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Sample records for air-sea co2 exchange

  1. Temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange in a low-emission estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Sørensen, Lise Lotte

    2016-07-01

    There is the need for further study of whether global estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange in estuarine systems capture the relevant temporal variability and, as such, the temporal variability of bulk parameterized and directly measured CO2 fluxes was investigated in the Danish estuary, Roskilde Fjord. The air-sea CO2 fluxes showed large temporal variability across seasons and between days and that more than 30% of the net CO2 emission in 2013 was a result of two large fall and winter storms. The diurnal variability of ΔpCO2 was up to 400 during summer changing the estuary from a source to a sink of CO2 within the day. Across seasons the system was suggested to change from a sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring to near neutral during summer and later to a source of atmospheric CO2 during fall. Results indicated that Roskilde Fjord was an annual low-emission estuary, with an estimated bulk parameterized release of 3.9 ± 8.7 mol CO2 m-2 y-1 during 2012-2013. It was suggested that the production-respiration balance leading to the low annual emission in Roskilde Fjord, was caused by the shallow depth, long residence time and high water quality in the estuary. In the data analysis the eddy covariance CO2 flux samples were filtered according to the H2Osbnd CO2 cross-sensitivity assessment suggested by Landwehr et al. (2014). This filtering reduced episodes of contradicting directions between measured and bulk parameterized air-sea CO2 exchanges and changed the net air-sea CO2 exchange from an uptake to a release. The CO2 gas transfer velocity was calculated from directly measured CO2 fluxes and ΔpCO2 and agreed to previous observations and parameterizations.

  2. Direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Hamish A.; MacKellar, Mellissa C.; Gray, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over coral reefs has relied on microscale measurements of pCO2 gradients across the air-sea interfacial boundary; shipboard measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over adjacent ocean inferred to represent over reef processes or ecosystem productivity modeling. Here we present by way of case study the first direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef made using the eddy covariance method. Research was conducted during the summer monsoon over a lagoonal platform reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Results show the reef flat to be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of similar magnitude as coastal lakes, while adjacent shallow and deep lagoons were net sinks as was the surrounding ocean. This heterogeneity in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere confirms need for spatially representative direct measurements of CO2 over coral reefs to accurately quantify their role in atmospheric carbon budgets.

  3. Decadal trends in air-sea CO2 exchange in the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2016-05-01

    Highly productive Antarctic shelf systems, like the Ross Sea, play important roles in regional carbon budgets, but the drivers of local variations are poorly quantified. We assess the variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle using a regional physical-biogeochemical model. Regionally, total partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increases are largely controlled by the biological pump and broadly similar to those in the offshore Southern Ocean. However, this masks substantial local variability within the Ross Sea, where interannual fluctuations in total pCO2 are driven by the biological pump and alkalinity, whereas those for anthropogenic pCO2 are related to physical processes. Overall, the high degree of spatial variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle causes extremes in aragonite saturation that can be as large as long-term trends. Therefore, Antarctic shelf polynya systems like the Ross Sea will be strongly affected by local processes in addition to larger-scale phenomena.

  4. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  5. Temporal variations in air-sea CO2 exchange near large kelp beds near San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Hiroki; Oechel, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    study presents nearly continuous air-sea CO2 flux for 7 years using the eddy covariance method for nearshore water near San Diego, California, as well as identifying environmental processes that appear to control temporal variations in air-sea CO2 flux at different time scales using time series decomposition. Monthly variations in CO2 uptake are shown to be positively influenced by photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) and negatively related to wind speeds. In contrast to the monthly scale, wind speeds often influenced CO2 uptake positively on an hourly scale. Interannual variations in CO2 flux were not correlated with any independent variables, but did reflect surface area of the adjacent kelp bed in the following year. Different environmental influences on CO2 flux at different temporal scales suggest the importance of long-term flux monitoring for accurately identifying important environmental processes for the coastal carbon cycle. Overall, the study area was a strong CO2 sink into the sea (CO2 flux of ca. -260 g C m-2 yr-1). If all coastal areas inhabited by macrophytes had a similar CO2 uptake rate, the net CO2 uptake from these areas alone would roughly equal the net CO2 sink estimated for the entire global coastal ocean to date. A similar-strength CO2 flux, ranging between -0.09 and -0.01 g C m-2 h-1, was also observed over another kelp bed from a pilot study of boat-based eddy covariance measurements.

  6. Sensitivity of air-sea CO2-exchange and calcite saturation depth to the remineralization depth of marine particulate organic and inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, B.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.

    2009-04-01

    The present study addresses the question of what would happen to air-sea CO2 exchange and the depth of the calcite saturation horizon (CSH) if the remineralization depth of particulate organic and inorganic carbon (POC, PIC) was changing. Therefore, a biogeochemical ocean circulation model (PISCES) was run with four different parameterizations for vertical particle fluxes, starting from the same initial conditions. Particle fluxes undergo strong changes induced by a combination of the respective mechanistic formulation of the vertical particle flux and the resulting ecosystem response. Reorganizations in dissolved properties are caused by (i) changed fluxes of POC and PIC; (ii) advection; (iii) air-sea CO2 exchange (DIC). The results show that the more (less) efficient the vertical transport of POC (PIC) from the surface toward depth, the lower the surface ocean pCO2, the higher the air-sea CO2 flux, and the stronger the increase in the oceanic inventory of DIC, and vice versa. Consequently, in one experiment the ocean is turning into a CO2 source to the atmosphere, in two cases it becomes a weak sink and in one simulation it turns into a strong sink. Surprisingly, results for changes in the CSH are more similar among the simulations at larger scale with a general deepening in the North Pacific and a shoaling elsewhere. In most areas the readjustment of the CSH is controlled by DIC and alkalinity acting both towards the simulated CSH shifts, however, in some cases DIC (alkalinity) is overcompensating for an effect that would occur due to changes in alkalinity (DIC), alone. In detail, the differences found between the experiments can be well explained by the respective particle flux responses. The current study shows that reorganizations in the vertical flux of particulate matter in the ocean may have immediate and longer-term effects on the marine carbon cycle which could potentially feedback on the climate system.

  7. Air-sea CO2 exchange process in the southern Yellow Sea in April of 2011, and June, July, October of 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Baoxiao; Song, Jinming; Yuan, Huamao; Li, Xuegang; Li, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and air-sea CO2 exchange flux (FCO2) in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS, 120-125°E, 31.5-37°N) were investigated basing on the field surveys conducted in April of 2011, and June, July, October of 2012. With significant spatial variations, surface pCO2 ranged from 243 to 574 μatm, 206 to 620 μatm, 102 to 655 μatm and 328 to 557 μatm in April, June, July and October, respectively. Nearshore area of Shandong Peninsula and Jiangsu Shallow (depth<50 m) were pCO2-supersaturated (pCO2=400-600 μatm), as the result of intensive water mixing which brought the bottom CO2-rich water to the surface layer. Conversely, offshore area of SYS center (depth>50 m) was pCO2-undersaturated (pCO2<390 μatm) in April, June and October, but supersaturated in July. Phytoplankton production sustained by abundant nutrient and suitable hydrodynamic conditions was of great importance for this undersaturated pCO2. Moreover, extreme low pCO2 (pCO2<300 μatm) was observed in the Changjiang plume (32.5-33.5°N, 123-125°E) in July, which was also related with the biological uptake of CO2. Average air-sea CO2 exchange flux of the SYS in April, June, July and October was -3.16±0.40 mmol m-2 d-1, -4.56±0.34 mmol m-2 d-1, -0.36±0.51 mmol m-2 d-1, and 6.67±0.57 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. As a whole, the SYS behaved as a weak CO2 sink during April to October, with an average flux for about -0.35 mmol m-2 d-1. As for the controlling factors for pCO2 variation, temperature played the dominant role in October, whereas the non-temperature factors, such as vertical mixing, Changjiang plume and biological activity, were considered as the primary controlling factors in June and July. Spatially, the control of temperature on pCO2 was predominant in the offshore SYS; the non-temperature factors were predominant in the shallow nearshore area, especially in coast of Shandong Peninsula and the Jiangsu Shallow.

  8. Assessing the sensitivity of modeled air-sea CO2 exchange to the remineralization depth of particulate organic and inorganic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Birgit; Bopp, Laurent; Gehlen, Marion

    2008-09-01

    To assess the sensitivity of surface ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes to changes in the remineralization depth of particulate organic and inorganic carbon (POC, PIC), a biogeochemical ocean circulation model (PISCES) was run with different parameterizations for vertical particle fluxes. On the basis of fluxes of POC and PIC, productivity, export, and the distributions of nitrogen (NO3), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and alkalinity, a number of indices defined to estimate the efficiency of carbon transport away from the atmosphere are applied. With differing success for the respective indices the results show that the more efficient the vertical transport of organic carbon toward depth, the lower the surface ocean pCO2, the higher the air-sea CO2 flux, and the stronger the increase in the oceanic inventory of DIC. Along with POC flux it is important to consider variations in PIC flux, as the net effect of particle flux reorganizations on surface ocean pCO2 is a combination of changes in DIC and alkalinity. The results demonstrate that changes in the mechanistic formulation of vertical particle fluxes have direct and indirect effects on surface ocean pCO2 and may thus interact with the atmospheric CO2 reservoir.

  9. Controls on air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean east of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, J.; Strutton, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The temperate latitudes of the world oceans (~30-50° north and south) are strong sinks for atmospheric CO2 on a mean annual basis. Due to sparse data, the Southern Ocean is the least understood of these CO2 sink regions, with estimates of the annual air-sea CO2 flux varying by as much as 100%, depending upon the calculation method. This work investigates processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean, with a focus on the Pacific sector east of Australia. We quantify the effects of temperature, biological drawdown, and the large-scale general circulation on seawater pCO2 on seasonal and annual timescales, and discuss the balance of these forcings. We expressly consider the impact of the general circulation on the air-sea CO2 flux, which we showed in a previous study to determine the location of the North Pacific carbon sink region. Worldwide, the regions of strong atmospheric CO2 uptake are all located in deep western boundary currents and their extensions, suggesting a larger role for the general circulation in forcing these sinks than is currently acknowledged or understood. Understanding the processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean is critical for predicting how this gas exchange will change in the future.

  10. Air--Sea CO2 Cycling in the Southeastern Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Else, Brent Gordon Thomas

    During the fourth International Polar Year, an interdisciplinary study was conducted to examine the couplings between sea ice, ocean, atmosphere, and ecosystem in the southeastern Beaufort Sea. This thesis examines components of the system that control the air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide. Using eddy covariance measurements, we found enhanced CO2 exchange associated with new ice formation in winter flaw leads. This exchange was typically directed towards the surface, although we also measured one instance of outgassing. Sea surface dissolved CO2 measurements (pCO 2sw) in Amundsen Gulf showed significant undersaturation with respect to the atmosphere at freeze-up, followed by a slow increase over the winter until spring phytoplankton blooms caused strong undersaturation at break-up. Over the summer, pCO2sw increased until becoming slightly supersaturated due to surface warming. Along the southern margins of Amundsen Gulf and on the Mackenzie Shelf we found pCO2sw supersaturations in the fall due to wind-driven coastal upwelling. In the spring, this upwelling occurred along the landfast ice edges of Amundsen Gulf. By combining observations of enhanced winter gas exchange with observations of pCO 2sw in Amundsen Gulf, we derived an annual budget of air-sea CO2 exchange for the region. This exercise showed that uptake through the winter season was as important as the open water season, making the overall annual uptake of CO2 about double what had previously been calculated. Prior to this work, the prevailing paradigm of airsea CO2 cycling in Arctic polynya regions posited that strong CO2 absorption occurs in the open water seasons, and that a potential outgassing during the winter is inhibited by the sea ice cover. As a new paradigm, we propose that the spatial and temporal variability of many processes---including phytoplankton blooms, sea surface temperature and salinity changes, upwelling, river input, continental shelf processes, and the potential for high rates

  11. A stability dependent theory for air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, David J.

    1993-05-01

    The influence of thermal stability at the air-sea interface on computed values of the transfer velocities of trace gases is examined. The novel "whitecap" model for air-sea gas exchange of Monahan and Spillane (1984), extended here to include thermal stability effects, is linked with an atmospheric general circulation model to compute global transfer velocity patterns of a climate reactive gas, CO2. The important terms in the model equations such as the whitecap coverage, friction velocity, neutral and local drag coefficients and the stability parameter ψm(Z/L) are discussed and analyzed. The atmospheric surface level air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and sea surface temperature, obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model 1 (CCM1) are used to drive algorithms describing the air-sea transfer velocity of trace gases. The transfer velocity for CO2 (kCO2) is then computed for each 2.8° × 2.8° latitudinal-longitudinal area every 24 hours for 5 years of the seasonal-hydro runs of the CCM1. The new model results are compared to previously proposed formulations using the identical CCM1 forcing terms. Air-sea thermal stability effects on the transfer velocity for CO2 are most important at mid-high wind speeds. Where cold air from continental interiors is transported over relatively warm oceanic waters, the transfer velocities are enhanced over neutral stability values. The depression of computed kCO2 values when warm air resides over cold water is especially important, due to asymmetry in the stability dependence of the drag coefficient. The stability influence is 20% to 50% of kCO2 for modest air-sea temperature differences and up to 100% for extreme cases of stability or instability. The stability dependent "whitecap" model, using the transfer velocity coefficients for whitecap and nonwhitecap areas suggested by Monahan and Spillane (1984), produces CO2 transfer velocities that range from 13 to 50 cm h-1 for a

  12. The atmospheric footprint of preindustrial, anthropogenic, and contemporary air-sea fluxes of CO2 estimated from an ocean inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Gruber, N. P.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    Air-sea exchange is a primary determinant of the spatial pattern of atmospheric carbon dioxide, yet there are substantial gaps in our understanding of the impact of the oceans on these gradients. Recent inverse modeling studies have used ocean interior observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other tracers and Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) to estimate separately the natural air-sea flux that already existed in preindustrial times and the component of the air-sea flux that is due to the anthropogenic perturbation of atmospheric CO2. The sum of these components is the contemporary air-sea flux. Furthermore, the results from the ocean inversion have been combined with an analogous atmospheric inversion using surface observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and atmospheric transport models to estimate air- sea and air-land fluxes. This work suggested that there might be an unexpectedly large source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from tropical land regions. We use the air-sea fluxes estimated from this ocean inversion together with estimates of the seasonal cycle of these fluxes from ΔpCO2 observations and bulk parameterizations as boundary conditions for the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART). The effects of preindustrial, anthropogenic, and contemporary air-sea fluxes on the spatial pattern of atmospheric CO2 are analyzed and the implications for ocean interior transport are discussed. In addition, we use atmospheric observations of 13C/12C isotopic ratios in carbon dioxide to independently test the finding of a large terrestrial source in the tropics, since the terrestrial biosphere discriminates against 13C much more strongly than the oceans.

  13. Influence of precipitation on the CO2 air-sea flux, an eddy covariance field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarsky, Alexander; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2016-04-01

    During the SPACES-OASIS cruise (July-August 2015) from Durban, SA to Male, MV direct fluxes of CO2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The cruise covered areas of sources and sinks for atmospheric CO2, where the bulk concentration gradient measurements resembled the Takahashi (2009) climatology. Most of the time, bulk CO2 fluxes (F=k* [cwater-cair]), calculated with the parametrization (k) by Nightingale et al. 2000, were in general agreement with direct EC measurements. However, during heavy rain events, the directly measured CO2 fluxes were 4 times higher than predicted. It has been previously described that rain influences the k parametrization of air-sea gas exchange, but this alone cannot explain the measured discrepancy. There is evidence that freshwater input and a change in the carbonate chemistry causes the water side concentration of ?c=cwater-cair to decrease. Unfortunately this cannot be detected by most bulk measurement systems. Using the flux measurements of an additional gas like DMS, this rain influence can be evaluated as DMS does not react to changes in the carbonate system and has a different solubility. A pending question is if the enhanced flux of CO2 in the ocean is sequestered into the ocean mixed layer and below. This question will be tackled using the GOTM model to understand the implications for the global carbon cycle.

  14. The SOLAS air-sea gas exchange experiment (SAGE) 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Mike J.; Law, Cliff S.; Smith, Murray J.; Hall, Julie A.; Abraham, Edward R.; Stevens, Craig L.; Hadfield, Mark G.; Ho, David T.; Ward, Brian; Archer, Stephen D.; Cainey, Jill M.; Currie, Kim I.; Devries, Dawn; Ellwood, Michael J.; Hill, Peter; Jones, Graham B.; Katz, Dave; Kuparinen, Jorma; Macaskill, Burns; Main, William; Marriner, Andrew; McGregor, John; McNeil, Craig; Minnett, Peter J.; Nodder, Scott D.; Peloquin, Jill; Pickmere, Stuart; Pinkerton, Matthew H.; Safi, Karl A.; Thompson, Rona; Walkington, Matthew; Wright, Simon W.; Ziolkowski, Lori A.

    2011-03-01

    The SOLAS air-sea gas exchange experiment (SAGE) was a multiple-objective study investigating gas-transfer processes and the influence of iron fertilisation on biologically driven gas exchange in high-nitrate low-silicic acid low-chlorophyll (HNLSiLC) Sub-Antarctic waters characteristic of the expansive subpolar zone of the southern oceans. This paper provides a general introduction and summary of the main experimental findings. The release site was selected from a pre-voyage desktop study of environmental parameters to be in the south-west Bounty Trough (46.5°S 172.5°E) to the south-east of New Zealand and the experiment was conducted between mid-March and mid-April 2004. In common with other mesoscale iron addition experiments (FeAX's), SAGE was designed as a Lagrangian study, quantifying key biological and physical drivers influencing the air-sea gas exchange processes of CO 2, DMS and other biogenic gases associated with an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom. A dual tracer SF 6/ 3He release enabled quantification of both the lateral evolution of a labelled volume (patch) of ocean and the air-sea tracer exchange at tenths of kilometer scale, in conjunction with the iron fertilisation. Estimates from the dual-tracer experiment found a quadratic dependency of the gas exchange coefficient on windspeed that is widely applicable and describe air-sea gas exchange in strong wind regimes. Within the patch, local and micrometeorological gas exchange process studies (100 m scale) and physical variables such as near-surface turbulence, temperature microstructure at the interface, wave properties and windspeed were quantified to further assist the development of gas exchange models for high-wind environments. There was a significant increase in the photosynthetic competence ( Fv/ Fm) of resident phytoplankton within the first day following iron addition, but in contrast to other FeAX's, rates of net primary production and column-integrated chlorophyll a concentrations had

  15. Annual and seasonal fCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Chierici, M.; Counillon, F.; Omar, A.; Nondal, G.; Johannessen, T.; Olsen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Barents Sea is the strongest CO2 sink in the Arctic region, yet estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux in this area show a large span reflecting uncertainty as well as significant variability both seasonally and regionally. Here we use a previously unpublished data set of seawater CO2 fugacity (fCO2), and map these data over the western Barents Sea through multivariable linear regressions with SeaWiFS/MODIS remote sensing and TOPAZ model data fields. We find that two algorithms are necessary in order to cover the full seasonal cycle, mainly because not all proxy variables are available for the entire year, and because variability in fCO2 is driven by different mechanisms in summer and winter. A comprehensive skill assessment indicates that there is a good overall correspondence between observations and predictions. The algorithms are also validated using two independent data sets, with good results. The gridded fCO2 fields reveal tight links between water mass distribution and fCO2 in all months, and particularly in winter. The seasonal cycle show peaks in the total air-sea CO2 influx in May and September, caused by respectively biological drawdown of CO2 and low sea ice concentration leaving a large open water area. For 2007 the annual average air-sea CO2 flux is - 48 ± 5 gC m- 2, which is comparable to previous estimates.

  16. Narrowing the spread in CMIP5 model projections of air-sea CO2 fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Jianbin; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci

    2016-01-01

    Large spread appears in the projection of air-sea CO2 fluxes using the latest simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Here, two methods are applied to narrow this spread in 13 CMIP5 models. One method involves model selection based on the ability of models to reproduce the observed air-sea CO2 fluxes from 1980 to 2005. The other method involves constrained estimation based on the strong relationship between the historical and future air-sea CO2 fluxes. The estimated spread of the projected air-sea CO2 fluxes is effectively reduced by using these two approaches. These two approaches also show great agreement in the global ocean and three regional oceans of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, the North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean, including the average state and evolution characteristics. Based on the projections of the two approaches, the global ocean carbon uptake will increase in the first half of the 21st century then remain relatively stable and is projected to be 3.68–4.57 PgC/yr at the end of 21st century. The projections indicate that the increase in the CO2 uptake by the oceans will cease at the year of approximately 2070. PMID:27892473

  17. The carbon dioxide system on the Mississippi River-dominated continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico: 1. Distribution and air-sea CO2 flux.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Jen; Cai, Wei-Jun; Wang, Yongchen; Lohrenz, Steven E; Murrell, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    River-dominated continental shelf environments are active sites of air-sea CO2 exchange. We conducted 13 cruises in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a region strongly influenced by fresh water and nutrients delivered from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River system. The sea surface partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) was measured, and the air-sea CO2 flux was calculated. Results show that CO2 exchange exhibited a distinct seasonality: the study area was a net sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring and early summer, and it was neutral or a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during midsummer, fall, and winter. Along the salinity gradient, across the shelf, the sea surface shifted from a source of CO2 in low-salinity zones (0≤S<17) to a strong CO2 sink in the middle-to-high-salinity zones (17≤S<33), and finally was a near-neutral state in the high-salinity areas (33≤S<35) and in the open gulf (S≥35). High pCO2 values were only observed in narrow regions near freshwater sources, and the distribution of undersaturated pCO2 generally reflected the influence of freshwater inputs along the shelf. Systematic analyses of pCO2 variation demonstrated the importance of riverine nitrogen export; that is, riverine nitrogen-enhanced biological removal, along with mixing processes, dominated pCO2 variation along the salinity gradient. In addition, extreme or unusual weather events were observed to alter the alongshore pCO2 distribution and to affect regional air-sea CO2 flux estimates. Overall, the study region acted as a net CO2 sink of 0.96 ± 3.7 mol m(-2) yr(-1) (1.15 ± 4.4 Tg C yr(-1)).

  18. Mesoscale modulation of air-sea CO2 flux in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hajoon; Marshall, John; Munro, David R.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Sweeney, Colm; McGillicuddy, D. J.; Hausmann, Ute

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of mesoscale eddies in modulating air-sea CO2 flux and associated biogeochemical fields in Drake Passage using in situ observations and an eddy-resolving numerical model. Both observations and model show a negative correlation between temperature and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) anomalies at the sea surface in austral summer, indicating that warm/cold anticyclonic/cyclonic eddies take up more/less CO2. In austral winter, in contrast, relationships are reversed: warm/cold anticyclonic/cyclonic eddies are characterized by a positive/negative pCO2 anomaly and more/less CO2 outgassing. It is argued that DIC-driven effects on pCO2 are greater than temperature effects in austral summer, leading to a negative correlation. In austral winter, however, the reverse is true. An eddy-centric analysis of the model solution reveals that nitrate and iron respond differently to the same vertical mixing: vertical mixing has a greater impact on iron because its normalized vertical gradient at the base of the surface mixed layer is an order of magnitude greater than that of nitrate.

  19. Annual sea ice. An air-sea gas exchange moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, T.A.; Kelley, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Arctic annual sea ice, particularly when it is relatively warm (> -15/sup 0/C) permits significant gas exchange between the sea and air throughout the entire year. Sea ice, particularly annual sea ice, differs from freshwater ice with respect to its permeability to gases. The presence of brine allows for significant air-sea-ice exchange of CO/sub 2/ throughout the winter, which may significantly affect the global carbon dioxide balance. Other trace gases are also noted to be enriched in sea ice, but less is known about their importance to air-sea-interactions at this time. Both physical and biological factors cause and modify evolution of gases from the surface of sea ice. Quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the nature and physical behavior of sea ice with respect to brine and gases are discussed.

  20. Air-sea CO2 flux pattern along the southern Bay of Bengal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, R.; Poornima, D.; Naveen, M.; Thangaradjou, T.; Choudhury, S. B.; Rao, K. H.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2016-12-01

    Physico-chemical observations made from January 2013 to March 2015 in coastal waters of the southwest Bay of Bengal show pronounced seasonal variation in physico-chemical parameters including total alkalinity (TA: 1927.390-4088.642 μmol kg-1), chlorophyll (0.13-19.41 μg l-1) and also calculated dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC: 1574.219-3790.954 μmol kg-1), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2: 155.520-1488.607 μatm) and air-sea CO2 flux (FCO2: -4.808 to 11.255 mmol Cm-2 d-1). Most of the physical parameters are at their maximum during summer due to the increased solar radiation at cloud free conditions, less or no riverine inputs, and lack of vertical mixing of water column which leads to the lowest nutrients concentration, dissolved oxygen (DO), biological production, pCO2 and negative flux of CO2 to the atmosphere. Chlorophyll and DO concentrations enhanced due to increased nutrients during premonsoon and monsoon season due to the vertical mixing of water column driven by the strong winds and external inputs at respective seasons. The constant positive loading of nutrients, TA, DIC, chlorophyll, pCO2 and FCO2 against atmospheric temperature (AT), lux, sea surface temperature (SST), pH and salinity observed in principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that physical and biological parameters play vital role in the seasonal distribution of pCO2 along the southwest Bay of Bengal. The annual variability of CO2 flux clearly depicted that the southwest Bay of Bengal switch from sink (2013) to source status in the recent years (2014 and 2015) and it act as significant source of CO2 to the atmosphere with a mean flux of 0.204 ± 1.449 mmol Cm-2 d-1.

  1. Air-sea CO 2 fluxes in the Caribbean Sea from 2002-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Olsen, Are; Triñanes, Joaquin

    2007-06-01

    Air-sea fluxes in the Caribbean Sea are presented based on measurements of partial pressure of CO 2 in surface seawater, pCO 2sw, from an automated system onboard the cruise ship Explorer of the Seas for 2002 through 2004. The pCO 2sw values are used to develop algorithms of pCO 2sw based on sea surface temperature (SST) and position. The algorithms are applied to assimilated SST data and remotely sensed winds on a 1° by 1° grid to estimate the fluxes on weekly timescales in the region. The positive relationship between pCO 2sw and SST is lower than the isochemical trend suggesting counteracting effects from biological processes. The relationship varies systematically with location with a stronger dependence further south. Furthermore, the southern area shows significantly lower pCO 2sw in the fall compared to the spring at the same SST, which is attributed to differences in salinity. The annual algorithms for the entire region show a slight trend between 2002 and 2004 suggesting an increase of pCO 2sw over time. This is in accord with the increasing pCO 2sw due the invasion of anthropogenic CO 2. The annual fluxes of CO 2 yield a net invasion of CO 2 to the ocean that ranges from - 0.04 to - 1.2 mol m - 2 year - 1 over the 3 years. There is a seasonal reversal in the direction of the flux with CO 2 entering into the ocean during the winter and an evasion during the summer. Year-to-year differences in flux are primarily caused by temperature anomalies in the late winter and spring period resulting in changes in invasion during these seasons. An analysis of pCO 2sw before and after hurricane Frances (September 4-6, 2004), and wind records during the storm suggest a large local enhancement of the flux but minimal influence on annual fluxes in the region.

  2. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  3. Air-sea fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory on the south-west coast of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Prytherch, John; Brooks, Ian M.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We present air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), momentum, and sensible heat measured by the eddy covariance method from the recently established Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) on the south-west coast of the United Kingdom. Measurements from the south-westerly direction (open water sector) were made at three different sampling heights (approximately 15, 18, and 27 m above mean sea level, a.m.s.l.), each from a different period during 2014-2015. At sampling heights ≥ 18 m a.m.s.l., measured fluxes of momentum and sensible heat demonstrate reasonable ( ≤ ±20 % in the mean) agreement with transfer rates over the open ocean. This confirms the suitability of PPAO for air-sea exchange measurements in shelf regions. Covariance air-sea CO2 fluxes demonstrate high temporal variability. Air-to-sea transport of CO2 declined from spring to summer in both years, coinciding with the breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful eddy covariance measurements of CH4 emissions from a marine environment. Higher sea-to-air CH4 fluxes were observed during rising tides (20 ± 3; 38 ± 3; 29 ± 6 µmole m-2 d-1 at 15, 18, 27 m a.m.s.l.) than during falling tides (14 ± 2; 22 ± 2; 21 ± 5 µmole m-2 d-1), consistent with an elevated CH4 source from an estuarine outflow driven by local tidal circulation. These fluxes are a few times higher than the predicted CH4 emissions over the open ocean and are significantly lower than estimates from other aquatic CH4 hotspots (e.g. polar regions, freshwater). Finally, we found the detection limit of the air-sea CH4 flux by eddy covariance to be 20 µmole m-2 d-1 over hourly timescales (4 µmole m-2 d-1 over 24 h).

  4. Reconstruction of super-resolution fields of ocean pCO2 and air-sea fluxes of CO2 from satellite imagery in the Southeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, I.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Yahia, H.; Garbe, C.; Paulmier, A.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of Green House Gases GHGs fluxes at the air-sea interface at high resolution is crucial to accurately quantify the role of the ocean in the absorption and emission of GHGs. In this paper we present a novel method to reconstruct maps of surface ocean partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4 km) using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ocean Colour (OC) data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). Inference of super-resolution of pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes is performed using novel nonlinear signal processing methodologies that prove efficient in the context of oceanography. The theoretical background comes from the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism which unlocks the geometrical determination of cascading properties of physical intensive variables. As a consequence, a multiresolution analysis performed on the signal of the so-called singularity exponents allows the correct and near optimal cross-scale inference of GHGs fluxes, as the inference suits the geometric realization of the cascade. We apply such a methodology to the study offshore of the Benguela area. The inferred representation of oceanic partial pressure of CO2 improves and enhances the description provided by CarbonTracker, capturing the small scale variability. We examine different combinations of Ocean Colour and Sea Surface Temperature products in order to increase the number of valid points and the quality of the inferred pCO2 field. The methodology is validated using in-situ measurements by means of statistical errors. We obtain that mean absolute and relative errors in the inferred values of pCO2 with respect to in-situ measurements are smaller than for CarbonTracker.

  5. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  6. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  7. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  8. Wintertime CO2 fluxes in an Arctic polynya using eddy covariance: Evidence for enhanced air-sea gas transfer during ice formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Else, B. G. T.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Galley, R. J.; Drennan, W. M.; Miller, L. A.; Thomas, H.

    2011-09-01

    Between Nov. 1 2007 and Jan. 31 2008, we calculated the air-sea flux of CO2, sensible heat, and water vapor in an Arctic polynya system (Amundsen Gulf, Canada) using eddy covariance equipment deployed on the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen. During this time period, Amundsen Gulf was a dynamic sea ice environment composed primarily of first year ice with open water coverage varying between 1-14%. In all cases where measurements were influenced by open water we measured CO2 fluxes that were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those expected under similar conditions in the open ocean. Fluxes were typically directed toward the water surface with a mean flux of -4.88 μmol m-2 s-1 and a maximum of -27.95 μmol m-2 s-1. One case of rapid outgassing (mean value +2.10 μmol m-2 s-1) was also observed. The consistent patten of enhanced gas exchange over open water allows us to hypothesize that high water-side turbulence is the main cause of these events. Modification of the physical and chemical properties of the surface seawater by cooling and brine rejection may also play a role. A rough calculation using an estimate of open water coverage suggests that the contribution of these events to the annual regional air-sea CO2 exchange budget may make the winter months as important as the open water months. Although high, the uptake of CO2 fits within mixed layer dissolved inorganic carbon budgets derived for the region by other investigators.

  9. Roles of biological and physical processes in driving seasonal air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean: New insights from CARIOCA pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; Antoine, D.

    2015-07-01

    On a mean annual basis, the Southern Ocean is a sink for atmospheric CO2. However the seasonality of the air-sea CO2 flux in this region is poorly documented. We investigate processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in a large area of the Southern Ocean (38°S-55°S, 60°W-60°E) that represents nearly one third of the subantarctic zone. A seasonal budget of CO2 partial pressure, pCO2 and of dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC in the mixed layer is assessed by quantifying the impacts of biology, physics and thermodynamical effect on seawater pCO2. A focus is made on the quantification at a monthly scale of the biological consumption as it is the dominant process removing carbon from surface waters. In situ biological carbon production rates are estimated from high frequency estimates of DIC along the trajectories of CARIOCA drifters in the Atlantic and Indian sector of the Southern Ocean during four spring-summer seasons over the 2006-2009 period. Net community production (NCP) integrated over the mixed layer is derived from the daily change of DIC, and mixed layer depth estimated from Argo profiles. Eleven values of NCP are estimated and range from 30 to 130 mmol C m- 2 d- 1. They are used as a constraint for validating satellite net primary production (NPP). A satellite data-based global model is used to compute depth integrated net primary production, NPP, for the same periods along the trajectories of the buoys. Realistic NCP/NPP ratios are obtained under the condition that the SeaWiFS chlorophyll are corrected by a factor of ≈ 2-3, which is an underestimation previously reported for the Southern Ocean. Monthly satellite based NPP are computed over the 38°S-55°S, 60°W-60°E area. pCO2 derived from these NPP combined with an export ratio, and taking into account the impact of physics and thermodynamics is in good agreement with the pCO2 seasonal climatology of Takahashi (2009). On an annual timescale, mean NCP values, 4.4 to 4.9 mol C m- 2 yr- 1 are ≈ 4-5 times

  10. Air-sea carbon dioxide exchange in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic Sea ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.

    The Southern Ocean is an important part of the global carbon cycle, responsible for roughly half of the carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbed by the global ocean. The air-sea CO2 flux (Fc) can be expressed as the product of the water-air CO2 partial pressure difference (DeltapCO2) and the gas transfer velocity ( k), an exchange coefficient which represents the efficiency of gas exchange. Generally, Fc is negative (a sink) throughout the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice zone (SIZ), but uncertainty in k has made it difficult to develop an accurate regional carbon budget. Constraining the functional dependence of k on wind speed in open water environments, and quantifying the effect of sea ice on k, will reduce uncertainty in the estimated contribution of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic SIZ to the global carbon cycle. To investigate Fc in the Southern Ocean, a ruggedized, unattended, closed-path eddy covariance (EC) system was deployed on the Antarctic research vessel Nathaniel B. Palmer for nine cruises during 18 months from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Southern Ocean and coastal Antarctica. The methods are described and results are shown for two cruises chosen for their latitudinal range, inclusion of open water and sea ice cover, and large DeltapCO2. The results indicated that ship-based unattended EC measurements in high latitudes are feasible, and recommendations for deployments in such environments were provided. Measurements of Fc and DeltapCO2 were used to compute k. The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm hr-1) and the neutral 10-m wind speed (U10n, m s -1), k=0.245 U10n 2+1.3, in close agreement with tracer-based results and much lower than previous EC studies. In the SIZ, it was found that k decreased in proportion to sea ice cover. This contrasted findings of enhanced Fc in the SIZ by previous open-path EC campaigns. Using the NBP results a net annual Southern Ocean (ocean south of 30°S) carbon flux of -1.1 PgC yr-1 was

  11. Mechanisms driving the seasonality of air-sea CO2 flux in the ice-free zone of the Southern Ocean and how these might evolve: A 1D vertical biogeochemical model approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelot, C.; Pasquer, B.; Metzl, N.; Goosse, H.

    2015-12-01

    The biogeochemical SWAMCO-3 model is used to understand mechanisms governing the seasonality of air-sea CO2 exchanges in the ice-free Southern Ocean. The model explicitly details the dynamics of three Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs) of importance for C, N, P, Si, Fe cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange in this area. These are the diatoms, the pico-nanophytoplankton and the coccolithophores whose growth regulation by light, temperature and nutrients has been obtained from phenomenological observations available for these PFTs. The performance of the SWAMCO-3 model coupled to a vertical one-dimensional physical model is assessed at the location of the time-series station KERFIX (around 51°S-68°E). The model was able to reproduce a mean seasonal cycle based on years where a maximum of chemical and biological observations are available. Ocean fCO2 in equilibrium with the atmosphere are simulated both in winter associated with surface layer replenishment in DIC due to deep vertical mixing and in late summer as a consequence of the warming effect on the carbonate system. A clear under-saturation is simulated in summer driven by primary production. Model scenarios cancelling biological activity or only coccolithophores allowed, by comparison with the standard simulation, untangling the respective role of physical and biological processes in driving the sign and magnitude of air-sea CO2 exchanges. First, we show that coccolithophores are repressing the ocean C uptake, but only marginally (5%). Second, the model highlights the role of diatoms on the presence of a CO2 sink in summer. Altogether, this results in a weak annual air-sea CO2 flux (-0.9 mol m-2 y-1 or -0.1 Pg C y-1 for the ice-free zone south of 50°S), whose variability seems more related to the thermodynamical processes. We then speculate how global warming might influence the latter mechanisms and alter air-sea CO2 exchanges in this region.

  12. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (<80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2 with a mean uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2d-1. We attribute this discrepancy to: (1) elevated PP rates (>600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally <100 mg C m-2d-1, daily PP rates cumulated to a total PP of ~437.6 × 103 t C, which was roughly twice higher than the organic carbon delivery by river inputs (~241.2 × 103 t C). Subsurface PP represented 37.4% of total PP for the

  13. CO2 air-sea fluxes across the Portuguese estuaries Tagus and Sado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, G.; Nogueira, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally, estuaries and proximal shelves under the direct influence of river runoff and large inputs of organic matter are mostly heterotrophic and, therefore, act as a carbon source. In this context the CO2 dynamics in Tagus and Sado estuaries (SW Portugal) was studied under two different climate and hydrological situations. These moderately productive mesotidal coastal-plain lagoon-type estuaries, localised in the center of Portugal and distant 30-40 km apart, present quite different freshwater inflows, surface areas and water residence times. A study performed in 2001 revealed that the magnitude of CO2 fluxes in the two estuarine systems varied seasonally. CO2 emissions during the huge rainfall winter were similar in both estuaries, reaching a mean value of ~50 mmol m-2 d-1, while in spring emissions from Sado were ~6 times higher then Tagus ones, attaining a mean value of 62 mmol m-2 d-1. Nevertheless, in both sampling periods, Sado estuary showed, within the upper estuary (salinity

  14. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.; Miller, Scott D.

    2016-07-01

    Direct carbon dioxide flux measurements using eddy covariance from an icebreaker in the high-latitude Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone are reported. Fluxes were combined with the measured water-air carbon dioxide partial pressure difference (ΔpCO2) to compute the air-sea gas transfer velocity (k, normalized to Schmidt number 660). The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm h-1) and the neutral 10 m wind speed (U10n, m s-1), kopen = 0.245 U10n2 + 1.3, in close agreement with decades old tracer-based results and much lower than cubic relationships inferred from previous open ocean eddy covariance studies. In the marginal ice zone, the effective gas transfer velocity decreased in proportion to sea ice cover, in contrast with predictions of enhanced gas exchange in the presence of sea ice. The combined open water and marginal ice zone results affect the calculated magnitude and spatial distribution of Southern Ocean carbon flux.

  15. Mapping of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas: Basin-wide distribution and seasonal to interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunaka, Sayaka; Murata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Eiji; Chierici, Melissa; Fransson, Agneta; van Heuven, Steven; Hoppema, Mario; Ishii, Masao; Johannessen, Truls; Kosugi, Naohiro; Lauvset, Siv K.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Nishino, Shigeto; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Olsen, Are; Sasano, Daisuke; Takahashi, Taro; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2016-09-01

    We produced 204 monthly maps of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Arctic north of 60°N, including the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas, from January 1997 to December 2013 by using a self-organizing map technique. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface water data were obtained by shipboard underway measurements or calculated from alkalinity and total inorganic carbon of surface water samples. Subsequently, we investigated the basin-wide distribution and seasonal to interannual variability of the CO2 fluxes. The 17-year annual mean CO2 flux shows that all areas of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas were net CO2 sinks. The estimated annual CO2 uptake by the Arctic Ocean was 180 TgC yr-1. The CO2 influx was strongest in winter in the Greenland/Norwegian Seas (>15 mmol m-2 day-1) and the Barents Sea (>12 mmol m-2 day-1) because of strong winds, and strongest in summer in the Chukchi Sea (∼10 mmol m-2 day-1) because of the sea-ice retreat. In recent years, the CO2 uptake has increased in the Greenland/Norwegian Sea and decreased in the southern Barents Sea, owing to increased and decreased air-sea pCO2 differences, respectively.

  16. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  17. Impacts of air-sea exchange coefficients on snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Yoon; Kwon, Young Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Snowfall over the Korean Peninsula is mainly associated with air mass transformation by the fluxes across the air-sea interface during cold-air outbreaks over the warm Yellow Sea. The heat and momentum exchange coefficients in the surface flux parameterization are key parameters of flux calculations across the air-sea interface. This study investigates the effects of the air-sea exchange coefficients on the simulations of snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two snowfall cases are selected for this study. One is a heavy snowfall event that took place on January 4, 2010, and the other is a light snowfall event that occurred on December 23-24, 2011. Several sensitivity tests are carried out with increased and decreased heat and momentum exchange coefficients. The domain-averaged precipitation is increased (decreased) with increased (decreased) heat exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) surface heat flux leads to more (less) moist conditions in the low level of the atmosphere. On the other hand, the domain-averaged precipitation is decreased (increased) with increased (decreased) momentum exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) momentum coefficient causes reduction (increase) of wind speed and heat flux. The variation of precipitation in the heat exchange coefficient experiments is much larger than that in the momentum exchange coefficient experiments because the change of heat flux has a more direct impact on moisture flux and snowfall amount, while the change of momentum flux has a rather indirect impact via wind speed changes. The low-pressure system is intensified and moves toward North when the heat exchange coefficient is increased because warming and moistening of the lower atmosphere contributes to destabilize the air mass, resulting in the change of precipitation pattern over the Korean Peninsula in the heat exchange coefficient experiments.

  18. Estimating lake-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.E.; Striegl, R.G.; Stannard, D.I.; Michmerhuizen, C.M.; McConnaughey, T.A.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Lake-atmosphere CO2 flux was directly measured above a small, woodland lake using the eddy covariance technique and compared with fluxes deduced from changes in measured lake-water CO2 storage and with flux predictions from boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Over a 3-yr period, lake-atmosphere exchanges of CO2 were measured over 5 weeks in spring, summer, and fall. Observed springtime CO2 efflux was large (2.3-2.7 ??mol m-2 s-1) immediately after lake-thaw. That efflux decreased exponentially with time to less than 0.2 ??mol m-2 s-1 within 2 weeks. Substantial interannual variability was found in the magnitudes of springtime efflux, surface water CO2 concentrations, lake CO2 storage, and meteorological conditions. Summertime measurements show a weak diurnal trend with a small average downward flux (-0.17 ??mol m-2 s-1) to the lake's surface, while late fall flux was trendless and smaller (-0.0021 ??mol m-2 s-1). Large springtime efflux afforded an opportunity to make direct measurement of lake-atmosphere fluxes well above the detection limits of eddy covariance instruments, facilitating the testing of different gas flux methodologies and air-water gas-transfer models. Although there was an overall agreement in fluxes determined by eddy covariance and those calculated from lake-water storage change in CO2, agreement was inconsistent between eddy covariance flux measurements and fluxes predicted by boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Comparison of measured and modeled transfer velocities for CO2, along with measured and modeled cumulative CO2 flux, indicates that in most instances the surface-renewal model underpredicts actual flux. Greater underestimates were found with comparisons involving homogeneous boundary-layer models. No physical mechanism responsible for the inconsistencies was identified by analyzing coincidentally measured environmental variables.

  19. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  20. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover (< 80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2, with an uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean ± standard deviation associated with spatial variability). We attribute this discrepancy to (1) elevated PP rates (> 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally < 100 mg C m-2 d-1 and cumulated to a total PP of ~ 437.6 × 103 t C for the region over a 35-day period. This amount was about twice the

  1. Linking air-sea energy exchanges and European anchovy potential spawning ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammauta, R.; Molteni, D.; Basilone, G.; Guisande, C.; Bonanno, A.; Aronica, S.; Giacalone, G.; Fontana, I.; Zora, M.; Patti, B.; Cuttitta, A.; Buscaino, G.; Sorgente, R.; Mazzola, S.

    2008-10-01

    The physical and chemical processes of the sea greatly affect the reproductive biology of fishes, mainly influencing both the numbers of spawned eggs and the survivorship of early stages up to the recruitment period. In the central Mediterranean, the European anchovy constitutes one of the most important fishery resource. Because of its short living nature and of its recruitment variability, associated to high environmental variability, this small pelagic species undergo high interannual fluctuation in the biomass levels. Despite several efforts were addressed to characterize fishes spawning habitat from the oceanographic point of view, very few studies analyze the air-sea exchanges effects. To characterize the spawning habitat of these resources a specific technique (quotient rule analysis) was applied on air-sea heat fluxes, wind stress, sea surface temperature and turbulence data, collected in three oceanographic surveys during the summer period of 2004, 2005 and 2006. The results showed the existence of preferred values in the examined physical variables, associated to anchovy spawning areas. Namely, for heat fluxes the values were around -40 W/m2, for wind stress 0.04-0.11 N/m2, for SST 23°C, and 300 - 500 m3s-3 for wind mixing. Despite the obtained results are preliminary, this is the first relevant analysis on the air-sea exchanges and their relationship with the fish biology of pelagic species.

  2. Response of biological production and air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification in the California and Canary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachkar, Zouhair; Gruber, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Upwelling-favorable winds have increased in most Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) in the last decades, and it is likely that they increase further in response to global climate change. Here, we explore the response of biological production and air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification in two of the four major EBUS, namely the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS). To this end, we use eddy-resolving regional ocean models on the basis of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) to which we have coupled a NPZD-type ecosystem model and a biogeochemistry module describing the carbon cycle and subject these model configurations to an idealized increase in the wind stress. We find that a doubling of the wind-stress doubles net primary production (NPP) in the southern California CS and central and northern Canary CS, while it leads to an increase of less than 50% in the central and northern California CS as well as in the southern Canary CS. This differential response is a result of i) different nutrient limitation states with higher sensitivity to upwelling intensification in regions where nutrient limitation is stronger and ii) more efficient nutrient assimilation by biology in the Canary CS relative to the California CS because of a faster nutrient-replete growth rate and longer nearshore water residence times. In the regions where production increases commensurably with upwelling intensification, the enhanced net biological uptake of CO2 compensates the increase in upwelling driven CO2 outgassing, resulting in only a small change in the biological pump efficiency and hence in a small sensitivity of air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification. In contrast, in the central California CS as well as in the southern Canary CS around Cape Blanc, the reduced biological efficiency enhances the CO2 outgassing and leads to a substantial sensitivity of the air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification.

  3. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North-West European Shelf based on Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 dataset based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the Western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in north-west European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), the gas transfer velocity coefficient (K), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with relative uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 dataset (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish Seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT database and obtained relatively robust results with an average precision of 4 ± 22 μatm in the seasonally stratified nWEC and the southern and northern CS (sCS and nCS), but less promising results in the permanently well-mixed sWEC, IS and Cap Lizard (CL) waters. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.4, -0.9 and -0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the nCS, sCS and nWEC, respectively, whereas, permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the sWEC, CL and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over six provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -0.95 Tg C year-1 for this

  4. Occurrence and air-sea exchange of phthalates in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Lohmann, Rainer; Caba, Armando; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Air and seawater samples were taken simultaneously to investigate the distribution and air-sea gas exchange of phthalates in the Arctic onboard the German Research Ship FS Polarstern. Samples were collected on expeditions ARK XX1&2 from the North Sea to the high Arctic (60 degrees N-85 degrees N) in the summer of 2004. The concentration of sigma6 phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-i-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)) ranged from 30 to 5030 pg L(-1) in the aqueous dissolved phase and from 1110 to 3090 pg m(-3) in the atmospheric gas phase. A decreasing latitudinal trend was present in the seawater and to a lesser degree in the atmosphere from the Norwegian coast to the high Arctic. Overall, deposition dominated the air-sea gas exchange for DEHP, while volatilization from seawater took place in the near-coast environment. The estimated net gas deposition of DEHP was 5, 30, and 190 t year(-1) for the Norwegian Sea, the Greenland Sea, and the Arctic, respectively. This suggests that atmospheric transport and deposition of phthalates is a significant process for their occurrence in the remote Atlantic and Arctic Ocean.

  5. Air-sea exchange over Black Sea estimated from high resolution regional climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velea, Liliana; Bojariu, Roxana; Cica, Roxana

    2013-04-01

    Black Sea is an important influencing factor for the climate of bordering countries, showing cyclogenetic activity (Trigo et al, 1999) and influencing Mediterranean cyclones passing over. As for other seas, standard observations of the atmosphere are limited in time and space and available observation-based estimations of air-sea exchange terms present quite large ranges of uncertainty. The reanalysis datasets (e.g. ERA produced by ECMWF) provide promising validation estimates of climatic characteristics against the ones in available climatic data (Schrum et al, 2001), while cannot reproduce some local features due to relatively coarse horizontal resolution. Detailed and realistic information on smaller-scale processes are foreseen to be provided by regional climate models, due to continuous improvements of physical parameterizations and numerical solutions and thus affording simulations at high spatial resolution. The aim of the study is to assess the potential of three regional climate models in reproducing known climatological characteristics of air-sea exchange over Black Sea, as well as to explore the added value of the model compared to the input (reanalysis) data. We employ results of long-term (1961-2000) simulations performed within ENSEMBLE project (http://ensemblesrt3.dmi.dk/) using models ETHZ-CLM, CNRM-ALADIN, METO-HadCM, for which the integration domain covers the whole area of interest. The analysis is performed for the entire basin for several variables entering the heat and water budget terms and available as direct output from the models, at seasonal and annual scale. A comparison with independent data (ERA-INTERIM) and findings from other studies (e.g. Schrum et al, 2001) is also presented. References: Schrum, C., Staneva, J., Stanev, E. and Ozsoy, E., 2001: Air-sea exchange in the Black Sea estimated from atmospheric analysis for the period 1979-1993, J. Marine Systems, 31, 3-19 Trigo, I. F., T. D. Davies, and G. R. Bigg (1999): Objective

  6. Design and construction of Information Systems of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiankun; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; He, Xianqiang; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jianyu

    2013-10-01

    Climate change has become one of the hotspots of global attention in recent progress of globalization and industrialization. The mainstream opinion presented by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) regards that the global warming was caused mainly by greenhouse gases generated by human activities, such as anthropogenic CO2, which also resulting in the high-frequent happening of abnormal climate events. Satellite remote sensing is an efficient and economic method for CO2 flux observation. In this paper, we describe an Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Ari-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) which developed by the Second Institute of Oceanography, China. The IssCO2can achieve the whole procedure automatically from the satellite remote data receiving to products distribution, including the data acquirement and satellite image process, products generation, etc. The IssCO2 can process various types of in situ data, satellite data and model data, and validate the final satellite-derived CO2 flux products by in situ data; it can provide a real-time browsing and download of remote sensing products on the web based on the Geo-information System (GIS) technologies. The IssCO2 can meet the concurrent queries of different levels of users, and the query results can be visual displayed and analyzed on the client.

  7. Multi-Satellite Characterization of Interannual Variation in Primary Production and Air-Sea CO2 Flux in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Ross Sea is the most productive sector of the Southern Ocean, the largest of the three iron limited HNLC regions. This productivity supports a rich upper trophic level community, including large numbers of penguins, seals, and whales. It also represents a large sink for atmospheric CO2. Since the advent of ocean color remote sensing using satellites such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, and MODIS, it has become increasingly clear that productivity in the Ross Sea is also characterized by a great deal of interannual variability. Passive microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager show that distributions of sea ice within the Ross Sea vary markedly from year to year, with some years experiencing nearly ice-free springtime conditions while others remain nearly ice covered. This extreme variability in sea ice cover is due to changes in climate state as well as some unusual events specific to the Ross Sea, such as the calving of two enormous icebergs, one in 2000 and the other in 2002. Variation in ice cover during austral spring and summer impacts the growth of the phytoplankton community, whose cumulative rate of annual primary production ranges widely, from <10 Tg C in 2002-03 to almost 40 Tg C in 1999-00. When these satellite data are used in conjunction with a three-dimensional ocean ecosystem model of the Ross Sea, the calculated air-sea fluxes of CO2 are even more variable, varying over 50-fold between 1997 and 2004. Not surprisingly, the lowest atmospheric flux of CO2 into the surface waters of the Ross Sea (0.10 Tg C) is associated with the year having the lowest primary production and highest sea ice cover. The extreme sensitivity of rates of primary production and particularly air-sea CO2 fluxes to changes in sea ice distribution in the Southern Ocean suggest that this region may undergo dramatic changes if global temperatures continue to rise, as they have in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  8. Decline of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Arctic atmosphere and reversal of air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Jantunen, L. M.; Falconer, R. L.; Barrie, L. A.; Fellin, P.

    1995-02-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are the most abundant organochlorine pesticides in the arctic atmosphere and ocean surface water. A compilation of measurements made between 1979-93 from stations in the Canadian and Norwegian Arctic and from cruises in the Bering and Chukchi seas indicates that atmospheric concentrations of α-HCH have declined significantly (p < 0.01), with a time for 50% decrease of about 4 y in summer-fall and 6 y in winter-spring. The 1992-93 levels of about 100 pg m-3 are 2-4 fold lower than values in the mid-1980s. The trend in γ-HCH is less pronounced, but a decrease is also suggested from measurements in the Canadian Arctic and the Bering-Chukchi seas. HCHs in ocean surface water have remained relatively constant since the early 1980s. The decline in atmospheric α-HCH has reversed the net direction of air-sea gas exchange to the point where some northern waters are now sources of the pesticide to the atmosphere instead of sinks.

  9. Effect of the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the sea surface microlayer on their coastal air-sea exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitart, C.; García-Flor, N.; Miquel, J. C.; Fowler, S. W.; Albaigés, J.

    2010-01-01

    Several measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in coastal marine compartments (viz. atmosphere, sea surface microlayer, subsurface seawater, sinking particles and sediments), made nearly simultaneously at two stations in the north-eastern Mediterranean, were used to estimate the transport fluxes of individual and total PAHs through the air-seawater-sediment system. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes were estimated using both subsurface water (SSW) and sea surface microlayer (SML) concentrations. The air-SML fluxes ranged from 411 to 12,292 ng m - 2 d - 1 (absorption) and from - 506 to -13,746 ng m - 2 d - 1 (volatilisation) for total PAHs (Σ15). Air-seawater column transport of particle-associated PAHs was estimated from the analysis of particulate atmospheric and sediment interceptor trap materials. Air-sea particle deposition fluxes of total PAHs ranged from 13 to 114 ng m - 2 d - 1 and seawater particle settling fluxes (upper 5 m water column) ranged from 184 to 323 ng m - 2 d - 1 . The results of this study indicate that both the magnitude and the direction of the calculated air-sea diffusive fluxes change when PAH concentrations in the SML are considered. As a result, PAHs accumulation in the SML could produce the so-called "flux capping effect". However, the high variability in the coastal air-sea PAHs flux estimations, mainly due to the parameters uncertainty, requires further experimental approaches, including improvement of parameterisations.

  10. Effect of gas-transfer velocity parameterization choice on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The oceanic sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important part of the global carbon budget. Understanding uncertainties in the calculation of this net flux into the ocean is crucial for climate research. One of the sources of the uncertainty within this calculation is the parameterization chosen for the CO2 gas-transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software toolbox, called the FluxEngine (Shutler et al., 2016), to estimate the monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes for the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean, including the European Arctic, and for the global ocean using several published quadratic and cubic wind speed parameterizations of the gas-transfer velocity. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic Ocean. This region is a large oceanic sink of CO2, and it is also a region characterized by strong winds, especially in winter but with good in situ data coverage. We show that the uncertainty in the parameterization is smaller in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic than in the global ocean. It is as little as 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, in comparison to 9 % for the global ocean when restricted to parameterizations with quadratic wind dependence. This uncertainty becomes 46, 44, and 65 %, respectively, when all parameterizations are considered. We suggest that this smaller uncertainty (5 and 4 %) is caused by a combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic (> 7 ms-1) and lack of any seasonal changes in the direction of the flux direction within most of the region. We also compare the impact of using two different in situ pCO2 data sets (Takahashi et al. (2009) and Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 and v2.0, for the flux calculation. The annual fluxes using the two data sets differ by 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal fluxes in the Arctic computed from the two data sets disagree with each

  11. Air-Sea CO2 fluxes and NEP changes in a Baja California Coastal Lagoon during the anomalous North Pacific warm condition in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila López, M. D. C.; Martin Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.; Sandoval Gil, J.; Mejía-Trejo, A.; Félix-Bermudez, A.; Pacheco-Ruiz, I.

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the temporal variability of seawater carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in a Baja California Mediterranean-climate coastal lagoon. This study was carried out from Nov-2013 to Nov-2014, a period in which anomalous warm conditions were present in the North Pacific Ocean influenced the local oceanography in the adjacent coastal waters off Baja California. These ocean conditions resulted on a negative anomaly of upwelling index, which led to summer-like season (weak upwelling condition) that could be observed in the response of carbon dynamics and metabolic status in San Quintín Bay. Minor changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration during spring months (~100 µmol kg-1) where observed and were associated to biological processes within the lagoon. High DIC (~2200 µmol kg-1), pCO2 (~800 μatm), and minimum pH (~7.8) values were observed in summer, reflecting the predominance of respiration processes apparently mostly linked to the remineralization of sedimentary organic matter supplied from macroalgal blooms. San Quintín Bay acted as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the study period, with maximum value observed in July (~10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Temporal biomass production of macroalgae contributed to about 50% of total FCO2 estimated in spring-summer seasons, that was a potencial internal source of organic matter to fuel respiration processes in San Quintín Bay. Eelgrass metabolism contributes in a lower degree in total FCO2. During the anomalous ocean conditions in 2014, the lagoon switched seasonally between net heterotrophy and net autotrophy during the study period, where photosynthesis and respiration processes in the lagoon were closer to a balance. Whole-system metabolism and FCO2 clearly indicated the strong dependence of San Quintín Bay on upwelling conditions and benthic metabolism activity, which was mainly controlled by dominant primary producer communities.

  12. Air-Sea Exchange and Atmospheric Cycling of Mercury in South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C. M.; Liu, C. S.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Limited knowledge exists concerning the role of the low-latitude marginal seas in mercury (Hg) emissions on a global scale, especially tropical-subtropical and monsoon-dominated marginal seas in East Asia. To assess this potential mobilization of Hg through air-sea gas exchange, we have determined the dissolved elemental Hg (DEM) and gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations in surface seawater and atmosphere, respectively, during seasonal oceanographic cruises to the SouthEast Asian Time-series Study (SEATS) station (18 oN, 116 oE) from 2003 to 2007. The sampling and analysis of GEM and DEM were performed on board ship by using an on-line mercury analyzer (GEMA). Over the SCS, the GEM concentrations are elevated 2-3 times above global background values, with higher enhancements in the winter when the northeast monsoon draws air from China. The impact of long-range transport, as controlled by seasonal monsoons, has on the Hg atmospheric distribution and cycling in the SCS. The DEM concentration varied seasonally, with a high in summer and a low in winter and showed a positive correlation with sea surface temperature (SST). The elevated DEM concentration in summer appears mainly abiologically driven. In winter, the SCS acts as a sink of atmosphere Hg0 as a result of low SST and high wind of the year, enhanced vertical mixing and elevated atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury. Annually, the SCS serves as a source of Hg0 to the atmosphere of 300±50 pmol m-2 d-1 (390±60 kmol Hg y-1, ~2.6% of global emission in ~1% of global ocean area), suggesting high regional Hg pollution impacts from the surrounding Mainland (mostly China).

  13. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Rice, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average alpha-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average gamma-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (alpha-HCH, average 79% saturation; gamma-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for alpha-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of gamma-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  14. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F. ); Rice, C.P. )

    1991-04-15

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average {alpha}-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg/m{sup 3} and 2.4 ng/l, respectively, and average {gamma}-HCH concentrations were 68 pg/m{sup 3} in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng/l in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations ({alpha}-HCH, average 79% saturation; {gamma}-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for {alpha}-HCH ranged from {minus}47 ng/m{sup 2} day (sea to air) to 122 ng/m{sup 2} day (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng/m{sup 2} day air to sea. All fluxes of {gamma}-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng/m{sup 2} day, and averaged 31 ng/m{sup 2} day.

  15. CO2 exchange coefficients from remotely sensed wind speed measurements: SSM/I versus QuikSCAT in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Mary-Elena; Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy

    2002-08-01

    We compare here the air-sea exchange coefficient for CO2 estimated with monthly mean wind speed measured by the Special Sensing Microwave Imager (SSM/I), KS, and by the scatterometer QuikSCAT, KQ, for the year 2000. KS and KQ present the same patterns, although are larger than in ~65% of the world ocean. Zonal mean KS are consistently larger, except ~50°S and north of 10°S in the Indian Ocean. Global oceanic uptake, FQ, estimated using KQ and climatological ΔpCO2 ranges from 0.43 (July) to 2.6 Gt C y-1 (December). The global sink estimated from SSM/I is ~10% larger than FQ for most of the year. This comparison supports the use of SSM/I to quantify interannual variability of the global exchange coefficient of CO2.

  16. Distribution and air-sea exchange of mercury (Hg) in polluted marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Bitetto, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Calabrese, S.; Di Stefano, V.; Oliveri, E.; Parello, F.; Mazzola, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is emitted in the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources, these last accounting for one third of the total emissions. Since the pre-industrial age, the atmospheric deposition of mercury have increased notably, while ocean emissions have doubled owing to the re-emission of anthropogenic mercury. Exchange between the atmosphere and ocean plays an important role in cycling and transport of mercury. We present the preliminary results from a study on the distribution and evasion flux of mercury at the atmosphere/sea interface in the Augusta basin (SE Sicily, southern Italy), a semi-enclosed marine area affected by a high degree of contamination (heavy metals and PHA) due to the oil refineries placed inside its commercial harbor. It seems that the intense industrial activity of the past have lead to an high Hg pollution in the bottom sediments of the basin, whose concentrations are far from the background mercury value found in most of the Sicily Strait sediments. The release of mercury into the harbor seawater and its dispersion by diffusion from sediments to the surface, make the Augusta basin a potential supplier of mercury both to the Mediterranean Sea and the atmosphere. Based on these considerations, mercury concentration and flux at the air-sea interface of the Bay have been estimated using a real-time atomic adsorption spectrometer (LUMEX - RA915+) and an home-made accumulation chamber, respectively. Estimated Total Atmospheric Mercury (TGM) concentrations during the cruise on the bay were in the range of 1-3 ng · m-3, with a mean value of about 1.4 ng · m-3. These data well fit with the background Hgatm concentration values detected on the land (1-2 ng · m-3, this work), and, more in general, with the background atmospheric TGM levels found in the North Hemisphere (1.5-1.7 ng · m-3)a. Besides, our measurements are in the range of those reported for other important polluted marine areas. The mercury evasion flux at the air-sea interface

  17. Changing controls on oceanic radiocarbon: New insights on shallow-to-deep ocean exchange and anthropogenic CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.; Key, R.; Khatiwala, S.; Giraud, X.

    2012-10-01

    The injection of radiocarbon (14C) into the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has provided a powerful tracer to investigate ocean physical and chemical processes. While the oceanic uptake of bomb-derived 14C was primarily controlled by air-sea exchange in the early decades after the bomb spike, we demonstrate that changes in oceanic 14C are now primarily controlled by shallow-to-deep ocean exchange, i.e., the same mechanism that governs anthropogenic CO2 uptake. This is a result of accumulated bomb 14C uptake that has rapidly decreased the air-sea gradient of 14C/C (Δ14C) and shifted the main reservoir of bomb 14C from the atmosphere to the upper ocean. The air-sea Δ14C gradient, reduced further by fossil fuel dilution, is now weaker than before weapons testing in most regions. Oceanic 14C, and particularly its temporal change, can now be used to study the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. We examine observed changes in oceanic Δ14C between the WOCE/SAVE (1988-1995) and the CLIVAR (2001-2007) eras and simulations with two ocean general circulation models, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean Model (ECCO). Observed oceanic Δ14C and its changes between the 1980s-90s and 2000s indicate that shallow-to-deep exchange is too efficient in ECCO and too sluggish in CCSM. These findings suggest that mean global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 between 1990 and 2007 is bounded by the ECCO-based estimate of 2.3 Pg C yr-1 and the CCSM-based estimate of 1.7 Pg C yr-1.

  18. Air-Sea and Lateral Exchange Processes in East Indian Coastal Current off Sri Lanka

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of which have a bearing on local air-sea fluxes. The project seeks to collect hydrographic data sets in the international waters (R/V Roger Revelle...and in Sri Lankan coastal waters (R/V Samuddrika). The measurements include thermohaline stratification, currents and the kinetic energy...conducted CTD and ADCP measurements in the southern BoB onboard R/V Roger Revelle and in Sri Lanka coastal waters using R/V Samuddrika. The data analysis

  19. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained.

  20. Air exchange rates from atmospheric CO2 daily cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrilho, João Dias; Mateus, Mário; Batterman, Stuart; da Silva, Manuel Gameiro

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach for measuring ventilation air exchange rates (AERs). The method belongs to the class of tracer gas techniques, but is formulated in the light of systems theory and signal processing. Unlike conventional CO2 based methods that assume the outdoor ambient CO2 concentration is constant, the proposed method recognizes that photosynthesis and respiration cycle of plants and processes associated with fuel combustion produce daily, quasi-periodic, variations in the ambient CO2 concentrations. These daily variations, which are within the detection range of existing monitoring equipment, are utilized for estimating ventilation rates without the need of a source of CO2 in the building. Using a naturally-ventilated residential apartment, AERs obtained using the new method compared favorably (within 10%) to those obtained using the conventional CO2 decay fitting technique. The new method has the advantages that no tracer gas injection is needed, and high time resolution results are obtained. PMID:26236090

  1. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  2. The influence of air-sea exchange on the isotropic composition of oceanic carbon: Observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch-Stieglitz, J.; Broecker, W.S.; Fairbanks, R.G.

    1995-12-01

    Although the carbon isotropic composition of ocean waters after they leave the surface ocean is determined by biological cycling, air-sea exchange affects the carbon isotopic composition of surface waters in two ways. The equilibrium fractionation between oceanic and atmospheric carbon increases with decreasing temperature. In Southern Ocean Surface Waters this isotopic equilibrium enriches {delta}{sup 13}C relative to the {delta}{sup 13}C expected from uptake and release of carbon by biological processes alone. Similarly, surface waters in the subtropical gyres are depleted in {delta}{sup 13}C due to extensive air-sea exchange at warm temperatures. Countering the tendency toward isotopic equilibration with the atmosphere (a relatively slow process), are the effects of the equilibration of CO{sub 2} itself (a much faster process). In regions where there is a net transfer of isotopically light CO{sub 2} from the ocean to the atmosphere (e.g., the equator) surface waters become enriched in {sup 13}C, whereas in regions where isotopically light CO{sub 2} is entering the ocean (e.g., the North Atlantic) surface waters become depleted in {sup 13}C. A compilation of high quality oceanic {delta}{sup 13}C measurements along with experiments performed using a zonally averaged three-basin dynamic ocean model are used to explore these processes. 40 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  4. Determination of temperature dependent Henry's law constants of polychlorinated naphthalenes: Application to air-sea exchange in Izmir Bay, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Adali, Mutlu

    2016-12-01

    The Henry's law constant (H) is a crucial variable to investigate the air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants. H values for 32 polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were measured using an inert gas-stripping technique at five temperatures ranging between 5 and 35 °C. H values in deionized water (at 25 °C) varied between 0.28 ± 0.08 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-73) and 18.01 ± 0.69 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-42). The agreement between the measured and estimated H values from the octanol-water and octanol-air partition coefficients was good (measured/estimated ratio = 1.00 ± 0.41, average ± SD). The calculated phase change enthalpies (ΔHH) were within the interval previously determined for other several semivolatile organic compounds (42.0-106.4 kJ mol-1). Measured H values, paired atmospheric and aqueous concentrations and meteorological variables were also used to reveal the level and direction of air-sea exchange fluxes of PCNs at the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey. The net PCN air-sea exchange flux varied from -0.55 (volatilization, PCN-24/14) to 2.05 (deposition, PCN-23) ng m-2 day-1. PCN-19, PCN-24/14, PCN-42, and PCN-33/34/37 were mainly volatilized from seawater while the remaining congeners were mainly deposited. The overall number of the cases showing deposition was higher (67.9%) compared to volatilization (21.4%) and near equilibrium (10.7%).

  5. Effects of the Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution on Polar Ocean Properties and Air-Sea Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific studies have demonstrated that sub-mesoscale ocean eddies, motions characterized by Rossby and Richardson numbers around 1, are important in determining the vertical density structure of the ocean, particularly in the mixed layer. Instabilities excited at the sub-mesoscale have timescales of days and length scales of less than 10 kilometers, and enhance ocean restratification by slumping lateral density gradients. In the polar oceans, a unique mechanism exists that may generate motions on these scales. Individual floes of sea ice may create lateral gradients in the ocean surface heat flux and wind stress curl, acting as an insulator and physical barrier between the ocean and the atmospheric processes that destabilize it. The "floe size distribution" describes the fraction of the ocean surface area covered by sea ice floes, as a function of the sea ice floe size, and determines the length scales over which gradients in atmospheric forcing are transmitted to the ocean. It may therefore play a significant role in exciting or inhibiting sub-mesoscale eddies, and consequently in restratification and air-sea exchange. Current GCMs simulate ice cover using grid-scale ice fraction alone, and lack information about the floe size distribution and of ice length scales that may be important in setting the larger-scale statistics of these motions. An important factor in determining the properties of the upper polar oceans might therefore be missing from modern GCMs. We consider this possibility by examining sub-mesoscale resolving ocean GCM experiments coupled to an energy-balanced atmosphere and idealized model of floes of sea ice. Varying the floe size distribution with a fixed sea ice fraction, we find that the length scales of individual floes and the floe size distribution itself play an important role in setting the steady-state ocean stratification, temperature, and air-sea exchange.

  6. Tropical Intraseasonal Air-Sea Exchanges during the 1997 Pacific Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Chou, S.-H.; Wang, Zihou

    1999-01-01

    The Madden Julian Oscillations (MJO) and associated westerly wind (WW) events account for much of the tropical intraseasonal variability (TISV). The TISV has been suggested as an important stochastic forcing that may be one of the underlying causes for the observed irregularities of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Recent observational studies and theories of interannual to interdecadal-scale variability suggest that ENSO may arise from different mechanisms depending on the basic states. The Pacific warming event of 1997, being associated with a period of strong MJO and WW events, serves as a natural experiment for studying the possible role of TISV in triggering an ENSO event. We have performed a combined statistical and composite analysis of surface WW events based on the assimilated surface wind and sea level pressure for the period of 1980-1993, the SSM/I wind for the period of 1988-1997, and OLR. Results indicates that extratropical forcing contribute significantly to the evolution of MJO and establishment of WW events over the Pacific warm pool. Following the major WW events, there appeared an eastward extension of equatorial warm SST anomalies from the western Pacific warm pool. Such tropical-extratropical interaction is particularly clear in the winter of 96-97 that leads to the recent warming event in 1997/98. From the above discussion, our current study on this subject is based on the hypothesis that 1) there is an enhanced air-sea interaction associated with TISV and the northerly surges from the extratropics in the initial phase of the 97/98 warming event, and 2) the relevant mechanisms are functions of the basic state of the coupled system (in terms of SST distribution and atmospheric mean circulation) that varies at the interannual and interdecadal time scale. We are analyzing the space-time structure of the northerly surges, their association with air-sea fluxes and upper ocean responses during the period of September 1996 to June 1997. The

  7. Sensitivity analysis of an ocean carbon cycle model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2011-06-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. We explore the effect on these outputs of variation in the values of the twenty parameters that control ocean ecosystem growth in a 1-D formulation of the UK Met Office HadOCC NPZD model used in GCMs. We use and compare the results from one-at-a-time and all-at-a-time perturbations performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W). Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. The most sensitive parameters are generally found to be those controlling well-established ocean ecosystem parameterisations widely used in many NPZD-type models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosynthesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of an Ocean Carbon Cycle Model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. The NPZD model is the Hadley Centre Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HadOCC) from the UK Met Office, used in the Hadley Centre Coupled Model 3 (HadCM3) and FAst Met Office and Universities Simulator (FAMOUS) GCMs. Here, HadOCC is coupled to the 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting meteorology to undertake a sensitivity analysis of its twenty biological parameters. Analyses are performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W) to assess variability in parameter sensitivities at different locations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. We perform the analysis using one-at-a-time perturbations and using a statistical emulator, and compare results. The most sensitive parameters are generic to many NPZD ocean ecosystem models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosythesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  9. Monitoring Exchange of CO2 - A KISS Workshop Report 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The problem and context: Can top-down estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes resolve the anthropogenic emissions of China, India, the United States, and the European Union with an accuracy of +/-10% or better?The workshop "Monitoring Exchange of Carbon Dioxide" was convened at the Keck Institute for Space Studies in Pasadena, California in February 2010 to address this question. The Workshop brought together an international, interdisciplinary group of 24 experts in carbon cycle science, remote sensing, emissions inventory estimation, and inverse modeling. The participants reviewed the potential of space-based and sub-orbital observational and modeling approaches to monitor anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the presence of much larger natural fluxes from the exchange of CO2 between the land, atmosphere, and ocean. This particular challenge was motivated in part by the NRC Report "Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions" [Pacala et al., 2010]. This workshop report includes several recommendations for improvements to observing strategies and modeling frameworks for optimal and cost-effective monitoring of carbon exchange

  10. Air sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds measured by autonomous oceanographic floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; McNeil, Craig

    2007-06-01

    Measurements of the air-sea fluxes of N 2 and O 2 were made in winds of 15-57 m s - 1 beneath Hurricane Frances using two types of air-deployed neutrally buoyant and profiling underwater floats. Two "Lagrangian floats" measured O 2 and total gas tension (GT) in pre-storm and post-storm profiles and in the actively turbulent mixed layer during the storm. A single "EM-APEX float" profiled continuously from 30 to 200 m before, during and after the storm. All floats measured temperature and salinity. N 2 concentrations were computed from GT and O 2 after correcting for instrumental effects. Gas fluxes were computed by three methods. First, a one-dimensional mixed layer budget diagnosed the changes in mixed layer concentrations given the pre-storm profile and a time varying mixed layer depth. This model was calibrated using temperature and salinity data. The difference between the predicted mixed layer concentrations of O 2 and N 2 and those measured was attributed to air-sea gas fluxes FBO and FBN. Second, the covariance flux FCO( z) = < wO 2'>( z) was computed, where w is the vertical motion of the water-following Lagrangian floats, O 2' is a high-pass filtered O 2 concentration and <>( z) is an average over covariance pairs as a function of depth. The profile FCO( z) was extrapolated to the surface to yield the surface O 2 flux FCO(0). Third, a deficit of O 2 was found in the upper few meters of the ocean at the height of the storm. A flux FSO, moving O 2 out of the ocean, was calculated by dividing this deficit by the residence time of the water in this layer, inferred from the Lagrangian floats. The three methods gave generally consistent results. At the highest winds, gas transfer is dominated by bubbles created by surface wave breaking, injected into the ocean by large-scale turbulent eddies and dissolving near 10-m depth. This conclusion is supported by observations of fluxes into the ocean despite its supersaturation; by the molar flux ratio FBO/ FBN, which is

  11. Air sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds measured by autonomous oceanographic floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; McNeil, Craig

    2008-11-01

    Measurements of the air-sea fluxes of N 2 and O 2 were made in winds of 15-57 m s - 1 beneath Hurricane Frances using two types of air-deployed neutrally buoyant and profiling underwater floats. Two "Lagrangian floats" measured O 2 and total gas tension (GT) in pre-storm and post-storm profiles and in the actively turbulent mixed layer during the storm. A single "EM-APEX float" profiled continuously from 30 to 200 m before, during and after the storm. All floats measured temperature and salinity. N 2 concentrations were computed from GT and O 2 after correcting for instrumental effects. Gas fluxes were computed by three methods. First, a one-dimensional mixed layer budget diagnosed the changes in mixed layer concentrations given the pre-storm profile and a time varying mixed layer depth. This model was calibrated using temperature and salinity data. The difference between the predicted mixed layer concentrations of O 2 and N 2 and those measured was attributed to air-sea gas fluxes FBO and FBN. Second, the covariance flux FCO( z) = < wO 2'>( z) was computed, where w is the vertical motion of the water-following Lagrangian floats, O 2' is a high-pass filtered O 2 concentration and <>( z) is an average over covariance pairs as a function of depth. The profile FCO( z) was extrapolated to the surface to yield the surface O 2 flux FCO(0). Third, a deficit of O 2 was found in the upper few meters of the ocean at the height of the storm. A flux FSO, moving O 2 out of the ocean, was calculated by dividing this deficit by the residence time of the water in this layer, inferred from the Lagrangian floats. The three methods gave generally consistent results. At the highest winds, gas transfer is dominated by bubbles created by surface wave breaking, injected into the ocean by large-scale turbulent eddies and dissolving near 10-m depth. This conclusion is supported by observations of fluxes into the ocean despite its supersaturation; by the molar flux ratio FBO/ FBN, which is

  12. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability.

  13. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  14. Bidirectional air-sea exchange and accumulation of POPs (PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs) in the nocturnal marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, Gerhard; Meixner, Franz X.; Vrana, Branislav; Efstathiou, Christos I.; Kohoutek, Jiři; Kukučka, Petr; Mulder, Marie D.; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Rusina, Tatsiana P.; Song, Guo-Zheng; Tsapakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    As a consequence of long-range transported pollution, air-sea exchange can become a major source of persistent organic pollutants in remote marine environments. The vertical gradients in the air were quantified for 14 species, i.e. four parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), three organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and two polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) in the gas-phase at a remote coastal site in the southern Aegean Sea in summer. Most vertical gradients were positive (Δc/Δz > 0), indicating downward (net depositional) flux. Significant upward (net volatilisational) fluxes were found for three PAHs, mostly during daytime, and for two OCPs, mostly during night-time, as well as for one PCB and one PBDE during part of the measurements. While phenanthrene was deposited, fluoranthene (FLT) and pyrene (PYR) seem to undergo flux oscillation, hereby not following a day-night cycle. Box modelling confirms that volatilisation from the sea surface has significantly contributed to the night-time maxima of OCPs. Fluxes were quantified based on eddy covariance. Deposition fluxes ranged from -28.5 to +1.8 µg m-2 day-1 for PAHs and -3.4 to +0.9 µg m-2 day-1 for halogenated compounds. Dry particle deposition of FLT and PYR did not contribute significantly to the vertical flux.

  15. Laboratory Investigation of Air-Sea Interfacial Properties in Relation to Gas Exchange and Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    Atmospheric Science ,4600 Rickenbacker Causeway,Miami,FL,33149 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...Exchange and Remote Sensing Eric S. Saltzman Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33149 phone (703) 306...1522 fax (703) 306-0377 email esaltzman@rsmas.miami.edu Mark Donelan Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy

  16. Air-sea Exchange of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammel, G. P.; Heil, A.; Kukucka, P.; Meixner, F. X.; Mulder, M. D.; Prybilova, P.; Prokes, R.; Rusina, T. S.; Song, G. Z.; Vrana, B.

    2015-12-01

    The marine atmospheric environment is a receptor for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which are advected from sources on land, primary, such as biomass burning by-products (PAHs, dioxins), and secondary, such as volatilization from contaminated soils (PCBs, pesticides). Primary sources do not exist in the marine environment, except for PAHs (ship engines) but following previous atmospheric deposition, the sea surface may turn to a secondary source by reversal of diffusive air-sea mass exchange. No monitoring is in place. We studied the vertical fluxes of a wide range of primary and secondary emitted POPs based on measurements in air and surface seawater at a remote coastal site in the eastern Mediterranean (2012). To this end, silicon rubbers were used as passive water samplers, vertical concentration gradients were determined in air and fluxes were quantified based on Eddy covariance. Diffusive air-sea exchange fluxes of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and semivolatile PAHs were found close to phase equilibrium, except one PAH, retene, a wood burning tracer, was found seasonally net-volatilisational. Some PCBs, p,p'-DDE, penta- and hexachlorobenzene (PeCB, HCB) were mostly net-depositional, while PBDEs were net-volatilizational. Fluxes determined at a a remote coastal site ranged -33 - +2.4 µg m-2 d-1 for PAHs and -4.0 - +0.3 µg m-2 d-1for halogenated compounds (< 0 means net-deposition, > 0 means net-volatilization). It is concluded that nowadays in open seas more pollutants are undergoing reversal of the direction of air-sea exchange. Recgional fire activity records in combination with box model simulations suggest that deposition of retene during summer is followed by a reversal of air-sea exchange. The seawater surface as secondary source of pollution should be assessed based on flux measurements across seasons and over longer time periods.

  17. Measurements and Modeling of the Air-Sea Exchange of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. P.; Andersson, M.; Sorenson, A.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Evasion of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from the ocean to the atmosphere is considered to be one of the major sources of atmospheric mercury. Most of the ocean's surface waters are saturated with Hg(0) which is produced in situ by photochemical processes (both oxidation and reduction can be photochemically mediated), and biological reduction may also be important in some instances. Until recently, measurements have been limited but analytical developments now allow the continuous collection of atmospheric and surface water Hg(0) concentrations, allowing for a more accurate assessment of the exchange flux. Recent data from various cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean will be presented and compared with data from other oceans. Global mercury models have incorporated Hg(0) evasion and the new modeling approaches better account for the various processes involved that have not been included in previous work. Our recent advances in the modeling of the exchange of Hg(0) will be presented as well as a comparison of the results of various model approaches. The policy implications of the model output will be discussed.

  18. pCO2 and CO2 Exchange During High Bora Winds in the Northern Adriatic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-05

    coastal ocean , has not been adequately assessed. Here we show the response of surfacewater pCO2 and CO2 fluxes during high borawind in the Northern...m−2 day−1 day in thewinter cases and 29 mmol m−2 day−1 in the summer case) over themag- nitude of the mean annual value. Oceanic data measured...simultaneously to surface pCO2 measurements suggest that themost likely responsiblemechanisms for the observed pCO2 increaseswere oceanic verticalmixing and

  19. Variability of annual CO2 exchange from Dutch Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. M. J.; Jacobs, A. F. G.; Bosveld, F. C.; Hendriks, D. M. D.; Hensen, A.; Kroon, P. S.; Moors, E. J.; Nol, L.; Schrier-Uijl, A.; Veenendaal, E. M.

    2007-05-01

    An intercomparison is made of the Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2, NEE, for eight Dutch grassland sites; four natural grasslands, two production grasslands and two meteorological stations within a rotational grassland region. At all sites the NEE was determined during at least 10 months per site, using the eddy-covariance (EC) technique, but in different years. The photosynthesis-light response analysis technique is used along with the respiration-temperature response technique to partition NEE among Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Re) and to obtain the eco-physiological characteristics of the sites at the field scale. Annual sums of NEE, GPP and Re are then estimated using the fitted response curves with observed radiation and air temperature from a meteorological site in the centre of The Netherlands as drivers. These calculations are carried out for four years (2002-2005). The estimated annual Re for all individual sites is more or less constant per site and the average for all sites amounts to 1390±30 gC m-2 a-1. The narrow uncertainty band (±2%) reflects the small differences in the mean annual air temperature. The mean annual GPP was estimated to be 1325 g C m-2 a-1, and displays a much higher standard deviation, of ±100 gC m-2 a-1 (8%), which reflects the relatively large variation in annual solar radiation. The mean annual NEE amounts to -65±85 gC m-2 a-1, which implies that on average the grasslands act as a source, with a relatively large standard deviation. From two sites, four-year records of CO2 flux were available and analyzed (2002-2005). Using the weather record of 2005 with optimizations from the other years, standard deviation of annual GPP was estimated to be 171-206 gC m-2 a-1 (8-14%), of annual Re 227-247 gC m-2 a-1 (14-16%) and of annual NEE 176-276 gC m-2 a-1. The inter-site standard deviation was higher for GPP and Re, 534 gC m-2 a-1 (37.3%) and 486 gC m-2 a-1 (34.8%), respectively. However, the inter

  20. Variability of annual CO2 exchange from Dutch grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, C. M. J.; Jacobs, A. F. G.; Bosveld, F. C.; Hendriks, D. M. D.; Hensen, A.; Kroon, P. S.; Moors, E. J.; Nol, L.; Schrier-Uijl, A.; Veenendaal, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An intercomparison is made of the Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2, NEE, for eight Dutch grassland sites: four natural grasslands, two production grasslands and two meteorological stations within a rotational grassland region. At all sites the NEE was determined during at least 10 months per site, using the eddy-covariance (EC) technique, but in different years. The NEE does not include any import or export other than CO2. The photosynthesis-light response analysis technique is used along with the respiration-temperature response technique to partition NEE into Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Re) and to obtain the eco-physiological characteristics of the sites at the field scale. Annual sums of NEE, GPP and Re are then estimated using the fitted response curves with observed radiation and air temperature from a meteorological site in the centre of The Netherlands as drivers. These calculations are carried out for four years (2002-2005). Land use and management histories are not considered. The estimated annual Re for all individual sites is more or less constant per site and the average for all sites amounts to 1390±30 gC m-2 a-1. The narrow uncertainty band (±2%) reflects the small differences in the mean annual air temperature. The mean annual GPP was estimated to be 1325 g C m-2 a-1, and displays a much higher standard deviation, of ±110 gC m-2 a-1 (8%), which reflects the relatively large variation in annual solar radiation. The mean annual NEE amounts to -65±85 gC m-2 a-1. From two sites, four-year records of CO2 flux were available and analyzed (2002-2005). Using the weather record of 2005 with optimizations from the other years, the standard deviation of annual GPP was estimated to be 171-206 gC m-2 a-1 (8-14%), of annual Re 227-247 gC m-2 a-1 (14-16%) and of annual NEE 176-276 gC m-2 a-1. The inter-site standard deviation was higher for GPP and Re, 534 gC m-2 a-1 (37.3%) and 486 gC m-2 a-1 (34.8%), respectively. However, the inter

  1. Persistent organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air of the North Sea region and air-sea exchange.

    PubMed

    Mai, Carolin; Theobald, Norbert; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Lammel, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were studied to determine occurrence, levels and spatial distribution in the marine atmosphere and surface seawater during cruises in the German Bight and the wider North Sea in spring and summer 2009-2010. In general, the concentrations found in air are similar to, or below, the levels at coastal or near-coastal sites in Europe. Hexachlorobenzene and α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) were close to phase equilibrium, whereas net atmospheric deposition was observed for γ-HCH. The results suggest that declining trends of HCH in seawater have been continuing for γ-HCH but have somewhat levelled off for α-HCH. Dieldrin displayed a close to phase equilibrium in nearly all the sampling sites, except in the central southwestern part of the North Sea. Here atmospheric deposition dominates the air-sea exchange. This region, close to the English coast, showed remarkably increased surface seawater concentrations. This observation depended neither on riverine input nor on the elevated abundances of dieldrin in the air masses of central England. A net depositional flux of p,p'-DDE into the North Sea was indicated by both its abundance in the marine atmosphere and the changes in metabolite pattern observed in the surface water from the coast towards the open sea. The long-term trends show that the atmospheric concentrations of DDT and its metabolites are not declining. Riverine input is a major source of PCBs in the German Bight and the wider North Sea. Atmospheric deposition of the lower molecular weight PCBs (PCB28 and PCB52) was indicated as a major source for surface seawater pollution.

  2. Wheat response to CO2 enrichment: CO2 exchanges transpiration and mineral uptakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, M.; Ducloux, H.; Richaud, C.

    1986-01-01

    When simulating canopies planted in varied densities, researchers were able to demonstrate that increase of dry matter production by enhancing CO2 quickly becomes independant of increase of leaf area, especially above leaf area index of 2; dry matter gain results mainly from photosynthesis stimulation per unit of surface (primary CO2 effect). When crop density is low (the plants remaining alone a longer time), the effects of increasing leaf surface (tillering, leaf elongation here, branching for other plants etc.) was noticeable and dry matter simulation factor reached 1.65. This area effect decreased when canopy was closed in, as the effect of different surfaces no longer worked. The stimulation of photosynthesis reached to the primary CO2 effect. The accumulation in dry matter which was fast during that phase made the original weight advantage more and more neglectible. Comparison with short term measurements showed that first order long term effect of CO2 in wheat is predictible with short term experiment, from the effect of CO2 on photosynthesis measured on reference sample.

  3. Winds induce CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and vadose zone transport in a karstic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Pérez-Priego, Oscar; Domingo, Francisco; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2016-08-01

    Research on the subterranean CO2 dynamics has focused individually on either surface soils or bedrock cavities, neglecting the interaction of both systems as a whole. In this regard, the vadose zone contains CO2-enriched air (ca. 5% by volume) in the first meters, and its exchange with the atmosphere can represent from 10 to 90% of total ecosystem CO2 emissions. Despite its importance, to date still lacking are reliable and robust databases of vadose zone CO2 contents that would improve knowledge of seasonal-annual aboveground-belowground CO2 balances. Here we study 2.5 years of vadose zone CO2 dynamics in a semiarid ecosystem. The experimental design includes an integrative approach to continuously measure CO2 in vertical and horizontal soil profiles, following gradients from surface to deep horizons and from areas of net biological CO2 production (under plants) to areas of lowest CO2 production (bare soil), as well as a bedrock borehole representing karst cavities and ecosystem-scale exchanges. We found that CO2 followed similar seasonal patterns for the different layers, with the maximum seasonal values of CO2 delayed with depth (deeper more delayed). However, the behavior of CO2 transport differed markedly among layers. Advective transport driven by wind induced CO2 emission both in surface soil and bedrock, but with negligible effect on subsurface soil, which appears to act as a buffer impeding rapid CO2 exchanges. Our study provides the first evidence of enrichment of CO2 under plant, hypothesizing that CO2-rich air could come from root zone or by transport from deepest layers through cracks and fissures.

  4. Air-Sea Exchange and Budget of Sulfur and Oxygen-Containing Volatile Organic Compounds in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Omori, Y.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Kameyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    By combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique, in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed and deployed. Starting in 2008, we made in situ observations of air-sea fluxes at 15 locations as well as underway observations of marine air/surface seawater bulk concentrations in the Pacific Ocean, during eight research cruises by R/V Hakuho-Maru. The fluxes of biogenic trace gases, DMS and isoprene, were always positive, with the magnitudes being in accordance with previously reported. In contrast, the fluxes of oxygenated VOCs including acetone and acetaldehyde varied from negative to positive, suggesting that the tropical and subtropical Pacific are a source, while the North Pacific is a sink. A basin-scale budget of VOCs were determined for 4 biogeochemical provinces in the Pacific Ocean, and the role of oceans for VOCs were discussed with respect to physical and biogeochemical processes.

  5. Vertical and horizontal soil CO2 transport and its exchanges with the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortíz, Penélope; Kowalski, Andrew S.; Curiel Yuste, Jorge; Domingo, Francisco; Oyonarte, Cecilio

    2015-04-01

    The CO2 efflux from soils to the atmosphere constitutes one of the major fluxes of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is a key determinant for sources and sinks of CO2 in land-atmosphere exchanges. Because of their large global magnitude, even small changes in soil CO2 effluxes directly affect the atmospheric CO2 content. Despite much research, models of soil CO2 efflux rates are highly uncertain, with the positive or negative feedbacks between underground carbon pools and fluxes and their temperature sensitivities in future climate scenarios largely unknown. Now it is necessary to change the point of view regarding CO2 exchange studies from an inappropriately conceived static system in which all respired CO2 is directly emitted by molecular processes to the atmosphere, to a dynamic system with gas transport by three different processes: convection, advection and molecular diffusion. Here we study the effects of wind-induced advection on the soil CO2 molar fraction during two years in a shrubland plateau situated in the Southeast of Spain. A borehole and two subterranean profiles (vertical and horizontal) were installed to study CO2 transport in the soil. Exchanges with the atmosphere were measured by an eddy covariance tower. In the vertical profile, two CO2 sensors (GMP-343, Vaisala) were installed at 0.15m and 1.5m along with soil temperature and humidity probes. The horizontal profile was designed to measure horizontal movements in the soil CO2 molar fraction due to down-gradient CO2 from the plant, where the majority CO2 is produced, towards bare soil. Three CO2 sensors (GMM-222, Vaisala) were installed, the first below plant (under-plant), the second in bare soil separated 25 cm from the first sensor (near-plant) and the third in bare soil at 25 cm from the second sensor (bare soil). The results show how the wind induces the movement of subterranean air masses both horizontally and vertically, affecting atmospheric CO2 exchanges. The eddy covariance tower

  6. Overview of the CoOP experiments: Physical and chemical measurements parameterizing air-sea heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Erik John; Bearer Edson, James; Frew, Nelson M.; Hara, Tetsu; Haussecker, Horst; Jähne, Bernd; McGillis, Wade R.; McKenna, Sean P.; Nelson, Robert K.; Schimpf, Uwe; Uz, Mete

    Experiments performed in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans in 1995 and 1997 attempted to measure the short time-scale and small spatial scale variability in the air-sea gas transfer rate. Along with these measurements, physical and chemical parameters known from previous laboratory studies to influence transfer rates were also characterized. These parameters include the atmospheric forcing, the capillary and capillary-gravity wave state, the surface chemical enrichment, and the level of near-surface turbulence. In this contribution we describe the methodologies employed for the measurement campaigns and summarize some general observations resulting from them. Other contributions from the coauthors describe in more detail the specific conclusions derived from the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP) field program.

  7. CO2 exchange coefficients from remotely-sensed wind speed measurements: SSM/I versus QuikSCAT in 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M.; Tang, W.; Liu, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    We compare here the air-sea exchange coefficient for C02 estimated with monthly mean wind speed measured by the Special Sensing Microwave Imager (SSM/I), Ks , and by the scatterometer QuikSCAT, Kq, for the year 2000.

  8. Materials, Turbomachinery and Heat Exchangers for Supercritical CO2 Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark; Nellis, Greg; Corradini, Michael

    2012-10-19

    The objective of this project is to produce the necessary data to evaluate the performance of the supercritical carbon dioxide cycle. The activities include a study of materials compatibility of various alloys at high temperatures, the heat transfer and pressure drop in compact heat exchanger units, and turbomachinery issues, primarily leakage rates through dynamic seals. This experimental work will serve as a test bed for model development and design calculations, and will help define further tests necessary to develop high-efficiency power conversion cycles for use on a variety of reactor designs, including the sodium fast reactor (SFR) and very high-temperature gas reactor (VHTR). The research will be broken into three separate tasks. The first task deals with the analysis of materials related to the high-temperature S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. The most taxing materials issues with regard to the cycle are associated with the high temperatures in the reactor side heat exchanger and in the high-temperature turbine. The system could experience pressures as high as 20MPa and temperatures as high as 650°C. The second task deals with optimization of the heat exchangers required by the S-CO{sub 2} cycle; the S-CO{sub 2} flow passages in these heat exchangers are required whether the cycle is coupled with a VHTR or an SFR. At least three heat exchangers will be required: the pre-cooler before compression, the recuperator, and the heat exchanger that interfaces with the reactor coolant. Each of these heat exchangers is unique and must be optimized separately. The most challenging heat exchanger is likely the pre-cooler, as there is only about a 40°C temperature change but it operates close to the CO{sub 2} critical point, therefore inducing substantial changes in properties. The proposed research will focus on this most challenging component. The third task examines seal leakage through various dynamic seal designs under the conditions expected in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle

  9. The organic sea-surface microlayer in the upwelling region off the coast of Peru and potential implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Anja; Galgani, Luisa

    2016-02-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) is at the uppermost surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Here, we report on organic matter components collected from an approximately 50 µm thick SML and from the underlying water (ULW), ˜ 20 cm below the SML, in December 2012 during the SOPRAN METEOR 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off the coast of Peru. Samples were collected at 37 stations including coastal upwelling sites and off-shore stations with less organic matter and were analyzed for total and dissolved high molecular weight (> 1 kDa) combined carbohydrates (TCCHO, DCCHO), free amino acids (FAA), total and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (THAA, DHAA), transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), Coomassie stainable particles (CSPs), total and dissolved organic carbon (TOC, DOC), total and dissolved nitrogen (TN, TDN), as well as bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our results showed a close coupling between organic matter concentrations in the water column and in the SML for almost all components except for FAA and DHAA that showed highest enrichment in the SML on average. Accumulation of gel particles (i.e., TEP and CSP) in the SML differed spatially. While CSP abundance in the SML was not related to wind speed, TEP abundance decreased with wind speed, leading to a depletion of TEP in the SML at about 5 m s-1. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  10. CO2 exchange in the Hudson Bay lowlands: Community characteristics and multispectral reflectance properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    Net ecosystem CO2 exchange was measured during the 1990 growing season (June to August) along a transect starting 10 km inland from James Bay and extending 100 km interior to Kinosheo Lake, Ontario. Sites were chosen in three distinct areas: a coastal fen, an interior fen, and a bog. For the most productive sites in the bog, net daily uptake rates reached a maximum of 2.5 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d with an area-weighted exchange of 0.3 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d near midsummer. This site was estimated to be a net carbon source of 9 g C-CO2 m(exp -2) to the atmosphere over a 153-day growing season. The interior fen was less productive on a daily basis with a net maximum uptake of 0.5 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d and with corresponding area-weighted uptake of 0.1 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d during midsummer. Early and late season release of carbon to the atmosphere resulted in a net loss of 21 g C-CO2 m(exp -2) over the growing season from this site. The coastal fen was the most productive site with uptake rates peaking near 1.7 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d which corresponded to an area-weighted uptake of 0.8 g C-CO2 m(exp -2)/d during midsummer and an estimated net uptake of 6 g C-CO2 m(exp -2) for the growing season. Associated with net CO2 exchange measurements, multispectral reflectance properties of the sites were measured over the growing season using portable radiometers. These properties were related to exchange rates with the goal of examining the potential for satellite remote sensing to monitor biosphere/atmosphere CO2 exchange in this biome. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) computed from surface reflectance was correlated with net CO2 exchange for all sites with the exception of areas with large proportions of Sphagnum moss cover. These mosses have greater near-infrared reflectance than typical surrounding vegetation and may require special adjustment for regional exchange/remote sensing applications.

  11. Continuous measurements of net CO2 exchange by vegetation and soils in a suburban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Emily B.; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2012-09-01

    In a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, we simultaneously measured net CO2 exchange of trees using sap flow and leaf gas exchange measurements, net CO2exchange of a turfgrass lawn using eddy covariance from a portable tower, and total surface-atmosphere CO2 fluxes (FC) using an eddy covariance system on a tall tower. Two years of continuous measurements showed that net CO2exchange varied among vegetation types, with the largest growing-season (Apr-Nov) net CO2 uptake on a per cover area basis from evergreen needleleaf trees (-603 g C m-2), followed by deciduous broadleaf trees (-216 g C m-2), irrigated turfgrass (-211 g C m-2), and non-irrigated turfgrass (-115 g C m-2). Vegetation types showed seasonal patterns of CO2exchange similar to those observed in natural ecosystems. Scaled-up net CO2 exchange from vegetation and soils (FC(VegSoil)) agreed closely with landscape FC measurements from the tall tower at times when fossil fuel emissions were at a minimum. Although FC(VegSoil) did not offset fossil fuel emissions on an annual basis, the temporal pattern of FC(VegSoil) did significantly alter the seasonality of FC. Total growing season FC(VegSoil)in recreational land-use areas averaged -165 g C m-2 and was dominated by turfgrass CO2 exchange (representing 77% of the total), whereas FC(VegSoil) in residential areas averaged -124 g C m-2 and was dominated by trees (representing 78% of the total). Our results suggest urban vegetation types can capture much of the variability required to predict seasonal patterns and differences in FC(VegSoil) that could result from changes in land use or vegetation composition in temperate cities.

  12. The Effects of Elevated CO2 on Soil Respiration, Cation Exchange, and Mineral Dissolution (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, N.; Richter, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    A key weathering agent of the Earth’s crust is soil CO2, produced mainly by plant roots and soil heterotrophs, a water-soluble gas that forms carbonic acid which reacts with soil minerals via cation exchange and mineral dissolution reactions. The elevated atmospheric CO2 can enhance both cation exchange and mineral dissolution reactions through increased plant production and subsequent increase in soil CO2 concentrations. Using laboratory column leaching experiments and field observations of soil water chemistry at the Duke FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment located in a warm temperate climate in North Carolina, USA, we examined the link among elevated atmospheric CO2, soil CO2 concentration, and weathering products in soil water. Results demonstrate that carbonic acid can readily displace exchangeable base cations in soils, altering soil-water chemistry and nutrient availability and also indicating that soil acidification can be enhanced under high CO2 world. The rate and extent at which soil acidification is being promoted by rising CO2 are important research issues for biogeochemistry.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.F. |

    1995-02-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model's main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  15. Air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea, the Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Ci, Zhijia; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei

    2016-06-01

    The air-sea exchange of gaseous mercury (mainly Hg(0)) in the tropical ocean is an important part of the global Hg biogeochemical cycle, but the related investigations are limited. In this study, we simultaneously measured Hg(0) concentrations in surface waters and overlaying air in the tropical coast (Luhuitou fringing reef) of the South China Sea (SCS), Hainan Island, China, for 13 days on January-February 2015. The purpose of this study was to explore the temporal variation of Hg(0) concentrations in air and surface waters, estimate the air-sea Hg(0) flux, and reveal their influencing factors in the tropical coastal environment. The mean concentrations (±SD) of Hg(0) in air and total Hg (THg) in waters were 2.34 ± 0.26 ng m(-3) and 1.40 ± 0.48 ng L(-1), respectively. Both Hg(0) concentrations in waters (53.7 ± 18.8 pg L(-1)) and Hg(0)/THg ratios (3.8 %) in this study were significantly higher than those of the open water of the SCS in winter. Hg(0) in waters usually exhibited a clear diurnal variation with increased concentrations in daytime and decreased concentrations in nighttime, especially in cloudless days with low wind speed. Linear regression analysis suggested that Hg(0) concentrations in waters were positively and significantly correlated to the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (R (2) = 0.42, p < 0.001). Surface waters were always supersaturated with Hg(0) compared to air (the degree of saturation, 2.46 to 13.87), indicating that the surface water was one of the atmospheric Hg(0) sources. The air-sea Hg(0) fluxes were estimated to be 1.73 ± 1.25 ng m(-2) h(-1) with a large range between 0.01 and 6.06 ng m(-2) h(-1). The high variation of Hg(0) fluxes was mainly attributed to the greatly temporal variation of wind speed.

  16. Effects of Freshwater Inflow on CO2 Exchange in a Coastal Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinsch, F.; Heilman, J. L.; McInnes, K. J.

    2001-05-01

    The freshwater supply to the Nueces River Delta near Corpus Christi, Texas, and its marshes is limited by extensive channelization of the Nueces River. As a result, marsh salinity is high, productivity is low, and the area frequently dries out during the summer. Diversion channels have been constructed between the Nueces River and its former delta to allow floodwaters to move into the delta, increasing both freshwater and nutrient inputs. Studies are being conducted to determine how daily and seasonal changes in CO2 exchange are affected by the availability of water. A tower-based conditional sampling system is being used to provide long-term measurements of the CO2 exchange of a salt marsh in the upper Nueces Delta. Measurements reveal that freshwater inflow increases the CO2 exchange rate (CER) by increasing CO2 assimilation and decreasing CO2 efflux. Rainfall and flooding of the Nueces River temporarily increase the productivity of the system by supplying nutrients and freshwater. The salt marsh ecosystem is a CO2 sink when freshwater is available and a CO2 source when water is limiting.

  17. Enhanced Seasonal Exchange of CO2 by Northern Ecosystems - Observations and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Keeling, R. F.; Piper, S. C.; Patra, P. K.; Stephens, B. B.; Wofsy, S. C.; Welp, L. R.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.; Kelley, J. J.; Daube, B. C.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G.; Bent, J. D.; Thomas, R.; Prentice, I. C.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term measurements of atmospheric CO2 have revealed increasing amplitude in seasonal variations at Northern Hemisphere sites. In a recent paper1, we extended the analysis of seasonal CO2 amplitude using aircraft data from 1958-61 and 2009-11 and found large increases of 50% in the mid-troposphere north of 45°N. Changes in amplitude south of 45°N were less than 25%. The observations indicate that seasonal CO2 exchanges with northern terrestrial ecosystems must have increased by 30-60% over the past 50 years. The increased exchange is likely widespread over northern ecosystems but it must be focused in boreal forests to match the observed spatial pattern in the aircraft data. Small decreases in seasonal CO2 exchange of subtropical and tropical regions may also contribute to CO2 amplitude changes. The required increases in seasonal CO2 exchange in northern ecosystems are larger than simulated by terrestrial models, indicating the models do not capture substantial ecological changes occurring since 1960. This presentation will give an overview of the recent paper1, highlighting the atmospheric evidence for a dominant influence from boreal forests and from the main growing season months. It will also expand on the investigation of modeled changes in seasonal CO2 flux using CMIP5 and other model intercomparisons, including the modeled influences of carbon vs climate drivers. 1. Graven et al. 2013, Enhanced Seasonal Exchange of CO2 by Northern Ecosystems Since 1960, Science, 341, 6150, 1085-1089. DOI: 10.1126/science.1239207

  18. Air-water CO2 exchange in five hypereutrophic lakes in Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Ghosh, P.; Bala, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2014-12-01

    Inland water bodies play a significant role in terrestrial carbon cycling, rather than being just conduits for the transport of terrestrial carbon to the oceans. Recent syntheses estimate that freshwaters emit substantial amounts of CO2 (1.4 Pg C yr-1) (Tranvik et al. 2009) and CH4 (0.65 Pg C yr-1) (Bastviken et al. 2011), which are similar in magnitude to the global terrestrial carbon sink (2.5 ± 1.7 Pg C yr-1) (IPCC 2013). However, eutrophic waters, which constitute the majority of the global freshwater supply (ILEC/UNEP 1994, Liu et al. 2012, Carpenter et al. 1998), are vastly underrepresented in these estimates. These waters, due to high primary productivity leading to CO2 undersaturation, can act as sinks rather than sources of CO2, thus reversing the role of lakes in the carbon cycle (Balmer and Downing 2011, Pacheco et al. 2013). We are investigating the air-water CO2 exchange of five hypereutrophic lakes in urban Bangalore using a novel Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR)-based CO2 sensor installed in flux chambers that can be used to measure CO2 exchange in lakes in situ. This work is a part of a larger study called Bangalore Carbon Mapping Study that aims to track the spatial flows of carbon in an urban area of a developing country. Preliminary observations reveal that these lakes absorb CO2 during the photosynthetic hours, at an average rate of 3.4 mg C m-2 h-1. The ongoing study will characterize the complete diurnal cycle of CO2 exchange, its variation over different seasons, and its relationships with various limnological and catchment characteristics. The flux estimates thus produced will also be compared with those predicted by the current models for air-water gas exchange based on wind speed.

  19. A new approach to quantifying internal diffusion resistances and CO2 isotope exchange in leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jason; Ogée, Jérôme; Burlett, Régis; Gimeno, Teresa; Genty, Bernard; Jones, Samuel; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of atmospheric CO2 can constrain the global CO2 budget at a range of scales, offering the potential to partition net CO2 exchanges into their component gross fluxes and provide insights to linkages between C and water cycles. However, there are significant limitations to utilizing the δ18O of CO2 to constrain C budgets because of uncertainties associated with the isotopic exchange of CO2 with terrestrial water pools. Leaf water in particular represents a critical pool with ongoing debates about its enrichment in heavy isotopes during transpiration and the hydration of CO2 and its oxygen isotope exchange with this pool. Isotopic heterogeneity of the leaf water, the spatial distribution and activity of carbonic anhydrase (CA) within leaves, and resistance to diffusion of CO2 from the substomatal cavity to chloroplasts are all key components with important uncertainties. Better constraints on these would significantly improve our ability to understand and model the global C budget as well as yield insights to fundamental aspects of leaf physiology. We report results using a new measurement system that permits the simultaneous measurement of the 13C and 18O composition of CO2 and the 18O isotopic composition of leaf transpiration. As this new approach permits rapid alteration of the isotopic composition of gases interacting with the leaf, key model parameters can be derived directly and simultaneously. Hence, our approach dos not rely on separate measurements shifted in time from the gas exchange measurements or that may not quantify the relevant scale of heterogeneity (e.g., CA enzyme assays or bulk leaf water extraction and analysis). In particular, this new method explicitly distinguishes the leaf mesophyll resistance to CO2 transport relevant for photosynthesis from the resistance required for interpreting the δ18O of CO2 and allows us to derive other relevant parameters directly. This new measurement system and modeling

  20. Exfoliation Propensity of Oxide Scale in Heat Exchangers Used for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Shingledecker, John P.; Kung, Steve; Wright, Ian G.; Nash, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical CO2 (sCO2) Brayton cycle systems offer the possibility of improved efficiency in future fossil energy power generation plants operating at temperatures of 650 C and above. As there are few data on the oxidation/corrosion behavior of structural alloys in sCO2 at these temperatures, modeling to predict the propensity for oxide exfoliation is not well developed, thus hindering materials selection for these novel cycles. The ultimate goal of this effort is to provide needed data on scale exfoliation behavior in sCO2 for confident alloy selection. To date, a model developed by ORNL and EPRI for the exfoliation of oxide scales formed on boiler tubes in high-temperature, high-pressure steam has proven useful for managing exfoliation in conventional steam plants. A major input provided by the model is the ability to predict the likelihood of scale failure and loss based on understanding of the evolution of the oxide morphologies and the conditions that result in susceptibility to exfoliation. This paper describes initial steps taken to extend the existing model for exfoliation of steam-side oxide scales to sCO2 conditions. The main differences between high-temperature, high-pressure steam and sCO2 that impact the model involve (i) significant geometrical differences in the heat exchangers, ranging from standard pressurized tubes seen typically in steam-producing boilers to designs for sCO2 that employ variously-curved thin walls to create shaped flow paths for extended heat transfer area and small channel cross-sections to promote thermal convection and support pressure loads; (ii) changed operating characteristics with sCO2 due to the differences in physical and thermal properties compared to steam; and (iii) possible modification of the scale morphologies, hence properties that influence exfoliation behavior, due to reaction with carbon species from sCO2. The numerical simulations conducted were based on an assumed sCO2 operating schedule and several

  1. Seasonal change in CO2 and H2O exchange between grassland and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, N.; Liu, S.; Oikawa, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1996-03-01

    The seasonal change in CO2 flux over an artificial grassland was analyzed from the ecological and meteorological point of view. This grassland contains C3 and C4 plants; the three dominant species belonging to the Gramineae; Festuca elatior (C3) dominated in early spring, and Imperata cylindrica (C4) and Andropogon virginicus (C4) grew during early summer and became dominant in mid-summer. CO2 flux was measured by the gradient method, and the routinely observed data for the surface-heat budget were used to analyze the CO2 and H2O exchange between the grassland and atmosphere. From August to October in 1993, CO2 flux was reduced to around half under the same solar-radiation conditions, while H2O flux decreased 20% during the same period. The monthly values of water use efficiency, i.e., ratio of CO2 flux to H2O flux decreased from 5.8 to 3.3 mg CO2/g H2O from August to October, the Bowen ratio increased from 0.20 to 0.30, and the ratio of the bulk latent heat transfer coefficient CE to the sensible heat transfer coefficient CH was maintained around 0.40-0.50. The increase in the Bowen ratio was explained by the decrease in air temperature from 22.3 °C in August to 16.6 °C in October without considering biological effects such as stomatal closure on the individual leaves. The nearly constant CE/CH ratios suggested that the contribution ratio of canopy resistance to aerodynamic resistance did not change markedly, although the meteorological conditions changed seasonally. The decrease in the water use efficiency, however, suggested that the photosynthetic rate decreased for individual leaves from August to October under the same radiation conditions. Diurnal variations of CO2 exchange were simulated by the multi-layer canopy model taking into account the differences in the stomatal conductance and photosynthetic pathway between C3 and C4 plants. The results suggested that C4 plants played a major role in the CO2 exchange in August, the contribution of C4 plants

  2. Relationships between carbonyl sulfide (COS) and CO2 during leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Stimler, Keren; Montzka, Stephen A; Berry, Joseph A; Rudich, Yinon; Yakir, Dan

    2010-06-01

    *Carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange in C(3) leaves is linked to that of CO(2), providing a basis for the use of COS as a powerful tracer of gross CO(2) fluxes between plants and the atmosphere, a critical element in understanding the response of the land biosphere to global change. *Here, we carried out controlled leaf-scale gas-exchange measurements of COS and CO(2) in representative C(3) plants under a range of light intensities, relative humidities and temperatures, CO(2) and COS concentrations, and following abscisic acid treatments. *No 'respiration-like' emission of COS or detectable compensation point, and no cross-inhibition effects between COS and CO(2) were observed. The mean ratio of COS to CO(2) assimilation flux rates, A(s)/A(c), was c. 1.4 pmol micromol(-1) and the leaf relative uptake (assimilation normalized to ambient concentrations, (A(s)/A(c))(C(a)(c)/C(a)(s))) was 1.6-1.7 across species and conditions, with significant deviations under certain conditions. Stomatal conductance was enhanced by increasing COS, which was possibly mediated by hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) produced from COS hydrolysis, and a correlation was observed between A(s) and leaf discrimination against C(18)OO. *The results provide systematic and quantitative information necessary for the use of COS in photosynthesis and carbon-cycle research on the physiological to global scales.

  3. Kinetics of CO2 exchange with carbonic anhydrase immobilized on fiber membranes in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Arazawa, D T; Kimmel, J D; Federspiel, W J

    2015-06-01

    Artificial lung devices comprised of hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) coated with the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), accelerate removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from blood for the treatment of acute respiratory failure. While previous work demonstrated CA coatings increase HFM CO2 removal by 115 % in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), testing in blood revealed a 36 % increase compared to unmodified HFMs. In this work, we sought to characterize the CO2 mass transport processes within these biocatalytic devices which impede CA coating efficacy and develop approaches towards improving bioactive HFM efficiency. Aminated HFMs were sequentially reacted with glutaraldehyde (GA), chitosan, GA and afterwards incubated with a CA solution, covalently linking CA to the surface. Bioactive CA-HFMs were potted in model gas exchange devices (0.0119 m(2)) and tested for esterase activity and CO2 removal under various flow rates with PBS, whole blood, and solutions containing individual blood components (plasma albumin, red blood cells or free carbonic anhydrase). Results demonstrated that increasing the immobilized enzyme activity did not significantly impact CO2 removal rate, as the diffusional resistance from the liquid boundary layer is the primary impediment to CO2 transport by both unmodified and bioactive HFMs under clinically relevant conditions. Furthermore, endogenous CA within red blood cells competes with HFM immobilized CA to increase CO2 removal. Based on our findings, we propose a bicarbonate/CO2 disequilibrium hypothesis to describe performance of CA-modified devices in both buffer and blood. Improvement in CO2 removal rates using CA-modified devices in blood may be realized by maximizing bicarbonate/CO2 disequilibrium at the fiber surface via strategies such as blood acidification and active mixing within the device.

  4. Compensatory responses of CO2 exchange and biomass allocation and their effects on the relative growth rate of ponderosa pine in different CO2 and temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Callaway, R M; DeLucia, E H; Thomas, E M; Schlesinger, W H

    1994-07-01

    Increases in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide may have a fertilizing effect on plant growth by increasing photosynthetic rates and therefore may offset potential growth decreases caused by the stress associated with higher temperatures and lower precipitation. However, plant growth is determined both by rates of net photosynthesis and by proportional allocation of fixed carbon to autotrophic tissue and heterotrophic tissue. Although CO2 fertilization may enhance growth by increasing leaf-level assimilation rates, reallocation of biomass from leaves to stems and roots in response to higher concentrations of CO2 and higher temperatures may reduce whole-plant assimilation and offset photosynthetic gains. We measured growth parameters, photosynthesis, respiration, and biomass allocation of Pinus ponderosa seedlings grown for 2 months in 2×2 factorial treatments of 350 or 650μ bar CO2 and 10/25° C or 15/30° C night/day temperatures. After 1 month in treatment conditions, total seedling biomass was higher in elevated CO2, and temperature significantly enhanced the positive CO2 effect. However, after 2 months the effect of CO2 on total biomass decreased and relative growth rates did not differ among CO2 and temperature treatments over the 2-month growth period even though photosynthetic rates increased ≈7% in high CO2 treatments and decreased ≈10% in high temperature treatments. Additionally, CO2 enhancement decreased root respiration and high temperatures increased shoot respiration. Based on CO2 exchange rates, CO2 fertilization should have increased relative growth rates (RGR) and high temperatures should have decreased RGR. Higher photosynthetic rates caused by CO2 fertilization appear to have been mitigated during the second month of exposure to treatment conditions by a ≈3% decrease in allocation of biomass to leaves and a ≈9% increase in root:shoot ratio. It was not clear why diminished photosynthetic rates and increased respiration rates

  5. Soil and Atmospheric CO2 Exchanges in Great Basin Plant Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipps, L. E.; Ivanovich, S.; Or, D.; Turcu, V.

    2001-12-01

    Seasonal changes in net CO2 exchange for three plant communities typical of the cold desert Great Basin biome, and primary factors governing CO2 exchange are studied. The communities include Agropyron desertorum (crested wheatgrass), Artemisia tridentata (sagebrush) and Juniperus osteosperma (Utah Juniper). Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was estimated for each site with open-path eddy covariance systems. Soil CO2 fluxes were independently estimated at local scales using both surface chambers and a new gradient method based upon continuous and passive monitoring of CO2 concentrations at various soil depths. Eddy covariance-determined NEE values were directed towards the soil surface in the early spring when water was available. As the ecosystems became drier, periods of downward flux became shorter, until fluxes were always upward in the crested wheatgrass and sage communities. The Juniper maintained some downward fluxes much longer into the summer, indicating net photosynthesis was sometimes greater than soil respiration. All sites responded rapidly to even small rain events, by exhibiting temporary downward NEE values. Estimates of soil CO2 fluxes by surface chamber and gradient methods were in good agreement with each other, however, these were often inconsistent with the larger scale eddy covariance estimates, even in the absence of active vegetation. The causes of these apparent discrepancies are being investigated.

  6. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a primary tropical peat swamp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang Che Ing, A.; Stoy, P. C.; Melling, L.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests are widely recognized as one of the world's most efficient ecosystems for the sequestration and storage of carbon through both their aboveground biomass and underlying thick deposits of peat. As the peat characteristics exhibit high spatial and temporal variability as well as the structural and functional complexity of forests, tropical peat ecosystems can act naturally as both carbon sinks and sources over their life cycles. Nonetheless, few reports of studies on the ecosystem-scale CO2 exchange of tropical peat swamp forests are available to-date and their present roles in the global carbon cycle remain uncertain. To quantify CO2 exchange and unravel the prevailing factors and potential underlying mechanism regulating net CO2 fluxes, an eddy covariance tower was erected in a tropical peat swamp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia. We observed that the diurnal and seasonal patterns of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE)) varied between seasons and years. Rates of NEE declined in the wet season relative to the dry season. Conversely, both the gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE) were found to be higher during the wet season than the dry season, in which GPP was strongly negatively correlated with NEE. The average annual NEE was 385 ± 74 g C m-2 yr-1, indicating the primary peat swamp forest functioned as net source of CO2 to the atmosphere over the observation period.

  7. Air and seawater pollution and air-sea gas exchange of persistent toxic substances in the Aegean Sea: spatial trends of PAHs, PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Gerhard; Audy, Ondřej; Besis, Athanasios; Efstathiou, Christos; Eleftheriadis, Kostas; Kohoutek, Jiři; Kukučka, Petr; Mulder, Marie D; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Rusina, Tatsiana P; Samara, Constantini; Sofuoglu, Aysun; Sofuoglu, Sait C; Taşdemir, Yücel; Vassilatou, Vassiliki; Voutsa, Dimitra; Vrana, Branislav

    2015-08-01

    Near-ground air (26 substances) and surface seawater (55 substances) concentrations of persistent toxic substances (PTS) were determined in July 2012 in a coordinated and coherent way around the Aegean Sea based on passive air (10 sites in 5 areas) and water (4 sites in 2 areas) sampling. The direction of air-sea exchange was determined for 18 PTS. Identical samplers were deployed at all sites and were analysed at one laboratory. hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its degradation products are evenly distributed in the air of the whole region. Air concentrations of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and o,p'-DDT and seawater concentrations of p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were elevated in Thermaikos Gulf, northwestern Aegean Sea. The polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener pattern in air is identical throughout the region, while polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE)patterns are obviously dissimilar between Greece and Turkey. Various pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, DDE, and penta- and hexachlorobenzene are found close to phase equilibrium or net-volatilisational (upward flux), similarly at a remote site (on Crete) and in the more polluted Thermaikos Gulf. The results suggest that effective passive air sampling volumes may not be representative across sites when PAHs significantly partitioning to the particulate phase are included.

  8. Air-sea exchange of dimethylsulfide in the Southern Ocean: Measurements from SO GasEx compared to temperate and tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Archer, S. D.; Huebert, B. J.

    2011-04-01

    In the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx), we measured an atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentration of 118 ± 54 pptv (1σ), a DMS sea-to-air flux of 2.9 ± 2.1 μmol m-2 d-1 by eddy covariance, and a seawater DMS concentration of 1.6 ± 0.7 nM. Dividing flux by the concurrent air-sea concentration difference yields the transfer velocity of DMS (kDMS). The kDMS in the Southern Ocean was significantly lower than previous measurements in the equatorial east Pacific, Sargasso Sea, northeast Atlantic, and southeast Pacific. Normalizing kDMS for the temperature dependence in waterside diffusivity and solubility results in better agreement among various field studies and suggests that the low kDMS in the Southern Ocean is primarily due to colder temperatures. The higher solubility of DMS at a lower temperature results in greater airside control and less transfer of the gas by bubbles formed from breaking waves. The final normalized DMS transfer velocity is similar to k of less soluble gases such as carbon dioxide in low-to-moderate winds; in high winds, DMS transfer velocity is significantly lower because of the reduced bubble-mediated transfer.

  9. Recent advances in developing COS as a tracer of Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, D.; Stimler, K.; Yakir, D.

    2012-04-01

    Potential use of COS as tracer of CO2 flux into vegetation, based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux, stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions. Atmospheric measurements by NOAA in recent years, across a global latitudinal transect, indicated a ratio of the seasonal drawdowns in COS and CO2 (normalized to their respective ambient concentrations) of about 6. We carried out leaf-scale gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species of deciduous, evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations (using mid IR laser spectroscopy). A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS and CO2 (termed leaf relative uptake; LRU) was observed with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes, except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited. A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. We also report first eddy flux measurements of COS/CO2 at the ecosystem scales. Preliminarily results indicate a ratio of the COS flux, Fcos, to net ecosystem CO2 exchange, NEE, of 3-5 (termed ecosystem relative uptake; ERU). Combining measurements of COS and CO2 and the new information on their ratios at different scales should permit the direct estimation of gross CO2 uptake, GPP, by land ecosystems according to: GPP=NEE*ERU/LRU. In addition, we show that COS effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) stimulate stomatal conductance. It seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the leaves from COS.

  10. CO2 and O2 Exchanges in the CAM Plant Ananas comosus (L.) Merr

    PubMed Central

    Cote, François Xavier; Andre, Marcel; Folliot, Michel; Massimino, Daniel; Daguenet, Alain

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthesis and light O2-uptake of the aerial portion of the CAM plant Ananas comosus (L.) merr. were studied by CO2 and O2 gas exchange measurements. The amount of CO2 which was fixed during a complete day-night cycle was equal to the amount of total net O2 evolved. This finding justifies the assumption that in each time interval of the light period, the difference between the rates of net O2-evolution and of net light atmospheric CO2-uptake give the rates of malate-decarboxylation-dependent CO2 assimilation. Based upon this hypothesis, the following photosynthetic characteristics were observed: (a) From the onset of the light to midphase IV of CAM, the photosynthetic quotient (net O2 evolved/net CO2 fixed) was higher than 1. This indicates that malate-decarboxylation supplied CO2 for the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle during this period. (b) In phase III and early phase IV, the rate of CO2 assimilation deduced from net O2-evolution was 3 times higher than the maximum rate of atmospheric CO2-fixation during phase IV. A conceivable explanation for this stimulation of photosynthesis is that the intracellular CO2-concentration was high because of malate decarboxylation. (c) During the final hours of the light period, the photosynthetic quotient decreased below 1. This may be the result of CO2-fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxylase activity and malate accumulation. Based upon this hypothesis, the gas exchange data indicates that at least 50% of the CO2 fixed during the last hour of the light period was stored as malate. Light O2-uptake determined with 18O2 showed two remarkable characteristics: from the onset of the light until midphase IV the rate of O2-uptake increased progressively; during the following part of the light period, the rate of O2-uptake was 3.5 times higher than the maximum rate of CO2-uptake. When malate decarboxylation was reduced or suppressed after a night in a CO2-free atmosphere or in continuous illumination, the rate of O2-uptake

  11. Drivers of long-term variability in CO2 net ecosystem exchange in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, C.; Campbell, C.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Drewer, J.; Coyle, M.; Anderson, M.; Skiba, U.; Nemitz, E.; Billett, M. F.; Sutton, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variability, which subsequently affects the carbon (C) sink strength of catchments across multiple temporal scales. Long-term studies are needed to fully capture the natural variability and therefore identify the key hydrometeorological drivers in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. Since 2002, NEE has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance at Auchencorth Moss, a temperate lowland peatland in central Scotland. Hence this is one of the longest peatland NEE studies to date. For 11 years, the site was a consistent, yet variable, atmospheric CO2 sink ranging from -5.2 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -64.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing season. Mean winter air temperature explained 87% of the inter-annual variability in the sink strength of the following summer, indicating an effect of winter climate on local phenology. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) was enhanced by drought, which also depressed gross primary productivity (GPP). The CO2 uptake rate during the growing season was comparable to three other sites with long-term NEE records; however, the emission rate during the dormant season was significantly higher. To summarise, the NEE of the peatland studied is modulated by two dominant factors: - phenology of the plant community, which is driven by winter air temperature and impacts photosynthetic potential and net CO2 uptake during the growing season (colder winters are linked to lower summer NEE), - water table level, which enhanced soil respiration and decreased GPP during dry spells. Although summer dry spells were sporadic during the study period, the positive effects of the current climatic trend towards milder winters on the site's CO2 sink strength could be offset by changes in precipitation patterns especially during the growing season.

  12. CO2 AND O3 ALTER PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND WATER VAPOR EXCHANGE FOR PINUS PONDEROSA NEEDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Effects of CO2 and O3 were determined for a key component of ecosystem carbon and water cycling: needle gas exchange (photosynthesis, conductance, transpiration and water use efficiency). The measurements were made on Pinus ponderosa seedlings grown in outdoor, sunlit, mesoc...

  13. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in a temperate loblolly pine forest grown under ambient and elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. L.; Zhou, Y.; Russo, R. S.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.; Varner, R. K.; Sive, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation, soil and ecosystem level carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange was observed at Duke Forest, a temperate loblolly pine forest, grown under ambient (Ring 1, R1) and elevated (Ring 2, R2) CO2. During calm meteorological conditions, ambient COS mixing ratios at the top of the forest canopy followed a distinct diurnal pattern in both CO2 growth regimes, with maximum COS mixing ratios during the day (R1=380±4 pptv and R2=373±3 pptv, daytime mean ± standard error) and minimums at night (R1=340±6 pptv and R2=346±5 pptv, nighttime mean ± standard error) reflecting a significant nighttime sink. Nocturnal vegetative uptake (-11 to -21 pmol m-2s-1, negative values indicate uptake from the atmosphere) dominated nighttime net ecosystem COS flux estimates (-10 to -30 pmol m-2s-1) in both CO2 regimes. In comparison, soil uptake (-0.8 to -1.7 pmol m-2 s-1) was a minor component of net ecosystem COS flux. In both CO2 regimes, loblolly pine trees exhibited substantial COS consumption overnight (50% of daytime rates) that was independent of CO2 assimilation. This suggests current estimates of the global vegetative COS sink, which assume that COS and CO2 are consumed simultaneously, may need to be reevaluated. Ambient COS mixing ratios, species specific diurnal patterns of stomatal conductance, temperature and canopy position were the major factors influencing the vegetative COS flux at the branch level. While variability in branch level vegetative COS consumption measurements in ambient and enhanced CO2 environments could not be attributed to CO2 enrichment effects, estimates of net ecosystem COS flux based on ambient canopy mixing ratio measurements suggest less nighttime uptake of COS in R2, the CO2 enriched environment.

  14. Carbonyl sulfide exchange in a temperate loblolly pine forest grown under ambient and elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. L.; Zhou, Y.; Russo, R. S.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.; Varner, R. K.; Sive, B. C.

    2009-08-01

    Vegetation, soil and ecosystem level carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange was observed at Duke Forest, a temperate loblolly pine forest, grown under ambient (Ring 1, R1) and elevated (Ring 2, R2) carbon dioxide (CO2). During calm meteorological conditions, ambient COS mixing ratios at the top of the forest canopy followed a distinct diurnal pattern in both CO2 growth regimes, with maximum COS mixing ratios during the day (R1=380±4 pptv and R2=373±3 pptv, daytime mean ±standard error) and minimums at night (R1=340±6 pptv and R2=346±5 pptv, nighttime mean ±standard error) reflecting a significant nighttime sink. Nocturnal vegetative uptake (-11 to -21 pmol m-2 s-1, negative values indicate uptake from the atmosphere) dominated nighttime net ecosystem COS flux estimates (-10 to -30 pmol m-2 s-1) in both CO2 regimes. In comparison, soil uptake (-0.8 to -1.7 pmol m-2 s-1) was a minor component of net ecosystem COS flux. In both CO2 regimes, loblolly pine trees exhibited substantial COS consumption overnight (50% of daytime rates) that was independent of CO2 assimilation. This suggests current estimates of the global vegetative COS sink, which assume that COS and CO2 are consumed simultaneously, may need to be reevaluated. Ambient COS mixing ratios, species specific diurnal patterns of stomatal conductance, temperature and canopy position were the major factors influencing the vegetative COS flux at the branch level. While variability in branch level vegetative COS consumption measurements in ambient and enhanced CO2 environments could not be attributed to CO2 enrichment effects, estimates of net ecosystem COS flux based on ambient canopy mixing ratio measurements suggest less nighttime uptake of COS in R2, the CO2 enriched environment.

  15. Parameterization of air sea gas fluxes at extreme wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Craig; D'Asaro, Eric

    2007-06-01

    Hurricane Frances data set. Although all the model parameters cannot be determined uniquely, some features are clear. The fluxes due to the surface equilibration terms, estimated both from data and from model inversions, increase rapidly at high wind speed but are still far below those predicted using the cubic parameterization of Wanninkhof and McGillis [Wannikhof, R. and McGillis, W.R., 1999. A cubic relationship between air-sea CO 2 exchange and wind speed. Geophysical Research Letters, 26:1889-1892.] at high wind speed. The fluxes due to gas injection terms increase with wind speed even more rapidly, causing bubble injection to dominate at the highest wind speeds.

  16. Rapid exchange between atmospheric CO2 and carbonate anion intercalated within magnesium rich layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pathik; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ohki, Shinobu; Tansho, Masataka; Shimizu, Tadashi; Eisaku, Nii; Sasai, Ryo; Labuta, Jan; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Hill, Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Iyi, Nobuo

    2014-10-22

    The carbon cycle, by which carbon atoms circulate between atmosphere, oceans, lithosphere, and the biosphere of Earth, is a current hot research topic. The carbon cycle occurring in the lithosphere (e.g., sedimentary carbonates) is based on weathering and metamorphic events so that its processes are considered to occur on the geological time scale (i.e., over millions of years). In contrast, we have recently reported that carbonate anions intercalated within a hydrotalcite (Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125·yH2O), a class of a layered double hydroxide (LDH), are dynamically exchanging on time scale of hours with atmospheric CO2 under ambient conditions. (Ishihara et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, 18040-18043). The use of (13)C-labeling enabled monitoring by infrared spectroscopy of the dynamic exchange between the initially intercalated (13)C-labeled carbonate anions and carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2. In this article, we report the significant influence of Mg/Al ratio of LDH on the carbonate anion exchange dynamics. Of three LDHs of various Mg/Al ratios of 2, 3, or 4, magnesium-rich LDH (i.e., Mg/Al ratio = 4) underwent extremely rapid exchange of carbonate anions, and most of the initially intercalated carbonate anions were replaced with carbonate anions derived from atmospheric CO2 within 30 min. Detailed investigations by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, adsorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and solid-state NMR revealed that magnesium rich LDH has chemical and structural features that promote the exchange of carbonate anions. Our results indicate that the unique interactions between LDH and CO2 can be optimized simply by varying the chemical composition of LDH, implying that LDH is a promising material for CO2 storage and/or separation.

  17. CO2 gas exchange and transpiration of Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. fil. in the central Namib desert.

    PubMed

    von Willert, D J; Eller, B M; Brinckmann, E; Baasch, R

    1982-10-01

    The diurnal course of CO2 gas exchange, (14)CO2 incorporation, malate and citrate content, and traspiration of Welwitschia mirabilis were measured in one of its natural habitats, the Welwitschia-Vlakte in the central Namib desert (Namibia), in order to decide which CO2 fixation pathway is used by this gymnosperm.The CO2 gas exchange of Welwitschia is that of a C3 plant under arid conditions. Younger leaf parts show a two-peaked pattern of photosynthetic CO2 uptake whereas in older parts the morning peak is followed by net CO2 release during the rest of the day. The maximum rates of net photosynthesis decrease from 3.4 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in 1-year-old parts to 1 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in 7-year-old parts. No net CO2 uptake was detected during the night. The diurnal CO2 balance indicates that the old leaf parts live at the expense of the younger ones. Irrigation of Welwitschia plants resulted in an increased CO2 uptake throughout the light period with maximum rate of 4.1 μmol m(-2) s(-1). (14)CO2 was only incorporated during the day.The water loss of Welwitschia by transpiration is considerable, reaching a peak value of 1.9 mmol m(-2) s(-1) around noon. Leaf conductance corresponds with the twopeaked pattern of CO2 uptake.Although there is no sign of a crassulacean acid metabolism in Welwitschia the leaf contains rather high amounts of malate (up to 200 μmol g(-1) dry matter) and citrate (up to 250 μmol g(-1) dry matter), which depend on leaf age but do not show any significant day-night oscillation.In spite of all this the δ(13)C values are in the range of-17.77 to-19.64‰. Possible reasons for such a high (13)C content in a C3 plant are discussed.

  18. Measuring air-sea gas-exchange velocities in a large-scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present gas-exchange measurements conducted in a large-scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.73 to 13.2 m s-1) conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas-exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of 3) was observed for the relatively insoluble N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant effect for CH3OH, the high solubility tracer, was significantly weaker.

  19. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  20. Characterization of atmosphere-water exchange processes of CO 2 in estuaries using dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Luque, E.; Forja, J. M.; Gómez-Parra, A.

    2005-12-01

    CO 2 is one of the so-called "greenhouse effect" gases; therefore, its rates of water-atmosphere exchange are very relevant for studies of climate change. Coastal zones (which include estuarine systems) are of special interest in relation to the global carbon cycle. Thus, an estuary simulator, which operates in a dynamic mixing regime, is specifically applied in an initial study of the estuarine dynamic of inorganic carbon, focusing basically on the influence of salinity and pH on the water-atmosphere fluxes of CO 2 in these zones. The simulation has been performed under two assumptions: (i) considering that the system is subjected to a stationary gradient of salinity and (ii) taking into account the effect of the tides, owing to the daily oscillations introduced by this phenomenon in the process of CO 2 transfer between the water and the atmosphere. After analysing the results, it has been observed that a potential source of error exists when choosing the coefficients of gas exchange ( k) for CO 2 studies. Nevertheless, the evolution of CO 2 fluxes along the salinity and pH gradients achieved shows the same trends with those observed in a wide variety of real estuaries described in the related literature.

  1. Sensitivity of mesquite shrubland CO2 exchange to precipitation in contrasting landscape settings.

    PubMed

    Potts, Daniel L; Scott, Russell L; Cable, Jessica M; Huxman, Travis E; Williams, David G

    2008-10-01

    In semiarid ecosystems, physiography (landscape setting) may interact with woody-plant and soil microbe communities to constrain seasonal exchanges of material and energy at the ecosystem scale. In an upland and riparian shrubland, we examined the seasonally dynamic linkage between ecosystem CO2 exchange, woody-plant water status and photosynthesis, and soil respiration responses to summer rainfall. At each site, we compared tower-based measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) with ecophysiological measurements among velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina Woot.) in three size classes and soil respiration in sub-canopy and inter-canopy micro-sites. Monsoonal rainfall influenced a greater shift in the magnitude of ecosystem CO2 assimilation in the upland shrubland than in the riparian shrubland. Mesquite water status and photosynthetic gas exchange were closely linked to the onset of the North American monsoon in the upland shrubland. In contrast, the presence of shallow alluvial groundwater in the riparian shrubland caused larger size classes of mesquite to be physiologically insensitive to monsoonal rains. In both shrublands, soil respiration was greatest beneath mesquite canopies and was coupled to shallow soil moisture abundance. Physiography, through its constraint on the physiological sensitivity of deeply rooted woody plants, may interact with plant-mediated rates of soil respiration to affect the sensitivity of semiarid-ecosystem carbon exchange in response to episodic rainfall.

  2. Influence of soil erosion on CO2 exchange within the CarboZALF manipulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of the time limited land cover and the vigorous crop growth. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore we established the interdisciplinary project 'CarboZALF' in 2009. In our field experiment CarboZALF-D we are monitoring CO2 fluxes for soil-plant systems, which cover all landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Albic Cutanic Luvisol, Calcic Cutanic Luvisol, Calcaric Regosol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Furthermore, we induced erosion / deposition in a manipulation experiment. Automated chamber systems (2.5 m, basal area 1 m2, transparent) are placed at the manipulated sites as well as at one site neither influenced by erosion, nor by deposition. CO2 flux modelling of high temporal resolution includes ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Modelling includes gap filling which is needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. In our presentation we would like to show results of the CO2 exchange measurements for one year. Differences are most pronounced between the non-eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco and NEE compared to the Albic Cutanic Luvisol. The eroded soil (Calcic Cutanic Luvisol) demonstrated CO2fluxes intermediate between the non-affected and depositional site. Site-specific consequences for the soil C stocks will be also discussed in the presentation.

  3. Perfusion and diffusion limitations in middle ear gas exchange: the exchange of CO2 as a test case.

    PubMed

    Marcusohn, Yael; Ar, Amos; Dirckx, Joris J J

    2010-06-14

    A long standing debate on perfusion/diffusion limitations in the context of middle ear (ME) gas exchange was revisited using data obtained from previous iso-pressure gas-exchange measurements in different mammals. We tried to determine whether the exchange of CO(2) in the ME is limited by perfusion or by diffusion by comparing the mass specific cardiac output (msQ) and the mass specific initial CO(2) flow rate into air-washed MEs (msV(i) CO(2)) of rabbits and rats. Based on previously published allometry at rest, the msQ was 0.154 mL/(min g) in rabbits (mean body weight: 2800 g) and 0.259 mL/(min g) in rats (mean body weight: 179.1 g); msV(i) CO(2) (Delta t=0) was 0.109+/-0.047 microL/(h g) in rabbits (n=16) and 0.170+/-0.094 microL/(h g) in rats (n=9). Similar ratios were found when an allometric comparison was made between the ratio of msV(i) CO(2) (Delta t=0) (approximately 0.64), and the ratio of msQs (approximately 0.59) in rabbits and rats. If the active mucosal surface areas of MEs of rabbits and rats are directly proportional to their masses as are the masses of their hearts and if their msQs are proportional to the rates of blood flows in the ME mucosa, these results support the assumption that the exchange of CO(2) in the ME of mammals is mainly perfusion (and not diffusion) dependent.

  4. CO2 adsorption properties of ion-exchanged zeolite Y prepared from natural clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeffal, Nadjiba; Benbouzid, Mohammed; Boukoussa, Bouhadjar; Sekkiou, Housseyn; Bengueddach, Abdelkader

    2017-03-01

    Ordered microporous Y zeolite was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal treatment using metakaolin and Ludox (40% SiO2) as an aluminum and silica source respectively. The metakaolin was obtained by thermal treatment of Algerian kaolin. The obtained Y zeolite was exchanged by different cations such as Cu2+, Ni2+, Ca2+, Na+ and used for the CO2 adsorption at 0 °C. The structural features of the materials were determined by various physico-chemical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption at 77 K, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy. The CO2 adsorption at 0 °C was carried using a volumetric method. The adsorption isotherms of CO2 exhibit nonlinear concave curves and showed a high adsorption capacity for CO2 from the M-Y zeolites. The equilibrium CO2 adsorption capacity increase in the following order of Cu2+  <  Ni2+  <  Ca2+  <  Na+. The experimental isotherm data of the CO2 adsorption was best described by the Langmuir model giving a maximum adsorbed amount q m  =  77.57 cm3 · g‑1 STP for Na-Y zeolite.

  5. Microbial, Physical and Chemical Drivers of COS and 18O-CO2 Exchange in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, L. K.; Boye, K.; Whelan, M.; Pang, E.; von Sperber, C.; Brueggemann, N.; Berry, J. A.; Welander, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and the oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of CO2 are potential tools for differentiating the contributions of photosynthesis and respiration to the balance of global carbon cycling. These processes are coupled at the leaf level via the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which hydrolyzes CO2 in the first biochemical step of the photosynthetic pathway (CO2 + H2O ⇌ HCO3- + H+) and correspondingly structural analogue COS (COS + H2O → CO2 + H2S). CA also accelerates the exchange of oxygen isotopes between CO2 and H2O leading to a distinct isotopic imprint [1]. The biogeochemical cycles of these tracers include significant, yet poorly characterized soil processes that challenge their utility for probing the carbon cycle. In soils, microbial CA also hydrolyze COS and accelerate O isotope exchange between CO2 and soil water. Soils have been observed to emit COS by undetermined processes. To account for these soil processes, measurements are needed to identify the key microbial, chemical, and physical factors. In this study, we survey COS and δ18O exchange in twenty different soils spanning a variety of biomes and soil properties. By comparing COS fluxes and δ18O-CO2 values emitted from moist soils we investigate whether the same types of CA catalyze these two processes. Additionally, we seek to identify the potential chemical drivers of COS emissions by measuring COS fluxes in dry soils. These data are compared with soil physical (bulk density, volumetric water content, texture), chemical (pH, elemental analysis, sulfate, sulfur K-edge XANES), and microbial measurements (biomass and phylogeny). Furthermore, we determine the abundance and diversity of CA-encoding genes to directly link CA with measured soil function. This work will define the best predictors for COS fluxes and δ18O-CO2 values from our suite of biogeochemical measurements. The suitability of identified predictor variables can be tested in follow-up studies and applied for modeling

  6. Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2004-01-01

    An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

  7. Ecosystem CO2 exchange during the snow-covered season in a boreal peatland, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats

    2014-05-01

    In high latitude areas, ecosystem CO2 emission in the snow-covered season (SCS) is a crucial part of annual carbon budget, which may account for 33-90% of the summer uptake. As snow pack development is sensitive to the warming climate, the change of CO2 flux in SCS is widely concerned, which, however, is still poorly understood. We used the 12-year CO2 exchange data (2001-2012) from an eddy covariance system in a minerogenic mire in Sweden, where the snow-covered season lasts for about 6 months in a year, to evaluate inter-annual change of CO2 flux in SCS and explore the underlying environmental controllers. Sum of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in SCS varied from 8.19 to 32.13 gC m-2 (CO2 release), which accounted for 11-41% of the net CO2 uptake during non-snow-covered period of each year. Over the studied years, the NEE during SCS performed a trend of decline (-1.58 gC m-2 year-1), which was attributed to the decreased daily NEE rather than the variation in the duration of SCS. However, we found no single environmental factor that was responsible for the trend. Over the whole SCS, snow depth did not show direct impact on the day-to-day variation of NEE but acted as an important role in insulating the environment below snow pack from the atmosphere. Daily NEE during the period with a deep snow cover (i.e. snow depth >30cm) was relatively lower and was not affected by air or soil temperature. In contrast, the period with a shallow snow cover (i.e. snow depth < 30cm), which was usually shorter, emitted more CO2 and the NEE was influenced by both air and soil temperatures as well as photosynthetically active radiation. At the end of SCS, snow melt usually lasted for about a month and during this period, NEE was jointly driven by air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Given a trend of CO2 emission decline in SCS over 2001-2012 and the influence of temperature on day-to-day NEE variation, our results suggest that winter time CO2 flux is an

  8. Gross primary production controls the subsequent winter CO2 exchange in a boreal peatland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junbin; Peichl, Matthias; Öquist, Mats; Nilsson, Mats B

    2016-12-01

    In high-latitude regions, carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions during the winter represent an important component of the annual ecosystem carbon budget; however, the mechanisms that control the winter CO2 emissions are currently not well understood. It has been suggested that substrate availability from soil labile carbon pools is a main driver of winter CO2 emissions. In ecosystems that are dominated by annual herbaceous plants, much of the biomass produced during the summer is likely to contribute to the soil labile carbon pool through litter fall and root senescence in the autumn. Thus, the summer carbon uptake in the ecosystem may have a significant influence on the subsequent winter CO2 emissions. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a plot-scale shading experiment in a boreal peatland to reduce the gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. At the growing season peak, vascular plant biomass in the shaded plots was half that in the control plots. During the subsequent winter, the mean CO2 emission rates were 21% lower in the shaded plots than in the control plots. In addition, long-term (2001-2012) eddy covariance data from the same site showed a strong correlation between the GPP (particularly the late summer and autumn GPP) and the subsequent winter net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). In contrast, abiotic factors during the winter could not explain the interannual variation in the cumulative winter NEE. Our study demonstrates the presence of a cross-seasonal link between the growing season biotic processes and winter CO2 emissions, which has important implications for predicting winter CO2 emission dynamics in response to future climate change.

  9. Precipitation regulates the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to environmental variation on U.S. rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For virtually all terrestrial ecosystems, the balance between photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CO2 loss to respiration varies among years in response to inter-annual variation in climate. Variability in CO2 exchange results from inter-annual differences in (1) climatic variables at ...

  10. Drivers of long-term variability in CO2 net ecosystem exchange in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, C.; Campbell, C.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Drewer, J.; Coyle, M.; Anderson, M.; Skiba, U.; Nemitz, E.; Billett, M. F.; Sutton, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variability, which subsequently affects the carbon sink strength of catchments across multiple temporal scales. Long-term studies are needed to fully capture the natural variability and therefore identify the key hydrometeorological drivers in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. NEE has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance at Auchencorth Moss, a temperate lowland peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Hence this is one of the longest peatland NEE studies to date. For 11 yr, the site was a consistent, yet variable, atmospheric CO2 sink ranging from -5.2 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -64.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing season. Mean winter air temperature explained 87% of the inter-annual variability in the sink strength of the following summer, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant productivity exhibited a marked hysteresis with respect to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over the growing season, indicative of two separate growth regimes. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary productivity (GPP) were closely correlated (ratio 0.74), suggesting that autotrophic processes were dominant. Whilst the site was wet most of the year (water table depth <5 cm) there were indications that heterotrophic respiration was enhanced by drought, which also depressed GPP. NEE was compared to 5 other peatland sites which have published long-term NEE records. The CO2 uptake rate during the growing season was comparable to 3 other European sites, however the emission rate during the dormant season was significantly higher.

  11. Atmosphere-biosphere exchange of CO2 and O3 in the Central Amazon Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Song-Miao; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bakwin, Peter S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy correlation measurement of O3 deposition and CO2 exchange at a level 10 m above the canopy of the Amazon forest, conducted as part of the NASA/INPE ABLE2b mission during the wet season of 1987, is presented. It was found that the ecosystem exchange of CO2 undergoes a well-defined diurnal variation driven by the input of solar radiation. A curvilinear relationship was found between solar irradiance and uptake of CO2, with net CO2 uptake at a given solar irradiance equal to rates observed over forests in other climate zones. The carbon balance of the system appeared sensitive to cloud cover on the time scale of the experiment, suggesting that global carbon storage might be affected by changes in insolation associated with tropical climate fluctuations. The forest was found to be an efficient sink for O3 during the day, and evidence indicates that the Amazon forests could be a significant sink for global ozone during the nine-month wet period and that deforestation could dramatically alter O3 budgets.

  12. Micrometeorological measurements of CH4 and CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Bakwin, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Anderson, S. M.; Kebabian, P. L.; Mcmanus, J. B.; Kolb, C. E.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation flux measurements and concentration profiles of total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO2 were combined to provide a comprehensive record of atmosphere-biosphere exchange for these gases over a 30-day period in July-August 1988 in the Yukon-Kuskokwin River Delta of Alaska. Over 90 percent of net ecosystem exchanges of THC were due to methane. Lakes and wet meadow tundra provided the major sources of methane. The average fluxes from lake, dry tundra, and wet tundra were 11 +/- 3, 29 +/- 3, and 57 +/- 6 mg CH4/sq m/d, respectively. The mean remission rate for the site was 25 mg/sq m/d. Maximum uptake of CO2 by the tundra was 1.4 gC/sq m/d between 1000 and 1500 hrs, and nocturnal respiration averaged 0.73 gC/sq m/d. Net uptake of CO2 was 0.30 gC/sq m/d for the 30 days of measurement; methane flux accounted for 6 percent of CO2 net uptake.

  13. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia.

  14. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  15. Nitrous oxide and methane in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters in the Strait of Gibraltar: Air-sea fluxes and inter-basin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, M.; Huertas, I. E.; Flecha, S.; Ríos, A. F.; Pérez, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    The global ocean plays an important role in the overall budget of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), as both gases are produced within the ocean and released to the atmosphere. However, for large parts of the open and coastal oceans there is little or no spatial data coverage for N2O and CH4. Hence, a better assessment of marine emissions estimates is necessary. As a contribution to remedying the scarcity of data on marine regions, N2O and CH4 concentrations have been determined in the Strait of Gibraltar at the ocean Fixed Time series (GIFT). During six cruises performed between July 2011 and November 2014 samples were collected at the surface and various depths in the water column, and subsequently measured using gas chromatography. From this we were able to quantify the temporal variability of the gas air-sea exchange in the area and examine the vertical distribution of N2O and CH4 in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters. Results show that surface Atlantic waters are nearly in equilibrium with the atmosphere whereas deeper Mediterranean waters are oversaturated in N2O, and a gradient that gradually increases with depth was detected in the water column. Temperature was found to be the main factor responsible for the seasonal variability of N2O in the surface layer. Furthermore, although CH4 levels did not reveal any feature clearly associated with the circulation of water masses, vertical distributions showed that higher concentrations are generally observed in the Atlantic layer, and that the deeper Mediterranean waters are considerably undersaturated (by up to 50%). Even though surface waters act as a source of atmospheric N2O during certain periods, on an annual basis the net N2O flux in the Strait of Gibraltar is only 0.35 ± 0.27 μmol m-2 d-1, meaning that these waters are almost in a neutral status with respect to the atmosphere. Seasonally, the region behaves as a slight sink for atmospheric CH4 in winter and as a source in spring and fall. Approximating

  16. Effect of ruminal CO2 on gas exchange and ventilation in the Hereford calf.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, W D; Dolezal, S R; Fedde, M R

    1985-05-01

    The contribution of ruminal CO2 to gas exchange measurements and ventilation was determined in four rumen-fistulated Hereford steers at rest and during exercise. The calves were exercised at 1.4 and 2.2m X s-1 under three treatments: 1)full rumen with fistula sealed, 2) full rumen with fistula open, and 3) empty rumen. Measurements also were made at rest while flushing the empty rumen with either 100% N2 or a mixture of 50% CO2-50% N2. O2 consumption, CO2 production (Mco2), and ventilation were measured by collecting the expired gas. Absorption across the ruminal epithelium during rest increased Mco2 by 3%, whereas absorption and eructation together increased Mco2 by 15%. The respiratory exchange ratio (R) was significantly different among the three treatments at rest, but no differences were observed in R among the treatments during exercise. No changes were observed in minute ventilation among the three conditions, but a decrease in respiratory frequency and an increase in tidal volume occurred when the rumen was empty. These changes in ventilatory pattern may have been due to a decrease in body temperature when the rumen was empty. When the empty rumen was flushed with 50% CO2, Mco2 was increased 21% over the value observed when flushing with 100% N2. CO2 of fermentation origin is added to the expired gas by both eructation and absorption and has a significant effect on R in the resting animal, but no effect on R during exercise.

  17. Investigating Liquid CO2 as a Coolant for a MTSA Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Padilla, Sebastian; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO 2) control for a future Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. CO 2 removal and rejection is accomplished by driving a sorbent through a temperature swing of approximately 210 K to 280 K . The sorbent is cooled to these sub-freezing temperatures by a Sublimating Heat Exchanger (SHX) with liquid coolant expanded to sublimation temperatures. Water is the baseline coolant available on the moon, and if used, provides a competitive solution to the current baseline PLSS schematic. Liquid CO2 (LCO2) is another non-cryogenic coolant readily available from Martian resources which can be produced and stored using relatively low power and minimal infrastructure. LCO 2 expands from high pressure liquid (5800 kPa) to Mars ambient (0.8 kPa) to produce a gas / solid mixture at temperatures as low as 156 K. Analysis and experimental work are presented to investigate factors that drive the design of a heat exchanger to effectively use this sink. Emphasis is given to enabling efficient use of the CO 2 cooling potential and mitigation of heat exchanger clogging due to solid formation. Minimizing mass and size as well as coolant delivery are also considered. The analysis and experimental work is specifically performed in an MTSA-like application to enable higher fidelity modeling for future optimization of a SHX design. In doing so, the work also demonstrates principles and concepts so that the design can be further optimized later in integrated applications (including Lunar application where water might be a choice of coolant).

  18. Responses of Bog Vegetation and CO2 Exchange to Experimental N and PK Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutinen, S.; Bubier, J. L.; Shrestha, P.; Smith, R.; Moore, T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to alter the structure and functioning of nutrient poor wetland ecosystems. It is important to quantify the effect of N input on ecosystem carbon (C) sequestration in these globally important C storages. We address this issue at the temperate Mer Bleue bog, ON, Canada. After 6 years of experimental fertilization, we saw that high N deposition can change mixed Sphagnum and dwarf shrub dominated communities to taller and denser dwarf shrub communities that are losing moss cover, and which might have even lower net C uptake. Now, after 8 years of fertilization and with new treatments we quantify the relationship between the plant community structure and ecosystem CO2 exchange. Three levels of N fertilization were applied with or without phosphorus and potassium (PK) into triplicate plots. We measured light saturated net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), and its components ecosystem respiration and gross photosynthesis using clear and dark chambers (May-August). Vegetation characteristics were quantified by measuring foliage cover (LAI), amount of woody and foliar biomass, and abundance of moss species (point interception technique), moss growth (cranked wires) and green area of vascular leaves and moss. Addition of PK fertilizer did not alter NEE or its components relative to the control. The 8-year low N addition alone and with PK, and the 4-year fertilization with high N levels resulted in the highest net ecosystem CO2 uptake relative to the control. The ecosystem respiration increased with increasing N input rate. All levels of N fertilization resulted in higher gross photosynthesis than the control, but there was no increasing trend with increasing N input. Vascular foliage increased, while moss cover drastically decreased with increasing levels of N fertilization. At the highest level of N (and PK) addition woody biomass increased at the expense of leaf increment. Dependencies of ecosystem CO2 exchange on the

  19. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Exchange above a Heterogeneous Northern-latitude Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, O. E.; Caulton, D.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Metzger, S.; Musinsky, J.; Munger, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Northern latitude forests represent an important global sink for carbon dioxide (CO2). Estimating the landscape-scale exchange of CO2 is complicated by the heterogeneity of forested areas. Airborne eddy-covariance measurements can complement continuous tower-based measurements for determining the magnitude and spatial variability of carbon uptake in forested areas, and to assess means for scaling-up. While aircraft provide accessibility, the resulting flux measurements represent a narrow time slice, and average over a comparatively large source area. The goal of this study is to improve our ability to attribute aircraft flux data to finer spatial scales. We hypothesize that this can be achieved by (i) improving the spatial scale of the sampling method, (ii) examining inter-day variability, and (iii) relating airborne eddy-covariance flux estimates to remote sensing determinations of the land cover. For this purpose identical flight experiments were conducted on May 29 and June 1, 2014 over a 240 km2 region encompassing the Harvard University EMS eddy flux tower at Harvard Forest, MA, using the Purdue University ALAR aircraft. In the early afternoon of each day, 19 flight legs, 20 km in length, were flown over the heterogeneous forest canopy. The two replicate experiments allow assessment of inter-day variability in CO2 exchange under similar meteorological conditions. Furthermore, the experiments were coordinated with high-resolution (≤1 m) and medium-resolution (≤100 m) remote sensing retrievals of forest canopy structure and composition (NEON AOP) and soil moisture (NASA AirMOSS), respectively. This unprecedented hierarchy of observations enables evaluation of the ability of different data processing approaches to calculate finer scale CO2 exchange with the surface. Analyses of the flights conducted on May 29 and June 1 show a transect-averaged (± 1σ) CO2 uptake of 13 ± 3 µmol m-2s-1 and 11 ± 2 µmol m-2s-1, respectively. In complement to the aircraft

  20. An Enhanced Engineering Perspective of Global Climate Systems and Statistical Formulation of Terrestrial CO2 Exchanges

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Yuanshun; Baek, Seung H.; Garcia-Diza, Alberto; Tsui, Kwok; Zhuang, Jie; Yang, Bai

    2012-01-01

    This paper designs a comprehensive approach based on the engineering machine/system concept, to model, analyze, and assess the level of CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, which is an important factor in understanding changes in global climate. The focus of this article is on spatial patterns and on the correlation between levels of CO2 fluxes and a variety of influencing factors in eco-environments. The engineering/machine concept used is a system protocol that includes the sequential activities of design, test, observe, and model. This concept is applied to explicitly include various influencing factors and interactions associated with CO2 fluxes. To formulate effective models of a large and complex climate system, this article introduces a modeling technique that will be referred to as Stochastic Filtering Analysis of Variance (SFANOVA). The CO2 flux data observed from some sites of AmeriFlux are used to illustrate and validate the analysis, prediction and globalization capabilities of the proposed engineering approach and the SF-ANOVA technology. The SF-ANOVA modeling approach was compared to stepwise regression, ridge regression, and neural networks. The comparison indicated that the proposed approach is a valid and effective tool with similar accuracy and less complexity than the other procedures.

  1. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  2. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h-1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m-2 d-1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  3. Empirically constrained estimates of Alaskan regional Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2, 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commane, R.; Lindaas, J.; Benmergui, J. S.; Luus, K. A.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Miller, S. M.; Henderson, J.; Karion, A.; Miller, J. B.; Sweeney, C.; Miller, C. E.; Lin, J. C.; Oechel, W. C.; Zona, D.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Iwata, H.; Ueyama, M.; Harazono, Y.; Veraverbeke, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Daube, B. C.; Pittman, J. V.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    We present data-driven estimates of the regional net ecosystem exchange of CO2 across Alaska for three years (2012-2014) derived from CARVE (Carbon in the Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment) aircraft measurements. Integrating optimized estimates of annual NEE, we find that the Alaskan region was a small sink of CO2 during 2012 and 2014, but a significant source of CO2 in 2013, even before including emissions from the large forest fire season during 2013. We investigate the drivers of this interannual variability, and the larger spring and fall emissions of CO2 in 2013. To determine the optimized fluxes, we couple the Polar Weather Research and Forecasting (PWRF) model with the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model, to produce footprints of surface influence that we convolve with a remote-sensing driven model of NEE across Alaska, the Polar Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (Polar-VPRM). For each month we calculate a spatially explicit additive flux (∆F) by minimizing the difference between the measured profiles of the aircraft CO2 data and the modeled profiles, using a framework that combines a uniform correction at regional scales and a Bayesian inversion of residuals at smaller scales. A rigorous estimate of total uncertainty (including atmospheric transport, measurement error, etc.) was made with a combination of maximum likelihood estimation and Monte Carlo error propagation. Our optimized fluxes are consistent with other measurements on multiple spatial scales, including CO2 mixing ratios from the CARVE Tower near Fairbanks and eddy covariance flux towers in both boreal and tundra ecosystems across Alaska. For times outside the aircraft observations (Dec-April) we use the un-optimized polar-VPRM, which has shown good agreement with both tall towers and eddy flux data outside the growing season. This approach allows us to robustly estimate the annual CO2 budget for Alaska and investigate the drivers of both the

  4. CO2 and CH4 exchange from ditch networks in two floodplain fens.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Kieran; Heppell, Catherine; Belyea, Lisa; Baird, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Historically, many peatlands were drained using ditches. These ditches are now often used to control water levels in sites under conservation management, though they can be a significant atmospheric source of both CO2 and CH4. Studies have already been undertaken on ditches in ombrotrophic peatlands (bogs), but little work has been done on C exchanges in drainage ditches in floodplain fens. This study quantified C exchange in drainage ditches at two floodplain fens, Sutton Fen (52°45'N 001°30'E) and Strumpshaw Fen (52°36'N 001°27'E), in The Norfolk Broadlands of England. C exchange was quantified between 19th June 2012 and 2nd September 2013 using floating static chambers. Ecosystem respiration (Reco), net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and CH4 fluxes were measured and a seasonal pattern was observed in all three, with the highest fluxes in late summer. Both sites were sources of CO2 and CH4. The few previous studies of C fluxes from ditches in floodplain fens have suggested flux ranges of 69.6 to 199 mg CO2 m2 h-1 for both Reco and NEE, and 1.2 to 366 mg CH4 m2 h-1 (positive means a flux to the atmosphere). For Reco, NEE and CH4, our values were generally at the higher end of the reported values. Reco ranged from 3.66 to 420.18 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 and 28.35 to 257.07 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 for Sutton and Strumpshaw, respectively. The highest flux was observed in September 2013 at Strumpshaw (506.03 mg CO2 m-2 h-1). NEE ranged from -80.64 to 786.2 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 and -70.72 to 229.75 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 for Sutton and Strumpshaw, respectively. The majority of NEE fluxes were positive (a source), apart from April, June and July 2013, where a small uptake occurred. Sutton had significantly greater CH4 emissions than Strumpshaw, with values ranging from 0.46 to 733.72 and 0.05 to 89.11 mg CH4 m-2 h-1, respectively. This difference may have been related to ditch water SO42- concentrations, which were higher at Strumpshaw (23.11 ± 1.26 mg L-1) than at Sutton (17.78 ± 1.68 mg L-1

  5. Modeling approaches to describe H2O and CO2 exchange in mare ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Novenko, E.; Volkova, E.

    2012-04-01

    The modern climatic conditions is strongly influenced by both internal variability of climatic system, and various external natural and anthropogenic factors (IPCC 2007). Significant increase of concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and especially the growth of atmospheric CO2 due to human activity are considered as the main factors that are responsible for global warming and climate changes. A significant part of anthropogenic CO2 is absorbed from the atmosphere by land biota and especially by vegetation cover. However, it is still not completely clear what is the role of different land ecosystems and especially forests and mares in global cycles of H2O and CO2 and what is a sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate changes. Within the frameworks of this study the spatial and temporal variability of H2O and CO2 fluxes in different types of mare ecosystems of the forest-steppe zone in European part of Russia was described using modeling approaches and results of field measurements. For this modeling and experimental study the mare ecosystems of Tula region were selected. The Tula region is located mostly in the forest-steppe zone and it is unique area for such studies because almost all existed types of mare ecosystems of Northern Eurasia distinguished by a geomorphological position, water and mineral supply can be found there. Most mares in Tula region have a relatively small size and surrounded by very heterogeneous forests that make not possible an application of the classical measuring and modeling approaches e.g. an eddy covariance technique or one-dimensional H2O and CO2 exchange models for flux estimation in such sites. In our study to describe the radiation, sensible heat, H2O and CO2 exchange between such heterogeneous mare ecosystems and the atmosphere a three-dimensional model Forbog-3D and one-dimensional Mixfor-SVAT were applied. The main concept used in the Forbog-3D and Mixfor-SVAT models is an aggregated description of physical and

  6. CO2 exchange coefficients from space-borne measurements of wind speed: SSM/I versus QuikSCAT in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M.; Tang, W.; Liu, W. T.

    2001-12-01

    With the ultimate goal of using the 13-year time series of wind speed from the Special Sensing Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to address the interannual variability of the air-sea exchange coefficient for CO2, K, we present here a comparison of K estimated from SSM/I (KS) and the scatterometer QuikSCAT (KQ) for the year 2000. Exchange coefficients estimated from the monthly average fields of wind speed from the two sensors present the same patterns in space and in time, although those estimated from SSM/I are larger for 59-67% of the world ocean. For both sensors, most values (>50%) fall between 2.5 and 7.5ṡ 10-2mol m-2y-1μ atm-1. Over 95% of the K values from the two sensors are within 2ṡ 10-2mol m-2y-1μ atm-1 and over 80% are within 1ṡ 10-2mol m-2y-1μ atm-1. The global mean KS is between 0.17 and 0.5ṡ 10-2mol m-2y-1μ atm-1 larger than KQ for all months, with larger differences in the second half of the year. Likewise, the zonal mean KS are consistently larger, except between 40oS and 50oS and within 20o of the equator. The global mean flux estimated with the Δ pCO{2} field of Takahashi (1999) and KS is between 1.69 and 3.12 Gt C y-1, while the QSCAT estimate ranges between 1.07 and 2.5 Gt C y-1. Differences in global flux estimated from the two sensors are between 0.52 and 0.64 Gt C y-1: the difference is greatest in the Atlantic basin in boreal spring and summer while in the Indian basin, the flux estimated from SSM/I is less than that from QuikSCAT. The difference between KS and KQ is largest in areas of negative Δ pCO{2}, thus leading to an overestimate of the oceanic sink term. The monthly anomaly of K (having subtracted the annual mean value) is of comparable magnitude and range for the two sensors. The rms values of the two monthly anomaly time series are less than 1ṡ 10-2mol m-2y-1μ atm-1 in 60% of the world ocean. A new monthly K estimate, using the QuikSCAT annual average and the monthly anomaly from SSM/I is a closer approximation (within 0

  7. Interannual variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange in a suburban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, J.; Hiller, R.

    2010-12-01

    Turfgrass lawns are a ubiquitous feature of North American cities and suburbs. In the continental United States, lawns cover an estimated area of 163,800 km2 (Milesi et al. 2005). Yet most of what we know about CO2 exchange in urban landscapes is related to the dominant fossil fuel emission terms, whereas relatively few direct measurements have been made of the CO2 uptake by and release from the land itself. This represents an important gap because urbanization in recent decades has been characterized by increasing per-capita land consumption and most of it has taken place in the suburbs, which have a higher percent cover of greenspace compared to the central areas of cities. Here, we report results from the KUOM tall tower flux site located in a first-ring suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. From November 2005 to June 2009 we concurrently measured CO2, water vapor, and energy fluxes from a mobile tower over an extensive unirrigated turfgrass field that was similar to residential lawns. The annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 ranged from a sink of -78 g C m-2 to a source of 86 g C m-2. We analyzed the interannual variability with respect to differences in winter respiration, the date of spring green-up and fall senescence, growing-season length, the maximum growth rate in spring, and seasonal drought. The long-term goal of this research is to understand how developed land use affects regional carbon budgets and to explore how these impacts may change with management practices and urban development patterns.

  8. Emerging Patterns In The Isotopic Composition Of Soil CO2 Concentrations, Soil CO2 Production, And Soil-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange At The Watershed Scale: On The Intersection Between Hydrology And Biology In The Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Liang, L.; Lorenzo, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to understand how physical and biological processes mediate the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Numerous studies have described fundamental relationships between environmental variables, the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated sugars in plants, litter, soil carbon, or recently respired CO2. However, studies that examine the spatial variability of the 13C content of forest soils at the landscape scale are lacking. We report on measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of soil CO2 concentrations (δ13CC), soil CO2 production (δ13CP), and soil-atmosphere CO2 exchange (δ13CD) across a subalpine forest of the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana over two growing seasons. We evaluate the variability of these measurements across different landscape positions. Our analysis demonstrates that soil moisture and the lateral redistribution of soil water are strong predictors of the spatial variability of δ13CC, δ13CP, and δ13CD at the watershed scale. We suggest that there are concomitant yet independent effects of soil water on physical (i.e., soil gas diffusivity) and biological (i.e., photosynthetic activity) processes that mediate the 13C composition of forest soils. We show systematic spatial variability in the δ13C of forest soils at the landscape scale that can be useful to accurately predict and model land-atmosphere CO2 exchange over complex terrain.

  9. Relating Leaf Nitrogen, Leaf Photosynthesis and Canopy CO2 Exchange in a Temperate Winter Barley Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, R.; Boegh, E.; Herbst, M.; Friborg, T.

    2012-12-01

    Net exchange of CO2 between the atmosphere and the soil-vegetation interface (NEE) is controlled by a wide range of biochemical and biophysical processes where leaf photosynthesis is often the most important. In mechanistically and physically based photosynthesis models (e.g. Farquhar et al. 1980) leaf nutrient status is a limiting factor for the photosynthetic capacity since it is implicitly incorporated through the parameters of maximum rate of carboxylation of CO2 (Vcmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax). These are closely related to leaf nitrogen concentration (Na) and leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) and often show a characteristic seasonal dynamic. When simulating CO2 exchange, model outputs are sensitive to leaf photosynthetic capacity, which is labour consuming to verify through field measurements. A less time consuming method is to measure leaf "greenness" (SPAD), which is closely related to chlorophyll content and thus photosynthetic capacity. In the present study field measurements of leaf photosynthesis (LI-6400, LICOR Inc.), leaf reflectance (SPAD-502, Minolta), and LAI (LAI-2000, LICOR Inc.) were conducted on agricultural fields in Western Denmark during one growing season. The leaf photosynthesis measurements provided the basis for estimating photosynthetic capacity. SPAD measurements and LAI was measured with a higher spatial and temporal resolution. SPAD readings were calibrated against Cab and Na analyzed on leaf material in the laboratory and later correlated to photosynthetic capacity. These data were used to parameterize a coupled photosynthesis and stomatal model that was run for the growing season 2012 to estimate NEE. As a part of the hydrological observatory HOBE (hobe.dk), fluxes of greenhouse gasses are continuously measured by eddy covariance systems at three field sites in the Skjern River Catchment, Western Denmark, providing the basis for estimating the exchange of energy, water vapour, and CO2 on canopy scale. One of

  10. CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration across dryland ecosystems of southwestern North America.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Joel A; Scott, Russell L; Bell, Tom W; Bowling, David R; Dore, Sabina; Garatuza-Payan, Jaime; Kolb, Thomas E; Krishnan, Praveena; Krofcheck, Dan J; Litvak, Marcy E; Maurer, Gregory E; Meyers, Tilden P; Oechel, Walter C; Papuga, Shirley A; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E; Rodriguez, Julio C; Smith, William K; Vargas, Rodrigo; Watts, Christopher J; Yepez, Enrico A; Goulden, Michael L

    2017-03-13

    Global-scale studies suggest that dryland ecosystems dominate an increasing trend in the magnitude and interannual variability of the land CO2 sink. However, such analyses are poorly constrained by measured CO2 exchange in drylands. Here we address this observation gap with eddy covariance data from 25 sites in the water-limited Southwest region of North America with observed ranges in annual precipitation of 100 - 1000 mm, annual temperatures of 2 - 25 °C, and records of 3 - 10 years (150 site-years in total). Annual fluxes were integrated using site-specific ecohydrologic years to group precipitation with resulting ecosystem exchanges. We found a wide range of carbon sink/source function, with mean annual net ecosystem production (NEP) varying from -350 to +330 gCm(-2) across sites with diverse vegetation types, contrasting with the more constant sink typically measured in mesic ecosystems. In this region, only forest-dominated sites were consistent carbon sinks. Interannual variability of NEP, gross ecosystem production (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco ) was larger than for mesic regions, and half the sites switched between functioning as C sinks/C sources in wet/dry years. The sites demonstrated coherent responses of GEP and NEP to anomalies in annual evapotranspiration (ET), used here as a proxy for annually available water after hydrologic losses. Notably, GEP and Reco were negatively related to temperature, both interannually within site and spatially across sites, in contrast to positive temperature effects commonly reported for mesic ecosystems. Models based on MODIS satellite observations matched the cross-site spatial pattern in mean annual GEP but consistently underestimated mean annual ET by ~50%. Importantly, the MODIS-based models captured only 20-30% of interannual variation magnitude. These results suggest the contribution of this dryland region to variability of regional to global CO2 exchange may be up to 3 - 5 times larger than current

  11. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    DOE PAGES

    King, Anthony W.; Andres, Robert; Davis, Kenneth J.; ...

    2015-01-21

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North Americanmore » land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, \\"best\\" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was 1720:472, or nearly 4

  12. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, A.W.; Andres, R.J.; Davis, K.J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D.J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, W.A.; McGuire, Anthony; Vargas, Rodrigo I.; Wei, Y.; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from −890 to −280 Tg C yr−1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are −472 ± 281 Tg C yr−1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and −360 Tg C yr−1 (with an interquartile range of −496 to −337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr−1 and assuming the estimate of −472 Tg C yr−1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was

  13. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A. W.; Andres, R. J.; Davis, K. J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D. J.; Huntzinger, D. N.; de Jong, B.; Kurz, W. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Vargas, R.; Wei, Y.; West, T. O.; Woodall, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990-2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990-2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was 1720:472, or nearly 4:1.

  14. Dynamic Patterns, Parameters, and Climatic Response of CO2 Exchange of Agricultural Crops: Monocotyledons VS. Dicotyledons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, T. G.; Wylie, B. K.; Howard, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Net CO2 exchange data from long-term flux tower measurements in monocotyledonous (wheat, maize) and dicotyledonous (soybeans, alfalfa, peas, peanuts) crops were partitioned into photosynthesis (P) and respiration (R) using the light-soil temperature-VPD response method. Analysis of the resulting time series of P and R revealed patterns of temporal and phenological dynamics in these plant groups. We established differences in ranges and dynamic patterns of P and R as well as CO2 exchange parameters (quantum yield, photosynthetic capacity, respiration rate, light-use efficiency, curvature of the VPD response). Weekly P and R data combined with remotely sensed 7-day eMODIS NDVI allow identification of the quasi-linear relationships between P, R, and NDVI, as well as estimation of parameters of NDVI response (start of the growing season, duration of the linearity period, slope of NDVI response). While the linear-like patterns occur early in the season, later the flux response to NDVI becomes less pronounced, and for the whole season the flux-NDVI relationship assumes a hysteresis-like pattern. Introduction of VPD and soil moisture limitation as well as phenological controls (growing degree days) leads to more flexible models for P and R in relation to NDVI and on-site drivers. These models allow mapping of the cropland CO2 exchange at regional and larger scales (e.g., the Great Plains). Significant relationships of the crop GPP to the seasonally integrated NDVI were also established, providing an opportunity for mapping of crop productivity using geographically distributed historic NDVI data. On the other hand, long time series (6 to 12 years and longer) of weekly P and R data lead to models of annual photosynthesis and respiration in response to climatic factors that may be used for prognostic purposes. We developed a model of maize GPP on the Great Plains in relation to the sum of temperatures above 5 °C and the hydrologic year precipitation. The model describes 75

  15. Growth, pod, and seed yield, and gas exchange of hydroponically grown peanut in response to CO2 enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanciel, K.; Mortley, D. G.; Hileman, D. R.; Loretan, P. A.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, W. A.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 on growth, pod, and seed yield, and gas exchange of 'Georgia Red' peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) were evaluated under controlled environmental conditions. Plants were exposed to concentrations of 400 (ambient), 800, and 1200 micromoles mol-1 CO2 in reach-in growth chambers. Foliage fresh and dry weights increased with increased CO2 up to 800 micromoles mol-1, but declined at 1200 micromoles mol-1. The number and the fresh and dry weights of pods also increased with increasing CO2 concentration. However, the yield of immature pods was not significantly influenced by increased CO2. Total seed yield increased 33% from ambient to 800 micromoles mol-1 CO2, and 4% from 800 to 1200 micromoles mol-1 CO2. Harvest index increased with increasing CO2. Branch length increased while specific leaf area decreased linearly as CO2 increased from ambient to 1200 micromoles mol-1. Net photosynthetic rate was highest among plants grown at 800 micromoles mol-1. Stomatal conductance decreased with increased CO2. Carboxylation efficiency was similar among plants grown at 400 and 800 micromoles mol-1 and decreased at 1200 micromoles mol-1 CO2. These results suggest that CO2 enrichment from 400 to 800 micromoles mol-1 had positive effects on peanut growth and yield, but above 800 micromoles mol-1 enrichment seed yield increased only marginally.

  16. ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ALTER THE ECOSYSTEM C EXCHANGE IN A YOUNG DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (EC) [ambient CO2 (AC) + 190 ppm] and elevated temperature (ET) [ambient temperature (AT) + 3.6 °C] on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of seedling Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mesocosms. As the study utilized seedlings in reconstruc...

  17. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  18. Autochamber measurements of Net Ecosystem (CO2) Exchange at a subarctic mire in Northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walthall, M.; Parker-Smith, X.; Lawrence, R. D.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Northern latitude wetlands (>~50°N) are characterized by cold and wet conditions that result in low decomposition rates for plant litter. This process promotes the sequestration of carbon (C) in the form of organic matter (i.e. peat) and the formation of widespread peatands. Peatlands, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere, have accumulated C by removing atmospheric CO2 for approximately the past 10,000 years. Historically, peatlands represent a net C sink; however, increases in the global average temperature could alter peatlands ability to store carbon. With a warming climate and permafrost thaw, the pool of once stable soil organic C available for decomposition is increasing. Like all terrestrial ecosystems, a number of environmental factors (e.g. peat temperature and vegetation) play important roles in governing the fate of C in peatlands. Projected climate change is expected to affect these regulating factors. Subarctic peatlands in zones of discontinuous permafrost are experiencing widespread environmental changes due to climate warming. In this study, we present net ecosystem (CO2) exchange and δ13C-CO2 data from Stordalen Mire in northern Sweden (68°22'N, 19°03'E). Measurements were made using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer connected to automatic chambers placed in the three predominant ecosystems (a dry, elevated Palsa; an intermediate thaw regime dominated by Sphagnum spp. and; a completely thawed, inundated site dominated by Eriophorum angustifolium). Team was mentored by Mr. Ryan Lawrence from The University of New Hampshire.

  19. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across northern Eurasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawlins, M.A.; McGuire, A.D.; Kimball, J.S.; Dass, P.; Lawrence, D.; Burke, E.; Chen, X.; Delire, C.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A.; Peng, S.; Rinke, A.; Saito, K.; Zhang, W.; Alkama, R.; Bohn, T. J.; Ciais, P.; Decharme, B.; Gouttevin, I.; Hajima, T.; Ji, D.; Krinner, G.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Miller, P.; Moore, J.C.; Smith, B.; Sueyoshi, T.

    2015-01-01

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate model simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m−2 yr−2, equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in model

  20. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    DOE PAGES

    Rawlins, M. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Kimball, J. S.; ...

    2015-07-28

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate modelmore » simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m⁻² yr⁻², equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in

  1. CO2 exchange following peat extraction - a comparison of two paired restored/unrestored peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Ian; Strack, Maria; Pelletier, Luc; Nugent, Kelly; Rankin, Tracy

    2016-04-01

    Peat extraction is an important industry in parts of Canada and elsewhere globally. The resulting disturbance from drainage and vacuum-harvesting is mitigated through best practices which now incorporate restoration intended to return the peatland's biodiversity and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange to that resembling the pre-disturbance state. We examine the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) in two sets of paired peatlands. Within each pair, the extraction year was the same and the sites were treated identically post-extraction in terms of management (blocking drains or leveling as applicable). The first pair is located in the vicinity of Rivière-du-Loup, Québec, Canada and were harvested in 1980. The Bois-des-Bel (BDB) site was restored in 1999 following the methods of Quinty and Rochefort (2003). GHG fluxes have been studied at various points since restoration (e.g. Strack and Zuback, 2013) largely using chamber measurements. The site now hosts a thriving bog ecosystem with Sphagnum, Eriophorum and shrub communities. A site 30 km away near Saint-Alexandre de Kamouraska (SAK) was managed post-harvest as BDB with drains blocked but was left unrestored and now has only sparse Eriophorum with invasive species. The second pair of peatlands represents a newly extracted site near Seba Beach, Alberta, Canada. One field was restored (SBR) in autumn 2012 as per the Québec sites but with ditches infilled when the fields were levelled while the other (SBU) was left unrestored. In the summer of 2013, eddy covariance towers were installed at each location and measured NEE continuously at 10Hz throughout the subsequent periods. BDB and SBR remain operational today while SBU was removed in fall 2014 and SAK in fall 2015. In this presentation, we will focus on the coincident years of operation. After 15 years, BDB has measured NEE in the range of that observed at natural peatlands. A summer sink and winter release lead to annual uptake of CO2. At SAK, the lack of establishment

  2. Coastal CO2 climatology of Oahu, Hawaii: Six years of high resolution time-series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlouw, G. J.; Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Tomlinson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Six years of high resolution pCO2, water quality, and meteorological data were used to calculate air-sea CO2 fluxes on yearly, seasonal and monthly timescales, and relate the temporal and spatial variation in CO2 fluxes to meteorological events and land derived inputs. Three MAPCO2 buoys are deployed in coastal waters of Oahu as part of the NOAA/PMEL Carbon Program, that autonomously collects CO2 and water quality data at 3-hour intervals. The buoys are located on a backreef in Kaneohe Bay and two fringing reef sites on Oahu's south shore, the latter two in open ocean like conditions but with one also influenced by fluvial inputs. Data for this study were collected from June 2008 to July 2014. Mean pCO2 values at the Ala Wai, Kilo Nalu and CRIMP2 buoys were 396, 381 and 447μatm, respectively, with mean daily ranges of 51, 32 and 190 μatm, respectively. The daily range in pCO2 is largest at CRIMP2, reflecting a combination of higher primary production and respiration, vigorous calcification and longer water residence time within the barrier reef environment. Net annualized air-sea CO2 fluxes of the entire study period were 0.083, -0.014 and 1.167 mol C m-2 year-1 for Ala Wai, Kilo Nalu and CRIMP2, respectively. Positive values indicate a CO2 flux from the water to the atmosphere (source behavior), and negative values from the atmosphere to the water (sink behavior). This presentation will also discuss the effects physical and biogeochemical processes on the magnitude and variability of air-sea CO2 fluxes. We observe a negative correlation between CO2 flux and rainfall over monthly, seasonal, and annual timescales. This correlation however, can partly be explained by temperature, because increased rainfall is more common during the colder winter months. Nevertheless, rainfall affects CO2 fluxes, both by rain-induced nutrient and organic matter runoff, as well as the physical effect of raindrops on air-sea gas exchange and the dilution of the air-sea boundary layer

  3. Measurement and modeling of CO2 exchange over forested landscapes in India: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, S.; Dadhwal, V.

    2009-04-01

    The increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and its potential impact on global climate change is the subject of worldwide studies, political debates and international discussions. The concern led to the establishment of the Kyoto Protocol to curtail emissions and mitigate the possible global warming. The studies so far suggest that terrestrial biological sinks might be the low cost options for carbon sequestration, which can be used to partially offset the industrial CO2 emissions globally. In past, the effectiveness of terrestrial sink and the quantitative estimates of their sink strengths have relied mainly on the measurements of changes in carbon stocks across the world. Recent developments in flux tower based measurement techniques such as Eddy Covariance for assessing the CO2, H2O and energy fluxes provide tools for quantifying the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 on a continuous basis. These near real time measurements, when integrated with remote sensing, enable the up-scaling of the carbon fluxes to regional scale. More than 470 towers exist worldwide as of now. Indian subcontinent was not having any tower-based CO2 flux measurement system so far. The Indian Space Research Organization under its Geosphere Biosphere Programme is funding five eddy covariance towers for terrestrial CO2 flux measurements in different ecological regions of the country. The tower sites already planned are: (i) a mixed forest plantation (Dalbergia sissoo, Acacia catechu, Holoptelia integrifolia) at Haldwani in collaboration with DISAFRI, University of Tuscia, Italy and the Indian Council for Forestry Research and Education (ICFRE), Dehradun, (ii) a sal (Shorea robusta) forest in Doon valley Himalayan state of Uttarakhand in northern India, (ii) a teak (Tectona grandis) mixed forest at Betul in Madhya Pradesh in central India, (iv) an old teak plantation at Dandeli, and (v) a semi-evergreen forest at Nagarhole in Karnataka state in southern India. The three towers have been

  4. Functional Divergence in CO2 Exchange Among Vascular Plant Communities in a Temperate Ombrotrophic Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Derrick Y. F.; Roulet, Nigel T.; Moore, Tim R.; Humphreys, Elyn R.

    2013-04-01

    Plant functional types (PFTs) are used to classify vegetation into groups that demonstrate similar responses to changes in environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the potential for differentiating CO2 exchange among three vascular plant communities (Chamaedaphne, Maianthemum/Ledum, and Eriophorum) with different dominant species and microclimatic characteristics at the Mer Bleue bog in Canada. Using an automatic chamber system, we examined the seasonal patterns of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), gross ecosystem production (GEP), and ecosystem respiration (ER), as well as the responses of GEP and ER to changing environmental and biotic conditions among communities in 2009. While seasonal mean NEE were similar among the three plant communities, seasonal mean GEP and ER were significantly lower in the Maianthemum/Ledum community owing to the lower green biomass and higher water table. Based on the parameterized GEP models, we detected a significant decrease in effective quantum yield in the order of Eriophorum > Chamaedaphne > Maianthemum/Ledum community, indicating the most efficient photosynthetic activity in sedges at lower light levels. The rate of linear increase in GEP with vascular green area index was considerably lower in the Maianthemum/Ledum community, in relation to the high specific leaf area of forb foliage. We found that maximum gross photosynthesis (Pmax) per unit ground area had a clear seasonal pattern with a single peak in mid-summer, but Pmax per unit green area varied much less over time. This suggests that the temporal changes in community-level Pmax are predominantly controlled by variations in green area rather than variations in photosynthetic capacity per unit green area. The ER model parameters were significantly different among communities, with the highest temperature sensitivity of ER in the Eriophorum community. The three communities each represent a distinct PFT as their CO2 exchange processes respond to environmental

  5. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 with rapidly changing high Arctic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Craig A; St Louis, Vincent L; Humphreys, Elyn R; Gamon, John A; Barker, Joel D; Pastorello, Gilberto Z

    2016-03-01

    High Arctic landscapes are expansive and changing rapidly. However, our understanding of their functional responses and potential to mitigate or enhance anthropogenic climate change is limited by few measurements. We collected eddy covariance measurements to quantify the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 with polar semidesert and meadow wetland landscapes at the highest latitude location measured to date (82°N). We coupled these rare data with ground and satellite vegetation production measurements (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) to evaluate the effectiveness of upscaling local to regional NEE. During the growing season, the dry polar semidesert landscape was a near-zero sink of atmospheric CO2 (NEE: -0.3 ± 13.5 g C m(-2) ). A nearby meadow wetland accumulated over 300 times more carbon (NEE: -79.3 ± 20.0 g C m(-2) ) than the polar semidesert landscape, and was similar to meadow wetland NEE at much more southerly latitudes. Polar semidesert NEE was most influenced by moisture, with wetter surface soils resulting in greater soil respiration and CO2 emissions. At the meadow wetland, soil heating enhanced plant growth, which in turn increased CO2 uptake. Our upscaling assessment found that polar semidesert NDVI measured on-site was low (mean: 0.120-0.157) and similar to satellite measurements (mean: 0.155-0.163). However, weak plant growth resulted in poor satellite NDVI-NEE relationships and created challenges for remotely detecting changes in the cycling of carbon on the polar semidesert landscape. The meadow wetland appeared more suitable to assess plant production and NEE via remote sensing; however, high Arctic wetland extent is constrained by topography to small areas that may be difficult to resolve with large satellite pixels. We predict that until summer precipitation and humidity increases enough to offset poor soil moisture retention, climate-related changes to productivity on polar semideserts may be restricted.

  6. Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 with Rapidly Changing High Arctic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are expansive and changing rapidly. However our understanding of their functional responses and potential to mitigate or enhance anthropogenic climate change is limited by few measurements. We collected eddy covariance measurements to quantify the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 with polar semidesert and meadow wetland landscapes at the highest-latitude location measured to date (82°N). We coupled these rare data with ground and satellite vegetation production measurements (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) to evaluate the effectiveness of upscaling local to regional NEE. During the growing season, the dry polar semidesert landscape was a near zero sink of atmospheric CO2 (NEE: -0.3±13.5 g C m-2). A nearby meadow wetland accumulated over two magnitudes more carbon (NEE: -79.3±20.0 g C m-2) than the polar semidesert landscape, and was similar to meadow wetland NEE at much more southern latitudes. Polar semidesert NEE was most influenced by moisture, with wetter surface soils resulting in greater soil respiration and CO2 emissions. At the meadow wetland, soil heating enhanced plant growth, which in turn increased CO2 uptake. Our upscaling assessment found that polar semidesert NDVI measured on site was low (mean: 0.120-0.157) and similar to satellite measurements (mean: 0.155-0.163). However, weak plant growth resulted in poor satellite NDVI-NEE relationships and created challenges for remotely-detecting changes in the cycling of carbon on the polar semidesert landscape. The meadow wetland appeared more suitable to assess plant production and NEE via remote-sensing, however high Arctic wetland extent is constrained by topography to small areas that may be difficult to resolve with large satellite pixels. We predict that until summer precipitation and humidity increases substantially, climate-related changes of dry high Arctic landscapes may be restricted by poor soil moisture retention, and therefore have some inertia against

  7. Estimation of Regional Net CO2 Exchange over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biraud, S. C.; Riley, W. J.; Fischer, M. L.; Torn, M. S.; Cooley, H. S.

    2004-12-01

    Estimating spatially distributed ecosystem CO2 exchange is an important component of the North American Carbon Program. We describe here a methodology to estimate Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) over the Southern Great Plains, using: (1) data from the Department Of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in Oklahoma and Kansas; (2) meteorological forcing data from the Mesonet facilities; (3) soil and vegetation types from 1 km resolution USGS databases; (4) vegetation status (e.g., LAI) from 1 km satellite measurements of surface reflectance (MODIS); (5) a tested land-surface model; and (6) a coupled land-surface and meteorological model (MM5/ISOLSM). This framework allows us to simulate regional surface fluxes in addition to ABL and free troposphere concentrations of CO2 at a continental scale with fine-scale nested grids centered on the ARM central facility. We use the offline land-surface and coupled models to estimate regional NEE, and compare predictions to measurements from the 9 Extended Facility sites with eddy correlation measurements. Site level comparisons to portable ECOR measurements in several crop types are also presented. Our approach also allows us to extend bottom-up estimates to periods and areas where meteorological forcing data are unavailable.

  8. Light-induced cation exchange for copper sulfide based CO2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Aurora; Simon, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Clemens; Döblinger, Markus; Wyrwich, Regina; Stern, Omar; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-11-11

    Copper(I)-based catalysts, such as Cu2S, are considered to be very promising materials for photocatalytic CO2 reduction. A common synthesis route for Cu2S via cation exchange from CdS nanocrystals requires Cu(I) precursors, organic solvents, and neutral atmosphere, but these conditions are not compatible with in situ applications in photocatalysis. Here we propose a novel cation exchange reaction that takes advantage of the reducing potential of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band of CdS and proceeds with Cu(II) precursors in an aqueous environment and under aerobic conditions. We show that the synthesized Cu2S photocatalyst can be efficiently used for the reduction of CO2 to carbon monoxide and methane, achieving formation rates of 3.02 and 0.13 μmol h(-1) g(-1), respectively, and suppressing competing water reduction. The process opens new pathways for the preparation of new efficient photocatalysts from readily available nanostructured templates.

  9. H2O and CO2 exchange between a sphagnum mire ecosystem and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Karataeva, Tatiana; Novenko, Elena

    2013-04-01

    part of the mire in June and reached 6.8+-4.2 mkmol m-2 s-1. In July the net CO2 flux is lower and doesn't not exceed -4.2 +- 2.8 mkmol m-2 s-1. Maximal values of H2O flux (0.23 +- 0.10 mm hour-1) was observed in August in central part of the mire. Do describe the spatial pattern of the H2O and CO2 exchange within the mire ecosystem a three dimensional model 3D Forbog-3D was applied. The model operates with the horizontal grid resolution - 2 m x 2 m, vertical resolution - 1 m, and primary time step - 1 hour. Forbog-3D uses data about position of each individual tree around the mire, mean height, crown and stem diameters of the trees to simulate patterns of plant and leaf area densities of a forest stand. The model algorithm describing solar radiation transfer through a forest canopy considers direct and diffuse radiation penetrating through gaps in the canopy, transmitted by leaves and reflected from leaves, bark and soil surface. It uses information about the 3D structure of each tree species in the forest stand, and about the optical properties of their leaves and bark. It takes into account clumping and gapping of foliage, spatial variations in leaf orientation angles and site topography. The study was supported by grants 11-04-97538-r_center_a, 11-04-01622-a and 11-05-00557-a of the Russian Foundation of the Basic Research (RFBR) and the grant of the government of Russian Federation (11.G34.31.0079).

  10. Gas exchange and CO2 flux in the tropical Atlantic Ocean determined from 222Rn and pCO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethie, William M.; Takahashi, Taro; Chipman, David W.; Ledwell, James R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of 222Rn vertical profiles and pCO2 in the surface water and the atmosphere were made simultaneously in the tropical Atlantic ocean as part of the TTO/TAS program. The gas exchange rate or piston velocity was determined from the 222Rn profiles, and the ΔpCO2 between the surface ocean and the atmosphere was determiend from the pCO2 measurements. The net flux of CO2 across the sea-air interface was calculated from these two data sets. The piston velocity ranged from 1.4 to 6.9 m/d and was correlated with wind speed. The slope of piston velocity versus wind speed was estimated to be between 0.3 and 1.1 (m/d)/(m/s). The ΔpCO2 ranged from -35 μatm at 15°N, 55°W to +64 /zatm at 5°S, 28°W, with the zero ΔpCO2 isopleth located at about 10°N. The high ΔpCO2 values can be explained by lateral advection of surface water from the east with heating and biological consumption of CO2 and alkalinity during transit. The net flux of CO2 was into the ocean north of 10°N latitude with values reaching a maximum of 1.4 mol m-2 yr-1 at 15°N, 50°W. South of 10°N, the net flux was out of the ocean, reaching a maximum value of 2.7 mol m-2 yr-1 at 8°S, 28°W. The average net flux from 10°N to 10°S was 1.3 mol m-2 yr-1 out of the ocean, which is equivalent to 0.15 gigatons of carbon per year if the flux determined applied throughout the year.

  11. Carbon isotope evidence for the latitudinal distribution and wind speed dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Randerson, James T.; Primeau, François W.; Gruber, Nicolas; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2006-11-01

    The air-sea gas transfer velocity is an important determinant of the exchange of gases, including CO2, between the atmosphere and ocean, but the magnitude of the transfer velocity and what factors control it remains poorly known. Here, we use oceanic and atmospheric observations of 14C and 13C to constrain the global mean gas transfer velocity as well as the exponent of its wind speed dependence, utilizing the distinct signatures left by the air-sea exchange of 14CO2 and 13CO2. While the atmosphere and ocean inventories of 14CO2 and 13CO2 constrain the mean gas transfer velocity, the latitudinal pattern in the atmospheric and oceanic 14C and 13C distributions contain information about the wind speed dependence. We computed the uptake of bomb 14C by the ocean for different transfer velocity patterns using pulse response functions from an ocean general circulation model, and evaluated the match between the predicted bomb 14C concentrations and observationally based estimates for the 1970s-1990s. Using a wind speed climatology based on satellite measurements, we solved either for the best-fit global relationship between gas exchange and mean wind speed or for the mean gas transfer velocity over each of 11 ocean regions. We also compared the predicted consequences of different gas exchange relationships on the rate of change and interhemisphere gradient of 14C in atmospheric CO2 with tree-ring and atmospheric measurements. Our results suggest that globally, the dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity on wind speed is close to linear, with an exponent of 0.5 +/- 0.4, and that the global mean gas transfer velocity at a Schmidt number of 660 is 20 +/- 3 cm/hr, similar to the results of previous analyses. We find that the air-sea flux of 13C estimated from atmosphere and ocean observations also suggests a lower than quadratic dependence of gas exchange on wind speed.

  12. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    PubMed

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  13. Measurement of CO2 exchange between Boreal forest and the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Black, T Andrew; Gaumont-Guay, David; Jassal, Rachhpal S; Amiro, Brian D; Jarvis, Paul G; Gower, Stith T; Kelliher, Frank M; Dunn, Allison; Wofsy, Steven C

    2005-01-01

    The Boreal forest is the world's second largest forested biome occupying the circumpolar region between 50 degrees N and 70 degrees N. This heterogeneous biome stores about 25% of all terrestrial carbon. We have reviewed EC measurements of CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and Boreal forests, and assessed progress in understanding the controlling processes. We have assessed net ecosystem productivity, the net balance between net primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration, measured using the EC method, for 38 Boreal forest sites. Gross ecosystem productivity has been estimated by adding day-time EC-measured CO2 fluxes to respiration estimated from night-time relationships between respiration and temperature. Maximum midday values of gross ecosystem productivity vary from 33 pmol m(-2) s(-1) for aspen to 6 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for larch stands. Long-term EC flux measurements, ongoing at nine Boreal sites, have shown the strong impact of spring weather and growing season water balance on annual net ecosystem productivity. Estimation of net biome production, incorporating the effects of disturbance resulting from forest fires and logging, has progressed significantly in recent years. After disturbance, summer measurements in Boreal chronosequences suggest that it takes about 10 years before growing season carbon uptake offsets the decomposition emissions. Small-scale exchange rate measurements using chambers and manipulative experiments such as stem girdling and soil heating help to understand the processes and mechanisms playing major roles in the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Aircraft EC flux measurements, convective boundary layer carbon budgets, and (13)C/12C changes in the atmosphere play an important role in validating estimates of regional carbon exchange based on scaled up EC measurements. Atmospheric inverse models are an important approach to studying regional and global carbon balance but need further improvement to yield reliable

  14. Long-term dynamics of production, respiration, and net CO2 exchange in two sagebrush-steppe ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmanov, T.G.; Svejcar, T.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Angell, R.F.; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Wylie, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    We present a synthesis of long-term measurements of CO2 exchange in 2 US Intermountain West sagebrush-steppe ecosystems. The locations near Burns, Oregon (1995-2001), and Dubois, Idaho (1996-2001), are part of the AgriFlux Network of the Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. Measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (F c) during the growing season were continuously recorded at flux towers using the Bowen ratio-energy balance technique. Data were partitioned into gross primary productivity (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) using the light-response function method. Wintertime fluxes were measured during 1999/2000 and 2000/2001 and used to model fluxes in other winters. Comparison of daytime respiration derived from light-response analysis with nighttime tower measurements showed close correlation, with daytime respiration being on the average higher than nighttime respiration. Maxima of Pg and Re at Burns were both 20 g CO2?? m-2??d-1 in 1998. Maxima of Pg and R e at Dubois were 37 and 35 g CO2??m -2??d-1, respectively, in 1997. Mean annual gross primary production at Burns was 1 111 (range 475-1 715) g CO2?? m-2??y-1 about 30% lower than that at Dubois (1 602, range 963-2 162 g CO2??m-2??y-1). Across the years, both ecosystems were net sinks for atmospheric CO2 with a mean net ecosystem CO2 exchange of 82 g CO2?? m-2??y-1 at Burns and 253 g CO2?? m-2??y-1 at Dubois, but on a yearly basis either site could be a C sink or source, mostly depending on precipitation timing and amount. Total annual precipitation is not a good predictor of carbon sequestration across sites. Our results suggest that Fc should be partitioned into Pg and Re components to allow prediction of seasonal and yearly dynamics of CO2 fluxes.

  15. CO2 and CH4 exchange by Phragmites australis under different climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano Ortiz, Penélope; Chojnickic, Bogdan H.; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Kowalska, Natalia; López-Ballesteros, Ana; Fernández, Néstor; Urbaniak, Marek; Olejnik, Janusz; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2015-04-01

    The key role of wetlands regarding global warming is the resulting balance between net CO2 assimilation, via photosynthesis, and CO2 and CH4 emissions, given the potential to release stored carbon, because of the high temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic soil respiration and anoxic conditions. However, it is still unknown whether wetlands will convert from long-term carbon sinks to sources as a result of climate change and other anthropogenic effects such as land use changes. Phragmites australis is one of the most common species found in wetlands and is considered the most globally widespread and productive plant species in this type of ecosystem. In this context, the main objective of this study is to analyse the GHG exchange (CO2 and CH4) of two wetlands with Phragmites australis as the dominant species under different climates using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The first site, Padul, is located in southern Spain, with a sub-humid warm climate, characterised by a mean annual temperature of 16°C and annual precipitation of ca. 470 mm, with a very dry summer. The second site, Rzecin is located in Poland with a mean annual temperature of 8°C, and annual precipitation around 600mm with no dry season. The Padul EC station is equipped with two infrared gas analysers to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes (LI-7200 and LI-7700 respectively) while the Rzecin EC station has the same CH4 sensor as Padul, but also a sensor measuring both GHG fluxes (DLT-100 Fast Methane Analyser, Los Gatos). In this study, we present: i) the results of a CH4 analyser inter-comparison campaign (LI-7700 vs. Los Gatos), ii) a comparative analysis of the functional behaviour of respiration and photosynthesis in both sites testing relationships between CO2 fluxes measured with the EC technique and meteorological variables such as temperature and direct or diffuse radiation and iii) the CH4 dynamicsat both sites by identifying, when possible, annual, seasonal and diurnal patterns.

  16. Isotopic air sampling in a tallgrass prairie to partition net ecosystem CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Schauer, Andrew J.; Owensby, Clenton; Ham, Jay M.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2003-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios of various ecosystem components and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) CO2 fluxes were measured in a C3-C4 mixture tallgrass prairie near Manhattan, Kansas. The July 2002 study period was chosen because of contrasting soil moisture contents, which allowed us to address the effects of drought on photosynthetic CO2 uptake and isotopic discrimination. Significantly higher NEE fluxes were observed for both daytime uptake and nighttime respiration during well-watered conditions when compared to a drought period. Given these differences, we investigated two carbon-flux partitioning questions: (1) What proportions of NEE were contributed by C3 versus C4 species? (2) What proportions of NEE fluxes resulted from canopy assimilation versus ecosystem respiration? To evaluate these questions, air samples were collected every 2 hours during daytime for 3 consecutive days at the same height as the eddy covariance system. These air samples were analyzed for both carbon isotope ratios and CO2 concentrations to establish an empirical relationship for isoflux calculations. An automated air sampling system was used to collect nighttime air samples to estimate the carbon isotope ratios of ecosystem respiration (δR) at weekly intervals for the entire growing season. Models of C3 and C4 photosynthesis were employed to estimate bulk canopy intercellular CO2 concentration in order to calculate photosynthetic discrimination against 13C. Our isotope/NEE results showed that for this grassland, C4 vegetation contributed ˜80% of the NEE fluxes during the drought period and later ˜100% of the NEE fluxes in response to an impulse of intense precipitation. For the entire growing season, the C4 contribution ranged from ˜68% early in the spring to nearly 100% in the late summer. Using an isotopic approach, the calculated partitioned respiratory fluxes were slightly greater than chamber-measured estimates during midday under well-watered conditions. In addition, time series

  17. Biosphere/atmosphere CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems - Community characteristics and relationships with multispectral surface reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Gary J.; Bartlett, David S.; Fan, Song-Miao; Bakwin, Peter S.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    CO2 exchange rates were measured at selected tundra sites near Bethel, Alaska using portable, climate-controlled, instrumented enclosures. The empirically modeled exchange rate for a representative area of vegetated tundra was 1.2 +/- 1.2 g/sq m/d, compared to a tower-measured exchange over the same time period of 1.1 +.0- 1.2 g/sq m/d. Net exchange in response to varying light levels was compared to wet meadow and dry upland tundra, and to the net exchange measured by the micrometeoroidal tower technique. The multispectral reflectance properties of the sites were measured and related to exchange rates in order to provide a quantitative foundation for the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor biosphere/atmosphere CO2 exchange in the tundra biome.

  18. Milk pH as a function of CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure in a heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-12-01

    Raw skim milk, with or without added CO2, was heated, held, and cooled in a small pilot-scale tubular heat exchanger (372 ml/min). The experiment was replicated twice, and, for each replication, milk was first carbonated at 0 to 1 degree C to contain 0 (control), 600, 1200, 1800, and 2400 ppm added CO2 using a continuous carbonation unit. After storage at 0 to 1 degree C, portions of milk at each CO2 concentration were heated to 40, 56, 72, and 80 degrees C, held at the desired temperature for 30 s (except 80 degrees C, holding 20 s) and cooled to 0 to 1 degree C. At each temperature, five pressures were applied: 69, 138, 207, 276, and 345 kPa. Pressure was controlled with a needle valve at the heat exchanger exit. Both the pressure gauge and pH probe were inline at the end of the holding section. Milk pH during heating depended on CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure. During heating of milk without added CO2, pH decreased linearly as a function of increasing temperature but was independent of pressure. In general, the pH of milk with added CO2 decreased with increasing CO2 concentration and pressure. For milk with added CO2, at a fixed CO2 concentration, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater at a higher temperature. At a fixed temperature, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater for milk with a higher CO2 concentration. Thermal death of bacteria during pasteurization of milk without added CO2 is probably due not only to temperature but also to the decrease in pH that occurs during the process. Increasing milk CO2 concentration and pressure decreases the milk pH even further during heating and may further enhance the microbial killing power of pasteurization.

  19. Interactions and exchange of CO2 and H2O in coals: an investigation by low-field NMR relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Yanbin; Liu, Dameng; Elsworth, Derek; Pan, Zhejun

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which CO2 and water interact in coal remain unclear and these are key questions for understanding ECBM processes and defining the long-term behaviour of injected CO2. In our experiments, we injected helium/CO2 to displace water in eight water-saturated samples. We used low-field NMR relaxation to investigate CO2 and water interactions in these coals across a variety of time-scales. The injection of helium did not change the T2 spectra of the coals. In contrast, the T2 spectra peaks of micro-capillary water gradually decreased and those of macro-capillary and bulk water increased with time after the injection of CO2. We assume that the CO2 diffuses through and/or dissolves into the capillary water to access the coal matrix interior, which promotes desorption of water molecules from the surfaces of coal micropores and mesopores. The replaced water mass is mainly related to the Langmuir adsorption volume of CO2 and increases as the CO2 adsorption capacity increases. Other factors, such as mineral composition, temperature and pressure, also influence the effective exchange between water and CO2. Finally, we built a quantified model to evaluate the efficiency of water replacement by CO2 injection with respect to temperature and pressure. PMID:26817784

  20. Long-term CO2 exchange at ICOS supersite in Northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurela, Mika; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea; Hatakka, Juha; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Penttilä, Timo; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2013-04-01

    The ICOS ecosystem station of Sodankylä is situated in northern Finland (67°21'N, 26°38'E), 100 km north of the Arctic Circle. The Arctic Research Center of Finnish Meteorological Institute offers excellent facilities for the long-term measurements in harsh high-latitude conditions and provides extensive set of supporting environmental measurements. The eddy covariance measurements of CO2 exchange over a Scots pine forest have been running since January 2000 as a part of various EU projects (LAPP, Carboeuroflux, Carboeurope-IP). Presently this station belongs to one of the supersites in the ICOS. Due to the cool and short summer the annual NEE is typically relatively small in most ecosystems at these latitudes. At Sodankylä forest the annual NEE varies from being a sink to being a source of CO2. On the average, the ecosystem has actually acted as a net source of carbon during the recent decade. The tree inventory conducted in the forest, however, suggests that the trees are growing and thus accumulating carbon. In order to understand this discrepancy we have initiated some new studies in the area. One suggested reason for the imbalance is the growth of the reindeer population since 1950s, which has resulted in the disappearance of the thick lichen (Cladonia spp.) cover from the ground. We estimated the influence of this lichen carpet on the soil respiration by installing automatic soil chambers on grazed and ungrazed forest floor on the area which has been partly fenced since 1950s. We also analyzed soil samples from both sides of this fence in order to compare soil carbon content with and without the insulating lichen cover. We have conducted similar soil C survey at the actual flux measurement site twice, in 2004 and 2011, in order to assess the long-term carbon loss from the soil. One possible error source of the flux measurements is the limited fetch of the EC measurements in certain wind directions. In east, the measurement forest is bounded by a peatland

  1. CO2 exchange over a mixed-grassland savanna in Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruda, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    We used eddy covariance technique to measure the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 between the atmosphere and an savanna in Central Brazil (locally known as cerrado), from February 2011 to February 2013, the data set included measurements of climatological variables. This part of brazilian savana has a long history of land cover change due to human activity, mainly due agricultural activity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the temporal variation in energy flux in areas of degraded, grass-dominated cerrado (locally known as campo sujo) in Central Brazil. The NEE variability is controlled mainly by solar radiation, temperature and air humidity on diel course. Seasonally, soil moisture and changes on land cover plays a strong role on the ecossystem. Daytime CO2 uptake under high irradiance averaged 4-12 μ mol .m-2 . s-1 in the wet season (October to April) and 0-3 μ mol . m2 . s-1 on the dry season (May to September). The net sign of NEE is negative (sink) during of the wet season and positive (source) in the dry season.

  2. Measurements of CO2 exchange over a mixed-grassland savanna in Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruda, P. H.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Santanna, F. B.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Nogueira, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    We used eddy covariance technique to measure the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 between the atmosphere and an savanna in Central Brazil (locally known as cerrado), from February 2011 to February 2013, the data set included measurements of climatological variables. This part of brazilian savana has a long history of land cover change due to human activity, mainly due agricultural activity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the temporal variation in energy flux in areas of degraded, grass-dominated cerrado (locally known as campo sujo) in Central Brazil. The NEE variability is controlled mainly by solar radiation, temperature and air humidity on diel course. Seasonally, soil moisture and changes on land cover plays a strong role on the ecossystem. Daytime CO2 uptake under high irradiance averaged 4-12 μmol m-2 s-1 in the wet season (October to April) and 0-3 μmol m-2 s-1 on the dry season (May to September). The net sign of NEE is negative (sink) during of the wet season and positive (source) in the dry season.

  3. Relationships between CH4 emission, biomass, and CO2 exchange in a subtropical grassland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Gary J.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Happell, James D.; Bartlett, David S.

    1991-01-01

    Methane flux was linearly correlated with plant biomass (r = 0.97, n = 6 and r = 0.95, n = 8) at two locations in a Florida Everglades Cladium marsh. One location, which had burned 4 months previously, exhibited a greater increase in methane flux as a function of biomass relative to sites at an unburned location. However, methane flux data from both sites fit a single regression (r = 0.94, n = 14) when plotted against net CO2 exchange suggesting that either methanogenesis in Everglades marl sediments is fueled by root exudation below ground, or that factors which enhance photosynthetic production and plant growth are also correlated with methane production and flux in this oligotrophic environment. The data presented are the first to show a direct relationship between spatial variability in plant biomass, net ecosystem production, and methane emission in a natural wetland.

  4. A model of the CO2 exchanges between biosphere and atmosphere in the tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labgaa, Rachid R.; Gautier, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    A physical model of the soil thermal regime in a permafrost terrain has been developed and validated with soil temperature measurements at Barrow, Alaska. The model calculates daily soil temperatures as a function of depth and average moisture contents of the organic and mineral layers using a set of five climatic variables, i.e., air temperature, precipitation, cloudiness, wind speed, and relative humidity. The model is not only designed to study the impact of climate change on the soil temperature and moisture regime, but also to provide the input to a decomposition and net primary production model. In this context, it is well known that CO2 exchanges between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere are driven by soil temperature through decomposition of soil organic matter and root respiration. However, in tundra ecosystems, net CO2 exchange is extremely sensitive to soil moisture content; therefore it is necessary to predict variations in soil moisture in order to assess the impact of climate change on carbon fluxes. To this end, the present model includes the representation of the soil moisture response to changes in climatic conditions. The results presented in the foregoing demonstrate that large errors in soil temperature and permafrost depth estimates arise from neglecting the dependence of the soil thermal regime on soil moisture contents. Permafrost terrain is an example of a situation where soil moisture and temperature are particularly interrelated: drainage conditions improve when the depth of the permafrost increases; a decrease in soil moisture content leads to a decrease in the latent heat required for the phase transition so that the heat penetrates faster and deeper, and the maximum depth of thaw increases; and as excepted, soil thermal coefficients increase with moisture.

  5. Net uptake of atmospheric CO2 by coastal submerged aquatic vegetation.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, Tatsuki; Hosokawa, Shinya; Miyoshi, Eiichi; Tada, Kazufumi; Watanabe, Kenta; Montani, Shigeru; Kayanne, Hajime; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2014-06-01

    'Blue Carbon', which is carbon captured by marine living organisms, has recently been highlighted as a new option for climate change mitigation initiatives. In particular, coastal ecosystems have been recognized as significant carbon stocks because of their high burial rates and long-term sequestration of carbon. However, the direct contribution of Blue Carbon to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 through air-sea gas exchange remains unclear. We performed in situ measurements of carbon flows, including air-sea CO2 fluxes, dissolved inorganic carbon changes, net ecosystem production, and carbon burial rates in the boreal (Furen), temperate (Kurihama), and subtropical (Fukido) seagrass meadows of Japan from 2010 to 2013. In particular, the air-sea CO2 flux was measured using three methods: the bulk formula method, the floating chamber method, and the eddy covariance method. Our empirical results show that submerged autotrophic vegetation in shallow coastal waters can be functionally a sink for atmospheric CO2. This finding is contrary to the conventional perception that most near-shore ecosystems are sources of atmospheric CO2. The key factor determining whether or not coastal ecosystems directly decrease the concentration of atmospheric CO2 may be net ecosystem production. This study thus identifies a new ecosystem function of coastal vegetated systems; they are direct sinks of atmospheric CO2.

  6. Net uptake of atmospheric CO2 by coastal submerged aquatic vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Tatsuki; Hosokawa, Shinya; Miyoshi, Eiichi; Tada, Kazufumi; Watanabe, Kenta; Montani, Shigeru; Kayanne, Hajime; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    ‘Blue Carbon’, which is carbon captured by marine living organisms, has recently been highlighted as a new option for climate change mitigation initiatives. In particular, coastal ecosystems have been recognized as significant carbon stocks because of their high burial rates and long-term sequestration of carbon. However, the direct contribution of Blue Carbon to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 through air-sea gas exchange remains unclear. We performed in situ measurements of carbon flows, including air-sea CO2 fluxes, dissolved inorganic carbon changes, net ecosystem production, and carbon burial rates in the boreal (Furen), temperate (Kurihama), and subtropical (Fukido) seagrass meadows of Japan from 2010 to 2013. In particular, the air-sea CO2 flux was measured using three methods: the bulk formula method, the floating chamber method, and the eddy covariance method. Our empirical results show that submerged autotrophic vegetation in shallow coastal waters can be functionally a sink for atmospheric CO2. This finding is contrary to the conventional perception that most near-shore ecosystems are sources of atmospheric CO2. The key factor determining whether or not coastal ecosystems directly decrease the concentration of atmospheric CO2 may be net ecosystem production. This study thus identifies a new ecosystem function of coastal vegetated systems; they are direct sinks of atmospheric CO2. PMID:24623530

  7. Assessing filtering of mountaintop CO2 mixing ratios for application to inverse models of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B.-G. J.; Desai, A. R.; Stephens, B. B.; Bowling, D. R.; Burns, S. P.; Watt, A. S.; Heck, S. L.; Sweeney, C.

    2011-09-01

    There is a widely recognized need to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchanges in areas of complex terrain including the United States Mountain West. CO2 fluxes over mountainous terrain are difficult to measure often due to unusual and complicated influences associated with atmospheric transport in complex terrain. Using five years of CO2 mixing ratio observations from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON), five statistical (subsetting) filters are used to investigate a range of approaches for identifying regionally representative CO2 mixing ratios. Test results from three filters indicate that subsets based on short-term variance and local CO2 gradients across tower inlet heights retain nine-tenths of the total observations and are able to define representative diurnal variability and seasonal cycles even for difficult-to-model sites where the influence of local fluxes is much larger than regional mixing ratio variations. Test results from two other filters that consider measurements from previous and following days using spline fitting or sliding windows are overly selective. Case study examples showed that even when standardized to common subset sizes these windowing-filters rejected measurements representing synoptic changes in CO2, which suggests that they are not well suited to filtering continental CO2 measurements. We present a novel CO2 lapse rate filter that uses CO2 differences between levels in the model atmosphere to constrain subsets of site measurements that are representative on model scales.

  8. Inter-annual variability in Alaskan net ecosystem CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; Lindaas, Jakob; Commane, Roisin; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella; Chang, Rachel; Kelly, Richard; Miller, Charles; Wofsy, Steven; Lin, John

    2015-04-01

    The high-latitude biospheric carbon cycle's responses to climate change are predicted to have an important role in determining future atmospheric concentrations of CO2. In response to warming soil and air temperatures, Arctic wetlands have been observed to increase rates of both soil C efflux and vegetation C uptake through photosynthesis. However, insights into the regional-scale consequences of these processes for net C uptake have been limited by the large uncertainties existing in process-based model estimates of Arctic net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). The Polar Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (PolarVPRM) instead provides data-driven, satellite-based estimates of high-latitude NEE, using a framework which specifically accounts for polar influences on NEE. PolarVPRM calculates NEE as the sum of respiration (R) and gross ecosystem exchange (GEE), where GEE refers to the light-dependent portion of NEE: NEE= -GEE + R. Meteorological inputs for PolarVPRM are provided by the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), and land surface inputs are acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Growing season R is calculated from air temperature, and subnivean R is calculated according to soil temperature. GEE is calculated according to shortwave radiation, air temperature, and MODIS-derived estimates of soil moisture and vegetation biomass. Previously, model validation has indicated that PolarVPRM showed reasonably good agreement with eddy covariance observations at nine North American Arctic sites, of which three were used for calibration purposes. For this project, PolarVPRM NEE was calculated year-round across Alaska at a three-hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 1 6°×1 4° (latitude × longitude). The objective of this work was to gain insight into inter-annual variability in Alaskan NEE, R and GEE, and an understanding of which meteorological and land surface drivers account for these observed patterns

  9. Water and CO2 Exchange for Different Land Use in Pampa Biome in Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberti, D. R.; de Moraes, O. L. L.; Diaz, M.; Tatsch, J. D.; Acevedo, O. C.; Zimermann, H. R.; Rubert, G. C.; Acosta, R.; Campos Velho, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa is the newest and most unknown Brazilian Biome. It is located in the Southern portion of the country, as well as part of Argentina and the entire Uruguay, and is formed principally by natural grasslands that have been used for centuries for grazing livestock. In recent decades it has gone through a process of intense land use change and degradation, with the replacement of natural vegetation by rice paddy crops, soybean and exotic forests. Recent studies show that the Pampa has only 36% of its original vegetation in Brazil. Research on carbon and greenhouse gas emissions in Pampa Biome are recent. It is known that the Pampa natural areas contain high stocks of soil organic carbon, and therefore their conservation is relevant for climate change mitigation. However, the net exchange of carbon and water between the surface and the atmosphere are unknown. To fill this gap, a flux tower network, SULFLUX - www.ufsm.br/sulfux, was created. Currently, SULFLUX comprises three flux towers in the Pampa biome, two of them being over natural vegetation and the other one over a rice paddy. The flux towers are nearly 100 km apart from each other. We examine the effects of climate on carbon fluxes of through the year 2014. Analysis of temporal variability in water and CO2 fluxes are examined at daily to annual scales. Overall, regional variability in climatic drivers, land use and soil proprieties appears to have a greater effect on evapotranspiration than on net carbon exchange.

  10. On the Structure-Property Relationships of Cation-Exchanged ZK-5 Zeolites for CO2 Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Hudson, Matthew R; Brown, Craig M; Lobo, Raul F

    2017-03-09

    The CO2 adsorption properties of cation-exchanged Li-, Na-, K-, and Mg-ZK-5 zeolites were correlated to the molecular structures determined by Rietveld refinements of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Li-, K-, and Na-ZK-5 all exhibited high isosteric heats of adsorption (Qst ) at low CO2 coverage, with Na-ZK-5 having the highest Qst (ca. 49 kJ mol(-1) ). Mg(2+) was located at the center of the zeolite hexagonal prism with the cation inaccessible to CO2 , leading to a much lower Qst (ca. 30 kJ mol(-1) ) and lower overall uptake capacity. Multiple CO2 adsorption sites were identified at a given CO2 loading amount for all four cation-exchanged ZK-5 adsorbents. Site A at the flat eight-membered ring windows and site B/B* in the γ-cages were the primary adsorption sites in Li- and Na-ZK-5 zeolites. Relatively strong dual-cation adsorption sites contributed significantly to an enhanced electrostatic interaction for CO2 in all ZK-5 samples. This interaction gives rise to a migration of Li(+) and Mg(2+) cations from their original locations at the center of the hexagonal prisms toward the α-cages, in which they interact more strongly with the adsorbed CO2 .

  11. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire: field measurements and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Karataeva, Tatiana; Zatsarinnaya, Dina; Novenko, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia (54.06N, 37.59E, 260 m a.s.l.) was described using results of field measurements and simulations with Mixfor-3D model. The area of the mire is about 1.2 ha and it is surrounded by a broadleaved forest stand. It is a typical peat mire according to water and mineral supply as well as to vegetation composition. The vegetation of the peripheral parts of the mire is typical eutrophic whereas the vegetation in its central part is represented by meso-oligothrophic plant communities. To describe the spatial variability of NEE and ET within the mire a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2 and H2O analyzer LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) was used. The measurements were provided along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and from May 2013 to October 2013. The chamber method was used for measurements of NEE and ET fluxes because of small size of the mire, a very uniform surrounding forest stand and the mosaic mire vegetation. All these factors promote very heterogeneous exchange conditions within the mire and make it difficult to apply, for example, an eddy covariance method that is widely used for flux measurements in the field. The results of the field measurements showed a significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation, air temperature and ground water level. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere (up to 6.8±4.2 µmol m-2 s-1 in June) whereas its peripheral part, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was mainly a source of

  12. CO2 Exchange in a Methane Hydrate Reservoir: Ignik Sikumi #1 Alaska Field Trial Operations and Summary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, K. C.; Farrell, H.; Howard, J. J.; Martin, K.; Raterman, K.; Schoderbek, D.; Smith, B.; Silpngarmlert, S.

    2012-12-01

    In the winter of 2012, a CO2 exchange field trial was performed at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of CO2 hydrate exchange technology, developed in the laboratory, on a natural methane hydrate-bearing reservoir. This included verifying the chemical exchange of CO2 with methane in addition to maintaining injectivity. Drilled in 2011, the Ignik Sikumi #1 well was perforated in February 2012. The pilot was designed as a 'huff and puff' style test where a single well is used first for injection then followed with production. The target for the test was a 10 m sand zone estimated to contain 70-80% hydrate saturation. For 13 days, over 5600 m3 of a CO2 mixture (77mol% N2, 23 mol% CO2) were injected in the hydrate-bearing interval. Injectivity was maintained over this period. Following injection, flow back commenced over a 30 day period. The production started by maintaining a bottom hole pressure above the dissociation pressure above methane hydrate. At later times, the bottom hole pressure was lowered causing both pore space fluids to be produced along with dissociation of non-exchanged original methane hydrate. In total, over 23,700 m3 of methane was produced over the production period.

  13. Seasonal patterns of tropical forest leaf area index and CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-03-01

    We used in situ and satellite measurements to investigate the seasonal patterns of leaf area index (LAI) and gross ecosystem CO2 exchange (GEE) by an evergreen tropical forest. The forest experienced a dry season from June through November. The rates of light-saturated CO2 uptake (GEE) were comparatively high from December through March and low from May through July. In situ measurements showed that LAI varied seasonally, with a minimum from May through September. Leaf production and leaf abscission were reduced from December through April. Leaf abscission increased in May, which reduced LAI. High rates of leaf abscission and production occurred from July through September associated with leaf turnover. Leaf abscission decreased abruptly in October, while production continued, which rapidly increased LAI. Leaf phenology was not directly correlated with changes in soil water. The seasonal cycle of in situ LAI differed markedly from the seasonal cycles of in situ normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MOD15 LAI product. We hypothesize that the NDVI and MOD15 seasonality at the site is driven partly by seasonal changes in leaf age and leaf reflectance. We developed three simple models to investigate the causes of GEE seasonality. The first two models showed that the seasonal changes in LAI alone, and the effects of leaf age on leaf-level photosynthesis alone, could not account for the observed GEE seasonality. The third model showed that the combined effect of seasonal changes in LAI and seasonal changes in leaf age and leaf photosynthesis was sufficient to account for the observed GEE seasonality.

  14. Simultaneous measurements of CO2 and water exchanges over three agroecosystems in South-West France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, P.; Lamaud, E.; Brunet, Y.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Loustau, D.; Irvine, M.

    2009-02-01

    During the last few decades, many studies have been performed to determine water and carbon budgets of broadleaf and deciduous forests, crops and grasslands. However, since most measurements have been made in different regions and at different periods, it is difficult to compare the results directly. In order to evaluate accurately the respective contribution of various agroecosystems to global water and carbon exchanges, it is necessary to compare data obtained in similar climatic and weather conditions. To address this question, we present the results from simultaneous measurements carried out from 31 March 2007 to 3 March 2008 over three typical agroecosystems of the Les Landes region in South-West France: an agricultural field with maize from 29 May to 18 October, a young (5 year-old) pine forest and a mature (37 year-old) pine forest. All measurements were collected as part of the Regional Experiment component of the CarboEurope-IP project. During most of the year, the agricultural field without vegetation is a source of CO2, but from late June to early September the maize crop becomes a stronger carbon sink than the forests. Over the whole measurement period the three agroecosystems behave as CO2 sinks with carbon storage of about 500, 330 and 230 gC m-2 for the young forest, the mature forest and the agricultural field, respectively. Daily Water Use Efficiencies (WUE) of the three ecosystems were evaluated and expressed as functions of the mean daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Similar trends were observed for the two forests, which suggests that for a given species WUE is independent of stand age. The WUE of the maize crop at maturity was also found to depend upon VPD, but it is about twice as large as for the forests, owing to the physiological advantages of C4 species.

  15. Interannual responses of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and NEP of intact tallgrass prairie ecosystems to an anomalously warm year under elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, John; Jasoni, Richard; Coulombe, William; Verburg, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Increases in anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) levels in the atmosphere continue to warm the troposphere and cause a higher frequency and intensity of extremely warm climatic events. Because the terrestrial biosphere strongly influences the fluxes of CO2, the most important GHG, to and from the atmosphere globally, quantification of the responses of these ecosystems to extremely warm years is essential to project how ecosystem process such as net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) will be affected, and to predict how these responses will impact atmospheric CO2 levels. Our earlier research with intact grassland ecosystems using the EcoCELL large-scale controlled environment facility under present day atmospheric CO2 concentrations demonstrated a 1-2 year lagged recovery time of NEE and NEP (with NEP= net primary productivity [NPP] minus heterotrophic respiration [Rh]) in response to exposure to an anomalously (+4° C) warm year (Arnone et al. 2008-Nature 455:383-386). This lagged effect was attributed to large reductions in NPP during the warm year and then a 1-year delayed increase in Rh followed in the next year by a recovery. Responses of NPP resulted primarily from decreases in leaf stomatal conductance and photosynthesis caused by warming-induced high vapor pressure deficits (VPDs) and drying soil in the rooting zone. Lagged responses in Rh resulted from dry surface soils occurring during the anomalously warm year followed by a recovery in soil moisture in the following year, with carbon fixed and deposited in the rhizosphere during warm year-in addition to carbon fixed and deposited in the rhizosphere during the year following-able to be decomposed in the year after the temperature extreme. Given the large modulating role that these hydrologic factors (VPD, soil moisture) played in defining responses of NEE and NEP to an extremely warm year, and the fact that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations can alleviate these hydrologic

  16. Direct Measurements of Leaf Level CH4 and CO2 Exchange in a Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, P.; Lindroth, A.; Vestin, P.; Båth, A.

    2008-12-01

    Reports of aerobic CH4 sources from leaves and litter of a variety of forests and plant functional types have added a potential mystery to our understanding of CH4 dynamics especially if these sources contribute enough to have a significant impact on the global budget. We have made direct measurements of leaf level CH4 and CO2 exchange using a quartz branch cuvette in a boreal forest in Norunda, Sweden since August of this year. The cuvette was temperature controlled and was designed to close for 5 minutes every 30 minutes. Air was circulated to a Los Gatos CH4/CO2 infrared absorption laser spectrometer. Air and cuvette temperatures, PAR and UV radiation (Kipp and Zonen, CUV4; spectral range 300-380 nm) were measured at the branch chamber. The study was made in the Norunda 100 years old stand consisting of a mixture of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) , Birch (Betula sp.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The cuvette was moved between trees at roughly 5 day intervals. A null empty cuvette period was included in the rotation. The initial data show the expected CO2 uptake correlated with incident PAR and low rates of emission at night. However, there was no clear pattern of emissions detectable in the CH4. We estimate that we should be able to resolve a change of 0.5 ppbv CH4 min- 1 with our analytical setup. Both the daytime (1000-1600) and nighttime (2200-0400) averages were less than our detection. Even on very sunny days with high PAR and UV flux values, no consistent pattern was detectable. The lack of a distinct signal may be due to the fact that the past month has been very rainy, it is late in the growth season at these latitudes and sun angles are increasing quickly. The trees were at the northern edge of a clearing and we were also measuring mid height (2-3 m) leaves and branches of young trees. The branch cuvette design can also be optimized to improve its sensitivity.

  17. Energy and CO2 exchanges and influencing factors in spring wheat ecosystem along the Heihe River, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuchen; Shao, Ming'an; Gao, Hongbei

    2016-12-01

    Spring wheat ( Triticum aestivum Linn.) is an important crop for food security in the desert-oasis farmland in the middle reaches of the Heihe River in northwestern China. We measured fluxes using eddy covariance and meteorological parameters to explore the energy fluxes and the relationship between CO2 flux and climate change in this region during the wheat growing seasons in 2013 and 2014. The energy balance closures were 70.5% and 72.7% in the 2013 and 2014 growing season, respectively. The wheat ecosystem had distinct seasonal and diurnal dynamics of CO2 fluxes with U-shaped curves. The accumulated net ecosystemic CO2 exchanges (NEE) were -111.6 and -142.2 g C/m2 in 2013 and 2014 growing season, respectively. The ecosystem generally acted as a CO2 sink during the growing season but became a CO2 source after the wheat harvest. A correlation analysis indicated that night-time CO2 fluxes were exponentially dependent on air temperature and soil temperature at a depth of 5 cm but were not correlated with soil-water content, water-vapour pressure, or vapour-pressure deficit. CO2 flux was not correlated with the meteorological parameters during daytime. However, irrigation and precipitation, may complicate the response of CO2 fluxes to other meteorological parameters.

  18. Assessing filtering of mountaintop CO2 mole fractions for application to inverse models of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B.-G. J.; Desai, A. R.; Stephens, B. B.; Bowling, D. R.; Burns, S. P.; Watt, A. S.; Heck, S. L.; Sweeney, C.

    2012-02-01

    There is a widely recognized need to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchanges in areas of complex terrain including the United States Mountain West. CO2 fluxes over mountainous terrain are often difficult to measure due to unusual and complicated influences associated with atmospheric transport. Consequently, deriving regional fluxes in mountain regions with carbon cycle inversion of atmospheric CO2 mole fraction is sensitive to filtering of observations to those that can be represented at the transport model resolution. Using five years of CO2 mole fraction observations from the Regional Atmospheric Continuous CO2 Network in the Rocky Mountains (Rocky RACCOON), five statistical filters are used to investigate a range of approaches for identifying regionally representative CO2 mole fractions. Test results from three filters indicate that subsets based on short-term variance and local CO2 gradients across tower inlet heights retain nine-tenths of the total observations and are able to define representative diel variability and seasonal cycles even for difficult-to-model sites where the influence of local fluxes is much larger than regional mole fraction variations. Test results from two other filters that consider measurements from previous and following days using spline fitting or sliding windows are overly selective. Case study examples showed that these windowing-filters rejected measurements representing synoptic changes in CO2, which suggests that they are not well suited to filtering continental CO2 measurements. We present a novel CO2 lapse rate filter that uses CO2 differences between levels in the model atmosphere to select subsets of site measurements that are representative on model scales. Our new filtering techniques provide guidance for novel approaches to assimilating mountain-top CO2 mole fractions in carbon cycle inverse models.

  19. Towards a consistent approach of measuring and modelling CO2 exchange with manual chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Vytas; Vaidya, Shrijana; Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Günther, Anke; Gundlach, Laura; Hagemann, Ulrike; Elsgaard, Lars; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Determining ecosystem CO2 exchange with the manual closed chamber method has been applied in the past for e.g. plant, soil or treatment on a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. Its major limitation is the discontinuous data acquisation challenging any gap-filling procedures. In addition, both data acquisition and gap-filling of closed chamber data have been carried out in different ways in the past. The reliability and comparability of the derived results from different closed chamber studies has therefore remained unclear. Hence, this study compares two different approaches of obtaining fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) either via sunrise to noon or via gradually-shaded mid-day measurements of transparent chamber fluxes (i.e. net ecosystem exchange, NEE) and opaque chamber fluxes (i.e., ecosystem respiration, RECO) on a field experiment plot in NE Germany cropped with a lucerne-clover-grass mix. Additionally, we compare three approaches of pooling RECO data for consecutive modelling of annual balances of NEE, i.e. campaign-wise (single measurement day RECO models), seasonal-wise (one RECO model for the entire study period), and cluster-wise (two RECO models representing low-/high-vegetation-stage data) modelling. The annual NEE balances of the sunrise to noon measurements are insensitive towards differing RECO modelling approaches (-101 to -131 g C m-2), whereas the choice of modelling annual NEE balances with the shaded mid-day measurements must be taken carefully (-200 to 425 g C m-2). In addition, the campaign-wise RECO modelling approach is very sensitive to daily data pooling (sunrise vs. mid-day) and only advisable when the diurnal variability of CO2 fluxes and environmental parameters (i.e. photosynthetically active radiation, temperature) is sufficiently covered. The seasonal- and cluster-wise approaches lead to robust NEE balances with only little variation in terms of daily data collection. We therefore recommend sunrise to noon measurements and

  20. Environment and phenology: CO2 net ecosystem exchange and CO2 flux partitioning at an acid and oligotrophic mire system in northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gažovič, Michal; Peichl, Matthias; Vermeij, Ilse; Limpens, Juul; Nilsson, Mats. B.

    2015-04-01

    Static chamber and environmental measurements in combination with vegetation indices (i.e. vascular green area (VGA) and the greenness chromatic color index (gcc) derived from digital camera images) were used to investigate effects of environment and phenology on the CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and CO2 flux partitioning at the Degerö Stormyr site in northern Sweden (64°11' 23.565" N, 19°33' 55.291 E) during two environmentally different years. Our measurement design included a control plot, a moss plot (where vascular plants were removed by clipping) and four heterotrophic respiration (RH) collars (where all green moss and vascular plant biomass were removed) to partition between soil heterotrophic and plant autotrophic (moss and vascular plants) respiration (RA), as well as between moss and vascular plant gross primary production (GPP). Environmental conditions, especially the shallow snow cover, peat soil frost and cold spring in 2014 caused delayed onset of spring green up, reduced soil respiration flux and reduced GPP of vascular plants. Soil temperature measured in 26 cm depth started to rise from spring temperatures of ~ 0.6 °C in 2013 and 0.15 °C in 2014 about 20 days earlier in 2013 compared to 2014. With earlier onset of the growing season and higher soil temperatures in 2013, heterotrophic soil respiration was higher in year 2013 than in year 2014. In 2013, RH dominated the total ecosystem respiration in all months but June and August. On contrary, autotrophic respiration dominated ecosystem respiration in all months of 2014. In both years, vascular plants and mosses were more or less equally contributing to autotrophic respiration. We measured higher GPP in year 2013 compared to year 2014. Also VGA and gcc were higher in spring and throughout the rest of 2013 compared to 2014. The onset of VGA was delayed by ~ 10 days in 2014. In general, total GPP was dominated by GPP of vascular plants in both years, although moss GPP had substantial

  1. Inter-annual variability of summertime CO2 exchange in Northern Eurasia inferred from GOSAT XCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, M.; Mabuchi, K.; Shirai, T.; Inoue, M.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Yoshida, Y.; Belikov, D.; Maksyutov, S.

    2016-10-01

    Northern Eurasia is one of the largest terrestrial carbon reservoirs on the Earth’s surface. However, since the coverage of surface CO2 observations is still limited, the response to the climate variability remains uncertain. We estimated monthly CO2 fluxes for three sub-regions in Northern Eurasia (north of ˜60°N), Northeastern Europe, Western Siberia and Eastern Siberia, using CO2 retrievals from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). The variations of estimated CO2 fluxes were examined in terms of the regional climate variability, for the three consecutive growing seasons of 2009-2011. The CO2 fluxes estimated using GOSAT data are highly correlated with the surface temperature anomalies in July and August (r > 0.8) while no correlation is found in the CO2 fluxes estimated only using surface observations. The estimated fluxes from GOSAT data exhibit high negative correlations with one-month lagged positive precipitation anomalies in late summer (r > -0.7) through surface temperature and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The results indicate that GOSAT data reflects the changes in terrestrial biospheric processes responding to climate anomalies. In 2010, a large part of Eurasia experienced an extremely hot and dry summer, while cold and wet weather conditions were recorded in Western Siberia. The CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT data showed a reduction of net CO2 uptake in Northeastern Europe and Eastern Siberia, but the enhancement of net CO2 uptake in Western Siberia. These opposite sub-regional flux anomalies can be explained by the different climate anomalies on a sub-regional scale in Northern Eurasia. Thus, this study demonstrates that space-based observations by GOSAT compensate for the lack of ground-based observational coverage so as to better capture the inter-annually varying atmosphere-terrestrial biosphere CO2 exchange on a regional scale.

  2. Water and nitrogen availability co-control ecosystem CO2 exchange in a semiarid temperate steppe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Tan, Yulian; Li, Ang; Ren, Tingting; Chen, Shiping; Wang, Lixin; Huang, Jianhui

    2015-10-23

    Both water and nitrogen (N) availability have significant effects on ecosystem CO2 exchange (ECE), which includes net ecosystem productivity (NEP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP). How water and N availability influence ECE in arid and semiarid grasslands is still uncertain. A manipulative experiment with additions of rainfall, snow and N was conducted to test their effects on ECE in a semiarid temperate steppe of northern China for three consecutive years with contrasting natural precipitation. ECE increased with annual precipitation but approached peak values at different precipitation amount. Water addition, especially summer water addition, had significantly positive effects on ECE in years when the natural precipitation was normal or below normal, but showed trivial effect on GEP when the natural precipitation was above normal as effects on ER and NEP offset one another. Nitrogen addition exerted non-significant or negative effects on ECE when precipitation was low but switched to a positive effect when precipitation was high, indicating N effect triggered by water availability. Our results indicate that both water and N availability control ECE and the effects of future precipitation changes and increasing N deposition will depend on how they can change collaboratively in this semiarid steppe ecosystem.

  3. CO2 exchange of CAM exhibiting succulents in the southern Namib desert in relation to microclimate and water stress.

    PubMed

    Von Willert, D J; Brinckmann, E; Eller, B M; Scheitler, B

    1983-09-01

    The responses of CO2 exchange and overnight malate accumulation of leaf and stem succulent CAM-plants to water stress and the particular climatic conditions of fog and föhn in the southern Namib desert have been investigated. In most of the investigated CAM plants a long term water stress gradually attenuated any uptake of external CO2 and led to CO2 release throughout day and night. No CAM-idling was observed. Rainfall or irrigation immediately restored daytime CO2 uptake while the recovery of the nocturnal CO2 uptake was delayed. Dawn peak of photosynthesis was only found in well watered plants but was markedly reduced by the short term water stress of a föhn-storm. Morning fog with its higher diffuse light intensity compared with clear days increased photosynthetic CO2 uptake considerably. Even in well watered plants nocturnal CO2 uptake and malate accumulation were strongly affected by föhn indicating that the water vapour pressure deficit during the night determines the degree of acidification.

  4. CO(2)-forced evolution of plant gas exchange capacity and water-use efficiency over the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    Franks, P J; Beerling, D J

    2009-03-01

    The capacity of plants to fix carbon is ultimately constrained by two core plant attributes: photosynthetic biochemistry and the conductance to CO(2) diffusion from the atmosphere to sites of carboxylation in chloroplasts, predominantly stomatal conductance. Analysis of fossilized plant remains shows that stomatal density (number per unit area, D) and size (length by width, S) have fluctuated widely over the Phanerozoic Eon, indicating changes in maximum stomatal conductance. Parallel changes are likely to have taken place in leaf photosynthetic biochemistry, of which maximal rubisco carboxylation rate, V(cmax) is a central element. We used measurements of S and D from fossilized plant remains spanning the last 400 Myr (most of the Phanerozoic), together with leaf gas exchange data and modeled Phanerozoic trends in atmospheric CO(2) concentration, [CO(2)](a), to calibrate a [CO(2)](a)-driven model of the long-term environmental influences on S, D and V(cmax). We show that over the Phanerozoic large changes in [CO(2)](a) forced S, D and V(cmax) to co-vary so as to reduce the impact of the change in [CO(2)](a) on leaf CO(2) assimilation for minimal energetic cost and reduced nitrogen requirements. Underlying this is a general negative correlation between S and D, and a positive correlation between water-use efficiency and [CO(2)](a). Furthermore, the calculated steady rise in stomatal conductance over the Phanerozoic is consistent with independent evidence for the evolution of plant hydraulic capacity, implying coordinated and sustained increase in gas exchange capacity and hydraulic capacity parallel long-term increases in land plant diversity.

  5. Simultaneous measurements of CO2 and water exchanges over three agroecosystems in South-West France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, P.; Lamaud, E.; Brunet, Y.; Bonnefond, J.-M.; Loustau, D.; Irvine, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the last few decades, many studies have been performed to determine water and carbon budgets of broadleaf and deciduous forests, crops and grasslands. However, since most measurements have been made in different regions and at different periods, it is difficult to compare the results directly. In order to evaluate accurately the respective contribution of various agroecosystems to global water and carbon exchanges, it is necessary to compare data obtained in similar climatic and weather conditions. To address this question, we present the results from simultaneous measurements carried out during one year over three typical agroecosystems of the Les Landes region in South-West France:~an agricultural field with maize from 29 May to 18 October, a young (5 year-old) pine forest and a mature (37 year-old) pine forest. All measurements were collected as part of the Regional Experiment component of the CarboEurope-IP project. During most of the year, the agricultural field without vegetation is a source of CO2, but from late June to early September the maize crop becomes a stronger carbon sink than the forests. Over the whole measurement period the three agroecosystems behave as CO2 sinks with carbon storage of about 335, 210 and 160 g C m-2 for the young forest, the mature forest and the agricultural field, respectively. We investigated the influence of climatic conditions on Gross Primary Production (GPP) of the three ecosystems and observed a predominant role of vapour pressure deficit (VPD) for forests and of photosynthetic photon flux density (FPP) for maize. Daily Water Use Efficiencies (WUE) of the three ecosystems were evaluated and expressed as functions of the mean daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Similar trends were observed for the two forests, which suggests that for a given species WUE is independent of stand age. The WUE of the maize crop at maturity was also found to depend upon VPD, but it is about twice as large as for the forests, owing to

  6. Improved method for measuring the apparent CO2 photocompensation point resolves the impact of multiple internal conductances to CO2 to net gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been growing concern about methods used to measure the CO2 photocompensation point, a vital parameter to model leaf photosynthesis. the CO2 photocompensation point is often measured as the common intercept of several CO2 response curves, but this method may over-estimate the CO2 photocompe...

  7. Standing litter as a driver of interannual CO2 exchange variability in a freshwater marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. V.; Potts, D. L.; Goulden, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh (SJFM) is a seasonally flooded Typha wetland in Southern California that is characterized by high rates of Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) and a large accumulation of standing leaf litter. The ANPP, Gross and Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (GEE and NEE), and Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) at the SJFM fluctuate by ˜40% from year to year, in ways that are not directly attributable to variation in weather or the maximum green Leaf Area Index (LAImax). We tested the hypothesis that this variation is caused by a negative feedback between ANPP, the buildup of leaf litter, shading of green leaves by litter, a reduction in GEE and NEE, and a subsequent reduction in ANPP. Litter manipulations on replicated plots demonstrated that the presence of standing litter decreased plot-level NEE by 17 to 47% and surface EVI by 25 to 48%, even as green Leaf Area Index (LAIgreen) was held constant. Plot level NEE and surface EVI remained tightly correlated, and largely decoupled from LAIgreen, as standing litter was varied. This pattern paralleled that observed for the entire marsh, where NEE and EVI remained tightly correlated, and largely decoupled from LAImax, from year to year. Correcting LAIgreen and LAImax for the amount of shading caused by standing litter improved the correlations between LAI and EVI and NEE, indicating that EVI and NEE are most sensitive to the amount of unshaded LAI. The accumulation of standing litter at the SJFM decouples the relationships between LAI and EVI and NEE, and appears to be important for controlling the interannual variability observed at the site.

  8. Biogenic emissions and CO 2 gas exchange investigated on four Mediterranean shrubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; van Eijk, J.; Bertin, N.; Staudt, M.; Kotzias, D.; Seufert, G.; Fugit, J.-L.; Torres, L.; Cecinato, A.; Brancaleoni, E.; Ciccioli, P.; Bomboi, T.

    In order to investigate the impact of plant physiology on emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds monoterpene emission rates from Rosmarinus officinalis (L.) and Pistacia lentiscus (L.) and isoprene emission rates from Erica arborea (L.) and Myrtus communis (L.) were determined. The study, an activity in the framework of BEMA (Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area), was carried out in May 1994 at Castelporziano near Rome in Italy, using a dynamic enclosure technique combined with recording CO 2 gas exchange, temperature and irradiance data. The monoterpenes dominating the emission pattern were 1,8-cineol, α-pinene and β-pinene for rosemary and α-pinene, linalool and β-pinene + sabinene for pistachio. Total monoterpene emission rates standardized to 30°C of 1.84 ± 0.24 and 0.35 ± 0.04 μg Cg -1 dw h -1 were found for rosemary and pistachio, respectively (on a leaf dry weight basis). Myrtle emitted 22.2 ± 4.9 μg C g -1 dw h -1 at standard conditions (30°C, PAR 1000 μmol photons m -2 s -1 as isoprene and erica 5.61 μg C g -1 dw h -1 The carbon loss due to terpenoid emissions per photosynthetically carbon uptake was about 0.01-0.1% for the monoterpene emitters. The isoprene emitting shrubs lost 0-0.9% of the assimilated carbon. The rapid induction of emissions in the sun after temporary shading indicates that isoprene emissions were closely linked to photosynthesis. A higher proportion of the assimilated carbon was lost as isoprene under conditions of high light and temperature compared to the morning and evening hours.

  9. Land use affects the net ecosystem CO(2) exchange and its components in mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, M; Bahn, M; Wohlfahrt, G; Tappeiner, U; Cernusca, A

    2010-08-01

    Changes in land use and management have been strongly affecting mountain grassland, however, their effects on the net ecosystem exchange of CO(2) (NEE) and its components have not yet been well documented. We analysed chamber-based estimates of NEE, gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R) and light use efficiency (LUE) of six mountain grasslands differing in land use and management, and thus site fertility, for the growing seasons of 2002 to 2008. The main findings of the study are that: (1) land use and management affected seasonal NEE, GPP and R, which all decreased from managed to unmanaged grasslands; (2) these changes were explained by differences in leaf area index (LAI), biomass and leaf-area-independent changes that were likely related to photosynthetic physiology; (3) diurnal variations of NEE were primarily controlled by photosynthetically active photon flux density and soil and air temperature; seasonal variations were associated with changes in LAI; (4) parameters of light response curves were generally closely related to each other, and the ratio of R at a reference temperature/ maximum GPP was nearly constant across the sites; (5) similarly to our study, maximum GPP and R for other grasslands on the globe decreased with decreasing land use intensity, while their ratio remained remarkably constant. We conclude that decreasing intensity of management and, in particular, abandonment of mountain grassland lead to a decrease in NEE and its component processes. While GPP and R are generally closely coupled during most of the growing season, GPP is more immediately and strongly affected by land management (mowing, grazing) and season. This suggests that management and growing season length, as well as their possible future changes, may play an important role for the annual C balance of mountain grassland.

  10. The impact of land use on the net ecosystem CO2 exchanges in the West African Sudanian Savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauder, Matthias; Quansah, Emmanuel; Annor, Thompson; Balogun, Ahmed A.; Amekudzi, Leonard K.; Bliefernicht, Jan; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The land surface in West Africa has been considerably changed within the past decade due to various anthropogenic measures such as an increased agricultural activity. However, the impact of these land use changes on land-atmosphere exchange processes such as net ecosystems exchange is not well known for this highly vulnerable region. To tackle this problem, the effects of land use on the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) along a transect of three contrasting ecosystems have been investigated on seasonal and annual time scales using the Eddy Covariance method. The ecosystems were grassland (GL), a mixture of fallow and cropland (CR) in the Upper East Region of Ghana, and a nature reserve (NR) near Pô in the Nahouri Province of Burkina Faso. The results for January to December 2013 showed that the ecosystems of the three sites served as net sinks of CO2 during the rainy season (May to October) and net sources of CO2 during the dry season (November to April). However, NR was a net sink of CO2 during the wet to dry transition period (November to December). On an annual timescale, only NR served as a net sink of CO2 from the atmosphere into the ecosystem, while the others were net sources of CO2 into the atmosphere. Furthermore, the study revealed that the three contrasting ecosystems responded to environmental and physiological factors based on the ecosystem functional types. This suggests that land use and land use management may play a significant role in the diurnal to annual sequestration and efflux patterns of NEE and its composite fluxes, gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER), over the West African Sudanian Savannas.

  11. Patterns and controls of CO2 exchange from developed land in the mid-continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, J. P.; Balogun, A. A.; Bauer, M. E.; Peters, E. B.; Wu, J.

    2006-12-01

    The rate at which wildlands and croplands are being developed for human settlement in the Unites States currently exceeds population growth by a factor of two to four. In the mid-continental U.S., the region of the first NACP intensive experiment, the area occupied by traditionally defined urban areas (cities and towns) is 4%, whereas the area covered by relatively lower density residential development is approximately 11% (Radeloff et al. 2005). Developed land areas represent major sources of CO2 and other radiatively- important trace gases due to the concentration of human activities that consume fossil fuels. However, they are also ecosystems with significant tree cover and green spaces that take up CO2 and soils that release CO2. Direct measurements are needed to quantify the land-based sources and sinks of CO2 in developed areas, especially lower density residential land, which is the type that accounts for most of the land- use change. Scaling CO2 exchange from developed land up to heterogeneous regions (10's to 100's of km) requires the integration of continuous in-situ measurements, biophysical models, and remote sensing. We measured CO2, water vapor, and energy fluxes using the eddy covariance technique on a 170-m tall radio transmission tower above a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN. We made concurrent measurements from a mobile tower over an un-irrigated, experimental turfgrass field that is similar to residential lawns in the study area. A preliminary land-cover classification using an new treatment of shadow areas was developed using QuickBird imagery from 2003. A suite of biophysical measurements was made at 7-10 day intervals on a replicated set of sample locations stratified by land cover type. Results from the 2006 growing season showed that seasonal drought and temperature both strongly modulated CO2 exchange, varying from net uptake of 0.79 g m^-2 d^-^1 under mesic conditions to net loss of 1.56 g m^-2 d^-^1 under

  12. Quantifying and Reducing Uncertainty in Eddy Covariance CO2 Exchange Estimates With Large Data Gaps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodeur, J. J.; Arain, M. A.; Peichl, M.

    2009-05-01

    Roving eddy covariance (rEC) applications involve cycling a single, portable rEC system through numerous ecosystems of interest at frequencies of weeks to months. This approach provides capability to measure energy, water and carbon exchanges in many more ecosystems with minimum resources. This approach has been adopted at many flux stations with multiple towers or sites. However, data gaps introduce large uncertainty when sums of annual exchanges are estimated from these measurements. Quantifying reliable carbon uptake/loss estimates, and reducing uncertainty is challenging. Analyses were performed with 5 years of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) measurements made over an age-sequence of managed eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) forests in southern Ontario, Canada. Measurements and synthetic data produced from a permanent closed-path EC system at the 70-year-old site were used to assess uncertainty on annual NEE sums caused by open-path rEC operation at three younger sites (35, 20 and 7 years old). Data was removed both randomly (to simulate short gaps due to typical EC operation), and systematically (to simulate 2-week to 2-month long gaps associated with rEC operation). Numerous gap scenarios were created, with annual data coverage ranging from 35 to 70%. Both Ameriflux Howland (HOW) and Fluxnet Canada Research Network (FCRN) gap-filling models were applied to the gapped-data to produce annual NEE estimates. Both gap-filling methods estimated a baseline uncertainty of ± 25 g C m-2 yr-1, that was associated with short gaps from regular EC operation only. However, when applied to datasets with long rEC gaps, a large discrepancy in gap-filling model performance was evident. The HOW method produced much less overall uncertainty (± 30 to 45 g C m-2 yr-1) in annual sums than the FCRN method (± 45 to > 200 g C m-2 yr-1). Uncertainty in annual sums increased with increases to overall gap frequency and length, as a result of inadequate parameterization of gap

  13. Influence of surface kinematics on air-sea heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, Ken

    2004-11-01

    The top few meters of the oceanic boundary layer play a critical role in the transfers of momentum, gas, mass and heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. These exchanges must necessarily transfer through the surface, and presumably, the rates at which they do are influence by the dynamics of the surface layer. Heat flux in particular is regulated by the thin surface thermal layer which, at most, is only a few millimeter thick. We are specifically interested in the influence of small coherent structures of the surface turbulence on the heat flux. Using active and passive infrared imaging, we measured the evolution the surface velocity and temperature fields over small areas of a few square meters. High-resolution surface Eulerian velocity fields using cross-correlation techniques (PIV) are obtained. Using active marking of the surface with an infrared CO2 laser, we have not only shown that it is possible to directly recover the Langrangian surface velocity, but also, by marking appropriate patterns on the surface we have been able to measure the shear strain, vorticity, and surface divergence. With the penetration depth of infrared radiation at these wavelengths being a few microns, these techniques appear to be quite apt for direct measurements of ocean surface turbulence. We have also found that the flux of heat through the surface appears to be influenced by the surface wave field. We will discuss the results in the context of air sea heat flux and ocean surface turbulence.

  14. A multiscale and multidisciplinary investigation of ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange over the rocky mountains of colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Oncley, S.P.; Burns, Sean P.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; Campos, T.; Monson, Russell K.; Schimel, D.S.; Sacks, W.J.; De Wekker, S. F. J.; Lai, C.-T.; Lamb, B.; Ojima, D.; Ellsworth, P.Z.; Sternberg, L.S.L.; Zhong, S.; Clements, C.; Moore, D.J.P.; Anderson, D.E.; Watt, A.S.; Hu, Jiawen; Tschudi, M.; Aulenbach, S.; Allwine, E.; Coons, T.

    2010-01-01

    A field study combined with modeling investigation demonstrated that the organization of CO2 transport by mountain terrain strongly affects the regional CO2 budget. Atmospheric dynamics can lead to complicated flows generated by inhomogeneous landscapes, topography or synoptic weather systems. The field campaign conducted of a ground deployment, the Carbon in the Mountain Experiment (CME04), and an aircraft deployment of the national Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) C-130, the Airborne Carbon in the Mountains Experiment (ACME04) over the period of spring to fall of 2004 to cover the seasonal variation of ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange. The role of the mountain circulation in CO2 transport can be played over seemingly flat terrain by mesoscale flows generated by various physical processes. The three dimensional observation strategy considered can also be applied over flat terrain.

  15. The air-sea DMS exchange experiment at platform Noordwijk, Dutch coastal zone: I. Spatial and temporal variability of biochemical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefels, J.; Dacey, J. W. H.; Warneke, C.; Hintsa, E.; Zemmelink, H. J.

    2003-04-01

    One of the tasks within the project "Iron Resources and Ocean Nutrients - Advancement of Global Environmental Simulations" (IRONAGES) is to improve global ocean models with a functional description of the production of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in relation to biochemical parameters. Emission of DMS from sea to atmosphere and its subsequent oxidation in the atmosphere affects the radiative properties of skies and clouds and it is therefore an important parameter in climate models. The flux of DMS across the air-sea interface is, however, still inaccurately determined. Up to date, fluxes are calculated from the product of the concentration difference between sea and air (which is effectively equal to the sea water concentration) and a kinetic factor, known as the transfer velocity (k). Estimations of k vary by a factor of two. Moreover, the DMS concentration in the water is subject to a wide variety of biological, chemical and hydrographical processes. More accurate estimates of DMS-fluxes, can only be provided by direct flux measurements in combination with knowledge on the characteristics of the source area.. During a joint pilot study on platform "Noordwijk", 10 km off shore the Dutch coast, direct flux measurements were compared with the conventional estimation of the DMS-flux. DMS is produced by enzymatic cleavage of dimethylsulphonio-propionate (DMSP), a compound produced by marine algae. Both the production of DMSP and its conversion into DMS are subject to a complex set of processes, related to the functioning of the foodweb. In addition, the flux of DMS to the atmosphere is dependent on the wind speed and temperature and the background concentration of DMS in the atmosphere is affected by oxidation processes. Here, we present data on the temporal (daily) and spatial (in the fetch area of the platform) heterogeneity of biological and chemical parameters in this highly turbulent and heterogeneous area, and their relationship to the concentration of aqueous and

  16. Acclimation of ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Alaskan Arctic in response to decadal climate warming

    PubMed

    Oechel; Vourlitis; Hastings; Zulueta; Hinzman; Kane

    2000-08-31

    Long-term sequestration of carbon in Alaskan Arctic tundra ecosystems was reversed by warming and drying of the climate in the early 1980s, resulting in substantial losses of terrestrial carbon. But recent measurements suggest that continued warming and drying has resulted in diminished CO2 efflux, and in some cases, summer CO2 sink activity. Here we compile summer CO2 flux data for two Arctic ecosystems from 1960 to the end of 1998. The results show that a return to summer sink activity has come during the warmest and driest period observed over the past four decades, and indicates a previously undemonstrated capacity for ecosystems to metabolically adjust to long-term (decadal or longer) changes in climate. The mechanisms involved are likely to include changes in nutrient cycling, physiological acclimation, and population and community reorganization. Nevertheless, despite the observed acclimation, the Arctic ecosystems studied are still annual net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere of at least 40 g C m(-2) yr(-1), due to winter release of CO2, implying that further climate change may still exacerbate CO2 emissions from Arctic ecosystems.

  17. Air-sea interactions in sea surface temperature frontal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianezze, Joris; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reynaud, Thierry; Marié, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Garnier, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Representation of air-sea exchanges in coastal, regional and global models represent a challenge firstly due to the small scale of acting turbulent processes comparatively to the resolved scales of these models. Beyond this subgrid parameterization issue, a comprehensive understanding of air-sea interactions at the turbulent process scales is still lacking. Many successful efforts are dedicated to measure the energy and mass exchanges between atmosphere and ocean, including the effect of surface waves. In comparison less efforts are brought to understand the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer and the oceanic mixing layer. In this regard, we are developing research mainly based on ideal and realistic numerical simulations which resolve very small scales (horizontal resolutions from 1 to 100 meters) in using grid nesting technics and coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere models. As a first step, the impact of marked gradients in sea surface temperatures (SST) on air-sea exchanges has been explored through realistic numerical simulations at 100m horizontal resolution. Results from simulations of a case observed during the FROMVAR experiment will be shown. The talk will mainly focus on the marked impact of SST front on the atmospheric boundary layer (stability and winds), the air-sea exchanges and surface parameters (rugosity, drag coefficient) Results will be also shown on the strong impact on the simulated atmosphere of small scale variability of SST field.

  18. Winter observations of CO2 exchange between sea ice and the atmosphere in a coastal fjord environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, J.; Sørensen, L. L.; Papakyriakou, T.; Else, B.; Sejr, M. K.; Haubjerg Søgaard, D.; Barber, D.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-08-01

    Eddy covariance observations of CO2 fluxes were conducted during March-April 2012 in a temporally sequential order for 8, 4 and 30 days, respectively, at three locations on fast sea ice and on newly formed polynya ice in a coastal fjord environment in northeast Greenland. CO2 fluxes at the sites characterized by fast sea ice (ICEI and DNB) were found to increasingly reflect periods of strong outgassing in accordance with the progression of springtime warming and the occurrence of strong wind events: FCO2ICE1 = 1.73 ± 5 mmol m-2 day-1 and FCO2DNB = 8.64 ± 39.64 mmol m-2 day-1, while CO2 fluxes at the polynya site (POLYI) were found to generally reflect uptake FCO2POLY1 = -9.97 ± 19.8 mmol m-2 day-1. Values given are the mean and standard deviation, and negative/positive values indicate uptake/outgassing, respectively. A diurnal correlation analysis supports a significant connection between site energetics and CO2 fluxes linked to a number of possible thermally driven processes, which are thought to change the pCO2 gradient at the snow-ice interface. The relative influence of these processes on atmospheric exchanges likely depends on the thickness of the ice. Specifically, the study indicates a predominant influence of brine volume expansion/contraction, brine dissolution/concentration and calcium carbonate formation/dissolution at sites characterized by a thick sea-ice cover, such that surface warming leads to an uptake of CO2 and vice versa, while convective overturning within the sea-ice brines dominate at sites characterized by comparatively thin sea-ice cover, such that nighttime surface cooling leads to an uptake of CO2 to the extent permitted by simultaneous formation of superimposed ice in the lower snow column.

  19. Water availability drives gas exchange and growth of trees in northeastern US, not elevated CO2 and reduced acid deposition

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Mathieu; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Pederson, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) exhibit high uncertainty about how climate change, elevated atmospheric CO2 (atm. CO2) concentration, and atmospheric pollutants will impact carbon sequestration in forested ecosystems. Although the individual roles of these environmental factors on tree growth are understood, analyses examining their simultaneous effects are lacking. We used tree-ring isotopic data and structural equation modeling to examine the concurrent and interacting effects of water availability, atm. CO2 concentration, and SO4 and nitrogen deposition on two broadleaf tree species in a temperate mesic forest in the northeastern US. Water availability was the strongest driver of gas exchange and tree growth. Wetter conditions since the 1980s have enhanced stomatal conductance, photosynthetic assimilation rates and, to a lesser extent, tree radial growth. Increased water availability seemingly overrides responses to reduced acid deposition, CO2 fertilization, and nitrogen deposition. Our results indicate that water availability as a driver of ecosystem productivity in mesic temperate forests is not adequately represented in DGVMs, while CO2 fertilization is likely overrepresented. This study emphasizes the importance to simultaneously consider interacting climatic and biogeochemical drivers when assessing forest responses to global environmental changes. PMID:28393872

  20. Enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange caused by amplified plant productivity in northern ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Matthias; Carvalhais, Nuno; Rödenbeck, Christian; Keeling, Ralph; Heimann, Martin; Thonicke, Kirsten; Zaehle, Sönke; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric monitoring has shown an increase in the seasonal cycle of carbon dioxide (CO2) in high northern latitudes (> 40°N) since the 1960s. The much stronger increase of the seasonal CO2 amplitude in high latitudes compared to low latitudes suggests that northern ecosystems are experiencing large changes in carbon cycle dynamics. However the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood and current climate/carbon cycle models under-estimate observed changes in the seasonal CO2 amplitude. Here we aim to explain the observed latitudinal gradient of seasonal CO2 amplitude trends by contrasting observations from long-term monitoring sites of atmospheric CO2 concentration, satellite observation of vegetation greenness, and global observation-based datasets of gross primary production and net biome productivity, with results from the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model coupled to the TM3 atmospheric transport model. Our results demonstrate that the latitudinal gradient of the enhanced seasonal CO2 amplitude is mainly driven by positive trends in photosynthetic carbon uptake caused by recent climate change and mediated by changing vegetation cover in boreal and arctic ecosystems. Climate change affects processes such as plant physiology, phenology, water availability, and vegetation dynamics, ultimately leading to increased plant productivity and vegetation cover in northern ecosystems in the last decades. Thereby photosynthetic carbon uptake has reacted much more strongly to warming than respiratory carbon release processes. Continued long-term observation of atmospheric CO2 together with ground and satellite observations of land surface and vegetation dynamics will be the key to detect, model, and better predict changes in high-latitude land/carbon cycle dynamics.

  1. The Influence of Internal Model Variability in GEOS-5 on Interhemispheric CO2 Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Melissa; Erickson, David; Kendall, Wesley; Fu, Joshua; Ott, Leslie; Pawson, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An ensemble of eight atmospheric CO2 simulations was completed employing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Earth Observation System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) for the years 2000-2001, each with initial meteorological conditions corresponding to different days in January 2000 to examine internal model variability. Globally, the model runs show similar concentrations of CO2 for the two years, but in regions of high CO2 concentrations due to fossil fuel emissions, large differences among different model simulations appear. The phasing and amplitude of the CO2 cycle at Northern Hemisphere locations in all of the ensemble members is similar to that of surface observations. In several southern hemisphere locations, however, some of the GEOS-5 model CO2 cycles are out of phase by as much as four months, and large variations occur between the ensemble members. This result indicates that there is large sensitivity to transport in these regions. The differences vary by latitude-the most extreme differences in the Tropics and the least at the South Pole. Examples of these differences among the ensemble members with regard to CO2 uptake and respiration of the terrestrial biosphere and CO2 emissions due to fossil fuel emissions are shown at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Integration-based flow analysis of the atmospheric circulation in the model runs shows widely varying paths of flow into the Tasmania region among the models including sources from North America, South America, South Africa, South Asia and Indonesia. These results suggest that interhemispheric transport can be strongly influenced by internal model variability.

  2. The Seasonal and Diurnal Patterns of net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange in a Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, H.; Lai, C.; Wu, C.; Hsia, Y.

    2008-12-01

    difference suggested that water droplets deposited on leaves might partially block the pathway of the gas exchange through stomata as canopy immersed in the very humid air. However, CO2 fluxes did not cease during foggy periods, as also supported by sap flow and leaf chamber measurements, the morphological characteristics of leaf or/and canopy structure might contribute to the well adaptability of this subtropical montane cloud forest to the humid environment.

  3. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  4. [On the analysis of CO2-exchange in bryophyllum : II. Inhibition of starch loss during the night in an atmosphere free from CO2].

    PubMed

    Kluge, M

    1969-06-01

    Starch consumption during the dark period in detached phyllodia of Bryophyllum tubiflorum is inhibited, when the phyllodia are held in an atmosphere free from carbon dioxide during the night. This is true also in other succulent plants with Crassulacean acid metabolism=CAM (examined were Bryophyllum calycinum and Sedum morganianum). This effect seems to indicate that the role of starch in CAM is production of CO2 acceptors rather than production of carbon dioxide by respiration. If the CO2 acceptors are not used, starch consumption comes to an end.This hypothesis could also explain results of experiments in which phyllodia were held at different temperatures during the dark period, and net CO2 fixation, starch loss and malate gain were determined. At 10° CO2 uptake was at a maximum (the necessary supply of CO2 acceptors must have therefore been at a maximum, too). Under these conditions there was the greatest amount of starch consumption. At 23° C, CO2 uptake was clearly lowered, and this was also true for starch consumption. At 35° C net CO2 uptake was balanced by net CO2, output (no CO2 acceptors were needed in CO2 dark fixation). At this temperature no starch loss could be measured.

  5. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have reported that stomata regulate leaf gas-exchange around &ldq...

  6. Towards up-scaling restored wetland CO2 and CH4 exchange in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtevant, C. S.; Knox, S. H.; Koteen, L. E.; Matthes, J. H.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Returning agricultural land to wetlands in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta of northern California (hereafter, the Delta) can help reverse the land subsidence that is currently threatening a large proportion of California's water supply. Wetland restoration maintains plant productivity while drastically reducing the rapid peat decomposition that has occurred since this region was drained for agricultural use in the 1850s. Rebuilding the peat soils i) protects California's water supply by reducing pressure on levies, and ii) mitigates globally rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The more anaerobic soil environment of wetlands, however, promotes methane (CH4) production, a 25x more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. It is therefore important to understand the impact of wetland restoration on both these gases to evaluate both subsidence reversal and climate change mitigation goals. To this end, we are conducting eddy covariance measurements of gas exchange in restored Delta wetlands to quantify ecosystem-scale sequestration/emission of CO2 and CH4. The ultimate goal of these measurements is to be able to predict the effects of wetland restoration on Delta-wide fluxes of these important greenhouse gases. Wetlands, however, are spatially variable ecosystems, varying in substrate, plant species, plant density, and open water fraction, to name a few. Extending site-level measurements to other areas therefore requires attributing spatial variability in CO2 and CH4 exchange to respective sources and identifying spatially available indicators of this change. This poster presents preliminary results evaluating the spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in two restored Delta wetlands and how this variability can be up-scaled to region-wide estimates using remotely sensed indicators.

  7. Hyperspectral measurements for estimating biophysical parameters and CO2 exchanges in a rice field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, M.; Migliavacca, M.; Meroni, M.; Manca, G.; Cogliati, S.; Busetto, L.; Picchi, V.; Galvagno, M.; Colombo, R.; Seufert, G.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this work was to monitor the main biophysical and structural parameters as well as the CO2 exchanges between atmosphere and a terrestrial ecosystem from remote and high spectral resolution spectroradiometric measurements. Estimation of photosynthetic rate or gross primary productivity from remotely sensed data is based on the light use efficiency model (LUE), which states that carbon exchange is a function of the photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (APAR) and the radiation use efficiency (ɛ) which represents the conversion efficiency of energy to fixed carbon. Hyperspectral data were used in this study in order to derived both the APAR of green vegetation and the ɛ term. The experimental site was a rice paddy field in North Italy equipped with an Eddy Covariance (EC) flux measurement tower (Castellaro IES-JRC site). Intensive field campaigns were conducted during summer 2007 and 2008. In each sampling day, canopy optical properties, canopy structure, biophysical and ecophysiological parameters were measured. EC fluxes were calculated with a time step of 30 minutes according to EUROFLUX methodology. Measured half-hourly net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was partitioned to derive half hourly gross ecosystem production (GEP). Canopy reflectance spectra were collected under clear sky conditions using two portable spectrometers (HR4000, OceanOptics, USA) characterised by different spectral resolutions. A spectrometer characterised by a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 nm was used to estimate steady-state fluorescence (F) and a second one with a FWHM of 2.8 nm was used for the computation of traditional vegetation indices (e.g. NVDI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and SAVI, Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) and PRI (Photochemical Reflectance Index, Gamon et al. 1992). F was estimated by exploiting a variation of the Fraunhofer Line Depth (FLD) principle (Plascyk 1975): the spectral fitting method described in Meroni

  8. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange measured by autochambers during the snow-covered season at a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubier, Jill; Crill, Patrick; Mosedale, Andrew

    2002-12-01

    Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 was measured at a temperate peatland in southeastern New Hampshire. Classified as a mineral-poor fen owing to deep, water-logged peats that are influenced to a limited extent by groundwater, the ecosystem is dominated by plants such as sedges (Carex spp.) and evergreen shrubs. Ten automatic chambers measured fluxes every 3 h by sampling changes in headspace concentration of CO2 from November 2000 through March 2001. The fen was covered in snow for most of this period and CO2 was emitted from the snow pack throughout the winter. The largest fluxes were associated with ground temperatures of 0°C and with declining atmospheric pressure. CO2 effluxes up to 3 µmol m-2 s-1 were recorded when the ground temperature reached the thaw point. Fluxes were lower when the ground temperature rose above 0°C, however, suggesting that the large fluxes were associated with a build up and release of stored CO2 degassing as soon as the ground thawed, or by enhanced microbial activity associated with freeze-thaw dynamics. The large number of thaw events coupled with frequent short-term releases of CO2 suggest that degassing occurred on a regular basis with changes in atmospheric pressure and/or microbial decomposition occurred beneath the snowpack. The extent of soil freezing prior to thaw was also an important factor, with colder soils yielding smaller CO2 emissions upon thaw. Although most of the observed CO2 flux was efflux from the ecosystem, occasional CO2 uptake by the ecosystem of up to 1 µmol m-2 s-1 was also observed, indicating small rates of photosynthesis even during winter. Photosynthesis occurred only when the ground temperature was >0°C. The implications for a warmer climate are unclear. If warmer winter temperatures yield less snow in the temperate region, then soils could freeze more deeply and result in lower CO

  9. Simulating potato gas exchange as influenced by CO2 and irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research suggests that an energy balance approach is required for crop models to adequately respond to current and future climatic conditions associated with elevated CO2, higher temperatures, and water scarcity. More realistic models are needed in order to understand the impact of, and deve...

  10. Development of ambulatory arterio-venous carbon dioxide removal (AVCO2R): the downsized gas exchanger prototype for ambulation removes enough CO2 with low blood resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfang; Lick, Scott D; Campbell, Kelly M; Loran, David B; Alpard, Scott K; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Chambers, Sean D

    2005-01-01

    We are developing an ultra compact gas exchanger to allow ambulation during arterial-venous CO2 removal (AVCO2R). The ambulatory AVCO2R gas exchanger (135 ml prime volume and 1.3 M2 gas exchange surface area) is made of polymethylpentene hollow fibers. The gas exchanger was attached to sheep carotid artery (12F) and jugular vein (14F) by percutaneous cannulae for 6 hours (n = 5). Device CO2 removal was measured and calculated at a constant blood flow rate of 1 L/min coupled with varying sweep gas from 1 to 15 L/min, and at constant sweep gas flow of 2 L/min coupled with varying blood flow from 0.5 to 1.25 L/min to determine capacity of CO2 removal at Pa CO2 = 40-50 mm Hg. Blood gases, CO2 removal and hemodynamics were recorded at 0, 3, and 6 hours. CO2 removal increased with sweep gas flow rate and with increase of device blood flow. Hemodynamics remained unchanged throughout study. Gas exchanger resistance remained stable at 2.3 +/- 0.53 mm Hg/L/min. CO2 removal with 1 L/min blood flow and 2 L/min sweep gas was 110 +/- 12 then stabilized at 85 +/- 14 mL/min to 6 hours. The compact ambulatory AVCO2R gas exchanger achieves stable, near total CO2 removal for at least 6 hours with a simple arteriovenous shunt.

  11. Elevated CO(2) and temperature alter net ecosystem C exchange in a young Douglas fir mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Tingey, David T; Lee, E Henry; Phillips, Donald L; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Waschmann, Ronald S; Johnson, Mark G; Olszyk, David M

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the effects of elevated CO(2) (EC) [ambient CO(2) (AC) + 190 ppm] and elevated temperature (ET) [ambient temperature (AT) + 3.6 degrees C] on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of seedling Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mesocosms. As the study utilized seedlings in reconstructed soil-litter-plant systems, we anticipated greater C losses through ecosystem respiration (R(e)) than gains through gross photosynthesis (GPP), i.e. negative NEE. We hypothesized that: (1) EC would increase GPP more than R(e), resulting in NEE being less negative; and (2) ET would increase R(e) more than GPP, resulting in NEE being more negative. We also evaluated effects of CO(2) and temperature on light inhibition of dark respiration. Consistent with our hypothesis, NEE was a smaller C source in EC, not because EC increased photosynthesis but rather because of decreased respiration resulting in less C loss. Consistent with our hypothesis, NEE was more negative in ET because R(e) increased more than GPP. The light level that inhibited respiration varied seasonally with little difference among CO(2) and temperature treatments. In contrast, the degree of light inhibition of respiration was greater in AC than EC. In our system, respiration was the primary control on NEE, as EC and ET caused greater changes in respiration than photosynthesis.

  12. [CO2-exchange in tundra ecosystems of Vaygach Island during the unusually warm and dry vegetation season].

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, D G

    2015-01-01

    In summer of 2013, field studies of CO2-exchange in tundra ecosystems of Vaygach Island have been conducted using the chamber method. The models are developed that establish relationships between CO2 fluxes and key ecological factors such as temperature, photosynthetic active radiation, leaf mass of vascular plants, and depth of thawing. According to the model estimates, in 2013 vegetation season tundra ecosystems of Vaygach Island have been appearing to be a CO2 source to the atmosphere (31.9 ± 17.1 g C m(-2) season(-1)) with gross primary production equal to 136.6 ± 18.9 g C m(-2) season(-1) and ecosystem respiration of 168.5 ± ± 18.4 g C m(-2) season(-1). Emission of CO2 from the soil surface (soil respiration) has been equal, on the average, to 67.3% of the ecosystem respiration. The reason behind carbon losses by tundra ecosystems seems to be unusually warm and dry weather conditions in 2013 summer. The air temperature during summer months has been twice as high as the climatic norm for 1961-1990. Last decades, researches in the circumpolar Arctic revealed a growing trend to the carbon sink from the atmosphere to tundra ecosystems. This trend can be interrupted by unusually warm weather situations becoming more frequent and of larger scale.

  13. Canopy CO2 exchange of two neotropical tree species exhibiting constitutive and facultative CAM photosynthesis, Clusia rosea and Clusia cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Garcia, Milton; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Photon flux density (PFD) and water availability, the daily and seasonal factors that vary most in tropical environments, were examined to see how they influenced expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in 3-year-old Clusia shrubs native to Panama. Instead of the commonly used single-leaf approach, diel CO2 exchange was measured for whole individual canopies of plants in large soil containers inside a naturally illuminated 8.8 m3 chamber. In well-watered C. rosea, a mainly constitutive CAM species, nocturnally fixed CO2 contributed about 50% to 24 h carbon gain on sunny days but the contribution decreased to zero following overcast days. Nonetheless, CO2 fixation in the light responded in such a way that 24 h carbon gain was largely conserved across the range of daily PFDs. The response of C. rosea to drought was similarly buffered. A facultative component of CAM expression led to reversible increases in nocturnal carbon gain that offset drought-induced reductions of CO2 fixation in the light. Clusia cylindrica was a C3 plant when well-watered but exhibited CAM when subjected to water stress. The induction of CAM was fully reversible upon rewatering. C. cylindrica joins C. pratensis as the most unambiguous facultative CAM species reported in the genus Clusia. PMID:19487388

  14. A Data Base of Nutrient Use, Water Use, CO2 Exchange, and Ethylene Production by Soybeans in a Controlled Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Peterson, B. V.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.; Sharifi, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    A data set is given describing daily nutrient and water uptake, carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange, ethylene production, and carbon and nutrient partitioning from a 20 sq m stand of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. McCall] for use in bioregenerative life support systems. Stand CO2 exchange rates were determined from nocturnal increases in CO2 (respiration) and morning drawdowns (net photosynthesis) to a set point of 1000 micromol/ mol each day (i.e., a closed system approach). Atmospheric samples were analyzed throughout growth for ethylene using gas chromatography with photoionization detection (GC/PH)). Water use was monitored by condensate production from the humidity control system, as well as water uptake from the nutrient solution reservoirs each day. Nutrient uptake data were determined from daily additions of stock solution and acid to maintain an EC of 0.12 S/m and pH of 5.8. Dry mass yields of seeds, pods (without seeds), leaves, stems, and roots are provided, as well as elemental and proximate nutritional compositions of the tissues. A methods section is included to qualify any assumptions that might be required for the use of the data in plant growth models, along with a daily event calendar documenting set point adjustments and the occasional equipment or sensor failure.

  15. CO2 Exchange and Growth of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Opuntia ficus-indica under Elevated CO2 in Open-Top Chambers.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, M.; Miller, P. M.; Nobel, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    CO2 uptake, water vapor conductance, and biomass production of Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism species, were studied at CO2 concentrations of 370, 520, and 720 [mu]L L-1 in open-top chambers during a 23-week period. Nine weeks after planting, daily net CO2 uptake for basal cladodes at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 76 and 98% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Eight weeks after daughter cladodes emerged, their daily net CO2 uptake was 35 and 49% higher at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of C02, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Daily water-use efficiency was 88% higher under elevated CO2 for basal cladodes and 57% higher for daughter cladodes. The daily net CO2 uptake capacity for basal cladodes increased for 4 weeks after planting and then remained fairly constant, whereas for daughter cladodes, it increased with cladode age, became maximal at 8 to 14 weeks, and then declined. The percentage enhancement in daily net CO2 uptake caused by elevated CO2 was greatest initially for basal cladodes and at 8 to 14 weeks for daughter cladodes. The chlorophyll content per unit fresh weight of chlorenchyma for daughter cladodes at 8 weeks was 19 and 62% lower in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2, respectively, compared with 370 [mu]L L-1. Despite the reduced chlorophyll content, plant biomass production during 23 weeks in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 21 and 55% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. The root dry weight nearly tripled as the C02 concentration was doubled, causing the root/shoot ratio to increase with CO2 concentration. During the 23-week period, elevated CO2 significantly increased CO2 uptake and biomass production of O. ficus-indica. PMID:12231958

  16. CO2 Exchange and Growth of the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Opuntia ficus-indica under Elevated CO2 in Open-Top Chambers.

    PubMed

    Cui, M.; Miller, P. M.; Nobel, P. S.

    1993-10-01

    CO2 uptake, water vapor conductance, and biomass production of Opuntia ficus-indica, a Crassulacean acid metabolism species, were studied at CO2 concentrations of 370, 520, and 720 [mu]L L-1 in open-top chambers during a 23-week period. Nine weeks after planting, daily net CO2 uptake for basal cladodes at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 76 and 98% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Eight weeks after daughter cladodes emerged, their daily net CO2 uptake was 35 and 49% higher at 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of C02, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. Daily water-use efficiency was 88% higher under elevated CO2 for basal cladodes and 57% higher for daughter cladodes. The daily net CO2 uptake capacity for basal cladodes increased for 4 weeks after planting and then remained fairly constant, whereas for daughter cladodes, it increased with cladode age, became maximal at 8 to 14 weeks, and then declined. The percentage enhancement in daily net CO2 uptake caused by elevated CO2 was greatest initially for basal cladodes and at 8 to 14 weeks for daughter cladodes. The chlorophyll content per unit fresh weight of chlorenchyma for daughter cladodes at 8 weeks was 19 and 62% lower in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2, respectively, compared with 370 [mu]L L-1. Despite the reduced chlorophyll content, plant biomass production during 23 weeks in 520 and 720 [mu]L L-1 of CO2 was 21 and 55% higher, respectively, than at 370 [mu]L L-1. The root dry weight nearly tripled as the C02 concentration was doubled, causing the root/shoot ratio to increase with CO2 concentration. During the 23-week period, elevated CO2 significantly increased CO2 uptake and biomass production of O. ficus-indica.

  17. Mineral nutrition and elevated [CO(2)] interact to modify δ(13)C, an index of gas exchange, in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John D; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    The effects of the past century's increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) have been recorded in the stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of the annual growth rings of trees. The isotope record frequently shows increases in photosynthetic CO2 uptake relative to stomatal conductance, which estimates the CO2 concentration gradient across the stomata (ca - ci). This variable, which is one control over the net photosynthetic rate, has been suggested as a homeostatic gas-exchange set point that is easy to estimate from δ(13)C and [CO2]. However, in high-latitude conifer forests, the literature is mixed; some studies show increases in (ca - ci) and others show homeostasis. Here we present leaf and tree-ring δ(13)C data from a controlled experiment that tested factorial combinations of elevated [CO2] (365 and 700 ∝mol mol(-1)) and fertilization on mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees in northern Sweden. We found first that the leaf carbon pool was contaminated by the current photosynthate in the older leaf cohorts. This is the reverse of the common observation that older photosynthate reserves can be used to produce new tissue; here the older tissue contains recent photosynthate. We found that the tree-ring data lack such contamination and in any case they better integrate over the canopy and the growing season than do leaves. In the second and third years of treatment, elevated [CO2] alone increased (ca - ci) by 38%; when combined with fertilization, it increased (ca - ci) by 60%. The results of this study support the idea that annual rings provide a clearer isotopic signal than do foliage age-classes. The tree-ring data show that inferred (ca - ci) depends not only on [CO2], but also on mineral-nutrient status. The differences in (ca - ci) are sufficiently large to account for the treatment-induced increase in wood-volume production in these stands.

  18. Temperature effects on microbial respiration assessed with CO2-exchange and continuous culture techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmeier, C.; Min, K.; Song, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work attempts to incorporate requirements of soil microorganisms for carbon and other resources, and how these requirements may respond to temperature, into theoretical concepts of soil organic matter decomposition and climate change. Because of the difficulties of measuring resource fluxes in natural soils, empirical data to guide these concepts remain scarce. Here, we present an experimental system that combines continuous culture techniques with CO2 measurements to study carbon fluxes through microbes in a reductionist, controlled environment amenable to experimental manipulation. In this pilot study, we quantified mass specific respiration rates (MSR) and δ13C of respired CO2 of Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Gram-negative bacterium common to soils, grown at 15°C and 25°C with otherwise identical environmental conditions. The microbes were grown in a 1.9 L bioreactor, in 0.9 L of nutrient medium with C:N:P atomic ratios of 100:10:3, and with 10 mM cellobiose as the carbon source. A peristaltic pump continuously supplied the bioreactor with sterile medium, and removed medium from the bioreactor, at a rate of 63 mL h-1. Both vessels were contained within a temperature incubator, and stir bars provided continuously well mixed volumes. CO2-free air was continuously bubbled through the reactor medium so to provide the microbes with O2; a cavity ring down spectrometer withdrew reactor headspace air and measured concentration and δ13C of the CO2. Air supply was regulated with a pressure/mass flow controller to approx. 27 mL min-1. In both temperature regimes, the pH of the bioreactor as well as concentration and δ13C of the CO2 in the head space air were constant over the course of 1 d, such that any imbalances in the CO2-H2CO3 equilibrium were considered negligible in the assessment of microbial respiration rates and the δ13C of respired CO2. After this time period, reactor medium was passed through a 0.22 μm filter and the filtrate dried for 24 h to obtain

  19. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  20. Air-sea energy exchanges measured by eddy covariance during a localised coral bleaching event, Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.

    2010-12-01

    Despite the widely claimed association between climate change and coral bleaching, a paucity of data exists relating to exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum between the atmosphere and the reef-water surface. We present in situ measurements of reef-water-air energy exchanges made using the eddy covariance method during a summer coral bleaching event at Heron Reef, Australia. Under settled, cloud-free conditions and light winds, daily net radiation exceeded 800 W m-2, with up to 95% of the net radiation during the morning partitioned into heating the water column, substrate and benthic cover including corals. Heating was exacerbated by a mid-afternoon low tide when shallow reef flat water reached 34°C and near-bottom temperatures 33°C, exceeding the thermal tolerance of corals, causing bleaching. Results suggest that local to synoptic scale meteorology, particularly clear skies, solar heating, light winds and the timing of low tide were the primary controls on coral bleaching.

  1. Interannual variability of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange and its component fluxes in a subalpine Mediterranean ecosystem (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Domingo, Francisco; Arnau-Rosalén, Eva; Oyonarte, Cecilio; Pérez-Priego, Óscar; López-Ballesteros, Ana; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2015-04-01

    Recent decades under climate change have seen increasing interest in quantifying the carbon (C) balance of different terrestrial ecosystems, and their behavior as sources or sinks of C. Both CO2 exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere and identification of its drivers are key to understanding land-surface feedbacks to climate change. The eddy covariance (EC) technique allows measurements of net ecosystem C exchange (NEE) from short to long time scales. In addition, flux partitioning models can extract the components of net CO2 fluxes, including both biological processes of photosynthesis or gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (Reco), and also abiotic drivers like subsoil CO2 ventilation (VE), which is of particular relevance in semiarid environments. The importance of abiotic processes together with the strong interannual variability of precipitation, which strongly affects CO2 fluxes, complicates the accurate characterization of the C balance in semiarid landscapes. In this study, we examine 10 years of interannual variability of NEE and its components at a subalpine karstic plateau, El Llano de los Juanes, in the Sierra de Gádor (Almería, SE Spain). Results show annual NEE ranging from 55 g C m-2 (net emission) to -54 g C m-2 (net uptake). Among C flux components, GPP was the greatest contributing 42-57% of summed component magnitudes, while contributions by Reco and VE ranged from 27 to 46% and from 3 to 18%, respectively. Annual precipitation during the studied period exhibited high interannual variability, ranging from 210 mm to 1374 mm. Annual precipitation explained 50% of the variance in Reco, 59% of that in GPP, and 56% for VE. While Reco and GPP were positively correlated with annual precipitation (correlation coefficient, R, of 0.71 and 0.77, respectively), VE showed negative correlation with this driver (R = -0.74). During the driest year (2004-2005), annual GPP and Reco reached their lowest values, while contribution of

  2. Gas exchange and CO2 flux in the tropical Atlantic Ocean determined from Rn-222 and pCO2 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smethie, W. M., Jr.; Takahashi, T.; Chipman, D. W.; Ledwell, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The piston velocity for the tropical Atlantic Ocean has been determined from 29 radon profiles measured during the TTO Tropical Atlantic Study. By combining these data with the pCO2 data measured in the surface water and air samples, the net flux of CO2 across the sea-air interface has been calculated for the tropical Atlantic. The dependence of the piston velocity on wind speed is discussed, and possible causes for the high sea-to-air CO2 flux observed in the equatorial zone are examined.

  3. Low impact of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange of a Northern-Norwegian blanket bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Magnus; Bjerke, J. W.; Drake, B. G.; Engelsen, O.; Hansen, G. H.; Parmentier, F. J. W.; Powell, T. L.; Silvennoinen, H.; Sottocornola, M.; Tømmervik, H.; Weldon, S.; Rasse, D. P.

    2015-02-01

    Northern peatlands hold large amounts of organic carbon (C) in their soils and are as such important in a climate change context. Blanket bogs, i.e. nutrient-poor peatlands restricted to maritime climates, may be extra vulnerable to global warming since they require a positive water balance to sustain their moss dominated vegetation and C sink functioning. This study presents a 4.5 year record of land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the Andøya blanket bog in northern Norway. Compared with other peatlands, the Andøya peatland exhibited low flux rates, related to the low productivity of the dominating moss and lichen communities and the maritime settings that attenuated seasonal temperature variations. It was observed that under periods of high vapour pressure deficit, net ecosystem exchange was reduced, which was mainly caused by a decrease in gross primary production. However, no persistent effects of dry conditions on the CO2 exchange dynamics were observed, indicating that under present conditions and within the range of observed meteorological conditions the Andøya blanket bog retained its C uptake function. Continued monitoring of these ecosystem types is essential in order to detect possible effects of a changing climate.

  4. Climatic and management drivers of CO2 exchanges by a production crop: analysis over three successive 4-year cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysse, Pauline; Moureaux, Christine; Bodson, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between crops and the atmosphere are influenced by both climatic and crop management drivers. The investigated crop, situated at the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (candidate ICOS site) in the Hesbaye region in Belgium and managed for more than 70 years using conventional farming practices, was monitored over three complete sugar beet/winter wheat/potato/winter wheat rotation cycles from 2004 to 2016. Eddy covariance, automatic and manual soil chambers, leaf diffusion and biomass measurements were performed continuously in order to obtain the daily and seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), Net Primary Productivity (NPP), autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration and Net Biome Production (NBP). Meteorological data and crop management practices were also recorded. Climatic and seasonal evolutions of the carbon balance components were studied and crop carbon budgets were computed both at the yearly and crop rotation cycle scales. On average over the 12 years, NEE was negative but NBP was positive, i.e. as far as carbon exportation by harvest are included in the budget, the site behaved as a carbon source. Impacts of both meteorological drivers and crop management operations on CO2 exchanges were analyzed and compared between crop types, years, and rotation cycles. The uncertainties associated to the carbon fluxes were also evaluated and discussed.

  5. Towards a Better Understanding of the Oxygen Isotope Signature of Atmospheric CO2: Determining the 18O-Exchange Between CO2 and H2O in Leaves and Soil On-line with Laser-Based Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangi, L.; Rothfuss, Y.; Vereecken, H.; Brueggemann, N.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotope signature of carbon dioxide (δ18O-CO2) is a powerful tool to disentangle CO2 fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems, as CO2 attains a contrasting 18O signature by the interaction with isotopically different soil and leaf water pools during soil respiration and photosynthesis, respectively. However, using the δ18O-CO2 signal to quantify plant-soil-atmosphere CO2 fluxes is still challenging due to a lack of knowledge concerning the magnitude and effect of individual fractionation processes during CO2 and H2O diffusion and during CO2-H2O isotopic exchange in soils and leaves, especially related to short-term changes in environmental conditions (non-steady state). This study addresses this research gap by combined on-line monitoring of the oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 and water vapor during gas exchange in soil and plant leaves with laser-based spectroscopy, using soil columns and plant chambers. In both experimental setups, the measured δ18O of water vapor was used to infer the δ18O of liquid water, and, together with the δ18O-CO2, the degree of oxygen isotopic equilibrium between the two species (θ). Gas exchange experiments with different functional plant types (C3 coniferous, C3 monocotyledonous, C3 dicotyledonous, C4) revealed that θ and the influence of the plant on the ambient δ18O-CO2 (CO18O-isoforcing) not only varied on a diurnal timescale but also when plants were exposed to limited water availability, elevated air temperature, and abrupt changes in light intensity (sunflecks). Maximum θ before treatments ranged between 0.7 and 0.8 for the C3 dicotyledonous (poplar) and C3 monocotyledonous (wheat) plants, and between 0.5 and 0.6 for the conifer (spruce) and C4 plant (maize) while maximum CO18O-isoforcing was highest in wheat (0.03 m s-1 ‰), similar in poplar and maize (0.02 m s-1 ‰), and lowest in spruce (0.01 m s-1 ‰). Multiple regression analysis showed that up to 97 % of temporal dynamics in CO18O-isoforcing could be

  6. Effect of intrapulmonary hematocrit maldistribution on O2, CO2, and inert gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Young, I H; Wagner, P D

    1979-02-01

    The potential effect of intrapulmonary variations in hematocrit on gas exchange has been studied in theoretical models of the lung containing maldistribution of both hematocrit (Hct) and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratio. Hematocrit inequality enhanced gas exchange when units of low VA/Q were given a low Hct, arterial PO2 rising by as much as 14 Torr and PCO2 falling by up to 2 Torr depending on the particular distributions of Hct and VA/Q, whereas gas exchange was depressed when units of low VA/Q had a high Hct. After measuring inert gas solubilities in both dog and human blood of different Hct, the effect of Hct inequality on inert gas exchange was similarly assessed. Solubility was found to increase with HCT for less soluble gases. Because of this, conditions for enhancement of inert and O2 exchange by HCt inequality coincided, and it was found that in general the effects on O2 and inert gas transfer were quantitatively internally consistent. Even when Hct inequality was extreme, the resulting perturbation of inert gas concentrations was sufficiently small that the main features of the recovered VA/Q distributions were unaltered.

  7. Environment or development? Lifetime net CO2 exchange and control of the expression of Crassulacean acid metabolism in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2007-01-01

    The relative influence of plant age and environmental stress signals in triggering a shift from C(3) photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the annual halophytic C(3)-CAM species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was explored by continuously monitoring net CO(2) exchange of whole shoots from the seedling stage until seed set. Plants exposed to high salinity (400 mm NaCl) in hydroponic culture solution or grown in saline-droughted soil acquired between 11% and 24% of their carbon via net dark CO(2) uptake involving CAM. In contrast, plants grown under nonsaline, well-watered conditions were capable of completing their life cycle by operating in the C(3) mode without ever exhibiting net CO(2) uptake at night. These observations are not consistent with the widely expressed view that the induction of CAM by high salinity in M. crystallinum represents an acceleration of preprogrammed developmental processes. Rather, our study demonstrates that the induction of the CAM pathway for carbon acquisition in M. crystallinum is under environmental control.

  8. Evaluation of the swell effect on the air-sea gas transfer in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Air-sea gas transfer processes are one of the most important factors regarding global climate and long-term global climate changes. Despite its importance, there is still a huge uncertainty on how to better parametrize these processes in order to include them on the global climate models. This uncertainty exposes the need to increase our knowledge on gas transfer controlling mechanisms. In the coastal regions, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes, however, there is still a lack of information and the influence of the ocean surface waves on the air-sea interaction and gas flux behavior must be validated. In this study, as part of the "Sea Surface Roughness as Air-Sea Interaction Control" project, we evaluate the effect of the ocean surface waves on the gas exchange in the coastal zone. Direct estimates of the flux of CO2 (FCO2) and water vapor (FH2O) through eddy covariance, were carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 in a coastal station located at the Northwest of Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México. For the same period, ocean surface waves are recorded using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) with a sampling rate of 2 Hz and located at 10 m depth about 350 m away from the tower. We found the study area to be a weak sink of CO2 under moderate wind and wave conditions with a mean flux of -1.32 μmol/m2s. The correlation between the wind speed and FCO2 was found to be weak, suggesting that other physical processes besides wind may be important factors for the gas exchange modulation at coastal waters. The results of the quantile regression analysis computed between FCO2 and (1) wind speed, (2) significant wave height, (3) wave steepness and (4) water temperature, show that the significant wave height is the most correlated parameter with FCO2; Nevertheless, the behavior of their relation varies along the probability distribution of FCO2, with the linear regression

  9. Dynamics of CO2-exchange and C-budgets due to soil erosion: Insights from a 4 years observation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Garcia Alba, Juana; Augustin, Jürgen; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture in the hummocky ground moraine landscape of NE-Germany is characterized by an increase in energy crop cultivation, like maize or sorghum. Both enhance lateral C fluxes by erosion and induce feedbacks on C dynamics of agroecosystems as a result of reduced wintertime plant cover and vigorous crop growth during summer. However, the actual impact of these phenomena on the CO2-sink/-source function of agricultural landscapes, is still not clear. Therefore, the interdisciplinary project "CarboZALF" was established in Dedelow/Prenzlau (NE-Germany) in 2009. Within the field experiment CarboZALF-D, CO2 fluxes for the soil-plant systems were monitored, covering typical landscape relevant soil states in respect to erosion and deposition, like Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol. Automated chamber systems, each consisting of four transparent chambers (2.5 m height, basal area 2.25 m2), were placed along gradients at both measurement sites. Monitored CO2 fluxes were gap-filled on a high-temporal resolution by modelling ecosystem respiration (Reco), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on parallel and continuous measurements of the CO2 exchange, soil and air temperatures as well as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Gap-filling was e.g. needed in case of chamber malfunctions and abrupt disturbances by farming practice. The monitored crop rotation was corn-winter wheat (2 a), sorghum-winter triticale and alfalfa (1.5 a). In our presentation we would like to show insights from a 4 years observation period, with prounounced differences between the eroded and the colluvial soil: The Endogleyic Colluvic Regosol showed higher flux rates for Reco, GPP and NEE compared to the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol. Site-specific NEE and C-balances were positively related to soil C-stocks as well as biomass production, and generated a minor C-sink in case of the Calcic Cutanic Luvisol and a highly variable C-source in case of the

  10. The influence of vegetation and relief heterogeneity on turbulent exchange of CO2 between land surface and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhartova, Juliya; Levashova, Natalia; Volkova, Elena; Olchev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The possible effect of spatial heterogeneity of vegetation cover and relief on horizontal and vertical turbulent exchange of CO2 was described using a process-based two-dimensional (2D) turbulent exchange models (Mukhartova et al. 2015). As a key area for this modeling study the hilly territory situated at the boundary between broadleaf forest and steppe zones in European part of Russia (Tula region) was selected. The vegetation cover in the study region is represented by complex mosaic of crop areas, grasslands, pastures, mires and groves. The very heterogeneous vegetation cover and complex dissected relief make very difficult an adequate determining the local and regional CO2 fluxes using experimental methods only. The two-dimensional model based on solution of the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using well-known one-and-a-half order (TKE) closure scheme is applied. For description of the plant canopy photosynthesis and respiration rates the model uses an aggregated approach based on the model of Ball et al (1987) in Leuning modification (1990, 1995), the Beer-Lambert equation for the description of solar radiation penetration within a plant canopy (Monsi, Saeki 1953), and also an algorithm describing the response of stomatal conductance of the leaves to incoming photosynthetically active radiation. All necessary input parameters describing the photosynthesis and respiration properties of different plants and soil types in the study region were measured in the field or taken from the literature. The system of differential equations in the model is numerically solved by the finite-difference method. It is assumed that the influence of ground surface heterogeneities at the upper boundary of computing domain is very low and the pressure excess can be therefore considered as zero. The concentration of CO2 at the upper boundary of computing domain is assumed to be equal to some background value. It is also assumed that all boundaries between different

  11. Regenerable device for scrubbing breathable air of CO2 and moisture without special heat exchanger equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tepper, E. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The device concerns the circulation of cabin air through canisters which absorb and adsorb carbon dioxide, together with excess moisture, and return the scrubbed air to the cabin for recirculation. A coating on an inert substrate in granular form absorbs and adsorbs the impurities at standard temperatures and pressures, but desorbs such impurities at low pressures (vacuum) and standard temperatures. This fact is exploited by making the device in a stack of cells consisting of layers or cells which are isolated from one another flow-wise and are connected to separate manifolds and valving systems into two separate subsets. A first subset may be connected for the flow breathable air therethrough until the polyethyleneimine of its cells is saturated with CO2 and H2O. During the same period the second subset of cells is manifolded to a vacuum source.

  12. Effects of permafrost melting on CO2 and CH4 exchange of a poorly drained black spruce lowland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickland, K.P.; Striegl, R.G.; Neff, J.C.; Sachs, T.

    2006-01-01

    Permafrost melting is occurring in areas of the boreal forest region where large amounts of carbon (C) are stored in organic soils. We measured soil respiration, net CO2 flux, and net CH4 flux during May-September 2003 and March 2004 in a black spruce lowland in interior Alaska to better understand how permafrost thaw in poorly drained landscapes affects land-atmosphere CO2 and CH4 exchange. Sites included peat soils underlain by permafrost at ???0.4 m depth (permafrost plateau, PP), four thermokarst wetlands (TW) having no permafrost in the upper 2.2 m, and peat soils bordering the thermokarst wetlands having permafi7ost at ???0.5 in depth (thermokarst edges, TE). Soil respiration rates were not significantly different among the sites, and 5-cm soil temperature explained 50-91% of the seasonal variability in soil respiration within the sites. Groundcover vegetation photosynthesis (calculated as net CO2 minus soil respiration) was significantly different among the sites (TW > TE > PP), which can be partly attributed to the difference in photosynthetically active radiation reaching the ground at each site type. Methane emission rates were 15 to 28 times greater fi7om TW than from TE and PP. We modeled annual soil respiration and groundcover vegetation photosynthesis using soil temperature and radiation data, and CH4 flux by linear interpolation. We estimated all sites as net C gas sources to the atmosphere (not including tree CO2 uptake at PP and TE), although the ranges in estimates when accounting for errors were large enough that TE and TW may have been net C sinks. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Simulation and Observation of Global Atmospheric CO2 from 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, A.; O'Dell, C. W.; Baker, D. F.; Parazoo, N.; McKeown, R.; Baker, I. T.; Kawa, S. R.; Doney, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We compare global variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations using a comprehensive model of surface carbon cycling and atmospheric transport to retrievals of column CO2 mole fraction from near-infrared spectroscopy from the GOSAT mission. Surface carbon exchanges due to photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and air-sea gas exchange are computed every hour. These fluxes are used as input to a global atmospheric tranport model to obtain three-dimensional fields of CO2, which are sampled at the time and location of quality-screened GOSAT data retrieved by the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) team. The system is operated on a 0.5° x 0.67° grid (dx ~ 50 km), providing global mesoscale coverage, and has good skill at replicating diurnal, synoptic, and seasonal variations over vegetated land surfaces. It is driven by meteorological output from the NASA Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System. Surface weather from the system drives calculations of terrestrial ecosystem metabolism (radiation, precipitation, humidity, temperature) and air-sea gas exchange (wind), with other input data coming from satellite data products. Simulated spatial patterns and seasonal variations of simulated and observed column CO2 exhibit broad agreement, but some offsets in latitude and seasonal variations are noted. These are attributed to both model and satellite retrieval errors.

  14. A comprehensive carbon dioxide analysis system for estimating CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, A.; Parazoo, N.; Lokupitiya, R. S.; Baker, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions due to combustion of fossil fuel can be estimated from observations of variations in atmospheric trace gases in time and space. Quantitative interpretation of these variations requires accounting for stronger changes due to other processes such as ecosystem metabolism, biomass burning, and air-sea gas exchange that operate on global scales. We have developed and tested an analysis system for assimilation of CO2 variations measured by a combination of sampling, in-situ, and remotely-sensed observations. The system combines existing models of CO2 exchanges due to hourly photosynthesis and respiration, daily air-sea gas exchange, biomass burning, fossil fuel emissions, and atmospheric transport. This comprehensive system allows direct comparison to the observed record of both in-situ and remotely sensed atmospheric CO2 at hourly timescales. By design, we decompose surface fluxes of CO2 into the atmosphere into “fast processes” that are well-understood and modeled using mechanistic algorithms, and more slowly-varying fluxes due to land use change, incorrect specification of decomposing carbon pools, and other persistent biases in the forward component models. These slowly varying components are then estimated from atmospheric obervations by the Maximum Likelihood Ensembe Filter, a data assimilation framework. The system is operated on a 0.5° x 0.67° grid, providing global mesoscale coverage, and has good skill at replicating diurnal, synoptic, and seasonal variations over vegetated land surfaces. It is driven by meteorological output from the NASA Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System. Surface weather from the system drives calculations of terrestrial ecosystem metabolism (radiation, precipitation, humidity, temperature) and air-sea gas exchange (wind), with other input data coming from satellite data products.

  15. Exchange bias induced at a Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5/Cr interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C. N. T.; Vick, A. J.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Frost, W.; Hirohata, A.

    2017-03-01

    In order to engineer the strength of an exchange bias in a cubic Heusler alloy layer, crystalline strain has been induced at a ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface by their lattice mismatch in addition to the conventional interfacial exchange coupling between them. Such interfaces have been formed in (Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5(CFAS)/Cr)3 structures grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The magnetic and structural properties have been characterised to investigate the exchange interactions at the CFAS/Cr interfaces. Due to the interfacial lattice mismatch of 1.4%, the maximum offset of 18 Oe in a magnetisation curve has been measured for the case of a CFAS (2 nm)/Cr (0.9 nm) interface at 193 K. The half-metallic property of CFAS has been observed to remain unchanged, which agrees with the theoretical prediction by Culbert et al (2008 J. Appl. Phys. 103 07D707). Such a strain-induced exchange bias may provide insight of the interfacial interactions and may offer a wide flexibility in spintronic device design.

  16. Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, S. C.; Goulden, M. L.; Munger, J. W.; Fan, S.-M.; Bakwin, P. S.; Daube, B. C.; Bassow, S. L.; Bazzaz, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    The eddy correlation method was used to measure the net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide continuously from April 1990 to December 1991 in a deciduous forest in central Massachusetts. The annual net uptake was 3.7 +/- 0.7 metric tons of carbon per hectare per year. Ecosystem respiration calculated from the relation between nighttime exchange and soil temperature, was 7.4 metric tons of carbon per hectare per year, implying gross ecosystem production of 11.1 metric tons of carbon per hectare per year. The observed rate of accumulation of carbon reflects recovery from agricultural development in the 1800s. Carbon uptake rates were notably larger than those assumed for temperate forests in global carbon studies. Carbon storage in temperate forests can play an important role in determining future concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  17. Effects of winter temperature and summer drought on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Skiba, Ute; Nemitz, Eiko; Billett, Michael; Sutton, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the most important global sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); their ability to sequester C is a natural feedback mechanism controlled by climatic variables such as precipitation, temperature, length of growing season and period of snow cover. In the UK it has been predicted that peatlands could become a net source of carbon in response to climate change with climate models predicting a rise in global temperature of ca. 3oC between 1961-1990 and 2100. Land-atmosphere exchange of CO2in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variations, which have significant short- and long-term effects on carbon sink strength. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance (EC) at Auchencorth Moss (55° 47'32 N, 3° 14'35 W, 267 m a.s.l.), a temperate peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from 5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The EC system consists of a LiCOR 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer. Over the 10 year period, the site was a consistent yet variable sink of CO2 ranging from -34.1 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -69.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing seasons and mean winter air temperature explained 93% of the variability in summertime sink strength, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant development and productivity were stunted by colder winters causing a net reduction in the annual carbon sink strength of this peatland where autotrophic processes are thought to be

  18. Effect of permafrost thaw on CO2 and CH4 exchange in a western Alaska peatland chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Carmel E.; Ewing, Stephanie A.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Varner, Ruth K.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Koch, Joshua C.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Manies, Kristen; Torre Jorgenson, M.

    2014-08-01

    Permafrost soils store over half of global soil carbon (C), and northern frozen peatlands store about 10% of global permafrost C. With thaw, inundation of high latitude lowland peatlands typically increases the surface-atmosphere flux of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. To examine the effects of lowland permafrost thaw over millennial timescales, we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 exchange along sites that constitute a ˜1000 yr thaw chronosequence of thermokarst collapse bogs and adjacent fen locations at Innoko Flats Wildlife Refuge in western Alaska. Peak CH4 exchange in July (123 ± 71 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1) was observed in features that have been thawed for 30 to 70 (<100) yr, where soils were warmer than at more recently thawed sites (14 to 21 yr; emitting 1.37 ± 0.67 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in July) and had shallower water tables than at older sites (200 to 1400 yr; emitting 6.55 ± 2.23 mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in July). Carbon lost via CH4 efflux during the growing season at these intermediate age sites was 8% of uptake by net ecosystem exchange. Our results provide evidence that CH4 emissions following lowland permafrost thaw are enhanced over decadal time scales, but limited over millennia. Over larger spatial scales, adjacent fen systems may contribute sustained CH4 emission, CO2 uptake, and DOC export. We argue that over timescales of decades to centuries, thaw features in high-latitude lowland peatlands, particularly those developed on poorly drained mineral substrates, are a key locus of elevated CH4 emission to the atmosphere that must be considered for a complete understanding of high latitude CH4 dynamics.

  19. Improvement of the GEOS-5 AGCM upon Updating the Air-Sea Roughness Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Molod, A.; Oman, L. D.; Song, I.-S.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of an air-sea roughness parameterization over the ocean that more closely matches recent observations of air-sea exchange is examined in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Surface wind biases in the GEOS-5 AGCM are decreased by up to 1.2m/s. The new parameterization also has implications aloft as improvements extend into the stratosphere. Many other GCMs (both for operational weather forecasting and climate) use a similar class of parameterization for their air-sea roughness scheme. We therefore expect that results from GEOS-5 are relevant to other models as well.

  20. Observations of net soil exchange of CO2 in a dryland show experimental warming increases carbon losses in biocrust soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darrouzet-Nardi, Anthony N.; Reed, Sasha C.; Grote, Ed; Belnap, Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Many arid and semiarid ecosystems have soils covered with well-developed biological soil crust communities (biocrusts) made up of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs living at the soil surface. These communities are a fundamental component of dryland ecosystems, and are critical to dryland carbon (C) cycling. To examine the effects of warming temperatures on soil C balance in a dryland ecosystem, we used infrared heaters to warm biocrust-dominated soils to 2 °C above control conditions at a field site on the Colorado Plateau, USA. We monitored net soil exchange (NSE) of CO2 every hour for 21 months using automated flux chambers (5 control and 5 warmed chambers), which included the CO2 fluxes of the biocrusts and the soil beneath them. We observed measurable photosynthesis in biocrust soils on 12 % of measurement days, which correlated well with precipitation events and soil wet-up. These days included several snow events, providing what we believe to be the first evidence of substantial photosynthesis underneath snow by biocrust organisms in drylands. Overall, biocrust soils in both control and warmed plots were net CO2 sources to the atmosphere, with control plots losing 62 ± 8 g C m−2 (mean ± SE) over the first year of measurement and warmed plots losing 74 ± 9 g C m−2. Between control and warmed plots, the difference in soil C loss was uncertain over the course of the entire year due to large and variable rates in spring, but on days during which soils were wet and crusts were actively photosynthesizing, biocrusts that were warmed by 2 °C had a substantially more negative C balance (i.e., biocrust soils took up less C and/or lost more C in warmed plots). Taken together, our data suggest a substantial risk of increased C loss from biocrust soils with higher future temperatures, and highlight a robust capacity to predict CO2 exchange in biocrust soils using easily measured environmental parameters.

  1. Using aircraft eddy-covariance measurements to examine the spatial heterogeneity of CO2 exchange above three temperate forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulton, D.; Shepson, P. B.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Munger, J. W.; Saatchi, S. S.; Moghaddam, M.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Metzger, S.; Stirm, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    Regional and global scale ecosystem models often rely on data from flux towers to simulate the surface-atmosphere exchange of CO2. Such data represent comparatively small source areas (~1 km2) and in many cases exhibit relatively homogeneous land use and surface characteristics. This approach assumes that the small-scale observations yield representative results for larger regions that can be more heterogeneous in terms of land cover, soil moisture, topography and climatology. To complement this data source, aircraft platforms can be used to provide snapshot views of land cover and meteorological properties. Moreover, aircraft provide access to essentially any environment including remote and heterogeneous regions. Here, we used an instrumented aircraft platform equipped with a 50 Hz wind probe, Global Navigation Satellite System/Inertial Measurement Unit and a 10 Hz Picarro CO2/H2O analyzer. Applying the eddy-covariance technique, this platform permits determining the surface-atmosphere exchange of heat and CO2 fluxes over larger (~101-102 km2) spatial scales. Specifically, thirty-eight flux measurement experiments were conducted as part of the Airborne Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) campaigns in July, 2012 and May-August, 2013. Each experiment targeted specific land cover types over and near Howland Forest, ME, Harvard Forest, MA and Duke Forest, NC. A footprint parameterization is used to determine the contribution of different surface sources to the flux measurements. The surface area contributing to the measured fluxes is typically on the order of 37 ± 17 km2, with 90% of the contributions being sourced from within an upwind distance of 1.9 ± 0.8 km. Combining the knowledge of these source areas with land cover and soil moisture data from the NASA G-III aircraft enables investigating the influence of surface heterogeneity on the measured fluxes. Lastly, the measured fluxes are compared to simulated CO2 fluxes from the Ecosystem Demography

  2. [CAM in Tillandsia usneoides: Studies on the pathway of carbon and the dependency of CO2-exchange on light intensity, temperature and water content of the plant].

    PubMed

    Kluge, M; Lange, O L; Eichmann, M V; Schmid, R

    1973-12-01

    Tillandsia usneoides, in the common sense a non-succulent plant, exhibits CO2 exchange characterized by net CO2 dark fixation during the night and depression of CO2 exchange during the day. Malate has been demonstrated to accumulate during CO2 dark fixation and to be converted to carbohydrates in light. Thus, T. usneoides exhibits CAM like typical succulents.Net CO2 uptake during the day is increased with net CO2 output being suppressed in duration of time and extent when light intensity increases. Furthermore, a slight increase in CO2 fixation during the following night can be observed if the plants were treated with high light intensity during the previous day.Curves of CO2 exchange typical for CAM are obtained if T. usneoides is kept at 15°C and 20°C. Lower temperature tend to increase CO2 uptake during the day and to inhibit CO2 dark fixation. Temperatures higher than 20°C favour loss of CO2 by respiration, which becomes apparent during the whole day and night at 30°C and higher temperatures. Thus, T. usneoides gains carbon only at temperatures well below 25°C.Net CO2 uptake during the day occurs only in moist plant material and is inhibited in plants cept under water stress conditions. However, CO2 uptake during the night is clearly favoured if the plants dry out. Therefore dry plants gain more carbon than moist ones.Curves of CO2 exchange typical for CAM were also obtained with 13 other species of the genus Tillandsia.The exhibition of CAM by the non-succulent T. usneoides calls for a new definition of the term "succulence" if it is to remain useful in characterizing this metabolic pathway. Because CO2-fixing cells of T. usneoides possess relatively large vacuoles and are relatively poor in chloroplasts, they resembles the assimilatory cells of typical CAM-exhibiting succulents. Therefore, if "succulence" only means the capacity of big vacuoles to store malate, the assimilatory cells in T. usneoides are succulent. It seems to be useful to investigate

  3. Biological and environmental variables tracking seasonality of CO2 exchange in boreal forests and links to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, T.; Aalto, T.; Laurila, T.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Lindroth, A.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    The CO2 exchange of boreal forests is characterized by a strong seasonal cycle, including strong winter dormancy, active summer season and transition periods between these two. In order to estimate changes imposed by the future climate on the boreal forests' carbon balance it is important to understand the dynamics and controls of this seasonal variation. In this work we studied proxies that were used in tracking the seasonal cycle of the boreal forests and how the seasonal cycle can be taken into account in modeling. We studied different biological and meteorological variables to track beginning and ending of the growing season. We used data from four coniferous sites located in Finland and Sweden. Micrometeorological CO2 flux measurements were used as a determinant for the growing season that other methods were referenced to. The variables used included different indices based on air temperature, the chlorophyll fluorescence Fv/Fm (i.e., the maximal photochemical efficiency), surface albedo, and the CO2 tropospheric concentration. One year was used as a reference to set a threshold values to these variables in the start and end of the growing season and these threshold values were used in estimation of the growing season during other years. Air temperature indices and Fv/Fm were useful in estimation of both start and end of the growing season. Decrease of surface albedo indicated the start of the snow melt and this coincided with the beginning of the growing season. The CO2 concentration was studied in two aspects, using threshold method as well as derivative estimation method. The first one was successful in prediction of the growing season. The latter enabled also capturing larger-scale spring recovery. The use of temperature indices was more feasible in the northern sites. In addition to the coniferous sites, one deciduous forest in Finnish Lapland was studied. The transition period from winter to summer creates a challenge for the biochemical models. A canopy

  4. Characteristics of net CO2 exchange during the growing season over the alpine steppe ecosystem on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikun; Ma, Yaoming; Li, Maoshan; Han, Cunbo; Chao, Xu; Meng, Chunchun

    2013-04-01

    Based on open-path eddy covariance measurement data of the alpine steppe ecosystem at Nam Co Monitoring and Research Station for Multisphere Interactions, CAS (NAMORS) from May to September in 2008 and 2009, the characteristics of the NEE (net ecosystem exchange) for the two growing seasons was analyzed. The average temperature was 7.5° and 9.1° in this two summer, respectively. And the total precipitation from May to September was 493.1 mm and 327 mm in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The rainy season arrived later in 2009. Especially in the early period of the growing season (May to July), the precipitation (129mm) was only half of that in 2008 (261mm). So compared with the 2008, there was a warm and dry growing season in 2009. The results showed that: (1) The CO2 concentration was low during daytime but high in nighttime in both growing season. It had an inverse correlation between VPD (vapor pressure deficit). The mean value in 2008 was 365.4 mg•m-3 and lower than that in 2009 (375.7 mg•m-3 ). (2) The NEE had diurnal variation. During daytime (08:00~19:00), alpine steppe uptakes CO2, but net CO2 emission occured in the nighttime (20:00~23:00, 00:00~08:00 ) for both growing season. The monthly mean NEE was 1.49, 3.09 and 2.7 g CO2 m-2 day-1 from June to August in 2008, while 0.94, 1.2 and 2.82 g CO2 m-2 day-1 in 2009, respectively . (3) The ecosystem respiration was influenced significantly by the soil moisture and soil temperature. When the alpine steppe ecosystem did not threaten by water, it had lower Q10 (the monthly mean Q10 was 2.06 in July and August in2008), but higher Q10 (3.88 in July 2009) when drought stress happened.

  5. Effects of Pre-industrial and Future Atmospheric CO2 concentration on Net Ecosystem Exchange on Arid and Semi-Arid Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, A. A. M.; Deutschman, D.; Cheng, Y.; Oechel, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide flux was studied between 1997 and 2000 under six different CO2 concentrations (250 ppm, 350 ppm, 450 ppm, 550 ppm, 650 ppm, and 750 ppm) using CO2 LT (CO2 controlled, naturally Lit, Temperature controlled) null balance chambers in Southern California chaparral dominated by Adenostoma fasciculatum. The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible effects of altered levels of atmospheric CO2 concentrations on carbon fluxes in a natural chaparral ecosystem. Here we present that the increase of CO2 from near pre-industrial levels of around 250 ppm to recent past CO2 levels of 350 ppm are sufficient to increase NEE. These data indicate that chaparral ecosystems will increase carbon sequestration under elevated CO2 levels and that under elevated atmospheric CO2 there will be greater sink or reduced source of ecosystem CO2 to the atmosphere as a result of improved moisture status. The effect of elevated CO2 on increasing NEE was greatest during the warm and dry season versus the cold and wet season. Further, it appears that increasing atmospheric CO2 will have greater relative effects in areas of increasing water stress as CO2 treatment effects on NEE were greater in modestly dry years and with longer periods of drought. The daily maximum NEE difference between the lowest (250 ppm) and the highest (750 ppm) CO2 concentrations treatments for January was -0.127gC m-2 h-1, but for June was -0.267 gC m-2 h-1 in this study, which was a 210 percent increase. The differences between the lower treatments and higher treatments were greater in the later years indicating there was an accumulative effect. Cumulative of net ecosystem exchange (gC m-2) between 1/1/1997 and 1/1/2001 under six different CO2 concentration is presented in the figure attached.

  6. Loss of Homeostatic Gas Exchange in Eastern Hemlock in Response to Pollution and Rising CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayback, S. A.; Gagen, M. H.; Lini, A.; Cogbill, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    In eastern North American, multiple environmental effects, natural and anthropogenic, may impinge upon tree-ring based stable carbon isotope ratios when examined over long time periods. Investigation of relationships between a Vermont (USA) eastern hemlock δ¹³C (1849-2010) chronology and local and regional climate variables, as well as a regional sulfur dioxide time series revealed the decoupling of δ¹³C from significant climate drivers such as May-August maximum temperature (r=0.50, p<0.01) and, raise the possibility that this decoupling can be attributed to foliar and soil leaching of calcium due to acidic deposition since the 1960s. Further, investigation of derived photosynthetic isotope discrimination (Δ¹³C) time series showed an overall decreasing trend in Δ¹³C in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (ca), but with a slight rise in Δ¹³C in the last decade. Comparison of time series of leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (ci), ci/ca, and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) showed homeostatic maintenance of ci levels against ca until 1965 and rising iWUE. Then, ci increased proportional (1965-2000) and later at the same rate as ca (2001-2010) and iWUE leveled off indicating a potential loss of sensitivity to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. This more recent passive response may be an indication of a loss of homeostatic maintenance of stomatal control and/or may be linked to changing climate in the region (e.g., wetter conditions).

  7. Inverse modeling of seasonal drought effects on canopy CO2/H2O exchange in three Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstein, Markus; Tenhunen, John; Roupsard, Olivier; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Rambal, Serge; Miglietta, Franco; Peressotti, Alessandro; Pecchiari, Marco; Tirone, Giampiero; Valentini, Riccardo

    2003-12-01

    We present a two-criteria inverse modeling approach to analyze the effects of seasonal drought on ecosystem gas exchange at three Mediterranean sites. The three sites include two nearly monospecific Quercus ilex L. forests, one on karstic limestone (Puéchabon), the other on fluvial sand with access to groundwater (Castelporziano), and a typical multispecies shrubland on limestone (Arca di Noè). A canopy gas exchange model Process Pixel Net Ecosystem Exchange (PROXELNEE), which contains the Farquhar photosynthesis model coupled to stomatal conductance via the Ball-Berry model, was inverted in order to estimate the seasonal time course of canopy parameters from hourly values of ecosystem gross carbon uptake and transpiration. It was shown that an inverse estimation of leaf-level parameters was impossible when optimizing against ecosystem H2O or CO2 fluxes alone (unidentifiable parameters). In contrast, a criterion that constrained the optimization against both H2O and CO2 fluxes yielded stable estimates of leaf-level parameters. Two separate model inversions were implemented to test two alternative hypotheses about the response to drought: a reduction in active leaf area as a result of patchy stomatal closure or a change in photosynthetic capacities. In contrast to a previously tested hypothesis of classical (uniform) stomatal control, both hypotheses were equally able to describe the seasonality of carbon uptake and transpiration on all three sites, with a decline during the drought and recovery after autumn rainfall. Large reductions of up to 80%, in either active leaf area or photosynthetic capacities, were necessary to describe the observed carbon and water fluxes at the end of the drought period. With a threshold-type relationship, soil water content was an excellent predictor of these changes. With the drought-dependent parameter changes included, the canopy model explains 80-90% of the variance of hourly gross CO2 uptake (root mean squared error (RMSE): 1

  8. Review of the findings of the Ignik Sikumi CO2-CH4 gas hydrate exchange field trial

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian J.; Boswell, Ray; Collett, Tim S.; Farrell, Helen; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; White, Mark D.

    2014-08-01

    The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Trial was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope (ANS) during 2011 and 2012. The 2011 field program included drilling the vertical test well and performing extensive wireline logging through a thick section of gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs that provided substantial new insight into the nature of ANS gas hydrate occurrences. The 2012 field program involved an extended, scientific field trial conducted within a single vertical well (“huff-and-puff” design) through three primary operational phases: 1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; 2) flowback conducted at down-hole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4-hydrate, and 3) extended (30-days) flowback at pressures below the stability threshold of native CH4-hydrate. Ignik Sikumi represents the first field investigation of gas hydrate response to chemical injection, and the longest-duration field reservoir response experiment yet conducted. Full descriptions of the operations and data collected have been fully reported by ConocoPhillips and are available to the science community. The 2011 field program indicated the presence of free water within the gas hydrate reservoir, a finding with significant implications to the design of the exchange trial – most notably the use of a mixed gas injectant. While this decision resulted in a complex chemical environment within the reservoir that greatly tests current experimental and modeling capabilities – without such a mixture, it is apparent that injection could not have been achieved. While interpretation of the field data are continuing, the primary scientific findings and implications of the program are: 1) gas hydrate destabilizing is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  9. Microphysics of Air-Sea Exchanges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-30

    Elevation Gauges (LEGs) and a 2-D Imaging Slope Gauge (ISG) so that wave propagation was not disturbed by intrusive measurement techniques. In the LEG system...Technology, 18, 994-1013. Ocampo-Torres, F. J. and M. A. Donelan, 1994: Laboratory measurements of mass transfer of carbon dioxide and water vapour for

  10. Water, energy and CO2 exchange over a seasonally flooded forest in the Sahel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergoat, L.; Le Dantec, V.; Timouk, F.; Hiernaux, P.; Mougin, E.; Manuela, G.; Diawara, M.

    2014-12-01

    In semi-arid areas like the Sahel, perennial water bodies and temporary-flooded lowlands are critical for a number of activities. In some cases, their existence is simply a necessary condition for human societies to establish. They also play an important role in the water and carbon cycle and have strong ecological values. As a result of the strong multi-decadal drought that impacted the Sahel in the 70' to 90', a paradoxical increase of ponds and surface runoff has been observed ("Less rain, more water in the ponds", Gardelle 2010). In spite of this, there are excessively few data documenting the consequence of such a paradox on the water and carbon cycle. Here we present 2 years of eddy covariance data collected over the Kelma flooded Acacia forest in the Sahel (15.50 °N), in the frame of the AMMA project. The flooded forest is compared to the other major component of this Sahelian landscape: a grassland and a rocky outcrop sites. All sites are involved in the ALMIP2 data/LSM model comparison. The seasonal cycle of the flooded forest strongly departs from the surroundings grassland and bare soil sites. Before the rain season, the forest displays the strongest net radiation and sensible heat flux. Air temperature within the canopy reaches extremely high values. During the flood, it turns to the lowest sensible heat flux. In fact, due to an oasis effect, this flux is negative during the late flood. Water fluxes turn from almost zero in the dry season to strong evaporation during the flood, since it uses additional energy provided by negative sensible heat flux. The eddy covariance fluxes are consistent with sap flow data, showing that the flood greatly increases the length of the growing season. CO2 fluxes over the forest were twice as large as over the grassland, and the growing season was also longer, giving a much larger annual photosynthesis. In view of these data and data over surroundings grasslands and bare soil, as well as data from a long-term ecological

  11. CO2 and O2 Gas Exchange in an Experimental Model of the Btlss with Plant Wastes and Human Wastes Included in the Mass Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    Mass exchange processes in the new experimental model of the biotechnical life support system (BTLSS) constructed at the Institute of Biophysics SB RAS have a higher degree of closure than in the previous BTLSS, and, thus, the technologies employed in the new system are more complex. Therefore, before closing the loops of mass exchange processes for several months, the new model of the BTLSS was run to match the technologies employed to cultivate plants and the methods used to involve inedible plant parts and human wastes into the mass exchange with the CO2 absorption rate and the amount of the resulting O2. The plant compartment included vegetables grown on the soil-like substrate (SLS) (chufa, beet, carrot, radish, and lettuce), plants hydroponically grown on expanded clay aggregate (wheat, soybean, watercress), and plants grown in aquaculture (common glasswort and watercress). Nutrient solutions for hydroponically grown plants were prepared by using products of physicochemical mineralization of human wastes. Growing the plants in aquaculture enabled maintaining NaCl concentration in the irrigation solution for hydroponically grown plants at a level safe for the plants. Inedible plant biomass was added to the SLS. Three cycles of closing the system were run, which lasted 7, 7, and 10 days. The comparison of the amount of CO2 fed into the system over 24 h (simulating human respiration) and the amount of CO2 daily exhaled by a 70-kg middle-aged human showed that between 1% and 4% of the daily emissions of CO2 were assimilated in the system, and about 3% of the average human daily O2 requirement accumulated in the system. Plant productivity was between 4 and 4.7% of the human daily vegetable requirement, or between 3 and 3.5% of the total human daily food requirement. Thus, testing of the BTLSS showed a match between the technologies employed to arrange mass exchange processes. This study was supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-14-00599).

  12. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in a temperate herbaceous peatland in the Sanjiang Plain of northeast China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Song, Changchun; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Guo, Yuedong; Zhang, Xinhow; Wang, Jiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Northern peatlands contain a considerable share of the terrestrial carbon pool, which will be affected by future climatic variability. Using the static chamber technique, we investigated ecosystem respiration and soil respiration over two growing seasons (2012 and 2013) in a Carex lasiocarpa-dominated peatland in the Sanjiang Plain in China. We synchronously monitored the environmental factors controlling CO2 fluxes. Ecosystem respiration during these two growing seasons ranged from 33.3 to 506.7 mg CO2–C m−2 h−1. Through step-wise regression, variations in soil temperature at 10 cm depth alone explained 73.7% of the observed variance in log10(ER). The mean Q10 values ranged from 2.1 to 2.9 depending on the choice of depth where soil temperature was measured. The Q10 value at the 10 cm depth (2.9) appears to be a good representation for herbaceous peatland in the Sanjiang Plain when applying field-estimation based Q10values to current terrestrial ecosystem models due to the most optimized regression coefficient (63.2%). Soil respiration amounted to 57% of ecosystem respiration and played a major role in peatland carbon balance in our study. Emphasis on ecosystem respiration from temperate peatlands in the Sanjiang Plain will improve our basic understanding of carbon exchange between peatland ecosystem and the atmosphere.

  13. Disentangling leaf area and environmental effects on the response of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange to diffuse radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Haslwanter, Alois; Bahn, Michael; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Cernusca, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about why the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of some ecosystems is less sensitive to diffuse radiation than others and about the role other environmental factors play in determining the response of NEE to diffuse radiation. Using a six-year data set from a temperate mountain grassland in Austria we show that differences between ecosystems may be reconciled based on their green area index (GAI; square meter green plant area per square meter ground area) - the sensitivity to diffuse radiation increasing with GAI. Our data suggest diffuse radiation to have a negligible influence on NEE below a GAI of 2 m2 m−2. Changes in air/soil temperature and air humidity concurrent with the fraction of diffuse radiation were found to amplify the sensitivity of the investigated temperate mountain grassland ecosystem to diffuse radiation. PMID:24347740

  14. Larval outbreaks in West Greenland: Instant and subsequent effects on tundra ecosystem productivity and CO2 exchange.

    PubMed

    Lund, Magnus; Raundrup, Katrine; Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; López-Blanco, Efrén; Nymand, Josephine; Aastrup, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Insect outbreaks can have important consequences for tundra ecosystems. In this study, we synthesise available information on outbreaks of larvae of the noctuid moth Eurois occulta in Greenland. Based on an extensive dataset from a monitoring programme in Kobbefjord, West Greenland, we demonstrate effects of a larval outbreak in 2011 on vegetation productivity and CO2 exchange. We estimate a decreased carbon (C) sink strength in the order of 118-143 g C m(-2), corresponding to 1210-1470 tonnes C at the Kobbefjord catchment scale. The decreased C sink was, however, counteracted the following years by increased primary production, probably facilitated by the larval outbreak increasing nutrient turnover rates. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time in tundra ecosystems, the potential for using remote sensing to detect and map insect outbreak events.

  15. First-principles study of mechanical, exchange interactions and the robustness in Co2MnSi full Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akriche, A.; Bouafia, H.; Hiadsi, S.; Abidri, B.; Sahli, B.; Elchikh, M.; Timaoui, M. A.; Djebour, B.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we report the results of ab-initio studies of structural, mechanical, electronic and magnetic properties of Co based Co2MnSi Heusler compound in stoichiometric composition. All of which are accurately calculated by the full-potential (FP-LMTO) program combined with the spin polarized generalized gradient approximation in the density functional formalism (DFT). The total energy calculations clearly favor the ferromagnetic ground state. The lattice parameter, elastic constants and their related parameters were also evaluated and compared to experimental and theoretical values whenever possible. In this paper, the electronic properties are treated with GGA+U approach. The magnetic exchange constants temperature has been calculated using a mean field-approximation (MFA). The half-metal to metal transition was observed around 40 GPa. Increasing pressure has no impact on the total magnetic moment or the overall shape of the band structure that indicates the robustness of the electronic structure of this system.

  16. Volume dependence of the exchange interaction and Curie temperature in Co2MGa (M = Ti and Fe): A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. B.; Altounian, Z.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic moment, exchange interaction and Curie temperature (TC) have been calculated for Co2TiGa and Co2FeGa by a first-principles density functional calculation combined with a linear response method. The exchange interaction is dominated by Co-Co pairs in Co2TiGa while that of Co2FeGa is mainly contributed by Fe-Co pairs. Based on the mean field multiple-sublattices model, the estimated TC is about 114 K for M = Ti and 1270 K for M = Fe, calculated with the experimental lattice constant, in good agreement with the experimental values (128 K and 1093 K for M = Ti and Fe, respectively). With increasing lattice constant, a, from 95% to 105% of the experimental value (aexp .), the moment per formula unit mf.u. changes from 0.43 μB to 1.0 μB and TC increases from 27 K to 142 K in Co2TiGa. However, mf.u. increases slightly from 4.98 μB to 5.40 μB while TC decreases from 1330 K to 1190 K with increasing a from 95% to 105% of aexp . in Co2FeGa. These different volume dependences of TC are ascribed to the weak ferromagnetism in Co2TiGa and the strong ferromagnetism in Co2FeGa.

  17. CO2 fluxes exchanged by a 4-year crop rotation cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, M.; Moureaux, C.; Bodson, B.; Dufranne, D.; Heinesch, B.; Suleau, M.; Vancutsem, F.; Vilret, A.

    2009-04-01

    This study analyses carbon fluxes exchanged by a production crop during a four year cycle. Between 2004 and 2008, the successive crops were sugar beet, winter wheat, potato and again winter wheat. Eddy covariance, automatic and manual soil chamber, leaf diffusion and biomass measurements were performed continuously in order to obtain the daily and seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), Total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), Net Primary Productivity (NPP), Autotrophic Respiration, Heterotrophic Respiration and Net Biome Production (NBP). The whole cycle budget showed that NEE was negative and the rotation behaved as a sink of 1.59 kgC m-2 over the 4-year rotation. However, if exports were deducted from the budget, the crop would become a small source of 0.22 (+/- 0.14) kgC m-2, which also suggests that the crop soil carbon content decreased. This could partly be explained by the crop management, as neither farmyard manure nor slurry had been applied to the crop for more than 10 years and as cereal straw had been systematically exported for livestock. This result is also strongly dependent on climate: the fluxes were subjected to a large inter-annual variability due to differences between crops but also to climate variability. In particular, the mild winter and the dry spring underwent in 2007 induced an increase of the biomass fraction that returned to the soil, at the expense of harvested biomass. If 2007 had been a ‘normal' year, the carbon emission by the crop rotation would have been twice as great. This is analysed more in detail in a companion presentation (Dufranne et al., this session). The impacts of some farmer interventions were quantified. In particular, the impact of ploughing was found to be limited both in intensity (1 to 2 micromol m-2 s-1) and duration (not more than 1 day). Seasonal budgets showed that, during cropping periods, the TER/GPP ratio varied between 40 and 60% and that TER was dominated mainly by the

  18. Pan-Arctic modelling of net ecosystem exchange of CO2.

    PubMed

    Shaver, G R; Rastetter, E B; Salmon, V; Street, L E; van de Weg, M J; Rocha, A; van Wijk, M T; Williams, M

    2013-08-19

    Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of C varies greatly among Arctic ecosystems. Here, we show that approximately 75 per cent of this variation can be accounted for in a single regression model that predicts NEE as a function of leaf area index (LAI), air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The model was developed in concert with a survey of the light response of NEE in Arctic and subarctic tundras in Alaska, Greenland, Svalbard and Sweden. Model parametrizations based on data collected in one part of the Arctic can be used to predict NEE in other parts of the Arctic with accuracy similar to that of predictions based on data collected in the same site where NEE is predicted. The principal requirement for the dataset is that it should contain a sufficiently wide range of measurements of NEE at both high and low values of LAI, air temperature and PAR, to properly constrain the estimates of model parameters. Canopy N content can also be substituted for leaf area in predicting NEE, with equal or greater accuracy, but substitution of soil temperature for air temperature does not improve predictions. Overall, the results suggest a remarkable convergence in regulation of NEE in diverse ecosystem types throughout the Arctic.

  19. Net CO2 and water exchanges of trees and grasses in a semi-arid region (Gourma, Mali)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Dantec, Valérie; Kergoat, Laurent; Timouk, Franck; Hiernaux, Pierre; Mougin, Eric

    2010-05-01

    An improved understanding of plant and soil processes is critical to predict land surface-atmosphere water exchanges, especially in semi-arid environments, where knowledge is still severely lacking. Within the frame of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Project (AMMA), eddy covariance and sapflow stations have been installed to document the intensity, the temporal variability and the main drivers of net CO2 fluxes, water fluxes and contribution of the trees to these fluxes in a pastoral Sahelian landscape. Indeed, although the importance of vegetation in the West African monsoon system has long been postulated, extremely few data were available sofar to test and develop land surface models. In particular, data documenting seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of vegetation/atmosphere exchanges did not exist at 15° N in West Africa before AMMA. The site is located in the Gourma, Mali. Vegetation in this area is sparse and mainly composed of annual grasses and forbs, and trees. Vegetation is organized according to soil type and lateral water redistribution, with bare soil with scattered trees on shallow soils and rocky outcrops (35% of the area), annual grasses and scattered trees on sandy soils (65% of the area), and more dense canopies of grasses and trees growing in valley bottoms over clay soil. To quantify tree transpiration in the overall evapotranspiration flux, sapflow measurements, associated to soil moisture measurements, have been conducted on the main tree species (Acacia senegal, A. seyal, A. raddiana, Combretum glutinosum, Balanites aegyptiaca) in a grassland site and in an open forest site, where eddy covariance fluxes measured the total flux. Using this dataset, we have studied the effects of plant diversity on carbon and water fluxes at the foot-print scale and seasonal dynamics of fluxes due to plant phenology and variations of soil water content (SWC). Carbon fluxes were documented as well, over two years. NEE was close to 0 during the dry season

  20. Photosynthesis of Littorella uniflora grown under two PAR regimes: C3 and CAM gas exchange and the regulation of internal CO2 and O2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Robe, W E; Griffiths, H

    1990-11-01

    The submersed aquatic macrophyte Littorella uniflora was grown under 50 and 300 μmol m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) (low and high PAR regimes) but identical sediment CO2 supply (1.0 mol m(-3)). The interactions between plant morphology, whole plant CO2 and O2 exchange, CAM activity, [CO2] i and [O2] i have been investigated in comparison with in vitro CO2 and PAR response characteristics (using 1 mm leaf sections). In terms of morphology, high-PAR-grown plants were smaller and leaves contained less chlorophyll, although root growth was proportionally larger. Gas exchange fluxes over roots and shoots of intact plants were similar in direction under the two PAR regimes, with the majority of CO2 uptake via the roots. Photosynthetic O2 evolution from intact plants was greater in high-PAR-grown L. uniflora (2.18 compared with 1.49 μmol O2g(-1) fresh weight h(-1) for the low PAR regime). Although net daytime CO2 uptake was similar for both PAR regimes (0.79 and 0.75 μmol g(-1) fwt h(-1)), net dark CO2 uptake was at a higher rate (0.92 compared with 0.52 μmol CO2 g(-1) fwt h(-1)), and dark fixation (as malic acid) was threefold greater in high PAR plants (ΔH(+) 117 compared with 42 μmol H(+) g(-1) fwt). Comparison of dark CO2 uptake with dark fixation suggested that much of the CO2 fixed at night and regenerated during the day may be respiratory in origin (60% low PAR plants, 71% high PAR plants). Regeneration of CO2 from CAM could account for 62% of daytime CO2 supply in low PAR plants and 81% in high PAR plants. [CO2] i values (ranging from 0.42 to 1.03 mol m(-3)) were close to or above the concentration required to saturate photosynthesis in vitro (0.5 mol m(-3)) under both PAR regimes, and combined with the low [O2] i (2.6-4.3 mol m(-3)) should have suppressed photorespiration. However, PAR inside leaves would have been well below the in vitro light saturation requirement (850-1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for both treatments). Thus PAR rather

  1. Decadal trends in the seasonal-cycle amplitude of terrestrial CO2 exchange resulting from the ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models

    DOE PAGES

    Ito, Akihiko; Inatomi, Motoko; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; ...

    2016-05-12

    The seasonal-cycle amplitude (SCA) of the atmosphere–ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rate is a useful metric of the responsiveness of the terrestrial biosphere to environmental variations. It is unclear, however, what underlying mechanisms are responsible for the observed increasing trend of SCA in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Using output data from the Multi-scale Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP), we investigated how well the SCA of atmosphere–ecosystem CO2 exchange was simulated with 15 contemporary terrestrial ecosystem models during the period 1901–2010. Also, we made attempt to evaluate the contributions of potential mechanisms such as atmospheric CO2, climate, land-use, and nitrogen deposition, throughmore » factorial experiments using different combinations of forcing data. Under contemporary conditions, the simulated global-scale SCA of the cumulative net ecosystem carbon flux of most models was comparable in magnitude with the SCA of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Results from factorial simulation experiments showed that elevated atmospheric CO2 exerted a strong influence on the seasonality amplification. When the model considered not only climate change but also land-use and atmospheric CO2 changes, the majority of the models showed amplification trends of the SCAs of photosynthesis, respiration, and net ecosystem production (+0.19 % to +0.50 % yr–1). In the case of land-use change, it was difficult to separate the contribution of agricultural management to SCA because of inadequacies in both the data and models. The simulated amplification of SCA was approximately consistent with the observational evidence of the SCA in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Large inter-model differences remained, however, in the simulated global tendencies and spatial patterns of CO2 exchanges. Further studies are required to identify a consistent explanation for the simulated and observed amplification trends, including their underlying

  2. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2: evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voelker, Steven L.; Brooks, J. Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; Bader, Martin K.-F.; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Becklin, Katie M.; Beerling, David; Bert, Didier; Betancourt, Julio L.; Dawson, Todd E.; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Guyette, Richard P.; Körner, Christian; Leavitt, Steven W.; Linder, Sune; Marshall, John D.; Mildner, Manuel; Ogée, Jérôme; Panyushkina, Irina P.; Plumpton, Heather J.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Saurer, Matthias; Smith, Andrew R.; Siegwolf, Rolf T.W.; Stambaugh, Michael C.; Talhelm, Alan F.; Tardif, Jacques C.; Van De Water, Peter K.; Ward, Joy K.; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric [CO2], ca, is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water, and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2], ci, a constant drawdown in CO2(ca − ci), and a constant ci/ca. These strategies can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange. The accuracy of Earth systems models depends in part on assumptions about generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to varying ca. The concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these strategies, provides a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca. To assess leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies, we analyzed patterns in ci inferred from studies reporting C stable isotope ratios (δ13C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆) in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms that grew across a range of ca spanning at least 100 ppm. Our results suggest that much of the ca-induced changes in ci/ca occurred across ca spanning 200 to 400 ppm. These patterns imply that ca − ci will eventually approach a constant level at high ca because assimilation rates will reach a maximum and stomatal conductance of each species should be constrained to some minimum level. These analyses are not consistent with canalization toward any single strategy, particularly maintaining a constant ci. Rather, the results are consistent with the existence of a broadly conserved pattern of stomatal optimization in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms. This results in trees being profligate water users at low ca, when additional water loss is small for each unit of C gain, and increasingly water-conservative at high ca, when photosystems are saturated and water loss is large for each unit C gain.

  3. A dynamic leaf gas-exchange strategy is conserved in woody plants under changing ambient CO2 : evidence from carbon isotope discrimination in paleo and CO2 enrichment studies.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Steven L; Brooks, J Renée; Meinzer, Frederick C; Anderson, Rebecca; Bader, Martin K-F; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Becklin, Katie M; Beerling, David; Bert, Didier; Betancourt, Julio L; Dawson, Todd E; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Guyette, Richard P; Körner, Christian; Leavitt, Steven W; Linder, Sune; Marshall, John D; Mildner, Manuel; Ogée, Jérôme; Panyushkina, Irina; Plumpton, Heather J; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Saurer, Matthias; Smith, Andrew R; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Stambaugh, Michael C; Talhelm, Alan F; Tardif, Jacques C; Van de Water, Peter K; Ward, Joy K; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Rising atmospheric [CO2 ], ca , is expected to affect stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange of woody plants, thus influencing energy fluxes as well as carbon (C), water, and nutrient cycling of forests. Researchers have proposed various strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange that include maintaining a constant leaf internal [CO2 ], ci , a constant drawdown in CO2 (ca  - ci ), and a constant ci /ca . These strategies can result in drastically different consequences for leaf gas-exchange. The accuracy of Earth systems models depends in part on assumptions about generalizable patterns in leaf gas-exchange responses to varying ca . The concept of optimal stomatal behavior, exemplified by woody plants shifting along a continuum of these strategies, provides a unifying framework for understanding leaf gas-exchange responses to ca . To assess leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies, we analyzed patterns in ci inferred from studies reporting C stable isotope ratios (δ(13) C) or photosynthetic discrimination (∆) in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms that grew across a range of ca spanning at least 100 ppm. Our results suggest that much of the ca -induced changes in ci /ca occurred across ca spanning 200 to 400 ppm. These patterns imply that ca  - ci will eventually approach a constant level at high ca because assimilation rates will reach a maximum and stomatal conductance of each species should be constrained to some minimum level. These analyses are not consistent with canalization toward any single strategy, particularly maintaining a constant ci . Rather, the results are consistent with the existence of a broadly conserved pattern of stomatal optimization in woody angiosperms and gymnosperms. This results in trees being profligate water users at low ca , when additional water loss is small for each unit of C gain, and increasingly water-conservative at high ca , when photosystems are saturated and water loss is large for each unit C gain.

  4. How the Surface Seawater of the South China Sea Exchanged CO2 with the Atmosphere over the Last Glacial Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, T.; Jian, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 content, changing synchronously with temperature over recent glacial cycles, is considered as one of the most important mechanisms regulating climate change. The ocean is the dominant force driving atmospheric CO2 changes in glacial cycles. The CO2 sink of global coastal seas currently comprise 21% of the net sea-air CO2 flux of the global ocean, therefore coastal seas play important role in adjusting atmospheric CO2. The South China Sea (SCS), one of the largest coastal seas separating Asia from the Pacific, currently acts as a source of atmospheric CO2 due to high seawater temperature and intense vertical mixing bringing CO2 of deep sea to the surface. We measured B/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifers, Globigerinoides ruber and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, from MD05-2896 located in the southern SCS to reconstruct surface water pH (pHsw) and thermocline water pH (pHtw) and then calculate pCO2 of surface water (pCO2sw) and pCO2 of thermocline water (pCO2tw) over the last glacial cycle. Additionally, Mg/Ca ratios and δ18O were measured in G.ruber and P. obliquiloculata to reconstruct seawater temperature and salinity. The difference of pCO2 between surface water and atmosphere (ΔpCO2sw-atm) were positive during Holocene and from MIS5.1 to MIS5.4, implying that the southern SCS was the source of atmospheric CO2. The Holocene result coincides with the modern observation. During the last glacial period, the southern SCS became the sink of atmospheric CO2, indicated from the negative ΔpCO2sw-atm values. We also discovered that ΔpCO2sw-atm, the difference of pCO2 between thermocline and surface water (ΔpCO2tw-sw) and thermocline water temperature (TWT) have similar change trend, presenting obvious 20,000-year precession cycle. Therefore, we regard TWT as one of the dominant elements effecting the SCS to absorb or release CO2. When TWT were lower during glacial time, the mixed layer was able to dissolve more CO2, with larger ΔpCO2tw-sw, and the

  5. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    PubMed

    Malone, Sparkle L; Staudhammer, Christina L; Oberbauer, Steven F; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G; Schedlbauer, Jessica L; Loescher, Henry W; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades.

  6. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Enhances CO2 Exchange Rates in Freshwater Marsh Ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Sparkle L.; Staudhammer, Christina L.; Oberbauer, Steven F.; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G.; Schedlbauer, Jessica L.; Loescher, Henry W.; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009–2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (−11 to −110 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (−5 to −43.5 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m−2 yr−1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (−16 g CO2 m−2 yr−1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades. PMID:25521299

  7. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  8. The spatial and temporal relationships between CO2 and CH4 exchange in a temperate ombrotrophic bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Derrick Y. F.; Roulet, Nigel T.; Moore, Tim R.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the relationships between CO2 and CH4 fluxes across space and time at a temperate ombrotrophic bog in Canada to assess the coupling between plant production and CH4 emissions. Based on periodic manual chamber measurements, we show that maximum net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEEmax) was a good predictor of the spatial variations in CH4 flux among the wetter Eriophorum and lawn sites (r2 = 0.61-0.88), but not the drier hummock sites (r2 = 0.04-0.49). Also, we observed large interannual variability in the NEEmax-CH4 relationship at the Eriophorum and lawn sites, with a smaller regression slope in 2010 that had a seasonal mean water table 8 cm lower than in 2009. Results of cross-correlation of instantaneous gross ecosystem production (GEP) and CH4 flux from autochambers show a moderate relationship (σ = -0.31) in the Eriophorum community at a lag of 9-12 h, suggesting a rapid turnover of recent photosynthate for methanogenesis. On the other hand, we found in two Maianthemum-dominated chambers that the temperature-independent residuals of daily mean CH4 flux lagged behind GEP by 18-26 days at the seasonal scale. The lagged correlations between GEP and CH4 flux by month were particularly strong in the late growing season in the Eriophorum and Maianthemum/Ledum communities. Our results suggest the presence of spatial and temporal coupling of plant production and CH4 emissions in this bog, whose strength varies with species composition, water table position, and plant phenology.

  9. Estimation of the Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange of Chaparral Using Eddy Covariance, remote sensing and Biome-BGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Oechel, W. C.; Sims, D.; Heinsch, F.; Kimball, J.

    2003-12-01

    The chaparral ecosystem ranges from California to Arizona, USA, and into Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas, eastern Mexico. Tower-based eddy covariance and measurements above the canopy of a young stand (10 years old) and an old stand (>100 years old) have been conducted at Sky Oaks Biological Field Station, San Diego, USA, for 5 years to quantify the seasonal and annual variation in the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of the chaparral ecosystem. Both stands are a C sink on an annual basis. Surprisingly, and contrary to the hypothesis by Odum, the old, mature, "scenscent" stand was as large of a C sink as the young stand. The stands tended to be net sinks during the wet seasons, and net sources during the dry seasons. Seasonal changes in carbon flux reflected changes of light use efficiency and were well correlated with two remote sensing indices of leaf pigment composition (NDVI and PRI). This implied the possibility of using remote sensing to estimate ecosystem CO2 balance. Two practical tram systems with optical sensors were set within the footprint of each eddy covariance tower in the young stand and old stand at Sky Oaks. This comparison between data from the eddy tower and spectral reflectance from remote sensing presented a good correlation between CO2 flux and NDVI corrected to a constant solar angle, which indicated that remote sensing is a very promising tool for the estimation of carbon fluxes in a chaparral ecosystem. To develop methods for scaling eddy flux measurements to the surrounding region, Biome-BGC model and MODIS results were introduced into the analysis. The eddy covariance data illustrated sink NEE patterns during wet seasons and source patterns during dry seasons, while the data simulated from Biome-BGC presented a net sink pattern throughout the whole year. The GPP simulated from Biome-BGC was lower than the estimate from MODIS, and their GPP yearly patterns were also different. Peak GPP from Biome-BGC was around June, while MODIS showed the peak

  10. Hydrological Controls on Ecosystem CO2 and CH4 Exchange in a MIXED Tundra and a FEN within an Arctic Landscape UNDER Current and Future Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, R. F.; Humphreys, E.; Lafleur, P.

    2014-12-01

    Variation in CO2 and CH4 exchange in years with contrasting weather is strongly affected by hydrology in landscapes underlain by permafrost. Hypotheses for this variation were incorporated into the ecosystem model ecosys which simulated CO2 and CH4 fluxes along a topographic gradient within an arctic landscape at Daring Lake, NWT, Canada. Fluxes modelled at mixed tundra and fen sites within the gradient were compared with CO2 fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers from 2006 to 2009, and with CH4 fluxes measured with surface chambers in 2008. Slopes and correlation coefficients from regressions of modelled vs. measured CO2 fluxes were 1.0 ± 0.1 and 0.7 - 0.8 for both sites in all years. At the mixed tundra site, rises in net CO2 uptake in warmer years with earlier snowmelt were constrained by midafternoon declines in CO2 influxes when vapor pressure deficits (D) exceeded 1.5 kPa, and by rises in CO2 effluxes with greater active layer depth (ALD). Consequently annual net CO2 uptake at this site rose little with warming. At the fen site, CO2 influxes declined less with D and CO2 effluxes rose less with warming, so that rises in net CO2 uptake in warmer years were greater than those at the mixed tundra site. The greater declines in CO2 influxes with warming at the mixed tundra site were modelled from greater soil-plant-atmosphere water potential gradients that developed in drier soil, and the smaller rises in CO2 effluxes with warming at the fen site were modelled from O2 constraints to heterotrophic and below-ground autotrophic respiration that limited their responses to greater ALD. Modelled and measured CH4 exchange during July and August indicated very small influxes at the mixed tundra site, and larger emissions at the fen site. Emissions of CH4 modelled during soil freezing in October - November contributed about one-third of the annual total, and so should be included in estimates of annual emissions. These contrasting responses to warming under current

  11. COCA: deriving urban emissions and the carbon exchange of a forested region using airborne CO2 and CO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiss, H.; Schmitgen, S.; Ciais, P.; Neininger, B.; Baeumle, M.; Brunet, Y.; Kley, D.

    2002-05-01

    A crucial challenge in measuring the partitioning of sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 is the separation of regional anthropogenic CO2 sources from biogenic activity. The aim of the COCA project is to quantify the fossil fuel and biogenic CO2 fractions using continuous airborne CO2 and CO measurements, where CO acts as a tracer for anthropogenic CO2. At first part of the project COCA an attempt was made to measure daytime biogenic CO2 fluxes over a forest area (about 15 by 30 km size). The campaign took place around the CARBOEUROFLUX site ``Le Bray'' (Pinus pinaster) close to Bordeaux in France end of June 2001 Based on continuous airborne CO2, H2O and CO flux and concentration measurements a Lagrangian budgeting approach was chosen to measure regional CO2 deposition fluxes. The objective is to determine the CO2 uptake of the extended forest area from the CO2/CO gradients up- and downwind of the ecosystem, using CO as air mass tracer and such estimating the influence of anthropogenic CO2 advected into the area First results of the summer flight on June 23rd will be shown, where fair wind speeds (~5 m/s) and a low CBL height led to the observation of a clear decrease in CO2 at the downwind flight stacks with basically constant CO concentrations. For other summer flights with very low wind speeds, local effects dominate the observations leading to a larger variability in the observations. Both, correlations and anti-correlations of CO2 with the anthropogenic tracer CO have been observed. Positive correlations indicate fresh plumes of anthropogenic CO2. Negative correlations are indicative of entrainment of free tropospheric air, that was marked by relatively higher CO2 and lower CO concentrations than the average CBL concentrations. During a second campaign the variance of anthropogenic CO and CO2 emissions of a large city unaffected by biogenic processes has been studied. This campaign was carried out on February 16 and 17, 2002 over the Paris metropolitan area

  12. Heatwave 2003: high summer temperature, rather than experimental fertilization, affects vegetation and CO2 exchange in an alpine bog.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Renato; Bragazza, Luca; Brancaleoni, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorus were added experimentally in a bog in the southern Alps. It was hypothesized that alleviating nutrient limitation will increase vascular plant cover. As a consequence, more carbon will be fixed through higher rates of net ecosystem CO(2) exchange (NEE). The vascular cover did increase at the expense of Sphagnum mosses. However, such vegetation changes were largely independent of the treatment and were probably triggered by an exceptional heatwave in summer 2003. Contrary to the tested hypothesis, NEE was unaffected by the nutrient treatments but was strongly influenced by temperature and water-table depth. In particular, ecosystem respiration in the hot summer of 2003 increased dramatically, presumably owing to enhanced heterotrophic respiration in an increased oxic peat layer. At the end of the experiment, the Sphagnum cover decreased significantly in the nitrogen-fertilized treatment at hummock microhabitats. In the long term, this will imply a proportionally greater accumulation of vascular litter, more easily decomposable than the recalcitrant Sphagnum litter. As a result, rates of carbon fixation may decrease because of stimulated respiration.

  13. Implications of a Changing Arctic on Summertime Surface Seawater pCO2 Variations in the Eastern Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgers, T.; Miller, L. A.; Thomas, H.; Else, B. G. T.; Gosselin, M.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic marine carbonate chemistry and rates of air-sea CO2 exchange are anticipated to be affected by current changes in sea-ice structure and extent, freshwater inputs, ocean circulation patterns, and the seasonality of phytoplankton blooms. This study examines how such changes will impact rates of air-sea CO2 exchange in northern Baffin Bay, Nares Strait, and the eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This complex oceanographic region includes the North Water polynya; one of the most biologically productive areas in the Arctic Ocean, and the convergence site of the warm West Greenland Current with cold exported Arctic waters. Continuous measurements of atmospheric and surface seawater CO2 (pCO2) were collected onboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen during its 2013 and 2014 summer cruises. Surface seawater pCO2 displayed considerable variability (145 - 389 ppm), but never exceeded atmospheric concentrations. Calculated CO2 fluxes ranged from 0 to -45 mmol m-2 day-1 (oceanic uptake), and were estimated using the Sweeney et al. (2007) parameterization with in-situ wind speed measurements. Ancillary measurements of chlorophyll a reveal low productivity in surface waters during mid-summer with isolated sub-surface blooms. This is likely the result of nutrient limitation within the highly stratified polar mixed layer (PML). Measurements of stable oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) and total alkalinity were used to estimate freshwater inputs (sea-ice melt vs. meteoric water) to the PML. These and in-situ observations of sea ice cover were used to interpret seawater pCO2 variations. Surface waters influenced by sea-ice melt exhibit lower pCO2 than those influenced by meteoric water. The results of this investigation shed light on the future role of this region as a summertime sink of atmospheric CO2.

  14. The effects of soil and air temperature on CO2 exchange and net biomass accumulation in Norway spruce, Scots pine and silver birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Rasilo, Terhi; Villemot, Julie; Ilvesniemi, Hannu

    2012-06-01

    Soil temperature is proposed to affect the photosynthetic rate and carbon allocation in boreal trees through sink limitation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature on CO(2) exchange, biomass partitioning and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi of boreal tree species. We measured carbon allocation, above- and below-ground CO(2) exchange and the species composition of associated ECM fungi in the rhizosphere of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies K.) and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings grown in soil maintained at 7-12, 12-15 and 16-22 °C. We found increased root biomass and photosynthetic rate at higher soil temperatures, but simultaneously with photosynthesis rate, higher temperature generally increased soil respiration as well as shoot, and root and rhizosphere respiration. The net CO(2) exchange and seedling biomass did not increase significantly with increasing temperature due to a concomitant increase in carbon assimilation and respiration rates. The 2-month-long growth period in different soil temperatures did not alter the ECM fungi species composition and the below-ground carbon sink strength did not seem to be directly related to ECM biomass and species composition in any of the tree species. Ectomycorrhizal species composition and number of mycorrhiza did not explain the CO(2) exchange results at different temperatures.

  15. Comparative studies on exchange reactions of hexafluoroacetylacetonate in bis(hexafluoroacetylacetonato)(dimethyl sulfoxide)dioxouranium(VI) in nonaqueous solvent and supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    Kachi, Yoshihiro; Kayaki, Yoshihito; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Ikariya, Takao; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2008-01-07

    Exchange reactions of hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfacac) in UO2(hfacac)2DMSO (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) in o-C6D4Cl2 and supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) have been studied using the NMR line-broadening method to compare reactivity in a nonaqueous solvent with that in sc-CO2. It was found that the exchange rates of hfacac in both systems are dependent on the concentration of the enol isomer ([Henol]) of hexafluoroacetylacetone and become slow with an increase in the concentration of free DMSO ([DMSO]). The exchange reaction between free and coordinated DMSO in UO2(hfacac)2DMSO has been also examined in o-C6D4Cl2 and sc-CO2. As a result, the exchange rate of DMSO was found to depend on [DMSO]. From these results, the hfacac exchange reactions in UO2(hfacac)2DMSO in o-C6D4Cl2 and sc-CO2 were proposed to proceed through the mechanism that the ring-opening for one of two coordinated hfacac in UO2(hfacac)2DMSO is the rate-determining step, and the resulting vacant site is coordinated by the incoming Henol, followed by the proton transfer from Henol to hfacac and the ring closure of unidentate hfacac. The rate constants at 60 degrees C and the activation parameters (DeltaH and DeltaS) for the ring-opening path are 35.8 +/- 3.2 s(-1), 57.8 +/- 2.7 kJ.mol(-1), and -42.9 +/- 7.7 J.mol(-1).K(-1) for the o-C6D4Cl2 system, and 518 +/- 50 s(-1), 18.9 +/- 1.8 kJ.mol(-1), and -138 +/- 5 J.mol(-1).K(-1) for the sc-CO2 system, respectively. Differences in kinetic parameters between sc-CO2 and o-C6D4Cl2 systems were proposed to be attributed to the solute-solvent interactions such as Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions and hydrogen bondings between sc-CO2 and beta-diketones.

  16. Atmospheric N deposition and feedbacks on net ecosystem CO2 exchange at a semi-natural peatland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2013-04-01

    Large areas of Northern Germany have been converted from natural peat bogs to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. This is the case at our study site - a semi-natural raised bog - which although located in a natural park, is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and highly emitting animal husbandry farms. In this study, we use a combined approach of two independent methods to quantify atmospheric N deposition. We further investigate possible feedbacks of seasonal variation in N deposition on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). Fluxes of ammonia (NH3) and its atmospheric reactants are measured by a KAPS-denuder system. Additionally, total N input from the atmosphere into a soil-plant model ecosystem is investigated by a 15N dilution method called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI). With this approach, we allocate atmospheric N after its uptake by the ecosystem into its different fractions and investigate both plant-species effects (Lolium multiflorum, Eriophorum vaginatum) and influences of the plant biomass production induced by different amounts of fertilizer addition. Continuous eddy-covariance measurements are carried out to measure NEE. Maximum NH3 depositions of 0.41 ± 0.04 kg ha-1 week-1 were found in spring 2012. The proportion of fluxes of other N compounds such as HNO3, aerosol NH4 and NO3 was usually around 20 % of total dry N measured by KAPS denuders. In total, dry N deposition was 11.2 ± 0.9 kg N ha-1 yr-1 over the first year of experiments. Complemented with wet N measurements using bulk samplers, total N depositions of about 25.0 kg ha-1 yr-1 were found. The mean atmospheric N uptake determined with the ITNI system was 3.99 ± 0.82 mg N g-1 dry weight from July to October 2011. About two third of total deposited airborne N was allocated in above-ground plant biomass and roots. Upscaling of data based on pot

  17. Precipitation regulates the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to environmental variation on U.S. rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangelands occupy about 50% of the Earth’s land surface and thus play an important role in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle. For rangelands and other terrestrial ecosystems, the balance between photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CO2 loss to respiration varies among years in response ...

  18. Interactive effects between nitrogen fertilization and elevated CO2 on growth and gas exchange of papaya seedling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevation of CO2 in the atmosphere will change requirements for minerals, mainly nitrogen, altering the relationship between nutrients demand and growth of the plants. We evaluated the interacting effects between CO2 concentrations (390 or 750 µL L-1) and nitrogen levels (3mM or 8mM) on the growth, ...

  19. Direct observations of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) Air-Sea Exchange in the remote North Atlantic from the High-Wind Gas-Exchange Study (HiWinGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Yang, M. X.; Blomquist, B.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) are reactive trace gases that impact both chemistry and climate by regulating oxidant loadings, determining secondary organic aerosol production rates as well as altering particle hygroscopicity. While continental BVOC exchange rates are well studied, global marine flux estimates are poorly constrained. In Fall 2013, a chemical-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToF-MS) utilizing benzene cations was deployed as part of the High Wind Gas Exchange Study (HiWinGs) to quantify monoterpenes, isoprene and dimethylsulfide fluxes in the remote North Atlantic. Dimethylsulfide measurements are in strong agreement with those determined by the University of Hawaii's atmospheric pressure ionization mass-spectrometer. In the remote marine boundary layer, positive monoterpene fluxes (i.e. emissions) were observed while isoprene levels rarely exceeded the detection limit.

  20. The Simulation of the Opposing Fluxes of Latent Heat and CO2 over Various Land-Use Types: Coupling a Gas Exchange Model to a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, Mark; Krüger, Andreas; Werner, Christiane; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Zacharias, Stefan; Kerschgens, Michael

    2011-04-01

    A mesoscale meteorological model (FOOT3DK) is coupled with a gas exchange model to simulate surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O under field conditions. The gas exchange model consists of a C3 single leaf photosynthesis sub-model and an extended big leaf (sun/shade) sub-model that divides the canopy into sunlit and shaded fractions. Simulated CO2 fluxes of the stand-alone version of the gas exchange model correspond well to eddy-covariance measurements at a test site in a rural area in the west of Germany. The coupled FOOT3DK/gas exchange model is validated for the diurnal cycle at singular grid points, and delivers realistic fluxes with respect to their order of magnitude and to the general daily course. Compared to the Jarvis-based big leaf scheme, simulations of latent heat fluxes with a photosynthesis-based scheme for stomatal conductance are more realistic. As expected, flux averages are strongly influenced by the underlying land cover. While the simulated net ecosystem exchange is highly correlated with leaf area index, this correlation is much weaker for the latent heat flux. Photosynthetic CO2 uptake is associated with transpirational water loss via the stomata, and the resulting opposing surface fluxes of CO2 and H2O are reproduced with the model approach. Over vegetated surfaces it is shown that the coupling of a photosynthesis-based gas exchange model with the land-surface scheme of a mesoscale model results in more realistic simulated latent heat fluxes.

  1. Air-surface exchange of H2O, CO2, and O3 at a tallgrass prairie in relation to remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M. L.; Cook, D. R.; Hart, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Parameters derived from eddy correlation measurements of the air-surface exchange rates of H2O, CO2, and O3 over a tallgrass prairie are examined in terms of their relationships with spectral reflectance data remotely sensed from aircraft and satellites during the four 1987 intensive field campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The surface conductances were strongly modulated by photosynthetically active radiation received at the surface when the grass was green and well watered; mesophyll resistances were large for CO2 but negligible for H2O and O3.

  2. Air-Sea Interactions over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Alejandro; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing, three dimensions, and realistic coastlines. Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions indicated that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality, which limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  3. Acclimation response of spring wheat in a free-air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) atmosphere with variable soil nitrogen regimes. 3. Canopy architecture and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Brooks, T J; Wall, G W; Pinter, P J; Kimball, B A; Lamorte, R L; Leavitt, S W; Matthias, A D; Adamsen, F J; Hunsaker, D J; Webber, A N

    2000-01-01

    The response of whole-canopy net CO(2) exchange rate (CER) and canopy architecture to CO(2) enrichment and N stress during 1996 and 1997 for open-field-grown wheat ecosystem (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) are described. Every Control (C) and FACE (F) CO(2) treatment (defined as ambient and ambient +200 mumol mol(-1), respectively) contained a Low- and High-N treatment. Low-N treatments constituted initial soil content amended with supplemental nitrogen applied at a rate of 70 kg N ha(-1) (1996) and 15 kg N ha(-1) (1997), whereas High-N treatments were supplemented with 350 kg N ha(-1) (1996 and 1997). Elevated CO(2) enhanced season-long carbon accumulation by 8% and 16% under Low-N and High-N, respectively. N-stress reduced season-long carbon accumulation 14% under ambient CO(2), but by as much as 22% under CO(2) enrichment. Averaging both years, green plant area index (GPAI) peaked approximately 76 days after planting at 7.13 for FH, 6.00 for CH, 3.89 for FL, and 3.89 for CL treatments. Leaf tip angle distribution (LTA) indicated that Low-N canopies were more erectophile than those of High-N canopies: 48 degrees for FH, 52 degrees for CH, and 58 degrees for both FL and CL treatments. Temporal trends in canopy greenness indicated a decrease in leaf chlorophyll content from the flag to flag-2 leaves of 25% for FH, 28% for CH, 17% for CL, and 33% for FL during 1997. These results indicate that significant modifications of canopy architecture occurs in response to both CO(2) and N-stress. Optimization of canopy architecture may serve as a mechanism to diminish CO(2) and N-stress effects on CER.

  4. Assessing the impact of cloud slicing techniques on estimates of surface CO2 exchange using atmospheric inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, A. E.; Kawa, S. R.; Crowell, S.; Browell, E. V.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typically more than half of the earth's surface is cloudy at any one point in time. Passive CO2 satellite instruments such as GOSAT and OCO-2 have historically filtered out these scenes, as being too difficult to interpret. However, with the advent of active sensing technologies coupled with ranging capabilities, many of these limitations are being lifted. While, the remote sensing community continues to grapple with the radiative-transfer aspects of the cloud-top CO2 retrieval problem, the carbon cycling community has begun to consider what parts of the carbon cycle might be constrained with this new stream of data. Using cloud data derived from CALIPSO, a simulated carbon cycle, and state of the art atmospheric inversion models, we will investigate the impact of "above cloud" partial-column retrievals of CO2 upon estimates of surface CO2 flux. In particular, we will investigate (1) the general constraint imposed upon surface CO2 fluxes, by retrievals over spatially and time coherent cloud structures around the globe as well as (2) the partitioning of gross primary production and respiration CO2 flux terms by differencing full-column and above-cloud partial column CO2 over scenes with optically thick low clouds.

  5. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  6. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration and nitrate: ammonium ratios on gas exchange and growth of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated how different nitrogen forms affect growth and photosynthetic responses of cassava to CO2 concentration. Cassava was grown in 12-L pots in a greenhouse (30/25o C day / night) at 390 or 750 ppm of CO2. Three nitrogen treatments were applied: (a) 12 mM NO3-, (b) 6 mM NO3- + 6 mM N...

  7. The Iġnik Sikumi Field Experiment, Alaska North Slope: Design, operations, and implications for CO2−CH4 exchange in gas hydrate reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Schoderbek, David; Collett, Timothy S.; Ohtsuki, Satoshi; White, Mark; Anderson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    The Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Exchange Field Experiment was conducted by ConocoPhillips in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, and the U.S. Geological Survey within the Prudhoe Bay Unit on the Alaska North Slope during 2011 and 2012. The primary goals of the program were to (1) determine the feasibility of gas injection into hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and (2) observe reservoir response upon subsequent flowback in order to assess the potential for CO2 exchange for CH4 in naturally occurring gas hydrate reservoirs. Initial modeling determined that no feasible means of injection of pure CO2 was likely, given the presence of free water in the reservoir. Laboratory and numerical modeling studies indicated that the injection of a mixture of CO2 and N2 offered the best potential for gas injection and exchange. The test featured the following primary operational phases: (1) injection of a gaseous phase mixture of CO2, N2, and chemical tracers; (2) flowback conducted at downhole pressures above the stability threshold for native CH4 hydrate; and (3) an extended (30-days) flowback at pressures near, and then below, the stability threshold of native CH4 hydrate. The test findings indicate that the formation of a range of mixed-gas hydrates resulted in a net exchange of CO2 for CH4 in the reservoir, although the complexity of the subsurface environment renders the nature, extent, and efficiency of the exchange reaction uncertain. The next steps in the evaluation of exchange technology should feature multiple well applications; however, such field test programs will require extensive preparatory experimental and numerical modeling studies and will likely be a secondary priority to further field testing of production through depressurization. Additional insights gained from the field program include the following: (1) gas hydrate destabilization is self-limiting, dispelling any notion of the potential for

  8. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration using 13CO2 measurements: A cost-effective sampling strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Roche, C.; Richard, P.; Bardoux, G.; Bonnefond, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    The current emphasis on global climate studies has led the scientific community to set up a number of sites for measuring the long-term biosphere-atmosphere net CO2 exchange (net ecosystem exchange, NEE). Partitioning this flux into its elementary components, net assimilation (FA), and respiration (FR), remains necessary in order to get a better understanding of biosphere functioning and design better surface exchange models. Noting that FR and FA have different isotopic signatures, we evaluate the potential of isotopic 13CO2 measurements in the air (combined with CO2 flux and concentration measurements) to partition NEE into FR and FA on a routine basis. The study is conducted at a temperate coniferous forest where intensive isotopic measurements in air, soil, and biomass were performed in summer 1997. The multilayer soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model MuSICA is adapted to compute 13CO2 flux and concentration profiles. Using MuSICA as a "perfect" simulator and taking advantage of the very dense spatiotemporal resolution of the isotopic data set (341 flasks over a 24-hour period) enable us to test each hypothesis and estimate the performance of the method. The partitioning works better in midafternoon when isotopic disequilibrium is strong. With only 15 flasks, i.e., two 13CO2 nighttime profiles (to estimate the isotopic signature of FR) and five daytime measurements (to perform the partitioning) we get mean daily estimates of FR and FA that agree with the model within 15-20%. However, knowledge of the mesophyll conductance seems crucial and may be a limitation to the method.

  9. Snowflake Impact on the Air-Sea Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David

    2016-11-01

    The air-sea interface is the site of globally important exchanges of mass, momentum, and heat between the sea and atmosphere. These climate-driving exchanges occur through small-scale processes such as bubble entrainment and bursting, raindrop impact, and wind-wave creation. The physics of snowflakes falling on the sea surface has not been previously considered. High speed imaging of natural snowflakes of characteristic size up to 6.5 mm falling at a mean speed of 1 m/s into an aquarium of chilled seawater reveals a complex multiphase flow. Snowflakes impacting and crossing the air-seawater interface appear to entrain a thin air film which forms micro-bubbles as the snowflake melts. Large, morphologically complex snowflakes may entrain hundreds of micro-bubbles which are up to 0.15 mm in diameter. Large snowflakes melt milliseconds after entry and subsequently form a downward-moving vortex ring of freshwater, evident from the motion of the bubbles it contains, which may penetrate up to 16 mm below the surface. Buoyant freshwater and bubbles then rise, with larger bubbles escaping from the downward flow more quickly than the smaller bubbles. The dissolution and popping of these bubbles represent previously unrecognized sources of air-sea gas transfer and marine aerosol droplet creation, respectively.

  10. Evaluation of variations in CO2 gas exchange in the atmosphere of the BTLSS with plants grown in a conveyor mode on the soil-like substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Ushakova, Sofya

    2016-07-01

    The soil-like substrate (SLS) included in the bioregenerative life support system (BLSS) exerts a substantial effect on its gas exchange. This effect is determined by the non-uniform rate of organic matter degradation in the SLS, on the one hand, and by the variable intensity of photosynthesis of the plants grown on it, on the other. The purpose of this study was to compare CO2 variations in the atmosphere of the higher plants - SLS system at different intervals in uneven-aged higher plant conveyers. The study showed that CO2 concentration could reach and exceed the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide acceptable for humans (over 1%) even when the conveyer interval was rather short. CO2 variations in the atmosphere of the higher plants - SLS system were determined not only by the frequency of adding plant waste to the SLS and the mass of the waste but also by the amount of the harvested actively photosynthesizing plant biomass. At the same time, no significant differences were found in the mineral and production components between the plants in different experiments. Results of the study can be used to optimize the conveyor interval and the associated effectiveness of mineralization of the plant waste added to the SLS and to stabilize the CO2 gas exchange. This study was carried out in the IBP SB RAS and supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-14-00599).

  11. Direct Observation of sp-d Exchange Interactions in Colloidal Mn2+- and Co2+-Doped CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul I.; Santangelo, Steven A.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

    2007-03-23

    The defining attribute of a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) is the existence of dopant-carrier magnetic exchange interactions. In this letter, we report the first direct observation of such exchange interactions in colloidal doped CdSe nanocrystals. Doped CdSe quantum dots were synthesized by thermal decomposition of (Me4N)2[Cd4(SePh)10] in the presence of TMCl2 (TM2+ ) Mn2+ or Co2+) in hexadecylamine and were characterized by several analytical and spectroscopic techniques. Using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, successful doping and the existence of giant excitonic Zeeman splittings in both Mn2+- and Co2+-doped wurtzite CdSe quantum dots are demonstrated unambiguously.

  12. Winter observations of CO2 exchange between sea-ice and the atmosphere in a coastal fjord environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, J.; Sørensen, L. L.; Papakyriakou, T.; Sejr, M. K.; Søgaard, D. H.; Barber, D.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy covariance observations of CO2-fluxes were conducted during March-April 2012 in a temporally sequential order at three locations on fast sea-ice and on newly formed polynya ice in a coastal fjord environment in North East Greenland. CO2 fluxes at the three sites, ICEI, POLYI and DNB, were found to increase over time in accordance with the progression of springtime warming: FCO2ICE1 =1.4 ± 4.9 mmol m-2 d-1, FCO2POLY1 =-3.4 ± 31.4 mmol m-2 d-1 and FCO2DNB =36.7 ± 72.8 mmol m-2 d-1, where values given are the mean and SD, and negative/positive values indicate uptake/outgassing respectively. Observations were carried out at the three sites for 8, 4 and 30 days respectively. A correlation analysis indicates a strong connection between net radiative forcing, wind-speed and CO2-fluxes. Correlations between latent heat fluxes and CO2-fluxes were found for the first time and support the presence of adsorption/desorption processes of CO2 in moist snow.

  13. A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program site synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Williams, Christopher A.; Schaefer, Kevin; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, A.; Baker, Ian; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Barr, Alan; Black, T. A.; Gu, Lianhong; Riciutto, Dan M.

    2010-12-01

    Our current understanding of terrestrial carbon processes is represented in various models used to integrate and scale measurements of CO2 exchange from remote sensing and other spatiotemporal data. Yet assessments are rarely conducted to determine how well models simulate carbon processes across vegetation types and environmental conditions. Using standardized data from the North American Carbon Program we compare observed and simulated monthly CO2 exchange from 44 eddy covariance flux towers in North America and 22 terrestrial biosphere models. The analysis period spans 220 site-years, 10 biomes, and includes two large-scale drought events, providing a natural experiment to evaluate model skill as a function of drought and seasonality. We evaluate models' ability to simulate the seasonal cycle of CO2 exchange using multiple model skill metrics and analyze links between model characteristics, site history, and model skill. Overall model performance was poor; the difference between observations and simulations was 10 times observational uncertainty, with forested ecosystems better predicted than nonforested. Model-data agreement was highest in summer and in temperate evergreen forests. In contrast, model performance declined in spring and fall, especially in ecosystems with large deciduous components, and in dry periods during the growing season. Models used across multiple biomes and sites, the mean model ensemble, and a model using assimilated parameter values showed high consistency with observations. Models with the highest skill across all biomes all used prescribed canopy phenology, calculated NEE as the difference between GPP and ecosystem respiration, and did not use a daily time step.

  14. Multiple Flux Footprints, Flux Divergences and Boundary Layer Mixing Ratios: Studies of Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Using the WLEF Tall Tower.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. J.; Bakwin, P. S.; Yi, C.; Cook, B. D.; Wang, W.; Denning, A. S.; Teclaw, R.; Isebrands, J. G.

    2001-05-01

    Long-term, tower-based measurements using the eddy-covariance method have revealed a wealth of detail about the temporal dynamics of netecosystem-atmosphere exchange (NEE) of CO2. The data also provide a measure of the annual net CO2 exchange. The area represented by these flux measurements, however, is limited, and doubts remain about possible systematic errors that may bias the annual net exchange measurements. Flux and mixing ratio measurements conducted at the WLEF tall tower as part of the Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) allow for unique assessment of the uncertainties in NEE of CO2. The synergy between flux and mixing ratio observations shows the potential for comparing inverse and eddy-covariance methods of estimating NEE of CO2. Such comparisons may strengthen confidence in both results and begin to bridge the huge gap in spatial scales (at least 3 orders of magnitude) between continental or hemispheric scale inverse studies and kilometer-scale eddy covariance flux measurements. Data from WLEF and Willow Creek, another ChEAS tower, are used to estimate random and systematic errors in NEE of CO2. Random uncertainty in seasonal exchange rates and the annual integrated NEE, including both turbulent sampling errors and variability in enviromental conditions, is small. Systematic errors are identified by examining changes in flux as a function of atmospheric stability and wind direction, and by comparing the multiple level flux measurements on the WLEF tower. Nighttime drainage is modest but evident. Systematic horizontal advection occurs during the morning turbulence transition. The potential total systematic error appears to be larger than random uncertainty, but still modest. The total systematic error, however, is difficult to assess. It appears that the WLEF region ecosystems were a small net sink of CO2 in 1997. It is clear that the summer uptake rate at WLEF is much smaller than that at most deciduous forest sites, including the nearby

  15. Elevated CO2 and warming effects on soil carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas exchange in agroecosystems: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) have been increasing dramatically in earth’s atmosphere since the industrial revolution, and are expected to continue increasing from ~385 ppmv today to more than 600 ppmv by the end of this century. Global surface temperatures are expected to ...

  16. The effects of clouds and aerosols on net ecosystem CO2 exchange over semi-arid Loess Plateau of Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, X.; Huang, J.; Wang, G.; Higuchi, K.; Bi, J.; Sun, Y.; Yu, H.; Wang, T.

    2010-09-01

    The impacts of clouds and atmospheric aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle at semi-arid Loess Plateau in Northwest China are investigated, by using the observation data obtained at the SACOL (Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University) site. Daytime (solar elevation angles of larger than 50°) net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 obtained during the midgrowing season (July-August) are analyzed with respect to variations in the diffuse radiation, cloud cover and aerosol optical depth (AOD). Results show a significant impact by clouds on the CO2 uptake by the grassland (with smaller LAI values) located in a semi-arid region, quite different from areas covered by forests and crops. The light saturation levels in the canopy are low, with a value of about 434.8 W m-2. Thus, under overcast conditions of optically thick clouds, the CO2 uptake increases with increasing clearness index (the ratio of global solar radiation received at the Earth surface to the extraterrestrial irradiance at a plane parallel to the Earth surface), and a maximum CO2 uptake and light use efficiency of vegetation occur with the clearness index of about 0.37 and lower air temperature. Under other sky conditions, CO2 uptake decreases with cloudiness but light use efficiency is enhanced, due to increased diffuse fraction of PAR. Additionally, under cloudy conditions, changes in the NEE of CO2 also result from the interactions of many environmental factors, especially the air temperature. In contrast to its response to changes in solar radiation, the carbon uptake shows a slightly negative response to increased AOD. The reason for the difference in the response of the semi-arid grassland from that of the forest and crop lands may be due to the difference in the canopy's architectural structure.

  17. Spatiotemporal variations in CO2 flux in a fringing reef simulated using a novel carbonate system dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nadaoka, K.; Maeda, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Blanco, A. C.

    2013-03-01

    A carbonate system dynamics (CSD) model was developed in a fringing reef on the east coast of Ishigaki Island, southwest Japan, by incorporating organic and inorganic carbon fluxes (photosynthesis and calcification), air-sea gas exchanges, and benthic cover of coral and seagrass into a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The CSD model could reproduce temporal variations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity in coral zones, but not in seagrass meadows. The poor reproduction in seagrass meadows can be attributed to significant contributions of submarine groundwater discharge as well as misclassification of remotely sensed megabenthos in this area. In comparison with offshore areas, the reef acted as a CO2 sink during the observation period when it was averaged over 24 h. The CSD model also indicated large spatiotemporal differences in the carbon dioxide (CO2) sink/source, possibly related to hydrodynamic features such as effective offshore seawater exchange and neap/spring tidal variation. This suggests that the data obtained from a single point observation may lead to misinterpretation of the overall trend and thus should be carefully considered. The model analysis also showed that the advective flux of DIC from neighboring grids is several times greater than local biological flux of DIC and is three orders of magnitude greater than the air-sea gas flux at the coral zone. Sensitivity tests in which coral or seagrass covers were altered revealed that the CO2 sink potential was much more sensitive to changes in coral cover than seagrass cover.

  18. Effect of Errors in Measuring Leaf Temperature and Ambient Gas Concentration on Calculated Resistances to CO2 and Water Vapor Exchanges in Plant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Slatyer, R. O.

    1971-01-01

    Errors as small as 1 C in the measurement of leaf temperature (Tleaf) are shown to cause significant changes in the estimated value of the stomatal resistance (expressed in terms of total resistance to water vapor transfer, ∑rH2O). The effect increases as Tleaf increases and as ambient relative humidity increases, if other conditions are maintained constant. The effect on the key CO2 exchange parameter, the intracellular (or mesophyll) resistance, rint, tends to be small under open stomata conditions but increases rapidly as stomatal closure occurs, particularly if the true value of rint is relatively small. Errors in the determination of the ambient water vapor and CO2 concentrations can also significantly affect the calculated value of ∑rH2O and rint. The effect on ∑rH2O and ∑rCO2 increases as the ratio of the inlet/outlet concentration departs from unity and also increases as the assumed leaf-air concentration difference decreases. The combined effect on rint tends to be less than the individual effects on ∑rH2O and ∑rCO2 since both are in the same direction. PMID:16657607

  19. Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in brines affect supercritical CO2-brine-biotite interactions: ion exchange, biotite dissolution, and illite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yandi; Ray, Jessica R; Jun, Young-Shin

    2013-01-02

    For sustainable geologic CO(2) sequestration (GCS), a better understanding of the effects of brine cation compositions on mica dissolution, surface morphological change, and secondary mineral precipitation under saline hydrothermal conditions is needed. Batch dissolution experiments were conducted with biotite under conditions relevant to GCS sites (55-95 °C and 102 atm CO(2)). One molar NaCl, 0.4 M MgCl(2), or 0.4 M CaCl(2) solutions were used to mimic different brine compositions, and deionized water was used for comparison. Faster ion exchange reactions (Na(+)-K(+), Mg(2+)-K(+), and Ca(2+)-K(+)) occurred in these salt solutions than in water (H(+)-K(+)). The ion exchange reactions affected bump, bulge, and crack formation on the biotite basal plane, as well as the release of biotite framework ions. In these salt solutions, numerous illite fibers precipitated after reaction for only 3 h at 95 °C. Interestingly, in slow illite precipitation processes, oriented aggregation of hexagonal nanoparticles forming the fibrous illite was observed. These results provide new information for understanding scCO(2)-brine-mica interactions in saline aquifers with different brine cation compositions, which can be useful for GCS as well as other subsurface projects.

  20. Performance Of A Laser Based CO2 Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometer To Study Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Hans-Juerg; Wapelhorst, Eric; Schlueter, Hans-Juergen; Kracht, Oliver; Radke, Jens; Hilkert, Andreas; Gangi, Laura; Bol, Roland; Brueggemann, Nicolas; Van Leeuwen, Charlotte; Meijer, Harro

    2014-05-01

    We are presenting results from a mid-infrared laser-based Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectrometers (IRIS) that is capable of simultaneously determining both δ18O and δ13C isotope ratios of carbon dioxide utilizing a simple, direct absorption approach with a robust multi pass cell and a cryogen free setup. A simulation of ambient measurement conditions with a 75 ppm per hour change in CO2 concentration from 350-650 ppm showed a precision of

  1. Effect of Coulomb interactions and Hartree-Fock exchange on structural, elastic, optoelectronic and magnetic properties of Co2MnSi Heusler: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantri, T.; Bentata, S.; Bouadjemi, B.; Benstaali, W.; Bouhafs, B.; Abbad, A.; Zitouni, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using the first-principle calculations, we have investigated the structural, elastic, optoelectronic and magnetic properties of Co2MnSi Heusler alloy. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) and hiring the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, we have used five approaches: the Hybrid on-site exact exchange, the Local Spin Density Approximation (LSDA), the LSDA+U, the Generalized Gradient Approximation GGA and GGA+U; where the Hubbard on-site Coulomb interaction correction U is calculated by constraint local density approximation for Co and Mn atoms. Our results show that the highly-ordered Co2MnSi alloy is a ductile, stiff and anisotropic material. It has a half-metallic ferromagnetic character with an integer magnetic moment of 5 μB which is in good agreement with the Slater-Pauling rule.

  2. Variation of pCO2 in ocean surface water in response to the passage of a hurricane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peisheng; Imberger, JöRg

    2010-10-01

    The temporal and spatial variations of pCO2 in the ocean surface layer in response to the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004) were investigated with a coupled three-dimensional hydrodynamic and carbon model. The results showed that the sea surface temperature cooling was the dominant cause of the decrease of surface pCO2, while the entrainment of water with higher CO2 levels partially offset the cooling-induced decrease. The surface distribution of pCO2 was thus found to mimic the physical deepening processes, with a "right bias" to the hurricane track. The impact of the hurricane on the local air-sea CO2 exchange extended to about 100 km on both sides of the hurricane track. The whole passage of Hurricane Frances was estimated to have caused a CO2 efflux of about 3.504-10.363 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g) C from ocean to the atmosphere. Globally, hurricanes in 2004 were estimated to have released a CO2 efflux of 0.047-0.141 Pg (1 Pg = 1015 g) C in total when extrapolating from Hurricane Frances. Under our assumptions, the CO2 efflux caused by the passages of global hurricanes should have increased by about 71.2%-75.0% in past decades.

  3. Causes of interannual variability in ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange in a northern Wisconsin forest using a Bayesian model calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciuto, Daniel M; Butler, Martha; Davis, Kenneth; Cook, Bruce D

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide fluxes were examined over the growing seasons of 2002 and 2003 from 14 different sites in Upper Midwest (USA) to assess spatial variability of ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange. These sites were exposed to similar temperature/precipitation regimes and spanned a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also spanned a range of stand ages (young, intermediate, mature). While seasonal changes in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and photosynthetic parameters were coherent across the 2 years at most sites, changes in ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were not. Canopy height and vegetation type were important variables for explaining spatial variability of CO2 fluxes across the region. Light-use efficiency (LUE) was not as strongly correlated to GEP as maximum assimilation capacity (Amax). A bottom-up multi-tower land cover aggregated scaling of CO2 flux to a 2000 km(2) regional flux estimate found June to August 2003 NEE, ER and GEP to be -290 +/- 89, 408 +/- 48, and 698 +/- 73 gC m(-2), respectively. Aggregated NEE, ER and GEP were 280% larger, 32% smaller and 3% larger, respectively, than that observed from a regionally integrating 447 m tall flux tower. However, when the tall tower fluxes were decomposed using a footprint-weighted influence function and then re-aggregated to a regional estimate, the resulting NEE, ER and GEP were within 11% of the multi-tower aggregation. Excluding wetland and young stand age sites from the aggregation worsened the comparison to observed fluxes. These results provide insight on the range of spatial sampling, replication, measurement error and land cover accuracy needed for multi-tiered bottom-up scaling of CO2 fluxes in heterogeneous regions such as the Upper Midwest, USA. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Contributions of Deciduous and Evergreen Trees to the Seasonal Dynamics of CO2 and Water Vapor Exchange Over Developed Land in the Midcontinental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. B.; Montgomery, R.; McFadden, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Half the world's population currently lives in urbanized areas, a proportion expected to increase to 60% by 2030. The clearing of agricultural and natural ecosystems for urban and suburban development is consequently one of the fastest rates of land use change around the world. Although developed land areas represent major sources of CO2 and alter hydrology, they are also ecosystems with significant vegetation cover that takes up CO2 and humidifies the atmospheric boundary layer. Direct measurements are needed to develop a mechanistic understanding of how vegetation contributes to the land-based CO2 sinks and evapotranspiration in developed areas, especially residential developed land which accounts for most of the land-use change in the United States. We quantified whole-tree transpiration, and modeled canopy conductance and canopy photosynthesis using thermal dissipation sap flow and leaf-level gas exchange measurements on stands of deciduous and evergreen trees in a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota. A suite of environmental variables was continuously monitored at each site. During the 2007 growing season, seasonal drought and synoptic and diurnal variations of vapor pressure deficit (VPD) strongly controlled transpiration and photosynthesis in both the deciduous and the evergreen stands. The results are analyzed against a phenology data set (including leaf area index (LAI), and plant and soil biophysical properties) measured at a larger number of stands within a suburban region during the 2006 growing season. These results will allow us to determine the relative contributions of different tree plant functional types to the seasonal dynamics of CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration in developed land, and to scale up the effect of these land cover types on regional carbon and water budgets. This study is a contribution to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Mid-Continent Intensive Field Campaign.

  5. Ecosystem carbon balance in a drier future: land-atmosphere exchanges of CO2, water and energy across semiarid southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, J. A.; Scott, R. L.; Goulden, M.; Litvak, M. E.; Kolb, T.; Yépez, E. A.; Oechel, W. C.; Meyers, T. P.; Papuga, S. A.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Maurer, G. E.; Dore, S.; Garatuza, J.; Bell, T. W.; Krishnan, P.

    2015-12-01

    The southwest US and northwest Mexico are predicted to become warmer and drier, increasing disturbance, shifting ecosystem composition, and altering global CO2 cycling. However, direct measurements of ecosystem land-atmosphere carbon and water exchange in this region have lagged behind those in wetter regions. In this presentation we present a synthesis of CO2, water, and energy exchanges made at 25 Southwest eddy covariance sites (3-10 years each, n = 174 years). This regional gradient includes desert shrublands, grasslands, savannas, and forests and spans ranges of 200 - 800 mm in mean annual precipitation and 2 - 24 ⁰C mean annual temperature, a climate space that has been underrepresented in flux databases and publications. We compare measured fluxes against state-of-the-art remote sensing and modeling products representing current best regional estimates. We find that 65% of annual net ecosystem production of CO2 (NEP) is explained by water availability. Meanwhile, most of the unexplained NEP variability is related to site-specific differences persisting over the observation years, suggesting slow-changing controls such as demography (plant type, age, structure) and legacies of disturbance. Disturbances that kill plants without removing biomass, such as drought, tend to decrease productivity and increase respiration, shifting sites from carbon sinks to sources. However, following disturbances that removed biomass, such as fire, both productivity and respiration decline, with minimal impacts on NEP. Remote sensing and modeling match mean CO2 uptake measurements across spatial gradients in climate and plant functional type. However, measured uptake reveals 200-400% greater interannual variability than model estimates. High variability and sensitivity to water help us understand why semiarid ecosystems dominate the interannual variability of the terrestrial carbon sink in global accounting studies.

  6. Developing multi-tracer approaches to constrain the parameterisation of leaf and soil CO2 and H2O exchange in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogée, Jerome; Wehr, Richard; Commane, Roisin; Launois, Thomas; Meredith, Laura; Munger, Bill; Nelson, David; Saleska, Scott; Zahniser, Mark; Wofsy, Steve; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The net flux of carbon dioxide between the land surface and the atmosphere is dominated by photosynthesis and soil respiration, two of the largest gross CO2 fluxes in the carbon cycle. More robust estimates of these gross fluxes could be obtained from the atmospheric budgets of other valuable tracers, such as carbonyl sulfide (COS) or the carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (δ13C and δ18O) of atmospheric CO2. Over the past decades, the global atmospheric flask network has measured the inter-annual and intra-annual variations in the concentrations of these tracers. However, knowledge gaps and a lack of high-resolution multi-tracer ecosystem-scale measurements have hindered the development of process-based models that can simulate the behaviour of each tracer in response to environmental drivers. We present novel datasets of net ecosystem COS, 13CO2 and CO18O exchange and vertical profile data collected over 3 consecutive growing seasons (2011-2013) at the Harvard forest flux site. We then used the process-based model MuSICA (multi-layer Simulator of the Interactions between vegetation Canopy and the Atmosphere) to include the transport, reaction, diffusion and production of each tracer within the forest and exchanged with the atmosphere. Model simulations over the three years captured well the impact of diurnally and seasonally varying environmental conditions on the net ecosystem exchange of each tracer. The model also captured well the dynamic vertical features of tracer behaviour within the canopy. This unique dataset and model sensitivity analysis highlights the benefit in the collection of multi-tracer high-resolution field datasets and the developement of multi-tracer land surface models to provide valuable constraints on photosynthesis and respiration across scales in the near future.

  7. Soil-atmospheric exchange of CO2, CH4, and N2O in three subtropical forest ecosystems in southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tang, X.; Liu, S.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Zhou, C.

    2006-01-01

    The magnitude, temporal, and spatial patterns of soil-atmospheric greenhouse gas (hereafter referred to as GHG) exchanges in forests near the Tropic of Cancer are still highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil-atmospheric CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (hereafter referred to as DNR) in southern China. Soils in DNR forests behaved as N2O sources and CH4 sinks. Annual mean CO2, N2O, and CH4 fluxes (mean ?? SD) were 7.7 ?? 4.6MgCO2-Cha-1 yr-1, 3.2 ?? 1.2 kg N2ONha-1 yr-1, and 3.4 ?? 0.9 kgCH4-Cha-1 yr-1, respectively. The climate was warm and wet from April through September 2003 (the hot-humid season) and became cool and dry from October 2003 through March 2004 (the cool-dry season). The seasonality of soil CO2 emission coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high CO2 emission rates in the hot-humid season and low rates in the cool-dry season. In contrast, seasonal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes were not clear, although higher CH4 uptake rates were often observed in the cool-dry season and higher N2O emission rates were often observed in the hot-humid season. GHG fluxes measured at these three sites showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. If this trend is representative at the regional scale, CO2 and N2O emissions and CH4 uptake in southern China may increase in the future in light of the projected change in forest age structure. Removal of surface litter reduced soil CO2 effluxes by 17-44% in the three forests but had no significant effect on CH4 absorption and N2O emission rates. This suggests that microbial CH4 uptake and N2O production was mainly related to the mineral soil rather than in the surface litter layer. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Leaf Stomatal Responses to Vapour Pressure Deficit Under Current and CO2- Enriched Atmosphere Explained by the Economics of gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, S.; Katul, G. G.; Oren, R.

    2008-12-01

    Climate models predict that warming caused by increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases will not be accompanied with a change in atmospheric relative humidity (RH) but will cause an exponential increase in vapor pressure deficit (D). Predictions of water cycling in future climates are sensitive to the response of stomatal conductance (g) to all these changes. In currently used ecosystem models, the simulation of CO2 and water vapor exchange through stomata is typically based on empirical or semi-empirical stomatal responses to environmental stimuli. Depending on the formulation, stomata respond to either D or RH and, consequently, g predicted under future climate scenarios will greatly differ. In difference to the semi- empirical formulations of g, the tradeoffs between leaf-level carbon gain in photosynthesis and water loss in transpiration can be analyzed using the economics of gas exchange. First presented by Cowan (1977) and Cowan and Farquhar (1977; hereafter CF77) and reformulated by Berninger and Hari (1993; hereafter BH93), the cost (water loss) to benefit (carbon gain) analysis was framed as an economic optimization where the daily carbon gain is maximized for a given loss of water. While the assumptions on the form of the underlying functions differ between CF77 and BH93, we show that the optimal solutions can be made identical where the solution is independent of the time scale of flux integration. The stomatal control over gas exchange is described through a concept of invariant 'cost of water', without a priori specification of stomatal response to D or atmospheric CO2. The expressions are "emergent properties" of the optimization theory. These emergent responses are compared with data from studies from a wide range of conditions and are shown to be consistent with (1) the onset of an apparent "feed-forward" mechanism, (2) the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to D, and (3) the nonlinear variation in intercellular CO2 concentration with increasing D

  9. Combining Microbial Enzyme Kinetics Models with Light Use Efficiency Models to Predict CO2 and CH4 Ecosystem Exchange from Flooded and Drained Peatland Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Jenerette, D.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under California's Cap-and-Trade program, companies are looking to invest in land-use practices that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is a drained cultivated peatland system and a large source of CO2. To slow soil subsidence and reduce CO2 emissions, there is growing interest in converting drained peatlands to wetlands. However, wetlands are large sources of CH4 that could offset CO2-based GHG reductions. The goal of our research is to provide accurate measurements and model predictions of the changes in GHG budgets that occur when drained peatlands are restored to wetland conditions. We have installed a network of eddy covariance towers across multiple land use types in the Delta and have been measuring CO2 and CH4 ecosystem exchange for multiple years. In order to upscale these measurements through space and time we are using these data to parameterize and validate a process-based biogeochemical model. To predict gross primary productivity (GPP), we are using a simple light use efficiency (LUE) model which requires estimates of light, leaf area index and air temperature and can explain 90% of the observed variation in GPP in a mature wetland. To predict ecosystem respiration we have adapted the Dual Arrhenius Michaelis-Menten (DAMM) model. The LUE-DAMM model allows accurate simulation of half-hourly net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in a mature wetland (r2=0.85). We are working to expand the model to pasture, rice and alfalfa systems in the Delta. To predict methanogenesis, we again apply a modified DAMM model, using simple enzyme kinetics. However CH4 exchange is complex and we have thus expanded the model to predict not only microbial CH4 production, but also CH4 oxidation, CH4 storage and the physical processes regulating the release of CH4 to the atmosphere. The CH4-DAMM model allows accurate simulation of daily CH4 ecosystem exchange in a mature wetland (r2=0.55) and robust estimates of annual CH4 budgets. The LUE

  10. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange of an invasive plant infestation: new insights on the effects of phenology and management practices on structure and functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, Oliver; Detto, Matteo; Runkle, Benjamin; Hatala, Jaclyn; Vargas, Rodrigo; Kelly, Maggi; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    The net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (FC) of invasive plant infestations has been subject of few studies only. Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium L.) is an aggressive invasive plant with severe economic and environmental consequences for infested ecosystems. A characteristic feature of pepperweed's phenological cycle is the dense arrangement of small white flowers during secondary inflorescence. Little is known about how pepperweed flowering and management practices such as mowing affect canopy structure and canopy photosynthesis (FA) and autotrophic respiration (FAR) and thus ecosystem respiration (FER; FC=FER-FA with FER=FAR+heterotrophic respiration [FHR]). To examine these effects we analyzed three years (2007-2010) of CO2 flux measurements made with eddy covariance, supporting environmental measurements and near-surface remote sensing data (canopy-scale reflectance, digital camera imagery) from a pepperweed-infested pasture in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The measurements cover three meteorologically similar summers (1 May - 30 September) that slightly differed in terms of land use practices. In 2007-2010, the site was subjected to year-round grazing by beef cattle, and in 2008, the site was additionally mowed in mid-May during flowering. We described structural changes in canopy development through seasonal changes in surface roughness for momentum transfer (z0m). Weekly soil CO2 efflux (≈ FHR) estimates from static chamber measurements made over bare soil were used to separate FER into FAR and FHR. We identified the onset of pepperweed's key phenological phases (i.e., germination, early vegetative growth, flowering, seed maturation, senescence, dormancy) through the integrated analysis of albedo of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), a broad-band green normalized difference vegetation index, and a digital camera-based color index. We used non-linear mixed-effects model analysis to investigate the combined

  11. Digital photography for assessing the link between vegetation phenology and CO2 exchange in two contrasting northern ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkosalmi, Maiju; Aurela, Mika; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Tanis, Cemal M.; Arslan, Ali N.; Kolari, Pasi; Böttcher, Kristin; Aalto, Tuula; Rainne, Juuso; Hatakka, Juha; Laurila, Tuomas

    2016-09-01

    Digital repeat photography has become a widely used tool for assessing the annual course of vegetation phenology of different ecosystems. By using the green chromatic coordinate (GCC) as a greenness measure, we examined the feasibility of digital repeat photography for assessing the vegetation phenology in two contrasting high-latitude ecosystems. Ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 fluxes and various meteorological variables were continuously measured at both sites. While the seasonal changes in GCC were more obvious for the ecosystem that is dominated by annual plants (open wetland), clear seasonal patterns were also observed for the evergreen ecosystem (coniferous forest). Daily and seasonal time periods with sufficient solar radiation were determined based on images of a grey reference plate. The variability in cloudiness had only a minor effect on GCC, and GCC did not depend on the sun angle and direction either. The daily GCC of wetland correlated well with the daily photosynthetic capacity estimated from the CO2 flux measurements. At the forest site, the correlation was high in 2015 but there were discernible deviations during the course of the summer of 2014. The year-to-year differences were most likely generated by meteorological conditions, with higher temperatures coinciding with higher GCCs. In addition to depicting the seasonal course of ecosystem functioning, GCC was shown to respond to environmental changes on a timescale of days. Overall, monitoring of phenological variations with digital images provides a powerful tool for linking gross primary production and phenology.

  12. CO2 and CH4 exchanges between land ecosystems and the atmosphere in northern high latitudes over the 21st century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhuang, Q.; Melillo, J.M.; Sarofim, M.C.; Kicklighter, D.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Felzer, B.S.; Sokolov, A.; Prinn, R.G.; Steudler, P.A.; Hu, S.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitudes (above 50??N) exchange large amounts of CO2 and CH4 with the atmosphere each year. Here we use a process-based model to estimate the budget of CO 2 and CH4 of the region for current climate conditions and for future scenarios by considering effects of permafrost dynamics, CO 2 fertilization of photosynthesis and fire. We find that currently the region is a net source of carbon to the atmosphere at 276 Tg C yr -1. We project that throughout the 21st century, the region will most likely continue as a net source of carbon and the source will increase by up to 473 Tg C yr-1 by the end of the century compared to the current emissions. However our coupled carbon and climate model simulations show that these emissions will exert relatively small radiative forcing on global climate system compared to large amounts of anthropogenic emissions. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Material and fin pitch effect on frosting CO2 in a fin-and-tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassila, Joseph; Toubassy, Joseph; Danlos, Amélie; Descombes, Georges; Clodic, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Cryo Pur technology uses cryogenic separation to remove water vapor and carbon dioxide from biogas, in order to obtain bio-methane. To cool down the biogas at a very low temperature, a fin-and-tube heat exchanger is designed. In order to improve the fin-and-tube heat exchanger performance, a model is developed to investigate the material and fin pitch on frosting carbon dioxide. This paper will study the effect of the tubes and the fins material, and the fin pitch effect. The purpose is to extend the duration of a frosting cycle.

  14. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations in the Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange of a Pasture in the Three-River Source Region of the Qinghai−Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang; Tang, Yanhong; Kato, Tomomichi; Gu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and grassland ecosystems is very important for the global carbon balance. To assess the CO2 flux and its relationship to environmental factors, the eddy covariance method was used to evaluate the diurnal cycle and seasonal pattern of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of a cultivated pasture in the Three-River Source Region (TRSR) on the Qinghai−Tibetan Plateau from January 1 to December 31, 2008. The diurnal variations in the NEE and ecosystem respiration (Re) during the growing season exhibited single-peak patterns, the maximum and minimum CO2 uptake observed during the noon hours and night; and the maximum and minimum Re took place in the afternoon and early morning, respectively. The minimum hourly NEE rate and the maximum hourly Re rate were −7.89 and 5.03 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1, respectively. The NEE and Re showed clear seasonal variations, with lower values in winter and higher values in the peak growth period. The highest daily values for C uptake and Re were observed on August 12 (−2.91 g C m−2 d−1) and July 28 (5.04 g C m−2 day−1), respectively. The annual total NEE and Re were −140.01 and 403.57 g C m−2 year−1, respectively. The apparent quantum yield (α) was −0.0275 μmol μmol−1 for the entire growing period, and the α values for the pasture’s light response curve varied with the leaf area index (LAI), air temperature (Ta), soil water content (SWC) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Piecewise regression results indicated that the optimum Ta and VPD for the daytime NEE were 14.1°C and 0.65 kPa, respectively. The daytime NEE decreased with increasing SWC, and the temperature sensitivity of respiration (Q10) was 3.0 during the growing season, which was controlled by the SWC conditions. Path analysis suggested that the soil temperature at a depth of 5 cm (Tsoil) was the most important environmental factor affecting daily variations in NEE during the growing season, and the

  15. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations in the Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange of a Pasture in the Three-River Source Region of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao, Liang; Tang, Yanhong; Kato, Tomomichi; Gu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and grassland ecosystems is very important for the global carbon balance. To assess the CO2 flux and its relationship to environmental factors, the eddy covariance method was used to evaluate the diurnal cycle and seasonal pattern of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of a cultivated pasture in the Three-River Source Region (TRSR) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau from January 1 to December 31, 2008. The diurnal variations in the NEE and ecosystem respiration (Re) during the growing season exhibited single-peak patterns, the maximum and minimum CO2 uptake observed during the noon hours and night; and the maximum and minimum Re took place in the afternoon and early morning, respectively. The minimum hourly NEE rate and the maximum hourly Re rate were -7.89 and 5.03 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, respectively. The NEE and Re showed clear seasonal variations, with lower values in winter and higher values in the peak growth period. The highest daily values for C uptake and Re were observed on August 12 (-2.91 g C m-2 d-1) and July 28 (5.04 g C m-2 day-1), respectively. The annual total NEE and Re were -140.01 and 403.57 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. The apparent quantum yield (α) was -0.0275 μmol μmol-1 for the entire growing period, and the α values for the pasture's light response curve varied with the leaf area index (LAI), air temperature (Ta), soil water content (SWC) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Piecewise regression results indicated that the optimum Ta and VPD for the daytime NEE were 14.1°C and 0.65 kPa, respectively. The daytime NEE decreased with increasing SWC, and the temperature sensitivity of respiration (Q10) was 3.0 during the growing season, which was controlled by the SWC conditions. Path analysis suggested that the soil temperature at a depth of 5 cm (Tsoil) was the most important environmental factor affecting daily variations in NEE during the growing season, and the photosynthetic photon flux

  16. Using the Surface Renewal Technique to Estimate CO2 Exchange from a Rice Field to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvocarev, K.; Reba, M. L.; Runkle, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring CO2 emissions as surface fluxes is crucial for climate change predictions. One major set of techniques to measure surface fluxes is through continuous micrometeorological observations over different landscapes. Recent approaches of the surface renewal method (SR) are becoming important for their capacity to independently measure sensible (H) and latent heat (LE) fluxes while avoiding some of the shortcomings of the eddy covariance method (EC). Unlike EC, SR avoids orientation limitations, leveling requirements and instrumentation separation and shadowing issues. The main advantage of SR over EC method is in its applicability in both roughness and inertial sub-layers. Therefore, SR measurements can be planned in cases where fetch requirements are not adequate for EC application. We applied the recent approach as suggested by Castellvi et al. (2008) over two months (May to July, 2015) of high-frequency data collected by EC equipment from a rice field in Arkansas. The main goal was to extend this SR application to CO2 fluxes (Fc) over agricultural fields. The results show high correlation between EC and SR fluxes (H, LE and Fc) when they are compared for all atmospheric stability conditions (R2 > 0.75). Some overestimation is observed for SR with respect to EC fluxes, similar to the findings of Castellvi et al. (2008) for rangeland grass. For all the data, SR analysis results were about 11%, 18% and 17% higher than the EC results for H, LE and Fc, respectively. These higher flux estimates resulted in better energy balance closure. The root mean square error for Fc was 6.55 μmol m-2 s-1. The observed overestimation will be addressed in the future by using additional methods for the turbulent fluxes quantification.

  17. Interannual variability in the atmosphere-biosphere CO2 exchange as simulated by a process-based model for the last decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.

    2001-05-01

    Atmosphere-biosphere CO2 exchange induces not only seasonal oscillation but also interannual change in the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Actually, in 1998, atmospheric CO2 concentration increased at a remarkably high rate, while the growth rate was apparently depressed in 1992 and 1993. Elucidating whether these anomalies were attributable to the ocean or the terrestrial biosphere is an important challenge for carbon cycle researchers. In this study, a process-based model of terrestrial carbon dynamics (Sim-CYCLE) was constructed and used to simulate the terrestrial carbon balance for the period from 1953 to 1999. Climatic variables related to ecosystem processes were derived from the U.S NCEP/NCAR-reanalysis data (T62 spatial resolution), and the Matthews's biome map was adopted. The atmospheric CO2 fertilization effect during the experimental period was also considered in the simulation analysis. Sim-CYCLE includes five carbon compartments (leaves, stems, roots, litter, and humus), and calculates fluxes among them at a monthly step, with taking environmental regulations into account. Accordingly, I could obtain a time-series of net carbon budget, i.e. net ecosystem production (NEP), on the global scale. Through the experimental period, global annual NEP exhibited a considerable interannual variability ranging from +2.0 Pg C in 1971 to ?2.5 Pg C in 1998 (SD 1.1 Pg C yr-1). Tropical ecosystems were most responsible for the interannual variability, especially in such ENSO years as 1973, 1983, and 1998. The estimated NEP anomalies were negatively correlated with surface temperature anomaly, due to the high sensitivity of respiration and decomposition to temperature. Thus, it is inferred that higher temperatures induced by the strong 1997-98 ENSO event would lead to extra CO2 emission and consequently the largest negative NEP anomaly. The estimated responsiveness of terrestrial carbon budget seems enough large to cause anomalies in atmospheric CO2 concentration

  18. Forecasting net ecosystem CO2 exchange in a subalpine forest using model data assimilation combined with simulated climate and weather generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott-Denton, Laura E.; Moore, David J. P.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.; Kittel, Timothy G. F.; Burns, Sean P.; Schimel, David S.; Monson, Russell K.

    2013-06-01

    Forecasting the carbon uptake potential of terrestrial ecosystems in the face of future climate change has proven challenging. Process models, which have been increasingly used to study ecosystem-atmosphere carbon and water exchanges when conditioned with tower-based eddy covariance data, have the potential to inform us about biogeochemical processes in future climate regimes, but only if we can reconcile the spatial and temporal scales used for observed fluxes and projected climate. Here, we used weather generator and ecosystem process models conditioned on observed weather dynamics and carbon/water fluxes, and embedded them within climate projections from a suite of six Earth Systems Models. Using this combination of models, we studied carbon cycle processes in a subalpine forest within the context of future (2080-2099) climate regimes. The assimilation of daily averaged, observed net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) into the ecosystem process model resulted in retrieval of projected NEE with a level of accuracy that was similar to that following the assimilation of half-daily averaged observations; the assimilation of 30 min averaged fluxes or monthly averaged fluxes caused degradation in the model's capacity to accurately simulate seasonal patterns in observed NEE. Using daily averaged flux data with daily averaged weather data projected for the period 2080-2099, we predicted greater forest net CO2 uptake in response to a lengthening of the growing season. These results contradict our previous observations of reduced CO2 uptake in response to longer growing seasons in the current (1999-2008) climate regime. The difference between these analyses is due to a projected increase in the frequency of rain versus snow during warmer winters of the future. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of modeled processes to local variation in meteorology, which is often left unresolved in traditional approaches to earth systems modeling, and the

  19. Bayesian optimization of the Community Land Model simulated biosphere-atmosphere exchange using CO2 observations from a dense tower network and aircraft campaigns over Oregon

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Andres; Law, Beverly E.; Göckede, Mathias; ...

    2016-09-15

    Here, the vast forests and natural areas of the Pacific Northwest comprise one of the most productive ecosystems in the northern hemisphere. The heterogeneous landscape of Oregon poses a particular challenge to ecosystem models. We present a framework using a scaling factor Bayesian inversion to improve the modeled atmosphere-biosphere exchange of carbon dioxide. Observations from 5 CO/CO2 towers, eddy covariance towers, and airborne campaigns were used to constrain the Community Land Model CLM4.5 simulated terrestrial CO2 exchange at a high spatial and temporal resolution (1/24°, 3-hourly). To balance aggregation errors and the degrees of freedom in the inverse modeling system,more » we applied an unsupervised clustering approach for the spatial structuring of our model domain. Data from flight campaigns were used to quantify the uncertainty introduced by the Lagrangian particle dispersion model that was applied for the inversions. The average annual statewide net ecosystem productivity (NEP) was increased by 32% to 29.7 TgC per year by assimilating the tropospheric mixing ratio data. The associated uncertainty was decreased by 28.4% to 29%, on average over the entire Oregon model domain with the lowest uncertainties of 11% in western Oregon. The largest differences between posterior and prior CO2 fluxes were found for the Coast Range ecoregion of Oregon that also exhibits the highest availability of atmospheric observations and associated footprints. In this area, covered by highly productive Douglas-fir forest, the differences between the prior and posterior estimate of NEP averaged 3.84 TgC per year during the study period from 2012 through 2014.« less

  20. The impact of Southern Ocean residual upwelling on atmospheric CO2 on centennial and millennial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Williams, Richard G.; Munday, David R.; Marshall, David P.

    2017-03-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a pivotal role in climate change by exchanging heat and carbon, and provides the primary window for the global deep ocean to communicate with the atmosphere. There has been a widespread focus on explaining atmospheric CO2 changes in terms of changes in wind forcing in the Southern Ocean. Here, we develop a dynamically-motivated metric, the residual upwelling, that measures the primary effect of Southern Ocean dynamics on atmospheric CO2 on centennial to millennial timescales by determining the communication with the deep ocean. The metric encapsulates the combined, net effect of winds and air-sea buoyancy forcing on both the upper and lower overturning cells, which have been invoked as explaining atmospheric CO2 changes for the present day and glacial-interglacial changes. The skill of the metric is assessed by employing suites of idealized ocean model experiments, including parameterized and explicitly simulated eddies, with online biogeochemistry and integrated for 10,000 years to equilibrium. Increased residual upwelling drives elevated atmospheric CO2 at a rate of typically 1-1.5 parts per million/106 m3 s-1 by enhancing the communication between the atmosphere and deep ocean. This metric can be used to interpret the long-term effect of Southern Ocean dynamics on the natural carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2, alongside other metrics, such as involving the proportion of preformed nutrients and the extent of sea ice cover.

  1. Investigating the impact of light and water status on the exchange of COS, 13CO2, CO18O and H218O from bryophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno, Teresa; Royles, Jessica; Ogee, Jerome; Jones, Samuel; Burlett, Regis; West, Jason; Sauze, Joana; Wohl, Steven; Genty, Bernard; Griffiths, Howard; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    in the oxygen isotope discrimination of CO2. These data followed closely values predicted by our process-based model. We also observed a consistent pattern in the fluxes of CO2 and COS during the desiccation cycle. Initially when the bryophyte was wet and a barrier to diffusion existed, net CO2 and COS uptake rates were low. As the water film on the bryophyte disappeared the net rates of CO2 and COS uptake increased to a steady maximum rate whilst relative water content values remained above 100%. Thereafter, the bryophyte turned from a COS sink to a source. In this talk we will further explore how the COS exchange rate of bryophytes varies with light level and whether there is any evidence for differences in the activity of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase with light and moisture status. We also use the data to develop and test a new theoretical model of COS exchange for astomatous plants for the first time.

  2. Control over ecosystem CO2 exchange by winter snow versus summer rain in a subalpine coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, R. K.; Moore, D. J.; Scott-Denton, L.; Rosenbloom, N.; Kittel, T.

    2008-12-01

    Subalpine forests in the Western U.S. depend on both winter snow and summer rain to provide water. Recent observations have shown a widespread decline in the snowpack of mountain ecosystems in the Western U.S. that is coupled to wintertime high temperature anomalies. Twenty-one coupled GCM models have predicted that this trend will continue. These same models predict changes in the summer precipitation regime, though with less consistency. In order to better understand the partitioning of soil water between winter snow and summer rain, we have been studying the seasonal 2H/1H signatures of these two water sources, as well as stem water (expressed as δD, or delta deuterium). Our analysis revealed that all three dominant tree species (spruce, pine and fir) relied on snowmelt water, to a varying extent, for the entire season. By mid-summer, however, the average contribution of rain water to tree xylem water had increased. We used the isotopic data of seasonal trends in water use to parameterize the SIPNET ecosystem process model. Using the model, we predicted that during warmer years the forest will more water stress with concomitantly lower midsummer photosynthesis rates. Given future climate projections for the Colorado Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, with associated earlier spring snow melt and reduced spring snowpacks, our analysis revealed that there will likely be more reliance on summer rains for CO2 uptake by Rocky Mountain subalpine forests.

  3. Development in a naturally acidified environment: Na+/H+-exchanger 3-based proton secretion leads to CO2 tolerance in cephalopod embryos

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of pH homeostasis is a central feature of all animals to cope with acid–base disturbances caused by respiratory CO2. Although a large body of knowledge is available for vertebrate and mammalian pH regulatory systems, the mechanisms of pH regulation in marine invertebrates remain largely unexplored. Results We used squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana), which are known as powerful acid–base regulators to investigate the pH regulatory machinery with a special focus on proton secretion pathways during environmental hypercapnia. We cloned a Rhesus protein (slRhP), V-type H+-ATPase (slVHA) and the Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (slNHE3) from S. lessoniana, which are hypothesized to represent key players in proton secretion pathways among different animal taxa. Specifically designed antibodies for S. lessoniana demonstrated the sub-cellular localization of NKA, VHA (basolateral) and NHE3 (apical) in epidermal ionocytes of early life stages. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that slNHE3, slVHA and slRhP are up regulated in response to environmental hypercapnia (pH 7.31; 0.46 kPa pCO2) in body and yolk tissues compared to control conditions (pH 8.1; 0.045 kPa pCO2). This observation is supported by H+ selective electrode measurements, which detected increased proton gradients in CO2 treated embryos. This compensatory proton secretion is EIPA sensitive and thus confirms the central role of NHE based proton secretion in cephalopods. Conclusion The present work shows that in convergence to teleosts and mammalian pH regulatory systems, cephalopod early life stages have evolved a unique acid–base regulatory machinery located in epidermal ionocytes. Using cephalopod molluscs as an invertebrate model this work provides important insights regarding the unifying evolutionary principles of pH regulation in different animal taxa that enables them to cope with CO2 induced acid–base disturbances. PMID:23988184

  4. What are the instrumentation requirements for measuring the isotopic composition of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 using eddy covariance methods?

    PubMed

    Saleska, Scott R; Shorter, Joanne H; Herndon, Scott; Jiménez, Rodrigo; McManus, J Barry; Munger, J William; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S

    2006-06-01

    Better quantification of isotope ratios of atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of CO2 could substantially improve our ability to probe underlying physiological and ecological mechanisms controlling ecosystem carbon exchange, but the ability to make long-term continuous measurements of isotope ratios of exchange fluxes has been limited by measurement difficulties. In particular, direct eddy covariance methods have not yet been used for measuring the isotopic composition of ecosystem fluxes. In this article, we explore the feasibility of such measurements by (a) proposing a general criterion for judging whether a sensor's performance is sufficient for making such measurements (the criterion is met when the contribution of sensor error to the flux measurement error is comparable to or less than the contribution of meteorological noise inherently associated with turbulence flux measurements); (b) using data-based numerical simulations to quantify the level of sensor precision and stability required to meet this criterion for making direct eddy covariance measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 fluxes above a specific ecosystem (a mid-latitude temperate forest in central Massachusetts, USA); (c) testing whether the performance of a new sensor-a prototype pulsed quantum cascade laser (QCL) based isotope-ratio absorption spectrometer (and plausible improvements thereon)-is sufficient for meeting the criterion in this ecosystem. We found that the error contribution from a prototype sensor (approximately 0.2 per thousand, 1 SD of 10 s integrations) to total isoflux measurement error was comparable to (1.5 to 2x) the irreducible 'meteorological' noise inherently associated with turbulent flux measurements above this ecosystem (daytime measurement error SD of approximately 60% of flux versus meteorological noise of 30-40% for instantaneous half-hour fluxes). Our analysis also shows that plausible instrument improvements (increase of sensor precision to approximately 0.1 per

  5. Warmer temperatures stimulate respiration and reduce net ecosystem productivity in a northern Great Plains grassland: Analysis of CO2 exchange in automatic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The interacting effects of altered temperature and precipitation are expected to have significant consequences for ecosystem net carbon storage. Here I report the results of an experiment that evaluated the effects of elevated temperature and altered precipitation on ecosystem CO2 exchange in a northern Great Plains grassland, near Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. Open-top chambers were used to establish an experiment in 2012 with three treatments (control, warmed, warmed plus 50% of normal precipitation input). A smaller experiment with only the two temperature treatments (control and warmed) was conducted in 2013. Continuous half-hourly net CO2 exchange measurements were made using nine automatic chambers during May-October in both years. My objectives were to determine the sensitivity of the ecosystem carbon budget to temperature and moisture manipulations, and to test for direct and indirect effects of the environmental changes on ecosystem CO2 exchange. The experimental manipulations resulted primarily in a significant increase in air temperature in the warmed treatment plots. A cumulative net loss of carbon or negative net ecosystem productivity (NEP) occurred during May through September in the warmed treatment (NEP = -659 g C m-2), while in the control treatment there was a cumulative net gain of carbon (NEP = +50 g C m-2). An eddy covariance system that operated at the site, over a footprint region that was not influenced by the experimental treatments, also showed a net gain of carbon by the ecosystem. The reduced NEP was due to higher plant and soil respiration rates in the warmed treatment that appeared to be caused by a combination of: (i) higher carbon substrate availability indirectly stimulating soil respiration in the warmed relative to the control treatment, and (ii) a strong increase in leaf respiration likely caused by a shift in electron partitioning to the alternative pathway respiration in the warmed treatment, particularly when exposed to high

  6. Element budgets in an Arctic mesocosm CO2 perturbation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerny, J.; Schulz, K. G.; Boxhammer, T.; Bellerby, R. G. J.; Büdenbender, J.; Engel, A.; Krug, S. A.; Ludwig, A.; Nachtigall, K.; Nondal, G.; Niehoff, B.; Siljakova, A.; Riebesell, U.

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies on the impacts of ocean acidification on pelagic communities have identified changes in carbon to nutrient dynamics with related shifts in elemental stoichiometry. In principle, mesocosm experiments provide the opportunity of determining the temporal dynamics of all relevant carbon and nutrient pools and, thus, calculating elemental budgets. In practice, attempts to budget mesocosm enclosures are often hampered by uncertainties in some of the measured pools and fluxes, in particular due to uncertainties in constraining air/sea gas exchange, particle sinking, and wall growth. In an Arctic mesocosm study on ocean acidification using KOSMOS (Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for future Ocean Simulation) all relevant element pools and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus were measured, using an improved experimental design intended to narrow down some of the mentioned uncertainties. Water column concentrations of particulate and dissolved organic and inorganic constituents were determined daily. New approaches for quantitative estimates of material sinking to the bottom of the mesocosms and gas exchange in 48 h temporal resolution, as well as estimates of wall growth were developed to close the gaps in element budgets. Future elevated pCO2 was found to enhance net autotrophic community carbon uptake in 2 of the 3 experimental phases but did not significantly affect particle elemental composition. Enhanced carbon consumption appears to result in accumulation of dissolved organic compounds under nutrient recycling summer conditions. This carbon over-consumption effect becomes evident from budget calculations, but was too small to be resolved by direct measurements of dissolved organics. The out-competing of large diatoms by comparatively small algae in nutrient uptake caused reduced production rates under future ocean CO2 conditions in the end of the experiment. This CO2 induced shift away from diatoms towards smaller phytoplankton and enhanced cycling of

  7. Towards constraining the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon: strategies of stratospheric 14CO2 measurements using AirCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huilin; Paul, Dipayan; Meijer, Harro; Miller, John; Kivi, Rigel; Krol, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) plays an important role in the carbon cycle studies to understand both natural and anthropogenic carbon fluxes, but also in atmospheric chemistry to constrain hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in the atmosphere. Apart from the enormous 14C emissions from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s and 1960s, radiocarbon is primarily produced in the stratosphere due to the cosmogenic production. To this end, better understanding the stratospheric radiocarbon source is very useful to advance the use of radiocarbon for these applications. However, stratospheric 14C observations have been very limited so that there are large uncertainties on the magnitude and the location of the 14C production as well as the transport of radiocarbon from the stratosphere to the troposphere. Recently we have successfully made stratospheric 14C measurements using AirCore samples from Sodankylä, Northern Finland. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which passively collects atmospheric air samples into a long piece of coiled stainless steel tubing during the descent of a balloon flight. Due to the relatively low cost of the consumables, there is a potential to make such AirCore profiling in other parts of the world on a regular basis. In this study, we simulate the 14C in the atmosphere and assess the stratosphere-troposphere exchange of radiocarbon using the TM5 model. The Sodankylä radiocarbon measurements will be used to verify the performance of the model at high latitude. Besides this, we will also evaluate the influence of different cosmogenic 14C production scenarios and the uncertainties in the OH field on the seasonal cycles of radiocarbon and on the stratosphere-troposphere exchange, and based on the results design a strategy to set up a 14C measurement program using AirCore.

  8. Robust MOFs of 'tsg' Topology Based on Trigonal Prismatic Organic and Metal Cluster SBUs: Single Crystal-to-Single Crystal Postsynthetic Metal Exchange and Selective CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Narasimha Jarugu; Chandrasekhar, Pujari; Savitha, Govardhan

    2017-04-03

    The self-assembly of a rigid and trigonal prismatic triptycene-hexaacid H6THA with Co(NO3)2 and Mn(NO3)2 leads to isostructural MOFs that are sustained by 6-c metal cluster [M3(μ3-O)(COO)6] SBUs. The Co- and Mn-MOFs, constructed from organic and metal-cluster building blocks that are both trigonal prismatic, correspond to the heretofore unknown 'tsg' topology. Due to the rigidity and concave attributes of H6THA, the networks in Co- and Mn-MOFs are highly porous and undergo 3-fold interpenetration. The interpenetration imparts permanent microporosity and high thermal stability to the MOFs to permit postsynthetic metal exchange (PSME) and gas sorption. The PSME occurs in a SC-SC fashion when the crystals of Co- and Mn-MOFs are immersed in a solution of Cu(NO3)2 in MeOH/H2O. Further, the isostructural robust MOFs exhibit significant gas sorption and remarkable selectivity for CO2 over N2 (ca. 100 fold) at ambient conditions. In fact, the postsynthetically-engineered Cu-THA exhibits better CO2 sorption than Co-THA and Mn-THA. A composite of effects that include pore dimensions (ca. 0.7 nm), unsaturated metal centers and basic environments conferred by the quinoxaline nitrogen atoms appears to be responsible for the observed high CO2 capture and selectivity. The high-symmetry and structural attributes of the organic linker seemingly dictate adoption of the trigonal-prismatic metal cluster SBU by the metal ions in the MOFs.

  9. Spatiotemporal variations in growing season exchanges of CO2, H2O,and sensible heat in agricultural fields of the Southern GreatPlains

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marc L.; Billesbach, David P.; Berry, Joseph A.; Riley,William J.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2007-06-13

    Climate, vegetation cover, and management create fine-scaleheterogeneity in unirrigated agricultural regions, with important but notwell-quantified consequences for spatial and temporal variations insurface CO2, water, and heat fluxes. We measured eddy covariance fluxesin seven agricultural fields--comprising winter wheat, pasture, andsorghum--in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the 2001-2003growing seasons. Land-cover was the dominant source of variation insurface fluxes, with 50-100 percent differences between fields planted inwinter-spring versus fields planted in summer. Interannual variation wasdriven mainly by precipitation, which varied more than two-fold betweenyears. Peak aboveground biomass and growing-season net ecosystem exchange(NEE) of CO2 increased in rough proportion to precipitation. Based on apartitioning of gross fluxes with a regression model, ecosystemrespiration increased linearly with gross primary production, but with anoffset that increased near the time of seed production. Because theregression model was designed for well-watered periods, it successfullyretrieved NEE and ecosystem parameters during the peak growing season,and identified periods of moisture limitation during the summer. Insummary, the effects of crop type, land management, and water limitationon carbon, water, and energy fluxes were large. Capturing the controllingfactors in landscape scale models will be necessary to estimate theecological feedbacks to climate and other environmental impactsassociated with changing human needs for agricultural production of food,fiber, and energy.

  10. Habitat stress initiates changes in composition, CO2 gas exchange and C-allocation as life traits in biological soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Colesie, Claudia; Allan Green, T G; Haferkamp, Ilka; Büdel, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are the dominant functional vegetation unit in some of the harshest habitats in the world. We assessed BSC response to stress through changes in biotic composition, CO2 gas exchange and carbon allocation in three lichen-dominated BSC from habitats with different stress levels, two more extreme sites in Antarctica and one moderate site in Germany. Maximal net photosynthesis (NP) was identical, whereas the water content to achieve maximal NP was substantially lower in the Antarctic sites, this apparently being achieved by changes in biomass allocation. Optimal NP temperatures reflected local climate. The Antarctic BSC allocated fixed carbon (tracked using 14CO2) mostly to the alcohol soluble pool (low-molecular weight sugars, sugar alcohols), which has an important role in desiccation and freezing resistance and antioxidant protection. In contrast, BSC at the moderate site showed greater carbon allocation into the polysaccharide pool, indicating a tendency towards growth. The results indicate that the BSC of the more stressed Antarctic sites emphasise survival rather than growth. Changes in BSC are adaptive and at multiple levels and we identify benefits and risks attached to changing life traits, as well as describing the ecophysiological mechanisms that underlie them. PMID:24694713

  11. Co-metal-organic-frameworks with pure uniform crystal morphology prepared via Co2 + exchange-mediated transformation from Zn-metallogels for luminol catalysed chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xue Qian; Xiao, Bo Wen; Li, Chun Mei; Wang, Dong Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang

    2017-03-01

    Cation exchange-mediated transformation from Zn-metallogels (MOGs), which was a mild facile strategy relative to the demanding hydrothermal method, was employed to develop Co2 + metal-organic frameworks (Co-MOFs) at room temperature. The obtained Co-MOFs was of uniform octahedral morphology and possessed high activity to catalyze luminol chemiluminescence without extra oxidants. By adding cysteine, the CL emission of luminol-Co-MOFs system was further enhanced. Based on this phenomenon, Co-MOFs was utilized to build a practical sensing platform for cysteine determination. Under the optimized conditions, the relative CL intensity (ΔI) was proportional to the concentration of cysteine in the range of 2-10 μM, and the detection limit was 0.49 μM (3S/N). Moreover, the established method was applied to the determination of cysteine in commercially available pharmaceutical injections.

  12. A model-data intercomparison of CO2 exchange across North America: Results from the North American Carbon Program Site Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, Christopher R; Williams, Christopher A; Schaefer, Kevin; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M A; Baker, Ian; Barr, Alan; Black, T Andrew; Chen, Guangsheng; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Davis, Kenneth J; Desai, Ankur R; Dietze, Michael; Dragoni, Danilo; Fischer, Marc; Flanagan, Lawrence; Grant, Robert; Gu, Lianghong; Hollinger, D; Izaurralde, Roberto C; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Law, Beverly E; Li, Longhui; Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Ma, Siyan; Margolis, Hank; Matamala, R; McCaughey, Harry; Monson, Russell K; Oechel, Walter C; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T; Riciutto, Dan M; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Sprintsin, Michael; Sun, Jianfeng; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B

    2010-12-09

    There is a continued need for models to improve consistency and agreement with observations [Friedlingstein et al., 2006], both overall and under more frequent extreme climatic events related to global environmental change such as drought [Trenberth et al., 2007]. Past validation studies of terrestrial biosphere models have focused only on few models and sites, typically in close proximity and primarily in forested biomes [e.g., Amthor et al., 2001; Delpierre et al., 2009; Grant et al., 2005; Hanson et al., 2004; Granier et al., 2007; Ichii et al., 2009; Ito, 2008; Siqueira et al., 2006; Zhou et al., 2008]. Furthermore, assessing model-data agreement relative to drought requires, in addition to high-quality observedCO2 exchange data, a reliable drought metric as well as a natural experiment across sites and drought conditions.

  13. Transferable force-field for modelling of CO2, N2, O2 and Ar in all silica and Na+ exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujić, Bojan; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new force field for modelling of adsorption of CO2, N2, O2 and Ar in all silica and Na+ exchanged Si-Al zeolites. The force field has a standard molecular-mechanical functional form with electrostatic and Lennard-Jones interactions satisfying Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules and thus has a potential for further extension in terms of new molecular types. The parameters for the zeolite framework atom types are optimized by an iterative procedure minimizing the difference with experimental adsorption data for a number of different zeolite structures and Si:Al ratios. The new force field shows a good agreement with available experimental data including those not used in the optimization procedure, and which also shows a reasonable transferability within different zeolite topologies. We suggest a potential usage in screening of different zeolite structures for carbon capture and storage process, and more generally, for separation of other gases.

  14. Different Apparent Gas Exchange Coefficients for CO2 and CH4: Comparing a Brown-Water and a Clear-Water Lake in the Boreal Zone during the Whole Growing Season.

    PubMed

    Rantakari, Miitta; Heiskanen, Jouni; Mammarella, Ivan; Tulonen, Tiina; Linnaluoma, Jessica; Kankaala, Paula; Ojala, Anne

    2015-10-06

    The air-water exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) is a central process during attempts to establish carbon budgets for lakes and landscapes containing lakes. Lake-atmosphere diffusive gas exchange is dependent on the concentration gradient between air and surface water and also on the gas transfer velocity, often described with the gas transfer coefficient k. We used the floating-chamber method in connection with surface water gas concentration measurements to estimate the gas transfer velocity of CO2 (kCO2) and CH4 (kCH4) weekly throughout the entire growing season in two contrasting boreal lakes, a humic oligotrophic lake and a clear-water productive lake, in order to investigate the earlier observed differences between kCO2 and kCH4. We found that the seasonally averaged gas transfer velocity of CH4 was the same for both lakes. When the lakes were sources of CO2, the gas transfer velocity of CO2 was also similar between the two study lakes. The gas transfer velocity of CH4 was constantly higher than that of CO2 in both lakes, a result also found in other studies but for reasons not yet fully understood. We found no differences between the lakes, demonstrating that the difference between kCO2 and kCH4 is not dependent on season or the characteristics of the lake.

  15. Air-Sea Fluxes in Hurricanes From GPS Dropsondes and a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desflots, M.; Chen, S.; Zhao, W.; Bao, J.

    2006-12-01

    The importance of the surface fluxes for tropical cyclone (TC) intensity has long been recognized. However, accurate surface fluxes under extreme high-wind conditions are difficult to determine due to the lack of direct observations. The physical processes controlling the air-sea fluxes and the exchange coefficients for the enthalpy and momentum fluxes are not well understood. Furthermore, a large amount of sea spray produced by the breaking waves in high winds further complicates the processes at the air-sea interface. To understand the behaviour of the surface fluxes and the atmospheric and upper ocean boundary layers in a hurricane, we use a high-resolution (1-2 km grid spacing), fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model. The components of the coupled model system are the 5th generation Pennsylvania State University/ National Center for Atmospheric Research non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (MM5), WAVEWATCH III (WW3), and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution three-dimensional upper ocean model (WHOI 3DPWP). The coupled model used in this study includes the CBLAST wind-wave coupling parameterization and a sea spray parameterization that include the effects of the surface waves. The sea spray parameterization was initially developed by Fairall et al. (1994) and modified by Bao et al. (2000). The model simulated air-sea fluxes and atmospheric profiles from several numerical experiments of a 5-day simulation of Hurricane Frances (2004) are compared with the Global Positioning System (GPS) dropsonde data. The coupled model simulations of Frances reproduce the observed storm track and intensity quite well. The observed cold wake at the ocean surface and the asymmetry in the air-sea fluxes are also evident in the model simulations. More detailed analysis is currently underway to better understand the physical processes affecting air-sea fluxes in hurricanes as well as their contribution to the storm structure and intensity.

  16. Growing season variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire in the broad-leaved forest zone of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Volkova, E.; Karataeva, T.; Novenko, E.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia in the Tula region was described using results from field measurements. NEE and ET were measured using a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2/H2O analyzer, LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and in May 2013. The results of the field measurements showed significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation and ground water level. The seasonal patterns of NEE and ET within the mire were quite different. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere. NEE reached maximal values in June-July (-6.8 ± 4.2 μmol m-2 s-1). The southern peripheral part of the mire, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere in June-July only. ET reached maximal values in the well-lighted central parts of the mire in May (0.34 ± 0.20 mm h-1) mainly because of high air and surface temperatures and the very wet upper peat horizon and sphagnum moss. Herbaceous species made the maximum contribution to the total gross primary production (GPP) in both the central and the peripheral parts of the mire. The contribution of sphagnum to the total GPP of these plant communities was relatively small and ranged on sunny days of July-August from -1.1 ± 1.1 mgC g-1 of dry weight (DW) per hour in the peripheral zone of the mire to -0.6 ± 0.2 mgC g-1 DW h-1 at the mire center. The sphagnum layer made the maximum contribution to total ET at the mire center (0.25 ± 0.10 mm h-1) and the herbaceous

  17. Seven-year trends of CO2 exchange in a tundra ecosystem affected by long-term permafrost thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trucco, Christian; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Natali, Susan M.; Belshe, E. Fay; Bracho, Rosvel; Vogel, Jason

    2012-06-01

    Arctic warming has led to permafrost degradation and ground subsidence, created as a result of ground ice melting. Frozen soil organic matter that thaws can increase carbon (C) emissions to the atmosphere, but this can be offset in part by increases in plant growth. The balance of plant and microbial processes, and how this balance changes through time, determines how permafrost ecosystems influence future climate change via the C cycle. This study addressed this question both on short (interannual) and longer (decadal) time periods by measuring C fluxes over a seven-year period at three sites representing a gradient of time since permafrost thaw. All three sites were upland tundra ecosystems located in Interior Alaska but differed in the extent of permafrost thaw and ground subsidence. Results showed an increasing growing season (May - September) trend in gross primary productivity (GPP), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and annual NEE at all sites over the seven year study period from 2004 to 2010, but no change in annual and growing season ecosystem respiration (Reco). These trends appeared to most closely follow increases in the depth to permafrost that occurred over the same time period. During the seven-year period, sites with more permafrost degradation had significantly greater GPP compared to where degradation was least, but also greater growing season Reco. Adding in winter Reco decreased, in part, the summer C sink and left only the site with the most permafrost degradation C neutral, with the other sites still C sinks. Annual C balance was strongly dependent on winter Reco, which, compared to the growing season, was relatively data-poor due to extreme environmental conditions. As a result, we cannot yet conclude whether the increased NEE in the growing season is truly sustained on an annual basis. If it turns out that winter measurements shown here are an underestimate, we may indeed find these systems are

  18. Effects of management thinning on CO2 exchange by a plantation oak woodland in south-eastern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M.; Crow, P.; Eaton, E. L.; Morison, J. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Forest thinning, which removes some individual trees from a forest stand at intermediate stages of the rotation, is commonly used as a silvicultural technique and is a management practice that can substantially alter both forest canopy structure and carbon storage. Whilst a proportion of the standing biomass is removed through harvested timber, thinning also removes some of the photosynthetic leaf area and introduces a large pulse of woody residue (brash) to the soil surface which potentially can alter the balance of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Using a combination of eddy covariance (EC) and aerial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, this study investigated the effects of management thinning on the carbon balance and canopy structure in a commercially managed oak plantation in the south-east of England. Whilst thinning had a large effect on the canopy structure, increasing canopy complexity and gap fraction, the effects of thinning on the carbon balance were not as evident. In the first year post thinning, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) was unaffected by the thinning, suggesting that the better illuminated ground vegetation and shrub layer partially compensated for the removed trees. NEE was reduced in the thinned area but not until two years after the thinning had been completed (2009); initially this was associated with an increase in ecosystem respiration (Reco). In subsequent years, NEE remained lower with reduced carbon sequestration in fluxes from the thinned area, which we suggest was in part due to heavy defoliation by caterpillars in 2010 reducing GPP in both sectors of the forest, but particularly in the east.

  19. Second international conference on air-sea interaction and on meteorology and oceanography of the coastal zone

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This conference was held September 22--27, 1994 in Lisbon, Portugal. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on air-sea interactions. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  20. Bubble Stripping as a Tool To Reduce High Dissolved CO2 in Coastal Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koweek, David A; Mucciarone, David A; Dunbar, Robert B

    2016-04-05

    High dissolved CO2 concentrations in coastal ecosystems are a common occurrence due to a combination of large ecosystem metabolism, shallow water, and long residence times. Many important coastal species may have adapted to this natural variability over time, but eutrophication and ocean acidification may be perturbing the water chemistry beyond the bounds of tolerance for these organisms. We are currently limited in our ability to deal with the geochemical changes unfolding in our coastal ocean. This study helps to address this deficit of solutions by introducing bubble stripping as a novel geochemical engineering approach to reducing high CO2 in coastal marine ecosystems. We use a process-based model to find that air/sea gas exchange rates within a bubbled system are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than within a nonbubbled system. By coupling bubbling-enhanced ventilation to a coastal ecosystem metabolism model, we demonstrate that strategically timed bubble plumes can mitigate exposure to high CO2 under present-day conditions and that exposure mitigation is enhanced in the more acidic conditions predicted by the end of the century. We argue that shallow water CO2 bubble stripping should be considered among the growing list of engineering approaches intended to increase coastal resilience in a changing ocean.

  1. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-20

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  2. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  3. The effect of varying soil moisture on the energy balance and CO2 exchange of sunflowers: A study using a mini weighing lysimeter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Espejo, A.; Verhoef, A.

    2003-04-01

    Soil moisture is, together with nitrogen, the most important limiting factor in the plant global production. Its spatial and temporal evolution will determine the energy, water and carbon budgets and the vegetation distribution. For vegetated surfaces, the evapotranspiration is a large component of the energy balance. Understanding the response of the plants to their environment is critical to estimate this flux. To study the evolution of the evapotranspiration under different conditions we have designed a high precision mini lysimeter system. The aim of this set-up is to get a better insight into the interaction between root-zone soil moisture and canopy exchange processes. The experiment consists of 25 soil-filled perspex boxes, which are arranged in a 5× 5-square. This set-up allows for flexibility in experimental set-up and vegetation types/soil moisture levels, and enables us to mimic within-field, or even within-region, variability, without the experimental difficulties encountered in field trials. The results show how soil water stress promotes a high variability in the canopy development and in the evapotranspiration, thereby affecting other components of the energy balance, especially the sensible heat flux. The effect of this variation on the CO_2 exchange and its impact on the water use efficiency by plants is also discussed. The results will be used to include the impact of soil water stress on canopy gas exchange in a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer model (SVAT). Furthermore, it will be tested how well a simple SVAT scheme can deal with within and between pixel variability. This study is deemed extremely relevant for large-scale remote sensing and to aid our understanding the impact of climate change on heterogeneous surfaces.

  4. Ecosystem CO2/H2O fluxes are explained by hydraulically limited gas exchange during tree mortality from spruce bark beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, John M.; Massman, William J.; Ewers, Brent E.; Huckaby, Laurie S.; Negrón, José F.

    2014-06-01

    Disturbances are increasing globally due to anthropogenic changes in land use and climate. This study determines whether a disturbance that affects the physiology of individual trees can be used to predict the response of the ecosystem by weighing two competing hypothesis at annual time scales: (a) changes in ecosystem fluxes are proportional to observable patterns of mortality or (b) to explain ecosystem fluxes the physiology of dying trees must also be incorporated. We evaluate these hypotheses by analyzing 6 years of eddy covariance flux data collected throughout the progression of a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic in a Wyoming Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forest and testing for changes in canopy conductance (gc), evapotranspiration (ET), and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. We predict from these hypotheses that (a) gc, ET, and NEE all diminish (decrease in absolute magnitude) as trees die or (b) that (1) gc and ET decline as trees are attacked (hydraulic failure from beetle-associated blue-stain fungi) and (2) NEE diminishes both as trees are attacked (restricted gas exchange) and when they die. Ecosystem fluxes declined as the outbreak progressed and the epidemic was best described as two phases: (I) hydraulic failure caused restricted gc, ET (28 ± 4% decline, Bayesian posterior mean ± standard deviation), and gas exchange (NEE diminished 13 ± 6%) and (II) trees died (NEE diminished 51 ± 3% with minimal further change in ET to 36 ± 4%). These results support hypothesis b and suggest that model predictions of ecosystem fluxes following massive disturbances must be modified to account for changes in tree physiological controls and not simply observed mortality.

  5. Response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of boreal forest ecosystems to projected future climate changes: results of a modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, Alexander; Kurbatova, Julia

    2014-05-01

    It is presented the modeling results describing the possible response of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE), gross (GPP) and net (NPP) primary production, as well as evapotranspiration (ET) of spruce forest ecosystems situated at central part of European part of Russia at the southern boundary of boreal forest community to projected future changes of climatic conditions and forest species composition. A process-based MixFor-SVAT model (Olchev et al 2002, 2008, 2009) has been used to describe the CO2 and H2O fluxes under present and projected future climate conditions. The main advantage of MixFor-SVAT is its ability not only to describe seasonal and daily dynamics of total CO2 and H2O fluxes at an ecosystem level, but also to adequately estimate the contributions of soil, forest understorey, and various tree species in overstorey into total ecosystem fluxes taking into account their individual responses to changes in environmental conditions as well as the differences in structure and biophysical properties. Results of modeling experiments showed that projected changes of climate conditions (moderate scenario A1B IPCC) and forest species composition at the end of 21 century can lead to small increase of annual evapotranspiration as well as to growth of NEE, GPP and NPP of the forests in case if the projected increase in temperature and elevated CO2 in the atmosphere in future will be strictly balanced with growth of available nutrients and water in plant and soil. It is obvious that any deficit of e.g. nitrogen in leaves (due to reduced transpiration, nitrogen availability in soil, etc.) may lead to decreases in the photosynthesis and respiration rates of trees and, as a consequence, to decreases in the GPP and NEE of entire forest ecosystem. Conducted modeling experiments have demonstrated that a 20% reduction of available nitrogen in tree leaves in a monospesific spruce forest stand may result in a 14% decrease in NEE, a 8% decrease in NPP, and a 4% decrease in

  6. Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

    2007-01-05

    The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate

  7. Rain pulse response of soil CO2 exchange by biological soil crusts and grasslands of the semiarid Colorado Plateau, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowling, David R.; Grote, E.E.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Biological activity in arid grasslands is strongly dependent on moisture. We examined gas exchange of biological soil crusts (biocrusts), the underlying soil biotic community, and the belowground respiratory activity of C3 and C4 grasses over 2 years in southeast Utah, USA. We used soil surface CO2 flux and the amount and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of soil CO2 as indicators of belowground and soil surface activity. Soil respiration was always below 2 μmol m-2s-1 and highly responsive to soil moisture. When moisture was available, warm spring and summer temperature was associated with higher fluxes. Moisture pulses led to enhanced soil respiration lasting for a week or more. Biological response to rain was not simply dependent on the amount of rain, but also depended on antecedent conditions (prior moisture pulses). The short-term temperature sensitivity of respiration was very dynamic, showing enhancement within 1-2 days of rain, and diminishing each day afterward. Carbon uptake occurred by cyanobacterially dominated biocrusts following moisture pulses in fall and winter, with a maximal net carbon uptake of 0.5 μmol m-2s-1, although typically the biocrusts were a net carbon source. No difference was detected in the seasonal activity of C3 and C4 grasses, contrasting with studies from other arid regions (where warm- versus cool-season activity is important), and highlighting the unique biophysical environment of this cold desert. Contrary to other studies, the δ13C of belowground respiration in the rooting zone of each photosynthetic type did not reflect the δ13C of C3 and C4 physiology.

  8. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a temperate mountain grassland: effects of climate and management

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Haslwanter, Alois; Bahn, Michael; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Cernusca, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The role and relative importance of climate and cutting for the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the net ecosystem CO2 (NEE) of a temperate mountain grassland was investigated. Eddy covariance CO2 flux data and associated measurements of the green area index and the major environmental driving forces acquired during 2001-2006 at the study site Neustift (Austria) were analyzed. Driven by three cutting events per year which kept the investigated grassland in a stage of vigorous growth, the seasonal variability of NEE was primarily modulated by gross primary productivity (GPP). The role of environmental parameters in modulating the seasonal variability of NEE was obscured by the strong response of GPP to changes in the amount of green area, as well as the cutting-mediated decoupling of phenological development and the seasonal course of climate drivers. None of the climate and management metrics examined was able to explain the inter-annual variability of annual NEE. This is thought to result from (1) a high covariance between GPP and ecosystem respiration (Reco) at the annual time scale which results in a comparatively small inter-annual variation of NEE, (2) compensating effects between carbon exchange during and outside the management period, and (3) changes in the biotic response to rather than the climate variables per se. GPP was more important in modulating inter-annual variations in NEE in spring and before the first and second cut, while Reco explained a larger fraction of the inter-annual variability of NEE during the remaining, in particular the post-cut, periods. PMID:24383047

  9. Rain pulse response of soil CO2 exchange by biological soil crusts and grasslands of the semiarid Colorado Plateau, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Grote, E. E.; Belnap, J.

    2011-09-01

    Biological activity in arid grasslands is strongly dependent on moisture. We examined gas exchange of biological soil crusts (biocrusts), the underlying soil biotic community, and the belowground respiratory activity of C3 and C4 grasses over 2 years in southeast Utah, USA. We used soil surface CO2 flux and the amount and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of soil CO2 as indicators of belowground and soil surface activity. Soil respiration was always below 2 μmol m-2 s-1 and highly responsive to soil moisture. When moisture was available, warm spring and summer temperature was associated with higher fluxes. Moisture pulses led to enhanced soil respiration lasting for a week or more. Biological response to rain was not simply dependent on the amount of rain, but also depended on antecedent conditions (prior moisture pulses). The short-term temperature sensitivity of respiration was very dynamic, showing enhancement within 1-2 days of rain, and diminishing each day afterward. Carbon uptake occurred by cyanobacterially dominated biocrusts following moisture pulses in fall and winter, with a maximal net carbon uptake of 0.5 μmol m-2 s-1, although typically the biocrusts were a net carbon source. No difference was detected in the seasonal activity of C3 and C4 grasses, contrasting with studies from other arid regions (where warm- versus cool-season activity is important), and highlighting the unique biophysical environment of this cold desert. Contrary to other studies, the δ13C of belowground respiration in the rooting zone of each photosynthetic type did not reflect the δ13C of C3 and C4 physiology.

  10. Air-sea coupling in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. M.; Powell, B.; Mattheus, D.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled numerical model is used to investigate the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the lee of the Hawaiian archipelago. The wind curl generated by the island blocking of the trade winds is known to give rise to ocean eddies; however, the impact of the sea surface temperature (SST) and velocity fronts associated with these eddies on the atmosphere is less understood. The main coupling mechanisms are: (i) changes in the near-surface stability and surface stress, (ii) vertical transfer of momentum from higher atmospheric levels to the ocean surface due to an increase of the turbulence in the boundary layer, (iii) secondary circulations associated with perturbations in the surface atmospheric pressure over the SST fronts, and (iv) the impact of the oceanic eddy currents on the net momentum transferred between the atmosphere and the ocean. To assess the relative contribution from each process, a coupled simulation between the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models is conducted for the main Hawaiian Islands. The impact of the coupling, the perturbation of the mean wind pattern, and the different spatial scales involved in the air-sea exchanges of momentum and heat are explored.

  11. How does a land use change from annual food crop to perennial energy crop affect the CO2 balance? A study on net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide from Danish fen peatland grown with spring barley and reed canary grass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, T. P.; Elsgaard, L.; Lærke, P. E.

    2012-04-01

    It is important to evaluate how land use change from annual arable food crop to perennial energy crop cultivation changes the carbon balance in cultivated peatland. We measured CO2 balance in a riparian fen peatland used for growing reed canary grass (RCG) and spring barley (SB) on adjacent field plots for a complete year with a dynamic closed chamber. Carbon dioxide fluxes measured with chamber were divided into a light dependent part as gross photosynthesis (GP) and a light independent part as ecosystem respiration (RE). GP and RE in both cropping system showed a strong seasonal pattern with weather condition and vegetation. A high ecosystem respiration in RCG (1532 ± 32 g CO2-C m-2) and SB (1080 ± 32 g CO2-C m-2) during growing season was offset by higher gross photosynthesis in RCG (-1782 ± 53 g CO2-C m-2) and SB (-1225 ± 59 g CO2-C m-2)making both cropping system net sink of CO2 during the growing season. The estimated gross photosynthesis in cold-season from October to March was 17% and 6% of annual GP in SB and RCG plots, respectively. This higher uptake of CO2 during cold-season in SB plots was caused by growth of volunteer grass during winter which was completely suppressed in RCG plots due to its invasive nature. Both GP and REwere significantly higher in RCG plots than SB plots in an annual scale but net ecosystem exchange was not significantly different. Total estimated annual ecosystem respirations were 1887 ± 10 g CO2-C m-2 in RCG plots and 1288 ± 12 g CO2-C m-2 in SB plots. Similarly, total estimated annual GP were 1885 ± 100 g CO2-C m-2in RCG plots and 1408 ± 24 g CO2-C m-2 in SB plots making a net ecosystem exchange of 2 ± 88 g CO2-C m-2 in RCG plots and -120 ± 25 g CO2-C m-2 in SB plots.

  12. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-17

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  13. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  14. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  15. Regulation of CO2 Air Sea Fluxes by Sediments in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Pätsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nicola; Salt, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    A multi-tracer approach is applied to assess the impact of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) on the acid-base buffering capacity, and overall biogeochemistry, of the North Sea. Analyses of both basin-wide observations in the North Sea and transects through tidal basins at the North-Frisian coastline, reveal that surface distributions of the δ13C signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are predominantly controlled by a balance between biological production and respiration. In particular, variability in metabolic DIC throughout stations in the well-mixed southern North Sea indicates the presence of an external carbon source, which is traced to the European continental coastline using naturally-occurring radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra). 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (AT) compared to the more conventional use of salinity. Coastal inputs of metabolic DIC and AT are calculated on a basin-wide scale, and ratios of these inputs suggest denitrification as a primary metabolic pathway for their formation. The AT input paralleling the metabolic DIC release prevents a significant decline in pH as compared to aerobic (i.e. unbuffered) release of metabolic DIC. Finally, long-term pH trends mimic those of riverine nitrate loading, highlighting the importance of coastal AT production via denitrification in regulating pH in the southern North Sea.

  16. Historical changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in the eutrophied Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gypens, N.; Borges, A. V.; Lancelot, C.

    2012-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities after the Second World War have severely increased river nutrient [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] loads to European coastal areas. The resulting N: P: Si imbalance (compared to phytoplankton requirements) stimulated in the Southern North Sea the growth of Phaeocystis colonies modifying the functioning of the ecosystem and, therefore, the carbon but also the biogenic sulphur cycles. Phaeocystis is a significant producer of DMSP (dimethylsulphide propionate), the precursor of DMS. When emitted to the atmosphere the DMS has a cooling effect on the climate contrarily to the CO2 greenhouse gas. Since the late 1990's specific nutrient reduction policies have however considerably reduced P loads while N is maintained. In this application we explore, with a mathematical tool, the effects of changing N and P loads on air-sea CO2 exchanges and DMS marine emissions. The chosen model is the MIRO-CO2-DMS, a complex biogeochemical model describing carbon, biogenic sulphur and nutrient cycles in the marine domain. Model simulations are performed for the contemporary period since 1950, using real forcing fields for sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric CO2 and RIVERSTRAHLER model simulations for river carbon and nutrient loads. Results are discussing the importance of human activities and river inputs of carbon and nutrients on the eutrophication of coastal areas, their ability to absorb atmospheric CO2 and the importance of DMS emissions associated with phytoplankton blooms, especially Phaeocystis.

  17. Process coupling and control over the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to climate variability and insect disturbance in subalpine forests of the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, R. K.; Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Scott-Denton, L.; Burns, S. P.; Hu, J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Following ten years of studies in subalpine forest ecosystems of the Western US, we have concluded that the tight coupling between gross primary productivity (GPP) and the autotrophic component of soil respiration (Ra) drives responses of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) to climate variability and insect disturbance. This insight has been gained through long-term eddy flux observations, manipulative plot experiments, analyses of dynamics in the stable isotope compositions of CO2 and H2O, and chamber gas-exchange measurements. Using past observations from these studies, we deployed model-data assimilation techniques and forecast weather/climate modeling to estimate how the coupling between GPP and Ra is likely to affect future (Year 2100) dynamics in NEE. The amount of winter snow and its melting dynamics in the spring represents the dominant control over interannual variation in GPP. Using the SIPNET ecosystem process model, combined with knowledge about the stable isotope content of different water sources, we estimated that approximately 75% of growing season GPP is coupled to the use of snowmelt water, whereas approximately 25% is coupled to summer rain. The tight coupling between GPP and winter snow pack drives a similar tight coupling between soil respiration (Rs) and winter snow pack. Manipulation of snow pack on forest plots has shown that Rs increases with increased snow pack, and this effect disappears when trees are girdled, which stops the transfer of GPP to roots and the soil rhizosphere. Higher-than-normal winter snowpacks cause the carbon isotope ratios of soil-respired CO2 to be depleted in 13C, reflecting a signal of lower photosynthetic water-use efficiency in the GPP that is transferred to the soil rhizosphere. Large-scale forest disturbance due to catastrophic tree mortality from mountain pine beetle attack causes an initial (2-3 year) reduction in Rs, which is attributable to the loss of GPP and its effect on Ra. This near-term reduction in Rs

  18. Spaceborne Microwave Remote Sensing of Seasonal Freeze-Thaw Processes in the Terrestrial High Latitudes: Relationships with Land-Atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  19. Effects of inorganic nitrogen on C2H 2 reduction and CO 2 exchange in the Peltigera praetextata-Nostoc and Peltigera aphthosa-Coccomyxa-Nostoc symbioses.

    PubMed

    Hällbom, L; Bergman, B

    1983-04-01

    Uptake of NH 4 (+) and NO 3 (-) by the N2-fixing lichens Peltigera praetextata (two-component lichen) and P. aphthosa (three-component lichen) was studied. In addition, the effects of these ions, separately and in combination, on C2H2 reduction and CO2 exchange were examined. Both NH 4 (+) and NO 3 (-) were utilized by the lichens. NH4NO3 caused an increased liberation of NO 3 (-) from the lichens as compared to the release observed in untreated lichen thalli. NH 4 (+) and NO 3 (-) led to reduced C2H2 reduction by P. praetextata, which, however, was less pronounced than when the two ions were given in combination. In P. aphthosa the C2H2 reduction was inhibited by NH 4 (+) and NH4NO3, but not by NO 3 (-) alone. NH 4 (+) and NO 3 (-) had no effect on the net photosynthesis of P. praetextata, while, in combination, they led to inhibition, although only at a concentration higher than that inhibitory to the C2H2 reduction of P. aphthosa. The photsynthesis was inhibited by all salts, but only initially, probably a "salt effect". Effects of NH 4 (+) on the membrane potential of the cyanobiont are suggested as an important factor causing the depression of net photosynthesis.

  20. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in theterrestrial high l atitudes : relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  1. Effects of different elevated CO2 concentrations on chlorophyll contents, gas exchange, water use efficiency, and PSII activity on C3 and C4 cereal crops in a closed artificial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjuan; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Dong, Chen; Hui, Liu; Guanghui, Liu; Liu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Although terrestrial CO2 concentrations [CO2] are not expected to reach 1000 μmol mol(-1) (or ppm) for many decades, CO2 levels in closed systems such as growth chambers and greenhouses can easily exceed this concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems (LSS) in space can exceed 10,000 ppm (1 %). In order to understand how photosynthesis in C4 plants may respond to elevated CO2, it is necessary to determine if leaves of closed artificial ecosystem grown plants have a fully developed C4 photosynthetic apparatus, and whether or not photosynthesis in these leaves is more responsive to elevated [CO2] than leaves of C3 plants. To address this issue, we evaluated the response of gas exchange, water use efficiency, and photosynthetic efficiency of PSII by soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr., 'Heihe35') of a typical C3 plant and maize (Zea mays L., 'Susheng') of C4 plant under four CO2 concentrations (500, 1000, 3000, and 5000 ppm), which were grown under controlled environmental conditions of Lunar Palace 1. The results showed that photosynthetic pigment by the C3 plants of soybean was more sensitive to elevated [CO2] below 3000 ppm than the C4 plants of maize. Elevated [CO2] to 1000 ppm induced a higher initial photosynthetic rate, while super-elevated [CO2] appeared to negate such initial growth promotion for C3 plants. The C4 plant had the highest ETR, φPSII, and qP under 500-3000 ppm [CO2], but then decreased substantially at 5000 ppm [CO2] for both species. Therefore, photosynthetic down-regulation and a decrease in photosynthetic electron transport occurred by both species in response to super-elevated [CO2] at 3000 and 5000 ppm. Accordingly, plants can be selected for and adapt to the efficient use of elevated CO2 concentration in LSS.

  2. The Coca-campaign: An Attempt To Derive The Carbon Exchange of A Forested Region Using Airborne Co2 and Co Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitgen, S.; Ciais, P.; Geiß, H.; Kley, D.; Neininger, B.; Baeumle, M.; Fuchs, W.; Brunet, Y.

    As part of the project COCA an attempt was made to measure the daytime biogenic CO2 fluxes over a forest area (about 15 by 30 km). This campaign took place around the CARBOEUROFLUX site "Le Bray" (Pinus pinaster) close to Bordeaux in France end of June 2001. Based on continuous airborne CO2, H2O and CO flux and concen- tration measurements a Lagrangian budgeting approach was chosen for the determi- nation of the regional CO2 fluxes. The objective is to determine the CO2 uptake of the extended forest area from the CO2/CO gradients up- and downwind of the ecosystem, using CO as air mass tracer and such eliminating the influence of anthropogenic CO2 advected into the area. First results will be shown of a flight on June 23rd, where fair wind speeds (about 5 m/s) and a low CBL height led to the observation of a clear decrease in CO2 at the downwind flight stacks with basically constant CO concentrations. For other flights with very low wind speeds, local effects dominate the observa- tions leading to a larger variability in the observations. Both, correlations and anti- correlations of CO2 with the anthropogenic tracer CO have been observed. Positive correlations indicate fresh plumes of anthropogenic CO2. Negative correlations are indicative of entrainment of free tropospheric air, that was marked by relatively higher CO2 and lower CO concentrations than the average CBL concentrations.

  3. European source and sink areas of CO2 retrieved from Lagrangian transport model interpretation of combined O2 and CO2 measurements at the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglietti, C.; Leuenberger, M.; Brunner, D.

    2011-08-01

    The University of Bern monitors carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) at the High Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch since the year 2000 by means of flasks sampling and since 2005 using a continuous in situ measurement system. This study investigates the transport of CO2 and O2 towards Jungfraujoch using backward Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) simulations and utilizes CO2 and O2 signatures to classify air masses. By investigating the simulated transport patterns associated with distinct CO2 concentrations it is possible to decipher different source and sink areas over Europe. The highest CO2 concentrations, for example, were observed in winter during pollution episodes when air was transported from Northeastern Europe towards the Alps, or during south Foehn events with rapid uplift of polluted air from Northern Italy, as demonstrated in two case studies. To study the importance of air-sea exchange for variations in O2 concentrations at Jungfraujoch the correlation between CO2 and APO (Atmospheric Potential Oxygen) deviations from a seasonally varying background was analyzed. Anomalously high APO concentrations were clearly associated with air masses originating from the Atlantic Ocean, whereas low APO concentrations were found in air masses advected either from the east from the Eurasian continent in summer, or from the Eastern Mediterranean in winter. Those air masses with low APO in summer were also strongly depleted in CO2 suggesting a combination of CO2 uptake by vegetation and O2 uptake