charge neutralized aerosol particles at 85 l min(-1) flow rate. Penetrations from the 238 nm MMD polydisperse aerosol test were <1% for N95 and FFP2 models and <0.03% for P100 and FFP3 models. Monodisperse aerosol penetration levels showed that the most penetrating particle size (MPPS) was in the 30-60 nm range for all models of FFRs tested in the study. Percentage penetrations at the MPPS were <4.28, <2.22, <0.009 and <0.164 for the N95, FFP2, P100 and FFP3 respirator models, respectively. The MPPS obtained for all four FFR types suggested particle capturing by electrostatic mechanism. Liquid isopropanol treatment of FFRs shifted the MPPS to 200-300 nm and dramatically increased polydisperse as well as monodisperse aerosol penetrations of all four FFR types indicating

  13. Development and evaluation of personal respirable particulate sampler (PRPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Joo; Demokritou, Philip; Koutrakis, Petros; Delgado-Saborit, Juana M.

    This paper presents the development, laboratory evaluation, and field tests of a personal respirable particulate sampler (PRPS). The PRPS is designed as a personal sampling system to collect particulate matter (PM 0.5, PM 1.0, PM 2.5, PM 4.5, and PM 10) and gaseous pollutants, including O 3, SO 2, and NO 2. It operates at a flow rate of 5.0 LPM and consists of five selectable impaction stages (with cutpoints of 10, 4.5, 2.5, 1.0, and 0.5 μm), a backup filter, and two diffusion passive samplers. In each impaction stage, particles are collected onto a polyurethane foam (PUF) substrate. This substrate, using no adhesive, was shown to have minimum particle bounce and re-entrainment. A backup 37 mm Teflon membrane filter is used downstream to collect particles smaller than the cutoff diameter of the final impaction stage. The impaction stage cutpoints were characterized in the laboratory using artificially generated polydisperse aerosols. Particle losses for each stage were found to be acceptably low. The performance of the PRPS was also compared with that of a collocated micro-orifice cascade impactor (MOI) and real-time particle sizing instruments (SMPS/APS) in laboratory experiments using artificially generated particles. The size distributions measured by the PRPS were found to be much closer to those measured by the real-time particle sizing instruments than to those measured by the MOI. A field PM intercomparison study was also conducted using the PRPS and three reference samplers, the Harvard Impactor (HI), the USEPA PM 2.5 Well Impactor Ninety Six (WINS), and the Harvard Personal Environmental Monitor (Harvard PEM) sampler. The PM 10, PM 2.5, and sulfate concentrations measured by PRPS were in a very good agreement with those obtained from the reference samplers.

  14. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to ultraviolet radiation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  18. Particulate Respirators Functionalized with Silver Nanoparticles Showed Excellent Real-Time Antimicrobial Effects against Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Clark Renjun; Li, Shuai; Ye, Chengsong; Li, Xinyang; Zhang, Chiqian; Yu, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Particulate respirators designed to filtrate fine particulate matters usually do not possess antimicrobial functions. The current study aimed to functionalize particulate respirators with silver nanoparticles (nanosilver or AgNPs), which have excellent antimicrobial activities, utilizing a straightforward and effective method. We first enhanced the nanosilver-coating ability of nonwoven fabrics from a particulate respirator through surface modification by sodium oleate. The surfactant treatment significantly improved the fabrics' water wet preference where the static water contact angles reduced from 122° to 56°. Both macroscopic agar-plate tests and microscopic scanning electron microscope (SEM) characterization revealed that nanosilver functionalized fabrics could effectively inhibit the growth of two model bacterial strains (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). The coating of silver nanoparticles would not affect the main function of particulate respirators (i.e., filtration of fine air-borne particles). Nanosilver coated particulate respirators with excellent antimicrobial activities can provide real-time protection to people in regions with severe air pollution against air-borne pathogens. PMID:27327938

  19. 21 CFR 880.6260 - Filtering facepiece respirator for use by the general public in public health medical emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are: (1) Certification by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a non-powered air-purifying particulate respirator with a minimum filtration efficiency classification of N95, in accordance with 42 CFR part 84. (2)...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6260 - Filtering facepiece respirator for use by the general public in public health medical emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special controls are: (1) Certification by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a non-powered air-purifying particulate respirator with a minimum filtration efficiency classification of N95, in accordance with 42 CFR part 84. (2)...

  1. Total inward leakage measurement of particulates for N95 filtering facepiece respirators--a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Walbert, Gary F; Newcomb, William E; Faulkner, Kimberly; Rengasamy, Mathi M; Brannen, Jeremy J; Szalajda, Jonathan V

    2014-03-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certified particulate respirators need to be properly fit tested before use to ensure workers' respiratory protection. However, the effectiveness of American National Standards Institute-/Occupational Safety and Health Administration (ANSI-/OSHA)-accepted fit tests for particulate respirators in predicting actual workplace protection provided to workers is lacking. NIOSH addressed this issue by evaluating the fit of half-mask particulate filtering respirators as a component of a program designed to add total inward leakage (TIL) requirements for all respirators to Title 42 Code of Federal Regulations Part 84. Specifically, NIOSH undertook a validation study to evaluate the reproducibility of the TIL test procedure between two laboratories. A PortaCount® was used to measure the TIL of five N95 model filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) on test subjects in two different laboratories. Concurrently, filter efficiency for four of the five N95 FFR models was measured using laboratory aerosol as well as polydisperse NaCl aerosol employed for NIOSH particulate respirator certification. Results showed that two N95 models passed the TIL tests at a rate of ~80-85% and ~86-94% in the two laboratories, respectively. However, the TIL passing rate for the other three N95 models was 0-5.7% in both laboratories combined. Good agreement (≥83%) of the TIL data between the two laboratories was obtained. The three models that had relatively lower filter efficiency for laboratory aerosol as well as for NaCl aerosol showed relatively low TIL passing rates in both laboratories. Of the four models tested for penetration, one model with relatively higher efficiency showed a higher passing rate for TIL tests in both laboratories indicating that filter efficiency might influence TIL. Further studies are needed to better understand the implications of the data in the workplace. PMID:24107745

  2. Efficiency of Respirator Filter Media against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kerrie A; Whitelaw, Jane L; Jones, Alison L; Davies, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engines have been a mainstay within many industries since the early 1900s. Exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a major issue in many industrial workplaces given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers; including the potential for lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects. Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM. To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates. The methodology outlined in AS/NZS1716 (Standards Australia International Ltd and Standards New Zealand 2012. Respiratory protective devices. Sydney/Wellington: SAI Global Limited/Standards New Zealand) does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and sodium chloride such as structure, composition, and particle size. This study examined filtering efficiency for three commonly used AS/NZS certified respirator filter models, challenging them with two types of diesel emissions; those from a diesel generator and a diesel engine. Penetration through the filter media of elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC), and total suspended particulate (TSP) was calculated. Results indicate that filtering efficiency assumed by P2 certification in Australia was achieved for two of the three respirator models for DPM generated using the small diesel generator, whilst when the larger diesel engine was used, filtering efficiency requirements were met for all three filter models. These results suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for

  3. Efficiency of Respirator Filter Media against Diesel Particulate Matter: A Comparison Study Using Two Diesel Particulate Sources.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kerrie A; Whitelaw, Jane L; Jones, Alison L; Davies, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Diesel engines have been a mainstay within many industries since the early 1900s. Exposure to diesel particulate matter (DPM) is a major issue in many industrial workplaces given the potential for serious health impacts to exposed workers; including the potential for lung cancer and adverse irritant and cardiovascular effects. Personal respiratory protective devices are an accepted safety measure to mitigate worker exposure against the potentially damaging health impacts of DPM. To be protective, they need to act as effective filters against carbon and other particulates. In Australia, the filtering efficiency of respiratory protective devices is determined by challenging test filter media with aerosolised sodium chloride to determine penetration at designated flow rates. The methodology outlined in AS/NZS1716 (Standards Australia International Ltd and Standards New Zealand 2012. Respiratory protective devices. Sydney/Wellington: SAI Global Limited/Standards New Zealand) does not account for the differences between characteristics of workplace contaminants like DPM and sodium chloride such as structure, composition, and particle size. This study examined filtering efficiency for three commonly used AS/NZS certified respirator filter models, challenging them with two types of diesel emissions; those from a diesel generator and a diesel engine. Penetration through the filter media of elemental carbon (EC), total carbon (TC), and total suspended particulate (TSP) was calculated. Results indicate that filtering efficiency assumed by P2 certification in Australia was achieved for two of the three respirator models for DPM generated using the small diesel generator, whilst when the larger diesel engine was used, filtering efficiency requirements were met for all three filter models. These results suggest that the testing methodology specified for certification of personal respiratory protective devices by Standards Australia may not ensure adequate protection for

  4. Measurement of Ozone Emission and Particle Removal Rates from Portable Air Purifiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mang, Stephen A.; Walser, Maggie L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laux, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Portable air purifiers are popular consumer items, especially in areas with poor air quality. Unfortunately, most users of these air purifiers have minimal understanding of the factors affecting their efficiency in typical indoor settings. Emission of the air pollutant ozone (O[subscript 3]) by certain air purifiers is of particular concern. In an…

  5. Life cycle assessment comparison of photocatalytic coating and air purifier.

    PubMed

    Tichá, Marie; Žilka, Miroslav; Stieberová, Barbora; Freiberg, František

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a comparison of 2 very different options for removal of undesirable microorganisms and airborne pollutants from the indoor environment of hospitals, schools, homes, and other enclosed spaces using air purifiers and photocatalytic coatings based on nano titanium dioxide (TiO2 ). Both products were assessed by life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology from cradle-to-grave. The assessment also includes comparison of 2 different nano TiO2 production technologies, one by continuous hydrothermal synthesis and the other by a sulfate process. Results of the study showed a relatively large contribution of photocatalytic coatings to reducing the effects of selected indices in comparison with an air purifier, regardless of which nano TiO2 production method is used. Although the impacts of the sulfate process are significantly lower compared to those of hydrothermal synthesis when viewed in terms of production alone, taken in the context of the entire product life cycle, the net difference becomes less significant. The study has been elaborated within the Sustainable Hydrothermal Manufacturing of Nanomaterials (SHYMAN) project, which aims to develop competitive and sustainable continuous nanoparticle (NP) production technology based on supercritical hydrothermal synthesis. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:478-485. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. Life cycle assessment comparison of photocatalytic coating and air purifier.

    PubMed

    Tichá, Marie; Žilka, Miroslav; Stieberová, Barbora; Freiberg, František

    2016-07-01

    This article presents a comparison of 2 very different options for removal of undesirable microorganisms and airborne pollutants from the indoor environment of hospitals, schools, homes, and other enclosed spaces using air purifiers and photocatalytic coatings based on nano titanium dioxide (TiO2 ). Both products were assessed by life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology from cradle-to-grave. The assessment also includes comparison of 2 different nano TiO2 production technologies, one by continuous hydrothermal synthesis and the other by a sulfate process. Results of the study showed a relatively large contribution of photocatalytic coatings to reducing the effects of selected indices in comparison with an air purifier, regardless of which nano TiO2 production method is used. Although the impacts of the sulfate process are significantly lower compared to those of hydrothermal synthesis when viewed in terms of production alone, taken in the context of the entire product life cycle, the net difference becomes less significant. The study has been elaborated within the Sustainable Hydrothermal Manufacturing of Nanomaterials (SHYMAN) project, which aims to develop competitive and sustainable continuous nanoparticle (NP) production technology based on supercritical hydrothermal synthesis. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:478-485. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:27082715

  7. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and... contamination of respirators which are not removed, and to prevent damage to respirators during transit....

  8. Full scale demonstration of air-purifying pavement.

    PubMed

    Ballari, M M; Brouwers, H J H

    2013-06-15

    Experiments concerning a full-scale demonstration of air purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands, are reported. The full width of the street was provided with concrete pavement containing TiO₂ over a length of 150 m ("DeNOx street"). Another part of the street, about 100 m, was paved with normal paving blocks ("Control street"). The outdoor monitoring was done during 26 days for a period exceeding one year, and measured parameters included traffic intensity, NO, NO₂ and ozone concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and the visible and UV light irradiance. Prior and parallel to these field measurements, the used blocks were also measured in the lab to assess their performance. The NOx concentration was, on average, 19% (considering the whole day) and 28% (considering only afternoons) lower than the obtained values in the Control street. Under ideal weather conditions (high radiation and low relative humidity) a NOx concentration decrease of 45% could be observed.

  9. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  10. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  11. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  12. Comparison of pressure drop and filtration efficiency of particulate respirators using welding fumes and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lee, Seung-Joo; Viner, Andrew; Johnson, Erik W

    2011-07-01

    Respirators are used to help reduce exposure to a variety of contaminants in workplaces. Test aerosols used for certification of particulate respirators (PRs) include sodium chloride (NaCl), dioctyl phthalate, and paraffin oil. These aerosols are generally assumed to be worst case surrogates for aerosols found in the workplace. No data have been published to date on the performance of PRs with welding fumes, a hazardous aerosol that exists in real workplace settings. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of respirators and filters against a NaCl aerosol and a welding fume aerosol and determine whether or not a correlation between the two could be made. Fifteen commercial PRs and filters (seven filtering facepiece, two replaceable single-type filters, and six replaceable dual-type filters) were chosen for investigation. Four of the filtering facepiece respirators, one of the single-type filters, and all of the dual-type filters contained carbon to help reduce exposure to ozone and other vapors generated during the welding process. For the NaCl test, a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health protocol was adopted for use with the TSI Model 8130 automated filter tester. For the welding fume test, welding fumes from mild steel flux-cored arcs were generated and measured with a SIBATA filter tester (AP-634A, Japan) and a manometer in the upstream and downstream sections of the test chamber. Size distributions of the two aerosols were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Penetration and pressure drop were measured over a period of aerosol loading onto the respirator or filter. Photos and scanning electron microscope images of clean and exposed respirators were taken. The count median diameter (CMD) and mass median diameter (MMD) for the NaCl aerosol were smaller than the welding fumes (CMD: 74 versus 216 nm; MMD: 198 versus 528 nm, respectively). Initial penetration and peak penetration were higher with the NaCl aerosol

  13. Comparison of pressure drop and filtration efficiency of particulate respirators using welding fumes and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lee, Seung-Joo; Viner, Andrew; Johnson, Erik W

    2011-07-01

    Respirators are used to help reduce exposure to a variety of contaminants in workplaces. Test aerosols used for certification of particulate respirators (PRs) include sodium chloride (NaCl), dioctyl phthalate, and paraffin oil. These aerosols are generally assumed to be worst case surrogates for aerosols found in the workplace. No data have been published to date on the performance of PRs with welding fumes, a hazardous aerosol that exists in real workplace settings. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of respirators and filters against a NaCl aerosol and a welding fume aerosol and determine whether or not a correlation between the two could be made. Fifteen commercial PRs and filters (seven filtering facepiece, two replaceable single-type filters, and six replaceable dual-type filters) were chosen for investigation. Four of the filtering facepiece respirators, one of the single-type filters, and all of the dual-type filters contained carbon to help reduce exposure to ozone and other vapors generated during the welding process. For the NaCl test, a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health protocol was adopted for use with the TSI Model 8130 automated filter tester. For the welding fume test, welding fumes from mild steel flux-cored arcs were generated and measured with a SIBATA filter tester (AP-634A, Japan) and a manometer in the upstream and downstream sections of the test chamber. Size distributions of the two aerosols were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Penetration and pressure drop were measured over a period of aerosol loading onto the respirator or filter. Photos and scanning electron microscope images of clean and exposed respirators were taken. The count median diameter (CMD) and mass median diameter (MMD) for the NaCl aerosol were smaller than the welding fumes (CMD: 74 versus 216 nm; MMD: 198 versus 528 nm, respectively). Initial penetration and peak penetration were higher with the NaCl aerosol

  14. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter.

    PubMed

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality.

  15. Health Outcomes of Exposure to Biological and Chemical Components of Inhalable and Respirable Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Morakinyo, Oyewale Mayowa; Mokgobu, Matlou Ingrid; Mukhola, Murembiwa Stanley; Hunter, Raymond Paul

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a key indicator of air pollution and a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes in humans. PM is not a self-contained pollutant but a mixture of different compounds including chemical and biological fractions. While several reviews have focused on the chemical components of PM and associated health effects, there is a dearth of review studies that holistically examine the role of biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM in disease causation. A literature search using various search engines and (or) keywords was done. Articles selected for review were chosen following predefined criteria, to extract and analyze data. The results show that the biological and chemical components of inhalable and respirable PM play a significant role in the burden of health effects attributed to PM. These health outcomes include low birth weight, emergency room visit, hospital admission, respiratory and pulmonary diseases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, non-communicable diseases, and premature death, among others. This review justifies the importance of each or synergistic effects of the biological and chemical constituents of PM on health. It also provides information that informs policy on the establishment of exposure limits for PM composition metrics rather than the existing exposure limits of the total mass of PM. This will allow for more effective management strategies for improving outdoor air quality. PMID:27314370

  16. Pulmonary clearance and toxicity of respirable gallium arsenide particulates intratracheally instilled into rats

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.R.; Wilson, S.E.; Carter, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is an intermetallic compound that is recognized as a potential toxicological risk to workers occupationally exposed to its dust. Previous results have shown that rats intratracheally instilled with a fraction of GaAs particulates, characterized with a mean count diameter of 8.30 ..mu..m and a mean volume diameter of 12.67 ..mu..m, developed signs of systemic arsenic intoxication, pulmonary inflammation, and pneumocyte hyperplasia. The results of the present study confirm these findings and also show that a significantly smaller fraction of GaAs is a relatively more severe pneumotoxicant. Decreasing the particle mean count and mean volume diameter to 1.63 ..mu..m and 5.82 ..mu..m, respectively, increased in vivo dissolution rate of GaAs, increased the severity of pulmonary lesions previously associated with GaAs exposure, and resulted in unique pathological sequalae in affected lung tissue. Pulmonary fibrosis, as indicated by analysis of lung 4-hydroxyproline content, was not considered statistically significant although histological examination of lung tissue revealed a mild fibrotic response. These results provide additional evidence that pulmonary exposure to respirable GaAs particulates is a potential health hazard in the semiconductor industry.

  17. Production of potentially hazardous respirable silica airborne particulate from the burning of sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blond, Jennifer S.; Williamson, Ben J.; Horwell, Claire J.; Monro, Alex K.; Kirk, Caroline A.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    In some areas of the world where agricultural burning is practised, the airborne particles produced have been linked to respiratory disease in humans. Here, we investigate the abundance and form of silica (SiO 2) minerals found within ash and aerosol produced by the experimental burning of sugarcane. Samples of sugarcane leaf were incinerated over a range of temperatures, time scales and airflow conditions, the latter to investigate the effects of wind and updrafts during natural fires. The silica content of the residual ash (from still air simulations) was measured using an improved wet chemical methodology, described here. This indicated that the release of silica from the plant material into the atmosphere increases with increasing temperature of combustion. Airborne particulate, sampled using air-pump-filter apparatus, was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with automated image and elemental analysis. For airborne particulate formed at 1100 °C (with airflow), 17% of the particles are in the respirable size fraction (<4 μm in diameter) and contain silica. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, a component of this silica is present as the potentially toxic polymorph cristobalite. For the residual ash, samples produced with no additional airflow were found to contain cristobalite, however none could be identified in ash formed with an airflow. It is considered likely that this is due to release of cristobalite to the atmosphere (as sampled on filters). This pilot study shows that potentially toxic particles could be released during sugarcane burning and reinforces the need for further study into the emissions and re-suspension of ash from the burning of biomass.

  18. Improvements in powered air purifying respirator protection in an ABSL-3E facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of and experimentation with zoonotic pathogens such as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) requires risk mitigation strategies including laboratory engineering controls and safety equipment, personal protective equipment (PPE), and proper practices and techniques. Incidences of potent...

  19. Removal efficiency of vapour/particulate phase PAHs by using alternative protective respirators in PAHs exposure workers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, Chien-Hung; Lin, Ming-Hsiu

    2012-06-15

    Due to the high heat environment in foundry industries, it is difficult for foundry workers to wear masks during their workday. Thus, how to prevent inhaling vapour or the particulate phase of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important for occupational hazard management. The present study assesses the characteristics of PAHs emission in foundry and plastic industries to evaluate the removal efficiencies of PAHs while workers use alternative personal protective equipment. The highest 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) level was found for workers who used a cotton-fabric face mask (1.19 μg/g creatinine) and activated-carbon face mask (1.16 μg/g creatinine), compared to a lower level in workers who wore a surgical face mask (0.27 μg/g creatinine) and a N95 respirator (0.51 μg/g creatinine). The urinary 1-OHP in end-of-shift samples correlated to the airborne vapour phase Bapeq, but not for the particulate phase Bapeq in the foundry industry. This is probably because workers wore personal protective equipment that only removed the particulate phase PAH. The current study suggests that future work focus on developing an appropriate and comfortable respirator with high removal efficiency for ultrafine particulates and vapour phase PAHs simultaneously in PAH work environments. PMID:22525483

  20. Effects of sinking velocities and microbial respiration rates on the attenuation of particulate carbon fluxes through the mesopelagic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, A. M. P.; Boyd, P. W.; Buesseler, K. O.

    2015-02-01

    The attenuation of sinking particle fluxes through the mesopelagic zone is an important process that controls the sequestration of carbon and the distribution of other elements throughout the oceans. Case studies at two contrasting sites, the oligotrophic regime of the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) and the mesotrophic waters of the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) sector of the Southern Ocean, revealed large differences in the rates of particle-attached microbial respiration and the average sinking velocities of marine particles, two parameters that affect the transfer efficiency of particulate matter from the base of the euphotic zone into the deep ocean. Rapid average sinking velocities of 270 ± 150 m d-1 were observed along the WAP, whereas the average velocity was 49 ± 25 m d-1 at the BATS site. Respiration rates of particle-attached microbes were measured using novel RESPIRE (REspiration of Sinking Particles In the subsuRface ocEan) sediment traps that first intercepts sinking particles then incubates them in situ. RESPIRE experiments yielded flux-normalized respiration rates of 0.4 ± 0.1 day-1 at BATS when excluding an outlier of 1.52 day-1, while these rates were undetectable along the WAP (0.01 ± 0.02 day-1). At BATS, flux-normalized respiration rates decreased exponentially with respect to depth below the euphotic zone with a 75% reduction between the 150 and 500 m depths. These findings provide quantitative and mechanistic insights into the processes that control the transfer efficiency of particle flux through the mesopelagic and its variability throughout the global oceans.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls in respirable particulate matter from different industrial areas in northern China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Haifeng; Fu, Shan; Dong, Yuan; Yang, Zhongfang

    2014-11-01

    As two typical industrial bases of China's great metropolises, Lingfen and Datong are affected by the steel industry, chemical plants, coal-fired power plants, and several coking plants, and face pollution from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the PCB concentrations in PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples obtained in Lingfen and Datong. We collected 22 respirable particulate matter samples (11 of PM2.5 and 11 of PM2.5-10) from Lingfen and Datong, and measured a total of 144 PCB congeners. The total PCB concentrations were 5.92-38.7 pg m(-3) (median: 21.58 pg m(-3)) in PM2.5 and 1.83-40.8 pg m(-3) (median: 24.3 pg m(-3)) in PM2.5-10 in Linfen, and 4.33-18.5 pg m(-3) (median: 11.9 pg m(-3)) in PM2.5 and 13.0-47.4 pg m(-3) (median: 17.4 pg m(-3)) in PM2.5-10 in Datong. Of the PCB homologues, the dominant PCBs detected in the various media were all trichlorobiphenyls (tri-CBs). Moreover, the PCB distributions in PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 samples were quite different in the two cities. This may be caused by the differences of the industrial structures, and their relatively unintentional release of PCBs in these cities. Source analysis revealed that the major PCB contaminants in Linfen and Datong were tri-CBs and di-CBs, which were possibly associated with unintentional release of PCBs. Toxic equivalency concentrations based on ten dioxin-like PCBs ranged from 4.0×10(-5) to 2.3×10(-3) pgWHO-TEQ m(-3) in Linfen, and 4.5×10(-4) to 2.6×10(-4) pgWHO-TEQ m(-3) in Datong. The presence of PCB pollution is a potential threat to the residents of Datong and Linfen.

  2. 42 CFR 84.181 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate filter efficiency level determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... equivalent. The DOP aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.185 ±0... further decrease in efficiency. (g) The sodium chloride test aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.075 ±0.020 micrometer and a standard geometric deviation...

  3. 42 CFR 84.181 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate filter efficiency level determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equivalent. The DOP aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.185 ±0... further decrease in efficiency. (g) The sodium chloride test aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.075 ±0.020 micrometer and a standard geometric deviation...

  4. 42 CFR 84.181 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate filter efficiency level determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equivalent. The DOP aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.185 ±0... further decrease in efficiency. (g) The sodium chloride test aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.075 ±0.020 micrometer and a standard geometric deviation...

  5. 42 CFR 84.181 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate filter efficiency level determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equivalent. The DOP aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.185 ±0... further decrease in efficiency. (g) The sodium chloride test aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.075 ±0.020 micrometer and a standard geometric deviation...

  6. 42 CFR 84.181 - Non-powered air-purifying particulate filter efficiency level determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equivalent. The DOP aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.185 ±0... further decrease in efficiency. (g) The sodium chloride test aerosol shall have a particle size distribution with count median diameter of 0.075 ±0.020 micrometer and a standard geometric deviation...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respirators; required components. 84.1131 Section..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1131 Respirators; required components. (a) Each respirator described in § 84.1130...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirators; required components. 84.1131 Section..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1131 Respirators; required components. (a) Each respirator described in § 84.1130...

  9. Effectiveness of a positive pressure respirator for controlling lead exposure in acid storage battery manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Grauvogel, L.W.

    1986-02-01

    Effective protection factors for lead-acid storage battery manufacturing workers using powered air-purifying respirators and their corresponding blood lead histories are reported and compared with results for half-mask, negative pressure respirators. Airborne lead protection factors for the powered, air-purifying respirator ranged from 2 to 74, while lead levels in the blood remained stable or decreased for 8 of the 13 workers monitored when compared to negative pressure respirator use levels.

  10. Effectiveness of a positive pressure respirator for controlling lead exposure in acid storage battery manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Grauvogel, L W

    1986-02-01

    Effective protection factors for lead-acid storage battery manufacturing workers using powered air-purifying respirators and their corresponding blood lead histories are reported and compared with results for half-mask, negative pressure respirators. Airborne lead protection factors for the powered, air-purifying respirator ranged from 2 to 74, while lead levels in the blood remained stable or decreased for 8 of the 13 workers monitored when compared to negative pressure respirator use levels. PMID:3456697

  11. Effectiveness of a positive pressure respirator for controlling lead exposure in acid storage battery manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Grauvogel, L W

    1986-02-01

    Effective protection factors for lead-acid storage battery manufacturing workers using powered air-purifying respirators and their corresponding blood lead histories are reported and compared with results for half-mask, negative pressure respirators. Airborne lead protection factors for the powered, air-purifying respirator ranged from 2 to 74, while lead levels in the blood remained stable or decreased for 8 of the 13 workers monitored when compared to negative pressure respirator use levels.

  12. An Evaluation of Sharp Cut Cyclones for Sampling Diesel Particulate Matter Aerosol in the Presence of Respirable Dust

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Emanuele; Sheehan, Maura; Gussman, Robert; Kenny, Lee; Volkwein, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Two prototype cyclones were the subjects of a comparative research campaign with a diesel particulate matter sampler (DPMS) that consists of a respirable cyclone combined with a downstream impactor. The DPMS is currently used in mining environments to separate dust from the diesel particulate matter and to avoid interferences in the analysis of integrated samples and direct-reading monitoring in occupational environments. The sampling characteristics of all three devices were compared using ammonium fluorescein, diesel, and coal dust aerosols. With solid spherical test aerosols at low particle loadings, the aerodynamic size-selection characteristics of all three devices were found to be similar, with 50% penetration efficiencies (d50) close to the design value of 0.8 µm, as required by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration for monitoring occupational exposure to diesel particulate matter in US mining operations. The prototype cyclones were shown to have ‘sharp cut’ size-selection characteristics that equaled or exceeded the sharpness of the DPMS. The penetration of diesel aerosols was optimal for all three samplers, while the results of the tests with coal dust induced the exclusion of one of the prototypes from subsequent testing. The sampling characteristics of the remaining prototype sharp cut cyclone (SCC) and the DPMS were tested with different loading of coal dust. While the characteristics of the SCC remained constant, the deposited respirable coal dust particles altered the size-selection performance of the currently used sampler. This study demonstrates that the SCC performed better overall than the DPMS. PMID:25060240

  13. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  16. Impact of Mining Waste on Airborne Respirable Particulates in Northeastern Oklahoma, United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric dispersion of particles from mine waste is potentially an important route of human exposure to metals in communities close to active and abandoned mining areas. In this study, we assessed sources of mass and metal concentrations in two size fractions of respirable pa...

  17. Degradation of volatile organic compounds in a non-thermal plasma air purifier.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stefan; Jecklin, Matthias C; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-03-01

    The degradation of volatile organic compounds in a commercially available non-thermal plasma based air purifying system was investigated. Several studies exist that interrogate the degradation of VOCs in closed air systems using a non-thermal plasma combined with a heterogeneous catalyst. For the first time, however, our study was performed under realistic conditions (normal indoor air, 297.5K and 12.5 g m(-3) water content) on an open system, in the absence of an auxiliary catalyst, and using standard operating air flow rates (up to 320 L min(-1)). Cyclohexene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylene isomers were nebulized and guided through the plasma air purifier. The degradation products were trapped by activated charcoal tubes or silica gel tubes, and analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Degradation efficiencies of 11+/-1.6% for cyclohexene, <2% for benzene, 11+/-2.4% for toluene, 3+/-1% for ethylbenzene, 1+/-1% for sigma-xylene, and 3+/-0.4% for m-/rho-xylene were found. A fairly wide range of degradation products could be identified. On both trapping media, various oxidized species such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and one epoxide were observed. The formation of adipaldehyde from nebulized cyclohexene clearly indicates an ozonolysis reaction. Other degradation products observed suggests reactions with OH radicals. We propose that mostly ozone and OH radicals are responsible for the degradation of organic molecules in the plasma air purifier. PMID:20167347

  18. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided...

  4. Analysis of respirable particulate exposure and its effect to public health around lead smelter and e-waste processing industry in West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marselina, M.; Roosmini, D.; Salami, I. R. S.; Ayu A, M.; Cahyadi, W.

    2016-03-01

    Respirable particulate exposure strongly affects human health, especially for children who lived around industrial area. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of respirable particulate exposure to lung capacity of children. Study location in this study was Parung Panjang District, area of lead smelter industry and also in Astana Anyar District, area of e-waste processing industry. Thirty children were involved in Astana Anyar District and also thirty children in Parung Panjang District. The control groups were also studied in both areas. Predicted average daily intake (ADD) of respirable particulate was estimated and lung or respiration condition of children was measured by using spirometer. The lung condition of respondents was estimated by FEV1.0 and FVC values. As the result, the predicted ADD of children in lead smelter area is 3 times higher than the predicted ADD of children in e-waste processing area. It was correlated positively with the higher PM2.5 concentration in Parung Panjang District than the PM2.5 concentration in Astana Anyar District. Metals concentration in Parung Panjang was also measured with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) in this study and it was clearly state that metals concentration in location study were higher than metals concentration in control area.

  5. Health and respirable particulate (PM10) air pollution: a causal or statistical association?

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, J F; Lewis, R J

    1996-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported weak but statistically significant acute health effects of particulate air pollution. The associations are observed at levels below the current U.S. standard of 150 micrograms/m3 (24 hr). Health effects include acute increased mortality from cardiopulmonary conditions and acute morbidity such as hospital admissions for related diseases. We reviewed recent epidemiology studies to evaluate whether criteria for causality are met, and we conclude that they are not. The weak associations are as likely to be due to confounding by weather, copollutants, or exposure misclassification as by ambient particulate matter (PM). The results from the same metropolitan areas are inconsistent, and PM explains such a small amount of the variability in mortality/morbidity that the association has little practical significance. Finally, experimental chamber studies of susceptible individuals exposed to PM concentrations well above 150 micrograms/m3 provide no evidence to support the morbidity/mortality findings. None of the criteria for establishing causality of the PM/mortality hypothesis are clearly met at ambient concentrations common in many U.S. cities. Images p838-a Figure 1. PMID:8875158

  6. Health effects of ambient levels of respirable particulate matter (PM) on healthy, young-adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, William J.; Venigalla, Mohan M.; Trump, David

    2015-12-01

    There is an absence of studies that define the relationship between ambient particulate matter (PM) levels and adverse health outcomes among the young and healthy adult sub-group. In this research, the relationship between exposures to ambient levels of PM in the 10 micron (PM10) and 2.5 micron (PM2.5) size fractions and health outcomes in members of the healthy, young-adult subgroup who are 18-39 years of age was examined. Active duty military personnel populations at three strategically selected military bases in the United States were used as a surrogate to the control group. Health outcome data, which consists of the number of diagnoses for each of nine International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) categories related to respiratory illness, were derived from outpatient visits at each of the three military bases. Data on ambient concentrations of particulate matter, specifically PM10 and PM2.5, were obtained for these sites. The health outcome data were correlated and regressed with the PM10 and PM2.5 data, and other air quality and weather-related data on a daily and weekly basis for the period 1998 to 2004. Results indicate that at Fort Bliss, which is a US Environmental Protection Agency designated non-attainment area for PM10, a statistically significant association exists between the weekly-averaged number of adverse health effects in the young and healthy adult population and the corresponding weekly-average ambient PM10 concentration. A least squares regression analysis was performed on the Fort Bliss data sets indicated that the health outcome data is related to several environmental parameters in addition to PM10. Overall, the analysis estimates a .6% increase in the weekly rate of emergency room visits for upper respiratory infections for every 10 μg/m3 increase in the weekly-averaged PM10 concentration above the mean. The findings support the development of policy and guidance opportunities that can be developed to mitigate exposures

  7. Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Wirth, S.; Ellerbrock, R.; Sommer, M.

    2009-12-01

    Michael Kaiser1, Stephan Wirth2, Ruth H. Ellerbrock3, Michael Sommer3,4 1University of California Merced, Natural Science, 4225 N. Hospital Rd., Atwater, CA 95301 2,3 Leibniz-Center for Agricultural Research (ZALF) e. V. 2 Institute of Landscape Matter Dynamics 3 Institute of Soil Landscape Research Eberswalder Str. 84, D-15374 Muencheberg, Germany 4University of Potsdam, Institute of Geoecology, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany Microbial respiration activities correlated to sequentially separated, particulate and water-soluble organic matter fractions from arable and forest topsoils Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) accounts for roughly half of CO2 evolution from vegetated soil surfaces and plays a crucial role in the ability of soil to mitigate the greenhouse effect. The separation and identification of labile (i.e., easily decomposable) organic matter (OM) fractions from bulk SOM is of particular importance for a mechanistic understanding of microbial decomposition processes and for predicting the response of SOM to changes in land use, management, and climate. This work aimed to reveal differences in the relevance of particulate as well as water-soluble organic matter (OM) fractions from topsoils to the easily biodegradable soil organic matter (SOM). We selected eight paired sites with quite different soil types (Udorthent, Paleudalf, Glossudalf, Aquept, Hapludalf, Aquert, Udert, Haplorthod) and soil properties (e.g., clay content: 28 to 564 g kg-1). For each of these sites, we took samples from adjacent arable and forest topsoils. Physically uncomplexed, macro-, and micro-aggregate-occluded organic particle, as well as water-soluble OM fractions were sequentially separated by a combination of electrostatic attraction, ultrasonic treatment, density separation, sieving, and water extraction. The easily biodegradable SOM of the topsoil samples was determined by measuring microbial respiration during a short-term incubation

  8. Effectiveness of dust control methods for crystalline silica and respirable suspended particulate matter exposure during manual concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl A; Wagner, Cynthia D; Bisesi, Michael S; Ames, April L; Khuder, Sadik; Susi, Pam; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2010-12-01

    Concrete grinding exposes workers to unacceptable levels of crystalline silica dust, known to cause diseases such as silicosis and possibly lung cancer. This study examined the influence of major factors of exposure and effectiveness of existing dust control methods by simulating field concrete grinding in an enclosed workplace laboratory. Air was monitored during 201 concrete grinding sessions while using a variety of grinders, accessories, and existing dust control methods, including general ventilation (GV), local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and wet grinding. Task-specific geometric mean (GM) of respirable crystalline silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled-grinding, while GV was off/on, were 0.17/0.09, 0.57/0.13, 1.11/0.44, and 23.1/6.80, respectively. Silica dust concentrations (mg/m³ using 100-125 mm (4-5 inch) and 180 mm (7 inch) grinding cups were 0.53/0.22 and 2.43/0.56, respectively. GM concentrations of silica dust were significantly lower for (1) GV on (66.0%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (99.0%), LEV:Shop-vac- (98.1%) or wet- (94.4%) vs. uncontrolled-grinding. Task-specific GM of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) concentrations (mg/m³ for LEV:HEPA-, LEV:Shop-vac-, wet-, and uncontrolled grinding, while GV was off/on, were 1.58/0.63, 7.20/1.15, 9.52/4.13, and 152/47.8, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP using 100-125 mm and 180 mm grinding cups were 4.78/1.62 and 22.2/5.06, respectively. GM concentrations of RSP were significantly lower for (1) GV on (70.2%) vs. off, and (2) LEV:HEPA- (98.9%), LEV:Shop-vac- (96.9%) or wet- (92.6%) vs. uncontrolled grinding. Silica dust and RSP were not significantly affected by (1) orientation of grinding surfaces (vertical vs. inclined); (2) water flow rates for wet grinding; (3) length of task-specific sampling time; or, (4) among cup sizes of 100, 115 or 125 mm. No combination of factors or control methods reduced an 8-hr exposure level to below the

  9. Respiration, mineralization, and biochemical properties of the particulate matter in the southern Nansen Basin water column in April 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Codispoti, L. A.

    2007-03-01

    Determinations of the activity of the respiratory electron transport system (ETS), during the FRAM III expedition permit us to estimate oxygen utilization rates ( RO 2) from the surface to 2000 m under the polar pack ice in the Nansen Basin just north of Svalbard (83°N, 7°E) during April 1981. We found RO 2 at in situ temperatures ranging from 20 pM O 2 min -1 just below the ice to 0.2 pM O 2 min -1 at 2000 m. These rates are low compared to most other ocean regions, but they could decrease particulate organic carbon and nitrogen by 76% and 74%, respectively, over a period of ˜6 months. The RO 2 calculations based on measurements made at 0 °C yielded a power function of RO 2 vs. depth ( Z) of RO 2=67 Z-0.5534. When this RO 2 profile was superimposed on a more recent oxygen utilization rate profile made using the 3He- 3H-AOU method (OUR), in the same vicinity of the Nansen Basin during 1987 (OUR=52 Z-0.4058, [Zheng, Y., Schlosser, P., Swift, J.W., Jones, E.P., 1997. Oxygen utilization rates in the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean: implications for new production. Deep Sea Research I 44, 1923-1943]), the agreement of the two profiles was close. On one hand, this was to be expected because RO 2 is the biological basis of OUR, on the other hand, it was a surprise because the methodologies are so different. Nitrate mineralization obtained from ETS activities also compared favorably with calculations based on the data of Zheng et al. [1997. Oxygen utilization rates in the Nansen Basin, Arctic Ocean: implications for new production. Deep Sea Research I 44, 1923-1943]. Chlorophyll ranged from 6 ng L -1 at 5 m to 0.06 ng L -1 at 2000 m. Particulate organic carbon (POC) decreased from 0.93 μM C just below the ice to less than 0.4 μM C at 500 m. Particulate organic nitrogen (PON) was not detectable below 70 m, however in the upper 70 m it ranged from 0.16 to 0.04 μM N. The C/N mass ratio over these depths ranged from 5.8 to 11.3. Annual carbon productivity as calculated to

  10. Ozone removal capability of a welding fume respirator containing activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.R.; Dyrud, J.F.; Shih, Y.T. )

    1989-09-01

    Development of air purifying respirators for protection against ozone has been slowed by concerns about oxidation of charcoal and other available sorbents. The suitability of a charcoal sorbent for low concentrations of ozone was evaluated as a part of the development of a half-mask air purifying respirator designed for welding fumes and ozone. Testing of the respirator confirmed that charcoal can be a suitable sorbent for low levels of ozone. Where the respirator is properly selected, fit tested, and worn, respirator use against welding fumes and ozone at concentrations not exceeding 10 times the permissible exposure limit had been recommended.

  11. Ozone removal capability of a welding fume respirator containing activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A R; Dyrud, J F; Shih, Y T

    1989-09-01

    Development of air purifying respirators for protection against ozone has been slowed by concerns about oxidation of charcoal and other available sorbents. The suitability of a charcoal sorbent for low concentrations of ozone was evaluated as a part of the development of a half-mask air purifying respirator designed for welding fumes and ozone. Testing of the respirator confirmed that charcoal can be a suitable sorbent for low levels of ozone. Where the respirator is properly selected, fit tested, and worn, respirator use against welding fumes and ozone at concentrations not exceeding 10 times the permissible exposure limit had been recommended. PMID:2801512

  12. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit, canister with filter, or cartridge with filter; (3) Harness; (4... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Respirators; required components. 84.1131 Section..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit, canister with filter, or cartridge with filter; (3) Harness; (4... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Respirators; required components. 84.1131 Section..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... noseclip, hood, or helmet; (2) Filter unit, canister with filter, or cartridge with filter; (3) Harness; (4... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Respirators; required components. 84.1131 Section..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying... reaction with sorbent material in the canister. (c) Pesticide respirators, including all completely...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4)...

  20. Physiologic and subjective effects of respirator mask type.

    PubMed

    Harber, P; Beck, J; Brown, C; Luo, J

    1991-09-01

    The effect of alternate airflow path designs on full-face mask air-purifying respirators was assessed in 14 healthy volunteers during submaximal exercise. Respirator designs included no respirator (N), full-face mask, dual-cartridge with no nasal deflector (FN), full-face mask respirator with nasal deflector (FD), and a powered air-purifying respirator (PA). Physiologic effects were measured by using respiratory inductive plethysmography and subjective responses by two visual analog scales. There were significant effects of airflow path design upon the physiologic parameters of ventilation, tidal volume, and mean flow rate. There were no significant physiologic or subjective differences between the full-face mask respirators with and without the nasal deflector in place. The PA had less physiologic impact than the nonpowered models but did not show significant subjective benefit. The study suggests that both subjective and objective physiologic responses must be utilized in assessing respirator design. PMID:1781441

  1. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO2 and respirable particulate on the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Gamble, J; Jones, W; Minshall, S

    1987-02-01

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO2 and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO2 or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  2. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  3. Crystalline silica dust and respirable particulate matter during indoor concrete grinding - wet grinding and ventilated grinding compared with uncontrolled conventional grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl; Ames, April; Susi, Pamela P; Bisesi, Michael; Khuder, Sadik A; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2007-10-01

    The effectiveness of wet grinding (wet dust reduction method) and ventilated grinding (local exhaust ventilation method, LEV) in reducing the levels of respirable crystalline silica dust (quartz) and respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) were compared with that of uncontrolled (no dust reduction method) conventional grinding. A field laboratory was set up to simulate concrete surface grinding using hand-held angle grinders in an enclosed workplace. A total of 34 personal samples (16 pairs side-by-side and 2 singles) and 5 background air samples were collected during 18 concrete grinding sessions ranging from 15-93 min. General ventilation had no statistically significant effect on operator's exposure to dust. Overall, the arithmetic mean concentrations of respirable crystalline silica dust and RSP in personal air samples during: (i) five sessions of uncontrolled conventional grinding were respectively 61.7 and 611 mg/m(3) (ii) seven sessions of wet grinding were 0.896 and 11.9 mg/m(3) and (iii) six sessions of LEV grinding were 0.155 and 1.99 mg/m(3). Uncontrolled conventional grinding generated relatively high levels of respirable silica dust and proportionally high levels of RSP. Wet grinding was effective in reducing the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 98.2% and RSP 97.6%. LEV grinding was even more effective and reduced the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 99.7% and RSP 99.6%. Nevertheless, the average level of respirable silica dust (i) during wet grinding was 0.959 mg/m(3) (38 times the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists [ACGIH] threshold limit value [TLV] of 0.025 mg/m(3)) and (ii) during LEV grinding was 0.155 mg/m(3) (6 times the ACGIH TLV). Further studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of a greater variety of models, types, and sizes of grinders on different types of cement in different positions and also to test the simulated field lab experimentation in the field.

  4. 42 CFR 84.1151 - DOP filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having an air...) All single air-purifying respirator filter units will be tested in an atmosphere concentration of 100... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOP filter test; respirators designed...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1151 - DOP filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having an air...) All single air-purifying respirator filter units will be tested in an atmosphere concentration of 100... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DOP filter test; respirators designed...

  6. Performance of an N95 filtering facepiece particulate respirator and a surgical mask during human breathing: two pathways for particle penetration.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Haruta, Hiroki; Eninger, Robert M; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy T; Lee, Shu-An

    2009-10-01

    The protection level offered by filtering facepiece particulate respirators and face masks is defined by the percentage of ambient particles penetrating inside the protection device. There are two penetration pathways: (1) through the faceseal leakage, and the (2) filter medium. This study aimed at differentiating the contributions of these two pathways for particles in the size range of 0.03-1 microm under actual breathing conditions. One N95 filtering facepiece respirator and one surgical mask commonly used in health care environments were tested on 25 subjects (matching the latest National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health fit testing panel) as the subjects performed conventional fit test exercises. The respirator and the mask were also tested with breathing manikins that precisely mimicked the prerecorded breathing patterns of the tested subjects. The penetration data obtained in the human subject- and manikin-based tests were compared for different particle sizes and breathing patterns. Overall, 5250 particle size- and exercise-specific penetration values were determined. For each value, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio was calculated to quantify the relative contributions of the two penetration pathways. The number of particles penetrating through the faceseal leakage of the tested respirator/mask far exceeded the number of those penetrating through the filter medium. For the N95 respirator, the excess was (on average) by an order of magnitude and significantly increased with an increase in particle size (p < 0.001): approximately 7-fold greater for 0.04 microm, approximately 10-fold for 0.1 microm, and approximately 20-fold for 1 microm. For the surgical mask, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio ranged from 4.8 to 5.8 and was not significantly affected by the particle size for the tested submicrometer fraction. Facial/body movement had a pronounced effect on the relative contribution of the two penetration pathways. Breathing intensity and

  7. Performance of an N95 filtering facepiece particulate respirator and a surgical mask during human breathing: two pathways for particle penetration.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Haruta, Hiroki; Eninger, Robert M; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy T; Lee, Shu-An

    2009-10-01

    The protection level offered by filtering facepiece particulate respirators and face masks is defined by the percentage of ambient particles penetrating inside the protection device. There are two penetration pathways: (1) through the faceseal leakage, and the (2) filter medium. This study aimed at differentiating the contributions of these two pathways for particles in the size range of 0.03-1 microm under actual breathing conditions. One N95 filtering facepiece respirator and one surgical mask commonly used in health care environments were tested on 25 subjects (matching the latest National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health fit testing panel) as the subjects performed conventional fit test exercises. The respirator and the mask were also tested with breathing manikins that precisely mimicked the prerecorded breathing patterns of the tested subjects. The penetration data obtained in the human subject- and manikin-based tests were compared for different particle sizes and breathing patterns. Overall, 5250 particle size- and exercise-specific penetration values were determined. For each value, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio was calculated to quantify the relative contributions of the two penetration pathways. The number of particles penetrating through the faceseal leakage of the tested respirator/mask far exceeded the number of those penetrating through the filter medium. For the N95 respirator, the excess was (on average) by an order of magnitude and significantly increased with an increase in particle size (p < 0.001): approximately 7-fold greater for 0.04 microm, approximately 10-fold for 0.1 microm, and approximately 20-fold for 1 microm. For the surgical mask, the faceseal leakage-to-filter ratio ranged from 4.8 to 5.8 and was not significantly affected by the particle size for the tested submicrometer fraction. Facial/body movement had a pronounced effect on the relative contribution of the two penetration pathways. Breathing intensity and

  8. 21 CFR 880.6260 - Filtering facepiece respirator for use by the general public in public health medical emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... biological airborne particulates during a public health medical emergency. The device is made of polymeric materials and is intended to fit closely to the face and to function by filtering particulate material. (b... emergencies is a device that is a disposable half-facepiece non-powered air-purifying particulate...

  9. Halogenated flame-retardant concentrations in settled dust, respirable and inhalable particulates and polyurethane foam at gymnastic training facilities and residences.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, Mark J; Hale, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Halogenated flame-retardants (FRs) are used in a wide array of polymer-containing products. Animal studies and structure-activity modeling exercises suggest that FR exposure may result in detrimental toxicological effects. Workers with extended contact with such polymers (e.g., electronic dismantlers, carpet installers and aircraft personnel) have previously been observed to exhibit elevated body burdens of FRs, e.g., polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Recently, elevated PBDE blood levels were also reported in a non-occupational exposure group, gymnasts. These levels were hypothesized to be related to the large volumes of FR-treated polyurethane foam in gymnastics facilities. To further our understanding of workers' potential exposure, we analyzed FR concentrations in indoor dust and size-fractionated air particulates (respirable (<4 μm) and inhalable (>4 μm)) from gymnastic studios. Values were compared to samples from the homes of coaches employed at these facilities. Polyurethane foam blocks (i.e., pit foam) were also analyzed to characterize potential FR sources. FRs examined included those used to flame-retard polyurethane foam: 8 PBDE congeners, two brominated components of Firemaster 550 (2-ethylhexyl 2, 3, 4, 5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 3, 4, 5, 6-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH)) and three chlorinated organophosphates (tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)). Several additional FRs not used in polyurethane were also evaluated. These have also been detected in indoor dust and air and may also lead to adverse health effects. These include: BDE-183 and its replacement product (1, 2-bis(2, 4, 6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), two congeners of the deca-BDE formulation (BDE-206, -209) and their replacement decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and hexabromocyclododecane (α-, β-, γ-HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA)). Pit foam contained multiple

  10. Halogenated flame-retardant concentrations in settled dust, respirable and inhalable particulates and polyurethane foam at gymnastic training facilities and residences.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, Mark J; Hale, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Halogenated flame-retardants (FRs) are used in a wide array of polymer-containing products. Animal studies and structure-activity modeling exercises suggest that FR exposure may result in detrimental toxicological effects. Workers with extended contact with such polymers (e.g., electronic dismantlers, carpet installers and aircraft personnel) have previously been observed to exhibit elevated body burdens of FRs, e.g., polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Recently, elevated PBDE blood levels were also reported in a non-occupational exposure group, gymnasts. These levels were hypothesized to be related to the large volumes of FR-treated polyurethane foam in gymnastics facilities. To further our understanding of workers' potential exposure, we analyzed FR concentrations in indoor dust and size-fractionated air particulates (respirable (<4 μm) and inhalable (>4 μm)) from gymnastic studios. Values were compared to samples from the homes of coaches employed at these facilities. Polyurethane foam blocks (i.e., pit foam) were also analyzed to characterize potential FR sources. FRs examined included those used to flame-retard polyurethane foam: 8 PBDE congeners, two brominated components of Firemaster 550 (2-ethylhexyl 2, 3, 4, 5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 3, 4, 5, 6-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH)) and three chlorinated organophosphates (tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)). Several additional FRs not used in polyurethane were also evaluated. These have also been detected in indoor dust and air and may also lead to adverse health effects. These include: BDE-183 and its replacement product (1, 2-bis(2, 4, 6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), two congeners of the deca-BDE formulation (BDE-206, -209) and their replacement decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and hexabromocyclododecane (α-, β-, γ-HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA)). Pit foam contained multiple

  11. Risk-based selection of respirators against infectious aerosols: application to anthrax spores.

    PubMed

    Nicas, M; Neuhaus, J; Spear, R C

    2000-07-01

    This article presents two methods for estimating infection risk among individuals wearing air-purifying respirators against airborne pathogens, with the overall aim of selecting appropriate respiratory protection. Necessary data inputs are the parameters for the ambient pathogen concentration distribution, the respirator penetration distribution, and the infectious dose distribution, along with the breathing rate, duration of a respirator use period, and the number of use periods. The first method assumes that the pathogen does not exhibit a cumulative dose effect, whereas the second accounts for a cumulative dose effect. The methods are illustrated with hypothetical scenarios involving Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores. Available data suggest that anthrax spores would exhibit a cumulative dose effect for multiple exposures occurring close in time, as would likely affect personnel responding to a bioterrorist release. The analysis shows that failure to account for a cumulative dose effect when present leads to underestimating infection risk. Three types of air-purifying respirators are compared for their predicted efficacy in reducing the risk of inhalation anthrax. Although uncertainty analyses are not performed, a general conclusion is that a full-facepiece powered air-purifying respirator would be the best air-purifying device for responding to an anthrax spore release. Because such respirators would not prevent all personnel from inhaling an infectious dose, it would be advisable for users not previously vaccinated against anthrax to receive post-exposure prophylactic therapy. PMID:10914342

  12. Investigation of respirable particulate matter pollutants on air-breathing zone workers in the Beam Rolling Mills Factory (Iran National Steel Industrial Group), Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rafiei, Masoud; Gadgil, Alaka S; Ghole, Vikram S; Jaafarzadeh, Neemat; Gore, Sharad D; Aberomand, Mohammad; Shabab, Mitra

    2008-08-01

    Workers of iron and steel factories are exposed to a wide range of pollutants depending on the particular process, the materials involved, the effectiveness of monitoring and the control measures. Adverse effects are determined by the physical state and propensities of the pollutant involved, the intensity and duration of the exposure, the extent of pollutant accumulation in the body and the sensitivity of the individual to its effects. The main aim of this study is to assess the levels of the indoor respirable particulate matter (RPM) and to compare the health condition of exposed workers, with nonexposed employees group. Line 630 has only one furnace of 40 tons and line 650 has two furnaces of 20 and 40 tons capacity due to which the mean of the RPM concentrations in the breathing zone was significantly different (P < 0.05) in line 650 but not in line 630 as compared with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Hygiene's (3 mg/m(3)). The average of the RPM concentrations in production line 650 is higher than that of production line 630, with the 95% confidence interval in saw cabin station number 1 of production line 650.

  13. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  18. "Worst-case" aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle ("worst case") size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method. PMID:2543198

  19. Worst-case aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle (''worst case'') size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method.

  20. Effect of an ozone-generating air-purifying device on reducing concentrations of formaldehyde in air

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, E.J.; Boeniger, M.F.

    1994-02-01

    Formaldehyde, an air contaminant found in many indoor air investigations, poses distinct occupational exposure hazards in certain job categories (e.g., mortuary science) but is also of concern when found or suspected in office buildings and homes. A variety of air-purifying devices (APDs) are currently available or marketed for application to reduce or remove concentrations of a variety of indoor air pollutants through the use of ozone as a chemical oxidant. An investigation was conducted to determine if concentrations of formaldehyde similar to those found in industrial hygiene evaluations of funeral homes could be reduced with the use of an ozone-generating APD. An ozone-generating APD was placed in an exposure chamber and formaldehyde-containing embalming solution was allowed to evaporate naturally, creating peak and mean chamber concentrations of 2.5 and 1.3 ppm, respectively. Continuous-reading instruments were used to sample for formaldehyde and ozone. Active sampling methods were also used to sample simultaneously for formaldehyde and a possible reactant product, formic acid. Triplicate measurements were made in each of three evaluations: formaldehyde alone, ozone alone, and formaldehyde and ozone combined. Concentrations of formaldehyde were virtually identical with and without 0.5 ppm ozone. No reduction in formaldehyde concentration was found during a 90-minute evaluation using ozone at this concentration with peak and average concentrations of approximately 2.5 and 1.3 ppm formaldehyde, respectively. The results of this investigation suggest that the use of ozone is ineffective in reducing concentrations of formaldehyde. Because ozone has demonstrated health hazards, and is a regulated air contaminant in both the occupational and ambient environment, the use of ozone as an air purification agent in indoor air does not seem warranted. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10077 - 3H-1,2,4-Triazol-3-one, 1,2-dihydro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... protection factor (APF) of 10-25 meet the minimum requirements for § 721.63(a)(4): Air-purifying, tight...-face); powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a loose-fitting hood or helmet and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1102 - Examination, inspection and testing of complete respirator assemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... and mist respirators— (1) Single particulate hazard having an Air Contamination Level more than 0.05... having an Air Contamination Level less than 0.05 mg./m.3 or 2 million particles per cubic foot,...

  3. "Worst case" aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, "worst case" aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change. PMID:2729102

  4. Worst case aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, ''worst case'' aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change.

  5. Noninvasive, quantitative respirator fit testing through dynamic pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A new method has been invented for the noninvasive and quantitative determination of fit for a respirator. The test takes a few seconds and requires less expensive instrumentation than presently used for invasive testing. In this test, the breath is held at a negative pressure for a few seconds, and the leak-induced pressure decay inside the respirator cavity is monitored. A dynamic pressure sensor is attached to a modified cartridge of an air-purifying respirator or built into the respirator body or into the air supply line of an air-supplied respirator. The method is noninvasive in that the modified cartridge can be mounted onto any air-purifying respirator. The pressure decay during testing quantifies the airflow entered through the leak site. An equation has been determined which gives the air leakage as a function of pressure decay slope, respirator volume and the pressure differential during actual wear--all of which are determined by the dynamic pressure sensor. Thus, the ratio of air inhaled through the filters or via the air supply line to the leak rate is a measure of respirator fit, independent of aerosol deposition in the lung and aerosol distribution in the respirator cavity as found for quantitative fit testing with aerosols. The new method is shown to be independent of leak and sensor locations. The concentration and distribution of aerosols entered through the leak site is dependent only on the physical dimensions of the leak site and the air velocity in it, which can be determined independently.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3189157

  6. Effect of exercise level on ventilatory adaptation to respirator use.

    PubMed

    Harber, P; Shimozaki, S; Barrett, T; Fine, G

    1990-10-01

    The effect of exercise on the adaptation to an air-purifying respirator type load (dead space + inspiratory resistance) was studied in a group of 13 volunteers with a rapidly incremental exercise protocol. The difference between loaded and unloaded breathing at each exercise level was determined for each subject for a series of parameters describing the ventilatory work to overcome the respirator load pattern of breathing and metabolic work. Linear regression and t tests determined the average effect of the respirator load and the extent to which this effect was affected by the level of exercise. The inspiratory time and duty cycle were increased by the load, and exercise did not significantly affect the magnitude of this adaptation. High exercise did, however, increase the magnitude of the effect of the respiratory load on ventilatory work. These findings suggest that constraints to respiratory pattern adjustment, which may decrease respirator tolerance, occur at high exercise levels. PMID:2262825

  7. Impact of abandoned mine waste on atmospheric respirable particulate matter in the historic mining district of Rio Tinto (Iberian Pyrite Belt).

    PubMed

    Sánchez de la Campa, Ana M; de la Rosa, Jesús D; Fernández-Caliani, Juan C; González-Castanedo, Yolanda

    2011-11-01

    This work documents for the first time the levels and composition of atmospheric particulate matter in the historic mining district of Rio Tinto (Spain) to estimate the contribution and impact of resuspended particles from hazardous mine waste on air quality. The resuspended mine waste dust contributes notably (32%) to the total concentrations of toxic trace metals (Bi, As, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn and Sb) into the atmosphere, with the consequent impact on public health.

  8. Genotoxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitro-Derived in Respirable Airborne Particulate Matter Collected from Urban Areas of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Ramos de Rainho, Claudia; Machado Corrêa, Sérgio; Luiz Mazzei, José; Alessandra Fortes Aiub, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution toxic effects are mainly attributed to small inhalable particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 µm (PM 2.5). Our objective was to investigate mutagenic and clastogenic activity in PM samples collected in Rio de Janeiro. Samples were collected using a high-volume sampler at three sites: with low traffic and (2) and (3) with a heavy traffic. Six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and the derivative strains YG1021 and YG1024 were used in mutagenicity assays in the presence of organic extracts (10–50 µg/ plate) with and without exogenous metabolization. Allium cepa test was performed to evaluate possible cytotoxic and clastogenic activities. The highest PM 2.5 µm (132.73 µm/m3) and PAH values (1.22 ng/m3 for benzo(a)pyrene) were detected at site 3. High mutagenic frameshift responses in absence and presence of metabolic activation were detected at site 3. The participation of nitroarenes and dinitroarenes was detected in the total mutagenicity of the extracts studied. The cytotoxic effect and the abnormalities detected by Allium cepa test can be attributed to the PAH nitroderivatives in the organic extracts. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of urban airborne particulate matter is important as a basis for decision making by regulatory authorities. PMID:23738331

  9. Genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-derived in respirable airborne particulate matter collected from urban areas of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Ramos de Rainho, Claudia; Machado Corrêa, Sérgio; Luiz Mazzei, José; Alessandra Fortes Aiub, Claudia; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution toxic effects are mainly attributed to small inhalable particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 µ m (PM 2.5). Our objective was to investigate mutagenic and clastogenic activity in PM samples collected in Rio de Janeiro. Samples were collected using a high-volume sampler at three sites: with low traffic and (2) and (3) with a heavy traffic. Six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and the derivative strains YG1021 and YG1024 were used in mutagenicity assays in the presence of organic extracts (10-50 µ g/ plate) with and without exogenous metabolization. Allium cepa test was performed to evaluate possible cytotoxic and clastogenic activities. The highest PM 2.5 µ m (132.73 µ m/m(3)) and PAH values (1.22 ng/m(3) for benzo(a)pyrene) were detected at site 3. High mutagenic frameshift responses in absence and presence of metabolic activation were detected at site 3. The participation of nitroarenes and dinitroarenes was detected in the total mutagenicity of the extracts studied. The cytotoxic effect and the abnormalities detected by Allium cepa test can be attributed to the PAH nitroderivatives in the organic extracts. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of urban airborne particulate matter is important as a basis for decision making by regulatory authorities. PMID:23738331

  10. A survey of private sector respirator use in the United States: an overview of findings.

    PubMed

    Doney, Brent C; Groce, Dennis W; Campbell, Donald L; Greskevitch, Mark F; Hoffman, William A; Middendorf, Paul J; Syamlal, Girija; Bang, Ki Moon

    2005-05-01

    Limitations of previous surveys of respirator use led the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics to undertake a survey of respirator use and practices among U.S. private sector employers. The survey was mailed to 40,002 private sector establishments in August 2001; the responses were used to develop national estimates. Respirator use was required in 4.5% of establishments and for 3.1% of employees. Of the establishments requiring respirator use, 95% used air-purifying respirators and 17% used air-supplied respirators. Manufacturing; mining (including oil and gas extraction); construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing had the highest rates of establishment respirator use. Respirators were used most frequently to protect against dust/mist, paint vapors, and solvents. Large percentages of establishments requiring respirator use had indicators of potentially inadequate respirator programs. Of establishments requiring respirator use, 91% had at least one indicator of a potentially inadequate respiratory protection program, while 54% had at least five indicators. The survey findings suggest that large numbers of employers may not follow NIOSH recommendations and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) requirements for the selection and use of respirators, potentially putting workers at risk. The findings will aid efforts to increase the appropriate use of respirators in the workplace. PMID:15814381

  11. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: III. Interrelations between Respirable Elemental Carbon and Gaseous and Particulate Components of Diesel Exhaust derived from Area Sampling in Underground Non-metal Mining Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Roel; Coble, Joseph B.; Yereb, Daniel; Lubin, Jay H.; Blair, Aaron; Portengen, Lützen; Stewart, Patricia A.; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T.

    2010-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) has been implicated as a potential lung carcinogen. However, the exact components of DE that might be involved have not been clearly identified. In the past, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon oxides (COx) were measured most frequently to estimate DE, but since the 1990s, the most commonly accepted surrogate for DE has been elemental carbon (EC). We developed quantitative estimates of historical exposure levels of respirable elemental carbon (REC) for an epidemiologic study of mortality, particularly lung cancer, among diesel-exposed miners by back-extrapolating 1998–2001 REC exposure levels using historical measurements of carbon monoxide (CO). The choice of CO was based on the availability of historical measurement data. Here, we evaluated the relationship of REC with CO and other current and historical components of DE from side-by-side area measurements taken in underground operations of seven non-metal mining facilities. The Pearson correlation coefficient of the natural log-transformed (Ln)REC measurements with the Ln(CO) measurements was 0.4. The correlation of REC with the other gaseous, organic carbon (OC), and particulate measurements ranged from 0.3 to 0.8. Factor analyses indicated that the gaseous components, including CO, together with REC, loaded most strongly on a presumed ‘Diesel exhaust’ factor, while the OC and particulate agents loaded predominantly on other factors. In addition, the relationship between Ln(REC) and Ln(CO) was approximately linear over a wide range of REC concentrations. The fact that CO correlated with REC, loaded on the same factor, and increased linearly in log–log space supported the use of CO in estimating historical exposure levels to DE. PMID:20876234

  12. Service life of respirator cartridges for formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Johnson, J.S.

    1981-11-20

    To date there is no NIOSH-approved air-purifying respirator which will effectively remove formaldehyde gas. Because of formaldehyde's high vapor pressure, service life values calculated using the adsorption isotherm and Wheeler equations indicate that organic vapor cartridges containing activated carbon will last less than 10 minutes at concentrations greater than 10 ppM. Studies were initiated to identify a suitable sorbent for this potentially dangerous material. The project involves the following steps: develop a method for producing relatively high concentrations (20 ppM) of a formaldehyde test mixture; verify this test concentration using the NIOSH-approved chromotropic acid wet chemical technique; and survey a wide variety of sorbents, both plain and impregnated, in hopes of identifying a suitable air-purifying cartridge for formaldehyde. A dynamic formaldehyde generation system was fabricated in which formaldehyde was produced by continuously injecting formalin using a syringe pump. The concentration was monitored using an infrared analyzer and checked using the chromotropic acid technique. Twenty-five cartridges were tested for service life at concentrations of formaldehyde gas from 7.1 to 14.8 ppM. Acid gas cartridges and those containing Pittsburgh FCA or ASC showed superior service life.

  13. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Berardinelli, S.P.

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studies air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warming properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentration designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (<20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC.

  14. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Berardinelli, S P

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical [Threshold Limit Value (TLV) = 0.02 ppm] used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. The principal manufacturer of MIC is Union Carbide, and the site of production is Institute, West Virginia. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studied air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warning properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentrations designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. Another report addresses the protective clothing issue. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (less than 20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC. PMID:3591646

  15. Workplace protection factors for an N95 filtering facepiece respirator.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry L; Nelson, Thomas J; Cuta, Karen T

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the workplace performance of an N95 filtering facepiece, air-purifying respirator in a steel foundry. Air samples were collected inside and outside respirators worn by workers who were properly trained and qualitatively fit tested. For most workers, three or four pairs of air samples were collected on each of 2 days. The 49 valid sample sets were analyzed for iron, silicon, and zirconium. Only iron was present in sufficient concentrations to perform workplace protection factor (WPF) calculations. Individual WPF measurements ranged from 5 to 753. The geometric mean of the distribution was 119 with a lower 5th percentile value of 19. Time-weighted average WPFs (WPF(TWA)) were also calculated for each day for each worker as an estimate of the protection an individual might receive with daily respirator use. The WPF(TWA) values ranged from 15 for the worker with the single WPF value of 5, to a high of 684. The distribution of WPF(TWA) had a geometric mean of 120 and a lower 5th percentile of 22. Both data treatments indicate this respirator's performance was consistent with the assigned protection factor of 10 typically used for half facepiece respirators. The respirator provided adequate protection as used in this study. All contaminant concentrations inside the respirator were well below the relevant occupational exposure limits. Data collected also illustrate the dynamic nature of faceseal leakage in the workplace.

  16. Workplace protection factors for an N95 filtering facepiece respirator.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Larry L; Nelson, Thomas J; Cuta, Karen T

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the workplace performance of an N95 filtering facepiece, air-purifying respirator in a steel foundry. Air samples were collected inside and outside respirators worn by workers who were properly trained and qualitatively fit tested. For most workers, three or four pairs of air samples were collected on each of 2 days. The 49 valid sample sets were analyzed for iron, silicon, and zirconium. Only iron was present in sufficient concentrations to perform workplace protection factor (WPF) calculations. Individual WPF measurements ranged from 5 to 753. The geometric mean of the distribution was 119 with a lower 5th percentile value of 19. Time-weighted average WPFs (WPF(TWA)) were also calculated for each day for each worker as an estimate of the protection an individual might receive with daily respirator use. The WPF(TWA) values ranged from 15 for the worker with the single WPF value of 5, to a high of 684. The distribution of WPF(TWA) had a geometric mean of 120 and a lower 5th percentile of 22. Both data treatments indicate this respirator's performance was consistent with the assigned protection factor of 10 typically used for half facepiece respirators. The respirator provided adequate protection as used in this study. All contaminant concentrations inside the respirator were well below the relevant occupational exposure limits. Data collected also illustrate the dynamic nature of faceseal leakage in the workplace. PMID:17654225

  17. Simulated workplace performance of N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Coffey, C C; Campbell, D L; Zhuang, Z

    1999-01-01

    During July 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) began to certify nine new classes of particulate respirators. To determine the level of performance of these respirators, NIOSH researchers conducted a study to (1) measure the simulated workplace performance of 21 N95 respirator models, (2) determine whether fit-testing affected the performance, and (3) investigate the effect of varying fit-test pass/fail criteria on respirator performance. The performance of each respirator model was measured by conducting 100 total penetration tests. The performance of each respirator model was then estimated by determining the 95th percentile of the total penetration through the respirator (i.e., 95% of wearers of that respirator can expect to have a total penetration value below the 95th percentile penetration value). The 95th percentile of total penetrations for each respirator without fit-testing ranged from 6 to 88%. The 95th percentile of total penetrations for all the respirators combined was 33%, which exceeds the amount of total penetration (10%) normally expected of a half-mask respirator. When a surrogate fit test (1% criterion) was applied to the data, the 95th percentile of total penetrations for each respirator decreased to 1 to 16%. The 95th percentile of total penetrations for all the respirators combined was only 4%. Therefore, fit-testing of N95 respirators is necessary to ensure that the user receives the expected level of protection. The study also found that respirator performance was dependent on the value of the pass/fail criterion used in the surrogate fit-test. PMID:10529991

  18. 40 CFR 721.10575 - 1-Propanone, 1,1'-(oxydi-4,1-phenylene)bis[2-hydroxy-2-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...), R100, or P100 filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters. (C) NIOSH-certified powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10583 - Benzenamine, 4,4′-[1,3-phenylenebis(1-methylethylidene)]bis-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...), R100, or P100 filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters. (C) NIOSH-certified powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)...

  20. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  1. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  2. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  3. The effectiveness of respirators measured during styrene exposure in a plastic boat factory.

    PubMed

    Löf, A; Brohede, C; Gullstrand, E; Lindström, K; Sollenberg, J; Wrangskog, K; Hagberg, M; Hedman, B K

    1993-01-01

    In a plastic boat company we studied workers' attitudes toward wearing respiratory protective equipment and differences in styrene exposure received with and without respirators. The workers studied used either half-facepiece air-purifying or full-face air-supplied respirators as much as possible during the first day of the study. On the second day respirators were used only for short periods or not at all. Individual styrene exposures were measured by personal air sampling in the breathing zone. When using respirators the exposure was measured both inside and outside the respirators. The styrene metabolites mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acids were determined in urine samples collected during the workday. The eleven workers studied used the respirators 52% of the time on the first day and 7% of the time on the second. The reasons for not wearing respirators were that they delayed work, were too tight and uncomfortable, made it difficult to breath, and/or became too warm. The use of respirators during work operations such as spraying, laminating, and painting reduced the styrene exposure by 56%-92%. The excretion rate of mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acids in urine collected at the end of the working day was 30%-99% lower when respirators were worn than when they were not. PMID:8354572

  4. Indoor-outdoor relationships of respirable sulfates and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockery, Douglas W.; Spengler, John D.

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of respirable particulates and sulfates have been measured in 68 homes in six cities for at least 1 yr. A conservation of mass model was derived describing indoor concentrations in terms of outdoor concentrations, infiltration and indoor sources. The measured data were analysed to identify important building characteristics and to quantify their effect. The mean infiltration rate of outdoor fine particulates was found to be approximately 70%. Cigarette smoking was found to be the dominant indoor source of respirable particulates. Increased indoor concentrations of sulfates were found to be associated with smoking and also with gas stoves. The effect of full air conditioning of the building was to reduce infiltration of outdoor fine particulates by about one half, while preventing dilution and purging of internally generated pollutants. The model for indoor respirable particulate and sulfate levels was found to compare well with measurements.

  5. Using CO(2) to determine inhaled contaminant volumes and blower effectiveness in several types of respirators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur T; Koh, Frank C; Scott, William H; Rehak, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine how much contaminant could be expected to be inhaled when overbreathing several different types of respirators. These included several tight-fitting and loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) and one air-purifying respirator (APR). CO(2) was used as a tracer gas in the ambient air, and several loose-and tight-fitting respirators were tested on the head form of a breathing machine. CO(2) concentration in the exhaled breath was monitored as well as CO(2) concentration in the ambient air. This concentration ratio was able to give a measurement of protection factor, not for the respirator necessarily, but for the wearer. Flow rates in the filter/blower inlet and breathing machine outlet were also monitored, so blower effectiveness (defined as the blower contribution to inhaled air) could also be determined. Wearer protection factors were found to range from 1.1 for the Racal AirMate loose-fitting PAPR to infinity for the 3M Hood, 3M Breath-Easy PAPR, and SE 400 breath-responsive PAPR. Inhaled contaminant volumes depended on tidal volume but ranged from 2.02  L to 0  L for the same respirators, respectively. Blower effectiveness was about 1.0 for tight-fitting APRs, 0.18 for the Racal, and greater than 1.0 for two of the loose-fitting PAPRs. With blower effectiveness greater than 1.0, some blower flow during the exhalation phase contributes to the subsequent inhalation. Results from this experiment point to different ways to measure respirator efficacy.

  6. Using CO2 to Determine Inhaled Contaminant Volumes and Blower Effectiveness in Several Types of Respirators

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Arthur T.; Koh, Frank C.; Scott, William H.; Rehak, Timothy E.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine how much contaminant could be expected to be inhaled when overbreathing several different types of respirators. These included several tight-fitting and loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) and one air-purifying respirator (APR). CO2 was used as a tracer gas in the ambient air, and several loose-and tight-fitting respirators were tested on the head form of a breathing machine. CO2 concentration in the exhaled breath was monitored as well as CO2 concentration in the ambient air. This concentration ratio was able to give a measurement of protection factor, not for the respirator necessarily, but for the wearer. Flow rates in the filter/blower inlet and breathing machine outlet were also monitored, so blower effectiveness (defined as the blower contribution to inhaled air) could also be determined. Wearer protection factors were found to range from 1.1 for the Racal AirMate loose-fitting PAPR to infinity for the 3M Hood, 3M Breath-Easy PAPR, and SE 400 breath-responsive PAPR. Inhaled contaminant volumes depended on tidal volume but ranged from 2.02 L to 0 L for the same respirators, respectively. Blower effectiveness was about 1.0 for tight-fitting APRs, 0.18 for the Racal, and greater than 1.0 for two of the loose-fitting PAPRs. With blower effectiveness greater than 1.0, some blower flow during the exhalation phase contributes to the subsequent inhalation. Results from this experiment point to different ways to measure respirator efficacy. PMID:21792358

  7. Using CO(2) to determine inhaled contaminant volumes and blower effectiveness in several types of respirators.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Arthur T; Koh, Frank C; Scott, William H; Rehak, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine how much contaminant could be expected to be inhaled when overbreathing several different types of respirators. These included several tight-fitting and loose-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) and one air-purifying respirator (APR). CO(2) was used as a tracer gas in the ambient air, and several loose-and tight-fitting respirators were tested on the head form of a breathing machine. CO(2) concentration in the exhaled breath was monitored as well as CO(2) concentration in the ambient air. This concentration ratio was able to give a measurement of protection factor, not for the respirator necessarily, but for the wearer. Flow rates in the filter/blower inlet and breathing machine outlet were also monitored, so blower effectiveness (defined as the blower contribution to inhaled air) could also be determined. Wearer protection factors were found to range from 1.1 for the Racal AirMate loose-fitting PAPR to infinity for the 3M Hood, 3M Breath-Easy PAPR, and SE 400 breath-responsive PAPR. Inhaled contaminant volumes depended on tidal volume but ranged from 2.02  L to 0  L for the same respirators, respectively. Blower effectiveness was about 1.0 for tight-fitting APRs, 0.18 for the Racal, and greater than 1.0 for two of the loose-fitting PAPRs. With blower effectiveness greater than 1.0, some blower flow during the exhalation phase contributes to the subsequent inhalation. Results from this experiment point to different ways to measure respirator efficacy. PMID:21792358

  8. Measuring performance of a half-mask respirator in a styrene environment.

    PubMed

    Weber, R A; Mullins, H E

    2000-01-01

    A workplace protection factor (WPF) study was conducted with a half-mask air-purifying respirator during fiber glass boat production. Styrene was the measured analyte, and the geometric mean WPF found was 39.7. Analytical detection limits, sample contamination, and pulmonary elimination from previous exposures or from skin absorption were identified as important considerations that can bias the WPFs measured. There were significant differences in the mean concentrations found inside the respirator when analyzed by time period. An increase in the concentration found inside the facepiece cavity and a decrease in the WPF over time was found for people with three or four measurements. This indicates either a change in performance of the respirator over time or a bias from low-level exposures during the day or skin absorption. PMID:10885894

  9. Effects of respirators on worker efficiency. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, R.; Woldstad, J.; Slobodien, M.J.; Madison, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of full face piece air purifying respirator use on worker efficiency. With and without a respirator, twenty nuclear power plant workers performed a typical mechanical work task and 2 dexterity tests in an environmental chamber maintained at a temperature of 35{degrees}C (95{degrees}F) and a relative humidity of 65%. The subjects were trained for one day and tested on the following day. On test day, each subject performed each standardized task twice in full cotton protective clothing, once with a respirator and once without. The order in which subjects performed the task with and without a respirator was staggered. The standardized tasks consisted of a stud torquing procedure and two separate trials of a pegboard dexterity test (before and after the torquing procedure). All subject testing wa videotaped and the videotapes were time coded for evaluation by an independent reviewer who determined the times for task completion. The 95% confidence intervals for the mean percentage increase in time to complete the various tasks for trials using th respirator were: 1st Dexterity Test (Lower Limit -1.16%, Mean 3.05%, Upper Limit 7.27%); Stud Torquing (Lower Limit -0.99%, Mean 2.11%, Upper Limit 5.21%); 2nd Dexterity Test (Lower Limit -2.06%, Mean 1.62%, Upper Limit 5.30%). These small increases in completion times attributable to respirator use were not statistically significant. It was concluded that respirator use had no significant effect on the efficiency with which workers conducted the tasks in this study.

  10. Respirator performance for STEL exposures in thermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Visage, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    An irritant smoke qualitative field test procedure was developed and used to evaluate the performance of rubber and silicone facepiece models of a half-mask air-purifying respirator under thermal and non-thermal working conditions for 37 maintenance workers at a coal-fired, electrical power generation plant. Prior to participating in field testing, subjects were screened using an irritant smoke qualitative fit test. During initial fit testing, 30% of the subjects failed to fit, and additional failures in subsequent tests resulted in an overall failure rate of 42%. The subjects experienced respiratory failures in both thermal and non-thermal environments even after the poor fits had been eliminated by the use of a fit test. Over 90% of the failures in the thermal environment and all of the failures in the non-thermal environment occurred within the first 9 min of the 15-min test period. The effectiveness of respirators of both facepiece materials was decreased significantly (p < .05) during thermal working conditions. Half-mask respirators of the type studied were found to provide inadequate protection for STEL exposures in thermal environments and may be inappropriate for use for a large percentage of working population. The irritant smoke qualitative field test procedure was shown to be effective for evaluating short-term performance of negative pressure, half-mask respirators, providing there are no interfering air currents, where HEPA or HEPA combination cartridges will provide adequate respiratory protection.

  11. Diminished speech intelligibility associated with certain types of respirators worn by healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Radonovich, Lewis J; Yanke, Robert; Cheng, Jing; Bender, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to determine the level of communication interference associated with commonly used disposable and reusable respirators and surgical masks worn by healthcare workers. Speech intelligibility was assessed using the modified rhyme test in an intensive care unit environment. Respirators decreased speech intelligibility by a range of 1% to 17%, although not all were statistically significant. Differences in speech intelligibility associated with surgical masks and disposable filtering facepiece respirators (without exhalation valves) were not statistically significant compared with controls. Wearing half-face elastomeric respirators with voice augmentation equipment was associated with higher speech intelligibility than models without this equipment (OR = 2.81). Hearing clarity while wearing a powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) was 79% compared with 90% with no PAPR (OR = 0.40). While some respirators appear to have little or no effect on speech intelligibility, interference with speech intelligibility associated with certain types of respirators commonly worn by U.S. healthcare workers may be substantial. PMID:19904661

  12. 40 CFR 721.10057 - Dodecanedioic acid, 1, 12-dihydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters;...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10057 - Dodecanedioic acid, 1, 12-dihydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters;...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10057 - Dodecanedioic acid, 1, 12-dihydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters;...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10057 - Dodecanedioic acid, 1, 12-dihydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters;...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10057 - Dodecanedioic acid, 1, 12-dihydrazide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters;...

  17. Effects of respirators under heat/work conditions

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; Dukes-Dobos, F.; Smith, R.

    1984-06-01

    Physiological responses and perceived strain of five unacclimatized male subjects were studied. The subjects were exposed to heat during an exercise task and were evaluated while wearing half and full facepiece, cartridge-type, air-purifying respirators, and without a respirator. The exercise consisted of walking on a treadmill for a period of 1 hour in a controlled environmental chamber at each of two different energy expenditure levels (200 and 400 kcal/hr)(approx. = 58 and 116 Watts) and two different heat exposures (air temperatures of 25/sup 0/C and 43.3./sup 0/C). The results indicated that wearing a full facepiece respirator imposed significant physiological strain added to that caused by the heat and workloads used in the study. Five of the six physiological measures show this increased physiological strain: (1) heart rate; (2) minute ventilation; (3) oxygen consumption; (4) energy expenditure; and (5) oral temperature. There was no detectable effect on sweat rate. Although subjective ratings indicated more discomfort with increasing physiological strain, the observed correlations between such measures were low (T/sub b/ < .60). The net consequence of the significant effects indicates that workers' tolerance to moderate or high levels of work under hot conditions while wearing a respirator is reduced. The reduction is more pronounced when wearing a full mask than when wearing a half mask. Changes in respirator design which minimize respiratory dead space are suggested to alleviate this problem. Otherwise, prevention of excessive physiological strain from respirator use when working at moderate or higher levels at hot job sites could necessitate more rest breaks or limiting work time under such conditions.

  18. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10077 - 3H-1,2,4-Triazol-3-one, 1,2-dihydro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-fitting respirator equipped with N100 (if aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or full... Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; and supplied-air respirator operated in...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10029 - Isocyanate compound, modified with methoxysilane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10077 - 3H-1,2,4-Triazol-3-one, 1,2-dihydro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; and supplied-air respirator operated in pressure...-fitting respirator equipped with N100 (if aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10171 - 1H-benz(e)indolium, 1,1,2,3-tetramethyl-, 4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10171 - 1H-benz(e)indolium, 1,1,2,3-tetramethyl-, 4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10575 - 1-Propanone, 1,1'-(oxydi-4,1-phenylene)bis[2-hydroxy-2-methyl-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respirator equipped with a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters... half-face or full-face) and HEPA filters. (E) NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in...), R100, or P100 filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10171 - 1H-benz(e)indolium, 1,1,2,3-tetramethyl-, 4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10029 - Isocyanate compound, modified with methoxysilane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10029 - Isocyanate compound, modified with methoxysilane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10171 - 1H-benz(e)indolium, 1,1,2,3-tetramethyl-, 4-methylbenzenesulfonic acid (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half- or full-face) and HEPA filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters (either half- or...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10029 - Isocyanate compound, modified with methoxysilane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10029 - Isocyanate compound, modified with methoxysilane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... absent), R100, or P100 filters; powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting full facepiece and High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters; supplied-air respirator operated in pressure... alternative to the § 721.63 respirator requirements may request to do so under 40 CFR 721.30. Persons...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10583 - Benzenamine, 4,4′-[1,3-phenylenebis(1-methylethylidene)]bis-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respirator equipped with a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters... half-face or full-face) and HEPA filters. (E) NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in...), R100, or P100 filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator...

  12. 42 CFR 84.173 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.173 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each respirator shall, where necessary, be equipped with a suitable harness designed and constructed to hold the components of the respirator in position against the...

  13. 42 CFR 84.173 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.173 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each respirator shall, where necessary, be equipped with a suitable harness designed and constructed to hold the components of the respirator in position against the...

  14. Factors Controlling Respiration Rates and Respired Carbon Dioxide Signatures in Riverine Ecosystems of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, E. E.; Richey, J. E.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Quay, P. D.; Krusche, A. V.; Alin, S. R.

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the processes controlling respiration rates observed in streams and rivers throughout the Amazon basin during the dry season by substituting spatial coverage for experimental manipulation. Throughout the Brazilian states of Amazonas and Acre, respiration rates ranged from 0.066 to 1.45 μM/hr of O2 consumed. In situ respiration was positively correlated with pH (r2=0.60), with pH values ranging from 3.95 to 8.57. Although the concentration of bulk size fractions of organic matter(dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fine particulate organic carbon, and coarse particulate organic carbon) were uncorrelated with both pH and respiration, respiration was positively correlated with the percentage of DOC that was less than 5 kDa as determined by centrifuge ultrafiltration (r2=0.52). No correlation was observed for the less than 100 kDa fraction. Further, pH was also correlated with the percentage of DOC in the <5 kDa fraction (r2=0.86), as the <5 kDa fraction increased from 34% in acidic blackwater streams to 91% in more basic whitewater rivers. These results suggest that low molecular weight organic matter (LMWOM, <5 kDa) is labile and supports higher respiration rates as compared to high molecular weight organic matter, and that pH may control the size distribution of dissolved organic matter. Further, at high pH sites with high respiration rates, net primary production ranged from 3.54 to 13.5 μM/hr of O2 produced. These rates suggest that higher pH sites are dominated by in situ production, resulting in high yields of LMWOM, which is rapidly consumed during the dry season. The 13C of respired CO2 was monitored during bottle incubations to characterize the source of organic matter being respired. Values ranged from -15.2 to -27.0‰, similar to the 13C of DIC at each site, indicating that respiration is a key process controlling the δ13C of the DIC. Furthermore, there is a positive correlation between the δ13C of respired CO2 and respiration rate (r2

  15. Plutonium hazard in respirable dust on the surface of soil.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C J; Tidball, R R; Severson, R C

    1976-08-01

    Plutonium-239 in the fine particulate soil fraction of surface dust is subject to suspension by air currents and is a potential health hazard to humans who may inhale it. This respirable particulate fraction is defined as particles less than or equal to 5 micrometers. The respirable fraction of surface dust was separated by ultrasonic dispersion and a standard water-sedimentation procedure. Plutonium concentration in this fraction of off-site soils located downwind from the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (Jefferson County, Colorado) were as much as 380 times the background concentration. It is prposed that this method of evaluation defines more precisely the potential health hazard from the respirable fraction of plutonium-contaminated soils. PMID:941018

  16. Effects of temperature and humidity on respirator fit under simulated work conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.J.; Loibl, J.M.; Carter, K.D.; Hyatt, E.C.

    1988-07-01

    A study conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory compared quantitative fit factors and simulated work factors and determined the effects of temperature and humidity on respirator fit. This study used a commercially available fit chamber and an environmental chamber set at six conditions to simulate US work environments. Seven respirators were tested on a limited test panel of 10 subjects. The test results indicate that the performance of one powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) helmet is significantly degraded during the simulated work exercises, whereas the half-mask PAPR performance was not affected. Tight-fitting facepiece PAPRs provide higher protection than loose-fitting PAPRs. The performance of the negative-pressure half-mask and full-facepiece respirators is degraded during fit tests at high humidity and high temperature. The degradation of the fit factors for the negative-pressure half-mask during high humidity at ambient and high temperatures is probably due to facepiece slippage caused by sweating. More dynamic exercises, including motions in which the individual bends over and stands up repeatedly, are recommended to develop quantitative fit factors that adequately simulate work factors. Tight-fitting facepiece PAPRs should not be classified with loose-fitting PAPRs. 12 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  18. Effects of respirator ambient air cooling on thermophysiological responses and comfort sensations.

    PubMed

    Caretti, David M; Barker, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    This investigation assessed the thermophysiological and subjective impacts of different respirator ambient air cooling options while wearing chemical and biological personal protective equipment in a warm environment (32.7 ± 0.4°C, 49.6 ± 6.5% RH). Ten volunteers participated in 90-min heat exposure trials with and without respirator (Control) wear and performed computer-generated tasks while seated. Ambient air cooling was provided to respirators modified to blow air to the forehead (FHC) or to the forehead and the breathing zone (BZC) of a full-facepiece air-purifying respirator using a low-flow (45 L·min(-1)) mini-blower. An unmodified respirator (APR) trial was also completed. The highest body temperatures (TTY) and least favorable comfort ratings were observed for the APR condition. With ambient cooling over the last 60 min of heat exposure, TTY averaged 37.4 ± 0.6°C for Control, 38.0 ± 0.4°C for APR, 37.8 ± 0.5°C for FHC, and 37.6 ± 0.7°C for BZC conditions independent of time. Both the FHC and BZC ambient air cooling conditions reduced facial skin temperatures, reduced the rise in body temperatures, and led to more favorable subjective comfort and thermal sensation ratings over time compared to the APR condition; however statistical differences among conditions were inconsistent. Independent of exposure time, average breathing apparatus comfort scores with BZC (7.2 ± 2.5) were significantly different from both Control (8.9 ± 1.4) and APR (6.5 ± 2.2) conditions when ambient cooling was activated. These findings suggest that low-flow ambient air cooling of the face under low work rate conditions and mild hyperthermia may be a practical method to minimize the thermophysiological strain and reduce perceived respirator discomfort. PMID:24730706

  19. SYSTEMIC TRANSLOCATION OF PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS FOLLOWING A SINGLE INTRATRACHEAL INSTILLATION IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respirable ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Direct translocation of PM associated metals from the lungs into systemic circulation may be partly responsible. We measured elemental content of lungs, pla...

  20. Use of MAG-1 spectacles with positive- and negative-pressure respirators

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, K.A.; Moore, T.O.

    1985-02-01

    Results of testing conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Personnel Protection Studies Section, using MAG-1 spectacles in conjunction with positive- and negative-pressure full-facepiece respirators, are reported. The purpose of the three-phase study was to determine if the specially constructed strap of the MAG-1s affected the protection factors (PFs) of the respirators or the cylinder life of selected self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The following respirators were tested with the MAG-1s: (1) Phases I and II, positive-pressure full facepiece: Presur-Pak II SCBA (pressure-demand) Scottoramic facepiece, MSA 401 Air Mask Ultravue facepiece (medium), Survivair pressure-demand SCBA/silicone full facepiece, MSA powered air-purifying respirator/Ultravue facepiece (medium); and (2) Phase III, negative-pressure full facepiece: MSA Ultravue (small, medium, large), MSA Ultra-twin (small, medium, large), Norton Series 7600 (one size only). Statistical analysis and review of the test data from Phases I and II indicated little, if any, variation with and without the MAG-1s with most protection factors greater than 10,000. Test data also indicated little, if any, difference in the cylinder life with and without the MAG-1s, except the Scott Presur-Pak II SCBA used with the Scottoramic facepiece. Statistical analysis of the quantitative fit test data indicated no difference in PFs for the negative-pressure devices for the Ultravue negative-pressure respirator, but a significance at the 0.05 and 0.01 levels for the Ultra-twin and Norton full facepieces, respectively.

  1. Protection of firefighters against combustion aerosol particles: simulated workplace protection factor of a half-mask respirator (pilot study).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, James; Yermakov, Michael; Reponen, Tiina; Kulkarni, Pramod; Qi, Chaolong; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the penetration of ultrafine particles originated by combustion of different materials into elastomeric half-mask respirators equipped with two P100 filters. We determined the Simulated Workplace Protection Factor (SWPF) for 11 firefighters wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators and performing activities simulating those conducted during fire overhaul operations. The tests were performed in a controlled laboratory setting. A newly-developed battery-operated Portable Aerosol Mobility Spectrometer (PAMS) was used to measure size-resolved aerosol particle concentrations outside (C(out)) and inside (Cin) of an air-purifying respirator donned on a firefighter, and the SWPF was calculated as C(out)/C(in). Based on the total aerosol concentration, the "total" SWPF ranged from 4,222 (minimum) to 35,534 (maximum) with values falling primarily in a range from 11,171 (25 percentile) to 26,604 (75 percentile) and a median value being ≈15,000. This is consistent with the recently reported fit factor (FF) data base.((1)) The size-resolved SWPF data revealed a dependency on the particle size. It was concluded that a portable device such as PAMS can be used on firefighters during overhaul operations (as well as on other workers wearing elastomeric half-mask respirators) to monitor the aerosol concentrations in real time and ultimately help prevent overexposure. PMID:25625543

  2. 40 CFR 721.10572 - Benzamide, N - [ [ 4- [(cyclopropylamino) carbonyl]phenyl] sulfonyl] -2 -methoxy-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. (D) NIOSH...-face) and HEPA filters. (E) NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10607 - Aliphatic diisocyanate, homopolymer, alkanol-blocked (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. (D) NIOSH...-face) and HEPA filters. (E) NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10278 - 4,4′-Bipyridinium, 1-(phosphonoalkyl)-1′-substituted-, salt with anion (1:2) (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters; (D) NIOSH-certified powered air-purifying respirator equipped with a tight-fitting facepiece (either half-face or full-face) and HEPA filters; or (E... respirator equipped with N100 (if oil aerosols absent), R100, or P100 filters; (B) NIOSH-certified...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10490 - HDI biuret, hydroxyethyl methacrylate prepolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters; NIOSH-certified powered... HEPA filters; or NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or continuous flow... filters; NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10490 - HDI biuret, hydroxyethyl methacrylate prepolymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters; NIOSH-certified powered... HEPA filters; or NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or continuous flow... filters; NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10607 - Aliphatic diisocyanate, homopolymer, alkanol-blocked (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... a loose-fitting hood or helmet and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. (D) NIOSH...-face) and HEPA filters. (E) NIOSH-certified supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filters. (B) NIOSH-certified air-purifying, tight-fitting full-face respirator equipped with N100 (if...

  8. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  9. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  10. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  11. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  12. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  13. Performance of N95 respirators: filtration efficiency for airborne microbial and inert particles.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Willeke, K; Grinshpun, S A; Donnelly, J; Coffey, C C

    1998-02-01

    In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal. PMID:9487666

  14. Inspiratory flow rates during hard work when breathing through different respirator inhalation and exhalation resistances.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Karen; Caretti, David; Scott, William; Johnson, Arthur; Koh, Frank

    2006-09-01

    There has been a long-standing debate regarding the adequacy of airflow rates used in respirator certification testing and whether these test flow rates underestimate actual values. This study investigated breath by breath inspiratory peak flow rate, minute ventilation, and instantaneous flow rates of eight young, healthy volunteers walking on a treadmill at 80-85% of maximal aerobic capacity until exhaustion while wearing an air-purifying respirator with one of eight combinations of inhalation and exhalation resistance. An analysis of variance was performed to identify differences among the eight conditions. Scheffe's post hoc analysis indicated which means differed. The group of conditions with the highest average value for each parameter was identified and considered to represent a worst-case scenario. Data was reported for these conditions. A Gaussian distribution was fit to the data and the 99.9% probability levels determined. The 99.9% probability level for the peak and instantaneous flow rates were 374 L/min and 336 L/min, respectively. The minute ventilation distribution was not Gaussian. Less than 1% of the recorded minute ventilations exceeded 135 L/min. Instantaneous flow rates exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's respirator test standards of 64, 85, and 100 L/min constant flow 91%, 87%, and 82% of the time, respectively. The recorded minute ventilations exceeded the 40 L/min minute ventilation test standard (for tests with a sinusoidal flow pattern) 100% of the time. This study showed that young, healthy respirator wearers generated peak flow rates, minute ventilations, and instantaneous flow rates that consistently exceeded current test standards. Their flow rates should be higher than those of a respirator wearer performing occupational work and could be considered upper limits. Testing respirators and respirator cartridges using a sinusoidal breathing pattern with a minute ventilation of 135 L/min (peak flow rate

  15. Respiratory protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis: quantitative fit test outcomes for five type N95 filtering-facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiyoung; Slavcev, Andrea; Nicas, Mark

    2004-01-01

    respirator penetration (primarily due to faceseal leakage) of .04 and 0.3, respectively. The respirator with the highest overall pass rate (95%) reduced M. tb infection risk by 95%, while the respirator with the lowest pass rate (8%) reduced M. tb infection risk by only 70%. To promote the marketing of respirators that will successfully fit the highest proportion of wearers, and to increase protection for workers who might use respirators without the benefit of being fit tested, we recommend that fit testing be part of the NIOSH certification process for negative-pressure air-purifying respirators with tightly fitting facepieces. At a minimum, we recommend that respirator manufacturers generate and provide pass rate data to assist in selecting candidate respirators. In any event, program managers can initially select candidate respirators by comparing quantitative fit tests for a representative sample of their employee population. PMID:15202153

  16. Respiratory protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis: quantitative fit test outcomes for five type N95 filtering-facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiyoung; Slavcev, Andrea; Nicas, Mark

    2004-01-01

    respirator penetration (primarily due to faceseal leakage) of .04 and 0.3, respectively. The respirator with the highest overall pass rate (95%) reduced M. tb infection risk by 95%, while the respirator with the lowest pass rate (8%) reduced M. tb infection risk by only 70%. To promote the marketing of respirators that will successfully fit the highest proportion of wearers, and to increase protection for workers who might use respirators without the benefit of being fit tested, we recommend that fit testing be part of the NIOSH certification process for negative-pressure air-purifying respirators with tightly fitting facepieces. At a minimum, we recommend that respirator manufacturers generate and provide pass rate data to assist in selecting candidate respirators. In any event, program managers can initially select candidate respirators by comparing quantitative fit tests for a representative sample of their employee population.

  17. Worker exposure to chemical agents in the manufacture of rubber tires and tubes: particulates.

    PubMed

    Williams, T M; Harris, R L; Arp, E W; Symons, M J; Van Ert, M D

    1980-03-01

    The Occupational Health Studies Group industrial hygiene studies at a group of 14 tire and tube manufacturing plants chosen to represent a cross-section of the industry include numerous evaluations of potential exposure to airborne particulate matter. Results of these environmental particulate sampling studies are reported by plant and by occupational groups within plants. High volume, open face and cyclone samplers were employed to evaluate both personnel and area particulate concentrations. The concentrations of particulates yielded by high volume and open face total particulate samplers are compared with those of comparison samples of respirable material. Personnel samples of particulates are compared with general air samples taken in the same work areas. An overall review and comparison is given of particulate exposures to workers in various occupational title groups where particulate materials are released to the air from processes or operations.

  18. THE ASSOCIATION OF EXPOSURE TO PARTICULATE MATTER AND RELATED AIR POLLUTANTS WITH SPECIFIC HEALTH EFFECTS IN HEALTHY HIGHWAY PATROL OFFICERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimated exposures to ambient respirable particulate matter (PM) and related co-pollutants have been statistically associated with mortality and morbidity in epidemiological studies conducted throughout the world. Although some subpopulations (e.g., asthmatics; elderly, pulmonar...

  19. Assessment of the effectiveness of respirator usage in coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2002-01-01

    This program protection factor study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of filter cartridge respirators while coke oven workers performed their normal work. Benzene soluble fraction (BSF) of total particulate concentrations was measured inside and outside the respirators of nine coke oven workers who worked on the top of the battery of one older coke oven plant and who reported regular use of respirators. The measurements were taken for 3 consecutive days. Excluding two undetectable measurements inside the respirator, it was found that the outside respirator BSF concentrations (25 sets) ranged from 87 to 807 microg/m3, whereas the inside respirator BSF concentrations ranged from 16 to 509 microg/m3. A program protection factor (PPF) for each set of observations was calculated as the ratio of outside to inside air BSF concentrations. The mean PPF was 2.5 with a range of 1.1 to 9.6, and 12 of the 25 measurements (48%) were below 2.0. Although the workers claimed they regularly wore their respirators, the wide range and the low PPF findings suggest that worker behavior and respirator fit may influence the level of protection provided by the respirator.

  20. Organic fuels for respiration in tropical river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, N.; Keil, R. G.; Richey, J. E.; Krusche, A. V.; Medeiros, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Watershed-derived organic matter is thought to provide anywhere from 30-90% of the organic matter in rivers (e.g. Hernes et al 2008; Spencer et al 2010). The most abundant biochemicals on land are cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. Combined, they represent as much as 80% of the biomass in a typical forest and as much as 60% of the biomass in a typical field (natural or crop)(Bose et al 2009; Bridgeman et al., 2007; Hu and Zu 2006; Martens et al 2004). They are often assumed to be refractory and hard to degrade, but this assumption is at odds with virtually all observations: soils and marine sediments are not accumulating vast amounts of these compounds (Hedges and Oades, 1997), and degradation experiments suggest that cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin are reactive and likely to be important fuels for respiration (Benner, 1991; Haddad et al, 1992; Dittmar et al, 2001; Otto and Simpson, 2006). During several trips to the lower Amazon River, incubation experiments were performed in which the biological degradation of lignin phenols was observed in order to assess the contribution of microbial respiration of terrestrially-derived macromolecules to gross respiration and CO2 gas evasion rates. Both particulate and dissolved lignin concentrations decreased by ~40% after being incubated in the dark for 5-7 days, indicating a turnover time of the entire lignin pool of 12-18 days. These results shift the paradigm that lignocellulose derived OM is highly recalcitrant, and indicate that microbial respiration of lignocellulose may play a larger role in total respiration rates/CO2 outgassing than previously thought. A simple mass balance calculation was done to test whether microbial degradation alone could explain the lignin data observed in the field. First, a theoretical particulate lignin concentration for Macapa was calculated based on the observed data at Obidos. The measured rate of particulate lignin degradation was multiplied by the transit time of water from

  1. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  2. Health effects of particulate air pollution: time for reassessment?

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C A; Bates, D V; Raizenne, M E

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have observed health effects of particulate air pollution. Compared to early studies that focused on severe air pollution episodes, recent studies are more relevant to understanding health effects of pollution at levels common to contemporary cities in the developed world. We review recent epidemiologic studies that evaluated health effects of particulate air pollution and conclude that respirable particulate air pollution is likely an important contributing factor to respiratory disease. Observed health effects include increased respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, increased hospitalizations and other health care visits for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, increased respiratory morbidity as measured by absenteeism from work or school or other restrictions in activity, and increased cardiopulmonary disease mortality. These health effects are observed at levels common to many U.S. cities including levels below current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate air pollution. Images Figure 1. PMID:7656877

  3. Health effects of particulate air pollution: time for reassessment?

    PubMed

    Pope, C A; Bates, D V; Raizenne, M E

    1995-05-01

    Numerous studies have observed health effects of particulate air pollution. Compared to early studies that focused on severe air pollution episodes, recent studies are more relevant to understanding health effects of pollution at levels common to contemporary cities in the developed world. We review recent epidemiologic studies that evaluated health effects of particulate air pollution and conclude that respirable particulate air pollution is likely an important contributing factor to respiratory disease. Observed health effects include increased respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, increased hospitalizations and other health care visits for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, increased respiratory morbidity as measured by absenteeism from work or school or other restrictions in activity, and increased cardiopulmonary disease mortality. These health effects are observed at levels common to many U.S. cities including levels below current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate air pollution.

  4. Respiration signals from photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lena M

    2013-10-01

    respiratory modulation of the pulse oximeter waveform and has been shown to predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients including infants. The pleth variability index value depends on the size of the tidal volume and on positive end-expiratory pressure. In conclusion, the respiration modulation of the PPG signal can be used to monitor respiratory rate. It is probable that improvements in neural network technology will increase sensitivity and specificity for detecting both central and obstructive apnea. The size of the PPG respiration variation can predict fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:23449854

  5. Anxiety during respirator use: comparison of two respirator types.

    PubMed

    Wu, Samantha; Harber, Philip; Yun, David; Bansal, Siddharth; Li, Yuan; Santiago, Silverio

    2011-03-01

    Anxiety may interfere with proper respirator use. This study directly compares the effect of two types of respirators--elastomeric half-face mask with dual-cartridges (HFM) and N95 filtering facepiece--on anxiety levels. Twelve volunteers with normal or mildly impaired respiratory conditions performed a series of simulated work tasks using the HFM and N95 on different days. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) measured state anxiety (SA) before and during respirator use. STAI also measured trait anxiety (TA), a stable personal characteristic. The effect of the respirator was measured as the difference between SA pre-use and during use. Work with HFM was associated with an increase in SA (2.92 units, p < .01), whereas work with the N95 had no observed effect. Anxiety should be considered in the selection of the best respirator for a user. Impact on anxiety should be considered for respirator design and certification purposes, particularly if the device is to be widely used in workplace and community settings. PMID:21318920

  6. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  7. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. PMID:25532022

  8. Respiration in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Spiders (Araneae) are unique regarding their respiratory system: they are the only animal group that breathe simultaneously with lungs and tracheae. Looking at the physiology of respiration the existence of tracheae plays an important role in spiders with a well-developed tracheal system. Other factors as sex, life time, type of prey capture and the high ability to gain energy anaerobically influence the resting and the active metabolic rate intensely. Most spiders have metabolic rates that are much lower than expected from body mass; but especially those with two pairs of lungs. Males normally have higher resting rates than females; spiders that are less evolved and possess a cribellum have lower metabolic rates than higher evolved species. Freely hunting spiders show a higher energy turnover than spiders hunting with a web. Spiders that live longer than 1 year will have lower metabolic rates than those species that die after 1 year in which development and reproduction must be completed. Lower temperatures and starvation, which most spiders can cope with, will decrease the metabolic rate as well. PMID:26820263

  9. Diesel particulate control

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelsen, F.I. )

    1988-01-01

    Diesel particulates, because of their chemical composition and extremely small size, have raised health and welfare issues. Health experts have expressed concern that they contribute to or aggravate chronic lung diseases such as asthma, bronchitis and emphysema, and there is the lingering issue about the potential cancer risk from exposure to diesel particulate. Diesel particulates impair visibility, soil buildings, contribute to structural damage through corrosion and give off a pungent odor. Diesel trucks, buses and cars together are such a significant and growing source of particulate emissions. Such vehicles emit 30 to 70 times more particulate matter than gasoline vehicles equipped with catalytic converters. Diesel engines currently power the majority of larger trucks and buses. EPA predicted that, if left uncontrolled, diesel particulate from motor vehicles would increase significantly. Diesel particulate emissions from motor vehicles are particularly troublesome because they frequently are emitted directly into the breathing zone where we work and recreate. The U.S. Congress recognized the risks posed by diesel particulate and as part of the 1977 Clean Air Act Amendments established specific, technology-forcing requirements for controlling these emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1980 established particulate standards for automobiles and light trucks and in 1985, heavy trucks and buses. California, concerned that EPA standards would not adequately protect its citizens, adopted its own set of standards for passenger cars and light trucks. This paper discusses emerging technologies proposed to address the problem.

  10. Airborne particulate discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Creek, Kathryn Louise; Castro, Alonso; Gray, Perry Clayton

    2009-08-11

    A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

  11. Particulate Air Pollution: The Particulars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, James E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the causes and consequences of particulate air pollution. Outlines the experimental procedures for measuring the amount of particulate materials that settles from the air and for observing the nature of particulate air pollution. (JR)

  12. Pitch based foam with particulate

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive, pitch based foam composite having a particulate content. The particulate alters the mechanical characteristics of the foam without severely degrading the foam thermal conductivity. The composite is formed by mixing the particulate with pitch prior to foaming.

  13. Compact hybrid particulate collector

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    1991-06-18

    This paper describes a method for removing particulates from flue gas. It comprises: flowing the flue gas through an electrostatic precipitator for removing 90-99% of the particulates, and for imparting a residual electric charge on remaining particulates exhausted from the electrostatic precipitator ins aid flue gas; maintaining the residual electric charge on the remaining particulates while flowing the flue gas through a barrier filter placed downstream of the electrostatic precipitator at a high filtration velocity in the range of from 4.06-20.32 centimeters per second (8-40 feet per minute), the barrier filter collecting the charged particulates exhausted from the electrostatic precipitator in the flue gas before the residual electric charge substantially dissipates.

  14. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  15. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  16. 42 CFR 84.180 - Airflow resistance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests. 84.180 Section 84.180... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.180 Airflow resistance tests. (a) Resistance to airflow will...

  17. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  18. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  19. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  20. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  1. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9719 - Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-face) equipped with a HEPA filter; (D) Supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (B) Air purifying, tight-fitting full-face... include a particulate filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (C) Powered...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9719 - Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-face) equipped with a HEPA filter; (D) Supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (B) Air purifying, tight-fitting full-face... include a particulate filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (C) Powered...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9719 - Tris carbamoyl triazine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-face) equipped with a HEPA filter; (D) Supplied-air respirator operated in pressure demand or... filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (B) Air purifying, tight-fitting full-face... include a particulate filter (N100 if oil aerosols are absent, R100, or P100); (C) Powered...

  5. 42 CFR 84.182 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements...-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.182 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements... height while in a normal operating position. (b) Leakage between the valve and valve seat shall...

  6. 42 CFR 84.182 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements...-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.182 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements... height while in a normal operating position. (b) Leakage between the valve and valve seat shall...

  7. 42 CFR 84.182 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements...-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.182 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements... height while in a normal operating position. (b) Leakage between the valve and valve seat shall...

  8. 42 CFR 84.182 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements...-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.182 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements... height while in a normal operating position. (b) Leakage between the valve and valve seat shall...

  9. 42 CFR 84.182 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements...-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.182 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements... height while in a normal operating position. (b) Leakage between the valve and valve seat shall...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 30 CFR part 11 (See 30 CFR part 11 edition, as revised July 1, 1994.), new... 30 CFR part 11 approval label. (b) Only changes or modifications of non-powered air-purifying respirators with particulate filters approved under the provisions of subparts I, K, L, or M of 30 CFR part...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 30 CFR part 11 (See 30 CFR part 11 edition, as revised July 1, 1994.), new... 30 CFR part 11 approval label. (b) Only changes or modifications of non-powered air-purifying respirators with particulate filters approved under the provisions of subparts I, K, L, or M of 30 CFR part...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 30 CFR part 11 (See 30 CFR part 11 edition, as revised July 1, 1994.), new... 30 CFR part 11 approval label. (b) Only changes or modifications of non-powered air-purifying respirators with particulate filters approved under the provisions of subparts I, K, L, or M of 30 CFR part...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 30 CFR part 11 (See 30 CFR part 11 edition, as revised July 1, 1994.), new... 30 CFR part 11 approval label. (b) Only changes or modifications of non-powered air-purifying respirators with particulate filters approved under the provisions of subparts I, K, L, or M of 30 CFR part...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1100 - Scope and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under the provisions of 30 CFR part 11 (See 30 CFR part 11 edition, as revised July 1, 1994.), new... 30 CFR part 11 approval label. (b) Only changes or modifications of non-powered air-purifying respirators with particulate filters approved under the provisions of subparts I, K, L, or M of 30 CFR part...

  15. 42 CFR 84.176 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.176 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to...

  16. 42 CFR 84.176 - Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum... DEVICES Non-Powered Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.176 Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements. Facepieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to...

  17. Method for measuring the spatial variability of aerosol penetration through respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Willeke, K; Qian, Y; Grinshpun, S; Ulevicius, V

    1998-07-01

    Fibrous filter media are widely used in respirators to remove airborne particulate matter from the inhaled airflow of workers. The N95 half-mask particulate respirator appears to be the most frequently used respirator under the new NIOSH regulation, 42 CFR 84. Considerable spatial variability in light penetration through the fibrous filter medium of an N95 respirator can be seen by visual observation when it is held to the light. This variability is due to the way in which the fibers are manufactured and laid down to form the filter medium. Similar spatial variability is expected in the aerosol penetration through the filters. Therefore, a test method has been developed for measuring the spatial variability in aerosol penetration. The main components of this method are an aerosol generator, a filter test stand with a movable sampling inlet, an aerosol size spectrometer, and an aerosol photometer. Measurements with the filter media of N95 respirators, tested at average filtration velocities corresponding to light, moderate, and heavy work loads, have shown spatial variations in aerosol penetration in excess of 100% relative to the average aerosol penetration for the entire respirator. N95 respirators are required to be at least 95% efficient (i.e., less than 5% penetrating) at the most penetrating particle size, when tested at 85 L/min. Tests with the new method have shown that the aerosol penetration of the most penetrating particles of about 0.1 micron diameter may locally be higher than 5%, while the average aerosol penetration of 0.1 micron particles is less than 5%. PMID:9697293

  18. Predicting soil respiration from peatlands.

    PubMed

    Rowson, J G; Worrall, F; Evans, M G; Dixon, S D

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the relative performance of six different models to predict soil respiration from upland peat. Predicting soil respiration is important for global carbon budgets and gap filling measured data from eddy covariance and closed chamber measurements. Further to models previously published new models are presented using two sub-soil zones and season. Models are tested using data from the Bleaklow plateau, southern Pennines, UK. Presented literature models include ANOVA using logged environmental data, the Arrhenius equation, modified versions of the Arrhenius equation to include soil respiration activation energy and water table depth. New models are proposed including the introduction of two soil zones in the peat profile, and season. The first new model proposes a zone of high CO(2) productivity related to increased soil microbial CO(2) production due to the supply of labile carbon from plant root exudates and root respiration. The second zone is a deeper zone where CO(2) production is lower with less labile carbon. A final model allows the zone of high CO(2) production to become dormant during winter months when plants will senesce and will vary depending upon vegetation type within a fixed location. The final model accounted for, on average, 31.9% of variance in net ecosystem respiration within 11 different restoration sites whilst, using the same data set, the best fitting literature equation only accounted for 18.7% of the total variance. Our results demonstrate that soil respiration models can be improved by explicitly accounting for seasonality and the vertically stratified nature of soil processes. These improved models provide an enhanced basis for calculating the peatland carbon budgets which are essential in understanding the role of peatlands in the global C cycle.

  19. ENDOGENOUS RESPIRATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, H. H.

    1962-01-01

    Ramsey, H. H. (Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif.). Endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus. J. Bacteriol. 83:507–514. 1962.—The endogenous respiration of Staphylococcus aureus is dependent upon the medium used to grow the cell suspension. Within wide ranges, the concentration of glucose in the medium has no effect upon subsequent endogenous respiration of the cells, but the concentration of amino acids in the medium, within certain limits, has a very marked effect. The total carbohydrate content of the cells does not decrease during endogenous respiration. As endogenous respiration proceeds, ammonia appears in the supernatant, and the concentration of glutamic acid in the free amino acid pool decreases. Organisms grown in the presence of labeled glutamic acid liberate labeled CO2 when allowed to respire without added substrate. The principal source of this CO2 is the free glutamate in the metabolic pool; its liberation is not suppressed by exogenous glucose or glutamate. With totally labeled cells, the free pool undergoes a rapid, but not total, depletion and remains at a low level for a long time. Activity of the protein fraction declines with time and shows the largest net decrease of all fractions. Exogenous glucose does not inhibit the release of labeled CO2 by totally labeled cells. Other amino acids in the free pool which can serve as endogenous substrates are aspartic acid and, to much lesser extents, glycine and alanine. The results indicate that both free amino acids and cellular protein may serve as endogenous substrates of S. aureus. PMID:14490204

  20. Predicting soil respiration from peatlands.

    PubMed

    Rowson, J G; Worrall, F; Evans, M G; Dixon, S D

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the relative performance of six different models to predict soil respiration from upland peat. Predicting soil respiration is important for global carbon budgets and gap filling measured data from eddy covariance and closed chamber measurements. Further to models previously published new models are presented using two sub-soil zones and season. Models are tested using data from the Bleaklow plateau, southern Pennines, UK. Presented literature models include ANOVA using logged environmental data, the Arrhenius equation, modified versions of the Arrhenius equation to include soil respiration activation energy and water table depth. New models are proposed including the introduction of two soil zones in the peat profile, and season. The first new model proposes a zone of high CO(2) productivity related to increased soil microbial CO(2) production due to the supply of labile carbon from plant root exudates and root respiration. The second zone is a deeper zone where CO(2) production is lower with less labile carbon. A final model allows the zone of high CO(2) production to become dormant during winter months when plants will senesce and will vary depending upon vegetation type within a fixed location. The final model accounted for, on average, 31.9% of variance in net ecosystem respiration within 11 different restoration sites whilst, using the same data set, the best fitting literature equation only accounted for 18.7% of the total variance. Our results demonstrate that soil respiration models can be improved by explicitly accounting for seasonality and the vertically stratified nature of soil processes. These improved models provide an enhanced basis for calculating the peatland carbon budgets which are essential in understanding the role of peatlands in the global C cycle. PMID:23178842

  1. [Dark respiration of terrestrial vegetations: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Wei; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Guan, De-Xin; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2013-06-01

    The source and sink effect of terrestrial plants is one of the hotspots in terrestrial ecosystem research under the background of global change. Dark respiration of terrestrial plants accounts for a large fraction of total net carbon balance, playing an important role in the research of carbon cycle under global climate change. However, there is little study on plant dark respiration. This paper summarized the physiological processes of plant dark respiration, measurement methods of the dark respiration, and the effects of plant biology and environmental factors on the dark respiration. The uncertainty of the dark respiration estimation was analyzed, and the future hotspots of related researches were pointed out.

  2. South African Particulates

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... Extensive burning of grass and shrubland for land management and agriculture comprises a principal source of these aerosols. ... 2000 - Airborne particulates over South Africa. project:  MISR category:  gallery date:  ...

  3. Fluidizing device for solid particulates

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    A flexible whip suspended in a hopper is caused to impact against fibrous and irregularly shaped particulates in the hopper to fluidize the particulates and facilitate the flow of the particulates through the hopper. The invention provides for the flow of particulates at a substantially constant mass flow rate and uses a minimum of energy.

  4. Comparative inflammatory effects of differential particulate matter species in an OVA-sensitization and challenge model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to respirable ambient particulate matter (APM) provokes allergic immunity that may also occur on exposure to environmental diesel exhaust particles (eDEP) or emission source DEP (cDEP). Our hypothesis tested whether APM, eDEP or cDEP provide immune adjuvancy in an antige...

  5. Soil Respiration - A Geochemist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil biogeochemistry is largely driven by the decomposition of plant-derived organic matter by soil microorganisms. In addition to its effects on water quality and soil fertility, the decomposition of organic matter couples soil processes to climate, via the production and emission of greenhouse gases. In this presentation, I will review a number of key factors controlling the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter. In particular, I will discuss the importance of the spatial and temporal variations in redox conditions as drivers of soil respiration. The discussion will highlight the limitations of current soil respiration models based on partitioning soil organic matter in a finite number of pools of different degradability. In order to predict the sensitivity of soil respiration to anthropogenic pressures - including climate warming - it is crucial to relate the apparent degradability of soil organic matter to the geochemical and hydrological dynamics of the soil environment. Overall, there remains much scope for geochemists to help develop more robust, process-based, representations of soil respiration in global carbon models and climate predictions.

  6. Persistence of respirator use learning.

    PubMed

    Harber, Philip; Su, Jing; Hu, Cheng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Although retraining and repeat fit-testing are needed for respirator users, the optimal frequency is uncertain. The persistence of proper respirator donning/doffing techniques and changes in quantitative fit factor over 6 months after initial training were measured in this study. Initial training was designed for rapid rollout situations in which direct contact with well-trained occupational health professionals may be infeasible. Subjects (n = 175) were assigned randomly to use either a filtering facepiece N95 (FFR) or dual cartridge half facemask (HFM) respirator. Each was assigned randomly to one of three training methods-printed brochure, video, or computer-based training. Soon after initial training, quantitative fit and measures of proper technique were determined. These measurements were repeated 6 months later. In the six-month followup, subjects were randomized to receive either a brief reminder card or a placebo card. Total performance score, major errors, and quantitative fit all became significantly worse at 6 months. An individual's result soon after training was the most important predictor of performance 6 months later. There was a marginal not statistically significant tendency for those initially trained by video to have better protection 6 months later. The study suggests that persons who use respirators intermittently should be thoroughly retrained and reevaluated periodically. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: Additional statistical analyses. PMID:24847912

  7. 30 CFR 57.5044 - Respirators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exceeding 1.0 WL, miners shall wear respirators approved by NIOSH for radon daughters prior to July 10, 1995 or under the equivalent section of 42 CFR part 84 and such respirator use shall be in compliance...

  8. 30 CFR 57.5044 - Respirators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exceeding 1.0 WL, miners shall wear respirators approved by NIOSH for radon daughters prior to July 10, 1995 or under the equivalent section of 42 CFR part 84 and such respirator use shall be in compliance...

  9. 30 CFR 57.5044 - Respirators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exceeding 1.0 WL, miners shall wear respirators approved by NIOSH for radon daughters prior to July 10, 1995 or under the equivalent section of 42 CFR part 84 and such respirator use shall be in compliance...

  10. 30 CFR 57.5044 - Respirators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... exceeding 1.0 WL, miners shall wear respirators approved by NIOSH for radon daughters prior to July 10, 1995 or under the equivalent section of 42 CFR part 84 and such respirator use shall be in compliance...

  11. 30 CFR 57.5044 - Respirators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exceeding 1.0 WL, miners shall wear respirators approved by NIOSH for radon daughters prior to July 10, 1995 or under the equivalent section of 42 CFR part 84 and such respirator use shall be in compliance...

  12. The Source of Carbon for Root Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Dozal, L.; Trumbore, S.; Zheng, S.

    2004-12-01

    In the Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) that took advantage of a whole-ecosystem radiocarbon label that occurred in the temperate forest near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, we measured the radiocarbon signature of total soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and root respiration, at different times during the last 3 growing seasons (2002-2004). By applying a mass balance approach, the relative and absolute contributions of heterotrophic and root respiration to total soil respiration were estimated. In contrast to heterotrophic respiration, root respiration seemed to be less affected by changes in soil moisture and temperature but rather showed a link to photosynthetic activity with a very similar pattern during the growing season as that of leaf area index. The radiocarbon signature of root respiration was very dynamic with low values in spring compared to the summer. The sources of variation can include changes in the local atmospheric signature and/or changes in the source of C being respired. Two different sites with different values and patterns of local atmospheric radiocarbon signature showed the same pattern in radiocarbon signatures of root respiration indicating that the source of variation was phenological. Low values during the spring could indicate the use of stored carbohydrates switching to more recent photosynthetic products as the summer progresses. As a first attempt to elucidate the source of C respired by roots, we will compare the radiocarbon content of starch, cellulose and soluble sugars in roots to that of bulk root material and root respired CO2. These radiocarbon signatures can help us identify the pool of C that is most likely being respired by roots during the growing season. A better understanding of the source of C for root respiration has implications for understanding the role of root respiration in C cycling in temperate forests, specifically the timescale over which carbon is fixed through photosynthesis and returned to the

  13. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley Miller; Rich Gebert; William Swanson

    1999-11-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC is currently being tested at the 2.7-MW scale at the Big Stone power station.

  14. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph

    1999-04-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of the dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses.

  15. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Schelkoph; Stanley J. Miller

    1999-07-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a manner that has not been done before. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of the dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and collection of dust in conventional baghouses.

  16. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  17. Microwave regenerated particulate trap

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, A.C. Jr.; Yonushonis, T.M.; Haberkamp, W.C.; Mako, F.; Len, L.K,; Silberglitt, R.; Ahmed, I.

    1997-12-31

    It has been demonstrated that a fibrous particulate filter can extract particulate matter from the diesel exhaust. However, additional engineering efforts remains to achieve the design target of 90%. It has also be shown that with minor modifications magnetrons produced for home ovens can endure a simulated diesel operating environment. Much work remains to develop a robust product ready to complete extensive engine testing and evaluation. These efforts include: (1) additional environmental testing of magnetrons; (2) vibration testing of the filter in the housing; (3) evaluating alternative methods/designs to seal the center bore; and (4) determining the optimum coating thickness that provides sufficient structural integrity while maintaining rapid heating rates.

  18. Plankton community respiration during a coccolithophore bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carol; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Tarran, Glen A.; Miller, Axel E. J.; Rees, Andrew P.

    Plankton dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), bacterial production, protozoan herbivory, and phytoplankton, microzooplankton and heterotrophic bacterial abundance were measured during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. The study, which was conducted in the northern North Sea during June 1999, included a spatial survey and a 6-day Lagrangian time series informed by a sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6) tracer-release experiment. E. huxleyi abundance in surface waters ranged from 380 to 3000 cells ml -1, while DCR varied between 2 and 4 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 and GP between 2 and 5 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1. Euphotic zone integrated DCR and GP were in approximate balance, with a mean (±SD) P:R ratio of 0.9±0.4 ( n=9). However, highest GP occurred at the surface alongside maxima of E. huxleyi, whereas highest rates of DCR occurred at depths of 25-30 m associated with maxima in chlorophyll a and bacterial biomass. DCR was positively correlated with bacterial biomass, microzooplankton biomass, attenuance, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll a concentration; and negatively correlated with apparent oxygen utilisation. DCR was not correlated with in situ temperature, dissolved organic carbon concentration or E. huxleyi abundance. A˜100 h incubation of 0.8 μm filtered seawater enabled the estimation of a bacterial respiratory quotient (RQ) and growth efficiency (BGE) from the slopes of the linear regressions of the decrease in dissolved oxygen and increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and bacterial carbon with time. During this experiment the bacterial RQ was 0.69 and the growth efficiency was 18%. This measured BGE was used in comparison with literature values to apportion DCR to that associated with bacterial (13-71%), microzooplankton (10-50%), and algal (11-28%) activity. This accounting exercise compared well with measured DCR (to within ±50%), the exact calculation being highly dependent on the BGE used.

  19. Analysis of microsize particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Farlow, N. H.; Ferry, G. V.

    1972-01-01

    Unique methods for analyzing individual particles ranging in size from 0.01 to 1000 micrometers have been developed for investigation of nature of cosmic dust. Methods are applicable to particulate aerosols and contaminants characteristically encountered in studies of air pollution and in experiments designed to abate pollution.

  20. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1102 - Examination, inspection and testing of complete respirator assemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... daughters—$1,250. (4) All dusts, fumes and mists—$2,000. (c) Paint spray respirators—$1,600. (d)...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1102 - Examination, inspection and testing of complete respirator assemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... daughters—$1,250. (4) All dusts, fumes and mists—$2,000. (c) Paint spray respirators—$1,600. (d)...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1102 - Examination, inspection and testing of complete respirator assemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... daughters—$1,250. (4) All dusts, fumes and mists—$2,000. (c) Paint spray respirators—$1,600. (d)...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1102 - Examination, inspection and testing of complete respirator assemblies; fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High... daughters—$1,250. (4) All dusts, fumes and mists—$2,000. (c) Paint spray respirators—$1,600. (d)...

  9. Feeder for particulate material

    SciTech Connect

    Christofer, D.E.; Stock, A.J.

    1981-03-24

    Feeder apparatus for feeding at a controlled variable rate particulate solid material, such as coal, from a supply conduit located above a gravimetric feeder to a discharge chute located below the feeder. The particulate material flows to the feeder from the supply conduit along a path having a generally vertical center line and the discharge chute provides a flow path having a generally vertical center line closely laterally spaced relative to the center line of flow to the feeder. The feeder apparatus has a horizontally extending housing with an upwardly facing inlet through which the material flows to the feeder and a downwardly facing outlet forming part of the discharge chute through which the material flows from the feeder. Within the housing is a main feeder conveyor including an endless belt with a generally horizontal span adapted to receive at one end the particulate material flowing to the feeder and to convey in a layer a measured quantity of material a horizontal distance across weighing means to an exit zone at the opposite end of the belt, the horizontal distance being substantially greater than the spacing between the center lines of flow to the feeder and through such discharge chute. Associated with the main feeder conveyor is a gravimetric control system for controlling the amount of material deposited on the belt. Particulate material that drops off the main conveyor belt at the exit zone is received on a return belt conveyor and carried in a reverse direction a sufficient distance to bring the material to the discharge chute. Cooperation between the main feeder conveyor and the return conveyor permits gravimetric feeding of particulate material to the discharge chute that is closely laterally spaced to the flow path of material to the main conveyor by a distance that is substantially less than the length of travel of the material on the main conveyor.

  10. Effect of Rocking Movements on Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Ximena; Crivelli, Francesco; Heinicke, Lorenz; Zaunseder, Sebastian; Achermann, Peter; Riener, Robert

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, rocking has been used to promote sleep in babies or toddlers. Recent research suggested that relaxation could play a role in facilitating the transition from waking to sleep during rocking. Breathing techniques are often used to promote relaxation. However, studies investigating head motions and body rotations showed that vestibular stimulation might elicit a vestibulo-respiratory response, leading to an increase in respiration frequency. An increase in respiration frequency would not be considered to promote relaxation in the first place. On the other hand, a coordination of respiration to rhythmic vestibular stimulation has been observed. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different movement frequencies and amplitudes on respiration frequency. Furthermore, we tested whether subjects adapt their respiration to movement frequencies below their spontaneous respiration frequency at rest, which could be beneficial for relaxation. Twenty-one healthy subjects (24–42 years, 12 males) were investigated using an actuated bed, moving along a lateral translation. Following movement frequencies were applied: +30%, +15%, -15%, and -30% of subjects’ rest respiration frequency during baseline (no movement). Furthermore, two different movement amplitudes were tested (Amplitudes: 15 cm, 7.5 cm; movement frequency: 0.3 Hz). In addition, five subjects (25–28 years, 2 males) were stimulated with their individual rest respiration frequency. Rocking movements along a lateral translation caused a vestibulo-respiratory adaptation leading to an increase in respiration frequency. The increase was independent of the applied movement frequencies or amplitudes but did not occur when stimulating with subjects’ rest respiration frequency. Furthermore, no synchronization of the respiration frequency to the movement frequency was observed. In particular, subjects did not lower their respiration frequency below their resting frequency. Hence, it was not

  11. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Fent, Kenneth W

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters' potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator's shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 10(7) particles per cm(3), 170 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 4700 μm(2) cm(-3) active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 10(4) particles per cm(3), 0.36 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 92 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 10(5) particles per cm(3), 2.7 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 320 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The

  12. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Fent, Kenneth W

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters' potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator's shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 10(7) particles per cm(3), 170 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 4700 μm(2) cm(-3) active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 10(4) particles per cm(3), 0.36 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 92 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 10(5) particles per cm(3), 2.7 mg m(-3) respirable particle mass, 320 μm(2) cm(-3) active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The

  13. Ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    Vehicle fires are a common occurrence, yet few studies have reported exposures associated with burning vehicles. This article presents an assessment of firefighters’ potential for ultrafine and respirable particle exposure during vehicle fire suppression training. Fires were initiated within the engine compartment and passenger cabins of three salvaged vehicles, with subsequent water suppression by fire crews. Firefighter exposures were monitored with an array of direct reading particle and air quality instruments. A flexible metallic duct and blower drew contaminants to the instrument array, positioned at a safe distance from the burning vehicles, with the duct inlet positioned at the nozzle operator’s shoulder. The instruments measured the particle number, active surface area, respirable particle mass, photoelectric response, aerodynamic particle size distributions, and air quality parameters. Although vehicle fires were suppressed quickly (<10 minutes), firefighters may be exposed to short duration, high particle concentration episodes during fire suppression, which are orders of magnitude greater than the ambient background concentration. A maximum transient particle concentration of 1.21 × 107 particles per cm3, 170 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 4700 μm2 cm−3 active surface area and 1400 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response were attained throughout the series of six fires. Expressed as fifteen minute time-weighted averages, engine compartment fires averaged 5.4 × 104 particles per cm3, 0.36 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 92 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area and 29 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Similarly, passenger cabin fires averaged 2.04 × 105 particles per cm3, 2.7 mg m−3 respirable particle mass, 320 μm2 cm−3 active particle surface area, and 34 (arbitrary units) in photoelectric response. Passenger cabin fires were a greater potential source of exposure than engine compartment fires. The wind direction

  14. Filtration performance of NIOSH-approved N95 and P100 filtering facepiece respirators against 4 to 30 nanometer-size nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; King, William P; Eimer, Benjamin C; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2008-09-01

    -approved air-purifying respirators provide expected levels of filtration protection against nanoparticles. PMID:18607812

  15. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change.

  16. High diversity of fungi in air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Pickersgill, Daniel A; Després, Viviane R; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Fungal spores can account for large proportions of air particulate matter, and they may potentially influence the hydrological cycle and climate as nuclei for water droplets and ice crystals in clouds, fog, and precipitation. Moreover, some fungi are major pathogens and allergens. The diversity of airborne fungi is, however, not well-known. By DNA analysis we found pronounced differences in the relative abundance and seasonal cycles of various groups of fungi in coarse and fine particulate matter, with more plant pathogens in the coarse fraction and more human pathogens and allergens in the respirable fine particle fraction (<3 microm). Moreover, the ratio of Basidiomycota to Ascomycota was found to be much higher than previously assumed, which might also apply to the biosphere.

  17. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    James, T W; Spencer, M S

    1979-09-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed.

  18. Rigid particulate matter sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Matthew

    2011-02-22

    A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

  19. Regenerable particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Stuecker, John N.; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Miller, James E.

    2009-05-05

    A method of making a three-dimensional lattice structure, such as a filter used to remove particulates from a gas stream, where the physical lattice structure is designed utilizing software simulation from pre-defined mass transfer and flow characteristics and the designed lattice structure is fabricated using a free-form fabrication manufacturing technique, where the periodic lattice structure is comprised of individual geometric elements.

  20. Respirator protection factors: Part II-protection factors of supplied-air respirators.

    PubMed

    Hack, A L; Bradley, O D; Trujillo, A

    1980-05-01

    Protection Factors provided by 25 NIOSH approved supplied-air respirators were determined while the devices were worn by a panel of test subjects anthropometrically selected to represent adult facial sizes. Polydispersed DOP aerosol was used for respirator fit tests on continuous flow, demand, and pressure-demand respirators. Based on facepiece leakage measurements it appears that demand-type respirators should neither be used nor approved. The highest level of protection was provided by pressure-demand devices.

  1. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped... commercial designation of the respirator it contains and all appropriate approval labels....

  2. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all completely assembled respirators which are designed for use as respiratory protection during entry into...

  3. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped... commercial designation of the respirator it contains, and all appropriate approval labels....

  4. 42 CFR 84.250 - Vinyl chloride respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride respirators; description. 84.250... Respirators § 84.250 Vinyl chloride respirators; description. Vinyl chloride respirators, including all completely assembled respirators which are designed for use as respiratory protection during entry into...

  5. 42 CFR 84.125 - Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.125 Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements. Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against particulates...

  6. 42 CFR 84.125 - Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.125 Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements. Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against particulates...

  7. 42 CFR 84.125 - Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.125 Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements. Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against particulates...

  8. 42 CFR 84.125 - Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.125 Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements. Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against particulates...

  9. Viable viral efficiency of N95 and P100 respirator filters at constant and cyclic flow.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul D; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P; Harpest, Shannon D; Richardson, Aaron W; Hofacre, Kent C

    2013-01-01

    The growing threat of an influenza pandemic presents a unique challenge to healthcare workers, emergency responders, and the civilian population. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommends National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved respirators to provide protection against infectious airborne viruses in various workplace settings. The filtration efficiency of selected NIOSH-approved particulate N95 and P100 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and filter cartridges was investigated against the viable MS2 virus, a non-pathogenic bacteriophage, aerosolized from a liquid suspension. Tests were performed under two cyclic flow conditions (minute volumes of 85 and 135 L/min) and two constant flow rates (85 and 270 L/min). The mean penetrations of viable MS2 through the N95 and P100 FFRs/cartridges were typically less than 2 and 0.03%, respectively, under all flow conditions. All N95 and P100 FFR and cartridge models assessed in this study, therefore, met or exceeded their respective efficiency ratings of 95 and 99.97% against the viable MS2 test aerosol, even under the very high flow conditions. These NIOSH-approved FFRs and particulate respirators equipped with these cartridges can be anticipated to achieve expected levels of protection (consistent with their assigned protection factor) against airborne viral agents, provided that they are properly selected, fitted, worn, and maintained. PMID:24011377

  10. Ambient Air Quality Assessment with Particular Reference to Particulates in Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurdeep; Roy, Debananda; Sinha, Sweta

    2014-01-01

    Jharia Coalfield is the critically polluted area with the intense mining and associated industrial activities. There has been widespread concern of particulate pollution with the alarming levels of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) and Respirable Particulate Matter (PM10 & PM2.5). Coke oven plants, coal washing, thermal power stations and associated activities coupled with the transportation activities, give rise to critical air pollution levels in the region. This study envisages the assessment of air pollution of the region with particular reference to SPM, PM10 and PM2.5. Eighteen monitoring stations were selected considering various sources of pollution such as mining, industrial, commercial and residential areas apart from siting criteria as per IS: 5182 Part XIV. Air quality monitoring was carried out following standard methodologies and protocols as per Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB)/ National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) norms using Respirable Dust Samplers (RDS) and Fine Particulate Samplers (PM2.5 Samplers). This study reveals considerable load of particulates (SPM, PM10, PM 2.5) which exceed not only the NAAQS but also the coal mining areas standards of Jharia coalfield, thus falling under the category of critically polluted area. Air Quality Indexing has also been developed which provides a clear map of the deterioration of air quality and also presenting comparative ranking of all the monitoring locations with respect to air quality status in the study area.

  11. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  12. Direct reading of electrocardiograms and respiration rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Technique for reading heart and respiration rates is more accurate and direct than the previous method. Index of a plastic calibrated card is aligned with a point on the electrocardiogram. Complexes are counted as indicated on the card and heart or respiration rate is read directly from the appropriate scale.

  13. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  14. Modelling Soil respiration in agro-ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    A soil respiration model was developed to simulate soil respiration in crops on a daily time step. The soil heterotrophic respiration component was derived from Century (Parton et al., 1987). Soil organic carbon is divided into three major components including active, slow and passive soil carbon. Each pool has its own decomposition rate coefficient. Carbon flows between these pools are controlled by carbon inputs (crop residues), decomposition rate and microbial respiration loss parameters, both of which are a function of soil texture, soil temperature and soil water content. The model assumes that all C decompositions flows are associated with microbial activity and that microbial respiration occurs for each of these flows. Heterotrophic soil respiration is the sum of all these microbial respiration processes. To model the soil autotrophic respiration component, maintenance respiration is calculated from the nitrogen content and assuming an exponential relationship to account for temperature dependence (Ryan et al., 1991). Growth respiration is calculated assuming a dependence on both growth rate and construction cost of the considered organ (MacCree et al., 1982) A database, made of four different soil and climate conditions in mid-latitude was used to study the two components of the soil respiration model in wheat fields. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to

  15. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  16. Total inward leakage of nanoparticles through filtering facepiece respirators.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2011-04-01

    Nanoparticle (<100 nm size) exposure in workplaces is a major concern because of the potential impact on human health. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-approved particulate respirators are recommended for protection against nanoparticles based on their filtration efficiency at sealed conditions. Concerns have been raised on the lack of information for face seal leakage of nanoparticles, compromising respiratory protection in workplaces. To address this issue, filter penetration and total inward leakage (TIL) through artificial leaks were measured for NIOSH-approved N95 and P100 and European certified Conformit'e Europe'en-marked FFP2 and FFP3 filtering facepiece respirator models sealed to a breathing manikin kept inside a closed chamber. Monodisperse sucrose aerosols (8-80 nm size) generated by electrospray or polydisperse NaCl aerosols (20-1000 nm size) produced by atomization were passed into the chamber. Filter penetration and TIL were measured at 20, 30, and 40 l min(-1) breathing flow rates. The most penetrating particle size (MPPS) was ∼50 nm and filter penetrations for 50 and 100 nm size particles were markedly higher than the penetrations for 8 and 400 nm size particles. Filter penetrations increased with increasing flow rates. With artificially introduced leaks, the TIL values for all size particles increased with increasing leak sizes. With relatively smaller size leaks, the TIL measured for 50 nm size particles was ∼2-fold higher than the values for 8 and 400 nm size particles indicating that the TIL for the most penetrating particles was higher than for smaller and larger size particles. The data indicate that higher concentration of nanoparticles could occur inside the breathing zone of respirators in workplaces where nanoparticles in the MPPS range are present, when leakage is minimal compared to filter penetration. The TIL/penetration ratios obtained for 400 nm size particles were larger than the ratios obtained for

  17. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  18. Effect of welding fume on heart rate variability among workers with respirators in a shipyard

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bor-Cheng; Liu, I-Jung; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Welding fume exposure is associated with heart rate variability (HRV) reduction. It is still unknown whether respirator can reduce effect of welding fume on HRV among welding workers in a shipyard. We recruited 68 welding workers with respirator and 52 welding workers without respirator to measure HRV indices, including standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals (r-MSSD) by ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG). Personal exposure to particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) was measured by a dust monitor. The association between 5-minute mean PM2.5 and log10-transformed HRV indices was analyzed by mixed-effects models. We found 5-minute mean PM2.5 was associated with 8.9% and 10.3% decreases in SDNN and r-MSSD. Effect of PM2.5 on HRV indices was greatest among workers without respirator {SDNN: 12.4% (95% confidence interval = −18.8–−6.9); r-MSSD: 14.7% (95% confidence interval = −20.8–−8.6)}. Workers with respirator showed slight decreases in HRV indices {SDNN: 2.2% (95% confidence interval = −6.3–−1.9); r-MSSD: 4.0% (95% confidence interval = −6.4–−1.6)}. We conclude that respirator use reduces the effect of PM2.5 exposure on HRV among workers performing welding in a shipyard. PMID:27677526

  19. Depth-resolved particle-associated microbial respiration in the northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Anna; Iversen, Morten; Giering, Sarah; Riou, Virginie; Henson, Stephanie A.; Berline, Leo; Guilloux, Loic; Sanders, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are tightly linked to the depth at which sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) is remineralised in the ocean. Rapid attenuation of downward POC flux typically occurs in the upper mesopelagic (top few hundred metres of the water column), with much slower loss rates deeper in the ocean. Currently, we lack understanding of the processes that drive POC attenuation, resulting in large uncertainties in the mesopelagic carbon budget. Attempts to balance the POC supply to the mesopelagic with respiration by zooplankton and microbes rarely succeed. Where a balance has been found, depth-resolved estimates reveal large compensating imbalances in the upper and lower mesopelagic. In particular, it has been suggested that respiration by free-living microbes and zooplankton in the upper mesopelagic are too low to explain the observed flux attenuation of POC within this layer. We test the hypothesis that particle-associated microbes contribute significantly to community respiration in the mesopelagic, measuring particle-associated microbial respiration of POC in the northeast Atlantic through shipboard measurements on individual marine snow aggregates collected at depth (36-500 m). We find very low rates of both absolute and carbon-specific particle-associated microbial respiration (< 3 % d-1), suggesting that this term cannot solve imbalances in the upper mesopelagic POC budget. The relative importance of particle-associated microbial respiration increases with depth, accounting for up to 33 % of POC loss in the mid-mesopelagic (128-500 m). We suggest that POC attenuation in the upper mesopelagic (36-128 m) is driven by the transformation of large, fast-sinking particles to smaller, slow-sinking and suspended particles via processes such as zooplankton fragmentation and solubilisation, and that this shift to non-sinking POC may help to explain imbalances in the mesopelagic carbon budget.

  20. A case study of spatial variation and enrichment of selected elements in ambient particulate matter around a large coal-fired power station in central India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajnikant; Pervez, Shamsh

    2004-12-01

    The dominant use of coal in power sectors has been associated with adverse environmental impacts. Ambient air monitoring for the two size fractions of particulate matter, respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) and non-respirable suspended particulate matter (NRSPM) in the downwind and upwind directions of a large coal-fired power station in central India, was carried out. Collected samples of ambient particulate matter were analysed atomic absorption spectrophotometrically for 15 elements. Spatial variability in elemental composition of RSPM and NRSPM and the degree of enrichment of these toxic metals in RSPM were investigated. A significant spatial variability for the elements in RSPM and NRSPM and higher degrees of enrichment of the elements were observed.

  1. Microbial respiration and trophic regimes in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Ferla, Rosabruna; Azzaro, Maurizio; Maimone, Giovanna

    2006-08-01

    Remineralization in the Northern Adriatic Sea has been examined by studying the respiratory rates, through electron transport system activity, in four systems identified on the basis of different salinities, caused by riverine outflows, and different productivity regimes measured by apparent oxygen utilization. The sea waters influenced by river discharges were characterized by high respiratory activity while in fully marine waters respiration fell close to the typical value for the surface pelagic Mediterranean waters. A speculative approach to quantify the trophic balance in the examined sub-systems was adopted and the following ratios were computed: Primary Production/Respiration (PP/R); Primary Production/(Bacterial Production + Respiration) [PP/(BP + R)]; (Dissolved Organic Carbon + Particulate Organic Carbon)/Respiration [(DOC + POC)/R], using the data generated at the same time from the same multidisciplinary cruises. High variability of these metabolic ratios in the described subsystems occurred, so that shifting autotrophy and heterotrophy patterns through summer-winter and cross-productivity front trends occurred. Episodic heterotrophy has been found to happen in the North Adriatic Sea, although this is normally considered a productive ecosystem.

  2. Proper use of surgical n95 respirators and surgical masks in the OR.

    PubMed

    Benson, Stacey M; Novak, Debra A; Ogg, Mary J

    2013-04-01

    Proper adherence to infection control precautions, including appropriate selection and use of personal protective equipment (PPE), is of significant importance to the health and well-being of perioperative personnel. Surgical masks are intended for use as a barrier to protect the wearer's face from large droplets and splashes of blood and other body fluids; however, surgical and high-filtration surgical laser masks do not provide enough protection to be considered respiratory PPE. Potential exposure to airborne contaminants and infectious agents, including those present in surgical smoke, necessitates the use of respiratory PPE, such as a surgical N95 particulate filtering facepiece respirator. Filtering facepiece respirators greatly reduce a wide size range of particles from entering the wearer's breathing zone and are designed to protect the user from both droplet and airborne particles. Every health care worker who must use a respirator to control hazardous exposures in the workplace must be trained to properly use the respirator and pass a fit test before using it in the workplace. PMID:23531312

  3. Respirator physiological effects under simulated work conditions.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Siddharth; Harber, Philip; Yun, David; Liu, David; Liu, Yihang; Wu, Samantha; Ng, David; Santiago, Silverio

    2009-04-01

    This study compared the physiological impacts of two respirator types in simulated work conditions. Fifty-six subjects included normal volunteers and persons with mild respiratory impairments (chronic rhinitis, mild COPD, and mild asthma). Respiratory parameters and electrocardiogram were measured using respiratory inductive plethysmography while performing eight work tasks involving low to moderate exertion using two respirators: (1) a dual cartridge half face mask (HFM) respirator, and (2) the N95. Mixed model regression analyses evaluating the effect of task and respirator type showed that task affected tidal volume, minute ventilation, breathing frequency and heart rate; all were greater in heavier tasks. Although respirator type did not affect respiratory volume parameters and flow rates, the HFM led to increase in the inspiratory time, reduction of the expiratory time, and increase in the duty cycle in comparison with the N95. The magnitude of differences was relatively small. The results suggest that most individuals, including persons with mild respiratory impairments, will physiologically tolerate either type of respirator at low to moderate exertion tasks. However, because effective protection depends on proper use, differences in subjective effect may have greater impact than physiological differences. Using respirators may be feasible on a widespread basis if necessary for maintaining essential services in the face of widespread concern about an infectious or terrorist threat. PMID:19180375

  4. BOREAS TE-5 Soil Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Ehleriinger, Jim; Brooks, J. Renee; Flanagan, Larry

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-5 team collected measurements in the NSA and SSA on gas exchange, gas composition, and tree growth. Soil respiration data were collected from 26-May-94 to 07-Sep-94 in the BOREAS NSA and SSA to compare the soil respiration rates in different forest sites using a LI-COR 6200 soil respiration chamber (model 6299). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distrobuted Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Apparatus for particulate matter analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gundel, Lara A.; Apte, Michael G.; Hansen, Anthony D.; Black, Douglas R.

    2007-01-30

    The apparatus described herein is a miniaturized system for particle exposure assessment (MSPEA) for the quantitative measurement and qualitative identification of particulate content in gases. The present invention utilizes a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) or other mass-sensitive temperature compensated acoustic wave resonator for mass measurement. Detectors and probes and light sources are used in combination for the qualitative determination of particulate matter.

  6. The effect of subject characteristics and respirator features on respirator fit.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Coffey, Christopher C; Ann, Roland Berry

    2005-12-01

    A recent study was conducted to compare five fit test methods for screening out poor-fitting N95 filtering-facepiece respirators. Eighteen models of NIOSH-certified, N95 filtering-facepiece respirators were used to assess the fit test methods by using a simulated workplace protection factor (SWPF) test. The purpose of this companion study was to investigate the effect of subject characteristics (gender and face dimensions) and respirator features on respirator fit. The respirator features studied were design style (folding and cup style) and number of sizes available (one size fits all, two sizes, and three sizes). Thirty-three subjects participated in this study. Each was measured for 12 face dimensions using traditional calipers and tape. From this group, 25 subjects with face size categories 1 to 10 tested each respirator. The SWPF test protocol entailed using the PortaCount Plus to determine a SWPF based on total penetration (face-seal leakage plus filter penetration) while the subject performed six simulated workplace movements. Six tests were conducted for each subject/respirator model combination with redonning between tests. The respirator design style (folding style and cup style) did not have a significant effect on respirator fit in this study. The number of respirator sizes available for a model had significant impact on respirator fit on the panel for cup-style respirators with one and two sizes available. There was no significant difference in the geometric mean fit factor between male and female subjects for 16 of the 18 respirator models. Subsets of one to six face dimensions were found to be significantly correlated with SWPFs (p < 0.05) in 16 of the 33 respirator model/respirator size combinations. Bigonial breadth, face width, face length, and nose protrusion appeared the most in subsets (five or six) of face dimensions and their multiple linear regression coefficients were significantly different from zero (p < 0.05). Lip length was found in

  7. Respiration in Neonate Sea Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Paladino, Frank V.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Pilar Santidrián, T.; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R.

    2007-01-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings’ response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species’ resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults. PMID:17258487

  8. Particulate erosion mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veerabhadrarao, P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Particulate damage and erosion of ductile metals are today plaguing design and field engineers in diverse fields of engineering and technology. It was found that too many models and theories were proposed leading to much speculation from debris analysis and failure mechanism postulations. Most theories of solid particle erosion are based on material removal models which do not fully represent the actual physical processes of material removal. The various mechanisms proposed thus far are: melting, low-cycle fatigue, extrusion, delamination, shear localization, adhesive material transfer, etc. The experimental data on different materials highlighting the observed failure modes of the deformation and cutting wear processes using optical and scanning electron microscopy are presented. The most important mechanisms proved from the experimental observations of the specimens exposed to both spherical and angular particles are addressed, and the validity of the earlier theories discussed. Both the initial stages of damage and advanced stages of erosion were studied to gain a fundamental understanding of the process.

  9. [Effects of Tillage on Soil Respiration and Root Respiration Under Rain-Fed Summer Corn Field].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xing-li; Liao, Yun-cheng

    2015-06-01

    To explore the effects of different tillage systems on soil respiration and root respiration under rain-fed condition. Based on a short-term experiment, this paper investigated soil respiration in summer corn growth season under four tillage treatments including subsoiling tillage (ST), no tillage (NT), rotary tillage (RT) and moldboard plow tillage (CT). The contribution of root respiration using root exclusion method was also discussed. The results showed that soil respiration rate presented a single peak trend under four tillage methods during the summer corn growing season, and the maximum value was recorded at the heading stage. The trends of soil respiration were as follows: heading stage > flowering stage > grain filling stage > maturity stage > jointing stage > seedling stage. The trends of soil respiration under different tillage systems were as follows: CT > ST > RT > NT. There was a significant correlation between soil respiration rate and soil temperatures (P < 0.05), which could explain 35%-75% variability of soil respiration using exponential function equation. However, there was no significant correlation between soil respiration rate and soil moisture. Root respiration accounted for 45.13%-56.86% of the proportion of soil respiratio n with the mean value 51.72% during the summer corn growing season under different tillage systems. Therefore, root exclusion method could be used to study the contribution of crop growth to carbon emission, to compare effects of different tillage systems on the contribution of root respiration provides the bases for selecting the measures to slow down the decomposition of soil carbon.

  10. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  11. Snorkel tracheotomy tube for respirator use.

    PubMed

    LEBO, C P

    1954-07-01

    The Snorkel tracheotomy tube, a simple modification of the standard tube, overcomes many of the mechanical inconveniences usually encountered in the care of patients with tracheotomy who have to be kept in respirators. With it in place, it is not necessary to use special devices to hold the collar of the respirator away from the site of the tracheal incision. Nursing care of the patient is made easier.

  12. THE TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTIC OF RESPIRATION OF AZOTOBACTER.

    PubMed

    Lineweaver, H; Burk, D; Horner, C K

    1932-05-20

    The temperature characteristic of respiration of Azotobacter vinelandii possesses a constant value of 19,330 +/- 165 over the temperature range 20-30 degrees C. This value is independent of pH, oxygen tension, age of culture, and other factors within the limits studied. The optimum temperature of respiration is 34-35 degrees C., with limits at about 10 degrees and 50 degrees C.

  13. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  14. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  15. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  16. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  17. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  18. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  19. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  20. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  1. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  2. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  3. 42 CFR 84.130 - Supplied-air respirators; description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supplied-air respirators; description. 84.130... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description. Supplied-air respirators, including all...

  4. Daily changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate associated with particulate air pollution and barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Dockery, D W; Pope, C A; Kanner, R E; Martin Villegas, G; Schwartz, J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fine particulate air pollution with increases in morbidity and mortality rates from cardiopulmonary complications. Although the underlying biologic mechanisms responsible for this increase remain largely unknown, potential pathways include transient declines in blood oxygenation and changes in pulse rate following exposures to particulate air pollution episodes. This study evaluated potential associations between daily measures of respirable particulate matter (PM) with pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the blood. Pulse rate and oxygen saturation (Spo2) using pulse oximetry were measured daily in 90 elderly subjects living near air pollution monitors during the winter of 1995-96 in Utah Valley. We also evaluated potential associations of oxygen saturation and pulse rate with barometric pressure. Small but statistically significant positive associations between day-to-day changes in Spo2 and barometric pressure were observed. Pulse rate was inversely associated with barometric pressure. Exposure to particulate pollution was not significantly associated with Spo2 except in male participants 80 years of age or older. Increased daily pulse rate, as well as the odds of having a pulse rate 5 or 10 beats per minute (bpm) above normal (normal is defined as the individual's mean pulse rate throughout the study period), were significantly associated with exposure to particulate pollution on the previous 1 to 5 days. The medical or biologic relevance of these increases in pulse rate following exposure to particulate air pollution requires further study.

  5. Daily changes in oxygen saturation and pulse rate associated with particulate air pollution and barometric pressure.

    PubMed

    Dockery, D W; Pope, C A; Kanner, R E; Martin Villegas, G; Schwartz, J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fine particulate air pollution with increases in morbidity and mortality rates from cardiopulmonary complications. Although the underlying biologic mechanisms responsible for this increase remain largely unknown, potential pathways include transient declines in blood oxygenation and changes in pulse rate following exposures to particulate air pollution episodes. This study evaluated potential associations between daily measures of respirable particulate matter (PM) with pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the blood. Pulse rate and oxygen saturation (Spo2) using pulse oximetry were measured daily in 90 elderly subjects living near air pollution monitors during the winter of 1995-96 in Utah Valley. We also evaluated potential associations of oxygen saturation and pulse rate with barometric pressure. Small but statistically significant positive associations between day-to-day changes in Spo2 and barometric pressure were observed. Pulse rate was inversely associated with barometric pressure. Exposure to particulate pollution was not significantly associated with Spo2 except in male participants 80 years of age or older. Increased daily pulse rate, as well as the odds of having a pulse rate 5 or 10 beats per minute (bpm) above normal (normal is defined as the individual's mean pulse rate throughout the study period), were significantly associated with exposure to particulate pollution on the previous 1 to 5 days. The medical or biologic relevance of these increases in pulse rate following exposure to particulate air pollution requires further study. PMID:10192116

  6. Characterization of Carbon Particulates in the Exit Flow of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Meyer, Marit E.; Agui, Juan H.; Berger, Gordon M.; Vijayakumar, R.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    The ISS presently recovers oxygen from crew respiration via a Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) that utilizes the Sabatier chemical process to reduce captured carbon dioxide to methane (CH4) and water. In order to recover more of the hydrogen from the methane and increase oxygen recovery, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is investigating a technology, plasma pyrolysis, to convert the methane to acetylene. The Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (or PPA), achieves 90% or greater conversion efficiency, but a small amount of solid carbon particulates are generated as a side product and must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. In this work, we present the experimental results of an initial characterization of the carbon particulates in the PPA exit gas stream. We also present several potential options to remove these carbon particulates via carbon traps and filters to minimize resupply mass and required downtime for regeneration.

  7. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  8. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Particle size-selective sampling refers to the collection of particles of varying sizes that potentially reach and adversely affect specific regions of the respiratory tract. Thoracic and respirable fractions are defined as the fraction of inhaled particles capable of passing beyond the larynx and ciliated airways, respectively, during inhalation. In an attempt to afford greater protection to exposed individuals, current size-selective sampling criteria overestimate the population means of particle penetration into regions of the lower respiratory tract. The purpose of our analyses was to provide estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions for adults and children during typical activities with both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of health effects evidence. Methods We estimated the fraction of inhaled particles (0.5-20 μm aerodynamic diameter) penetrating beyond the larynx (based on experimental data) and ciliated airways (based on a mathematical model) for an adult male, adult female, and a 10 yr old child during typical daily activities and breathing patterns. Results Our estimates show less penetration of coarse particulate matter into the thoracic and gas exchange regions of the respiratory tract than current size-selective criteria. Of the parameters we evaluated, particle penetration into the lower respiratory tract was most dependent on route of breathing. For typical activity levels and breathing habits, we estimated a 50% cut-size for the thoracic fraction at an aerodynamic diameter of around 3 μm in adults and 5 μm in children, whereas current ambient and occupational criteria suggest a 50% cut-size of 10 μm. Conclusions By design, current size-selective sample criteria overestimate the mass of particles generally expected to penetrate into the lower respiratory tract to provide protection for individuals who may breathe orally. We provide estimates of thoracic and

  9. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak; Rich Gebert

    2001-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hr parametric tests and 100-hr proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency. Since all of the developmental goals of Phase I were met, the approach was scaled up in Phase II to a size of 255 m{sup 3}/min (9000 acfm) (equivalent in size to 2.5 MW) and was installed on a slipstream at the Big Stone Power Plant. For Phase II, the AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant was operated continuously from late July 1999 until mid-December 1999. The Phase II results were highly successful in that ultrahigh particle collection efficiency was achieved, pressure drop was well controlled, and system operability was excellent. For Phase III, the AHPC was modified into a more compact configuration, and components were installed that were closer to what would be used in a full-scale commercial design. The modified AHPC was operated from April to July 2000. While operational results were acceptable during this time, inspection of bags in the summer of 2000 revealed some membrane damage to the fabric that appeared to be

  10. Health care workers and respiratory protection: is the user seal check a surrogate for respirator fit-testing?

    PubMed

    Danyluk, Quinn; Hon, Chun-Yip; Neudorf, Mike; Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth; Janssen, Bob; Astrakianakis, George

    2011-05-01

    Many agencies recommend that health care workers wear N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95-FFR) to minimize occupational exposure to bioaerosols, such as tuberculosis and pandemic influenza. Published standards outline procedures for the proper selection of an N95-FFR model, including user seal checks and respirator fit-testing. Some health officials have argued that the respirator fit-test step should be eliminated altogether, given its additional time and cost factors, and that only a user seal check be utilized to ensure that an adequate face seal has been achieved. One of the aims of the current study is to examine whether a user seal check is an appropriate surrogate for respirator fit-testing. Subjects were assigned an N95-FFR and asked to perform a user seal check (as per manufacturer's instructions) after which they immediately underwent a respirator fit-test. Successfully passing a respirator fit-test was based on not detecting a leakage through the face seal (either qualitatively with a test agent or quantitatively with a particulate counter). The sample population consisted of 647 subjects who had never been previously fit-tested (naive), while the remaining 137 participants were experienced respirator users. Only four of the 647 naive subjects (0.62%) identified an inadequate seal during their user seal check. Of the 643 remaining naive subjects who indicated that they had an adequate face seal prior to fit-testing, 158 (25%) failed the subsequent quantitative fit-test and 92 (14%) failed the qualitative fit-test. All 137 experienced users indicated that they had an adequate seal after performing the user seal check; however, 41 (30%) failed the subsequent quantitative fit-test, and 30 (22%) failed the qualitative fit-test. These findings contradict the argument to eliminate fit-testing and rely strictly on a user seal check to evaluate face seal.

  11. Health care workers and respiratory protection: is the user seal check a surrogate for respirator fit-testing?

    PubMed

    Danyluk, Quinn; Hon, Chun-Yip; Neudorf, Mike; Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth; Janssen, Bob; Astrakianakis, George

    2011-05-01

    Many agencies recommend that health care workers wear N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95-FFR) to minimize occupational exposure to bioaerosols, such as tuberculosis and pandemic influenza. Published standards outline procedures for the proper selection of an N95-FFR model, including user seal checks and respirator fit-testing. Some health officials have argued that the respirator fit-test step should be eliminated altogether, given its additional time and cost factors, and that only a user seal check be utilized to ensure that an adequate face seal has been achieved. One of the aims of the current study is to examine whether a user seal check is an appropriate surrogate for respirator fit-testing. Subjects were assigned an N95-FFR and asked to perform a user seal check (as per manufacturer's instructions) after which they immediately underwent a respirator fit-test. Successfully passing a respirator fit-test was based on not detecting a leakage through the face seal (either qualitatively with a test agent or quantitatively with a particulate counter). The sample population consisted of 647 subjects who had never been previously fit-tested (naive), while the remaining 137 participants were experienced respirator users. Only four of the 647 naive subjects (0.62%) identified an inadequate seal during their user seal check. Of the 643 remaining naive subjects who indicated that they had an adequate face seal prior to fit-testing, 158 (25%) failed the subsequent quantitative fit-test and 92 (14%) failed the qualitative fit-test. All 137 experienced users indicated that they had an adequate seal after performing the user seal check; however, 41 (30%) failed the subsequent quantitative fit-test, and 30 (22%) failed the qualitative fit-test. These findings contradict the argument to eliminate fit-testing and rely strictly on a user seal check to evaluate face seal. PMID:21462067

  12. Development of emission factors for particulate matter in a school

    SciTech Connect

    Scheff, P.A.; Paulius, V.; Conroy, L.M.

    1999-07-01

    Schools have complex indoor environments which are influenced by many factors such as number of occupants, building design, office equipment, cleaning agents, and school activities. Like large office buildings, school environments may be adversely influenced by deficiencies in ventilation which may be due to improper operation of HVAC systems, attempts at energy efficiency that limit the supply of outdoor air, or remodeling of building components. Most importantly, children spend up to a third of their time in these structures, and thus it is desirable to better understand the environmental quality in these buildings. A middle school (grades 6 to 8) in a residential section of Springfield, IL was selected for this baseline indoor air quality survey. The school was characterized as having no health complaints, good maintenance schedules, and did not contain carpeting within the classrooms or hallways. The focus of this paper is on the measurements of air quality in the school. The development of emission factors for particulate matter is also discussed. Four indoor locations including the Cafeteria, a Science Classroom, an Art Classroom, and the Lobby outside of the main office, and one outdoor location were sampled for various environmental comfort and pollutant parameters for one week in February of 1997. Integrated samples (8 hour sampling time) for respirable and total particulate matter, and short-term measurements of bioaerosols (two minute samples, three times per day) on three consecutive days were collected at each of the indoor and outdoor sites. Continuous measurements of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, temperature and humidity were logged at all locations for five days. Continuous measurements of respirable particulate matter were also collected in the Lobby area. Detailed logs of occupant activity were also collected at each indoor monitoring location throughout the study. Total particle concentrations ranged from 29 to 177 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in the art

  13. Compact hybrid particulate collector (COHPAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method for retrofit filtering of particulates in a flue gas from a combustion source having an existing conventional electrostatic precipitator connected thereto and a smoke stack connected to the precipitator. It comprises: removing at least one discharge electrode and collecting electrode from within the housing of the electrostatic precipitator; attaching a tubesheet within the housing; supporting a compact baghouse filter within the separate filter section by the tubesheet; whereby the remaining discharge electrodes and corresponding collecting electrodes in the electrostatis precipitator serve to remove a majority of particulates form the flue gas and impart a residual charge on remaining particulates discharged to the separate filter section, and the remaining particulates are collected by the baghouse filter before the residual electric charge substantially dissipates.

  14. Electrically heated particulate filter restart strategy

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2011-07-12

    A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a propagation module that estimates a propagation status of combustion of particulate matter in the particulate filter. A regeneration module controls current to the particulate filter to re-initiate regeneration based on the propagation status.

  15. Application of PUF foam inserts for respirable dust measurements in the brick-manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    De Vocht, Frank; Hirst, Adrian; Gardner, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Institute of Occupational Medicine dual-fraction samplers equipped with porous polyurethane foam inserts have been introduced as a cheaper alternative to cyclone pre-selectors for measuring respirable dust. Initial data from a variety of industries suggested that the dual-fraction sampler yielded similar results as personal cyclones and that the respirable selection of the foam was not adversely affected by particle loading. We conducted a similar study, but specifically in the brick industry to assess the validity of this dual-fraction sampler as an alternative to personal cyclones in this industry. A total of 72 side-by-side samples using Higgins-Dewell cyclones and dual-fraction samplers were taken in seven UK factories manufacturing a variety of bricks. A priori measurements were assigned to any of the three groups based on the dominant source of the particulates in the exposure matrix (clay, sand or mixed) at the location in the factories where the measurements were taken. After log transformation, Higgins-Dewell cyclone-measured concentrations were on average 1.9 times higher than the concentrations measured by the dual-fraction samplers, with a Pearson correlation of 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.66-0.85). Stratified analysis by main source of exposure suggested that the correlation was best for silica dust-based exposures r(p) = 0.88 (0.63-0.96), but decreased with the relative importance of clay particulates in the exposure matrix to r(p) = 0.82 (0.59-0.93) in the 'mixed-source' group and r(p) = 0.74 (0.55-0.85) in the 'clay particulates' group. Similarly, performance of the dual-fraction sampler relative to the cyclone sampler was negatively associated with increased relative importance of clay particulates in the exposure matrix and ranged from similar measured concentration beta = 0.96 (0.54-1.39) for silica to 50% under sampling beta = 0.50 (0.33-0.67) for clay particulates. These results suggested that the overall performance of the dual

  16. Monitoring of daily integrated exposure of outdoor workers to respirable particulates in an urban region

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, M.M.; Patil, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    A realization is gradually emerging that estimation of daily integrated exposure of population to air pollutants is more relevant rather than the ambient air quality, since it gives a better indicator of health risk. Outdoor workers in urban region are generally of low income category and suffer from both indoor and outdoor air pollution of high levels. These respondent population sub-group have been selected for this study. The outdoor workers are divided into two categories - stationary and mobile. Stationary outdoor workers are further divided into two groups viz. traffic police and casual outdoor workers like watchman, roadside shopkeeper, etc. The mobile outdoor workers include drivers and workers who have to travel for a majority period of their occupation time. Most of the respondents are from lower income group. The sampling frequency is once a week. The study region is situated in the N-W part of Greater Bombay Municipal Corporation. It can be classified as industrial cum residential area. Ambient air quality monitoring stations are established at three sites viz. Marol, Sakinaka and Jogeshwari in this region and respondents for the exposure measurement are selected from the cluster of residential houses (slums) near these stations. In the present study, outdoor workers residing and working in the study region are selected. This has eliminated the commuting microenvironment. The daily integrated exposure of the outdoor workers consists of two major microenvironments viz. occupation and indoor residential. In addition, activity diary of the respondents is maintained to check whether there are any other major microenvironments.

  17. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... air changes per minute. (4) The atomizer employed will be a No. 64-5 nozzle with setup 3, or... atomizer employed will be a No. 64 nozzle with setup 1A, or equivalent, operating at 69 kN/m.2 (10...

  18. Modeling vertical carbon flux from zooplankton respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Theodore T.; Gómez, May

    2013-03-01

    The transport of carbon from ocean surface waters to the deep sea is a critical factor in calculations of planetary carbon cycling and climate change. This vertical carbon flux is currently thought to support the respiration of all the organisms in the water column below the surface, the respiration of the organisms in the benthos, as well as the carbon lost to deep burial. Accordingly, for conditions where the benthic respiration and the carbon burial are small relative to the respiration in the water column, and where horizontal fluxes are known or negligible, the carbon flux can be calculated by integrating the vertical profile of the water-column plankton respiration rate. Here, this has been done for the zooplankton component of the vertical carbon flux from measurements of zooplankton ETS activity south of the Canary Island Archipelago. From zooplankton ETS activity depth profiles, zooplankton respiration depth profiles were calculated and using the equations for the profiles as models, the epipelagic (3.05 μmol CO2 m-3 h-1), mesopelagic (112.82 nmol CO2 m-3 h-1), and bathypelagic (27.89 nmol CO2 m-3 h-1) zooplankton respiration for these waters were calculated. Then, by integration of the depth-normalized respiration profiles, zooplankton-associated carbon flux profiles below 150 m were calculated. These had an uncertainty of ±40%. At the station level (local regional variation) the variability was ±114% (n = 16). At 150 m and 500 m the average passive carbon flux associated with the zooplankton was 36 (±114%) and 20 (±113%) μmol C m-2 h-1. The carbon transfer efficiency (Teff) from the 150 to the 500 m levels averaged 51 ± 21% and a new metric, the nutrient retention efficiency (NRE), averaged 49 ± 21%. This metric is an index of the efficiency with which nutrients are maintained in the epipelagic zone and is directly related to the respiration in the water column. The carbon flux equation describing the pooled data (n = 16) was 131.14Z-0.292. Using

  19. Electrical diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-12-31

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

  20. Sampling of respirable isocyanate particles.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Gustavsson, Marcus; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    An advanced design of a denuder impactor (DI) sampler has been developed for characterization of possible airborne isocyanate exposure in different particle size fractions. The sampler is equipped with 12 different parallel denuder tubes, 4 impaction stages with the cut-off values (d50) of: 9.5, 4, 2.5 and 1 µm, and an end filter that collects particles < 1 µm. All collecting parts were impregnated with di-n-butylamine DBA as the reagent in a mixture with acetic acid. The performance of the DI sampler was studied on a standard atmosphere containing gas and particulate isocyanates. The isocyanate atmosphere was generated by liquid permeation of 2,4-, 2,6-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI) and Isophorone Diisocyanate (IPDI). 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) particles were generated by heating of technical MDI and condensing the mixture of gas and particle-borne MDI in an atmosphere containing mixed salt particles. The study was performed in a 0.85 m3 environmental chamber with stainless steel walls. With the advancement of the DI sampler it is now possible to collect isocyanate particle samples for up to 320 min. The performance of the DI sampler is essentially unaffected by the humidity. The DI sampler and the ASSET EZ4-NCO sampler (Sigma-Aldrich/Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA) gave similar results. Sample losses within the DI sampler are low. In the environmental chamber it was observed that the particle distribution may be affected by the humidity and ageing. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to separate a flow of selected fractions containing MDI particles from mixed MDI and salt particles. The particle-size distribution had a maximum at about 300 nm, but later in the environmental chamber 1 µm dominated. The distribution was very different as compared to with only NaCl or MDI present. The biological relevance for studying isocyanate nano particles is significant as these have the possibility to reach the

  1. Association of expired nitric oxide with occupational particulate exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee Young; Wand, Matthew P; Hauser, Russ; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C

    2003-01-01

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with adverse respiratory health effects. This study assessed the utility of expired nitric oxide to detect acute airway responses to metal-containing fine particulates. Using a repeated-measures study design, we investigated the association between the fractional concentration of expired nitric oxide (F(E)NO) and exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic mass median diameter of less than or equal to 2.5 micro m (PM(2.5)) in boilermakers exposed to residual oil fly ash and metal fumes. Subjects were monitored for 5 days during boiler repair overhauls in 1999 (n = 20) or 2000 (n = 14). The Wilcoxon median baseline F(E)NO was 10.6 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1, 12.7] in 1999 and 7.4 ppb (95% CI: 6.7, 8.0) in 2000. The Wilcoxon median PM(2.5) 8-hr time-weighted average was 0.56 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.37, 0.93) in 1999 and 0.86 mg/m(3) (95% CI: 0.65, 1.07) in 2000. F(E)NO levels during the work week were significantly lower than baseline F(E)NO in 1999 (p < 0.001). A significant inverse exposure-response relationship between log-transformed F(E)NO and the previous workday's PM(2.5) concentration was found in 1999, after adjusting for smoking status, age, and sampling year. With each 1 mg/m(3) incremental increase in PM(2.5) exposure, log F(E)NO decreased by 0.24 (95% CI: -0.38, -0.10) in 1999. The lack of an exposure-response relationship between PM(2.5) exposure and F(E)NO in 2000 could be attributable to exposure misclassification resulting from the use of respirators. In conclusion, occupational exposure to metal-containing fine particulates was associated with significant decreases in F(E)NO in a survey of workers with limited respirator usage. PMID:12727593

  2. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  3. Component analysis of respirator user training.

    PubMed

    Harber, Philip; Boumis, Robert J; Su, Jing; Barrett, Sarah; Alongi, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Respirators must be properly used to be effective. In an experimental protocol, 145 subjects were trained and then observed donning and doffing respirators. Filtering facepiece and dual cartridge half face mask types were studied. Subjects were then tested for knowledge and for proper performance using video recording analysis. Knowledge tests showed adequate learning, but performance was often poor. Inspection, strap tension (half mask), seal checking, and avoiding mask contact during doffing were particularly problematic. Mask positioning was generally well done. Correlation between knowledge and performance for specific items was generally poor, although there was a weak correlation between overall knowledge and overall performance (rho = 0.32) for the half mask users. Actual unprompted performance as well as knowledge and fit-testing should be assessed for user certification. Respirator design approval should consider users' ability to learn proper technique. PMID:24011265

  4. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  5. Man-made respirable-sized organic fibers: what do we know about their toxicological profiles?

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Reed, K L; Webb, T R

    2001-04-01

    Man-made organic fibers (MMOFs) have been manufactured for over 50 years. Until recently, there have been few concerns raised regarding the safety of organic fiber dusts. This is due, in large part, to the perception that the dimensions of most, if not all, of these products were too large to be inhaled into the distal lungs of workers, i.e., were considered to be nonrespirable. A brief review of some of the issues related to organic fiber toxicology is presented herein. Some of the organic fiber-types used in commerce are identified and some fundamental tenets of fiber toxicology are discussed. In addition, the European Union, in their recent consideration for banning chrysotile asbestos fibers, evaluated some organic fiber substitutes and compared them to the hazards of asbestos. A brief review of their conclusions is described below. Finally, the results of some recent studies assessing the mechanisms of biodegradability of para-aramid respirable-sized, fiber-shaped particulates (RFP) are presented. Para-aramid (p-aramid) RFP are the most extensively-studied respirable organic fiber-type and RFP is the new term which describes respirable-sized organic fibers (ECETOC, 1996) (1). The results of these studies provide clues regarding the mechanism(s) of p-aramid RFP shortening in the lungs of exposed animals, and may be relevant for humans.

  6. Using half-facepiece respirators for H1N1.

    PubMed

    Larson, Scott

    2009-11-01

    A respirator is a device designed to help provide the wearer with respiratory protection against inhalation of airborne contaminants. Increasing the filtration level of a particle respirator does not increase the respirator's ability to reduce a user's exposure to contaminants. The APF of a respirator, which is affected by the respirator style, determines the potential for exposure reduction. Surgical masks that are not approved as filtering facepiece half-mask respirators do not have an APF and should not be used for reducing workers' exposures to particles in the air. PMID:19927872

  7. BOREAS TE-2 Root Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set includes means of tree root respiration measurements on roots having diameters ranging from 0 to 2 mm conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. BOREAS TE-2 Continuous Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration measured continuously (about once per hour) in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  9. BOREAS TE-2 Wood Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Lavigne, Michael; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of wood respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. BOREAS TE-2 Foliage Respiration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Lavigne, Michael; Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-2 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the respiration of the foliage, roots, and wood of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of foliar respiration conducted in the NSA during the growing season of 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  11. Changes in soil respiration components and their specific respiration along three successional forests in the subtropics

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tianfeng; Liu, Juxiu; Wang, Gangsheng; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi

    2016-01-16

    1.Understanding how soil respiration components change with forest succession is critical for modelling and predicting soil carbon (C) processes and its sequestration below-ground. The specific respiration (a ratio of respiration to biomass) is increasingly being used as an indicator of forest succession conceptually based on Odum's theory of ecosystem development. However, the hypothesis that specific soil respiration declines with forest succession remains largely untested. 2.We used a trenching method to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration (RH and RA) and then evaluated the specific RH and specific RA in three successional forests in subtropical China. 3.Our resultsmore » showed a clear seasonality in the influence of forest succession on RH, with no significant differences among the three forests in the dry season but a higher value in the old-growth forest than the other two forests in the wet season. RA in the old-growth forest tended to be the highest among the three forests. Both the specific RH and specific RA decreased with the progressive maturity of three forests. 4.Lastly, our results highlight the importance of forest succession in determining the variation of RH in different seasons. With forest succession, soil microbes and plant roots become more efficient to conserve C resources, which would result in a greater proportion of C retained in soils.« less

  12. Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Brown, David B.

    2010-02-02

    A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

  13. ITP Filter Particulate Decontamination Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1993-05-21

    A new test method was developed which showed the installed In- Tank Precipitation Filter Unit {number_sign}3 provided at least 40, 000 x decontamination of the precipitated potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) during the cold chemical runs.This filter is expected to meet the needed 40,000 x hot cesium decontamination requirements, assuming that the cesium precipitate, CsTPB, behaves the same as KTPB. The new method permits cold chemicals field testing of installed filters to quantify particulate decontamination and verify filter integrity before going hot. The method involves a 1000 x concentration of fine particulate KTPB in the filtrate to allow direct analysis by counting for naturally radioactive isotope K-40 using the underground SRTC gamma spectroscopy facility. The particulate concentration was accomplished by ultra filtration at Rhone-Poulenc, NJ, using a small cross-flow bench facility, followed by collection of all suspended solids on a small filter disc for K analysis.

  14. Facial hair policy in a respirator program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, P.R. )

    1989-10-01

    In this paper the prohibition against facial hair for respirator users is explored. Reasons for the prohibition are given, along with suggestions for establishing or reviewing a policy. Recommendations are given for properly wording a facial hair policy, and the issue of facial hair on female workers is also addressed.

  15. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  16. Estimating Canopy Dark Respiration for Crop Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje Mejia, Oscar Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Crop production is obtained from accurate estimates of daily carbon gain.Canopy gross photosynthesis (Pgross) can be estimated from biochemical models of photosynthesis using sun and shaded leaf portions and the amount of intercepted photosyntheticallyactive radiation (PAR).In turn, canopy daily net carbon gain can be estimated from canopy daily gross photosynthesis when canopy dark respiration (Rd) is known.

  17. Respiration patterns of resting wasps (Vespula sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Käfer, Helmut; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the respiration patterns of wasps (Vespula sp.) in their viable temperature range (2.9–42.4 °C) by measuring CO2 production and locomotor and endothermic activity. Wasps showed cycles of an interburst–burst type at low ambient temperatures (Ta < 5 °C) or typical discontinuous gas exchange patterns with closed, flutter and open phases. At high Ta of >31 °C, CO2 emission became cyclic. With rising Ta they enhanced CO2-emission primarily by an exponential increase in respiration frequency, from 2.6 mHz at 4.7 °C to 74 mHz at 39.7 °C. In the same range of Ta CO2 release per cycle decreased from 38.9 to 26.4 μl g−1 cycle−1. A comparison of wasps with other insects showed that they are among the insects with a low respiratory frequency at a given resting metabolic rate (RMR), and a relatively flat increase of respiratory frequency with RMR. CO2 emission was always accompanied by abdominal respiration movements in all open phases and in 71.4% of the flutter phases, often accompanied by body movements. Results suggest that resting wasps gain their highly efficient gas exchange to a considerable extent via the length and type of respiration movements. PMID:23399474

  18. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  19. Microbial iron respiration: impacts on corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, A K; Newman, D K

    2003-08-01

    In this review, we focus on how biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria influence steel corrosion. Specifically, we discuss how biofilm growth can affect the chemistry of the environment around the steel at different stages of biofilm development, under static or dynamic fluid regimes. We suggest that a mechanistic understanding of the role of biofilm metabolic activity may facilitate corrosion control.

  20. Respiration patterns of resting wasps (Vespula sp.).

    PubMed

    Käfer, Helmut; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the respiration patterns of wasps (Vespula sp.) in their viable temperature range (2.9-42.4°C) by measuring CO2 production and locomotor and endothermic activity. Wasps showed cycles of an interburst-burst type at low ambient temperatures (Ta<5°C) or typical discontinuous gas exchange patterns with closed, flutter and open phases. At high Ta of >31°C, CO2 emission became cyclic. With rising Ta they enhanced CO2-emission primarily by an exponential increase in respiration frequency, from 2.6 mHz at 4.7°C to 74 mHz at 39.7°C. In the same range of Ta CO2 release per cycle decreased from 38.9 to 26.4 μl g(-1)cycle(-1). A comparison of wasps with other insects showed that they are among the insects with a low respiratory frequency at a given resting metabolic rate (RMR), and a relatively flat increase of respiratory frequency with RMR. CO2 emission was always accompanied by abdominal respiration movements in all open phases and in 71.4% of the flutter phases, often accompanied by body movements. Results suggest that resting wasps gain their highly efficient gas exchange to a considerable extent via the length and type of respiration movements.

  1. How to Properly Put On, Take Off a Disposable Respirator

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nose piece at your fingertips. Checking Your Seal 2 Cup the respirator in your hand allowing ... quick breath in to check whether the respirator seals tightly to the face. Place both hands completely ...

  2. [Regulation of respiration in assisted ventilation].

    PubMed

    Waurick, S; König, F

    1984-02-01

    Based on knowledge of the control of external respiration, the physiological reactions are discussed which should be evoked proprioceptively and chemoreceptively by an assisting respirator's disturbances of spontaneous breathing movements. The following possible states are discriminated: 1. "no adaption": the respiratory motor system does not remain passive during the machine's stroke; 2. "passive adaption": the respiratory motor system remains passive during the respirator's stroke; to changes of the blood gas-status, only the breathing frequency responds, but in just the same manner as during spontaneous ventilation; 3. "active adaption": the ventilatory motor apparatus remains passive during the respirator's operation; changes of the blood gases are responded to by the breathing frequency only, but in a manner different to spontaneous breathing and which compensates for the invariability of the fixed stroke-volume. - Related to these 3 states, consequences concerning the efficiency of chemical respiratory control can be derived which should reveal themselves during experimental manipulation of the blood gas partial pressures. Accordingly, the CO2-response curves of minute ventilation, breathing frequency and tidal-volume generated in 9 healthy, awake and cooperative subjects during spontaneous breathing and assisted (stroke-volume controlled) respiration with gas mixtures of 0, 3 and 6% CO2 were investigated and compared. (In each subject assisted ventilation with 2 or 3 different stroke-volumes was performed. The smallest stroke-volume equalled the medium tidal-volume of spontaneous ventilation. Every stroke-volume produced its particular CO2-response curve). Hence it follows that with assisted ventilation, using a stroke-volume larger than the spontaneous tidal-volume, the subjects maintain a state between "passive" and "active adaption".(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [Stem respiration of Pinus koraiensis in Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Ji, Lanzhu; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Dongmei; Liu, Hailiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, soil respiration chamber, a simple and precise method, was used to measure the stem respiration of trees. LI-6400-09 respiration chamber serving as a system is usually used in soil respiration, but we made polyvinyl chloride (PVC) collar and fixed it on the stem surface to measure the stem respiration. From May to October 2003, the stem respiration of Pinus koraiensis, the dominant tree species in Changbai Mountain, was measured in different time and different places using this technique. Meanwhile, the temperatures in the stems and in the forests were measured. The results showed that the stem respiration rate had a remarkably seasonal tendency with a single peak, the maximum was in August and the minimum was in February. The stem respiration rate had an exponential relationship with stem temperature, and the curve exponential regressions for stem respiration rate and temperature factor of trees with big DBH were better than those with small DBH. The stem respiration in different DBH trees was higher in the south stem face than that in the north stem face, and the variance of respiration rate between south and north decreased with a decrease of DBH trees. During the growing season from May to October, the average maintenance respiration accounted for 63.63% in different DBH trees, and the maintenance respiration contribution to total respiratory consumption increased with increasing DBH, which was 66.76, 73.29% and 50.84%, respectively. The stem respiration Q10 values ranged from 2.56-3.32 in different DBH of trees, and the seasonal tendency for stem R, and Rm in different DBH of trees was obtained by using respiration Q10. Therefore, the differences between different parts of stem and different DBH of trees should be considered in estimating the respiration model in ecosystem. PMID:15852948

  4. PM 2.5 Airborne Particulates Near Frac Sand Operations.

    PubMed

    Walters, Kristin; Jacobson, Jeron; Kroening, Zachary; Pierce, Crispin

    2015-11-01

    The rapid growth of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas extraction in the U.S. has led to 135 active "frac" sand mines, processing plants, and rail transfer stations in Wisconsin. Potential environmental health risks include increased truck traffic, noise, ecosystem loss, and groundwater, light, and air pollution. Emitted air contaminants include fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and respirable crystalline silica. Inhalation of fine dust particles causes increased mortality, cardiovascular disease, lung disease, and lung cancer. In the authors' pilot study, use of a filter-based ambient particulate monitor found PM2.5 levels of 5.82-50.8 µg/m3 in six 24-hour samples around frac sand mines and processing sites. Enforcement of the existing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency annual PM2.5 standard of 12 µg/m3 is likely to protect the public from silica exposure risks as well. PM2.5 monitoring around frac sand sites is needed to ensure regulatory compliance, inform nearby communities, and protect public health.

  5. PM 2.5 Airborne Particulates Near Frac Sand Operations.

    PubMed

    Walters, Kristin; Jacobson, Jeron; Kroening, Zachary; Pierce, Crispin

    2015-11-01

    The rapid growth of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas extraction in the U.S. has led to 135 active "frac" sand mines, processing plants, and rail transfer stations in Wisconsin. Potential environmental health risks include increased truck traffic, noise, ecosystem loss, and groundwater, light, and air pollution. Emitted air contaminants include fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and respirable crystalline silica. Inhalation of fine dust particles causes increased mortality, cardiovascular disease, lung disease, and lung cancer. In the authors' pilot study, use of a filter-based ambient particulate monitor found PM2.5 levels of 5.82-50.8 µg/m3 in six 24-hour samples around frac sand mines and processing sites. Enforcement of the existing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency annual PM2.5 standard of 12 µg/m3 is likely to protect the public from silica exposure risks as well. PM2.5 monitoring around frac sand sites is needed to ensure regulatory compliance, inform nearby communities, and protect public health. PMID:26638669

  6. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used...

  7. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his...

  8. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his...

  9. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... Death from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his...

  10. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease,...

  11. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his or...

  12. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease,...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used...

  14. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  15. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  16. MODELING PARTICULATE CHARGING IN ESPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In electrostatic precipitators there is a strong interaction between the particulate space charge and the operating voltage and current of an electrical section. Calculating either the space charge or the operating point when the other is fixed is not difficult, but calculating b...

  17. Particulate matter and preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) has been variably associated with preterm birth (PTB) (gestation <37 weeks), but the role played by specific chemical components of PM has been little studied. We examined the association between ambient PM <2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.S) ...

  18. Process for particulate removal from coal liquids

    DOEpatents

    Rappe, Gerald C.

    1983-01-01

    Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

  19. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ross G

    2008-04-01

    The current mini-review describes the toxic effects of zinc inhalation principally in the workplace and associated complications with breathing and respiration. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Criteria were used to specifically select articles. Most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc/day. Metal fume fever associated with inhalation of fumes of ZnO is characterized by fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste and salivation. ZnCl(2) inhalation results in edema in the alveolar surface and the protein therein the lavage fluid is elevated. Particular pathological changes associated with zinc intoxication include: pale mucous membranes; jaundice; numerous Heinz bodies; and marked anemia. Adequate ambient air monitors for permissible exposure limits, excellent ventilation and extraction systems, and approved respirators are all important in providing adequate protection.

  20. Zinc toxicology following particulate inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ross G.

    2008-01-01

    The current mini-review describes the toxic effects of zinc inhalation principally in the workplace and associated complications with breathing and respiration. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Criteria were used to specifically select articles. Most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc/day. Metal fume fever associated with inhalation of fumes of ZnO is characterized by fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste and salivation. ZnCl2 inhalation results in edema in the alveolar surface and the protein therein the lavage fluid is elevated. Particular pathological changes associated with zinc intoxication include: pale mucous membranes; jaundice; numerous Heinz bodies; and marked anemia. Adequate ambient air monitors for permissible exposure limits, excellent ventilation and extraction systems, and approved respirators are all important in providing adequate protection. PMID:20040991

  1. Organic speciation of size-segregated atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Raphael

    Particle size and composition are key factors controlling the impacts of particulate matter (PM) on human health and the environment. A comprehensive method to characterize size-segregated PM organic content was developed, and evaluated during two field campaigns. Size-segregated particles were collected using a cascade impactor (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a PM2.5 large volume sampler. A series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were solvent extracted and quantified using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Large volume injections were performed using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet to lower detection limits. The developed analysis method was evaluated during the 2001 and 2002 Intercomparison Exercise Program on Organic Contaminants in PM2.5 Air Particulate Matter led by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Ambient samples were collected in May 2002 as part of the Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Florida, USA and in July and August 2004 as part of the New England Air Quality Study - Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS - ITCT) in New Hampshire, USA. Morphology of the collected particles was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Smaller particles (one micrometer or less) appeared to consist of solid cores surrounded by a liquid layer which is consistent with combustion particles and also possibly with particles formed and/or coated by secondary material like sulfate, nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. Source apportionment studies demonstrated the importance of stationary sources on the organic particulate matter observed at these two rural sites. Coal burning and biomass burning were found to be responsible for a large part of the observed PAHs during the field campaigns. Most of the measured PAHs were concentrated in particles smaller than one micrometer and linked to combustion sources

  2. Particulate emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), including open beef cattle feedlots, swine facilities, and poultry facilities, can emit large amounts of particulate matter, including TSP (total suspended particulates), PM10 (particulate matter with equivalent aerodynamic diameter of 10 mm or less) a...

  3. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  4. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  5. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  6. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  7. Paper-Based Electrical Respiration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Ainla, Alar; Redston, Julia; Mosadegh, Bobak; Glavan, Ana; Martin, T J; Whitesides, George M

    2016-05-01

    Current methods of monitoring breathing require cumbersome, inconvenient, and often expensive devices; this requirement sets practical limitations on the frequency and duration of measurements. This article describes a paper-based moisture sensor that uses the hygroscopic character of paper (i.e. the ability of paper to adsorb water reversibly from the surrounding environment) to measure patterns and rate of respiration by converting the changes in humidity caused by cycles of inhalation and exhalation to electrical signals. The changing level of humidity that occurs in a cycle causes a corresponding change in the ionic conductivity of the sensor, which can be measured electrically. By combining the paper sensor with conventional electronics, data concerning respiration can be transmitted to a nearby smartphone or tablet computer for post-processing, and subsequently to a cloud server. This means of sensing provides a new, practical method of recording and analyzing patterns of breathing. PMID:27059088

  8. Tumors and mitochondrial respiration: a neglected connection.

    PubMed

    Viale, Andrea; Corti, Denise; Draetta, Giulio F

    2015-09-15

    For decades, tumor cells have been considered defective in mitochondrial respiration due to their dominant glycolytic metabolism. However, a growing body of evidence is now challenging this assumption, and also implying that tumors are metabolically less homogeneous than previously supposed. A small subpopulation of slow-cycling cells endowed with tumorigenic potential and multidrug resistance has been isolated from different tumors. Deep metabolic characterization of these tumorigenic cells revealed their dependency on mitochondrial respiration versus glycolysis, suggesting the existence of a common metabolic program active in slow-cycling cells across different tumors. These findings change our understanding of tumor metabolism and also highlight new vulnerabilities that can be exploited to eradicate cancer cells responsible for tumor relapse.

  9. Transducer for monitoring respiration during imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Jones, K R

    1988-07-01

    A transducer system for monitoring respiration is described; it uses a 'liquid column' sensor with a remote integrated circuit pressure module. It was designed primarily for non-invasive monitoring and control of respiration during diagnostic imaging procedures, but has also found applications in other areas, e.g. physiotherapy and pulse monitoring. The device is a new version of a system developed several years ago and takes advantage of relatively low cost commercial 'building blocks'. The output is an analogue voltage (from a low impedance source) capable of driving a wide range of recorders, amplifiers and computer interfaces. Reference is also made in the text to a bio-feedback signal processing and display unit (described elsewhere) which, when used with this transducer, provides a versatile respiratory control system.

  10. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Michal, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation`s Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. {open_quotes}It basically delineates that dose is dose,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.{close_quotes} The revision of Part 20 changed the industry`s attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. {open_quotes}Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.{close_quotes}

  11. Technical Note: Particulate reactive oxygen species concentrations and their association with environmental conditions in an urban, subtropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, S. S.; Siegel, J. A.; Kinney, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Reactions between hydrocarbons and ozone or hydroxyl radicals lead to the formation of oxidized species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the troposphere. ROS can be carried deep into the lungs by small aerodynamic particles where they can cause oxidative stress and cell damage. While environmental studies have focused on ROS in the gas phase and rainwater, it is also important to determine concentrations of ROS on respirable particles. Samples of PM2.5 collected over 3 h at midday on 40 days during November 2011 and September 2012 show that the particulate ROS concentration in Austin, Texas, ranged from a minimum value of 0.02 nmoles H2O2 m-3 air in December to 3.81 nmoles H2O2 m-3 air in September. Results from correlation tests and linear regression analysis on particulate ROS concentrations and environmental conditions (which included ozone and PM2.5 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and solar radiation) indicate that ambient particulate ROS is significantly influenced by the ambient ozone concentration, temperature and incident solar radiation. Particulate ROS concentrations measured in this study were in the range reported by other studies in the US, Taiwan and Singapore. This study is one of the first to assess seasonal variations in particulate ROS concentrations and helps explain the influence of environmental conditions on particulate ROS concentrations.

  12. Technical Note: Particulate reactive oxygen species concentrations and their association with environmental conditions in an urban, subtropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, S. S.; Siegel, J. A.; Kinney, K. A.

    2014-02-01

    Reactions between hydrocarbons and ozone or hydroxyl radicals lead to the formation of oxidized species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the troposphere. ROS can be carried deep into the lungs by small aerodynamic particles where they can cause oxidative stress and cell damage. While environmental studies have focused on ROS in the gas-phase and rainwater, it is also important to determine concentrations of ROS on respirable particles. Samples of PM2.5 collected over 3 h at midday on 40 days during November 2011 and September 2012 show that the particulate ROS concentration in Austin, Texas ranged from a minimum value of 0.02 nmol H2O2 (m3 air)-1 in December to 3.81 nmol H2O2 (m3 air)-1 in September. Results from correlation tests and linear regression analysis on particulate ROS concentrations and environmental conditions (which included ozone and PM2.5 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and solar radiation) indicate that ambient particulate ROS is significantly influenced by the ambient ozone concentration, temperature and incident solar radiation. Particulate ROS concentrations measured in this study were in the range reported by other studies in the US, Taiwan and Singapore. This study is one of the first to assess seasonal variations in particulate ROS concentrations and helps explain the influence of environmental conditions on particulate ROS concentrations.

  13. Aerosol penetration through respirator exhalation valves.

    PubMed

    Bellin, P; Hinds, W C

    1990-10-01

    Exhalation valves are a critical component of industrial respirators. They are designed to permit minimal inward leakage of air contaminants during inhalation and provide low resistance during exhalation. Under normal conditions, penetration of aerosol through exhalation valves is minimal. The exhalation valve is, however, a vulnerable component of a respirator and under actual working conditions may become dirty or damaged to the point of causing significant leakage. Aerosol penetration was measured for normal exhalation valves and valves compromised by paint or fine copper wires on the valve seat. Penetration increased with increasing wire diameter. A wire 250 microns in diameter allowed greater than 1% penetration into the mask cavity. Dirt or paint accumulated on the exhalation valve allowed a similar level of penetration. Work rate had little effect on observed penetration. Penetration decreased significantly with increasing aerosol particle size. The amount of material on the valve or valve seat necessary for significant (greater than 0.5%) inward leakage in a half-mask respirator could be readily observed by careful inspection of the exhalation valve and its seat in good lighting conditions.

  14. How Ecosystems Breathe: Measuring Respiration of Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTammany, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Curriculum for general ecology labs often uses in-lab exercises and computer simulations to demonstrate ecological principles rather than experimental field projects. In addition, ecosystem processes can be difficult to incorporate into general ecology labs because the techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex field designs. As an alternative to in-lab projects, I have integrated field measurement of soil respiration into my general ecology lab to teach students aspects of experimental design (sampling, replication, error, etc.) and to demonstrate how organism-level processes operate beyond single organisms in nature and are influenced by environmental conditions. In a program laden with biomedical interests, analogies between organisms and ecosystems are quite appealing to students. Students in my general ecology course complete a 2-week field project in which they measure soil respiration inside a dark microcosm chamber. We use 10% KOH to trap evolved CO2 and titrate unreacted KOH in lab using 1N HCl. The protocol is simple, only requires some chemicals, and can be used in many different habitats (including flower beds on campus) quite easily. Potential experiments could involve varying environmental conditions, such as soil moisture, nutrient availability, gaseous environment, carbon supply, or temperature, to affect soil respiration rate.

  15. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  16. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that 1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; 2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; 3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and 4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms. PMID:23420623

  17. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  18. Natural Niche for Organohalide-Respiring Chloroflexi

    PubMed Central

    Krzmarzick, Mark J.; Crary, Benjamin B.; Harding, Jevon J.; Oyerinde, Oyenike O.; Leri, Alessandra C.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2012-01-01

    The phylum Chloroflexi contains several isolated bacteria that have been found to respire a diverse array of halogenated anthropogenic chemicals. The distribution and role of these Chloroflexi in uncontaminated terrestrial environments, where abundant natural organohalogens could function as potential electron acceptors, have not been studied. Soil samples (116 total, including 6 sectioned cores) from a range of uncontaminated sites were analyzed for the number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes present. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi populations were detected in all but 13 samples. The concentrations of organochlorine ([organochlorine]), inorganic chloride, and total organic carbon (TOC) were obtained for 67 soil core sections. The number of Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi 16S rRNA genes positively correlated with [organochlorine]/TOC while the number of Bacteria 16S rRNA genes did not. Dehalococcoides-like Chloroflexi were also observed to increase in number with a concomitant accumulation of chloride when cultured with an enzymatically produced mixture of organochlorines. This research provides evidence that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi are widely distributed as part of uncontaminated terrestrial ecosystems, they are correlated with the fraction of TOC present as organochlorines, and they increase in abundance while dechlorinating organochlorines. These findings suggest that organohalide-respiring Chloroflexi may play an integral role in the biogeochemical chlorine cycle. PMID:22101035

  19. Fogging formulations for fixation of particulate contamination in ductwork and enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Jr., Joseph W.; Kostelnik, Lori M.; Kriskivich, James R.; Demmer, Rick L.; Tripp, Julia L.

    2015-09-08

    A method and an apparatus using aqueous fixatives for fogging of ventilation ductwork, enclosures, or buildings containing dust, lint, and particulates that may be contaminated by radionuclides and other dangerous or unsafe particulate contaminants, which method and apparatus are capable of (1) obtaining full coverage within the ductwork and (2) penetrating and fixing the lint, dust and large particles present in the ductwork so that no airborne particles are released during or after the application of the fixative. New aqueous fogging solutions outperform conventional glycerin-based solutions. These aqueous solutions will fog using conventional methods of application and contain a surfactant to aid wetting and penetration of the lint and dust, a binder to stabilize loose or respirable particles, and an agent to aid in fogging and enhance adhesiveness. The solutions are safe and easy to use.

  20. Establishing aeolian particulate 'fingerprints' in an airport environment using magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sue; Hoon, Stephen R.; Richardson, Nigel; Bennett, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of particulate matter (PM) from aviation activity on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment, in particular, may be derived from a wide range of potential sources including aircraft; vehicles; ground support equipment and buildings. In order to investigate and remediate potential problem sources, it is important to be able to identify characteristic particulate 'fingerprints' which would allow source attribution, particularly respirable particulates. To date the identification of such 'fingerprints' has remained elusive but remains a key research priority for the aviation industry (Webb et al, 2008). In previous PM studies, environmental magnetism has been used as a successful technique for discriminating between different emission types and particulate sources in both urban and industrial environments (e.g. Hunt et al 1984; Lecoanet et al 2003, Jones et al 2015). Environmental magnetism is a non-destructive and relatively rapid technique involving the use of non-directional, rock magnetic measurements to characterise the mineral magnetic properties of natural and anthropogenic materials. In other studies scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has also been used as an effective characterisation technique for the investigation of grain size and morphology of PM derived from vehicle emissions (e.g. Bucko et al 2010) and fossil fuel combustion sources (Kim et al 2009). In this study, environmental magnetic measurements and SEM/EDAX have been used to characterise dusts from specific aircraft sources including engines, brakes and tyres. Furthermore, these methods have also been applied to runway (both hard and grass covered surfaces), taxiway and apron dusts collected during extensive environmental sampling at Manchester International Airport, UK in order to

  1. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  2. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  3. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  4. Airborne particulates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air in Donghe, northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tao, Shu; Wang, Wentao; Shen, Guofeng; Zhao, Jingyu; Lam, Kin-Che

    2009-07-15

    Five sets of size-fractionated particles were collected in a northern China village in various seasons in order to measure respirable airborne particulates (PM10) and particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air. The time-weighted annual mean concentration and standard deviation of PM10 were 358 +/- 107 microg/m3, higher than both the national standard (100 microg/m3) and the levels observed in several contaminated northern Chinese cities. In addition to high levels of PAHs (391 +/- 487 ng/m3), the fraction of higher molecular weight PAHs was higher than most reported in the literature, and the time-weighted annual mean benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentration was 44.2 +/- 51.4 ng/m3, more than four times the national standard of 10 ng/m3 and 44 times the WHO guideline of 1 ng/m3. Apparently, residents in Donghe suffer from exposure to high levels of both PM10 and particulate phase PAHs. The particle size distribution was centered in the range of Dp < or = 3.3 microm in winter and shifted to the ranges of Dp < or = 2.1 microm and 5.8 microm < Dp < 10 microm in spring and summer respectively. Approximately 90.0% of PAHs were associated with airborne particulates with Dp < or = 2.1 microm. PMID:19799054

  5. Particle release from respirators, part I: determination of the effect of particle size, drop height, and load.

    PubMed

    Birkner, Jeffrey S; Fung, David; Hinds, William C; Kennedy, Nola J

    2011-01-01

    In late 2001, some U.S. Postal Service workers and a few members of Congress were exposed to anthrax spores. This led to an increased effort to develop employable methods to protect workers from exposure to anthrax. Some investigations focused on selection and use of respirators to protect workers against airborne anthrax. The present study evaluated the potential for several types of half-mask respirators to release deposited particles. Four brands of the most commonly used filtering facepiece respirators (hereafter termed masks) were loaded with 0.59-μm, 1.0-μm, and 1.9-μm polystyrene latex (PSL) microspheres (nominally 0.6, 1.0, and 2.0 μm) and then dropped onto a rigid surface. The load conditions were 10, 20, or 40 million particles, and drop heights were 0.15, 0.76, and 1.37 m. For the average conditions of 0.76 m, 1.15 μm size and 22 million particles loaded, the average particle release was 0.604 particles per 10,000 (95% CI: .552, .662) particles loaded for all of the filtering facepieces tested. The averaging of conditions is a useful tool to provide generalized information and is also useful when making risk estimates. For most filtering facepiece respirators, particle release tended to increase with drop height and particle size, and there appeared to be a slight inverse relationship with particle load. Two brands of reusable elastomeric half-mask respirators with P100 high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter cartridges were also evaluated. Results of these tests were inconclusive. Part II in this issue addresses the release of particles when simulating removal of a filtering facepiece from a wearer's head. PMID:21132594

  6. Mesozooplankton production, grazing and respiration in the Bay of Bengal: Implications for net heterotrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Veronica; Ramaiah, N.

    2016-03-01

    Mesozooplankton samples were collected from the mixed layer along a central (along 88°E) and a western transect in the Bay of Bengal during four seasons covered between 2001 and 2006 in order to investigate spatio-temporal variability in their biomass. At these stations, grazing and respiration rates were measured from live zooplankton hauled in from the surface during December 2005. Akin to the mesozooplankton "paradox" in the central and eastern Arabian Sea, biomass in the mixed layer was more or less invariant in the central and western Bay of Bengal, even as the chl a showed marginal temporal variation. By empirical equation, the mesozooplankton production rate calculated to be 70-246 mg C m- 2 d- 1 is on par with the Arabian Sea. Contrary to the conventional belief, mesozooplankton grazing impact was up to 83% on primary production (PP). Low PP coupled with very high zooplankton production (70% of PP) along with abundant bacterial production (50% of the PP; Ramaiah et al., 2009) is likely to render the Bay of Bengal net heterotrophic, especially during the spring intermonsoon. Greater estimates of fecal pellet-carbon egestion by mesozooplankton compared to the average particulate organic carbon flux in sediment traps, implies that much of the matter is recycled by heterotrophic communities in the mixed layer facilitating nutrient regeneration for phytoplankton growth. We also calculated that over a third of the primary production is channelized for basin-wide zooplankton respiration that accounts for ~ 52 Mt C annually. In the current scenario of global warming, if low (primary) productive warm pools like the Bay of Bengal continue to be net heterotrophic, negative implications like enhanced emission of CO2 to the atmosphere, increased particulate flux to the deeper waters and greater utilization of dissolved oxygen resulting in expansion of the existing oxygen minimum zone are imminent.

  7. Respiration and intensity dependence of photosynthesis in Chlorella.

    PubMed

    BRACKETT, F S; OLSON, R A; CRICKARD, R G

    1953-03-01

    1. Respiration changes as a result of illumination. 2. In the absence of glucose or other supply of substrate, respiration decays in the dark showing at least two types-a fast decay in a few minutes and a slow decay lasting hours. 3. Respiratory response to illumination is delayed. 4. Intermittent illumination (in the absence of glucose, etc.) produces a periodic variation in respiration with a delay or phase lag. 5. Periodic variation of respiration may produce a higher average value in the dark than in the light due to the lag and depending upon the period of intermittent illumination. 6. Based upon average respiration values our data confirm the Kok effect. 7. Interpolated values of respiration, however, result in photosynthetic rates which are linearly dependent upon intensity of illumination. 8. Thus the quantum efficiency is found to be independent of intensity, over the wide range of intensities investigated.

  8. RESPIRATION AND INTENSITY DEPENDENCE OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN CHLORELLA

    PubMed Central

    Brackett, Frederick S.; Olson, Rodney A.; Crickard, Robert G.

    1953-01-01

    1. Respiration changes as a result of illumination. 2. In the absence of glucose or other supply of substrate, respiration decays in the dark showing at least two types—a fast decay in a few minutes and a slow decay lasting hours. 3. Respiratory response to illumination is delayed. 4. Intermittent illumination (in the absence of glucose, etc.) produces a periodic variation in respiration with a delay or phase lag. 5. Periodic variation of respiration may produce a higher average value in the dark than in the light due to the lag and depending upon the period of intermittent illumination. 6. Based upon average respiration values our data confirm the Kok effect. 7. Interpolated values of respiration, however, result in photosynthetic rates which are linearly dependent upon intensity of illumination. 8. Thus the quantum efficiency is found to be independent of intensity, over the wide range of intensities investigated. PMID:13035068

  9. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  10. What does respirator certification tell us about filtration of ultrafine particles?

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in exposures to ultrafine particles (less than 100 nm) in both environmental and occupational settings led the authors to question whether the protocols used to certify respirator filters provide adequate attention to ultrafine aerosols. The authors reviewed the particle size distribution of challenge aerosols and evaluated the aerosol measurement method currently employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) particulate respirator certification protocol for its ability to measure the contribution of ultrafine particles to filter penetration. Also considered were the differences between mechanical and electrically charged (electret) filters in light of the most penetrating particle size. It was found that the sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) aerosols currently used in respirator certification tests contain a significant fraction of particles in the ultrafine region. However, the photometric method deployed in the certification test is not capable of adequately measuring light scatter of particles below approximately 100 nm in diameter. Specifically, 68% (by count) and 8% (by mass) of the challenge NaCl aerosol particles and 10% (by count) and 0.3% (by mass) of the DOP particles below 100 nm do not significantly contribute to the filter penetration measurement. In addition, the most penetrating particle size for electret filters likely occurs at 100 nm or less under test conditions similar to those used in filter certification. The authors conclude, therefore, that the existing NIOSH certification protocol may not represent a worst-case assessment for electret filters because it has limited ability to determine the contribution of ultrafine aerosols, which include the most penetrating particle size for electret filters. Possible strategies to assess ultrafine particle penetration in the certification protocol are discussed. PMID:18322869

  11. Electrostatic respirator filter media: filter efficiency and most penetrating particle size effects.

    PubMed

    Martin, S B; Moyer, E S

    2000-08-01

    New electrostatic filter media has been developed for use in 42 CFR 84 negative pressure particulate respirator filters. This respirator filter media was not available for evaluation prior to the change from 30 CFR 11 to 42 CFR 84. Thus, characterization of this filter media is warranted. In this study, the new 42 CFR 84 electrostatic respirator filters were investigated with respect to filter penetration and most penetrating particle size. Three different models of N95 filters, along with one model each of the N99, R95, and P100 class filters were used in this study. First, three of each filter were loaded with a sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol, and three of each filter were loaded with a dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol to obtain normal background penetration results for each filter. Then, two new filters of each type were dipped in isopropanol for 15 seconds and allowed to dry. This isopropanol dip should reduce or eliminate any electrostatic charge on the fibers of each filter, as reported in the technical literature. These dipped filters, along with controls of each filter type, were tested on a TSI 8160 filter tester to determine the most penetrating particle size. These same filters were then tested against a NaCl aerosol to get final penetration values. Electret filters rely heavily on their electrostatic charge to provide adequate filter efficiencies, and correlations between penetration and a filter's electrostatic characteristics are found in the technical literature. In all six of the filter models tested, filter penetration values increased considerably and the most penetrating particle size noticeably shifted toward larger particles. These results are important in better understanding how these new filter materials perform under various conditions, and they indicate the need for additional research to define environmental conditions that may affect electrostatic filter efficiency. PMID:10957816

  12. What does respirator certification tell us about filtration of ultrafine particles?

    PubMed

    Eninger, Robert M; Honda, Takeshi; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2008-05-01

    Recent interest in exposures to ultrafine particles (less than 100 nm) in both environmental and occupational settings led the authors to question whether the protocols used to certify respirator filters provide adequate attention to ultrafine aerosols. The authors reviewed the particle size distribution of challenge aerosols and evaluated the aerosol measurement method currently employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) particulate respirator certification protocol for its ability to measure the contribution of ultrafine particles to filter penetration. Also considered were the differences between mechanical and electrically charged (electret) filters in light of the most penetrating particle size. It was found that the sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) aerosols currently used in respirator certification tests contain a significant fraction of particles in the ultrafine region. However, the photometric method deployed in the certification test is not capable of adequately measuring light scatter of particles below approximately 100 nm in diameter. Specifically, 68% (by count) and 8% (by mass) of the challenge NaCl aerosol particles and 10% (by count) and 0.3% (by mass) of the DOP particles below 100 nm do not significantly contribute to the filter penetration measurement. In addition, the most penetrating particle size for electret filters likely occurs at 100 nm or less under test conditions similar to those used in filter certification. The authors conclude, therefore, that the existing NIOSH certification protocol may not represent a worst-case assessment for electret filters because it has limited ability to determine the contribution of ultrafine aerosols, which include the most penetrating particle size for electret filters. Possible strategies to assess ultrafine particle penetration in the certification protocol are discussed.

  13. Nanoparticle filtration performance of filtering facepiece respirators and canister/cartridge filters.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; BerryAnn, Roland; Szalajda, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory protection offered by a particulate respirator is a function of the filter efficiency and face seal leakage. A previous study in our laboratory measured the filter penetration and total inward leakage (TIL) of 20-1000 nm size particles for N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) using a breathing manikin. The results showed relatively higher filter penetration and TIL value under different leak sizes and flow rates at the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), ∼45 nm for electrostatic FFRs,and ∼150 nm for the same FFRs after charge removal. This indicates an advantage of mechanical filters over electrostatic filters rated for similar filter efficiencies in providing respiratory protection in nanoparticle workplaces. To better understand the influence of the MPPS, the filtration performance of commonly used one N95 and one N100 FFR models, and four P100 canister/cartridge models were measured with monodisperse NaCl aerosols, and polydisperse NaCl aerosols employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test method. As expected, the polydisperse aerosol penetration was below 5% for the N95 FFR, and below 0.03% for the N100 FFR and P100 canister/cartridge filters. Monodisperse aerosol penetration results showed a MPPS of ∼40 nm for both the N95 and N100 FFRs. All four P100 canister/cartridge filters had a MPPS of ≥150 nm, similar to expectations for mechanical filters. The P100 canister/cartridge filters showed lower penetration values for different size nanoparticles than the N100 FFRs. The results indicate that a mechanical filter would offer a relatively higher filtration performance for nanoparticles than an electrostatic counterpart rated for the same filter efficiency. Overall, the results obtained in the study suggest that MPPS should be considered as a key factor in the development of respirator standards and recommendations for protection against nanoparticles. PMID:23927008

  14. Soil respiration under different land uses in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84-98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86-1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  15. Performance evaluation of filtering facepiece respirators using virus aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2013-01-01

    Physical penetration and infectivity penetration of adenovirus and influenza virus aerosols through respirators were measured to better characterize the effectiveness of filtering facepiece respirators against airborne virus. A physical penetration of 2%-5% was found. However, large sample-to-sample variation made it difficult to quantify the difference in physical penetration caused by the different virus aerosols. Infectivity penetration of adenovirus was much lower than physical penetration, indicating that the latter provides a conservative estimate for respirator performance. PMID:22483237

  16. Soil Respiration under Different Land Uses in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84–98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86–1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  17. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  18. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Terrance W.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1979-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed. PMID:16660982

  19. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Francesca; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Flower, Charles E; Lynch, Douglas J; Czimczik, Claudia; Tang, Jianwu; Subke, Jens-Arne

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the partitioning of autotrophic from heterotrophic respiration processes in soils in conjunction with new high temporal resolution soil respiration data sets offer insights into biotic and environmental controls of respiration. Besides temperature, many emerging controlling factors have not yet been incorporated into ecosystem-scale models. We synthesize recent research that has partitioned soil respiration into its process components to evaluate effects of nitrogen, temperature and photosynthesis on autotrophic flux from soils at the ecosystem level. Despite the widely used temperature dependence of root respiration, gross primary productivity (GPP) can explain most patterns of ecosystem root respiration (and to some extent heterotrophic respiration) at within-season time-scales. Specifically, heterotrophi crespiration is influenced by a seasonally variable supply of recent photosynthetic products in the rhizosphere. The contribution of stored root carbon (C) to root respiratory fluxes also varied seasonally, partially decoupling the proportion of photosynthetic C driving root respiration. In order to reflect recent insights, new hierarchical models, which incorporate root respiration as a primary function of GPP and which respond to environmental variables by modifying Callocation belowground, are needed for better prediction of future ecosystem C sequestration. PMID:23943914

  20. LINKAGE BETWEEN PRODUCTION AND RESPIRATION ON THE LOUISIANA CONTINENTAL SHELF.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for presentation. Original title, "PRIMARY PRODUCTION, BACTERIOPLANKTON PRODUCTION, AND COMMUNITY RESPIRATION IN STRATIFIED WATERS OF THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO CONTINENTAL SHELF: LINKAGE TO HYPOXIA."

  1. Autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in permafrost zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovenko, Maria; Goncharova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon dioxide emissions production is an important integral indicator of soil biological activity and it includes several components: the root respiration and microbial decomposition of organic matter. Separate determination of the components of soil respiration is necessary for studying the balance of carbon in the soil and to assessment its potential as a sink or source of carbon dioxide. The aim of this study was testing field methods of separate determination of root and microbial respiration in soils of north of West Siberia. The research took place near the town Nadym, Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous District (north of West Siberia).The study area was located in the northern taiga with sporadic permafrost. Investigations were carried out at two sites: in forest and in frozen peatland. 3 methods were tested for the separation of microbial and root respiration. 1) "Shading"; 2) "Clipping"(removing the above-ground green plant parts); 3)a modified method of roots exclusion (It is to compare the emission of soils of "peat spots", devoid of vegetation and roots, and soils located in close proximity to the spots on which there is herbaceous vegetation and moss). For the experiments on methods of "Shading" and "Clipping" in the forest and on the frozen peatland ware established 12 plots, 1 x 1 m (3 plots in the forest and at 9 plots on frozen peatland; 4 of them - control).The criterions for choosing location sites were the similarity of meso- and microrelief, the same depth of permafrost, the same vegetation. Measurement of carbon dioxide emissions (chamber method) was carried out once a day, in the evening, for a week. Separation the root and microbial respiration by "Shading" showed that in the forest the root respiration contribution is 5%, and microbial - 95%. On peatlands root respiration is 41%, 59% of the microbial. In the experiment "Clipping" in peatlands root respiration is 56%, the microbial respiration - 44%, in forest- root respiration is 17%, and

  2. A survey of respirators usage for airborne chemicals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Don-Hee; Kang, Min-Sun

    2009-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was undertaken to identify the current status of respirator usage in manufacturing work environments subject to gas/vapor chemicals exposure in Korea and to suggest improvements to enhance the effectiveness of respirator usage. The number of target companies included 17 big companies, 110 small & mid-size companies, and 5 foreign companies, and the number of respondents included 601 workers and 69 persons in charge of respirators (PCR). The results explained clearly that respirator programs in practice were extremely poor in small & mid-sized companies. The findings indicated that the selection of respirators was not appropriate. Quarter mask including filtering facepiece was the most common facepiece form for respirator and was worn by sixty-four percent. Not a little proportion of respondents (33%) complained about the fit: faceseal leakage between the face and facepiece. A filtering facepiece with carbon fiber filter was used as a substitution for a gas/vapor respirator. Another result was that the PCR respondents' perception of the administration of respirators was very low. The results of this survey suggest that regal enforcement of respiratory protection programs should be established in Korea. On the basis of these findings, respiratory protection programs should include respirator selection, maintenance, training, and fit testing. PMID:19834267

  3. A survey of respirators usage for airborne chemicals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Han, Don-Hee; Kang, Min-Sun

    2009-10-01

    A questionnaire survey was undertaken to identify the current status of respirator usage in manufacturing work environments subject to gas/vapor chemicals exposure in Korea and to suggest improvements to enhance the effectiveness of respirator usage. The number of target companies included 17 big companies, 110 small & mid-size companies, and 5 foreign companies, and the number of respondents included 601 workers and 69 persons in charge of respirators (PCR). The results explained clearly that respirator programs in practice were extremely poor in small & mid-sized companies. The findings indicated that the selection of respirators was not appropriate. Quarter mask including filtering facepiece was the most common facepiece form for respirator and was worn by sixty-four percent. Not a little proportion of respondents (33%) complained about the fit: faceseal leakage between the face and facepiece. A filtering facepiece with carbon fiber filter was used as a substitution for a gas/vapor respirator. Another result was that the PCR respondents' perception of the administration of respirators was very low. The results of this survey suggest that regal enforcement of respiratory protection programs should be established in Korea. On the basis of these findings, respiratory protection programs should include respirator selection, maintenance, training, and fit testing.

  4. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Francesca; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Flower, Charles E; Lynch, Douglas J; Czimczik, Claudia; Tang, Jianwu; Subke, Jens-Arne

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in the partitioning of autotrophic from heterotrophic respiration processes in soils in conjunction with new high temporal resolution soil respiration data sets offer insights into biotic and environmental controls of respiration. Besides temperature, many emerging controlling factors have not yet been incorporated into ecosystem-scale models. We synthesize recent research that has partitioned soil respiration into its process components to evaluate effects of nitrogen, temperature and photosynthesis on autotrophic flux from soils at the ecosystem level. Despite the widely used temperature dependence of root respiration, gross primary productivity (GPP) can explain most patterns of ecosystem root respiration (and to some extent heterotrophic respiration) at within-season time-scales. Specifically, heterotrophi crespiration is influenced by a seasonally variable supply of recent photosynthetic products in the rhizosphere. The contribution of stored root carbon (C) to root respiratory fluxes also varied seasonally, partially decoupling the proportion of photosynthetic C driving root respiration. In order to reflect recent insights, new hierarchical models, which incorporate root respiration as a primary function of GPP and which respond to environmental variables by modifying Callocation belowground, are needed for better prediction of future ecosystem C sequestration.

  5. Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-03-08

    A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

  6. Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2010-03-30

    An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

  7. Nitrogen controls spatial and temporal variability of substrate-induced respiration within seven years of bare fallow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nele; Bornemann, Ludger; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2015-04-01

    Bare fallow management goes along with lacking supply of new C sources; yet, little is known on the spatio-temporal controls of microbial adaptation processes. Here we hypothesized that microbial activity parameters decline upon bare fallow but that their spatial patterns are increasingly controlled by nutrient status as fallow management proceeds. To test these hypotheses, we investigated spatial and temporal patterns of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration curves in an arable field after 1, 3, and 7 years of bare fallow but with large within-field heterogeneity of physicochemical soil parameters. The analyses comprised the contents of SOC, mineral nitrogen (Nmin), particulate organic matter (POM), texture of the fine earth, and the proportion of rock fragments as well as basal respiration and several SIR fitting parameters (microbial biomass, microbial growth rates, peak respiration rates, cumulative CO2 release) each with and without additions of mineral N and P. We also repeated substrate (i.e. glucose) additions following the first SIR measurement. The results revealed that most respiration parameters like basal respiration, microbial biomass, and growth rates showed no or inconsistent responses to spatial and temporal patterns of basic soil properties like SOC, Nmin or texture. However, bare fallow changed the shape of the SIR curves; it developed two distinct microbial growth peaks at advanced stages of fallow, i.e. a delayed CO2 release. Likewise, the maximum respiration rate during the first growth phase declined during 7 years of fallow by 47% but its spatial distribution was always correlated with Nmin contents (r = 0.43 - 0.79). The nutrient additions suggested that these changes in SIR curves were caused by N deficiency; the first peak increased after N additions while the second growth phase diminished. Intriguingly, a repeated glucose addition had a similar effect on the SIR curves as the glucose+N addition. Thus, N deficiency

  8. NIOSH comments to DOL on the Mine Safety and Health Administration proposed rule on permissible exposure limit for diesel particulate, July 10, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Niemeier, R.W.

    1992-07-10

    The testimony discussed the views of NIOSH concerning the establishment of a permissible exposure limit for diesel particulate to control exposure to diesel exhaust in the mining industry. As requested by the Mine Safety and Health Association, NIOSH was in the process of developing a sampling and analytical method for airborne diesel exhaust particles and had proposed the use of elemental carbon as a surrogate measure of particulate diesel exhaust. The testimony also reviewed the genotoxicity of diesel soot. Studies have indicated that respired diesel soot particles on the surface of the lung alveoli and respiratory bronchioles can be dispersed in the surfactant rich aqueous phase lining of the surfaces. Other specific issues discussed included the effect of environmental background levels of diesel particulate on diesel particulate exposure, health effects resulting from exposure to diesel particulate, methods available to measure diesel particulate exposure in underground mines, and after treatment devices being developed for over the road vehicles and the level of diesel particulate reduction that can be achieved. Attachments presented a research plan for the development of a sampling and analytical method for airborne diesel exhaust particles, and a status report on the project.

  9. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    1988-01-26

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

  10. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, L.W.

    1988-11-08

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

  11. Combustor for fine particulate coal

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1988-01-01

    A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover.

  12. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  13. Pichia pastoris "just in time" alternative respiration.

    PubMed

    Kern, Alexander; Hartner, Franz S; Freigassner, Maria; Spielhofer, Julia; Rumpf, Cornelia; Leitner, Laura; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Glieder, Anton

    2007-04-01

    Alternative oxidases (Aox or Aod) are present in the mitochondria of plants, fungi and many types of yeast. These enzymes transfer electrons from the ubiquinol pool directly to oxygen without contributing to the proton transfer across the mitochondrial membrane. Alternative oxidases are involved in stress responses, programmed cell death and maintenance of the cellular redox balance. The alternative oxidase gene of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris was isolated and cloned to study its regulation and the effects of deregulation of the alternative respiration by overexpression or disruption of the gene. Both disruption and overexpression had negative effects on the biomass yield; however, the growth rate and substrate uptake rate of the strain overexpressing the alternative oxidase were slightly increased. These effects were even more pronounced when higher glucose concentrations were used. The occurrence of free intracellular radicals and cell death phenomena was investigated using dihydrorhodamine 123 and the TUNEL test. The results suggest a major contribution of the alternative oxidase to P. pastoris cell viability. The negative effects of deregulated alternative respiration clearly indicated the importance of precise regulation of the alternative oxidase in this yeast.

  14. Filtration of respired gases: theoretical aspects.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Ron J

    2006-06-01

    The filtration of aerosols and the behavior of aerosolized particles are less intuitive and more complex than commonly indicated in the medical literature, but once the basic principles are presented, they are not difficult to understand or apply. Particles with diameters close to the most penetrating particle size are clearly the particles of greatest concern, interest, and value in considering the performance of different filtration devices, and this size has been identified as the standard particle size for testing respirators and breathing system filters. Although almost every level of health care now mandates the N95 (NIOSH rating) as the minimum rating for medical respirators, there is no such mandate regarding minimum efficiencies of breathing system filters. At least in North America, it still falls to each individual purchaser to ensure that these standardized tests are performed, because manufacturers adhere to these standards only on a voluntary basis. Government regulations similar to NIOSH 42 CFR 84 are needed for breathing system filters and should include a rating system such as N95, N99, or N100. For breathing system filters, the BFE and VFE tests are misleading and should be abandoned (or even better, banned) in favor of internationally recognized sodium chloride tests. Until then, manufacturers will be hesitant to abandon their BFE and VFE data, which give the appearance of vastly better performance than does the sodium chloride test. PMID:16828690

  15. Underwater breathing: the mechanics of plastron respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, M. R.; Bush, John W. M.

    The rough, hairy surfaces of many insects and spiders serve to render them water-repellent; consequently, when submerged, many are able to survive by virtue of a thin air layer trapped along their exteriors. The diffusion of dissolved oxygen from the ambient water may allow this layer to function as a respiratory bubble or , and so enable certain species to remain underwater indefinitely. Maintenance of the plastron requires that the curvature pressure balance the pressure difference between the plastron and ambient. Moreover, viable plastrons must be of sufficient area to accommodate the interfacial exchange of O2 and CO2 necessary to meet metabolic demands. By coupling the bubble mechanics, surface and gas-phase chemistry, we enumerate criteria for plastron viability and thereby deduce the range of environmental conditions and dive depths over which plastron breathers can survive. The influence of an external flow on plastron breathing is also examined. Dynamic pressure may become significant for respiration in fast-flowing, shallow and well-aerated streams. Moreover, flow effects are generally significant because they sharpen chemical gradients and so enhance mass transfer across the plastron interface. Modelling this process provides a rationale for the ventilation movements documented in the biology literature, whereby arthropods enhance plastron respiration by flapping their limbs or antennae. Biomimetic implications of our results are discussed.

  16. Penetration of asbestos fibers in respirator filters

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Pearson, S.D.; Rohrbacher, K.D.; Yeh, Hsu-Chi

    1994-11-01

    Currently, the health risks associated with asbestos have restricted its use and created a growing asbestos abatement industry with a need for respirator filters that are effective for worker protection. The main purpose of this project is to determine the influence of fiber size, electrostatic charge, and flow rate on the penetration of asbestos fibers in respirator filter cartridges. The study includes four types of filters each tested at two flow rates: the AO-R57A, a dual cartridge HEPA filter tested at 16 and 42.5 L/min; the MSA-S, a dust and mist filter tested at 16 and 42.5 L/min; the MSA-A power filter tested at 32 and 85 L/min; and the 3M-8710, a low-efficiency disposable face mask filter tested at 32 and 85 L/min. The three types of asbestos fibers used (amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile) ranged in length from 0.04-0.5 {mu}m and in aspect ratio (ratio of length to diameter) from 3 to 60. The fibers were used in both charged and neutralized forms. The results from amosite fibers are reported here.

  17. Angiotensin stimulates respiration in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Jennings, D B; Lockett, H J

    2000-05-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have an activated brain angiotensin system. We hypothesized 1) that ventilation (V) would be greater in conscious SHR than in control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and 2) that intravenous infusion of the ANG II-receptor blocker saralasin would depress respiration in SHR, but not in WKY. Respiration and oxygen consumption (VO(2)) were measured in conscious aged-matched groups (n = 16) of adult female SHR and WKY. For protocol 1, rats were habituated to a plethysmograph and measurements obtained over 60-75 min. After installation of chronic intravenous catheters, protocol 2 consisted of 30 min of saline infusion ( approximately 14 microliter. kg(-1). min(-1)) followed by 40 min of saralasin (1.3 microgram. kg(-1). min(-1)). V, tidal volume (VT), inspiratory flow [VT/inspiratory time (TI)], breath expiratory time, and VO(2) were higher, and breath TI was lower in "continuously quiet" SHR. In SHR, but not in WKY rats, ANG II-receptor block decreased V, VT, and VT/TI and increased breath TI. During ANG II-receptor block, an average decrease in VO(2) in SHR was not significant. About one-half of the higher V in SHR appears to be accounted for by an ANG II mechanism acting either via peripheral arterial receptors or circumventricular organs.

  18. Electrically heated particulate filter embedded heater design

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Chapman, Mark R.

    2014-07-01

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine and wherein an upstream surface of the particulate filter includes machined grooves. A grid of electrically resistive material is inserted into the machined grooves of the exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF.

  19. Powder and particulate production of metallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments of particulate metallurgy of alloyed materials where the final products is a fully dense body are discussed. Particulates are defined as powders, flakes, foils, silvers, ribbons and strip. Because rapid solidification is an important factor in particulate metallurgy, all of the particulates must have at least one dimension which is very fine, sometimes as fine as 10 to 50 microns, but move typically up to several hundred microns, provided that the dimension permits a minimum solidification rate of at least 100 K/s.

  20. Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

    2013-07-16

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

  1. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  2. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  3. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  4. 42 CFR 84.125 - Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... filters; minimum requirements. 84.125 Section 84.125 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.125 Particulate tests; canisters containing particulate filters; minimum requirements. Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against particulates...

  5. Respirator Performance against Nanoparticles under Simulated Workplace Activities.

    PubMed

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Ziqing; Horvatin, Matthew; Liu, Yuewei; He, Xinjian; Rengasamy, Samy

    2015-10-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs) are commonly used by workers for protection against potentially hazardous particles, including engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of these types of respirators against 10-400 nm particles using human subjects exposed to NaCl aerosols under simulated workplace activities. Simulated workplace protection factors (SWPFs) were measured for eight combinations of respirator models (2 N95 FFRs, 2 P100 FFRs, 2 N95 EHRs, and 2 P100 EHRs) worn by 25 healthy test subjects (13 females and 12 males) with varying face sizes. Before beginning a SWPF test for a given respirator model, each subject had to pass a quantitative fit test. Each SWPF test was performed using a protocol of six exercises for 3 min each: (i) normal breathing, (ii) deep breathing, (iii) moving head side to side, (iv) moving head up and down, (v) bending at the waist, and (vi) a simulated laboratory-vessel cleaning motion. Two scanning mobility particle sizers were used simultaneously to measure the upstream (outside the respirator) and downstream (inside the respirator) test aerosol; SWPF was then calculated as a ratio of the upstream and downstream particle concentrations. In general, geometric mean SWPF (GM-SWPF) was highest for the P100 EHRs, followed by P100 FFRs, N95 EHRs, and N95 FFRs. This trend holds true for nanoparticles (10-100 nm), larger size particles (100-400 nm), and the 'all size' range (10-400 nm). All respirators provided better or similar performance levels for 10-100 nm particles as compared to larger 100-400 nm particles. This study found that class P100 respirators provided higher SWPFs compared to class N95 respirators (P < 0.05) for both FFR and EHR types. All respirators provided expected performance (i.e. fifth percentile SWPF > 10) against all particle size ranges tested.

  6. Respirator Performance against Nanoparticles under Simulated Workplace Activities.

    PubMed

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Ziqing; Horvatin, Matthew; Liu, Yuewei; He, Xinjian; Rengasamy, Samy

    2015-10-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs) are commonly used by workers for protection against potentially hazardous particles, including engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of these types of respirators against 10-400 nm particles using human subjects exposed to NaCl aerosols under simulated workplace activities. Simulated workplace protection factors (SWPFs) were measured for eight combinations of respirator models (2 N95 FFRs, 2 P100 FFRs, 2 N95 EHRs, and 2 P100 EHRs) worn by 25 healthy test subjects (13 females and 12 males) with varying face sizes. Before beginning a SWPF test for a given respirator model, each subject had to pass a quantitative fit test. Each SWPF test was performed using a protocol of six exercises for 3 min each: (i) normal breathing, (ii) deep breathing, (iii) moving head side to side, (iv) moving head up and down, (v) bending at the waist, and (vi) a simulated laboratory-vessel cleaning motion. Two scanning mobility particle sizers were used simultaneously to measure the upstream (outside the respirator) and downstream (inside the respirator) test aerosol; SWPF was then calculated as a ratio of the upstream and downstream particle concentrations. In general, geometric mean SWPF (GM-SWPF) was highest for the P100 EHRs, followed by P100 FFRs, N95 EHRs, and N95 FFRs. This trend holds true for nanoparticles (10-100 nm), larger size particles (100-400 nm), and the 'all size' range (10-400 nm). All respirators provided better or similar performance levels for 10-100 nm particles as compared to larger 100-400 nm particles. This study found that class P100 respirators provided higher SWPFs compared to class N95 respirators (P < 0.05) for both FFR and EHR types. All respirators provided expected performance (i.e. fifth percentile SWPF > 10) against all particle size ranges tested. PMID:26180261

  7. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  8. SOUTHERN FINE PARTICULATE MONITORING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley D. Williamson

    2001-10-01

    This quarterly report presents results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham study site during the July-September, 2000 study period. The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S sulfate monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. The report also presents some initial notes on our operating experience with the 8400S sulfate analyzer. As described in the previous quarterly report, some persistent daily trends are seen in the particulate data, superimposed on a seasonal trend toward higher concentrations in warmer months. The sulfate mass fraction shows a markedly different time of day pattern from the balance of the particle mass, confirming the independent origin of this major mass fraction. The time variability of the major mass-bearing size fractions, and of the light-scattering potential, do not allow for a clean separation of independent size fractions. However, when the particle number averages are examined, the stronger time of day dependence of the smaller size fractions becomes more apparent, consistent with periods of higher formation of sub-100nm particles in early morning and in afternoon-evening periods.

  9. Efficiency of different respiratory protective devices for removal of particulate and gaseous reactive oxygen species from welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chung, Shih-Hsiang; Jhuo, Ming-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light inherent to welding processes generates ozone (O(3)) with subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through photochemical reactions when UV light is present with O(3). This study aimed to determine the performance of filters used as respiratory protective devices by welding personnel to simultaneously mitigate particulate and gaseous inhalation hazards. Four respiratory protective devices were selected for this study, including a surgical facemask, a cotton-fabric facemask, an activated-carbon facemask, and an N95 respirator. The removal efficiencies for the particulates in welding fumes were all above 98%. For particulate-phase ROS, the removal efficiencies of the different respiratory protective devices ranged from 83.5% to 94.1%; however, the removal efficiencies for gaseous ROS were only 1.3% (active carbon facemask) to 21.1% (N95 respirator). The data indicated that the respiratory protective devices commercially available cannot block the passage of the gas-phase ROS found in welding fumes. PMID:23428060

  10. Efficiency of different respiratory protective devices for removal of particulate and gaseous reactive oxygen species from welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chung, Shih-Hsiang; Jhuo, Ming-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light inherent to welding processes generates ozone (O(3)) with subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through photochemical reactions when UV light is present with O(3). This study aimed to determine the performance of filters used as respiratory protective devices by welding personnel to simultaneously mitigate particulate and gaseous inhalation hazards. Four respiratory protective devices were selected for this study, including a surgical facemask, a cotton-fabric facemask, an activated-carbon facemask, and an N95 respirator. The removal efficiencies for the particulates in welding fumes were all above 98%. For particulate-phase ROS, the removal efficiencies of the different respiratory protective devices ranged from 83.5% to 94.1%; however, the removal efficiencies for gaseous ROS were only 1.3% (active carbon facemask) to 21.1% (N95 respirator). The data indicated that the respiratory protective devices commercially available cannot block the passage of the gas-phase ROS found in welding fumes.

  11. Observing Mean Annual Mediterranean Maquis Ecosystem Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Bellucco, V.; Mereu, S.; Sirca, C.; Spano, D.

    2014-12-01

    In semi arid ecosystems, extremely low Soil Water Content (SWC) values may limit ecosystem respiration (Reco) to the point of hiding the typical exponential response of respiration to temperature. This work is aimed to understand and model the Reco of an evergreen Mediterranean maquis ecosystem and to estimate the contribution of soil CO2 efflux to Reco. The selected site is located in the center of the Mediterranean sea in Sardinia (Italy). Mean annual precipitation is 588 mm and mean annual temperature is 15.9 °C. Vegetation cover is heterogeneous: 70% covered by shrubs and 30% of bare soil. Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) is monitored with an Eddy Covariance (EC) tower since April 2004. Soil collars were placed underneath the dominant species (Juniperus phoenicea and Pistacia lentiscus) and over the bare soil. Soil CO2 efflux was measured once a month since April 2012. Soil temperature and SWC were monitored continuously at 5 cm depth in 4 different positions close to the soil collars. Six years of EC measurements (2005-2010) and two years of soil CO2 efflux (2012-2013) measurements were analysed. Reco was estimated from the measured EC fluxes at night after filtering for adequate turbulence (u* > 1.5). Reco measurements were then binned into 1°C intervals and median values were first fitted using the Locally Estimated Scatterplot Smoothing (LOESS) method (to determine the dominant trend of the experimental curve) Reco shows an exponential increase with air and soil temperature, until SWC measured at 0.2 m depth remains above 19% vol. Secondly, the coefficients of the selected Lloyd and Taylor (1994) were estimated through the nonlinear least square (nls) method: Rref (ecosystem respiration rate at a reference temperature of 10 °C was equal to 1.65 μmol m-2 s-1 and E0 (activation energy parameter that determines the temperature sensitivity) was equal to 322.46. In addition, bare and drier soils show a reduced response of measured CO2 efflux to increasing

  12. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust....

  13. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.300 Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust....

  14. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction.

  15. Waiting to inhale: HIF-1 modulates aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Adam T; Johnson, Randall S

    2007-04-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 is known to promote anaerobic respiration during low oxygen conditions (hypoxia). In this issue, Fukuda et al. (2007) expand the range of HIF-1's functions by showing that it modulates aerobic respiration as well.

  16. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  17. Antibiotic efficacy is linked to bacterial cellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lobritz, Michael A.; Belenky, Peter; Porter, Caroline B. M.; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Yang, Jason H.; Schwarz, Eric G.; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotic treatments result in two fundamentally different phenotypic outcomes—the inhibition of bacterial growth or, alternatively, cell death. Most antibiotics inhibit processes that are major consumers of cellular energy output, suggesting that antibiotic treatment may have important downstream consequences on bacterial metabolism. We hypothesized that the specific metabolic effects of bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotics contribute to their overall efficacy. We leveraged the opposing phenotypes of bacteriostatic and bactericidal drugs in combination to investigate their activity. Growth inhibition from bacteriostatic antibiotics was associated with suppressed cellular respiration whereas cell death from most bactericidal antibiotics was associated with accelerated respiration. In combination, suppression of cellular respiration by the bacteriostatic antibiotic was the dominant effect, blocking bactericidal killing. Global metabolic profiling of bacteriostatic antibiotic treatment revealed that accumulation of metabolites involved in specific drug target activity was linked to the buildup of energy metabolites that feed the electron transport chain. Inhibition of cellular respiration by knockout of the cytochrome oxidases was sufficient to attenuate bactericidal lethality whereas acceleration of basal respiration by genetically uncoupling ATP synthesis from electron transport resulted in potentiation of the killing effect of bactericidal antibiotics. This work identifies a link between antibiotic-induced cellular respiration and bactericidal lethality and demonstrates that bactericidal activity can be arrested by attenuated respiration and potentiated by accelerated respiration. Our data collectively show that antibiotics perturb the metabolic state of bacteria and that the metabolic state of bacteria impacts antibiotic efficacy. PMID:26100898

  18. Respiration hastens maturation and lowers yield in rice.

    PubMed

    Sitaramam, V; Bhate, R; Kamalraj, P; Pachapurkar, S

    2008-07-01

    Role of respiration in plant growth remains an enigma. Growth of meristematic cells, which are not photosynthetic, is entirely driven by endogenous respiration. Does respiration determine growth and size or does it merely burn off the carbon depleting the biomass? We show here that respiration of the germinating rice seed, which is contributed largely by the meristematic cells of the embryo, quantitatively correlates with the dynamics of much of plant growth, starting with the time for germination to the time for flowering and yield. Seed respiration appears to define the quantitative phenotype that contributes to yield via growth dynamics that could be discerned even in commercial varieties, which are biased towards higher yield, despite considerable susceptibility of the dynamics to environmental perturbations. Intrinsic variation, irreducible despite stringent growth conditions, required independent validation of relevant physiological variables both by critical sampling design and by constructing dendrograms for the interrelationships between variables that yield high consensus. More importantly, seed respiration, by mediating the generation clock time via variable time for maturation as seen in rice, directly offers the plausible basis for the phenotypic variation, a major ecological stratagem in a variable environment with uncertain water availability. Faster respiring rice plants appear to complete growth dynamics sooner, mature faster, resulting in a smaller plant with lower yield. Counter to the common allometric views, respiration appears to determine size in the rice plant, and offers a valid physiological means, within the limits of intrinsic variation, to help parental selection in breeding. PMID:23572892

  19. Study of contact characteristics between a respirator and a headform.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mang; Shen, Shengnan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaotie; Ma, Yanzhao

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a computational study on contact characteristics of contact pressure and resultant deformation between an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a newly developed digital headform. The geometry of the headform model is obtained based on computed tomography scanning of a volunteer. The segmentation and reconstruction of the headform model is performed by Mimics v16.0 (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium), which is a medical image processing software. The respirator model is obtained by scanning the surface of a 3M 8210 N95 respirator using a 3D digitizer and then the model is transformed by Geomagic Studio v12.0 (3D system, Rock Hill, SC), a reverse engineering software. The headform model contains a soft tissue layer, a skull layer, and a separate nose. The respirator model contains two layers (an inner face sealing layer and an outer layer) and a nose clip. Both the headform and respirator are modeled as solid elements and are deformable. The commercial software, LS-DYNA (LSTC, Livermore, CA), is used to simulate the contact between the respirator and headform. Contact pressures and resultant deformation of the headform are investigated. Effects of respirator stiffness on contact characteristics are also studied. A Matlab (MathWorks, Natick, MA) program is developed to calculate local gaps between the headform and respirator in the stable wearing state. PMID:26558322

  20. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...