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Sample records for air-sea co2 transfer

  1. Air-sea gas transfer for two gases of different solubility (CO2 and O2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutgersson, A.; Andersson, A.; Sahlée, E.

    2016-05-01

    At the land-based marine measuring site Östergarnsholm in the Baltic Sea, the eddy covariance technique was used to measure air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide and oxygen. High- frequency measurements of oxygen were taken with a Microx TX3 optode using the luminescence lifetime technique. The system gives reasonable oxygen fluxes after the limited frequency response of the sensor was corrected for. For fluxes of carbon dioxide the LICOR-7500 instrument was used. Using flux data to estimate transfer velocities indicates higher transfer velocity for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide for winds above 5 m/s. There are too few data for any extensive conclusions, but a least-square fit of the data gives a cubic wind speed dependence of oxygen corresponding to k 660 = 0.074U 3 10. The more effective transfer for oxygen compared to carbon dioxide above 5 m/s is most likely due to enhanced efficiency of oxygen exchange across the surface. Oxygen has lower solubility compared with carbon dioxide and might be more influenced by near surface processes such as microscale wave breaking or sea spray.

  2. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  3. Effect of gas-transfer velocity parameterization choice on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The oceanic sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important part of the global carbon budget. Understanding uncertainties in the calculation of this net flux into the ocean is crucial for climate research. One of the sources of the uncertainty within this calculation is the parameterization chosen for the CO2 gas-transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software toolbox, called the FluxEngine (Shutler et al., 2016), to estimate the monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes for the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean, including the European Arctic, and for the global ocean using several published quadratic and cubic wind speed parameterizations of the gas-transfer velocity. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic Ocean. This region is a large oceanic sink of CO2, and it is also a region characterized by strong winds, especially in winter but with good in situ data coverage. We show that the uncertainty in the parameterization is smaller in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic than in the global ocean. It is as little as 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, in comparison to 9 % for the global ocean when restricted to parameterizations with quadratic wind dependence. This uncertainty becomes 46, 44, and 65 %, respectively, when all parameterizations are considered. We suggest that this smaller uncertainty (5 and 4 %) is caused by a combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic (> 7 ms-1) and lack of any seasonal changes in the direction of the flux direction within most of the region. We also compare the impact of using two different in situ pCO2 data sets (Takahashi et al. (2009) and Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 and v2.0, for the flux calculation. The annual fluxes using the two data sets differ by 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal fluxes in the Arctic computed from the two data sets disagree with each

  4. Temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange in a low-emission estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mørk, Eva Thorborg; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Sørensen, Lise Lotte

    2016-07-01

    There is the need for further study of whether global estimates of air-sea CO2 exchange in estuarine systems capture the relevant temporal variability and, as such, the temporal variability of bulk parameterized and directly measured CO2 fluxes was investigated in the Danish estuary, Roskilde Fjord. The air-sea CO2 fluxes showed large temporal variability across seasons and between days and that more than 30% of the net CO2 emission in 2013 was a result of two large fall and winter storms. The diurnal variability of ΔpCO2 was up to 400 during summer changing the estuary from a source to a sink of CO2 within the day. Across seasons the system was suggested to change from a sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring to near neutral during summer and later to a source of atmospheric CO2 during fall. Results indicated that Roskilde Fjord was an annual low-emission estuary, with an estimated bulk parameterized release of 3.9 ± 8.7 mol CO2 m-2 y-1 during 2012-2013. It was suggested that the production-respiration balance leading to the low annual emission in Roskilde Fjord, was caused by the shallow depth, long residence time and high water quality in the estuary. In the data analysis the eddy covariance CO2 flux samples were filtered according to the H2Osbnd CO2 cross-sensitivity assessment suggested by Landwehr et al. (2014). This filtering reduced episodes of contradicting directions between measured and bulk parameterized air-sea CO2 exchanges and changed the net air-sea CO2 exchange from an uptake to a release. The CO2 gas transfer velocity was calculated from directly measured CO2 fluxes and ΔpCO2 and agreed to previous observations and parameterizations.

  5. Air-sea transfer of gas phase controlled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Bell, T. G.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Brooks, I. M.; Nightingale, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Gases in the atmosphere/ocean have solubility that spans several orders of magnitude. Resistance in the molecular sublayer on the waterside limits the air-sea exchange of sparingly soluble gases such as SF6 and CO2. In contrast, both aerodynamic and molecular diffusive resistances on the airside limit the exchange of highly soluble gases (as well as heat). Here we present direct measurements of air-sea methanol and acetone transfer from two open cruises: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The transfer of the highly soluble methanol is essentially completely airside controlled, while the less soluble acetone is subject to both airside and waterside resistances. Both compounds were measured concurrently using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, with their fluxes quantified by the eddy covariance method. Up to a wind speed of 15 m s-1, observed air-sea transfer velocities of these two gases are largely consistent with the expected near linear wind speed dependence. Measured acetone transfer velocity is ∼30% lower than that of methanol, which is primarily due to the lower solubility of acetone. From this difference we estimate the “zero bubble” waterside transfer velocity, which agrees fairly well with interfacial gas transfer velocities predicted by the COARE model. At wind speeds above 15 m s-1, the transfer velocities of both compounds are lower than expected in the mean. Air-sea transfer of sensible heat (also airside controlled) also appears to be reduced at wind speeds over 20 m s-1. During these conditions, large waves and abundant whitecaps generate large amounts of sea spray, which is predicted to alter heat transfer and could also affect the air-sea exchange of soluble trace gases. We make an order of magnitude estimate for the impacts of sea spray on air-sea methanol transfer.

  6. Annual and seasonal fCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Chierici, M.; Counillon, F.; Omar, A.; Nondal, G.; Johannessen, T.; Olsen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Barents Sea is the strongest CO2 sink in the Arctic region, yet estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux in this area show a large span reflecting uncertainty as well as significant variability both seasonally and regionally. Here we use a previously unpublished data set of seawater CO2 fugacity (fCO2), and map these data over the western Barents Sea through multivariable linear regressions with SeaWiFS/MODIS remote sensing and TOPAZ model data fields. We find that two algorithms are necessary in order to cover the full seasonal cycle, mainly because not all proxy variables are available for the entire year, and because variability in fCO2 is driven by different mechanisms in summer and winter. A comprehensive skill assessment indicates that there is a good overall correspondence between observations and predictions. The algorithms are also validated using two independent data sets, with good results. The gridded fCO2 fields reveal tight links between water mass distribution and fCO2 in all months, and particularly in winter. The seasonal cycle show peaks in the total air-sea CO2 influx in May and September, caused by respectively biological drawdown of CO2 and low sea ice concentration leaving a large open water area. For 2007 the annual average air-sea CO2 flux is - 48 ± 5 gC m- 2, which is comparable to previous estimates.

  7. Direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Hamish A.; MacKellar, Mellissa C.; Gray, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over coral reefs has relied on microscale measurements of pCO2 gradients across the air-sea interfacial boundary; shipboard measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over adjacent ocean inferred to represent over reef processes or ecosystem productivity modeling. Here we present by way of case study the first direct measurements of air-sea CO2 exchange over a coral reef made using the eddy covariance method. Research was conducted during the summer monsoon over a lagoonal platform reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Results show the reef flat to be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of similar magnitude as coastal lakes, while adjacent shallow and deep lagoons were net sinks as was the surrounding ocean. This heterogeneity in CO2 exchange with the atmosphere confirms need for spatially representative direct measurements of CO2 over coral reefs to accurately quantify their role in atmospheric carbon budgets.

  8. Air-sea CO2 fluxes measured by eddy covariance in a coastal station in Baja California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, L.; Ocampo-Torres, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of wave-associated parameters controlling turbulent CO2 fluxes through the air-sea water interface is evaluated in a coastal region. The study area, located within the Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México, was found to be a weak sink of CO2 with a mean flux of -1.32 µmol m-2s-1. The low correlation found between flux and wind speed (r = 0.09), suggests that the influence of other forcing mechanisms, besides wind, is important for gas transfer modulation through the sea surface, at least for the conditions found in this study. In addition, the results suggest that for short periods where an intensification of the wave conditions occurs, a CO2 flux response increases the transport of gas to the ocean.

  9. Large Temporal Variations in Air-Sea CO2 Flux off the Coast of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caves, J. K.; Sabine, C.; Cai, W.; Alin, S.

    2008-12-01

    Though the inner shelf is a small portion of global ocean area, its air-sea CO2 flux is disproportionately high. Due to its tight links with both terrestrial and oceanic systems, the inner shelf is likely to experience significant spatial and temporal variability. We measured the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2) continuously from July 2006 to June 2008 on a moored platform in Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary on Georgia's inner shelf. The long-term, high temporal resolution data has allowed us to begin to measure interannual variations in CO2 flux along the inner Georgia shelf. From July 2006-June 2007, the inner Georgia shelf was a CO2 sink (-3.26mmol/m2/day), while during following year, the shelf switched to being a source (2.26mmol/m2/day). Choice of wind data (satellite or buoy-derived) significantly alters these estimates of annual fluxes. QuikSCAT satellite wind data indicate a much larger sink (- 6.13mmol/m2/day) during 2006-2007, and a non-existent source (0.02mmol/m2/day) during 2007- 2008. An earlier, high-resolution spatial study from January 2005-May 2006 found that the inner shelf within the South Atlantic Bight may have been a source of 0.65 to 1.20mmol/m2/day, suggesting that the inner shelf may experience dramatic swings in CO2 flux. Though sea-surface temperature (SST) is the largest influence on surface water fCO2, average monthly SST varied little between both years; instead, possible explanations for the large variation in interannual CO2 flux include decreased biological production and increased river flow (and, hence carbon export) during 2007-2008. This is the first evidence of large-scale, annual switches in air-sea CO2 flux within an inner shelf, and it holds significant implications for global estimates of air-sea CO2 flux.

  10. Air-Sea Exchange Of CO2: A Multi-Technology Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengberg, A.; Almroth, E.; Anderson, L.; Hall, P.; Hjalmarsson, S.; Lefevre, D.; Omstedt, A.; Rutgersson, A.; Sahlee, E.; Smedman, A.; Wesslander, K.

    2006-12-01

    We report on experiences and results from a multidisciplinary project in which we try to elucidate the complex processes involved in air-sea exchange of CO2. This study was performed in the Baltic Sea (off the Swedish island Gotland) and combined the following technologies: - Meteorological measurements of wind, turbulence, temperature, humidity, humidity flux, CO2 and CO2 flux at several levels from a fixed observation tower - Hourly PCO2 measurements with a moored automatic instrument - Collection of dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity and turbidity data at different levels in the water column at 1-minute intervals - Daily light (PAR) and primary production measurements obtained with a moored automatic incubator - Daily primary production measurements using manual methods - Use of an acoustic current profiler to collect water column information on currents, turbulence, water level and waves - Repetitive water column profiles, from a ship, of dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, nutrients, alkalinity, pH, PAR, Chlorophyll A, salinity and temperature

  11. Influence of precipitation on the CO2 air-sea flux, an eddy covariance field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarsky, Alexander; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2016-04-01

    During the SPACES-OASIS cruise (July-August 2015) from Durban, SA to Male, MV direct fluxes of CO2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The cruise covered areas of sources and sinks for atmospheric CO2, where the bulk concentration gradient measurements resembled the Takahashi (2009) climatology. Most of the time, bulk CO2 fluxes (F=k* [cwater-cair]), calculated with the parametrization (k) by Nightingale et al. 2000, were in general agreement with direct EC measurements. However, during heavy rain events, the directly measured CO2 fluxes were 4 times higher than predicted. It has been previously described that rain influences the k parametrization of air-sea gas exchange, but this alone cannot explain the measured discrepancy. There is evidence that freshwater input and a change in the carbonate chemistry causes the water side concentration of ?c=cwater-cair to decrease. Unfortunately this cannot be detected by most bulk measurement systems. Using the flux measurements of an additional gas like DMS, this rain influence can be evaluated as DMS does not react to changes in the carbonate system and has a different solubility. A pending question is if the enhanced flux of CO2 in the ocean is sequestered into the ocean mixed layer and below. This question will be tackled using the GOTM model to understand the implications for the global carbon cycle.

  12. Using eddy covariance to estimate air-sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  13. Comparison of CO2 Dynamics and Air-Sea Exchange in Contrasting Tropical Reef Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Shamberger, K. E.; Musielewicz, S. B.; Maenner-Jones, S.; Sabine, C. L.; Feely, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiyear high temporal resolution CO2 records in three differing coral reef settings were obtained using buoys deployed in coastal waters of Oahu since June 2008. The buoys are located on the barrier reef of Kaneohe Bay and offshore of Honolulu, on the south shore of Oahu. Annualized CO2 air-sea fluxes at the three buoys ranged from +0.05 mol C/m2/yr offshore Honolulu on a fringing reef well mixed with the open ocean to -1.12 mol C/m2/yr on a barrier reef flat in Kaneohe Bay (positive values represent CO2 sinks from the atmosphere and negative values represent sources). These fluxes compare well to those estimated from previous studies in Kaneohe Bay as well as in other tropical reef environments. pCO2 measurements, made every 3 hours, at each location show strong temporal cycles on multiple time scales ranging from diel to seasonal at each buoy and an anticorrelation with pO2. These records, when combined with those of a prior buoy deployment in southern Kaneohe Bay and several synoptic studies, allow us to examine how the principal biological cycles of productivity/respiration and calcification/carbonate dissolution are influenced by changing water column properties, physical processes (e.g. residence time) and atmospheric conditions and how these processes ultimately impact the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere on hourly to interannual cycles. The data clearly demonstrate the need for high frequency pCO2 data to characterize completely and accurately short-term local changes in the CO2-carbonic acid system parameters and how these changes overprint the longer scale process of ocean acidification as a result of invasion of CO2 into the ocean due to emissions of anthropogenic CO2 to the atmosphere. Since many coral reef ecosystems are still sources of CO2 to the atmosphere because of positive net ecosystem calcification, and in some instances net heterotrophy, such data are even more critical in terms of assessing future changes in the direction

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of air-sea CO2 exchange of alongshore waters in summer near Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, Hiroki; Oechel, Walter C.

    2014-03-01

    Alongshore water off Barrow, Alaska is a useful area for studying the carbon cycle of the Arctic coastal sea, because the different coastal characteristics extant in the area likely represent much larger regions of the coastal water of the western Arctic Ocean. Especially noteworthy is the inflow shelf water transferred northward by the Arctic Coastal Current into the Chukchi Sea from the North Pacific and turbid water in the Elson Lagoon where a significant amount of coastal erosion has been reported along the extensive coastal line and where a part of the water from the lagoon drains into the Beaufort Sea adjacent to the Chukchi Sea. To investigate spatial and temporal variations of air-sea CO2 flux (CO2 flux) of the alongshore water, partial pressure of CO2 of surface seawater (pCO2sw) was measured in summer, 2007 and 2008, and CO2 flux was directly measured by eddy covariance at a fixed point for the Beaufort Sea in summer 2008. Measured pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was the lowest in the beginning of the measurement season and increased later in the season both in 2007 and 2008. The average CO2 flux estimated based on pCO2sw in the Chukchi Sea side was -0.10 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) using the sign convention of positive fluxes into the atmosphere from the ocean. pCO2sw in the Beaufort Sea and the Elson Lagoon was relatively higher in early summer and decreased in the middle of the summer. The overall average CO2 flux was -0.07 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.1 s.d.) for the Beaufort Sea side and -0.03 μmol m-2 s-1 (±0.07 s.d.) for the Elson Lagoon respectively, indicating a sink of CO2 despite high carbon inflows from the terrestrial margin into the Elson Lagoon. A strong sink of CO2 was often observed from the Beaufort Sea by eddy covariance in the middle of the summer. This sink activity in the middle summer in the Beaufort Sea and Elson Lagoon was likely due to biological carbon uptake as inferred by low apparent oxygen utilization and high chlorophyll

  15. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  16. Dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, W. J.; Bell, T. G.; Marandino, C.; Saltzman, E. S.; Miller, S. D.; Law, C. S.; Smith, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulfide (DMS) fluxes were measured by eddy correlation over the Southern Ocean (Feb/March 2012) aboard the R/V Tangaroa during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) study. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator. The study included measurements inside and outside a dinoflagellate bloom of large areal extent, with seawater DMS levels ranging up to 20 nM. Horizontal wind speeds of up to 20 m/sec were encountered. Gas transfer coefficients were calculated from eddy covariance DMS flux measurements and the air-sea concentration gradient. This study represents a significant addition to the limited database of direct gas transfer measurements in the Southern Ocean.

  17. Contribution of tropical cyclones to the air-sea CO2 flux: A global view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LéVy, M.; Lengaigne, M.; Bopp, L.; Vincent, E. M.; Madec, G.; Ethé, C.; Kumar, D.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.

    2012-06-01

    Previous case studies have illustrated the strong local influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on CO2 air-sea flux ? suggesting that they can significantly contribute to the global ? In this study, we use a state-of-the art global ocean biochemical model driven by TCs wind forcing derived from a historical TCs database, allowing to sample the ? response under 1663 TCs. Our results evidence a very weak contribution of TCs to global ? one or two order of magnitude smaller than previous estimates extrapolated from case studies. This result arises from several competing effects involved in the ? response to TCs, not accounted for in previous studies. While previous estimates have hypothesized the ocean to be systematically oversaturated in CO2 under TCs, our results reveal that a similar proportion of TCs occur over oversaturated regions (i.e. the North Atlantic, Northeast Pacific and the Arabian Sea) and undersaturated regions (i.e. Westernmost North Pacific, South Indian and Pacific Ocean). Consequently, by increasing the gas exchange coefficient, TCs can generate either instantaneous CO2 flux directed from the ocean to the atmosphere (efflux) or the opposite (influx), depending on the CO2 conditions at the time of the TC passage. A large portion of TCs also occurs over regions where the ocean and the atmosphere are in near equilibrium, resulting in very weak instantaneous fluxes. Previous estimates also did not account for any asynchronous effect of TCs on ? during several weeks after the storm, oceanic pCO2 is reduced in response to vertical mixing, which systematically causes an influx anomaly. This implies that, contrary to previous estimates, TCs weakly affect the CO2 efflux when they blow over supersaturated areas because the instantaneous storm wind effect and post-storm mixing effect oppose with each other. In contrast, TCs increase the CO2 influx in undersaturated conditions because the two effects add up. These compensating effects result in a very weak

  18. Reconstruction of super-resolution fields of ocean pCO2 and air-sea fluxes of CO2 from satellite imagery in the Southeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, I.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Yahia, H.; Garbe, C.; Paulmier, A.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of Green House Gases GHGs fluxes at the air-sea interface at high resolution is crucial to accurately quantify the role of the ocean in the absorption and emission of GHGs. In this paper we present a novel method to reconstruct maps of surface ocean partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4 km) using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ocean Colour (OC) data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). Inference of super-resolution of pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes is performed using novel nonlinear signal processing methodologies that prove efficient in the context of oceanography. The theoretical background comes from the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism which unlocks the geometrical determination of cascading properties of physical intensive variables. As a consequence, a multiresolution analysis performed on the signal of the so-called singularity exponents allows the correct and near optimal cross-scale inference of GHGs fluxes, as the inference suits the geometric realization of the cascade. We apply such a methodology to the study offshore of the Benguela area. The inferred representation of oceanic partial pressure of CO2 improves and enhances the description provided by CarbonTracker, capturing the small scale variability. We examine different combinations of Ocean Colour and Sea Surface Temperature products in order to increase the number of valid points and the quality of the inferred pCO2 field. The methodology is validated using in-situ measurements by means of statistical errors. We obtain that mean absolute and relative errors in the inferred values of pCO2 with respect to in-situ measurements are smaller than for CarbonTracker.

  19. Air-sea fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory on the south-west coast of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Prytherch, John; Brooks, Ian M.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We present air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), momentum, and sensible heat measured by the eddy covariance method from the recently established Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) on the south-west coast of the United Kingdom. Measurements from the south-westerly direction (open water sector) were made at three different sampling heights (approximately 15, 18, and 27 m above mean sea level, a.m.s.l.), each from a different period during 2014-2015. At sampling heights ≥ 18 m a.m.s.l., measured fluxes of momentum and sensible heat demonstrate reasonable ( ≤ ±20 % in the mean) agreement with transfer rates over the open ocean. This confirms the suitability of PPAO for air-sea exchange measurements in shelf regions. Covariance air-sea CO2 fluxes demonstrate high temporal variability. Air-to-sea transport of CO2 declined from spring to summer in both years, coinciding with the breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful eddy covariance measurements of CH4 emissions from a marine environment. Higher sea-to-air CH4 fluxes were observed during rising tides (20 ± 3; 38 ± 3; 29 ± 6 µmole m-2 d-1 at 15, 18, 27 m a.m.s.l.) than during falling tides (14 ± 2; 22 ± 2; 21 ± 5 µmole m-2 d-1), consistent with an elevated CH4 source from an estuarine outflow driven by local tidal circulation. These fluxes are a few times higher than the predicted CH4 emissions over the open ocean and are significantly lower than estimates from other aquatic CH4 hotspots (e.g. polar regions, freshwater). Finally, we found the detection limit of the air-sea CH4 flux by eddy covariance to be 20 µmole m-2 d-1 over hourly timescales (4 µmole m-2 d-1 over 24 h).

  20. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  1. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North-West European Shelf based on Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 dataset based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the Western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in north-west European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), the gas transfer velocity coefficient (K), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with relative uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 dataset (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish Seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT database and obtained relatively robust results with an average precision of 4 ± 22 μatm in the seasonally stratified nWEC and the southern and northern CS (sCS and nCS), but less promising results in the permanently well-mixed sWEC, IS and Cap Lizard (CL) waters. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.4, -0.9 and -0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the nCS, sCS and nWEC, respectively, whereas, permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the sWEC, CL and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over six provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -0.95 Tg C year-1 for this

  2. The relationship between ocean surface turbulence and air-sea gas transfer velocity: An in-situ evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esters, L.; Landwehr, S.; Sutherland, G.; Bell, T. G.; Saltzman, E. S.; Christensen, K. H.; Miller, S. D.; Ward, B.

    2016-05-01

    Although the air-sea gas transfer velocity k is usually parameterized with wind speed, the so-called small-eddy model suggests a relationship between k and ocean surface dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ. Laboratory and field measurements of k and ɛ have shown that this model holds in various ecosystems. Here, field observations are presented supporting the theoretical model in the open ocean. These observations are based on measurements from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler and eddy covariance CO2 and DMS air-sea flux data collected during the Knorr11 cruise. We show that the model results can be improved when applying a variable Schmidt number exponent compared to a commonly used constant value of 1/2. Scaling ɛ to the viscous sublayer allows us to investigate the model at different depths and to expand its applicability for more extensive data sets.

  3. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  4. Decadal trends in air-sea CO2 exchange in the Ross Sea (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2016-05-01

    Highly productive Antarctic shelf systems, like the Ross Sea, play important roles in regional carbon budgets, but the drivers of local variations are poorly quantified. We assess the variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle using a regional physical-biogeochemical model. Regionally, total partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increases are largely controlled by the biological pump and broadly similar to those in the offshore Southern Ocean. However, this masks substantial local variability within the Ross Sea, where interannual fluctuations in total pCO2 are driven by the biological pump and alkalinity, whereas those for anthropogenic pCO2 are related to physical processes. Overall, the high degree of spatial variability in the Ross Sea carbon cycle causes extremes in aragonite saturation that can be as large as long-term trends. Therefore, Antarctic shelf polynya systems like the Ross Sea will be strongly affected by local processes in addition to larger-scale phenomena.

  5. Evaluation of the swell effect on the air-sea gas transfer in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Air-sea gas transfer processes are one of the most important factors regarding global climate and long-term global climate changes. Despite its importance, there is still a huge uncertainty on how to better parametrize these processes in order to include them on the global climate models. This uncertainty exposes the need to increase our knowledge on gas transfer controlling mechanisms. In the coastal regions, breaking waves become a key factor to take into account when estimating gas fluxes, however, there is still a lack of information and the influence of the ocean surface waves on the air-sea interaction and gas flux behavior must be validated. In this study, as part of the "Sea Surface Roughness as Air-Sea Interaction Control" project, we evaluate the effect of the ocean surface waves on the gas exchange in the coastal zone. Direct estimates of the flux of CO2 (FCO2) and water vapor (FH2O) through eddy covariance, were carried out from May 2014 to April 2015 in a coastal station located at the Northwest of Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México. For the same period, ocean surface waves are recorded using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) with a sampling rate of 2 Hz and located at 10 m depth about 350 m away from the tower. We found the study area to be a weak sink of CO2 under moderate wind and wave conditions with a mean flux of -1.32 μmol/m2s. The correlation between the wind speed and FCO2 was found to be weak, suggesting that other physical processes besides wind may be important factors for the gas exchange modulation at coastal waters. The results of the quantile regression analysis computed between FCO2 and (1) wind speed, (2) significant wave height, (3) wave steepness and (4) water temperature, show that the significant wave height is the most correlated parameter with FCO2; Nevertheless, the behavior of their relation varies along the probability distribution of FCO2, with the linear regression

  6. The potential role of sea spray droplets in facilitating air-sea gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, E. L.; Vlahos, P.; Monahan, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    For over 30 years, air-sea interaction specialists have been evaluating and parameterizing the role of whitecap bubbles in air-sea gas exchange. To our knowledge, no one, however, has studied the mirror image process of whether sea spray droplets can facilitate air-sea gas exchange. We are therefore using theory, data analysis, and numerical modeling to quantify the role of spray on air-sea gas transfer. In this, our first formal work on this subject, we seek the rate-limiting step in spray-mediated gas transfer by evaluating the three time scales that govern the exchange: τ air , which quantifies the rate of transfer between the atmospheric gas reservoir and the surface of the droplet; τ int , which quantifies the exchange rate across the air-droplet interface; and τ aq , which quantifies gas mixing within the aqueous solution droplet.

  7. Inference of super-resolution ocean pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes from non-linear and multiscale processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Sudre, Joel; Garçon, Veronique; Yahia, Hussein; Dewitte, Boris; Garbe, Christoph; Illig, Séréna; Montes, Ivonne; Dadou, Isabelle; Paulmier, Aurélien; Butz, André

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the role of submesoscale activity is emerging as being more and more important to understand global ocean properties, for instance, for accurately estimating the sources and sinks of Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) at the air-sea interface. The scarcity of oceanographic cruises and the lack of available satellite products for GHG concentrations at high resolution prevent from obtaining a global assessment of their spatial variability at small scales. In this work we develop a novel method to reconstruct maps of CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4km) using SST and ocean colour data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). The responsible process for propagating the information between scales is related to cascading properties and multiscale organization, typical of fully developed turbulence. The methodology, based on the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism, makes use, from the knowledge of singularity exponents, of the optimal wavelet for the determination of the energy injection mechanism between scales. We perform a validation analysis of the results of our algorithm using pCO2 ocean data from in-situ measurements in the upwelling region off Namibia.

  8. CO2 air-sea fluxes across the Portuguese estuaries Tagus and Sado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, G.; Nogueira, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally, estuaries and proximal shelves under the direct influence of river runoff and large inputs of organic matter are mostly heterotrophic and, therefore, act as a carbon source. In this context the CO2 dynamics in Tagus and Sado estuaries (SW Portugal) was studied under two different climate and hydrological situations. These moderately productive mesotidal coastal-plain lagoon-type estuaries, localised in the center of Portugal and distant 30-40 km apart, present quite different freshwater inflows, surface areas and water residence times. A study performed in 2001 revealed that the magnitude of CO2 fluxes in the two estuarine systems varied seasonally. CO2 emissions during the huge rainfall winter were similar in both estuaries, reaching a mean value of ~50 mmol m-2 d-1, while in spring emissions from Sado were ~6 times higher then Tagus ones, attaining a mean value of 62 mmol m-2 d-1. Nevertheless, in both sampling periods, Sado estuary showed, within the upper estuary (salinity

  9. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (<80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2 with a mean uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2d-1. We attribute this discrepancy to: (1) elevated PP rates (>600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally <100 mg C m-2d-1, daily PP rates cumulated to a total PP of ~437.6 × 103 t C, which was roughly twice higher than the organic carbon delivery by river inputs (~241.2 × 103 t C). Subsurface PP represented 37.4% of total PP for the

  10. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  11. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  12. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  13. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover (< 80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2, with an uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean ± standard deviation associated with spatial variability). We attribute this discrepancy to (1) elevated PP rates (> 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally < 100 mg C m-2 d-1 and cumulated to a total PP of ~ 437.6 × 103 t C for the region over a 35-day period. This amount was about twice the

  14. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the northwestern European shelf based on voluntary observing ship and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-09-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 data set based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in northwestern European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), wind speed (WND), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 data set (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT and LDEO databases and obtained good agreement between modeled and observed data. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.6 ± 0.3, -0.9 ± 0.3 and -0.5 ± 0.3 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the northern Celtic Sea, southern Celtic sea and nWEC, respectively, whereas permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2 ± 0.2 and 0.3 ± 0.2 mol C m-2 yr-1 in the sWEC and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over these provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -1.11 ± 0.32 Tg C yr-1 for this part of the northwestern European continental shelf. Our study showed that combining VOS data with satellite observations can be a powerful tool to

  15. An Approach to Minimizing Artifacts Caused by Cross-Sensitivity in the Determination of Air-Sea CO2 Flux Using the Eddy-Covariance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ziqiang; Gao, Huiwang; Gao, Zengxiang; Wang, Renlei; Xue, Yuhuan; Yao, Xiaohong

    2013-07-01

    The air-sea CO2 flux was measured from a research vessel in the North Yellow Sea in October 2007 using an open-path eddy-covariance technique. In 11 out of 64 samples, the normalized spectra of scalars (C}2, water vapour, and temperature) showed similarities. However, in the remaining samples, the normalized CO2 spectra were observed to be greater than those of water vapour and temperature at low frequencies. In this paper, the noise due to cross-sensitivity was identified through a combination of intercomparisons among the normalized spectra of three scalars and additional analyses. Upon examination, the cross-sensitivity noise appeared to be mainly present at frequencies {<}0.8 Hz. Our analysis also suggested that the high-frequency fluctuations of CO2 concentration (frequency {>}0.8 Hz) was probably less affected by the cross-sensitivity. To circumvent the cross-sensitivity issue, the cospectrum in the high-frequency range 0.8-1.5 Hz, instead of the whole range, was used to estimate the CO2 flux by taking the contribution of the high frequency to the CO2 flux to be the same as the contribution to the water vapour flux. The estimated air-sea CO2 flux in the North Yellow Sea was -0.039 ± 0.048 mg m^{-2} s^{-1}, a value comparable to the estimates using the inertial dissipation method and Edson's method (Edson et al., J Geophys Res 116:C00F10, 2011).

  16. Estimating monthly averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat and momentum are computed from 25 years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly averaged wind speeds, temperatures and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimates of monthly averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly averaged nonneutral values.

  17. Intraseasonal variability linked to sampling alias in air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Pedro M. S.; Gregor, Luke; Lévy, Marina; Maenner, Stacy; Sabine, Christopher L.; Swart, Sebastiaan

    2015-10-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) contributes most of the uncertainty in contemporary estimates of the mean annual flux of carbon dioxide CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Attempts to reduce this uncertainty have aimed at resolving the seasonal cycle of the fugacity of CO2 (fCO2). We use hourly CO2 flux and driver observations collected by the combined deployment of ocean gliders to show that resolving the seasonal cycle is not sufficient to reduce the uncertainty of the flux of CO2 to below the threshold required to reveal climatic trends in CO2 fluxes. This was done by iteratively subsampling the hourly CO2 data set at various time intervals. We show that because of storm-linked intraseasonal variability in the spring-late summer, sampling intervals longer than 2 days alias the seasonal mean flux estimate above the required threshold. Moreover, the regional nature and long-term trends in storm characteristics may be an important influence in the future role of the SO in the carbon-climate system.

  18. Quantifying the air-sea CO2 flux at a time-series in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Nathalie; Veleda, Doris; Araujo, Moacyr; Caniaux, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Hourly fCO2 is recorded at a time-series at the PIRATA buoy located at 6oS 10oW in the eastern tropical Atlantic since June 2006. This site is located south and west of the seasonal Atlantic cold tongue and is affected by its propagation from June to September. Using an alkalinity-salinity relationship determined for the eastern tropical Atlantic and the observed fCO2, pH and the inorganic carbon concentration are calculated. The time-series of fCO2 exhibits strong intraseasonal, seasonal and interannual variability. On seasonal timescales, the variations of fCO2 and pH are mostly controlled by sea surface salinity. At interannual timescales, some important differences appear in 2011-2012: lower fCO2 and fluxes are observed from September to December 2011 and are explained by higher advection of salty waters at the mooring. In early 2012, the anomaly is still present and is associated with lower sea surface temperatures. No significant long-term trend is detected over the period 2006-2013 on CO2 and any other physical parameter. However, as atmospheric fCO2 is increasing over time, the outgassing of CO2 is reduced over the period 2006-2013 as the flux is mainly controlled by the difference of fCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. A longer time-series is required to determine if any significant trend exists in this region.

  19. Variability of 14C reservoir age and air-sea flux of CO2 in the Peru-Chile upwelling region during the past 12,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carré, Matthieu; Jackson, Donald; Maldonado, Antonio; Chase, Brian M.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of radiocarbon marine reservoir age through time and space limits the accuracy of chronologies in marine paleo-environmental archives. We report here new radiocarbon reservoir ages (ΔR) from the central coast of Chile (~ 32°S) for the Holocene period and compare these values to existing reservoir age reconstructions from southern Peru and northern Chile. Late Holocene ΔR values show little variability from central Chile to Peru. Prior to 6000 cal yr BP, however, ΔR values were markedly increased in southern Peru and northern Chile, while similar or slightly lower-than-modern ΔR values were observed in central Chile. This extended dataset suggests that the early Holocene was characterized by a substantial increase in the latitudinal gradient of marine reservoir age between central and northern Chile. This change in the marine reservoir ages indicates that the early Holocene air-sea flux of CO2 could have been up to five times more intense than in the late Holocene in the Peruvian upwelling, while slightly reduced in central Chile. Our results show that oceanic circulation changes in the Humboldt system during the Holocene have substantially modified the air-sea carbon flux in this region.

  20. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couldrey, Matthew P.; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul R.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2 concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature- and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual) timescales. Previous work shows that in the North Atlantic, ΔpCO2 and k both contribute significantly to interannual F variability but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. On some timescale between interannual and multidecadal, gas transfer velocity variability and its associated uncertainty become negligible. Here we quantify this critical timescale for the first time. Using an ocean model, we determine the importance of k, ΔpCO2, and α on a range of timescales. On interannual and shorter timescales, both ΔpCO2 and k are important controls on F. In contrast, pentadal to multidecadal North Atlantic flux variability is driven almost entirely by ΔpCO2; k contributes less than 25%. Finally, we explore how accurately one can estimate North Atlantic F without a knowledge of nonseasonal k variability, finding it possible for interannual and longer timescales. These findings suggest that continued efforts to better constrain gas transfer velocities are necessary to quantify interannual variability in the North Atlantic carbon sink. However, uncertainty in k variability is unlikely to limit the accuracy of estimates of longer-term flux variability.

  1. On which timescales do gas transfer velocities control North Atlantic CO2 flux variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couldrey, Matthew; Oliver, Kevin; Yool, Andrew; Halloran, Paul; Achterberg, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is an important basin for the global ocean's uptake of anthropogenic and natural carbon dioxide (CO2), but the mechanisms controlling this carbon flux are not fully understood. The air-sea flux of CO2, F, is the product of a gas transfer velocity, k, the air-sea CO2concentration gradient, ΔpCO2, and the temperature and salinity-dependent solubility coefficient, α. k is difficult to constrain, representing the dominant uncertainty in F on short (instantaneous to interannual) timescales. Previous work shows that in the North Atlantic, ΔpCO2and k both contribute significantly to interannual F variability, but that k is unimportant for multidecadal variability. On some timescale between interannual and multidecadal, gas transfer velocity variability and its associated uncertainty become negligible. Here, we quantify this critical timescale for the first time. Using an ocean model, we determine the importance of k, ΔpCO2and α on a range of timescales. On interannual and shorter timescales, both ΔpCO2and k are important controls on F. In contrast, pentadal to multidecadal North Atlantic flux variability is driven almost entirely by ΔpCO2; k contributes less than 25%. Finally, we explore how accurately one can estimate North Atlantic F without a knowledge of non-seasonal k variability, finding it possible for interannual and longer timescales. These findings suggest that continued efforts to better constrain gas transfer velocities are necessary to quantify interannual variability in the North Atlantic carbon sink. However, uncertainty in k variability is unlikely to limit the accuracy of estimates of longer term flux variability.

  2. On the calculation of air-sea fluxes of CO2 in the presence of temperature and salinity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, D. K.; Land, P. E.; Shutler, J. D.; Goddijn-Murphy, L. M.; Donlon, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    The presence of vertical temperature and salinity gradients in the upper ocean and the occurrence of variations in temperature and salinity on time scales from hours to many years complicate the calculation of the flux of carbon dioxide (CO2) across the sea surface. Temperature and salinity affect the interfacial concentration of aqueous CO2 primarily through their effect on solubility with lesser effects related to saturated vapor pressure and the relationship between fugacity and partial pressure. The effects of temperature and salinity profiles in the water column and changes in the aqueous concentration act primarily through the partitioning of the carbonate system. Climatological calculations of flux require attention to variability in the upper ocean and to the limited validity of assuming "constant chemistry" in transforming measurements to climatological values. Contrary to some recent analysis, it is shown that the effect on CO2 fluxes of a cool skin on the sea surface is large and ubiquitous. An opposing effect on calculated fluxes is related to the occurrence of warm layers near the surface; this effect can be locally large but will usually coincide with periods of low exchange. A salty skin and salinity anomalies in the upper ocean also affect CO2 flux calculations, though these haline effects are generally weaker than the thermal effects.

  3. Air-Sea CO2 fluxes and NEP changes in a Baja California Coastal Lagoon during the anomalous North Pacific warm condition in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila López, M. D. C.; Martin Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.; Sandoval Gil, J.; Mejía-Trejo, A.; Félix-Bermudez, A.; Pacheco-Ruiz, I.

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the temporal variability of seawater carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in a Baja California Mediterranean-climate coastal lagoon. This study was carried out from Nov-2013 to Nov-2014, a period in which anomalous warm conditions were present in the North Pacific Ocean influenced the local oceanography in the adjacent coastal waters off Baja California. These ocean conditions resulted on a negative anomaly of upwelling index, which led to summer-like season (weak upwelling condition) that could be observed in the response of carbon dynamics and metabolic status in San Quintín Bay. Minor changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration during spring months (~100 µmol kg-1) where observed and were associated to biological processes within the lagoon. High DIC (~2200 µmol kg-1), pCO2 (~800 μatm), and minimum pH (~7.8) values were observed in summer, reflecting the predominance of respiration processes apparently mostly linked to the remineralization of sedimentary organic matter supplied from macroalgal blooms. San Quintín Bay acted as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the study period, with maximum value observed in July (~10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Temporal biomass production of macroalgae contributed to about 50% of total FCO2 estimated in spring-summer seasons, that was a potencial internal source of organic matter to fuel respiration processes in San Quintín Bay. Eelgrass metabolism contributes in a lower degree in total FCO2. During the anomalous ocean conditions in 2014, the lagoon switched seasonally between net heterotrophy and net autotrophy during the study period, where photosynthesis and respiration processes in the lagoon were closer to a balance. Whole-system metabolism and FCO2 clearly indicated the strong dependence of San Quintín Bay on upwelling conditions and benthic metabolism activity, which was mainly controlled by dominant primary producer communities.

  4. Model estimating the effect of marginal ice zone processes on the phytoplankton primary production and air-sea flux of CO2 in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Anton; Sein, Dmitry; Ryabchenko, Vladimir; Gorchakov, Victor; Martjyanov, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    This study is aimed to assess the impact of sea ice on the primary production of phytoplankton (PPP) and air-sea CO2 flux in the Barents Sea. To get the estimations, we apply a three-dimensional eco-hydrodynamic model based on the Princeton Ocean Model which includes: 1) a module of sea ice with 7 categories, and 2) the 11-component module of marine pelagic ecosystem developed in the St. Petersburg Branch, Institute of Oceanology. The model is driven by atmospheric forcing, prescribed from the reanalysis NCEP / NCAR, and conditions on the open sea boundary, prescribed from the regional model of the atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-ocean biogeochemistry, developed at Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg. Comparison of the model results for the period 1998-2007 with satellite data showed that the model reproduces the main features of the evolution of the sea surface temperature, seasonal changes in the ice extent, surface chlorophyll "a" concentration and PPP in the Barents Sea. Model estimates of the annual PPP for whole sea, APPmod, appeared in 1.5-2.3 times more than similar estimates, APPdata, from satellite data. The main reasons for this discrepancy are: 1) APPdata refers to the open water, while APPmod, to the whole sea area (under the pack ice and marginal ice zone (MIZ) was produced 16 - 38% of PPP); and 2) values of APPdata are underestimated because of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum. During the period 1998-2007, the modelled maximal (in the seasonal cycle) sea ice area has decreased by 15%. This reduction was accompanied by an increase in annual PPP of the sea at 54 and 63%, based, respectively, on satellite data and the model for the open water. According to model calculations for the whole sea area, the increase is only 19%. Using a simple 7-component model of oceanic carbon cycle incorporated into the above hydrodynamic model, the CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and sea has been estimated in different conditions. In the absence of biological

  5. Estimating monthly-averaged air-sea transfers of heat and momentum using the bulk aerodynamic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esbensen, S. K.; Reynolds, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Air-sea transfers of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum are computed from twenty-five years of middle-latitude and subtropical ocean weather ship data in the North Atlantic and North Pacific using the bulk aerodynamic method. The results show that monthly-averaged wind speeds, temperatures, and humidities can be used to estimate the monthly-averaged sensible and latent heat fluxes computed from the bulk aerodynamic equations to within a relative error of approximately 10%. The estimate of monthly-averaged wind stress under the assumption of neutral stability are shown to be within approximately 5% of the monthly-averaged non-neutral values.

  6. Open ocean gas transfer velocity derived from long-term direct measurements of the CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, John; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Moat, Bengamin I.; Skjelvan, Ingunn; Srokosz, Meric A.

    2010-12-01

    Air-sea open ocean CO2 flux measurements have been made using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique onboard the weathership Polarfront in the North Atlantic between September 2006 and December 2009. Flux measurements were made using an autonomous system ‘AutoFlux’. CO2 mass density was measured with an open-path infrared gas analyzer. Following quality control procedures, 3938 20-minute flux measurements were made at mean wind speeds up to 19.6 m/s, significantly higher wind speeds than previously published results. The uncertainty in the determination of gas transfer velocities is large, but the mean relationship to wind speed allows a new parameterisation of the gas transfer velocity to be determined. A cubic dependence of gas transfer on wind speed is found, suggesting a significant influence of bubble-mediated exchange on gas transfer.

  7. Blackbody pumped N2-CO2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Young, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The power and intrinsic efficiency of a small N2-CO2 fluid mixing transfer laser has been measured. Powers of 1.4 watts and intrinsic efficiencies for 0.7 percent were found for N2 oven temperatures of 1473 K. Laser output was optimized for He, CO2 and N2 partial pressures, output mirror reflectivity, nozzle diameter and oven temperature.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of an Ocean Carbon Cycle Model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. The NPZD model is the Hadley Centre Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HadOCC) from the UK Met Office, used in the Hadley Centre Coupled Model 3 (HadCM3) and FAst Met Office and Universities Simulator (FAMOUS) GCMs. Here, HadOCC is coupled to the 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting meteorology to undertake a sensitivity analysis of its twenty biological parameters. Analyses are performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W) to assess variability in parameter sensitivities at different locations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. We perform the analysis using one-at-a-time perturbations and using a statistical emulator, and compare results. The most sensitive parameters are generic to many NPZD ocean ecosystem models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosythesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  9. Carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 flux at a fixed point in a NW Mediterranean Bay, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, E. H.; Mousseau, L.; Passafiume, O.; Drupp, P. S.; Gattuso, J.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of the Service d'Observation de la Rade de Villefranche-sur-Mer (SO-RADE) is to study the temporal variability of hydrological conditions as well as the abundance and composition of holo- and meroplankton at a fixed station in the bay of Villefranche-sur-Mer, North West Mediterranean. The weekly data collected at this site, designated as "Point B (43° 41.10'N - 7° 18.94'E), since 1957 are recognized as a long-term time series describing the evolution of the hydrological conditions in a coastal environment. Since 2007, historical measurements of hydrological and biological conditions have been complemented by measurements of the CO2-carbonate system parameters. In this contribution we present CO2-carbonate system parameters and ancillary data for the period 2007-2010. The data are evaluated in the context of the physical and biogeochemical processes that contribute to the fluxes of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. Seasonal cycles of seawater pCO2 are controlled principally by variations in temperature, showing maxima in the summer and minima during the winters. Normalization of pCO2 to the mean seawater temperature (18oC) results in an apparent reversal of the seasonal cycle with maxima observed in the winters and minima in the summers, consistent with a control of pCO2 by primary productivity. Calculations of "instantaneous fluxes" of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere show this area to be primarily a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the summer and a weak sink during the winter and near neutral overall (range: -0.3 to +0.3 mmol CO2 m-2 h-1, average: 0.02 mmol CO2 m-2 h-1). We will also provide projections of errors incurred from the estimation of annualized fluxes of CO2 based on weekly measurements relative to daily and high-frequency (3 h) data such as those obtained at the Hawaii Kilo Nalu coastal time series station, which shows similar behavior to the Point B location despite significant differences in climate and hydrological

  10. The transfer of trace constituents across the air-sea interface

    SciTech Connect

    Businger, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    The study of the transfer of properties, and especially the transfer of trace constituents, has received considerable attention from the scientific community during the last 20 years or so. The author will highlight some relevant topics which include: the role of the molecular sublayer near the interface; the transfer of momentum from the atmosphere to the ocean; the energy budget of the sea surface and the cool skin; bubbles, sea spray, and whitecap coverage; the measurement of fluxes; and a global perspective.

  11. High wind speed measurements of dimethylsulfide air/sea gas transfer by eddy correlation in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. G.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.; Slawksy, L.; Stacy, B.; Callaghan, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Air/sea dimethylsulphide (DMS) fluxes and gas transfer coefficients (kDMS) were measured by eddy correlation over the western North Atlantic Ocean during June/July 2011 aboard the R/V Knorr. Atmospheric and seawater DMS were measured using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (API-CIMS). Seawater DMS was measured continuously from the ship's underway system using a porous membrane equilibrator and API-CIMS. The cruise included regions of high biological productivity, wind speeds from 0-18 m/sec and whitecap areas of 0-5%. Four stations were occupied during the cruise for periods of 24-36 hours. In general, the stations exhibited a linear relationship between kDMS and wind speed, although there were significant variations in the slope of this relationship. One of the stations showed kDMS increasing with wind speed to 10 m/sec and then levelling off at higher wind speeds. The data from this cruise suggest that gas transfer can vary substantially due to parameters other than wind speed, most likely sea state and surfactants.

  12. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed-layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea-ice-covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea-ice as "melt ponds" and below sea-ice as "interface waters") and mixed-layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At 19 stations, the salinity (∼0.5 to <6.5), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; ∼20 to <550 μmol kg-1) and total alkalinity (TA; ∼30 to <500 μmol kg-1) of above-ice melt pond water was low compared to the co-located underlying mixed layer. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in these melt ponds was highly variable (∼<10 to >1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (>8.2 to 10.8). All of the observed melt ponds had very low (<0.1) saturation states (Ω) for calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals such as aragonite (Ωaragonite). Our data suggest that sea-ice generated alkaline or acidic type melt pond water. This melt water chemistry dictates whether the ponds are sources of CO2 to the atmosphere or CO2 sinks. Below-ice interface water CO2-carbonate chemistry data also indicated substantial generation of alkalinity, presumably owing to dissolution of CaCO3 in sea-ice. The interface waters generally had lower pCO2 and higher pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed-layer pCO2, thereby enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to

  13. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-08-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  14. Transition from downward to upward air-sea momentum transfer in swell-dominated light wind condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Högström, Ulf; Rutgersson, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric and surface wave data from two oceanic experiments carried out on FLIP and ASIS platforms are analysed in order to identify swell-related effects on the momentum exchange during low wind speed conditions. The RED experiment was carried out on board an R/P Floating Instrument Platform, FLIP, anchored north east of the Hawaiian island Oahu with sonic anemometers at four levels: 5.1 m, 6.9 m, 9.9 m and 13.8 m respectively. The meteorological conditions were characterized by north- easterly trade wind and with swell present during most of the time. During swell the momentum flux was directed downwards meaning a positive contribution to the stress. The FETCH experiment was carried out in the Gulf of Lion in the north-western Mediterranean Sea. On the ASIS (air-sea interaction spar) buoy a sonic anemometer was mounted at 7 m above the mean surface level. During strong swell conditions the momentum flux was directed upwards meaning a negative contribution to the stress in this case. The downward momentum flux is shown to be a function of the orbital circulation while the upward momentum flux is a function of wave height. The dividing wind speed is found to be 3.5 m/s Conclusion: Wind speed > 3.5 m/s creates waves (ripples) and thus roughness. Combination of orbital motion and asymmetric structure of ripples lead to flow perturbation and downward transport of negative momentum. With low wind speed (no ripples but viscosity) circulations will form above the crest and the trough with opposite direction which will cause a pressure drop in the vertical direction and an upward momentum transport from the water to the air.

  15. Air-sea Energy Transfer at Mesoscale in a Coupled High-resolution Model: Impact of Resolution and Current Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullien, S.; Colas, F.; Masson, S. G.; Oerder, V.; Echevin, V.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Berthet, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    Winds are usually considered to force the ocean but recent studies suggested that oceanic mesoscale activity, characterized by eddies, filaments and fronts, could also affect the wind field. These structures feature abrupt changes in sea surface temperature (SST), surface pressure and surface currents that could impact the atmosphere by enhancing/reducing air-sea fluxes, accelerating/decelerating winds, modifying the wind-pressure balance… At this time, the detailed processes associated to such coupling, its intensity and significance remain a matter of research. Here, a state-of-the-art WRF-OASIS-NEMO coupled model is set up over a wide tropical channel (45°S-45°N) at various resolutions: 3/4°, 1/4° and 1/12° in both the ocean and the atmosphere. Several experiments are conducted in forced, partially or fully coupled modes, to highlight the effect of resolution and the role of SST vs. current feedback to energy injection into the ocean and the atmosphere. In strong mesoscale activity regions, a negative wind power input from the atmosphere to the ocean is seen at scales ranging from 100km to more than 1000km. Nonexistent at 3/4°, this negative forcing, acting against oceanic mesoscale activity, is almost twice more important at 1/12° than at 1/4°. In addition, partially coupled simulations, i.e. without current feedback, show that the impact of thermal coupling on this process is very limited. Energy injection to the marine atmospheric boundary layer also features imprints from oceanic mesoscale. Energy injection by scales shorter than 300km represents up to 20% of the total. Finally we show that increasing oceanic resolution, and therefore mesoscale activity, is necessary to resolve the full wind stress spectrum and has an upscaling effect by enhancing atmospheric mesoscale, which is larger scale than in the ocean. Using 1/4°oceanic resolution instead of 1/12° leads to a 50% loss of energy in the atmospheric mesoscale.

  16. In situ measurements of the air-sea gas transfer rate using heat as a proxy tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Haussecker, H.; Jaehne, B. |

    1994-12-31

    Conventional techniques to measure the transfer velocity k = j/{Delta}c of gases across the ocean interface are based on mass balance of the gas tracer in the water body. In order to determine j the temporal change {dot c}{sub w} of the tracer concentration in a volume of water V{sub w} has to be measured. The corresponding time constant {tau}{sub w} is in the order of days to weeks in the ocean. This long integration time prevents both an empirical parameterization of the gas transfer rate with friction velocity and other parameters such as the wave field and an insight into the mechanisms. Eddy correlation techniques are in principal suitable for flux measurements and parameterization of the gas transfer rate. So far, however, it could not be verified that they yield results that are consistent with geochemical methods and laboratory investigations. Here, an alternative approach is presented. The novel technique controls the tracer flux at the interface and uses heat as a proxy tracer.

  17. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  18. Inhibited proton transfer enhances Au-catalyzed CO2-to-fuels selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wuttig, Anna; Yaguchi, Momo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Osawa, Masatoshi; Surendranath, Yogesh

    2016-08-01

    CO2 reduction in aqueous electrolytes suffers efficiency losses because of the simultaneous reduction of water to H2 We combine in situ surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical kinetic studies to probe the mechanistic basis for kinetic bifurcation between H2 and CO production on polycrystalline Au electrodes. Under the conditions of CO2 reduction catalysis, electrogenerated CO species are irreversibly bound to Au in a bridging mode at a surface coverage of ∼0.2 and act as kinetically inert spectators. Electrokinetic data are consistent with a mechanism of CO production involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer to CO2 with concomitant adsorption to surface active sites followed by rapid one-electron, two-proton transfer and CO liberation from the surface. In contrast, the data suggest an H2 evolution mechanism involving rate-limiting, single-electron transfer coupled with proton transfer from bicarbonate, hydronium, and/or carbonic acid to form adsorbed H species followed by rapid one-electron, one-proton, or H recombination reactions. The disparate proton coupling requirements for CO and H2 production establish a mechanistic basis for reaction selectivity in electrocatalytic fuel formation, and the high population of spectator CO species highlights the complex heterogeneity of electrode surfaces under conditions of fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:27450088

  19. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  20. Geothermal Recovery System Using Natural Circulating CO2 as A Heat Transfer Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Hiroshi; Iwasawa, Kenji; Fukumiya, Kenji

    In the conventional system, heat is recovered as sensible heat through liquid anti-freezer circulating in a piping laid underground, but if CO2 is used as a heat transfer fluid, heat is recovered as latent heat which increases the capacity and enables to promote downsize of the equipment and reduction of the electric consumption. It also enables the diameter or the length of heat recovery piping for the same heat exchange performance, thus the installation cost of the piping would be reduced. In our study, a geothermal recovery system using CO2 for air-conditioning was installed, and the heating capacity and the electric consumption were measured. Also, those of a conventional propylene-glycol system were measured. As a result, the CO2-system exerted the same heating ability with the propylene-glycol system with a half length of heat recovery piping and a half electric consumption of the propylene-glycol system. And the reduction in the diameter of the CO2 recovery piping was possible to 50 mm at most to gain more than adequate heating effect.

  1. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (<150°C) non - catalytic process using a hydrogen transfer agent (instead of molecu-lar hydrogen) for coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that

  2. Mechanistic Insights into Hydride Transfer for Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 with Cobalt Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Neeraj; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dupuis, Michel; Raugei, Simone; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-08-21

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate by Co(dmpe)2H can proceeds via direct hydride transfer or via CO2 coordination to Co followed by reductive elimination of formate. Both pathways have activation barriers consistent with experiment (~17.5 kcal/mol). Controlling the basicity of Co by ligand design is key to improve catalysis. The research by N.K., D.M.C. and A.M.A. was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The research by S.R. and M.D. was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  3. Supercritical CO2 Dissolution and Mass Transfer in a Heterogeneous Pore Network under Drainage and Imbibition Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Chang, C.; Zhou, Q.; Oostrom, M.; Wietsma, T. W.; Yu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolution trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is usually modeled by assuming instantaneous scCO2 dissolution and equilibrium phase partitioning. Our recent core-scale imbibition experiments show a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In our 2D sandstone-analogue micromodel experimental study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution was inferred from imaging (1) drainage using a pH-sensitive water dye and (2) imbibition using a scCO2 dye. The drainage experiment was conducted by injecting scCO2 into the dissolved-CO2 (dsCO2)-free water-filled pore network. The time-lapse images of non-uniform dye intensities indicating varying pH show that dsCO2 concentration varies from zero to solubility in individual pores and pore clusters and the average concentration gradually increases with time. The different rates of dissolution in different pores/clusters can be attributed to (1) fast scCO2 dissolution at scCO2-water interfaces, (2) rate-limited mass transfer due to limited interface areas, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer, revealed by detailed analysis on selected pores and pore clusters. The imbibition experiments conducted by injecting deionized water at different rates show (1) water flow in channels bypassing scCO2 at high residual saturations, (2) subsequent, slow scCO2 depletion by dissolution and mass transfer as effluent dsCO2 concentration varies from 0.06% to 4.44% of solubility, and (3) creation of new water flow paths by dissolution, enhancing scCO2 depletion by coupled displacement and dissolution. Both the drainage and imbibitions experiments indicate non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the centimeter-scale pore network over 4.5 hours and up to 14 hours, respectively. The pore-scale imaging can help better understand the effects of pore-throat characteristics on scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer during drainage and imbibition and the interplay between displacement and

  4. A method for mapping regional oxygen and CO2 transfer in the lung.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Troels; Winkler, Tilo; Kelly, Vanessa Jane; Osorio-Valencia, Juan Sebastian; Greenblatt, Elliot Eliyahu; Harris, Robert Scott; Venegas, Jose Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to visualizing regional lung function, through quantitative three-dimensional maps of O2 and CO2 transfer rates. These maps describe the contribution of anatomical regions to overall gas exchange and demonstrate how transfer rates of the two gas species' differ regionally. An algorithm for generating such maps is presented, and for illustration, regional gas transfer maps were generated using values of ventilation and perfusion imaged by PET/CT for a healthy subject and an asthmatic patient after bronchoprovocation. In a sensitivity analysis, compartment values of gas transfer showed minor sensitivity to imaging noise in the ventilation and perfusion data, and moderate sensitivity to estimation errors in global lung input values, chiefly global alveolar ventilation, followed by cardiac output and arterial-venous O2 content difference. Gas transfer maps offer an intuitive display of physiologically relevant lung function at a regional level, the potential for an improved understanding of pulmonary gas exchange in health and disease, and potentially a presurgical evaluation tool. PMID:26563454

  5. A method for mapping regional oxygen and CO2 transfer in the lung.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Troels; Winkler, Tilo; Kelly, Vanessa Jane; Osorio-Valencia, Juan Sebastian; Greenblatt, Elliot Eliyahu; Harris, Robert Scott; Venegas, Jose Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to visualizing regional lung function, through quantitative three-dimensional maps of O2 and CO2 transfer rates. These maps describe the contribution of anatomical regions to overall gas exchange and demonstrate how transfer rates of the two gas species' differ regionally. An algorithm for generating such maps is presented, and for illustration, regional gas transfer maps were generated using values of ventilation and perfusion imaged by PET/CT for a healthy subject and an asthmatic patient after bronchoprovocation. In a sensitivity analysis, compartment values of gas transfer showed minor sensitivity to imaging noise in the ventilation and perfusion data, and moderate sensitivity to estimation errors in global lung input values, chiefly global alveolar ventilation, followed by cardiac output and arterial-venous O2 content difference. Gas transfer maps offer an intuitive display of physiologically relevant lung function at a regional level, the potential for an improved understanding of pulmonary gas exchange in health and disease, and potentially a presurgical evaluation tool.

  6. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-02-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objectives of our study were to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak.

  7. First-principles study of spin-transfer torque in Co2MnSi/Al/Co2MnSi spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Yang, Zejin

    2013-11-01

    The spin-transfer torque (STT) in Co2MnSi(CMS)/Al/Co2MnSi spin-valve system with and without interfacial disorder is studied by a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method. It is shown that in the case of clean interface the angular dependence of STT for CoCo/Al (the asymmetry parameter Λ ≈4.5) is more skewed than that for MnSi/Al (Λ≈2.9), which suggests the clean CoCo/Al architecture is much more efficient for the application on radio frequency oscillation. We also find that even with interfacial disorder the spin-valve of half-metallic CMS still has a relatively large parameter Λ compared to that of conventional ferromagnet. In addition, for clean interface the in-plane torkance of MnSi/Al is about twice as large as that of CoCo/Al. However, as long as the degree of interfacial disorder is sufficiently large, the CoCo/Al and MnSi/Al will show approximately the same magnitude of in-plane torkance. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that CMS/Al/CMS system has very high efficiency of STT to switch the magnetic layer of spin-valve.

  8. Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange across contrasting biogeochemical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Ryan; Schneider-Zapp, Klaus; Upstill-Goddard, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Air-sea gas exchange is important to the global partitioning of CO2.Exchange fluxes are products of an air-sea gas concentration difference, ΔC, and a gas transfer velocity, kw. The latter is controlled by the rate of turbulent diffusion at the air-sea interface but it cannot be directly measured and has a high uncertainty that is now considered one of the greatest challenges to quantifying net global air-sea CO2 exchange ...(Takahashi et al., 2009). One important control on kw is exerted by sea surface surfactants that arise both naturally from biological processes and through anthropogenic activity. They influence gas exchange in two fundamental ways: as a monolayer physical barrier and through modifying sea surface hydrodynamics and hence turbulent energy transfer. These effects have been demonstrated in the laboratory with artificial surfactants ...(Bock et al., 1999; Goldman et al., 1988) and through purposeful surfactant releases in coastal waters .(.).........().(Brockmann et al., 1982) and in the open ocean (Salter et al., 2011). Suppression of kwin these field experiments was ~5-55%. While changes in both total surfactant concentration and the composition of the natural surfactant pool might be expected to impact kw, the required in-situ studies are lacking. New data collected from the coastal North Sea in 2012-2013 shows significant spatio-temporal variability in the surfactant activity of organic matter within the sea surface microlayer that ranges from 0.07-0.94 mg/L T-X-100 (AC voltammetry). The surfactant activities show a strong winter/summer seasonal bias and general decrease in concentration with increasing distance from the coastline possibly associated with changing terrestrial vs. phytoplankton sources. Gas exchange experiments of this seawater using a novel laboratory tank and gas tracers (CH4 and SF6) demonstrate a 12-45% reduction in kw compared to surfactant-free water. Seasonally there is higher gas exchange suppression in the summer

  9. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under imbibition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Yu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    In modeling of geological carbon storage, dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is often assumed to be instantaneous with equilibrium phase partitioning. In contrast, recent core-scale imbibition experiments have shown a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2 by dissolution, implying a non-equilibrium mechanism. In this study, eight pore-scale scCO2 dissolution experiments in a 2D heterogeneous, sandstone-analog micromodel were conducted at supercritical conditions (9 MPa and 40 °C). The micromodel was first saturated with deionized (DI) water and drained by injecting scCO2 to establish a stable scCO2 saturation. DI water was then injected at constant flow rates after scCO2 drainage was completed. High resolution time-lapse images of scCO2 and water distributions were obtained during imbibition and dissolution, aided by a scCO2-soluble fluorescent dye introduced with scCO2 during drainage. These images were used to estimate scCO2 saturations and scCO2 depletion rates. Experimental results show that (1) a time-independent, varying number of water-flow channels are created during imbibition and later dominant dissolution by the random nature of water flow at the micromodel inlet, and (2) a time-dependent number of water-flow channels are created by coupled imbibition and dissolution following completion of dominant imbibition. The number of water-flow paths, constant or transient in nature, greatly affects the overall depletion rate of scCO2 by dissolution. The average mass fraction of dissolved CO2 (dsCO2) in water effluent varies from 0.38% to 2.72% of CO2 solubility, indicating non-equilibrium scCO2 dissolution in the millimeter-scale pore network. In general, the transient depletion rate decreases as trapped, discontinuous scCO2 bubbles and clusters within water-flow paths dissolve, then remains low with dissolution of large bypassed scCO2 clusters at their interfaces with longitudinal water flow, and finally increases with coupled transverse water flow and

  10. Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Fast CO2 Absorption by MgO-Based Absorbents with High Cycling Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Weizhen; Rohatgi, Aashish; Duan, Yuhua; Singh, Prabhakar; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 capture from pre-combustion syngas in the temperature range of 250-400°C is highly desirable from an energy efficiency perspective. Thermodynamically, MgO is a promising material for CO2 capture, but the gas-solid reaction to produce MgCO3 is kinetically slow due to high lattice energy. We report here fast CO2 absorption over a solid MgO-molten nitrate/nitrite aggregate through phase transfer catalysis, in which the molten phase serves as both a catalyst and reaction medium. Reaction with CO2 at the gas-solid-liquid triple phase boundary results in formation of MgCO3 with significant reaction rate and a high conversion of MgO. This methodology is also applicable to other alkaline earth oxides, inspiring the design of absorbents which require activation of the bulk material.

  11. DOGEE-SOLAS: The Role of Surfactants in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Upstill-Goddard, R. C.; Nightingale, P.

    2008-12-01

    One of the major aims of DOGEE-SOLAS was to improve our understanding of the role of surfactants in air- sea gas exchange. With this in mind we carried out a number of artificial surfactant releases on a research cruise in the North Atlantic (D320), during June-July of 2007. We used oleyl alcohol, a surrogate for natural surfactants which is relatively cheap and easy to obtain (it is used in the manufacture of cosmetics). The main release overlaid a dual tracer "patch" of SF6 and 3He; our aim was to directly compare values of the gas transfer velocity, kw, estimated within the surfactant covered patch with those estimated quasi- simultaneously in a second, surfactant-free patch about 20km away. A second release in conjunction with colleagues from the University of Hawaii had the aim of measuring DMS fluxes by eddy correlation both inside and outside a surfactant slick, and a third was undertaken in the path of one of two 14m ASIS (Air-Sea Interaction Spar) buoys operated by the University of Miami for direct comparison of surfactant effects on the fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum (eddy correlation) etc. We present here some preliminary findings from the work.

  12. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  13. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  14. Modeling of mass transfer of Phospholipids in separation process with supercritical CO2 fluid by RBF artificial neural networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An artificial Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network model was developed for the prediction of mass transfer of the phospholipids from canola meal in supercritical CO2 fluid. The RBF kind of artificial neural networks (ANN) with orthogonal least squares (OLS) learning algorithm were used for mod...

  15. Influence of O-CO2 and O-NO Vibrational Energy Transfer on Thermospheric Density and Satellite Drag Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, J. A.; Sharma, R. D.; Hwang, E. S.; Castle, K. J.

    2001-12-01

    Collisions of O with the trace species CO2 and NO provide significant atmospheric cooling in the Earth's upper mesosphere-lower thermosphere, between 70 and 200 km. These collisions efficiently populate CO2(ν 2) and NO(v=1), respectively, converting a portion of the ambient kinetic energy into 15-μ m and 5.3-μ m IR emission. Much of the emission escapes into space, effectively removing ambient kinetic energy from the atmosphere. In recent years our group has performed laboratory measurements to better characterize the vibrational energy transfer (VET) efficiencies for the NO-O system, and is currently developing techniques for studying VET in the CO2-O system. These results, together with TIME-GCM modeling, show that predictions of upper atmospheric temperature and density are sensitive to the values assumed for the NO-O and CO2-O VET efficiencies, including their temperature dependence. The predicted cooling rates may either add or compensate, depending on the atmospheric conditions and on the kinetic parameters used in the photochemical model. In particular, the large CO2-O VET efficiency and increasing global CO2 concentrations suggest that the thermosphere may be cooling and contracting over time. This hypothesis is supported by a limited number of analyses of satellite orbital motion, as well as variation in polar mesospheric cloud and ion layer altitudes implied by recent observations. This has important implications for photochemical models, radiance predictions, and for spacecraft drag and satellite longevity. It also provides an interesting connection between a molecular-level parameter, the CO2-O VET efficiency, and the macroscopic effects of atmospheric density and satellite drag.

  16. Uncertainties in wind speed dependent CO2 transfer velocities due to airflow distortion at anemometer sites on ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbaum, F.; Moat, B. I.; Narita, Y.; Yelland, M. J.; Klemm, O.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Data from platforms, research vessels and merchant ships are used to estimate ocean CO2 uptake via parameterisations of the gas transfer velocity (k) and measurements of the difference between the partial pressures of CO2 in the ocean (pCO2 sw) and atmosphere (pCO2 atm) and of wind speed. Gas transfer velocities estimated using wind speed dependent parameterisations may be in error due to air flow distortion by the ship's hull and superstructure introducing biases into the measured wind speed. The effect of airflow distortion on estimates of the transfer velocity was examined by modelling the airflow around the three-dimensional geometries of the research vessels Hakuho Maru and Mirai, using the Large Eddy Simulation code GERRIS. For airflows within ±45° of the bow the maximum bias was +16%. For wind speed of 10 m s-1 to 15 m s-1, a +16% bias in wind speed would cause an overestimate in the calculated value of k of 30% to 50%, depending on which k parameterisation is used. This is due to the propagation of errors when using quadratic or cubic parameterisations. Recommendations for suitable anemometer locations on research vessels are given. The errors in transfer velocity may be much larger for typical merchant ships, as the anemometers are generally not as well-exposed as those on research vessels. Flow distortion may also introduce biases in the wind speed dependent k parameterisations themselves, since these are obtained by relating measurements of the CO2 flux to measurements of the wind speed and the CO2 concentration difference. To investigate this, flow distortion effects were estimated for three different platforms from which wind speed dependent parameterisations are published. The estimates ranged from -4% to +14% and showed that flow distortion may have a significant impact on wind speed dependent parameterisations. However, the wind biases are not large enough to explain the differences at high wind speeds in parameterisations which are based on eddy

  17. Uncertainties in wind speed dependent CO2 transfer velocities due to airflow distortion at anemometer sites on ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbaum, F.; Moat, B. I.; Narita, Y.; Yelland, M. J.; Klemm, O.; Uematsu, M.

    2009-09-01

    Data from research vessels and merchant ships are used to estimate ocean CO2 uptake via parameterizations of the gas transfer velocity (k) and measurements of the difference between the concentration of CO2 in the ocean (pCO2sw) and atmosphere (pCO2atm) and of wind speed. Gas transfer velocities estimated using wind speed dependent parameterisations may be in error due to air flow distortion by the ship's hull and superstructure introducing biases into the measured wind speed. The effect of airflow distortion on estimates of the transfer velocity was examined by modelling the airflow around the three-dimensional geometries of the research vessels Hakuho Maru and Mirai, using the Large Eddy Simulation code GERRIS. For airflows within ±45° of the bow the maximum bias was +16%. For wind speed of 10 m s-1 to 15 m s-1, a +16% bias in wind speed would cause an overestimate in the calculated value of k of 30% to 50%, depending on which k parameterisation is used. This is due to the propagation of errors when using quadratic or cubic parameterizations. Recommendations for suitable anemometer locations on research vessels are given. The errors in transfer velocity may be much larger for typical merchant ships, as the anemometers are generally not as well-exposed as those on research vessels. Flow distortion may also introduce biases in the wind speed dependent k parameterizations themselves, since these are obtained by relating measurements of the CO2 flux to measurements of the wind speed and the CO2 concentration difference. To investigate this, flow distortion effects were estimated for three different platforms from which wind speed dependent parameterizations are published. The estimates ranged from -4% to +14% and showed that flow distortion may have a significant impact on wind speed dependent parameterizations. However, the wind biases are not large enough to explain the differences at high wind speeds in parameterizations which are based on eddy covariance and

  18. Technique development for estimation of CO2 and CH4 concentration using radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Prabhunath; Rastogi, Shantanu; Singh, Rp; Panigrahy, S.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO _{2}) and methane (CH _{4}) are the well-known green house gases. Accurate spatially and temporally continuous estimation of these gases is essential for many environmental studies. Satellite observations provide important input in global monitoring of green house gases, and the area of scientific research which can help to reduce the uncertainty in measurement of trace gas concentration evolved rapidly. Spectral techniques are used to derive GHG concentration by developing the relation between satellite derived differential absorption indices with gaseous concentration. In the present work spectra were simulated to study the effect of different CO _{2} and CH _{4} concentration for estimation of atmospheric transmittances in the near infrared spectral region. Forward simulation was carried out using GUI based PcLnWin3.1 model. It uses calculations made by the FASCODE using HITRAN, molecular spectroscopic databases. It was found that for study of CO _{2} suitable spectral window is the 1.6 μm (6250 cm ^{-1}) band where there are two prominent absorptions at 1.576 μm (6348 cm ^{-1}) due to 2v _{1}+2v _{2}+v _{3} and 1.606 μm (6228 cm ^{-1}) due to v _{1}+4v _{2}+v _{3}. Of these 1.606 μm is dominant and more suitable. The suitable CH _{4} spectral window is 1.666 μm where although most of the P branch dissolves in water absorption but Q and R bands are sensitive and not affected by any other absorption. Optimum spectral resolution for correct determination of gas concentrations was found. It was observed from that the resolving power about 8000 (Δ λ ˜ 0.2 nm) is needed for detection of atmospheric CO _{2} and CH _{4} concentration at the 1.60 μm and 1.66 μm spectral region respectively.

  19. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  20. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  1. Effect of casting/mould interfacial heat transfer during solidification of aluminium alloys cast in CO2-sand mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. N.; Radhakrishna, D. K.

    2011-06-01

    The ability of heat to flow across the casting and through the interface from the casting to the mold directly affects the evolution of solidification and plays a notable role in determining the freezing conditions within the casting, mainly in foundry systems of high thermal diffusivity such as chill castings. An experimental procedure has been utilized to measure the formation process of an interfacial gap and metal-mould interfacial movement during solidification of hollow cylindrical castings of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand mould. Heat flow between the casting and the mould during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy in CO2-sand mould was assessed using an inverse modeling technique. The analysis yielded the interfacial heat flux ( q), heat transfer coefficient ( h) and the surface temperatures of the casting and the mould during solidification of the casting. The peak heat flux was incorporated as a dimensionless number and modeled as a function of the thermal diffusivities of the casting and the mould materials. Heat flux transients were normalized with respect to the peak heat flux and modeled as a function of time. The heat flux model proposed was to estimate the heat flux transients during solidification of Al-4.5 % Cu alloy cast in CO2-sand moulds.

  2. Electron-transfer sensitization of H2 oxidation and CO2 reduction catalysts using a single chromophore.

    PubMed

    La Porte, Nathan T; Moravec, Davis B; Hopkins, Michael D

    2014-07-01

    Energy-storing artificial-photosynthetic systems for CO2 reduction must derive the reducing equivalents from a renewable source rather than from sacrificial donors. To this end, a homogeneous, integrated chromophore/two-catalyst system is described that is thermodynamically capable of photochemically driving the energy-storing reverse water-gas shift reaction (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O), where the reducing equivalents are provided by renewable H2. The system consists of the chromophore zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP), H2 oxidation catalysts of the form [Cp(R)Cr(CO)3](-), and CO2 reduction catalysts of the type Re(bpy-4,4'-R2)(CO)3Cl. Using time-resolved spectroscopic methods, a comprehensive mechanistic and kinetic picture of the photoinitiated reactions of mixtures of these compounds has been developed. It has been found that absorption of a single photon by broadly absorbing ZnTPP sensitizes intercatalyst electron transfer to produce the substrate-active forms of each. The initial photochemical step is the heretofore unobserved reductive quenching of the low-energy T1 state of ZnTPP. Under the experimental conditions, the catalytically competent state decays with a second-order half-life of ∼15 μs, which is of the right magnitude for substrate trapping of sensitized catalyst intermediates.

  3. Electron-transfer sensitization of H2 oxidation and CO2 reduction catalysts using a single chromophore

    PubMed Central

    La Porte, Nathan T.; Moravec, Davis B.; Hopkins, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-storing artificial-photosynthetic systems for CO2 reduction must derive the reducing equivalents from a renewable source rather than from sacrificial donors. To this end, a homogeneous, integrated chromophore/two-catalyst system is described that is thermodynamically capable of photochemically driving the energy-storing reverse water–gas shift reaction (CO2 + H2 → CO + H2O), where the reducing equivalents are provided by renewable H2. The system consists of the chromophore zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP), H2 oxidation catalysts of the form [CpRCr(CO)3]–, and CO2 reduction catalysts of the type Re(bpy-4,4′-R2)(CO)3Cl. Using time-resolved spectroscopic methods, a comprehensive mechanistic and kinetic picture of the photoinitiated reactions of mixtures of these compounds has been developed. It has been found that absorption of a single photon by broadly absorbing ZnTPP sensitizes intercatalyst electron transfer to produce the substrate-active forms of each. The initial photochemical step is the heretofore unobserved reductive quenching of the low-energy T1 state of ZnTPP. Under the experimental conditions, the catalytically competent state decays with a second-order half-life of ∼15 μs, which is of the right magnitude for substrate trapping of sensitized catalyst intermediates. PMID:24961370

  4. High-power ultrasonic system for the enhancement of mass transfer in supercritical CO2 extraction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Enrique; Blanco, Alfonso; García, José; Benedito, José; Mulet, Antonio; Gallego-Juárez, Juan A.; Blasco, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Oil is an important component of almonds and other vegetable substrates that can show an influence on human health. In this work the development and validation of an innovative, robust, stable, reliable and efficient ultrasonic system at pilot scale to assist supercritical CO2 extraction of oils from different substrates is presented. In the extraction procedure ultrasonic energy represents an efficient way of producing deep agitation enhancing mass transfer processes because of some mechanisms (radiation pressure, streaming, agitation, high amplitude vibrations, etc.). A previous work to this research pointed out the feasibility of integrating an ultrasonic field inside a supercritical extractor without losing a significant volume fraction. This pioneer method enabled to accelerate mass transfer and then, improving supercritical extraction times. To commercially develop the new procedure fulfilling industrial requirements, a new configuration device has been designed, implemented, tested and successfully validated for supercritical fluid extraction of oil from different vegetable substrates.

  5. High-power ultrasonic system for the enhancement of mass transfer in supercritical CO2 extraction processes.

    PubMed

    Riera, Enrique; Blanco, Alfonso; García, José; Benedito, José; Mulet, Antonio; Gallego-Juárez, Juan A; Blasco, Miguel

    2010-02-01

    Oil is an important component of almonds and other vegetable substrates that can show an influence on human health. In this work the development and validation of an innovative, robust, stable, reliable and efficient ultrasonic system at pilot scale to assist supercritical CO(2) extraction of oils from different substrates is presented. In the extraction procedure ultrasonic energy represents an efficient way of producing deep agitation enhancing mass transfer processes because of some mechanisms (radiation pressure, streaming, agitation, high amplitude vibrations, etc.). A previous work to this research pointed out the feasibility of integrating an ultrasonic field inside a supercritical extractor without losing a significant volume fraction. This pioneer method enabled to accelerate mass transfer and then, improving supercritical extraction times. To commercially develop the new procedure fulfilling industrial requirements, a new configuration device has been designed, implemented, tested and successfully validated for supercritical fluid extraction of oil from different vegetable substrates.

  6. Experimental investigation of buoyancy effects on convection heat transfer of supercritical CO2 flow in a horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimizu, Katsuyoshi; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) turbulent flow were investigated experimentally in a horizontal circular pipe with an inner diameter of 8.7 mm. Local convection coefficients and Nusselt numbers of the flow were obtained at different locations along the pipe with a constant heat flux ranging from 16 to 64 kW/m2. Experiments were performed for fluid mass flow rate ranging from 0.011 to 0.017 kg/s, an inlet fluid temperature ranging from 24 to 28 °C, and a flow pressure ranging from 7.5 to 9.0 MPa to investigate their effects on the convection heat transfer in the pipe. Both enhancement as well as deterioration in the heat transfer coefficient was observed for the flow conditions examined in this work. Experimental results were then compared with the widely used empirical correlation for pipe flow. Three commonly used buoyancy parameters were utilized to investigate their applicability in the present test conditions. Results indicate that all the parameters show a strong presence of buoyancy effects in the present test conditions. The trend and magnitude of these parameters, however, do not agree with the trend and magnitude of heat transfer enhancement and deterioration along the pipe.

  7. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Brian J.; Miller, Scott D.

    2016-07-01

    Direct carbon dioxide flux measurements using eddy covariance from an icebreaker in the high-latitude Southern Ocean and Antarctic marginal ice zone are reported. Fluxes were combined with the measured water-air carbon dioxide partial pressure difference (ΔpCO2) to compute the air-sea gas transfer velocity (k, normalized to Schmidt number 660). The open water data showed a quadratic relationship between k (cm h-1) and the neutral 10 m wind speed (U10n, m s-1), kopen = 0.245 U10n2 + 1.3, in close agreement with decades old tracer-based results and much lower than cubic relationships inferred from previous open ocean eddy covariance studies. In the marginal ice zone, the effective gas transfer velocity decreased in proportion to sea ice cover, in contrast with predictions of enhanced gas exchange in the presence of sea ice. The combined open water and marginal ice zone results affect the calculated magnitude and spatial distribution of Southern Ocean carbon flux.

  8. Attempts To Catalyze the Electrochemical CO2-to-Methanol Conversion by Biomimetic 2e(-) + 2H(+) Transferring Molecules.

    PubMed

    Saveant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2016-01-27

    In the context of the electrochemical and photochemical conversion of CO2 to liquid fuels, one of the most important issues of contemporary energy and environmental issues, the possibility of pushing the reduction beyond the CO and formate level and catalytically generate products such as methanol is particularly attractive. Biomimetic 2e(-) + 2H(+) is often viewed as a potential hydride donor. This has been the object of a recent interesting attempt (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 14007) in which 6,7-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-2-mercaptopteridine was reported as a catalyst of the electrochemical conversion of CO2 to methanol and formate, based on cyclic voltammetric, (13)C NMR, IR, and GC analyses. After checking electrolysis at the reported potential and at a more negative potential to speed up the reaction, it appears, on (1)H NMR and gas chromatographic grounds, that there is neither catalysis nor methanol and nor formate production. (1)H NMR (with H2O presaturation) brings about an unambiguous answer to the eventual production of methanol and formate, much more so than (13)C NMR, which can even be misleading when no internal standard is used as in the above-mentioned paper. IR analysis is even less conclusive. Use of a GC technique with sufficient sensitivity confirmed the lack of methanol formation. The direct or indirect hydride transfer electrochemical reduction of CO2 to formate and to methanol remains an open question. Original ideas and efforts such as those discussed here are certainly worth tempting. However, in view of the importance of the stakes, it appears necessary to carefully check reports in this area.

  9. Vibrational energy transfer in CO2-C2H2n + 2 (n=0, 1, 2) mixtures from 220 to 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares I., Carlos; Pinzon, Hernando; Fumero, Juan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Sanchez, Eugenio

    1983-05-01

    Time resolved laser induced infrared fluorescence studies have been performed to obtain the rate constants of energy transfer of CO2 (ν3) in mixtures with C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 at temperatures between 220 and 300 K. A pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser light has been used to directly excite the CO2 molecules at low temperatures. The CO2 self-relaxation was measured and the results are in agreement with previous measurements. The rate constants for the transfer of energy in the CO2-C2H2 system show normal temperature behavior, (rate constant increases as the temperature increases) associated with large energy defect and caused by short-range repulsive forces. The rate constants for the systems CO2-C2H4 and CO2-C2H6 show an inverse temperature effect, (rate constant increases as the temperature decreases) associated with near resonant energy exchange and long-range attractive forces between the molecules. The observed behavior with temperature for the three systems is explained using a Morse potential which includes repulsive and attractive terms to describe the interaction between the molecules and a probability expression formulated by H. K. Shin, to calculate the energy transfer probabilities of some important reactions considered for each system.

  10. Spin-transfer switching in full-Heusler Co2FeAl-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Wen, Zhenchao; Kondou, Kouta; Kasai, Shinya; Mitani, Seiji; Inomata, Koichiro

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrated spin-transfer magnetization switching using magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a full-Heusler alloy Co2FeAl (CFA). We prepared CFA (1.5 nm)/MgO/CoFe (4 nm) ("CFA-free") and CFA (30 nm)/MgO/CoFeB (2 nm) ("CFA-reference") MTJs on a Cr(001) layer. The intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) of the CFA-free (CFA-reference) MTJ was 29 MA/cm2 (7.1 MA/cm2). The larger Jc0 of the CFA-free MTJ is attributed to the significant enhancement of the Gilbert damping factor (˜0.04) of the CFA due to the Cr layer. The Jc0 of the CFA-reference is as small as that reported for typical CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs.

  11. Spin Transfer Torque Switching and Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in Full Heusler Alloy Co2FeAl-BASED Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, H.; Wen, Z. C.; Kasai, S.; Inomata, K.; Mitani, S.

    2014-12-01

    Some of Co-based full Heusler alloys have remarkable properties in spintronics, that is, high spin polarization of conduction electrons and low magnetic damping. Owing to these properties, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using Co-based full Heusler alloys are potentially of particular importance for spintronic application such as magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAMs). Recently, we have first demonstrated spin transfer torque (STT) switching and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which are required for developing high-density MRAMs, in full-Heusler Co2FeAl alloy-based MTJs. In this review, the main results of the experimental demonstrations are shown with referring to related issues, and the prospect of MTJs using Heusler alloys is also discussed.

  12. Assessment of the Brain's Macro- and Micro-Circulatory Blood Flow Responses to CO2 via Transfer Function Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin W.-D.; Österreich, Mareike; Müller, Andreas; Lygeros, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: At present, there is no standard bedside method for assessing cerebral autoregulation (CA) with high temporal resolution. We combined the two methods most commonly used for this purpose, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD, macro-circulation level), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, micro-circulation level), in an attempt to identify the most promising approach. Methods: In eight healthy subjects (5 women; mean age, 38 ± 10 years), CA disturbance was achieved by adding carbon dioxide (CO2) to the breathing air. We simultaneously recorded end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), blood pressure (BP; non-invasively at the fingertip), and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in both middle cerebral arteries using TCD and determined oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin levels using NIRS. For the analysis, we used transfer function calculations in the low-frequency band (0.07–0.15 Hz) to compare BP–CBFV, BP–oxygenated hemoglobin (OxHb), BP–tissue oxygenation index (TOI), CBFV–OxHb, and CBFV–TOI. Results: ETCO2 increased from 37 ± 2 to 44 ± 3 mmHg. The CO2-induced CBFV increase significantly correlated with the OxHb increase (R2 = 0.526, p < 0.001). Compared with baseline, the mean CO2 administration phase shift (in radians) significantly increased (p < 0.005) from –0.67 ± 0.20 to –0.51 ± 0.25 in the BP–CBFV system, and decreased from 1.21 ± 0.81 to −0.05 ± 0.91 in the CBFV–OxHb system, and from 0.94 ± 1.22 to −0.24 ± 1.0 in the CBFV–TOI system; no change was observed for BP–OxHb (0.38 ± 1.17 to 0.41 ± 1.42). Gain changed significantly only in the BP–CBFV system. The correlation between the ETCO2 change and phase change was higher in the CBFV–OxHb system [r = −0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.16, −0.84; p < 0.01] than in the BP–CBFV system (r = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.08; p < 0.05). Conclusion: The transfer function characterizes the blood flow transition from macro- to micro-circulation by time delay only. The CBFV

  13. Observational Studies of Parameters Influencing Air-sea Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimpf, U.; Frew, N. M.; Bock, E. J.; Hara, T.; Garbe, C. S.; Jaehne, B.

    A physically-based modeling of the air-sea gas transfer that can be used to predict the gas transfer rates with sufficient accuracy as a function of micrometeorological parameters is still lacking. State of the art are still simple gas transfer rate/wind speed relationships. Previous measurements from Coastal Ocean Experiment in the Atlantic revealed positive correlations between mean square slope, near surface turbulent dis- sipation, and wind stress. It also demonstrated a strong negative correlation between mean square slope and the fluorescence of surface-enriched colored dissolved organic matter. Using heat as a proxy tracer for gases the exchange process at the air/water interface and the micro turbulence at the water surface can be investigated. The anal- ysis of infrared image sequences allow the determination of the net heat flux at the ocean surface, the temperature gradient across the air/sea interface and thus the heat transfer velocity and gas transfer velocity respectively. Laboratory studies were carried out in the new Heidelberg wind-wave facility AELOTRON. Direct measurements of the Schmidt number exponent were done in conjunction with classical mass balance methods to estimate the transfer velocity. The laboratory results allowed to validate the basic assumptions of the so called controlled flux technique by applying differ- ent tracers for the gas exchange in a large Schmidt number regime. Thus a modeling of the Schmidt number exponent is able to fill the gap between laboratory and field measurements field. Both, the results from the laboratory and the field measurements should be able to give a further understanding of the mechanisms controlling the trans- port processes across the aqueous boundary layer and to relate the forcing functions to parameters measured by remote sensing.

  14. Air-Sea Interactions in CLIMODE: In-Situ Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigorre, S.; Weller, R.

    2006-12-01

    The subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic or Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is an important component of the oceanic circulation. Its formation and evolution are linked to fundamental aspects of the oceanic climate. A central formation process involves the subduction of surface water through air-sea interactions. Conditions for this are ideal in the Gulf Stream region when warm water interacts with cold air above, sinks and is trapped in the late winter, thereby ventilating the interior. The study program CLIvar MOde Water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE), sponsored by NSF, is designed to quantify and understand which processes lead to the formation and dissipation of EDW. A key component to this goal is the knowledge of buoyancy fluxes in the region of EDW formation. The Upper Ocean Processes (UOP) group deployed a 3-m discus buoy anchored in the Gulf Stream (64W, 38N) in November 2005. Oceanographic instruments collect data along the mooring line while meteorological and surface sensors are placed on the buoy and collect data every minute. Since the deployment, hourly averages of the meteorological data were transmitted through the Argos satellite system. These data were plugged in the TOGA-COARE bulk algorithm to estimate air-sea fluxes. These preliminary results are presented, while the full dataset will be analyzed after recovery of the buoy in November 2006. Heat fluxes estimates indicate high heat loss events. In December 2005, regular losses larger than 1000W/m2 occurred. These heat loss events are associated with cold air outbreaks. When the air-sea temperature gradient increases, winds also tend to increase indicating a destabilization of the boundary layer and production of turbulence, enhancing further the heat transfer. As the air-sea temperature gradient decreases in the late winter, heat loss also decreases. The SST signal is seen to modulate the heat fluxes on lower frequencies than air temperature changes. This kind of signal tends therefore to be

  15. Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution and intermolecular energy transfer of benzene in supercritical CO 2: measurements from the gas phase up to liquid densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Benten, R.; Charvat, A.; Link, O.; Abel, B.; Schwarzer, D.

    2004-03-01

    Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy was employed to measure intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and intermolecular vibrational energy transfer (VET) of benzene in the gas phase and in supercritical (sc) CO 2. We observe two IVR time scales the faster of which proceeds within τ IVR(1)<0.5 ps. The slower IVR component has a time constant of τ IVR(2)=(48±5) ps in the gas phase and in scCO 2 is accelerated by interactions with the solvent. At the highest CO 2 density it is reduced to τ IVR(2)=(6±1) ps. The corresponding IVR rate constants show a similar density dependence as the VET rate constants. Model calculations suggest that both quantities correlate with the local CO 2 density in the immediate surrounding of the benzene molecule.

  16. Using a laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analyser to investigate gas transfer in geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, S.; Pili, E.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-05-01

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analysis provides continuous measurement at high temporal resolution and is a promising alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We performed a thorough assessment of a commercially available CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyser (CCIA DLT-100, Los Gatos Research) that allows in situ measurement of δ 13C in CO2. Using a set of reference gases of known CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition, we evaluated the precision, long-term stability, temperature sensitivity and concentration dependence of the analyser. Despite good precision calculated from Allan variance (5.0 ppm for CO2 concentration, and 0.05 ‰ for δ 13C at 60 s averaging), real performances are altered by two main sources of error: temperature sensitivity and dependence of δ 13C on CO2 concentration. Data processing is required to correct for these errors. Following application of these corrections, we achieve an accuracy of 8.7 ppm for CO2 concentration and 1.3 ‰ for δ 13C, which is worse compared to mass spectrometry performance, but still allowing field applications. With this portable analyser we measured CO2 flux degassed from rock in an underground tunnel. The obtained carbon isotopic composition agrees with IRMS measurement, and can be used to identify the carbon source.

  17. Two-center interference effects in (e, 2e) ionization of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Nakajima, Isao; Satoh, Hironori; Watanabe, Noboru; Jones, Darryl; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in understanding quantum mechanical interference effects in molecular ionization. Since this interference appears as a consequence of coherent electron emission from the different molecular centers, it should depend strongly on the nature of the ionized molecular orbital. Such molecular orbital patterns can be investigated by means of binary (e, 2e) spectroscopy, which is a kinematically-complete electron-impact ionization experiment performed under the high-energy Bethe ridge conditions. In this study, two-center interference effects in the (e, 2e) cross sections of H2 and CO2 at large momentum transfer are demonstrated with a high-statistics experiment, in order to elucidate the relationship between molecular orbital patterns and the interference structure. It is shown that the two-center interference is highly sensitive to the phase, spatial pattern, symmetry of constituent atomic orbital, and chemical bonding nature of the molecular orbital. This work was partially supported by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (S) (No. 20225001) and for Young Scientists (B) (No. 21750005) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  18. Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients for H2, N2, CO and CO2 incident upon spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S. R.; Hoffbauer, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients were made for gas-surface interactions between the Space Shuttle reaction control jet plume gases and the solar panel array materials to be used on the International Space Station. Actual conditions were simulated using a supersonic nozzle source to produce beams of the gases with approximately the same average velocities as the gases have in the Shuttle plumes. Samples of the actual solar panel materials were mounted on a torsion balance that was used to measure the force exerted on the surfaces by the molecular beams. Measurements were made with H2, N2, CO, and CO2 incident upon the solar array material, Kapton, SiO2-coated Kapton, and Z93-coated Al. The measurements showed that molecules scatter from the surfaces more specularly as the angle of incidence increases and that scattering behavior has a strong dependence upon both the incident gas and velocity. These results show that for some technical surfaces the simple assumption of diffuse scattering with complete thermal accommodation is entirely inadequate. It is clear that additional measurements are required to produce models that more accurately describe the gas-surface interactions encountered in rarefied flow regimes.

  19. Measurement of Momentum Transfer Coefficients for H2, N2, CO, and CO2 Incident Upon Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Steven R.; Hoffbauer, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of momentum transfer coefficients were made for gas-surface interactions between the Space Shuttle reaction control jet plume gases and the solar panel array materials to be used on the International Space Station. Actual conditions were simulated using a supersonic nozzle source to produce beams of the gases with approximately the same average velocities as the gases have in the Shuttle plumes. Samples of the actual solar panel materials were mounted on a torsion balance that was used to measure the force exerted on the surfaces by the molecular beams. Measurements were made with H2, N2, CO, and CO2 incident upon the solar array material, Kapton, SiO2-coated Kapton, and Z93-coated Al. The measurements showed that molecules scatter from the surfaces more specularly as the angle of incidence increases and that the scattering behavior has a strong dependence upon both the incident gas and velocity. These results show that for some technical surfaces the simple assumption of diffuse scattering with complete thermal accommodation is entirely inadequate. It is clear that additional measurements are required to produce models that more accurately describe the gas-surface interactions encountered in rarefied flow regimes.

  20. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  1. Combining Experiments and Simulation of Gas Absorption for Teaching Mass Transfer Fundamentals: Removing CO2 from Air Using Water and NaOH

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, William M.; Jackson, Yaminah Z.; Morin, Michael T.; Ferraro, Giacomo P.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and computer models for studying the mass transfer process of removing CO2 from air using water or dilute NaOH solution as absorbent are presented. Models tie experiment to theory and give a visual representation of concentration profiles and also illustrate the two-film theory and the relative importance of various…

  2. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  3. Research on a middle infrared and long infrared dual-band laser based on energy transferring from DF (v) to CO2 (0000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei; Yuan, Shengfu; Sun, Xu

    2013-05-01

    We propose a continuous wave (CW) middle infrared (MIR) and long infrared (LIR) dual-band laser based on energy transferring from DF (v) to CO2(0000). A total output power of 5W is achieved by the proposed dual-band laser consisted of DF gain medium module (DF module) and DF-CO2 gain medium module (DF-CO2 module). Technologies about the gain peak position, beam qualification are analyzed. The two modules use a common stable resonator and output mirror with nominal transmissivities of 3.5%-5% in the MIR band and 6%-10% in the LIR band. Spectra of dual-band laser are acquired.

  4. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial mixed layer depth and strength of the stratification that essentially set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the mixed layer. In oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean to form cold wakes which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture transfers are available through the enthalpy fluxes (typically 1 to 1.5 kW m-2) into the hurricane boundary layer. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions, tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina, Rita and Wilma in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. Thus, to constrain these models, having complete 3-D ocean profiles juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements prior, during and subsequent to passage is an absolute necessity framed within regional scale satellite derived fields.

  5. Simple approximation of total emissivity of CO2-H2O mixture used in the zonal method of calculation of heat transfer by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisienko, V. G.; Malikov, G. K.; Titaev, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents a new simple-to-use expression to calculate the total emissivity of a mixture of gases CO2 and H2O used for modeling heat transfer by radiation in industrial furnaces. The accuracy of this expression is evaluated using the exponential wide band model. It is found that the time taken to calculate the total emissivity in this expression is 1.5 times less than in other approximation methods.

  6. Off-On-Off fluorescence behavior of an intramolecular charge transfer probe toward anions and CO2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rashid; Razi, Syed S; Shahid, Mohammad; Srivastava, Priyanka; Misra, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    The photophysical behavior of a newly developed fluorescent probe, tricyanoethylphenyl phenanthroimidazole (TCPPI) has been studied. Upon interaction of different class of anions TCPPI displayed naked-eye sensitive fluorescence "turn-on" response to detect selectively F(-) (0.98μM, 18.62ppb) and CN(-) (1.12μM, 29.12ppb) anions in acetonitrile (MeCN). Job's plot analysis revealed a 1:1 binding stoichiometry between probe and anions. The spectral data analysis and 1H NMR titration studies suggested about the affinity of F(-) and CN(-) anions with moderately acidic -NH fragment of imidazolyl unit of probe through deprotonation and H-bonding interaction. Moreover, the anion activated probe upon interaction with CO2 revived photophysical properties of probe, "On-Off-On" type fluorescence and enabled anion-induced CO2 sensing in the medium. PMID:27267280

  7. Off-On-Off fluorescence behavior of an intramolecular charge transfer probe toward anions and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Rashid; Razi, Syed S.; Shahid, Mohammad; Srivastava, Priyanka; Misra, Arvind

    2016-11-01

    The photophysical behavior of a newly developed fluorescent probe, tricyanoethylphenyl phenanthroimidazole (TCPPI) has been studied. Upon interaction of different class of anions TCPPI displayed naked-eye sensitive fluorescence "turn-on" response to detect selectively F- (0.98 μM, 18.62 ppb) and CN- (1.12 μM, 29.12 ppb) anions in acetonitrile (MeCN). Job's plot analysis revealed a 1:1 binding stoichiometry between probe and anions. The spectral data analysis and 1H NMR titration studies suggested about the affinity of F- and CN- anions with moderately acidic - NH fragment of imidazolyl unit of probe through deprotonation and H-bonding interaction. Moreover, the anion activated probe upon interaction with CO2 revived photophysical properties of probe, "On-Off-On" type fluorescence and enabled anion-induced CO2 sensing in the medium.

  8. A Contribution for the Simulation of VUV-IR Radiation Transfer in CO2-N2 Entry Flows Using a Line-By-Line Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lino da Silva, M.

    2011-02-01

    Departing from the proposed Test-Case 3 for the simulation of Martian atmospheric entry radiative transfer, we present several simulations carried out using a full line-by-line spectral simulation, ranging from VUV to IR. Namely, the radiation of CO2 Infrared transitions are treated using a two-temperature (T,Tv) line-by-line model. Several calculations are presented which showcase the ability to solve the uncoupled radiative transfer problem (Heat transfer towards a spacecraft thermal protections) in a timely fashion, using a 8-core, 32GB RAM Linux Debian machine. In these calculations, different criteria are evaluated (1T vs. 2T models; different line-by-line spectral grid parameters; different spatial grids for radiative transfer) which allow determining their inpact on the overall predicted wall fluxes.

  9. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  10. Using eddy covariance to estimate air–sea gas transfer velocity for oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Air-sea gas transfer velocity for O2 is calculated using directly measured fluxes with the eddy covariance technique. It is a direct method and is frequently used to determine fluxes of heat, humidity, and CO2, but has not previously been used to estimate transfer velocities for O2, using atmospheric eddy covariance data. The measured O2 fluxes are upward directed, in agreement with the measured air-sea gradient of the O2 concentration, and opposite to the direction of the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes. The transfer velocities estimated from measurements are compared with prominent wind speed parameterizations of the transfer velocity for CO2 and O2, previously established from various measurement techniques. Our result indicates stronger wind speed dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2 starting at intermediate wind speeds. This stronger wind speed dependence appears to coincide with the onset of whitecap formation in the flux footprint and the strong curvature of a cubic wind-dependent function for the transfer velocity provides the best fit to the data. Additional data using the measured O2 flux and an indirect method (based on the Photosynthetic Quotient) to estimate oxygen concentration in water, support the stronger wind dependence for the transfer velocity of O2 compared to CO2.

  11. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  12. Regulation of CO2 Air Sea Fluxes by Sediments in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Pätsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nicola; Salt, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    A multi-tracer approach is applied to assess the impact of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) on the acid-base buffering capacity, and overall biogeochemistry, of the North Sea. Analyses of both basin-wide observations in the North Sea and transects through tidal basins at the North-Frisian coastline, reveal that surface distributions of the δ13C signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are predominantly controlled by a balance between biological production and respiration. In particular, variability in metabolic DIC throughout stations in the well-mixed southern North Sea indicates the presence of an external carbon source, which is traced to the European continental coastline using naturally-occurring radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra). 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (AT) compared to the more conventional use of salinity. Coastal inputs of metabolic DIC and AT are calculated on a basin-wide scale, and ratios of these inputs suggest denitrification as a primary metabolic pathway for their formation. The AT input paralleling the metabolic DIC release prevents a significant decline in pH as compared to aerobic (i.e. unbuffered) release of metabolic DIC. Finally, long-term pH trends mimic those of riverine nitrate loading, highlighting the importance of coastal AT production via denitrification in regulating pH in the southern North Sea.

  13. Developments in Airborne Oceanography and Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. K.

    2014-12-01

    , just as aircraft carriers "project force". Now we can measure winds, waves, temperatures, currents, radiative transfer, images and air-sea fluxes from aircraft over the ocean.I will review some of the history of airborne oceanography and present examples of how it can extend our knowledge and understanding of air-sea interaction.

  14. Distribution and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide on the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Repina, I. A.; Dudarev, O. V.; Charkin, A. N.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of long-term studies of the dynamics of carbonate parameters and air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes on the Chukchi Sea shelf during the summer. As a result of the interaction of physical and biological factors, the surface waters on the west of Chukchi Sea were undersaturated with carbon dioxide when compared with atmospheric air; the partial pressure of CO2 varied in the range from 134 to 359 μatm. The average value of CO2 flux in the Chukchi Sea per unit area varied in the range from-2.4 to-22.0 mmol /(m2 day), which is significantly higher than the average value of CO2 flux in the World Ocean. It has been estimated that the minimal mass of C absorbed by the surface of Chukchi Sea from the atmosphere during ice-free season is 13 × 1012 g; a great part of this carbon is transported to the deeper layers of sea and isolated from the atmosphere for a long period of time. The studies of the carbonate system of the Chukchi Sea, especially of its western part, will provide some new data on the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Arctic Ocean and their changes. Our analysis can be used for an interpretation of the satellite assessment of CO2 fluxes and dissolved CO2 distribution in the upper layers of the ocean.

  15. On the Global Oxygen Anomaly and Air-Sea Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hernan E.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2001-01-01

    A new climatology of monthly air-sea oxygen fluxes throughout the ice-free surface global ocean is presented. The climatology is based on weighted linear least squares regressions using heat flux monthly anomalies for spatial and temporal interpolation of historical O2 data. The seasonal oceanic variations show that the tropical belt (20 S - 20 N) is characterized by relatively small air-sea fluxes when compared to the middle to high latitudes (40 deg - 70 deg). The largest and lowest seasonal fluxes occur during summer and winter in both hemispheres. By means of an atmospheric transport model we show that our climatology is in better agreement with the observed amplitude and phasing of the variations in atmospheric O2/N2 ratios because of seasonal air-sea exchanges at baseline stations in the Pacific Ocean than with previous air-sea O2 climatologies. Our study indicates that the component of the air-sea O2 flux that correlates with heat flux dominates the large-scale air-sea O2 exchange on seasonal timescales. The contribution of each major oceanic basin to the atmospheric observations is described. The seasonal net thermal (SNO(sub T)) and biological (SNO(sub B)) outgassing components of the flux are examined in relation to latitudinal bands, basin-wide, and hemispheric contributions. The Southern Hemisphere's SNO(sub B) (approximately 0.26 Pmol) and SNO(sub T) (approximately 0.29 Pmol) values are larger than the Northern Hemisphere's SNO(sub B) (approximately 0.15 Pmol) and SNO(sub T) (approximately 0.16 Pmol) values (1 Pmol = 10(exp 15) mol). We estimate a global extratropical carbon new production during the outgassing season of 3.7 Pg C (1 Pg = 10(exp 15) g), lower than previous estimates with air-sea O2 climatologies.

  16. Parity-Dependent Rotational Energy Transfer in CN(A2Π, ν = 4, jF1ε) + N2, O2, and CO2 Collisions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report state-resolved total removal cross sections and state-to-state rotational energy transfer (RET) cross sections for collisions of CN(A2Π, ν = 4, jF1ε) with N2, O2, and CO2. CN(X2Σ+) was produced by 266 nm photolysis of ICN in a thermal bath (296 K) of the collider gas. A circularly polarized pulse from a dye laser prepared CN(A2Π, ν = 4) in a range of F1e rotational states, j = 2.5, 3.5, 6.5, 11.5, 13.5, and 18.5. These prepared states were monitored using the circularly polarized output of an external cavity diode laser by frequency-modulated (FM) spectroscopy on the CN(A–X)(4,2) band. The FM Doppler profiles were analyzed as a function of pump–probe delay to determine the time dependence of the population of the initially prepared states. Kinetic analysis of the resulting time dependences was used to determine total removal cross sections from the initially prepared levels. In addition, a range of j′ F1e and j′ F2f product states resulting from rotational energy transfer out of the j = 6.5 F1e initial state were probed, from which state-to-state RET cross sections were measured. The total removal cross sections lie in the order CO2 > N2 > O2, with evidence for substantial cross sections for electronic and/or reactive quenching of CN(A, ν = 4) to unobserved products with CO2 and O2. This is supported by the magnitude of the state-to-state RET cross sections, where a deficit of transferred population is apparent for CO2 and O2. A strong propensity for conservation of rotational parity in RET is observed for all three colliders. Spin–orbit-changing cross sections are approximately half of those of the respective conserving cross sections. These results are in marked disagreement with previous experimental observations with N2 as a collider but are in good agreement with quantum scattering calculations from the same study (Khachatrian et al. J. Phys. Chem. A2009, 113, 392219215110). Our results with CO2 as a collider are similarly in strong

  17. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat-transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 degrees/F degrees on-axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 degrees upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from zero to 20 degrees in 4 degree increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real-gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three-dimensional 'parabolized Navier-Stokes' equations.

  18. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 deg/7 deg on axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 deg upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from 0 to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Origin of the Red Shift for the Lowest Singlet π → π* Charge-Transfer Absorption of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marcelo; Rivelino, Roberto; Canuto, Sylvio

    2014-04-01

    The origin of the unusual solvatochromic shift of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) is theoretically investigated on the basis of experimental data. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been employed to unveil the interaction of CO2 with this archetypical molecule. It is demonstrated that the nitro group of PNA works as an electron-donating site binding to the electron-deficient carbon atom of CO2, most probably via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Moreover, a cooperative C-H···O hydrogen bond seems to act as an additional stabilizing source during the solvation process of PNA in SCCO2. To support the influence of solute-solvent specific interactions on the lowest singlet π → π* charge-transfer excitation, we perform a sequential Monte Carlo time-dependent density functional theory simulation to evaluate the excited states of PNA in SCCO2 (T = 315 K, ρ = 0.81 g/cm(3)). A critical assessment of this simulation, compared to calculations carried out within the polarized continuum model, gives strong evidence that our proposed complexes are important in describing the solvatochromic shift of PNA in SCCO2. The calculated red shift from the gas phase accounts for 66% to 80% (depending on the degree of complexation) of the experimental data. Finally, these results also alleviate possible failures commonly attributed to long-range corrected functionals in reproducing the solvatochromism of PNA.

  20. Origin of the Red Shift for the Lowest Singlet π → π* Charge-Transfer Absorption of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marcelo; Rivelino, Roberto; Canuto, Sylvio

    2014-04-01

    The origin of the unusual solvatochromic shift of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) is theoretically investigated on the basis of experimental data. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been employed to unveil the interaction of CO2 with this archetypical molecule. It is demonstrated that the nitro group of PNA works as an electron-donating site binding to the electron-deficient carbon atom of CO2, most probably via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Moreover, a cooperative C-H···O hydrogen bond seems to act as an additional stabilizing source during the solvation process of PNA in SCCO2. To support the influence of solute-solvent specific interactions on the lowest singlet π → π* charge-transfer excitation, we perform a sequential Monte Carlo time-dependent density functional theory simulation to evaluate the excited states of PNA in SCCO2 (T = 315 K, ρ = 0.81 g/cm(3)). A critical assessment of this simulation, compared to calculations carried out within the polarized continuum model, gives strong evidence that our proposed complexes are important in describing the solvatochromic shift of PNA in SCCO2. The calculated red shift from the gas phase accounts for 66% to 80% (depending on the degree of complexation) of the experimental data. Finally, these results also alleviate possible failures commonly attributed to long-range corrected functionals in reproducing the solvatochromism of PNA. PMID:26580369

  1. New research initiative on air sea interaction in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Leethorp, A.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.

    1994-12-31

    Recent statistical results have demonstrated that the oceanic environment of Southern Africa plays a important regulating role in the climate of the subcontinent. Statistical teleconnections between oceanic temperature anomalies and precipitation over South Africa`s summer rainfall region have been demonstrated, even to the extent of being partially implicated in catastrophic floods. A research program to investigate the interaction between ocean and atmosphere in those ocean areas that have been identified as crucial to Southern Africa climate and rainfall has just started. The first step of this program was to set up a state of the art air-sea interaction measurement system aboard the antarctic research vessel S.A. Agulhas. The second step of the program was to install low cost automatic air sea interaction measurement systems on three research vessels which will provide an extensive database for air-sea interaction studies.

  2. Transferable force-field for modelling of CO2, N2, O2 and Ar in all silica and Na+ exchanged zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujić, Bojan; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new force field for modelling of adsorption of CO2, N2, O2 and Ar in all silica and Na+ exchanged Si-Al zeolites. The force field has a standard molecular-mechanical functional form with electrostatic and Lennard-Jones interactions satisfying Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules and thus has a potential for further extension in terms of new molecular types. The parameters for the zeolite framework atom types are optimized by an iterative procedure minimizing the difference with experimental adsorption data for a number of different zeolite structures and Si:Al ratios. The new force field shows a good agreement with available experimental data including those not used in the optimization procedure, and which also shows a reasonable transferability within different zeolite topologies. We suggest a potential usage in screening of different zeolite structures for carbon capture and storage process, and more generally, for separation of other gases.

  3. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  4. Air-sea interactions and precipitation over the tropical oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, C.

    1992-01-01

    In this lecture, the author principally discusses air-sea exchanges that are relevant to climate and global problems. The processes of interest are those acting over time scales of months to decades, which in some instances are influenced by smaller-time-scale processes, down to the diurnal time scale. The repsective influence of these processes varies with regions, seasons and scales over which they occur and, because these processes are mostly nonlinear, scale interactions can be quite complex. Owing to the breadth of the topic addressed, the discussion is mostly focused on the tropical regions where air-sea interactions and precipitation processes eventually affect the entire globe. This allows a look in more detail at some air-sea processes, such as those associated with the El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO). This oscillation, which affects the climate of the entire globe, acts over periods of a year or longer and is caused, primarily, by sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the tropical Pacific. As a result, SST variability is often used as an indicator of coupled ocean-atmosphere low-frequency variability. Global or basin scale processes can uniquely be observed from space-born instruments with the coverage required. Space based techniques have been developed during the last decade which can now be used to illustrate the scientific issues presented and the presentation concludes with an overview of some Earth Observing System (EOS) capabilities for addressing air-sea interactions and hydrology issues.

  5. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  6. Net uptake of atmospheric CO2 by coastal submerged aquatic vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Tokoro, Tatsuki; Hosokawa, Shinya; Miyoshi, Eiichi; Tada, Kazufumi; Watanabe, Kenta; Montani, Shigeru; Kayanne, Hajime; Kuwae, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    ‘Blue Carbon’, which is carbon captured by marine living organisms, has recently been highlighted as a new option for climate change mitigation initiatives. In particular, coastal ecosystems have been recognized as significant carbon stocks because of their high burial rates and long-term sequestration of carbon. However, the direct contribution of Blue Carbon to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 through air-sea gas exchange remains unclear. We performed in situ measurements of carbon flows, including air-sea CO2 fluxes, dissolved inorganic carbon changes, net ecosystem production, and carbon burial rates in the boreal (Furen), temperate (Kurihama), and subtropical (Fukido) seagrass meadows of Japan from 2010 to 2013. In particular, the air-sea CO2 flux was measured using three methods: the bulk formula method, the floating chamber method, and the eddy covariance method. Our empirical results show that submerged autotrophic vegetation in shallow coastal waters can be functionally a sink for atmospheric CO2. This finding is contrary to the conventional perception that most near-shore ecosystems are sources of atmospheric CO2. The key factor determining whether or not coastal ecosystems directly decrease the concentration of atmospheric CO2 may be net ecosystem production. This study thus identifies a new ecosystem function of coastal vegetated systems; they are direct sinks of atmospheric CO2. PMID:24623530

  7. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  8. Selective on/off switching at room temperature of a magnetic bistable {Fe2Co2} complex with single crystal-to-single crystal transformation via intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Tao, Jun; Gao, Qian; Liu, Tao; Xia, Zhengcai; Li, Dongfeng

    2014-02-18

    A cyano-bridged {Fe2Co2} complex shows reversible single crystal-to-single crystal transformation between diamagnetic and paramagnetic states switched specifically by losing and absorbing methanol at room temperature in the solid state. And the solvent loss form presents temperature- and pressure-induced intramolecular electron transfer behaviour.

  9. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  10. Ab Initio and DFT Studies on CO2 Interacting with Zn(q+)-Imidazole (q=0, 1, 2) Complexes: Prediction of Charge Transfer through σ- or π-Type Models.

    PubMed

    Boulmene, Reda; Boussouf, Karim; Prakash, Muthuramalingam; Komiha, Najia; Al-Mogren, Muneerah M; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-04-01

    Using first-principles methodologies, the equilibrium structures and the relative stability of CO2 @[Zn(q+) Im] (where q=0, 1, 2; Im=imidazole) complexes are studied to understand the nature of the interactions between the CO2 and Zn(q+) -imidazole entities. These complexes are considered as prototype models mimicking the interactions of CO2 with these subunits of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks or Zn enzymes. These computations are performed using both ab initio calculations and density functional theory. Dispersion effects accounting for long-range interactions are considered. Solvent (water) effects were also considered using a polarizable continuum model approach. Natural bond orbital, charge, frontier orbital and vibrational analyses clearly reveal the occurrence of charge transfer through covalent and noncovalent interactions. Moreover, it is found that CO2 can adsorb through more favorable π-type stacking as well as σ-type hydrogen-bonding interactions. The inter-monomer interaction potentials show a significant anisotropy that might induce CO2 orientation and site-selectivity effects in porous materials and in active sites of Zn enzymes. Hence, this study provides valuable information about how CO2 adsorption takes place at the microscopic level within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and biomolecules. These findings might help in understanding the role of such complexes in chemistry, biology and material science for further development of new materials and industrial applications. PMID:26790137

  11. Ocean Winds and Turbulent Air-Sea Fluxes Inferred From Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.; Gille, Sarah T.; Jackson, Daren L.; Roberts, J. Brent; Wick, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-sea turbulent fluxes determine the exchange of momentum, heat, freshwater, and gas between the atmosphere and ocean. These exchange processes are critical to a broad range of research questions spanning length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers and time scales from hours to decades. Examples are discussed (section 2). The estimation of surface turbulent fluxes from satellite is challenging and fraught with considerable errors (section 3); however, recent developments in retrievals (section 3) will greatly reduce these errors. Goals for the future observing system are summarized in section 4. Surface fluxes are defined as the rate per unit area at which something (e.g., momentum, energy, moisture, or CO Z ) is transferred across the air/sea interface. Wind- and buoyancy-driven surface fluxes are called surface turbulent fluxes because the mixing and transport are due to turbulence. Examples of nonturbulent processes are radiative fluxes (e.g., solar radiation) and precipitation (Schmitt et al., 2010). Turbulent fluxes are strongly dependent on wind speed; therefore, observations of wind speed are critical for the calculation of all turbulent surface fluxes. Wind stress, the vertical transport of horizontal momentum, also depends on wind direction. Stress is very important for many ocean processes, including upper ocean currents (Dohan and Maximenko, 2010) and deep ocean currents (Lee et al., 2010). On short time scales, this horizontal transport is usually small compared to surface fluxes. For long-term processes, transport can be very important but again is usually small compared to surface fluxes.

  12. Carbon Isotope Composition of Caribbean Sea Surface Waters: Response to the Uptake of Anthropogenic CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. E.; Thunell, R.; Wejnert, K. E.; Astor, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuels and deforestation have significantly increased atmospheric CO2 levels, from ~280 ppm prior to the industrial revolution to the present value of ~390 ppm. Suess (1955) was the first to show that the carbon isotopic composition of the atmosphere is changing in response to the anthropogenic input of radiocarbon-dead, 13C depleted CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. While biological processes may be the primary mechanism controlling the δ13C of marine carbon, air-sea gas exchange should allow for the transfer of the so-called 13C Suess effect (Keeling, 1979) from the atmosphere to the surface ocean. The first measurements of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon of ocean surface waters were made in 1970 (Kroopnick, 1974) and serve as a baseline for assessing how the carbon isotopic composition of the oceans have changed in response to the invasion of fossil fuel CO2 over the last 40 years. However, in order to gain a longer and more complete picture of the marine δ13C Suess effect, we must rely on indirect measures of changes in surface water δ13C, most notably those preserved in carbonate secreting marine organisms. The Cariaco Basin is one of the rare locations where one can directly compare sediment records with modern instrumental data. Here we report a high resolution planktonic foraminiferal δ13C record from the basin for the last 300 years that clearly resolves the timing and magnitude of the marine 13C Suess effect associated with the oceanic uptake of anthropogenically derived CO2. Cariaco Basin sediment trap and upper-most box core sediment δ13C match both the trend and magnitude of observed δ13C changes in atmospheric CO2 over the last 15 years. The longer sediment record suggests the marine Suess effect to be -0.75 % from pre-industrial values, with most of the change occurring since 1950, coincident with the rapid rise in atmospheric CO2 noted in ice core and instrumental data. If the current anthropogenic CO2 emission

  13. Climatological mean and decadal change in surface ocean pCO 2, and net sea-air CO 2 flux over the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Sweeney, Colm; Feely, Richard A.; Chipman, David W.; Hales, Burke; Friederich, Gernot; Chavez, Francisco; Sabine, Christopher; Watson, Andrew; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Schuster, Ute; Metzl, Nicolas; Yoshikawa-Inoue, Hisayuki; Ishii, Masao; Midorikawa, Takashi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Körtzinger, Arne; Steinhoff, Tobias; Hoppema, Mario; Olafsson, Jon; Arnarson, Thorarinn S.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Bellerby, Richard; Wong, C. S.; Delille, Bruno; Bates, N. R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2009-04-01

    A climatological mean distribution for the surface water pCO 2 over the global oceans in non-El Niño conditions has been constructed with spatial resolution of 4° (latitude) ×5° (longitude) for a reference year 2000 based upon about 3 million measurements of surface water pCO 2 obtained from 1970 to 2007. The database used for this study is about 3 times larger than the 0.94 million used for our earlier paper [Takahashi et al., 2002. Global sea-air CO 2 flux based on climatological surface ocean pCO 2, and seasonal biological and temperature effects. Deep-Sea Res. II, 49, 1601-1622]. A time-trend analysis using deseasonalized surface water pCO 2 data in portions of the North Atlantic, North and South Pacific and Southern Oceans (which cover about 27% of the global ocean areas) indicates that the surface water pCO 2 over these oceanic areas has increased on average at a mean rate of 1.5 μatm y -1 with basin-specific rates varying between 1.2±0.5 and 2.1±0.4 μatm y -1. A global ocean database for a single reference year 2000 is assembled using this mean rate for correcting observations made in different years to the reference year. The observations made during El Niño periods in the equatorial Pacific and those made in coastal zones are excluded from the database. Seasonal changes in the surface water pCO 2 and the sea-air pCO 2 difference over four climatic zones in the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans are presented. Over the Southern Ocean seasonal ice zone, the seasonality is complex. Although it cannot be thoroughly documented due to the limited extent of observations, seasonal changes in pCO 2 are approximated by using the data for under-ice waters during austral winter and those for the marginal ice and ice-free zones. The net air-sea CO 2 flux is estimated using the sea-air pCO 2 difference and the air-sea gas transfer rate that is parameterized as a function of (wind speed) 2 with a scaling factor of 0.26. This is estimated by inverting

  14. Anomalies in coral reef community metabolism and their potential importance in the reef CO2 source-sink debate.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, J R; Barnes, D J

    1998-05-26

    It is not certain whether coral reefs are sources of or sinks for atmospheric CO2. Air-sea exchange of CO2 over reefs has been measured directly and inferred from changes in the seawater carbonate equilibrium. Such measurements have provided conflicting results. We provide community metabolic data that indicate that large changes in CO2 concentration can occur in coral reef waters via biogeochemical processes not directly associated with photosynthesis, respiration, calcification, and CaCO3 dissolution. These processes can significantly distort estimates of reef calcification and net productivity and obscure the contribution of coral reefs to global air-sea exchange of CO2. They may, nonetheless, explain apparent anomalies in the metabolic performance of reefs close to land and reconcile the differing experimental findings that have given rise to the CO2 debate.

  15. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  16. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  17. The role of bubbles during air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Steven; Bushinsky, Seth

    2016-06-01

    The potential for using the air-sea exchange rate of oxygen as a tracer for net community biological production in the ocean is greatly enhanced by recent accuracy improvements for in situ measurements of oxygen on unmanned platforms. A limiting factor for determining the exchange process is evaluating the air-sea flux contributed by bubble processes produced by breaking waves, particularly during winter months under high winds. Highly accurate measurements of noble gases (Ne, Ar & Kr) and nitrogen, N2, in seawater are tracers of the importance of bubble process in the surface mixed layer. We use measured distributions of these gases in the ventilated thermocline of the North Pacific and an annual time series of N2 in the surface ocean of the NE Subarctic Pacific to evaluate four different air-water exchange models chosen to represent the range of model interpretation of bubble processes. We find that models must have an explicit bubble mechanism to reproduce concentrations of insoluble atmospheric gases, but there are periods when they all depart from observations. The recent model of Liang et al. (2013) stems from a highly resolved model of bubble plumes and categorizes bubble mechanisms into those that are small enough to collapse and larger ones that exchange gases before they resurface, both of which are necessary to explain the data.

  18. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  19. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  20. An improved model of radiative transfer for the NLTE problem in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO molecules in the daytime atmosphere of Mars. 1. Input data and calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogibalov, V. P.; Shved, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    Advances in attacking the problem of radiative transfer in the near infrared (NIR) bands of CO2 and CO under nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) conditions depend on the accuracy of taking into account the radiation processes and inelastic collisions of CO2 and CO molecules. The focus of the paper is to substantially improve the physical model of the problem and update the calculation method. It is the first time the surface albedo is introduced into the problem of the molecular emission under NLTE conditions. The values of the rate constants for inelastic molecular collisions and their temperature dependences have been radically updated. In some cases, since laboratory measurements of these constants are lacking, different versions are provided for them. The relative abundance of CO2 and CO isotopologues is based on the ratios of isotope abundances for the elements C and O obtained from the measurements in the atmosphere of Mars. The intensity of extraterrestrial solar NIR radiation is specified on the base of the high-accuracy ground-based measurements. In the method for calculating the populations of vibrational states, we pioneer in completely taking into account the overlapping of spectral lines in the NIR bands of CO2 and CO.

  1. In calm seas, precipitation drives air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-05-01

    In a series of experiments run in what resembles a heavily instrumented fish tank, Harrison et al. investigated the interwoven roles of wind and rain on air-sea gas exchange rates. Working with a 42-meterlong, 1-meter-wide, and 1.25-meter-tall experimental pool, the authors were able to control the wind speed, rainfall rate, water circulation speed, and other parameters, which they used to assess the effect of 24 different wind speed-rainfall rate combinations on the gas exchange rate of sulfur hexafuoride, a greenhouse gas. In trials that lasted up to 3 hours, the authors collected water samples from the tank at regular intervals, tracking the concentration of the dissolved gas.

  2. ASGAMAGE, the Air-Sea Gas Exchange/MAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, Wiebe; Jacobs, Cor; Kohsiek, Wim; Goossens, Guus; van der Horn, Jaap; Sprung, Detlev; Rapsomanikis, Spyros; Kenntner, Thomas; Reiner, Thomas; Bowyer, Peter; Larsen, Søren; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kunz, Gerard; Hall, Alan; Liss, Peter; Malin, Gill; Upstill-Goddard, Rob; Woolf, David; Graham, Angus; Nightingale, Phil; Fairall, Chris; Hare, Jeff; Dissly, Richard; Tans, Pieter; Anderson, Bob; Smith, Stu

    The ASGAMAGE project addressed the problem of the large discrepancy between the chemistry based and micrometeorological methods and aimed to determine any geophysical parameters apart from the wind speed that affect air-sea gas exchange in an effort to reduce the uncertainty in the global carbon balance. Experiments were performed in the spring and fall of 1996 at and near a research platform off the Dutch coast and two surface layer models were developed for the gas exchange process. The results gave a reduction of the difference between the two types of methods from an order of magnitude to a factor of two as well as indications for the causes of the remaining difference.

  3. Air-sea Interaction Influence on the MJO propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, P. W.; Chen, S.; Doyle, J.; Flatau, M. K.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is a multi-scale low frequency mode that influences the intraseasonal variability of weather across the globe. One of the outstanding forecast challenges is the large model errors in the MJO eastward propagation as it transitions from the Indian Ocean to the Maritime Continent. We will discuss the air-sea coupling impact on the MJO propagation using the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) running in an extended forecast mode on the second CINDY/DYNAMO MJO. Preliminary comparison with uncoupled forecast indicates the effect of the full ocean coupling is to damp the westward propagating modes and retrograde the eastward propagating mode. The impacts of these changes are examined through the analysis of the model sensitivity and satellite data.

  4. Air-Sea Interactions over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Alejandro; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-10-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing, three dimensions, and realistic coastlines. Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions indicated that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality, which limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  5. Tropical Cyclone Induced Air-Sea Interactions Over Oceanic Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, L.

    2012-04-01

    Recent severe tropical cyclones underscore the inherent importance of warm background ocean fronts and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. Central to the question of heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere, the amount of heat available to the tropical cyclone is predicated by the initial depth of the mixed layer and strength of the stratification level that set the level of entrainment mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer. For example in oceanic regimes where the ocean mixed layers are thin, shear-induced mixing tends to cool the upper ocean (and sea surface temperatures) quickly which reduces the air-sea fluxes. This is an example of negative feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere. By contrast, in regimes where the ocean mixed layers are deep (usually along the western part of the gyres), warm water advection by the nearly steady currents reduces the levels of turbulent mixing by shear instabilities. As these strong near-inertial shears are arrested, more heat and moisture is available through the sea surface. When tropical cyclones move into favorable or neutral atmospheric conditions (low vertical shear, anticyclonic circulation aloft), tropical cyclones have a tendency to rapidly intensify as observed over the Gulf of Mexico during Isidore and Lili in 2002, Katrina and Rita in 2005, Dean and Felix in 2007 in the Caribbean Sea, and Earl in 2010 just north of the Caribbean Islands. To predict these tropical cyclone deepening (as well as weakening) cycles, coupled models must have ocean models with realistic ocean conditions and accurate air-sea and vertical mixing parameterizations. These effects and possible impact on TC deepening and weakening underscores the necessity of having complete 3-D ocean measurements juxtaposed with atmospheric profiler measurements.

  6. Comparison of metasomatic reactions between a common CO2-rich vein fluid and diverse wall rocks: intensive variables, mass transfers, and Au mineralization at Alleghany, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The gold deposits at Alleghany, California, are typical of many epigenetic gold-bearing hydrothermal vein systems in metamorphic terranes worldwide. Detailed analyses of alteration halos in serpentinite, mafic amphibolite, and granite wall rocks at Alleghany indicate that widely contrasting deposit types, ranging from fuchsite-carbonate schists to pyrite-albitites, resulted when different wall rocks interacted with the same externally derived CO2-rich hydrothermal vein fluid. Patterns of element redistribution within halos and among lithologic units suggest a complex process involving fluid flow along vein fractures and diffusion (?? infiltration) normal to the veins. Wall rocks locally controlled both the directions and magnitudes of chemical fluxes across vein walls. -from Author

  7. Modeling of energy transfer from vibrationally excited CO2 molecules: cross sections and probabilities for kinetic modeling of atmospheres, flows, and plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Andrea; Faginas-Lago, Noelia; Pacifici, Leonardo; Costantini, Alessandro

    2013-11-14

    We present extended applications of an established theoretical and computational machinery suitable for the study of the dynamics of CO2+CO2 collisions, focusing on vibrational energy exchange, considered over a wide range of energies and rotational temperatures. Calculations are based on quasi-classical trajectories on a potential energy function (a critical component of dynamics simulations), tailored to accurately describe the intermolecular interactions, modeled by the recently proposed bond-bond semiempirical formulation that allows the colliding molecules to be stretchable, rather than frozen at their equilibrium geometry. In a previous work, the same potential energy surface has been used to show that modifications in the geometry (and in physical properties such as polarizability and charge distribution) of the colliding partners affect the intermolecular interaction and determine the features of the energy exchange, to a large extent driven by long-range forces. As initial partitioning of the energy among the molecular degrees of freedom, we consider the excitation of the vibrational bending mode, assuming an initial rotational distribution and a rotational temperature. The role of the vibrational angular momentum is also carefully assessed. Results are obtained by portable implementations of this approach in a Grid-computing framework and on high performance platforms. Cross sections are basic ingredients to obtain rate constants of use in advanced state-to-state kinetic models, under equilibrium or nonequilibrium conditions, and this approach is suitable for gas dynamics applications to plasmas and modeling of hypersonic flows.

  8. The Ocean in a High CO2 World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicerone, Ralph; Orr, James; Brewer, Peter; Haugan, Peter; Merlivat, Liliane; Ohsumi, Takashi; Pantoja, Silvio; Poertner, Hans-Otto

    2004-09-01

    It is now 25 years since the first papers appeared documenting by direct measurement the buildup of fossil fuel CO2 in the ocean. In the past quarter century the situation has changed enormously. What was at first a controversial detection of a signal above a large natural oceanic background is now a huge and easily recognizable geochemical perturbation on a scale not matched for a large part of Earth's history. Earth's atmospheric concentration of CO2 is now higher than experienced during at least the last 400,000 years. The accumulated oceanic burden of fossil fuel CO2 is now >400 billion metric tons. The net CO2 gas invasion rate across the air-sea interface, driven by the growing global mean pCO2 difference between air and sea, is now about 1 million metric tons CO2 per hour, and the decrease in surface water pH is now about 0.1 pH units. The signal is detectable worldwide, and has penetrated to >1000-m depth. And simple extrapolations based upon well-recognized energy use scenarios, such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) IS92A ``Business as Usual'' projection, lead to oceanic pCO2 levels of ~600 ppm, and a pH change of about 0.3, in the second half of this century with far greater changes possible in the future. Without the benefit of this massive disposal in the upper ocean of mankind's artifact of energy use, the world would face an overwhelming atmospheric CO2 problem.

  9. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  10. pCO2 distribution and CO2 flux on the inner continental shelf of the East China Sea during summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Baoxiao; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang; Yuan, Huamao; Li, Ning; Ma, Qingxia

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of pH, total alkalinity (TA), partial pressure of CO2 ( pCO2) and air-sea CO2 flux ( FCO2) were conducted for the inner continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) during August 2011. Variations in pCO2 distribution and FCO2 magnitude during the construction of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) (2003-2009), and the potential effects of the TGD on the air-sea CO2 exchange were examined. Results showed that the ECS acts as an overall CO2 sink during summer, with pCO2 ranging from 107 to 585 μatm and an average FCO2 of -6.39 mmol/(m2 ·d). Low pCO2 (<350 μatm) levels were observed at the central shelf (28°-32°N, 123°-125.5°E) where most CO2-absorption occurred. High pCO2 (>420 μatm) levels were found in the Changjiang estuary and Hangzhou Bay which acted as the main CO2 source. A negative relationship between pCO2 and salinity ( R 2=0.722 0) in the estuary zone indicated the predominant effect of the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) on the seawater CO2 system, whereas a positive relationship ( R 2=0.744 8) in the offshore zone revealed the influence of the Taiwan Current Warm Water (TCWW). Together with the historical data, our results indicated that the CO2 sink has shown a shift southwest while FCO2 exhibited dramatic fluctuation during the construction of the TGD, which is located in the middle reaches of the Changjiang. These variations probably reflect fluctuation in the Changjiang runoff, nutrient import, phytoplankton productivity, and sediment input, which are likely to have been caused by the operations of the TGD. Nevertheless, the potential influence of the TGD on the CO2 flux in the ECS is worthy of further study.

  11. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from R/P FLIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friehe, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Soon after its inception, R/P FLIP was used to study the interaction of the atmosphere and ocean due to its unique stability and low flow distortion. A number of campaigns have been conducted to measure the surface fluxes of heat, water vapor and horizontal momentum of the wind with instrumentation as used over land, supported by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation. The size of FLIP allows for simultaneous ocean wave and mixed-layer measurements as well. Air-sea interaction was a prime component of BOMEX in 1968, where FLIP transited the Panama Canal. The methods used were similar to the over-land "Kansas" experiment of AFCRL in 1968. BOMEX was followed by many experiments in the north Pacific off San Diego, northern California, and Hawaii. Diverse results from FLIP include identification of the mechanism that causes erroneous fluctuating temperature measurements in the salt-aerosol-laden marine atmosphere, the role of humidity on optical refractive index fluctuations, and identification of Miles' critical layer in the air flow over waves.

  12. Diagnosing Air-Sea Interactions on Intraseasonal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    What is the role of ocean coupling in the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO)? Consensus thinking holds that the essential physics of the MJO involve interactions between convection, atmospheric wave dynamics, and boundary layer and free troposphere moisture. However, many modeling studies demonstrate improved MJO simulation when an atmosphere-only general circulation model (AGCM) is coupled to an ocean model, so feedbacks from the ocean are probably not negligible. Assessing the importance and processes of these feedbacks is challenging for at least two reasons. First, observations of the MJO only sample the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere system; there is no "uncoupled" MJO in nature. Second, the practice of analyzing the MJO in uncoupled and coupled GCMs (CGCMs) involves using imperfect tools to study the problem. Although MJO simulation is improving in many models, shortcomings remain in both AGCMs and CGCMs, making it difficult to determine if changes brought about through coupling reflect critical air-sea interactions or are simply part of the collective idiosyncracies of a given model. For the atmosphere, ocean feedbacks from intraseasonal sea surface temperature (SST) variations are communicated through their effects on surface fluxes of heat and moisture. This presentation suggests a set of analysis tools for diagnosing the impact of an interactive ocean on surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, including their mean, variance, spectral characteristics, and phasing with respect to wind, SST, and MJO convection. The diagnostics are demonstrated with application to several CMIP5 models, and reveal a variety of responses to coupled ocean feedbacks.

  13. Assessing the potential for dimethylsulfide enrichment at the sea surface and its influence on air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Carolyn F.; Harvey, Mike J.; Smith, Murray J.; Bell, Thomas G.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Marriner, Andrew S.; McGregor, John A.; Law, Cliff S.

    2016-09-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) to the atmosphere is generally inferred using water sampled at or below 2 m depth, thereby excluding any concentration anomalies at the air-sea interface. Two independent techniques were used to assess the potential for near-surface DMS enrichment to influence DMS emissions and also identify the factors influencing enrichment. DMS measurements in productive frontal waters over the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, did not identify any significant gradients between 0.01 and 6 m in sub-surface seawater, whereas DMS enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer was variable, with a mean enrichment factor (EF; the concentration ratio between DMS in the sea-surface microlayer and in sub-surface water) of 1.7. Physical and biological factors influenced sea-surface microlayer DMS concentration, with high enrichment (EF > 1.3) only recorded in a dinoflagellate-dominated bloom, and associated with low to medium wind speeds and near-surface temperature gradients. On occasion, high DMS enrichment preceded periods when the air-sea DMS flux, measured by eddy covariance, exceeded the flux calculated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coupled-Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment (COARE) parameterized gas transfer velocities and measured sub-surface seawater DMS concentrations. The results of these two independent approaches suggest that air-sea emissions may be influenced by near-surface DMS production under certain conditions, and highlight the need for further study to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of DMS production in the sea-surface microlayer.

  14. Improvement of the GEOS-5 AGCM upon Updating the Air-Sea Roughness Parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Molod, A.; Oman, L. D.; Song, I.-S.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of an air-sea roughness parameterization over the ocean that more closely matches recent observations of air-sea exchange is examined in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Surface wind biases in the GEOS-5 AGCM are decreased by up to 1.2m/s. The new parameterization also has implications aloft as improvements extend into the stratosphere. Many other GCMs (both for operational weather forecasting and climate) use a similar class of parameterization for their air-sea roughness scheme. We therefore expect that results from GEOS-5 are relevant to other models as well.

  15. Improvement of the GEOS-5 AGCM upon updating the air-sea roughness parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, C. I.; Molod, A. M.; Oman, L. D.; Song, I.-S.

    2011-09-01

    The impact of an air-sea roughness parameterization over the ocean that more closely matches recent observations of air-sea exchange is examined in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model. Surface wind biases in the GEOS-5 AGCM are decreased by up to 1.2m/s. The new parameterization also has implications aloft as improvements extend into the stratosphere. Many other GCMs (both for operational weather forecasting and climate) use a similar class of parameterization for their air-sea roughness scheme. We therefore expect that results from GEOS-5 are relevant to other models as well.

  16. Estimating lake-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.E.; Striegl, R.G.; Stannard, D.I.; Michmerhuizen, C.M.; McConnaughey, T.A.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Lake-atmosphere CO2 flux was directly measured above a small, woodland lake using the eddy covariance technique and compared with fluxes deduced from changes in measured lake-water CO2 storage and with flux predictions from boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Over a 3-yr period, lake-atmosphere exchanges of CO2 were measured over 5 weeks in spring, summer, and fall. Observed springtime CO2 efflux was large (2.3-2.7 ??mol m-2 s-1) immediately after lake-thaw. That efflux decreased exponentially with time to less than 0.2 ??mol m-2 s-1 within 2 weeks. Substantial interannual variability was found in the magnitudes of springtime efflux, surface water CO2 concentrations, lake CO2 storage, and meteorological conditions. Summertime measurements show a weak diurnal trend with a small average downward flux (-0.17 ??mol m-2 s-1) to the lake's surface, while late fall flux was trendless and smaller (-0.0021 ??mol m-2 s-1). Large springtime efflux afforded an opportunity to make direct measurement of lake-atmosphere fluxes well above the detection limits of eddy covariance instruments, facilitating the testing of different gas flux methodologies and air-water gas-transfer models. Although there was an overall agreement in fluxes determined by eddy covariance and those calculated from lake-water storage change in CO2, agreement was inconsistent between eddy covariance flux measurements and fluxes predicted by boundary-layer and surface-renewal models. Comparison of measured and modeled transfer velocities for CO2, along with measured and modeled cumulative CO2 flux, indicates that in most instances the surface-renewal model underpredicts actual flux. Greater underestimates were found with comparisons involving homogeneous boundary-layer models. No physical mechanism responsible for the inconsistencies was identified by analyzing coincidentally measured environmental variables.

  17. Short-term natural δ13C variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-03-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C to disentangle potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. For these purposes we have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consequent days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbon translocation through the plant-soil continuum. A period of 24 h was needed to transfer the C assimilated by photosynthesis from the top crown leaves to the tree trunk at breast height and additional 3 h for further respiration of that C by roots and soil microorganisms and its to subsequent diffusion back to the atmosphere.

  18. Radon, CO2 and CH4 as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies - comparative theoretical evaluation of the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Paschke, A.

    2015-05-01

    The applicability of radon as environmental tracer in groundwater/surface water interaction studies has been documented in a considerable number of publications. In some of these reports it has also been suggested to validate the radon based results by using CO2 and CH4 as supplementary tracers. The on-site measurement of the three gaseous parameters relies on their extraction from the water followed by the measurement of their concentration by means of mobile gas-in-air detectors. Since most related practical applications require the recording of time series, a continuous extraction of the gases from (e.g.) a permanently pumped water stream is necessary. A precondition for the sound combined interpretation of the resulting time series is that the individual temporal responses of the extracted gas-in-air concentrations to instantaneously changing gas-in-water concentrations are either identical or in reproducible relation to each other. The aim of our theoretical study was the comparison of the extraction behavior of the three gaseous solutes with focus on the individual temporal responses to changing gas-in-water concentrations considering in particular the gas specific water/air phase transfer kinetics. We could show that the overall mass transfer coefficients of radon, CO2 and CH4 result in a virtually similar temporal response to aqueous concentration changes, thus confirming the straightforward combined measurement/utilization of the dissolved gases as environmental tracers in groundwater/surface water interaction studies.

  19. Advances in Air-Sea Flux Measurement by Eddy Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomquist, Byron W.; Huebert, Barry J.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Edson, James B.; Hare, Jeffrey E.; McGillis, Wade R.

    2014-09-01

    Eddy-correlation measurements of the oceanic flux are useful for the development and validation of air-sea gas exchange models and for analysis of the marine carbon cycle. Results from more than a decade of published work and from two recent field programs illustrate the principal interferences from water vapour and motion, demonstrating experimental approaches for improving measurement precision and accuracy. Water vapour cross-sensitivity is the greatest source of error for flux measurements using infrared gas analyzers, often leading to a ten-fold bias in the measured flux. Much of this error is not related to optical contamination, as previously supposed. While various correction schemes have been demonstrated, the use of an air dryer and closed-path analyzer is the most effective way to eliminate this interference. This approach also obviates density corrections described by Webb et al. (Q J R Meteorol 106:85-100, 1980). Signal lag and frequency response are a concern with closed-path systems, but periodic gas pulses at the inlet tip provide for precise determination of lag time and frequency attenuation. Flux attenuation corrections are shown to be 5 % for a cavity ring-down analyzer (CRDS) and dryer with a 60-m inlet line. The estimated flux detection limit for the CRDS analyzer and dryer is a factor of ten better than for IRGAs sampling moist air. While ship-motion interference is apparent with all analyzers tested in this study, decorrelation or regression methods are effective in removing most of this bias from IRGA measurements and may also be applicable to the CRDS.

  20. Translucent CO2 ice on Mars ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frederic; Andrieu, Francois; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    The Martian climate is driven by the condensation/sublimation of CO2 representing 95% of the atmosphere. Many active surface features (such dark spot, dark flows), have been potentially linked to CO2 exchange. Understanding the surface/atmosphere interactions is a major issue, for both atmospheric but also surface science. This study aims at estimating the physical properties of the seasonal CO2 ice deposits. Are these deposits granular or compact? What is the thickness of the ice? How much impurities are included within the ice? These questions have been highly debated in the literature, in particular the presence of a translucent slab ice, the link with the H2O cycle. In particular the cold jet geyser model requires translucent CO2 ice. We use radiative transfer models to simulate spectroscopic data from the CRISM instrument and perform an inversion to estimate model's parameters though time. We then discuss the consistency of the results with other datasets.

  1. Air-Sea Exchange and Budget of Sulfur and Oxygen-Containing Volatile Organic Compounds in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, H.; Omori, Y.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Kameyama, S.

    2015-12-01

    By combining proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gradient flux (GF) technique, in situ measurement of air-sea fluxes of multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed and deployed. Starting in 2008, we made in situ observations of air-sea fluxes at 15 locations as well as underway observations of marine air/surface seawater bulk concentrations in the Pacific Ocean, during eight research cruises by R/V Hakuho-Maru. The fluxes of biogenic trace gases, DMS and isoprene, were always positive, with the magnitudes being in accordance with previously reported. In contrast, the fluxes of oxygenated VOCs including acetone and acetaldehyde varied from negative to positive, suggesting that the tropical and subtropical Pacific are a source, while the North Pacific is a sink. A basin-scale budget of VOCs were determined for 4 biogeochemical provinces in the Pacific Ocean, and the role of oceans for VOCs were discussed with respect to physical and biogeochemical processes.

  2. CO2 laser preionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  3. Dynamics and impacts of eddy-driven air-sea interaction in a regional air-sea coupled model for the US West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H.; Miller, A. J.; Norris, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The US West Coast coastal oceans feature energetic mesoscale eddies. The associated sea surface temperature (SST) and surface current modify the wind stress, leading to significant dynamic feedback on to the air-sea coupled system. Dynamics of the interaction and impacts on the regional coastal climate are however not well understood; this is an important research question for regional modeling studies for the coastal climate. A high-resolution (7km) SCOAR regional air-sea coupled climate model is used to investigate this question by implementing a novel model coupling technique that separates spatial scale of air-sea interaction. It allows the large-scale coupling effect to be preserved while suppressing the eddy-driven coupling via interactive spatial smoothing of SST and surface current. When the eddy-induced surface current is allowed to modify the wind stress, the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) is reduced by 42%, and this is primarily due to enhanced surface eddy drag. In contrast, the eddy-induced SST-wind coupling has little impact on the EKE. Eddies also modify the Ekman pumping; the resultant Ekman pumping velocity due to surface current attenuates the amplitude of eddies while the SST-induced Ekman pumping affects the propagation of eddies. Rectified change in time-mean SST is determined by the altered offshore temperature advection by the mean and eddy currents, but the magnitude of the mean SST change is greater with the eddy-induced current effect. The subsequent influence on the downstream winter rainfall variability on the US West Coast is stronger with the eddy-induced SST effect because of the proximity of SST anomalies to the coasts. The strong dynamical response in the coastal climate system to the eddy-driven air-sea interaction suggests that the fine-scale air-sea coupling should be better represented in the regional climate modeling studies for the coastal environments and the marine weather.

  4. Atmospheric CO2 Removal by Enhancing Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster van Groos, A. F.; Schuiling, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    The increase of the CO2 content in the atmosphere by the release of anthropogenic CO2 may be addressed by the enhancement of weathering at the surface of the earth. The average emission of mantle-derived CO2 through volcanism is ~0.3 Gt/year (109 ton/year). Considering the ~3.000 Gt of CO2 present in the atmosphere, the residence time of CO2 in the earth's atmosphere is ~10,000 years. Because the vast proportion of carbon in biomass is recycled through the atmosphere, CO2 is continuously removed by a series of weathering reactions of silicate minerals and stored in calcium and magnesium carbonates. The addition of anthropogenic CO2 from fossil fuel and cement production, which currently exceeds 35 Gt/year and dwarfs the natural production 100-fold, cannot be compensated by current rates of weathering, and atmospheric CO2 levels are rising rapidly. To address this increase in CO2 levels, weathering rates would have to be accelerated on a commensurate scale. Olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) is the most reactive silicate mineral in the weathering process. This mineral is the major constituent in relatively common ultramafic rocks such as dunites (olivine content > 90%). To consume the current total annual anthropogenic release of CO2, using a simplified weathering reaction (Mg2SiO4 + 4CO2 + 4H2O --> 2 Mg2+ + 4HCO3- + H4SiO4) would require ~30 Gt/year or ~8-9 km3/year of dunite. This is a large volume; it is about double the total amount of ore and gravel currently mined (~ 17 Gt/year). To mine and crush these rocks to <100 μm costs ~ 8/ton. The transport and distribution over the earth's surface involves additional costs, that may reach 2-5/ton. Thus, the cost of remediation for the release of anthropogenic CO2 is 300-400 billion/year. This compares to a 2014 global GDP of ~80 trillion. Because weathering reactions require the presence of water and proceed more rapidly at higher temperatures, the preferred environments to enhance weathering are the wet tropics. From a socio

  5. Influence of vertical temperature contrasts and diel cycles on near-surface seawater pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Robin; deYoung, Brad

    2016-04-01

    While the oceanic mixed layer is sometimes assumed to be of vertically-uniform temperature, it is well-known that considerable temperature gradients (>0.1C/m) can develop within its upper few meters, particularly in the tropics during daytime. Given that the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2sw) is strongly temperature-dependent, ceteris paribus (all else being equal), we would expect to observe sizeable corresponding vertical pCO2sw gradients under such situations. If prevalent and persistent, such gradients could affect the accuracy of large-scale air-sea CO2 flux estimates since, while intended to be representative of the sea surface skin, the pCO2sw measurements used to compute these are typically from underway systems sampling at 2-4m depth. Vertical variability in pCO2sw could thus be an important but as yet, poorly quantified uncertainty in air-sea CO2 flux estimates. As a first step towards assessing this uncertainty, we derive a global gridded monthly climatology for the peak daily vertical temperature contrast between the upper (0-2m) and lower (2-10m) sea surface and compute the corresponding vertical pCO2sw differences these would cause, ceteris paribus. The latter are an estimate of the temperature-driven pCO2 contrast we would expect to find in a given month between the upper sea surface and the sampling depth of an underway system at the time of the peak temperature contrast in the daily cycle. In addition, we construct a monthly climatology for the amplitude of diel variation in upper sea temperature and compute the corresponding diel pCO2sw amplitudes these would generate, ceteris paribus. While these analyses reveal the locations and months for which vertical temperature contrasts and diel cycles are likely to exert a strong influence on pCO2sw, temperature is only one factor influencing this carbonate chemistry parameter. In situ measurements are required to reveal the actual dynamics of pCO2sw under the influence of all competing factors

  6. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH₄, H₂and CO₂. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production uncertainty the most. This analysis is repeated for (i) different temperature regimes and (ii) different solids retention times (SRTs) in the anaerobic digester. Results show that both SRC and MS are good measures of sensitivity unless the anaerobic digester is operating at low SRT and mesophilic conditions. In the latter situation, and due to the intrinsic nonlinearities of the system, SRC fails in decomposing the variance of the model predictions (R² < 0.7) making MS a more reliable method. At high SRT, influent fractionations are the most influential parameters for predictions of CH₄and CO₂emissions. Nevertheless, when the anaerobic digester volume is decreased (for the same load), the role of acetate degraders gains more importance under mesophilic conditions, while lipids and fatty acid metabolism is more influential under thermophilic conditions. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the results and their implications during model calibration and validation exercises.

  7. Effects of influent fractionation, kinetics, stoichiometry and mass transfer on CH4, H2 and CO2 production for (plant-wide) modeling of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Solon, Kimberly; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of influent fractionation, kinetic, stoichiometric and mass transfer parameter uncertainties when modeling biogas production in wastewater treatment plants. The anaerobic digestion model no. 1 implemented in the plant-wide context provided by the benchmark simulation model no. 2 is used to quantify the generation of CH₄, H₂and CO₂. A comprehensive global sensitivity analysis based on (i) standardized regression coefficients (SRC) and (ii) Morris' screening's (MS's) elementary effects reveals the set of parameters that influence the biogas production uncertainty the most. This analysis is repeated for (i) different temperature regimes and (ii) different solids retention times (SRTs) in the anaerobic digester. Results show that both SRC and MS are good measures of sensitivity unless the anaerobic digester is operating at low SRT and mesophilic conditions. In the latter situation, and due to the intrinsic nonlinearities of the system, SRC fails in decomposing the variance of the model predictions (R² < 0.7) making MS a more reliable method. At high SRT, influent fractionations are the most influential parameters for predictions of CH₄and CO₂emissions. Nevertheless, when the anaerobic digester volume is decreased (for the same load), the role of acetate degraders gains more importance under mesophilic conditions, while lipids and fatty acid metabolism is more influential under thermophilic conditions. The paper ends with a critical discussion of the results and their implications during model calibration and validation exercises. PMID:25812096

  8. CO2 Laser Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Samuel

    1989-03-01

    It gives me a great deal of pleasure to introduce our final speaker of this morning's session for two reasons: First of all, his company has been very much in the news not only in our own community but in the pages of Wall Street Journal and in the world economic press. And, secondly, we would like to welcome him to our shores. He is a temporary resident of the United States, for a few months, forsaking his home in Germany to come here and help with the start up of a new company which we believe, probably, ranks #1 as the world supplier of CO2 lasers now, through the combination of former Spectra Physics Industrial Laser Division and Rofin-Sinar GMBH. Samuel Simonsson is the Chairman of the Board of Rofin-Sinar, Inc., here in the U.S. and managing director of Rofin-Sinar GMBH. It is a pleasure to welcome him.

  9. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk

  10. Simulation and Observation of Global Atmospheric CO2 from 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, A.; O'Dell, C. W.; Baker, D. F.; Parazoo, N.; McKeown, R.; Baker, I. T.; Kawa, S. R.; Doney, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We compare global variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations using a comprehensive model of surface carbon cycling and atmospheric transport to retrievals of column CO2 mole fraction from near-infrared spectroscopy from the GOSAT mission. Surface carbon exchanges due to photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and air-sea gas exchange are computed every hour. These fluxes are used as input to a global atmospheric tranport model to obtain three-dimensional fields of CO2, which are sampled at the time and location of quality-screened GOSAT data retrieved by the Atmospheric Carbon Observations from Space (ACOS) team. The system is operated on a 0.5° x 0.67° grid (dx ~ 50 km), providing global mesoscale coverage, and has good skill at replicating diurnal, synoptic, and seasonal variations over vegetated land surfaces. It is driven by meteorological output from the NASA Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System. Surface weather from the system drives calculations of terrestrial ecosystem metabolism (radiation, precipitation, humidity, temperature) and air-sea gas exchange (wind), with other input data coming from satellite data products. Simulated spatial patterns and seasonal variations of simulated and observed column CO2 exhibit broad agreement, but some offsets in latitude and seasonal variations are noted. These are attributed to both model and satellite retrieval errors.

  11. A comprehensive carbon dioxide analysis system for estimating CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, A.; Parazoo, N.; Lokupitiya, R. S.; Baker, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions due to combustion of fossil fuel can be estimated from observations of variations in atmospheric trace gases in time and space. Quantitative interpretation of these variations requires accounting for stronger changes due to other processes such as ecosystem metabolism, biomass burning, and air-sea gas exchange that operate on global scales. We have developed and tested an analysis system for assimilation of CO2 variations measured by a combination of sampling, in-situ, and remotely-sensed observations. The system combines existing models of CO2 exchanges due to hourly photosynthesis and respiration, daily air-sea gas exchange, biomass burning, fossil fuel emissions, and atmospheric transport. This comprehensive system allows direct comparison to the observed record of both in-situ and remotely sensed atmospheric CO2 at hourly timescales. By design, we decompose surface fluxes of CO2 into the atmosphere into “fast processes” that are well-understood and modeled using mechanistic algorithms, and more slowly-varying fluxes due to land use change, incorrect specification of decomposing carbon pools, and other persistent biases in the forward component models. These slowly varying components are then estimated from atmospheric obervations by the Maximum Likelihood Ensembe Filter, a data assimilation framework. The system is operated on a 0.5° x 0.67° grid, providing global mesoscale coverage, and has good skill at replicating diurnal, synoptic, and seasonal variations over vegetated land surfaces. It is driven by meteorological output from the NASA Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System. Surface weather from the system drives calculations of terrestrial ecosystem metabolism (radiation, precipitation, humidity, temperature) and air-sea gas exchange (wind), with other input data coming from satellite data products.

  12. Quantifying air-sea gas exchange using noble gases in a coastal upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. C.; Stanley, R. H. R.; Nicholson, D. P.; Squibb, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    The diffusive and bubble-mediated components of air-sea gas exchange can be quantified separately using time-series measurements of a suite of dissolved inert gases. We have evaluated the performance of four published air-sea gas exchange parameterizations using a five-day time-series of dissolved He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentration in Monterey Bay, CA. We constructed a vertical model including surface air-sea gas exchange and vertical diffusion. Diffusivity was measured throughout the cruise from profiles of turbulent microstructure. We corrected the mixed layer gas concentrations for an upwelling event that occurred partway through the cruise. All tested parameterizations gave similar results for Ar, Kr, and Xe; their air-sea fluxes were dominated by diffusive gas exchange during our study. For He and Ne, which are less soluble, and therefore more sensitive to differences in the treatment of bubble-mediated exchange, the parameterizations gave widely different results with respect to the net gas exchange flux and the bubble flux. This study demonstrates the value of using a suite of inert gases, especially the lower solubility ones, to parameterize air-sea gas exchange.

  13. Using Wind Setdown and Storm Surge on Lake Erie to Calibrate the Air-Sea Drag Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  14. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1. PMID:23977309

  15. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    PubMed

    Drews, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN). Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  16. Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 Plasmas in ASTRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Munoz, J.; Kamar, O.; Loch, S.

    2007-11-01

    Spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL helicon plasma source running Ar + CO2 and He + CO2 gas mixes is presented. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 - 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 - 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 - 0.5 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. A 0.33 m scanning monochromator is used for this study. Using Ar + CO2 gas mixes, very different plasmas are observed as the concentration of CO2 is changed. At low CO2 concentration, the bluish plasma is essentially atomic and argon transitions dominate the spectra. Weak C I and O I lines are present in the 750 - 1000 nm range. At higher CO2 concentration, the plasma becomes essentially molecular and is characterized by intense, white plasma columns. Here, spectra are filled with molecular bands (CO2, CO2^+, CO and CO^+). Limited molecular dissociative excitation processes associated with the production of C I and O I emission are also observed. On the other hand, He + CO2 plasmas are different. Here, rf matches are only possible at low CO2 concentration. Under these conditions, the spectra are characterized by strong C I and O I transitions with little or no molecular bands. Strong dissociative processes observed in these plasmas can be link to the high Te associated with He plasmas. An analysis of the spectra with possible scientific and industrial applications will be presented.

  17. Experimental investigation of CO2 condensation process using cryogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheonkyu; Yoo, Junghyun; Lee, Jisung; Park, Hana; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the dominant gas molecules that causes greenhouse effect, i.e. global warming. Numerous studies have been carried out to regulate the emission of CO2 to reduce greenhouse gas. The liquid CO2 is a convenient form of transportation compared to high-pressurized gaseous CO2. Therefore, the direct liquefaction mechanism of CO2 at low temperature draws technical attention recently. In particular, cold thermal energy of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) could be a candidate to condense gaseous CO2, especially in the LNG powered ship. In this paper, the detailed direct condensation process of CO2 using LN2 with intermittent solidification is investigated. Pressurized CO2 at 600 kPa is directly liquefied in a vessel by liquid nitrogen which is supplied into the coiled tube heat exchanger inside the CO2 vessel. The heat exchanger temperature is controlled from 130 K to 205 K to regulate the solidification and sublimation of CO2 by duty control with cryogenic solenoid valve. The characteristics of CO2 condensation process with cryogen are analyzed from the measurement results. The results show that the solidification causes the significant degradation of CO2 condensation heat transfer. Finally, the condensation rate with and without solidification is compared.

  18. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by phytoplankton and estimates of ancient CO2 levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of the 13C content of marine particulate organic carbon are compiled and on the basis of GEOSECS data and temperatures, concentrations, and isotopic compositions of dissolved CO2 in the waters in which the related phytoplankton grew are estimated. In this way, the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthetic fixation of CO2 is found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of dissolved CO2. Because ancient carbon isotopic fractionations have been determined from analyses of sedimentary porphyrins [Popp et al., 1989], the relationship between isotopic fractionation and concentrations of dissolved CO2 developed here can be employed to estimate concentrations of CO2 dissolved in ancient oceans and, in turn, partial pressures of CO2 in ancient atmospheres. The calculations take into account the temperature dependence of chemical and isotopic equilibria in the dissolved-inorganic-carbon system and of air-sea equilibria. Paleoenvironmental temperatures for each sample are estimated from reconstructions of paleogeography, latitudinal temperature gradients, and secular changes in low-latitude sea surface temperature. It is estimated that atmospheric partial pressures of CO2 were over 1000 micro atm 160 - 100 Ma ago, then declined to values near 300 micro atm during the next 100 Ma. Analysis of a high-resolution record of carbon isotopic fractionation at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary suggests that the partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere was drawn down from values near 840 micro atm to values near 700 micro atm during the anoxic event.

  19. Did the North Atlantic Ocean sequester more CO2 during the last glacial?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Thornalley, D. J.; Jin, Z.; Rohling, E. J.; Menviel, L.; McCave, I. N. N.

    2015-12-01

    To explain the ~90 ppm lower atmospheric CO2 content during the Last Glacial Maximum, much effort has been focused on the mechanisms that helped to limit the outgassing of CO2 from the deep ocean to the atmosphere via the Southern Ocean. Field measurements and modeling studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean has been an important sink of CO2 during preindustrial and modern times. However, the role of the North Atlantic in sequestering atmospheric CO2 in the past largely remains unconstrained. Here, we use a suite of geochemical proxies to reconstruct nutrient and carbonate ion concentrations of both surface and deep waters in the North Atlantic during the last ~25 kyr. When normalized to the same nutrient levels, we find that the gradient in carbonate ion content between surface and mid-depth waters increased during the last glacial. Although a combination of factors including changes in Redfield ratio and rain ratio and increased CO2 absorption at the air-sea boundary might have caused the observed change, the greater gradient most likely suggests an enhanced sequestration of CO2 in the North Atlantic Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum. Therefore, we infer that, in addition to changes in the Southern Ocean, processes in the North Atlantic Ocean enhanced the uptake of CO2 and synergistically contributed to the low atmospheric CO2 during ice ages.

  20. Oxygen isotope fractionation in stratospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Jackson, T.; Mauersberger, K.; Schueler, B.; Morton, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new cryogenic collection system has been flown on board a balloon gondola to obtain separate samples of ozone and carbon dioxide without entrapping major atmospheric gases. Precision laboratory isotopic analysis of CO2 samples collected between 26 and 35.5 km show a mass-independent enrichment in both O-17 and O-18 of about 11 per mil above tropospheric values. Ozone enrichment in its heavy isotopes was 9 to 16 percent in O3-50 and 8 to 11 percent in O3-49, respectively (Schueler et al., 1990). A mechanism to explain the isotope enrichment in CO2 has been recently proposed by Yung et al. (1991). The model is based on the isotope exchange between CO2 and O3 via O(1D), resulting in a transfer of the ozone isotope enrichment to carbon dioxide. Predicted enrichment and measured values agree well.

  1. Coupled Air-Sea Observations and Modeling for Better Understanding Tropical Cyclone Prediction and Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    A systematic observational and modeling study is conducted to better understand the physical processes controlling air-sea interaction and their impact on tropical cyclone (TC) prediction and predictability using a fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system developed at the University of Miami and observations from field campaigns. We have developed a unified air-sea interface module that couples multiple atmosphere, wave, and ocean models using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). It is a physically based and computationally efficient coupling system that is flexible to use in a multi-model system and portable for transition to the next generation research and operational coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean-land models. This standardized coupling framework allows researchers to develop and test air-sea coupling parameterizations and coupled data assimilation, and to better facilitate research-to-operation activities. It also allows for ensemble forecasts that can be used for coupled atmosphere-ocean data assimilation and assessment of uncertainties in coupled model predictions. The coupled modeling system has been evaluated using the coupled air-sea observations (e.g., GPS dropsondes and AXBTs, ocean drifters and floats) collected in recent field campaigns in the Gulf of Mexico and TCs in the Atlantic and Pacific basins. This talk will provide 1) an overview of the unified air-sea interface model, 2) fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model predictions of TCs and evaluation with coupled air-sea observations, and 3) results from high-resolution (1.3 km grid resolution) ensemble experiments using a stochastic kinetic energy backscatter (SKEB) perturbation method to assess the predictability and uncertainty in TC predictions.

  2. Dicobalt-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound, [(α(2)-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-): a potent species for water oxidation, C-H bond activation, and oxygen transfer.

    PubMed

    Barats-Damatov, Delina; Shimon, Linda J W; Weiner, Lev; Schreiber, Roy E; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Poblet, Josep M; de Graaf, Coen; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-02-01

    High-valent oxo compounds of transition metals are often implicated as active species in oxygenation of hydrocarbons through carbon-hydrogen bond activation or oxygen transfer and also in water oxidation. Recently, several examples of cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation have been reported, and cobalt(IV) species have been suggested as active intermediates. A reactive species, formally a dicobalt(IV)-μ-oxo polyoxometalate compound [(α2-P2W17O61Co)2O](14-), [(POMCo)2O], has now been isolated and characterized by the oxidation of a monomeric [α2-P2W17O61Co(II)(H2O)](8-), [POMCo(II)H2O], with ozone in water. The crystal structure shows a nearly linear Co-O-Co moiety with a Co-O bond length of ∼1.77 Å. In aqueous solution [(POMCo)2O] was identified by (31)P NMR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Reactivity studies showed that [(POMCo)2O]2O] is an active compound for the oxidation of H2O to O2, direct oxygen transfer to water-soluble sulfoxides and phosphines, indirect epoxidation of alkenes via a Mn porphyrin, and the selective oxidation of alcohols by carbon-hydrogen bond activation. The latter appears to occur via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism. Density functional and CASSCF calculations strongly indicate that the electronic structure of [(POMCo)2O]2O] is best defined as a compound having two cobalt(III) atoms with two oxidized oxygen atoms.

  3. Common Freshwater Cyanobacteria Grow in 100% CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Sullivan, Shannon L.; Price, Amanda L.; Zimmerman, Shawn M.

    2005-02-01

    Cyanobacteria and similar organisms produced most of the oxygen found in Earth's atmosphere, which implies that early photosynthetic organisms would have lived in an atmosphere that was rich in CO2 and poor in O2. We investigated the tolerance of several cyanobacteria to very high (>20 kPa) concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Cultures of Synechococcus PCC7942, Synechocystis PCC7942, Plectonema boryanum, and Anabaena sp. were grown in liquid culture sparged with CO2-enriched air. All four strains grew when transferred from ambient CO2 to 20 kPa partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), but none of them tolerated direct transfer to 40 kPa pCO2. Synechococcus and Anabaena survived 101 kPa (100%) pCO2 when pressure was gradually increased by 15 kPa per day, and Plectonema actively grew under these conditions. All four strains grew in an anoxic atmosphere of 5 kPa pCO2 in N2. Strains that were sensitive to high CO2 were also sensitive to low initial pH (pH 5-6). However, low pH in itself was not sufficient to prevent growth. Although mechanisms of damage and survival are still under investigation, we have shown that modern cyanobacteria can survive under Earth's primordial conditions and that cyanobacteria-like organisms could have flourished under conditions on early Mars, which probably had an atmosphere similar to early Earth's.

  4. Common freshwater cyanobacteria grow in 100% CO2.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David J; Sullivan, Shannon L; Price, Amanda L; Zimmerman, Shawn M

    2005-02-01

    Cyanobacteria and similar organisms produced most of the oxygen found in Earth's atmosphere, which implies that early photosynthetic organisms would have lived in an atmosphere that was rich in CO2 and poor in O2. We investigated the tolerance of several cyanobacteria to very high (>20 kPa) concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Cultures of Synechococcus PCC7942, Synechocystis PCC7942, Plectonema boryanum, and Anabaena sp. were grown in liquid culture sparged with CO2-enriched air. All four strains grew when transferred from ambient CO2 to 20 kPa partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), but none of them tolerated direct transfer to 40 kPa pCO2. Synechococcus and Anabaena survived 101 kPa (100%) pCO2 when pressure was gradually increased by 15 kPa per day, and Plectonema actively grew under these conditions. All four strains grew in an anoxic atmosphere of 5 kPa pCO2 in N2. Strains that were sensitive to high CO2 were also sensitive to low initial pH (pH 5-6). However, low pH in itself was not sufficient to prevent growth. Although mechanisms of damage and survival are still under investigation, we have shown that modern cyanobacteria can survive under Earth's primordial conditions and that cyanobacteria-like organisms could have flourished under conditions on early Mars, which probably had an atmosphere similar to early Earth's. PMID:15711170

  5. Is CO2 ice permanent?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Carbon dioxide ice has been inferred to exist at the south pole in summertime, but Earth based measurements in 1969 of water vapor in the Martian atmosphere suggest that all CO2 ice sublined from the southern polar cap and exposed underlying water ice. This implies that the observed summertime CO2 ice is of recent origin. It appears possible to construct an energy balance model that maintains seasonal CO2 ice at the south pole year round and still reasonably simulates the polar cap regression and atmospheric pressure data. This implies that the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap could be seasonal in origin, and that minor changes in climate could cause CO2 ice to completely vanish, as would appear to have happened in 1969. However, further research remains before it is certain whether the CO2 ice observed in the summertime south polar cap is seasonal or is part of a permanent reservoir.

  6. India Co2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  7. Co2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2004-11-18

    Human activities are increasingly altering the Earth's climate. A particular concern is that atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) may be rising fast because of increased industrialization. CO{sub 2} is a so-called ''greenhouse gas'' that traps infrared radiation and may contribute to global warming. Scientists project that greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} will make the arctic warmer, which would melt glaciers and raise sea levels. Evidence suggests that climate change may already have begun to affect ecosystems and wildlife around the world. Some animal species are moving from one habitat to another to adapt to warmer temperatures. Future warming is likely to exceed the ability of many species to migrate or adjust. Human production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuels (such as at coal-fired power plants) is not likely to slow down soon. It is urgent to find somewhere besides the atmosphere to put these increased levels of CO{sub 2}. Sequestration in the ocean and in soils and forests are possibilities, but another option, sequestration in geological formations, may also be an important solution. Such formations could include depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and deep saline aquifers. In many cases, injection of CO2 into a geological formation can enhance the recovery of hydrocarbons, providing value-added byproducts that can offset the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. Before CO{sub 2} gas can be sequestered from power plants and other point sources, it must be captured. CO{sub 2} is also routinely separated and captured as a by-product from industrial processes such as synthetic ammonia production, H{sub 2} production, and limestone calcination. Then CO{sub 2} must be compressed into liquid form and transported to the geological sequestration site. Many power plants and other large emitters of CO{sub 2} are located near geological formations that are amenable to CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  8. CO2 interaction with geomaterials.

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, George D.; Al-Saidi, Wissam A.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Voora, Vamsee, K.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Lopano, Christina L; Myshakin, Eugene M.; Hur, Tae Bong; Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald J.; Howard, Bret H.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-09-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  9. Continuous CO2 extractor and methods

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to assist in technology transfer from Russia to the US and assist in development of the technology improvements and applications for use in the U.S. and worldwide. Over the period of this work, ORNL has facilitated design, development and demonstration of a low-pressure liquid extractor and development of initial design for high-pressure supercritical CO2 fluid extractor.

  10. Air-sea heat exchange, an element of the water cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and variation of water vapor, clouds and precipitation are examined. Principal driving forces for these distributions are energy exchange and evaporation at the air-sea interface, which are also important elements of air-sea interaction studies. The overall aim of air-sea interaction studies is to quantitatively determine mass, momentum and energy fluxes, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms controlling them. The results of general circulation simulations indicate that the atmosphere in mid-latitudes responds to changes in the oceanic surface conditions in the tropics. This correlation reflects the strong interaction between tropical and mid-latitude conditions caused by the transport of heat and momentum from the tropics. Studies of air-sea exchanges involve a large number of physica, chemical and dynamical processes including heat flux, radiation, sea-surface temperature, precipitation, winds and ocean currents. The fluxes of latent heat are studied and the potential use of satellite data in determining them evaluated. Alternative ways of inferring heat fluxes will be considered.

  11. Air-Sea Interaction Measurements from the Controlled Towed Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, D.; Bluth, R. T.; Jonsson, H.; Barge, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Controlled Towed Vehicle (CTV) uses improved towed drone technology to actively maintain via a radar altimeter and controllable wing a user-set height that can be as low as the canonical reference height of 10 m above the sea surface. After take-off, the drone is released from the tow aircraft on a ~700-m stainless steel cable. We have instrumented the 0.23 m diameter and 2.13 m long drone with high fidelity instruments to measure the means and turbulent fluctuations of 3-D wind vector, temperature, humidity, pressure, CO2 and IR sea surface temperature. Data are recorded internally at 40 Hz and simultaneously transmitted to the tow aircraft via dedicated wireless Ethernet link. The CTV accommodates 40 kg of instrument payload and provides it with 250 W of continuous power through a ram air propeller-driven generator. Therefore its endurance is only limited by that of the tow aircraft.We will discuss the CTV development, the engineering challenges and solutions that have been successfully implemented to overcome them. We present results from recent flights as low as 9 m over the coastal ocean and comparisons of profiles and turbulent fluxes from the CTV and the tow aircraft. Manned aircraft operation at low-level boundary-layer flights is very limited. Dropsondes and UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and UAS are alternates for measurements near the ocean surface. However, dropsondes have limited sensor capability and do not measure fluxes, and most present UAS vehicles do not have the payload and power capacity nor the low-flying ability in high winds over the oceans. The CTV therefore, fills a needed gap between the dropsondes, in situ aircraft, and UAS. The payload, capacity and power of the CTV makes it suitable for a variety of atmospheric research measurements. Other sensors to measure aerosol, chemistry, radiation, etc., could be readily accommodated in the CTV.

  12. Net ecosystem production, calcification and CO2 fluxes on a reef flat in Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Cybelle M.; Souza, Marcelo F. L.; Silva, Ananda M.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon cycle in coral reefs is usually dominated by the organic carbon metabolism and precipitation-dissolution of CaCO3, processes that control the CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in seawater and the CO2 fluxes through the air-sea interface. In order to characterize these processes and the carbonate system, four sampling surveys were conducted at the reef flat of Coroa Vermelha during low tide (exposed flat). Net ecosystem production (NEP), net precipitation-dissolution of CaCO3 (G) and CO2 fluxes across the air-water interface were calculated. The reef presented net autotrophy and calcification at daytime low tide. The NEP ranged from -8.7 to 31.6 mmol C m-2 h-1 and calcification from -13.1 to 26.0 mmol C m-2 h-1. The highest calcification rates occurred in August 2007, coinciding with the greater NEP rates. The daytime CO2 fluxes varied from -9.7 to 22.6 μmol CO2 m-2 h-1, but reached up to 13,900 μmol CO2 m-2 h-1 during nighttime. Carbon dioxide influx to seawater was predominant in the reef flat during low tide. The regions adjacent to the reef showed a supersaturation of CO2, acting as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere (from -22.8 to -2.6 mol CO2 m-2 h-1) in the reef flat during ebbing tide. Nighttime gas release to the atmosphere indicates a net CO2 release from the Coroa Vermelha reef flat within 24 h, and that these fluxes can be important to carbon budget in coral reefs.

  13. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin-Transfer-Torque Switching in Polycrystalline Co2FeAl Full-Heusler-Alloy Magnetic Tunnel Junctions on Amorphous Si /SiO2 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Kasai, Shinya; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    We study polycrystalline B2-type Co2FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler-alloy-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) fabricated on a Si /SiO2 amorphous substrate. Polycrystalline CFA films with a (001) orientation, a high B2 ordering, and a flat surface are achieved by using a MgO buffer layer. A tunnel magnetoresistance ratio up to 175% is obtained for a MTJ with a CFA /MgO/CoFe structure on a 7.5-nm-thick MgO buffer. Spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetization switching is achieved in the MTJs with a 2-nm-thick polycrystalline CFA film as a switching layer. By using a thermal activation model, the intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) is determined to be 8.2×106 A /cm2, which is lower than 2.9×107 A /cm2, the value for epitaxial CFA MTJs [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 182403 (2012), 10.1063/1.4710521]. We find that the Gilbert damping constant (α) evaluated by using ferromagnetic resonance measurements for the polycrystalline CFA film is approximately 0.015 and is almost independent of the CFA thickness (2-18 nm). The low Jc0 for the polycrystalline MTJ is mainly attributed to the low α of the CFA layer compared with the value in the epitaxial one (approximately 0.04).

  14. Convergent Cenozoic CO2 history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, D. L.; Beerling, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The quality and quantity of Cenozoic CO2 records have increased significantly in the last decade. Gains in quality have come primarily from a fuller accounting of confounding factors; examples include soil respiration rates in the pedogenic carbonate method, alkalinity and seawater δ11B in the boron method, and cell size in the alkenone phytoplankton method. Previously, variability across Cenozoic CO2 estimates in a given time period sometimes exceeded an order of magnitude, but through these improvements variability has been reduced to a factor of two or less. Further improvements in the record can probably be facilitated by more robust quantification of statistical error, generation of CO2 estimates at single locations from multiple methods, and cross-calibration with Pleistocene ice-core CO2 records (Beerling & Royer, 2011, Nature Geoscience 4: 418-420). An improved Cenozoic CO2 record offers opportunities for better understanding Earth system processes. We provide one example related to climate sensitivity. We find a significant relationship between CO2 radiative forcing and global temperature during the Cenozoic, even after accounting for forcings related to solar evolution and paleogeographic changes. Although the calculations are based on simple assumptions and should be taken as provisional, the mean Cenozoic climate sensitivity (3 °C or higher per CO2 doubling) is similar to or higher than calculations for the present-day (~3 °C per CO2 doubling).

  15. Leaves: Elevated CO2 levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning fossil fuels and land use changes such as deforestation and urbanization have led to a dramatic rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The highly dilute CO2 from the atmosphere enters plant leaves where it is concentr...

  16. Monitoring of near surface CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, E.; Möller, I.; Teschner, M.; Poggenburg, J.; Spickenbom, K.; Schulz, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring of near surface CO2 ECKHARD FABER1, INGO MÖLLER1, MANFRED TESCHNER1, JÜRGEN POGGENBURG1, KAI SPICKENBOM1, HANS-MARTIN SCHULZ1,2 1Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover, e.faber@bgr.de 2present adress: GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Telegrafenberg, D-14473 Potsdam Underground gas storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods to reduce the input of antropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere and its greenhouse effect. Storage of CO2 is planned in depleted reservoirs, in aquifers and in salt caverns. Storage sites must have very small leakage rates to safely store the CO2 for centuries. Thus, a careful investigation and site selection is crucial. However, any leakage of CO2 to the surface is potentially dangerous for humans and environment. Therefore, instruments and systems for the detection of any CO2 escaping the storage sites and reaching the atmosphere have to be developed. Systems to monitor gases in deep wells, groundwater and surface sediments for leaking CO2 are developed, tested and are contnuously improved. Our group is mainly analysing CO2 in shallow (down to 3 m) soil samples using automatically operating monitoring systems. The systems are equipped with sensors to measure CO2 (and other gases) concentrations and other environmental parameters (atmospheric pressure, ambient and soil temperatures, etc.). Data are measured in short intervals (minute to subminute), are stored locally and are transferred by telemetrical systems into the BGR laboratory (Weinlich et al., 2006). In addition to soil gases monitoring systems technical equipment is available for continuous underwater gas flow measurements. Several of those monitoring systems are installed in different areas like Czech Republic, Austria, Italy and Germany. To detect any leaking gas from a sequestration site after CO2 injection, the naturally existing CO2 concentration (before injection) must be known. Thus, the natural

  17. CO2 Sequestration short course

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Cole, David R; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Bourg, Ian C

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  18. Implications of a Changing Arctic on Summertime Surface Seawater pCO2 Variations in the Eastern Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgers, T.; Miller, L. A.; Thomas, H.; Else, B. G. T.; Gosselin, M.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic marine carbonate chemistry and rates of air-sea CO2 exchange are anticipated to be affected by current changes in sea-ice structure and extent, freshwater inputs, ocean circulation patterns, and the seasonality of phytoplankton blooms. This study examines how such changes will impact rates of air-sea CO2 exchange in northern Baffin Bay, Nares Strait, and the eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. This complex oceanographic region includes the North Water polynya; one of the most biologically productive areas in the Arctic Ocean, and the convergence site of the warm West Greenland Current with cold exported Arctic waters. Continuous measurements of atmospheric and surface seawater CO2 (pCO2) were collected onboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen during its 2013 and 2014 summer cruises. Surface seawater pCO2 displayed considerable variability (145 - 389 ppm), but never exceeded atmospheric concentrations. Calculated CO2 fluxes ranged from 0 to -45 mmol m-2 day-1 (oceanic uptake), and were estimated using the Sweeney et al. (2007) parameterization with in-situ wind speed measurements. Ancillary measurements of chlorophyll a reveal low productivity in surface waters during mid-summer with isolated sub-surface blooms. This is likely the result of nutrient limitation within the highly stratified polar mixed layer (PML). Measurements of stable oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) and total alkalinity were used to estimate freshwater inputs (sea-ice melt vs. meteoric water) to the PML. These and in-situ observations of sea ice cover were used to interpret seawater pCO2 variations. Surface waters influenced by sea-ice melt exhibit lower pCO2 than those influenced by meteoric water. The results of this investigation shed light on the future role of this region as a summertime sink of atmospheric CO2.

  19. Spatial and seasonal variability of the air-sea equilibration timescale of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel; Ito, Takamitsu; Takano, Yohei; Hsu, Wei-Ching

    2014-05-01

    The exchange of carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere tends to bring near-surface waters toward equilibrium by reducing the partial pressure gradient across the air-water interface. However, the equilibration process is not instantaneous; in general there is a lag between forcing and response. The timescale of air-sea equilibration depends on several factors involving the depth of the mixed layer, temperature, salinity, wind speed, and carbonate chemistry. In this work, we use a suite of observational datasets to generate climatological and seasonal composite maps of the air-sea equilibration timescale. The relaxation timescale exhibits considerable spatial and seasonal variations, which are largely set by changes in mixed layer depth and wind speed. The net effect is dominated by the mixed layer depth; the gas exchange velocity and carbonate chemistry parameters only provide partial compensation. Broadly speaking, the adjustment timescale tends to increase with latitude. We compare the observationally-derived air-sea gas exchange timescale with a model-derived surface residence time and a data-derived horizontal transport timescale, which allows us to define two non-dimensional metrics of gas exchange efficiency. These parameters highlight the Southern Ocean, equatorial Pacific, and North Atlantic as regions of inefficient air-sea equilibration where carbon anomalies are likely to form and persist. The efficiency parameters presented here can serve as simple tools for understanding regional air-sea disequilibrium in both observations and models. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License together with an author copyright. This license does not conflict with the regulations of the Crown Copyright.

  20. The mechanisms of North Atlantic CO2 uptake in a large Earth System Model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, P. R.; Booth, B. B. B.; Jones, C. D.; Lambert, F. H.; McNeall, D. J.; Totterdell, I. J.; Völker, C.

    2015-07-01

    The oceans currently take up around a quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by human activity. While stored in the ocean, this CO2 is not influencing Earth's radiation budget; the ocean CO2 sink therefore plays an important role in mitigating global warming. CO2 uptake by the oceans is heterogeneous, with the subpolar North Atlantic being the strongest CO2 sink region. Observations over the last 2 decades have indicated that CO2 uptake by the subpolar North Atlantic sink can vary rapidly. Given the importance of this sink and its apparent variability, it is critical that we understand the mechanisms behind its operation. Here we explore the combined natural and anthropogenic subpolar North Atlantic CO2 uptake across a large ensemble of Earth System Model simulations, and find that models show a peak in sink strength around the middle of the century after which CO2 uptake begins to decline. We identify different drivers of change on interannual and multidecadal timescales. Short-term variability appears to be driven by fluctuations in regional seawater temperature and alkalinity, whereas the longer-term evolution throughout the coming century is largely occurring through a counterintuitive response to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At high atmospheric CO2 concentrations the contrasting Revelle factors between the low latitude water and the subpolar gyre, combined with the transport of surface waters from the low latitudes to the subpolar gyre, means that the subpolar CO2 uptake capacity is largely satisfied from its southern boundary rather than through air-sea CO2 flux. Our findings indicate that: (i) we can explain the mechanisms of subpolar North Atlantic CO2 uptake variability across a broad range of Earth System Models; (ii) a focus on understanding the mechanisms behind contemporary variability may not directly tell us about how the sink will change in the future; (iii) to identify long-term change in the North Atlantic CO2 sink we should focus

  1. The mechanisms of North Atlantic CO2 uptake in a large Earth System Model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, P. R.; Booth, B. B. B.; Jones, C. D.; Lambert, F. H.; McNeall, D. J.; Totterdell, I. J.; Völker, C.

    2014-10-01

    The oceans currently take up around a quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by human activity. While stored in the ocean, this CO2 is not influencing Earth's radiation budget; the ocean CO2 sink therefore plays an important role in mitigating global warming. CO2 uptake by the oceans is heterogeneous, with the subpolar North Atlantic being the strongest CO2 sink region. Observations over the last two decades have indicated that CO2 uptake by the subpolar North Atlantic sink can vary rapidly. Given the importance of this sink and its apparent variability, it is critical that we understand the mechanisms behind its operation. Here we explore subpolar North Atlantic CO2 uptake across a large ensemble of Earth System Model simulations, and find that models show a peak in sink strength around the middle of the century after which CO2 uptake begins to decline. We identify different drivers of change on interannual and multidecadal timescales. Short-term variability appears to be driven by fluctuations in regional seawater temperature and alkalinity, whereas the longer-term evolution throughout the coming century is largely occurring through a counterintuitive response to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. At high atmospheric CO2 concentrations the contrasting Ravelle factors between the subtropical and subpolar gyres, combined with the transport of surface waters from the subtropical to subpolar gyre, means that the subpolar CO2 uptake capacity is largely satisfied from its southern boundary rather than through air-sea CO2 flux. Our findings indicate that: (i) we can explain the mechanisms of subpolar North Atlantic CO2 uptake variability across a broad range of Earth System Models, (ii) a focus on understanding the mechanisms behind contemporary variability may not directly tell us about how the sink will change in the future, (iii) to identify long-term change in the North Atlantic CO2 sink we should focus observational resources on monitoring subtropical as

  2. Longitudinally Excited CO2 Laser with Short Laser Pulse like TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Nakamura, Kenshi; Goto, Tatsumi; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a short laser pulse similar to that of TEA and Q-switched CO2 lasers. A capacitor transfer circuit with a low shunt resistance provided rapid discharge and a sharp spike pulse with a short pulse tail. Specifically, a circuit with a resistance of 10 M Ω provided a spike pulse width of 103.3 ns and a pulse tail length of 61.9 μs, whereas a circuit with a shunt resistance of 100 Ω provided a laser pulse with a spike pulse width of 96.3 ns and a pulse tail length of 17.2 μs. The laser pulses from this longitudinally excited CO2 laser were used for processing a human tooth without carbonization and for glass marking without cracks.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Impacts in the Deep-Sea: Is Maintaining a Metabolically Required CO2 Efflux Rate Challenging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Hofmann, A. F.; Brewer, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion, from temperature driven changes in respiration, and from possible leakage from sub-seabed geologic CO2 disposal has aroused concern over the impacts of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine life. Here we describe the rate problem for animals who must export CO2 at about the same rate at which O2 is consumed. We analyze the basic properties controlling CO2 export within the diffusive boundary of marine animals in a changing ocean in order to compare the challenges posed by O2 uptake under stress with the equivalent problem of CO2 expulsion. The problem is more complex than that for a non-reactive gas since, as with gas exchange of CO2 at the air-sea interface, the influence of the ensemble of reactions within the CO2 - HCO3- - CO3= acid-base system needs to be considered. These reactions appear as an enhancement factor which significantly facilitates CO2 efflux compared to O2 intake at equal temperature, pressure and flow rate under typical oceanic concentrations. Possibly as an adaptation to this chemical advantage marine animals typically can respond to external CO2 stress simply by metabolic adjustment. This is energetically more favorable than having to resort to mechanically increasing flow over their surface to thin the boundary layer as is required to alleviate O2 stress. Regionally as with O2 the combination of T, P, and pH/pCO2 creates a zone of maximum CO2 stress at around 1000 m depth. But the net result is that the combination of an increase in T combined with declining O2 poses a greater respiratory challenge to marine life than does increasing CO2. The relationships developed here allow a more accurate prediction of the impacts on marine life from the combined effects of changing T, O2, and CO2 than can be estimated from single variable studies.

  4. The air-sea transformation and diapycnal overturning circulation within the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachsen, P. E.; Nøst, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    Air-sea flux climatologies and reanalyzes show that the bulk of the oceanic heat and buoyancy loss over the Nordic Seas takes place over interior regions not easily accessible by the time-mean large-scale currents. Eddy transport of heat and buoyancy, from the boundary currents and into the deep basins, is thought to be a key mechanism. Here we use gridded observations, theory and a modern parametrization of eddy transport to quantify the buoyancy budget of this region. The calculations confirm that mean currents are unable to explain the air-sea transformation that takes place over the interior basins of the Nordic Seas and that eddy transport instead dominates. The parametrization of eddy transport also suggests a significant overturning cell between the eastern and western parts of the Nordic Seas. This cell is, however, unaccounted for in the remaining data sets studied here.

  5. Simulation-based study of air-sea momentum fluxes nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xuanting; Shen, Lian

    2015-11-01

    Momentum fluxes at sea surface are crucial to air-sea interactions. In nearshore regions, the bathymetry variation has a significant impact on the surface wave field and complicates the momentum fluxes at water surface. In this study, we extend a high order spectral method to address wave-bottom interactions and wave modeling. From the wave simulation data, we use the Hilbert-Huang transform to quantify the properties of the wave spectrum, based on which the wave field is reconstructed for the detailed mechanistic study of wind-wave interactions using large-eddy simulation for the wind field. The roughness of the water surface is quantified using a dynamic model for the effects of subgrid-scale waves. The results show that the waves are sensitive to the water depth variation. Associated with the changes in the wave field, the momentum fluxes at the air-sea interface increase in shallow regions.

  6. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-20

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  7. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change.

  8. Large CO2 effluxes at night and during synoptic weather events significantly contribute to CO2 emissions from a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heping; Zhang, Qianyu; Katul, Gabriel G.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-06-01

    CO2 emissions from inland waters are commonly determined by indirect methods that are based on the product of a gas transfer coefficient and the concentration gradient at the air water interface (e.g., wind-based gas transfer models). The measurements of concentration gradient are typically collected during the day in fair weather throughout the course of a year. Direct measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes from a large inland water body (Ross Barnett reservoir, Mississippi, USA) show that CO2 effluxes at night are approximately 70% greater than those during the day. At longer time scales, frequent synoptic weather events associated with extratropical cyclones induce CO2 flux pulses, resulting in further increase in annual CO2 effluxes by 16%. Therefore, CO2 emission rates from this reservoir, if these diel and synoptic processes are under-sampled, are likely to be underestimated by approximately 40%. Our results also indicate that the CO2 emission rates from global inland waters reported in the literature, when based on indirect methods, are likely underestimated. Field samplings and indirect modeling frameworks that estimate CO2 emissions should account for both daytime–nighttime efflux difference and enhanced emissions during synoptic weather events. The analysis here can guide carbon emission sampling to improve regional carbon estimates.

  9. Large CO2 effluxes at night and during synoptic weather events significantly contribute to CO2 emissions from a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Heping; Zhang, Qianyu; Katul, Gabriel G.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-06-01

    CO2 emissions from inland waters are commonly determined by indirect methods that are based on the product of a gas transfer coefficient and the concentration gradient at the air water interface (e.g., wind-based gas transfer models). The measurements of concentration gradient are typically collected during the day in fair weather throughout the course of a year. Direct measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes from a large inland water body (Ross Barnett reservoir, Mississippi, USA) show that CO2 effluxes at night are approximately 70% greater than those during the day. At longer time scales, frequent synoptic weather events associated with extratropical cyclones induce CO2 flux pulses, resulting in further increase in annual CO2 effluxes by 16%. Therefore, CO2 emission rates from this reservoir, if these diel and synoptic processes are under-sampled, are likely to be underestimated by approximately 40%. Our results also indicate that the CO2 emission rates from global inland waters reported in the literature, when based on indirect methods, are likely underestimated. Field samplings and indirect modeling frameworks that estimate CO2 emissions should account for both daytime-nighttime efflux difference and enhanced emissions during synoptic weather events. The analysis here can guide carbon emission sampling to improve regional carbon estimates.

  10. Large CO2 effluxes at night and during synoptic weather events significantly contribute to CO2 emissions from a reservoir

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Heping; Zhang, Qianyu; Katul, Gabriel G.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Chapin, III, F. Stuart; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-05-24

    CO2 emissions from inland waters are commonly determined by indirect methods that are based on the product of a gas transfer coefficient and the concentration gradient at the air water interface (e.g., wind-based gas transfer models). The measurements of concentration gradient are typically collected during the day in fair weather throughout the course of a year. Direct measurements of eddy covariance CO2 fluxes from a large inland water body (Ross Barnett reservoir, Mississippi, USA) show that CO2 effluxes at night are approximately 70% greater than those during the day. At longer time scales, frequent synoptic weather events associated with extratropicalmore » cyclones induce CO2 flux pulses, resulting in further increase in annual CO2 effluxes by 16%. Therefore, CO2 emission rates from this reservoir, if these diel and synoptic processes are under-sampled, are likely to be underestimated by approximately 40%. Our results also indicate that the CO2 emission rates from global inland waters reported in the literature, when based on indirect methods, are likely underestimated. Field samplings and indirect modeling frameworks that estimate CO2 emissions should account for both daytime-nighttime efflux difference and enhanced emissions during synoptic weather events. Furthermore, the analysis here can guide carbon emission sampling to improve regional carbon estimates.« less

  11. Climatic Impacts of a Stochastic Parameterization of Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    The atmosphere and ocean are coupled by the exchange of fluxes across the ocean surface. Air-sea fluxes vary partly on scales that are too small and fast to be resolved explicitly in numerical models of weather and climate, making them a candidate for stochastic parameterization. This presentation proposes a nonlinear physical mechanism by which stochastic fluctuations in the air-sea buoyancy flux may modify the mean climate, even though the mean fluctuation is zero. The mechanism relies on a fundamental asymmetry in the physics of the ocean mixed layer: positive surface buoyancy fluctuations cannot undo the vertical mixing caused by negative fluctuations. The mechanism has much in common with Stommel's mixed-layer demon. The presentation demonstrates the mechanism in climate simulations with a comprehensive coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (SINTEX-G). In the SINTEX-G simulations with stochastic air-sea buoyancy fluxes, significant changes are detected in the time-mean oceanic mixed-layer depth, sea-surface temperature, atmospheric Hadley circulation, and net upward water flux at the sea surface. Also, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability is significantly increased. The findings demonstrate that noise-induced drift and noise-enhanced variability, which are familiar concepts from simple climate models, continue to apply in comprehensive climate models with millions of degrees of freedom. The findings also suggest that the lack of representation of sub-grid variability in air-sea fluxes may contribute to some of the biases exhibited by contemporary climate models.

  12. Small Autonomous Air/Sea System Concepts for Coast Guard Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of small autonomous air/sea system concepts are outlined in this paper that support and enhance U.S. Coast Guard missions. These concepts draw significantly upon technology investments made by NASA in the area of uninhabited aerial vehicles and robotic/intelligent systems. Such concepts should be considered notional elements of a greater as-yet-not-defined robotic system-of-systems designed to enable unparalleled maritime safety and security.

  13. Biological and physical controls on N2, O2, and CO2 distributions in contrasting Southern Ocean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortell, Philippe D.; Bittig, Henry C.; Körtzinger, Arne; Jones, Elizabeth M.; Hoppema, Mario

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of pCO2, O2 concentration, biological oxygen saturation (ΔO2/Ar), and N2 saturation (ΔN2) in Southern Ocean surface waters during austral summer, 2010-2011. Phytoplankton biomass varied strongly across distinct hydrographic zones, with high chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations in regions of frontal mixing and sea ice melt. pCO2 and ΔO2/Ar exhibited large spatial gradients (range 90 to 450 µatm and -10 to 60%, respectively) and covaried strongly with Chl a. However, the ratio of biological O2 accumulation to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) drawdown was significantly lower than expected from photosynthetic stoichiometry, reflecting the differential time scales of O2 and CO2 air-sea equilibration. We measured significant oceanic CO2 uptake, with a mean air-sea flux (~ -10 mmol m-2 d-1) that significantly exceeded regional climatological values. N2 was mostly supersaturated in surface waters (mean ΔN2 of +2.5%), while physical processes resulted in both supersaturation and undersaturation of mixed layer O2 (mean ΔO2phys = 2.1%). Box model calculations were able to reproduce much of the spatial variability of ΔN2 and ΔO2phys along the cruise track, demonstrating significant effects of air-sea exchange processes (e.g., atmospheric pressure changes and bubble injection) and mixed layer entrainment on surface gas disequilibria. Net community production (NCP) derived from entrainment-corrected surface ΔO2/Ar data, ranged from ~ -40 to > 300 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 and showed good coherence with independent NCP estimates based on seasonal mixed layer DIC deficits. Elevated NCP was observed in hydrographic frontal zones and stratified regions of sea ice melt, reflecting physical controls on surface water light fields and nutrient availability.

  14. CO2 Sequestration Crosswell Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2, a green house gas, represents an effort to reduce the large amount of CO2 generated as a by-product of fossil fuels combustion and emitted into the atmosphere. This process of sequestration involves CO2 storage deep underground into highly permeable porous media sealed by caprock. "4D seismics" is a natural non-intrusive monitoring technique which involves 3D time-lapse seismic surveys. The success of monitoring CO2 movement relies upon a proper description of the physics of the problem. We realize time-lapse migrations comparing acoustic, elastic (with or without Gassmann's formulae), and poroelastic simulations of 4D seismic imaging. This approach highlights the influence of using different physical theories on interpreting seismic data, and, more importantly, on extracting the CO2 signature from the seismic wave field. We investigate various types of inversions using (1) P-wave traveltimes, (2) P- & S-wave traveltimes and (3) P- & S-wave traveltimes and amplitudes. Simulations are performed using a spectral-element method, and finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, used in the non-linear iterative inversions, are calculated based on an adjoint method. Biot's equations are implemented in the forward and adjoint simulations to account for poroelastic effects.

  15. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  16. Effect of Air-Sea coupling on the Frequency Distribution of Intense Tropical Cyclones over the Northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomomaki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual SST variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling and hence TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  17. Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones over the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Tomomichi; Mizuta, Ryo; Adachi, Yukimasa; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ose, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Effect of air-sea coupling on the frequency distribution of intense tropical cyclones (TCs) over the northwestern Pacific (NWP) region is investigated using an atmosphere and ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM). Monthly varying flux adjustment enables AOGCM to simulate both subseasonal air-sea interaction and realistic seasonal to interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. The maximum of intense TC distribution around 20-30°N in the AGCM shifts equatorward in the AOGCM due to the air-sea coupling. Hence, AOGCM reduces northward intense TC distribution bias seen in AGCM. Over the NWP, AOGCM-simulated SST variability is large around 20-30°N where the warm mixed layer becomes shallower rapidly. Active entrainment from subsurface water over this region causes stronger SST cooling, and hence, TC intensity decreases. These results suggest that air-sea coupling characterized by subsurface oceanic condition causes more realistic distribution of intense TCs over the NWP.

  18. Update on CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedingstein, P.; Houghton, R.A.; Marland, Gregg; Hackler, J.; Boden, Thomas A; Conway, T.J.; Canadell, J.G.; Raupach, Mike; Ciais, Philippe; Le Quere, Corrine

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

  19. Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western Pacific Air-Sea Interaction Study (W-PASS), Introduction and Highlights Atsushi Tsuda Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo In the western Pacific (WESTPAC) region, dust originating from Asian and Australian arid regions to the North and South Pacific, biomass burning emissions from the Southeast Asia to sub-tropical Pacific, and other anthropogenic substances are transported regionally and globally to affect cloud and rainfall patterns, air quality, and radiative budgets downwind. Deposition of these compounds into the Asian marginal seas and onto the Pacific Ocean influence surface primary productivity and species composition. In the WESTPAC region, subarctic, subtropical oceans and marginal seas are located relatively narrow latitudinal range and these areas are influenced by the dust and anthropogenic inputs. Moreover, anthropogenic emission areas are located between the arid region and the oceans. The W-PASS (Western Pacific Air-Sea interaction Study) project has been funded for 5 years as a part of SOLAS-Japan activity in the summer of 2006. We aim to resolve air-sea interaction through field observation studies mainly using research vessels and island observatories over the western Pacific. We have carried out 5 cruises to the western North Pacific focusing on air-sea interactions. Also, an intensive marine atmospheric observation including direct atmospheric deposition measurement was accomplished by a dozen W-PASS research groups at the NIES Atmospheric and Aerosol Monitoring Station of Cape Hedo in the northernmost tip of the Okinawa main Island facing the East China Sea in the spring 2008. A few weak Kosa (dust) events, anthropogenic air outflows, typical local air and occupation of marine background air were identified during the campaign period. The W-PASS has four research groups mainly focusing on VOC emissions, air-sea gas exchange processes, biogeochemical responses to dust depositions and its modeling. We also

  20. Vertical CO2-Flux Gradients in the Marine Boundary Layer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupski, Michael; Peters, Gerhard; Münster, Hans; Ament, Felix

    2010-05-01

    A classical method to estimate CO2-fluxes through the air/sea-interface consist of measuring the vertical turbulent flux close to the surface by Eddy-Covariance assuming constant flux between the measuring height and the surface. To re-evaluate this assumption, a two level flux measurement was installed on the research platform FINO2 in order to search for vertical flux gradients. The research platform is located at 55° 00' north and 13°09' east in the Baltic Sea between the coasts of Sweden, Denmark and Germany. At FINO2 the water is about 25 meters deep. A 9 meter long boom carrying the flux sensors is mounted at the south-east corner of the platform pointing south. Raw data with 10 Hz sampling rate are stored locally since June 2008 and can be downloaded remotely via satellite-based internet link. CO2-fluxes were calculated with 30 min time resolution applying a standard eddy covariance processing scheme including tilt- and Webb-corrections. In addition, power and cross spectra were calculated for selected (high wind) periods - mainly in order to verify that there are no artifacts due to wind- and wave-induced vibrations of the platform. Our first results over a period of two months in summer 2008 show significant flux gradients over extended periods (1-2 days). Recent runs of mesoscale circulation models, which consider the time dependent sources and sinks of vegetation-covered land, predict patterns of CO2 concentration with horizontal gradients of considerable magnitude. Moreover these model results show that the gradients fade out over open oceans only very gradually on trajectories several hundred kilometers off the coast. We estimate that these horizontal gradients of atmospheric CO2 concentration in combination with vertical gradients of wind speed could be a potential reason for vertical flux gradients. In coastal waters the gradients can result in flux differences between the height of the flux sensor and the sea surface which can amount the same

  1. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  2. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  3. The CO2nnect activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  4. Analysis of the PKT correction for direct CO2 flux measurements over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landwehr, S.; Miller, S. D.; Smith, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.; Ward, B.

    2014-04-01

    Eddy covariance measurements of air-sea CO2 fluxes can be affected by cross-sensitivities of the CO2 measurement to water vapour, resulting in order-of-magnitude biases. Well-established causes for these biases are (i) cross-sensitivity of the broadband non-dispersive infrared sensors due to band-broadening and spectral overlap (commercial sensors typically correct for this) and (ii) the effect of air density fluctuations (removed by determining the dry air CO2 mixing ratio). Another bias related to water vapour fluctuations has recently been observed with open-path sensors, attributed to sea salt build-up and water films on sensor optics. Two very different approaches have been used to deal with these water vapour-related biases. Miller et al. (2010) employed a membrane drier to physically eliminate 97% of the water vapour fluctuations in the sample air before it entered a closed-path gas analyser. Prytherch et al. (2010a) employed the empirical (Peter K. Taylor, PKT) post-processing correction to correct open-path sensor data. In this paper, we test these methods side by side using data from the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) experiment in the Southern Ocean. The air-sea CO2 flux was directly measured with four closed-path analysers, two of which were positioned down-stream of a membrane dryer. The CO2 fluxes from the two dried gas analysers matched each other and were in general agreement with common parameterisations. The flux estimates from the un-dried sensors agreed with the dried sensors only during periods with low latent heat flux (≤7 W m-2). When latent heat flux was higher, CO2 flux estimates from the un-dried sensors exhibited large scatter and an order-of-magnitude bias. Applying the PKT correction to the flux data from the un-dried analysers did not remove the bias when compared to the data from the dried gas analyser. The results of this study demonstrate the validity of measuring CO2 fluxes using a pre-dried air stream and show that

  5. Effect of CO2 concentration on the carbon acquisition of bloom-forming marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, B.; Sültemeyer, D.; Riebesell, U.

    2003-04-01

    in CO2 availability may influence phytoplankton species succession and distribution. Potential effects on marine biogeochemical cycling and air-sea gas exchange, which could arise from changes in the relative contribution of different functional groups to overall primary production, will be discussed.

  6. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    Air-sea interaction dramatically changes from moderate to very high wind speed conditions (Donelan et al. 2004). Unresolved physics of the air-sea interface are one of the weakest components in tropical cyclone prediction models. Rapid disruption of the air-water interface under very high wind speed conditions was reported in laboratory experiments (Koga 1981) and numerical simulations (Soloviev et al. 2012), which resembled the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at an interface with very large density difference. Kelly (1965) demonstrated that the KH instability at the air-sea interface can develop through parametric amplification of waves. Farrell and Ioannou (2008) showed that gustiness results in the parametric KH instability of the air-sea interface, while the gusts are due to interacting waves and turbulence. The stochastic forcing enters multiplicatively in this theory and produces an exponential wave growth, augmenting the growth from the Miles (1959) theory as the turbulence level increases. Here we complement this concept by adding the effect of the two-phase environment near the mean interface, which introduces additional viscosity in the system (turning it into a rheological system). The two-phase environment includes air-bubbles and re-entering spray (spume), which eliminates a portion of the wind-wave wavenumber spectrum that is responsible for a substantial part of the air sea drag coefficient. The previously developed KH-type interfacial parameterization (Soloviev and Lukas 2010) is unified with two versions of the wave growth model. The unified parameterization in both cases exhibits the increase of the drag coefficient with wind speed until approximately 30 m/s. Above this wind speed threshold, the drag coefficient either nearly levels off or even slightly drops (for the wave growth model that accounts for the shear) and then starts again increasing above approximately 65 m/s wind speed. Remarkably, the unified parameterization reveals a local minimum

  7. High resolution measurements of methane and carbon dioxide in surface waters over a natural seep reveal dynamics of dissolved phase air-sea flux.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengran; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Valentine, David L; Mendes, Stephanie D; Kessler, John D

    2014-09-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are sources of methane and carbon dioxide to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. To better constrain these variables in natural environments, we conducted the first high-resolution measurements of sea surface methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in the massive natural seep field near Coal Oil Point (COP), California. The corresponding high resolution fluxes were calculated, and the total dissolved phase air-sea fluxes over the surveyed plume area (∼363 km(2)) were 6.66 × 10(4) to 6.71 × 10(4) mol day(-1) with respect to CH4 and -6.01 × 10(5) to -5.99 × 10(5) mol day(-1) with respect to CO2. The mean and standard deviation of the dissolved phase air-sea fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from the contour gridding analysis were estimated to be 0.18 ± 0.19 and -1.65 ± 1.23 mmol m(-2) day(-1), respectively. This methane flux is consistent with previous, lower-resolution estimates and was used, in part, to conservatively estimate the total area of the dissolved methane plume at 8400 km(2). The influx of carbon dioxide to the surface water refutes the hypothesis that COP seep methane appreciably influences carbon dioxide dynamics. Seeing that the COP seep field is one of the biggest natural seeps, a logical conclusion could be drawn that microbial oxidation of methane from natural seeps is of insufficient magnitude to change the resulting plume area from a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a source.

  8. SST, Winds, and Air-Sea Fluxes in the Gulf Stream Region in the First Winter of CLIMODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, K. A.; Dickinson, S.; Jones, H. R.

    2006-12-01

    The NSF sponsored CLIvar MOde Water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE) focuses on the wintertime processes responsible for the formation and dispersal of Eighteen Degree Water (EDW), the subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic. This region has the largest wintertime loss of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere, made possible by the influx of heat from the Gulf Stream (GS). These fluxes fuel the formation and intensification of storms, as cool, dry continental air encounters the warm boundary current waters. The actual impact of the large transfers of heat on the ocean and on the atmosphere are likely underestimated in weather and climate models, owing to poor observational input and inaccurate boundary layer physics. Several new sources of data are available with which to examine the relationship between the Gulf Stream, air-sea heat fluxes, winds, and storms: wind vector and SST measurements from satellites, as well as in situ measurements, including data from CLIMODE. Improved satellite data includes the ocean vector winds from QuikSCAT, re-processed at a spatial resolution of 12.5km, and microwave SST from AMSR-E. Although the microwave resolution is coarser than for infrared SST, the ability of microwave sensors to see through clouds gives better effective resolution of SST, particularly during storms. Two CLIMODE cruises were conducted in the winter of 2005-2006. During the first cruise in November 2005, SST dropped by about 1.5-2C, leaving SST in the recirculation region at about 22C. By the start of the second cruise in January 2006, SST had fallen to 20C near the GS core, and 19C in the mode water region. By the end of the second cruise 2 weeks later, the region of 20C water had dropped to 19C, suggesting that EDW formation was imminent. SST in the mode water region reached 18C the following week. Maximum wind speeds were distinctly centered on the GS warm core for much of January 2006. Recent studies suggest that the Gulf Stream could affect the storm

  9. A two-dimensional model with coupled dynamics, radiative transfer, and photochemistry. 2: Assessment of the response of stratospheric ozone to increased levels of CO2, N2O, CH4, and CFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Hans R.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Shia, Run-Lie; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1993-01-01

    The impact of increased levels of carbon dioxide (CO2), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and other trace gases on stratospheric ozone is investigated with an interactive, two-dimensional model of gas phase chemistry, dynamics, and radiation. The scenarios considered are (1) a doubling of the CO2 concentration, (2) increases of CFCs, (3) CFC increases combined with increases of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane CH4, and (4) the simultaneous increase of CO2, CFCs, N2O, and CH4. The radiative feedback and the effect of temperature and circulation changes are studied for each scenario. For the double CO2 calculations the tropospheric warming was specified. The CO2 doubling leads to a 3.1% increase in the global ozone content. Doubling of the CO2 concentrations would lead to a maximum cooling of about 12 C at 45 km if the ozone concentration were held fixed. The cooling of the stratosphere leads to an ozone increase with an associated increase in solar heating, reducing the maximum temperature drop by about 3 C. The CFC increase from continuous emissions at 1985 rate causes a 4.5% loss of ozone. For the combined perturbations a net loss of 1.3% is calculated. The structure of the perturbations shows a north-south asymmetry. Ozone losses (when expressed in terms of percent changes) are generally larger in the high latitudes of the southern hemisphere as a result of the eddy mixing being smaller than in the northern hemisphere. Increase of chlorine leads to ozone losses above 30 km altitude where the radiative feedback results in a cooler temperature and an ozone recovery of about one quarter of the losses predicted with a noninteractive model. In all the cases, changes in circulation are small. In the chlorine case, circulation changes reduce the calculated column depletion by about one tenth compared to offline calculations.

  10. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  11. Global and regional drivers of nutrient supply, primary production and CO2 drawdown in the changing Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Jean-Éric; Anderson, Leif G.; Matrai, Patricia; Coupel, Pierre; Bélanger, Simon; Michel, Christine; Reigstad, Marit

    2015-12-01

    -Arctic scale. While CO2 intake by the Arctic Ocean should respond positively to reduced sea-ice extent, which facilitates air-sea exchange, the negative influence of rising temperatures and runoff on CO2 solubility might counteract the positive effect of modest PP increases in seasonally open waters. Overall, this review shows that local changes in light availability resulting from reduced sea-ice is only one factor in the intricate web of local and remote drivers of PP and CO2 drawdown in the Arctic Ocean. Understanding and predicting change requires an integrated biogeochemical approach that connects the small Arctic Ocean to adjacent ones and adequately resolves vertical nutrient supply processes at regional and local scales.

  12. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO2 in Nonaqueous CO2-Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paul M; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M; Bearden, Mark D; Koech, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2 BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called "first-generation" CO2 BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a "second-generation" CO2 BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g ) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2 BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model.

  13. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO2 in Nonaqueous CO2-Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paul M; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M; Bearden, Mark D; Koech, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2 BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called "first-generation" CO2 BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a "second-generation" CO2 BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g ) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2 BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model. PMID:26377774

  14. Excitation of CO2/+/ by electron impact on CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, J. E.; Coplan, M. A.; Kushlis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Consideration of a discrepancy concerning the correct value of the cross section for excitation of the CO2(+) B state by electron impact on CO2. It is suggested that the reason for the disparate results obtained by various authors for the B state can be traced to a calibration error due to scattered light. In particular, the tungsten filament lamps used in the experiments cited have very low intensity at wavelengths below 3000 A where the B state emissions occur, so that even a small amount of scattered light in the spectrometer will produce a large error in the measured cross section. In a remeasurement of the cross section for excitation of the B state at an energy of 150 eV it was found that at 2900 A the scattered light signal, if uncorrected for, would introduce an error of about 50%.

  15. Development of design information for molecular-sieve type regenerative CO2-removal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. M.; Ruder, J. M.; Dunn, V. B.; Hwang, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytic studies were conducted with molecular sieve sorbents to provide basic design information, and to develop a system design technique for regenerable CO2-removal systems for manned spacecraft. Single sorbate equilibrium data were obtained over a wide range of conditions for CO2, water, nitrogen, and oxygen on several molecular sieve and silica gel sorbents. The coadsorption of CO2 with water preloads, and with oxygen and nitrogen was experimentally evaluated. Mass-transfer, and some limited heat-transfer performance evaluations were accomplished under representative operating conditions, including the coadsorption of CO2 and water. CO2-removal system performance prediction capability was derived.

  16. Analysis of the PKT correction for direct CO2 flux measurements over the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landwehr, S.; Miller, S. D.; Smith, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.; Ward, B.

    2013-10-01

    Eddy covariance measurements of air-sea CO2 fluxes can be affected by cross-sensitivities of the CO2 measurement to water vapour, resulting in order-of-magnitude biases. Well established causes for these biases are (i) cross-sensitivity of the broadband non-dispersive infrared sensors due to band-broadening and spectral overlap (commercial sensors typically correct for this) and (ii) the effect of air density fluctuations (removed by determining the CO2 mixing ratio respective to dry air). However, another bias related to water vapour fluctuations has recently been observed with open-path sensors, and was attributed to sea salt build-up and water films on sensor optics. Two very different approaches have been used to deal with these water vapour-related biases. Miller et al. (2010) employed a membrane drier to physically eliminate 97% of the water vapour fluctuations in the sample air before it enters the gas analyser. Prytherch et al. (2010a) on the other hand, employed the empirical (Peter K. Taylor, PKT) post-processing correction to correct open-path sensor data. In this paper, we test these methods side by side using data from the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP) experiment in the Southern Ocean. The air-sea CO2 flux was directly measured with four closed-path analysers, two of which were positioned down-stream of a membrane dryer. The CO2 fluxes from the two dried gas analysers matched each other and were in general agreement with common parametrisations. The flux estimates from the un-dried sensors agreed with the dried sensors only during periods with low latent heat flux (≤ 7 W m-2). When latent heat flux was higher, CO2 flux estimates from the un-dried sensors exhibited large scatter and an order-of magnitude bias. We applied the PKT correction to the flux data from the un-dried analysers and found that it did not remove the bias when compared to the data from the dried gas analyser. Our detailed analysis of the correction algorithm reveals

  17. Changing controls on oceanic radiocarbon: New insights on shallow-to-deep ocean exchange and anthropogenic CO2 uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.; Key, R.; Khatiwala, S.; Giraud, X.

    2012-10-01

    The injection of radiocarbon (14C) into the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has provided a powerful tracer to investigate ocean physical and chemical processes. While the oceanic uptake of bomb-derived 14C was primarily controlled by air-sea exchange in the early decades after the bomb spike, we demonstrate that changes in oceanic 14C are now primarily controlled by shallow-to-deep ocean exchange, i.e., the same mechanism that governs anthropogenic CO2 uptake. This is a result of accumulated bomb 14C uptake that has rapidly decreased the air-sea gradient of 14C/C (Δ14C) and shifted the main reservoir of bomb 14C from the atmosphere to the upper ocean. The air-sea Δ14C gradient, reduced further by fossil fuel dilution, is now weaker than before weapons testing in most regions. Oceanic 14C, and particularly its temporal change, can now be used to study the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. We examine observed changes in oceanic Δ14C between the WOCE/SAVE (1988-1995) and the CLIVAR (2001-2007) eras and simulations with two ocean general circulation models, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean Model (ECCO). Observed oceanic Δ14C and its changes between the 1980s-90s and 2000s indicate that shallow-to-deep exchange is too efficient in ECCO and too sluggish in CCSM. These findings suggest that mean global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 between 1990 and 2007 is bounded by the ECCO-based estimate of 2.3 Pg C yr-1 and the CCSM-based estimate of 1.7 Pg C yr-1.

  18. Spatiotemporal variations in CO2 flux in a fringing reef simulated using a novel carbonate system dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nadaoka, K.; Maeda, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Blanco, A. C.

    2013-03-01

    A carbonate system dynamics (CSD) model was developed in a fringing reef on the east coast of Ishigaki Island, southwest Japan, by incorporating organic and inorganic carbon fluxes (photosynthesis and calcification), air-sea gas exchanges, and benthic cover of coral and seagrass into a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The CSD model could reproduce temporal variations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity in coral zones, but not in seagrass meadows. The poor reproduction in seagrass meadows can be attributed to significant contributions of submarine groundwater discharge as well as misclassification of remotely sensed megabenthos in this area. In comparison with offshore areas, the reef acted as a CO2 sink during the observation period when it was averaged over 24 h. The CSD model also indicated large spatiotemporal differences in the carbon dioxide (CO2) sink/source, possibly related to hydrodynamic features such as effective offshore seawater exchange and neap/spring tidal variation. This suggests that the data obtained from a single point observation may lead to misinterpretation of the overall trend and thus should be carefully considered. The model analysis also showed that the advective flux of DIC from neighboring grids is several times greater than local biological flux of DIC and is three orders of magnitude greater than the air-sea gas flux at the coral zone. Sensitivity tests in which coral or seagrass covers were altered revealed that the CO2 sink potential was much more sensitive to changes in coral cover than seagrass cover.

  19. Numerical simulation of changes in tropical cyclone intensity using a coupled air-sea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yihong; Wu, Rongsheng; Yu, Runling; Liang, Xudong

    2013-10-01

    A coupled air-sea model for tropical cyclones (TCs) is constructed by coupling the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research mesoscale model (MM5) with the Princeton Ocean Model. Four numerical simulations of tropical cyclone development have been conducted using different configurations of the coupled model on the f-plane. When coupled processes are excluded, a weak initial vortex spins up into a mature symmetric TC that strongly resembles those observed and simulated in prior research. The coupled model reproduces the reduction in sea temperature induced by the TC reasonably well, as well as changes in the minimum central pressure of the TC that result from negative atmosphere-ocean feedbacks. Asymmetric structures are successfully simulated under conditions of uniform environmental flow. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is suitable for simulating air-sea interactions under TC conditions. The effects of the ocean on the track of the TC and changes in its intensity under uniform environmental flow are also investigated. TC intensity responds nonlinearly to sea surface temperature (SST). The TC intensification rate becomes smaller once the SST exceeds a certain threshold. Oceanic stratification also influences TC intensity, with stronger stratification responsible for a larger decrease in intensity. The value of oceanic enthalpy is small when the ocean is weakly stratified and large when the ocean is strongly stratified, demonstrating that the oceanic influence on TC intensity results not only from SST distributions but also from stratification. Air-sea interaction has only a slight influence on TC movement in this model.

  20. Impacts of air-sea exchange coefficients on snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Yoon; Kwon, Young Cheol

    2016-08-01

    Snowfall over the Korean Peninsula is mainly associated with air mass transformation by the fluxes across the air-sea interface during cold-air outbreaks over the warm Yellow Sea. The heat and momentum exchange coefficients in the surface flux parameterization are key parameters of flux calculations across the air-sea interface. This study investigates the effects of the air-sea exchange coefficients on the simulations of snowfall events over the Korean Peninsula using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two snowfall cases are selected for this study. One is a heavy snowfall event that took place on January 4, 2010, and the other is a light snowfall event that occurred on December 23-24, 2011. Several sensitivity tests are carried out with increased and decreased heat and momentum exchange coefficients. The domain-averaged precipitation is increased (decreased) with increased (decreased) heat exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) surface heat flux leads to more (less) moist conditions in the low level of the atmosphere. On the other hand, the domain-averaged precipitation is decreased (increased) with increased (decreased) momentum exchange coefficient because the increased (decreased) momentum coefficient causes reduction (increase) of wind speed and heat flux. The variation of precipitation in the heat exchange coefficient experiments is much larger than that in the momentum exchange coefficient experiments because the change of heat flux has a more direct impact on moisture flux and snowfall amount, while the change of momentum flux has a rather indirect impact via wind speed changes. The low-pressure system is intensified and moves toward North when the heat exchange coefficient is increased because warming and moistening of the lower atmosphere contributes to destabilize the air mass, resulting in the change of precipitation pattern over the Korean Peninsula in the heat exchange coefficient experiments.

  1. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  2. Intense air-sea exchange and heavy rainfall: impact of the northern Adriatic SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchi, P.; Davolio, S.

    2016-02-01

    Over the northern Adriatic basin, intense air-sea interactions are often associated with heavy precipitation over the mountainous areas surrounding the basin. In this study, a high-resolution mesoscale model is employed to simulate three severe weather events and to evaluate the effect of the sea surface temperature on the intensity and location of heavy rainfall. The sensitivity tests show that the impact of SST varies among the events and it mainly involves the modification of the PBL characteristics and thus the flow dynamics and its interaction with the orography.

  3. An observational search for CO2 ice clouds on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Calvin, Wendy M.; Pollack, James B.; Crisp, David

    1993-01-01

    CO2 ice clouds were first directly identified on Mars by the Mariner 6 and 7 infrared spectrometer limb scans. These observations provided support for early theoretical modeling efforts of CO2 condensation. Mariner 9 IRIS temperature profiles of north polar hood clouds were interpreted as indicating that these clouds were composed of H2O ice at lower latitudes and CO2 ice at higher latitudes. The role of CO2 condensation on Mars has recently received increased attention because (1) Kasting's model results indicated that CO2 cloud condensation limits the magnitude of the proposed early Mars CO2/H2O greenhouse, and (2) Pollack el al.'s GCM results indicated that the formation of CO2 ice clouds is favorable at all polar latitudes during the fall and winter seasons. These latter authors have shown that CO2 clouds play an important role in the polar energy balance, as the amount of CO2 contained in the polar caps is constrained by a balance between latent heat release, heat advected from lower latitudes, and thermal emission to space. The polar hood clouds reduce the amount of CO2 condensation on the polar caps because they reduce the net emission to space. There have been many extensive laboratory spectroscopic studies of H2O and CO2 ices and frosts. In this study, we use results from these and other sources to search for the occurrence of diagnostic CO2 (and H2O) ice and/or frost absorption features in ground based near-infrared imaging spectroscopic data of Mars. Our primary goals are (1) to try to confirm the previous direct observations of CO2 clouds on Mars; (2) to determine the spatial extent, temporal variability, and composition (H2O/CO2 ratio) of any clouds detected; and (3) through radiative transfer modeling, to try to determine the mean particle size and optical depth of polar hood clouds, thus, assessing their role in the polar heat budget.

  4. Drivers of pCO2 variability in two contrasting coral reef lagoons: The influence of submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyronak, Tyler; Santos, Isaac R.; Erler, Dirk V.; Maher, Damien T.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2014-04-01

    The impact of groundwater on pCO2 variability was assessed in two coral reef lagoons with distinct drivers of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Diel variability of pCO2 in the two ecosystems was explained by a combination of biological drivers and SGD inputs. In Rarotonga, a South Pacific volcanic island, 222Rn-derived SGD was driven primarily by a steep terrestrial hydraulic gradient, and the water column was influenced by the high pCO2 (5501 µatm) of the fresh groundwater. In Heron Island, a Great Barrier Reef coral cay, SGD was dominated by seawater recirculation through the sediments (i.e., tidal pumping), and pCO2 was mainly impacted through the stimulation of biological processes. The Rarotonga water column had a higher average pCO2 (549 µatm) than Heron Island (471 µatm). However, pCO2 exhibited a greater diel range in Heron Island (778 µatm) than in Rarotonga (507 µatm). The Rarotonga water column received 29.0 ± 8.2 mmol free-CO2 m-2 d-1 from SGD, while the Heron Island water column received 12.1 ± 4.2 mmol free-CO2 m-2 d-1. Over the course of this study, both systems were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere with SGD-derived free-CO2 most likely contributing a large portion to the air-sea CO2 flux. Studies measuring the carbon chemistry of coral reefs (e.g., metabolism and calcification rates) may need to consider the effects of groundwater inputs on water column carbonate chemistry. Local drivers of coral reef carbonate chemistry such as SGD may offer more approachable management solutions to mitigating the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs.

  5. Is there a component of Pleistocene CO2 change associated with carbonate dissolution cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, Robin S.

    1995-10-01

    The only processes which could have decreased atmospheric CO2 during glacial climates without appreciably changing the carbon isotope distribution in the sea appear to be (1) dissolved calcium carbonate input to the ocean, e.g., coral reef buildup and erosion, (2) the ocean solubility pump, due to changes in surface temperature or air-sea exchange, or (3) decreased biological production of calcium carbonate. It is assumed here that one of these mechanisms caused part of the atmospheric CO2 changes recorded in the 200-kyr-long Vostok ice core. Two residual CO2 records are generated by scaling the δ13C difference between planktonic and benthic foraminifera in marine sediment cores to -82 ppm CO2 per 1‰ increase in Δδ13C and subtracting from this the measured CO2 concentration in the ice core. Both residual CO2 records exhibit two broad maximums between about 20-50 ka and 140-200 ka, indicating that during these times, about 40 ppm of the CO2 decrease from interglacial levels cannot be explained by the interaction of the ocean's biological and vertical mixing cycles. The shape of the residual CO2 curve is similar qualitatively to the variation of calcium carbonate in central equatorial Pacific sediments during this time period, which would imply that changes in dissolved carbonate input to the ocean contributed the added component of CO2 change. However, recent models of atmospheric CO2 change in response to changing alkaline input to the ocean exhibit about a 25 to 35 ppm decrease per 1013 mol yr-1 increase in dissolved CaCO3 input. If compensation for the changing input is occurring mostly within an area of about 40 × 106 km² below the lysocline in the Indo-Pacific, the change in carbonate accumulation rate corresponding to a -40 ppm CO2 change would be a minimum of 3 mg cm-2 yr-1. This can be compared to glacial increases of 0.5 to 1.0 mg cm-2 yr-1 during the last 200 kyr in central equatorial Pacific sediments. Thus, the added glacial accumulation of

  6. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y; Zhang, Gengsheng; Rannik, Ullar; Vesala, Timo

    2008-09-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts the concentration and flux fields against those of a uniform forested surface. We use an atmospheric boundary layer two-equation closure model that accounts for the flow dynamics and vertical divergence of CO2 sources/sinks within a plant canopy. This paper characterizes the spatial variation of CO2 fluxes as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated in the upper part of the canopy. These results can be useful both for interpretation of existing measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) from flux towers in limited fetch conditions and in planning future CO2 transport experiments.

  7. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y; Zhang, Gengsheng; Rannik, Ullar; Vesala, Timo

    2008-09-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts the concentration and flux fields against those of a uniform forested surface. We use an atmospheric boundary layer two-equation closure model that accounts for the flow dynamics and vertical divergence of CO2 sources/sinks within a plant canopy. This paper characterizes the spatial variation of CO2 fluxes as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes monotonously. Such a variation is caused by scalar advection in the trunk space and reveals itself as a decrease or increase in vertical fluxes over the forest relative to carbon dioxide exchange of the underlying forest. The effect was more pronounced in model forests where the leaf area is concentrated in the upper part of the canopy. These results can be useful both for interpretation of existing measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) from flux towers in limited fetch conditions and in planning future CO2 transport experiments. PMID:18767622

  8. Ozone Radiative Feedback in Global Warming Simulations with CO2 and non-CO2 Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponater, M.; Rieger, V.; Dietmüller, S.

    2015-12-01

    It has been found that ozone radiative feedback acts to reduce the climate sensitivity in global warming simulations including interactive atmospheric chemistry, if the radiative forcing origins from CO2 increase. The effect can be traced to a negative feedback from stratospheric ozone changes and it is amplified by a reduced positive feedback from stratospheric water vapor.These findings cannot be simply transferred to simulations in which the warming is driven by a non-CO2 radiative forcing. Using a perturbation of surface NOx and CO emissions as an example, we demonstrate that a tropospheric ozone feedback may have significant impacts on physical feedbacks. These interactions can act to an extent that the effect of a negative ozone feedback can be reversed by changes in other feedbacks, thus increasing the climate sensitivity instead of reducing it. We also address some conceptual issues showing up as chemical feedbacks are added to set of physical feedbacks in simulation with interactive chemistry.

  9. Phytoplankton carbon fixation gene (RuBisCO) transcripts and air-sea CO2 flux in the Mississippi River plume

    SciTech Connect

    John, David E.; Wang, Zhaohui A.; Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Corredor, Jorge E.; López, José M.; Cabrera, Alvaro; Bronk, Deborah A.; Tabita, F. Robert; Paul, John H.

    2007-08-30

    River plumes deliver large quantities of nutrients to oligotrophic oceans, often resulting in significant CO2 drawdown. To determine the relationship between expression of the major gene in carbon fixation (large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) and CO2 dynamics, we evaluated rbcL mRNA abundance using novel quantitative PCR assays, phytoplankton cell analyses, photophysiological parameters, and pCO2 in and around the Mississippi River plume (MRP) in the Gulf of Mexico. Lower salinity (30–32) stations were dominated by rbcL mRNA concentrations from heterokonts, such as diatoms and pelagophytes, which were at least an order of magnitude greater than haptophytes, alpha-Synechococcus or high-light Prochlorococcus. However, rbcL transcript abundances were similar among these groups at oligotrophic stations (salinity 34–36). Diatom cell counts and heterokont rbcL RNA showed a strong negative correlation to seawater pCO2. While Prochlorococcus cells did not exhibit a large difference between low and high pCO2 water, Prochlorococcus rbcL RNA concentrations had a strong positive correlation to pCO2, suggesting a very low level of RuBisCO RNA transcription among Prochlorococcus in the plume waters, possibly due to their relatively poor carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These results provide molecular evidence that diatom/pelagophyte productivity is largely responsible for the large CO2 drawdown occurring in the MRP, based on the co-occurrence of elevated RuBisCO gene transcript concentrations from this group and reduced seawater pCO2 levels. This may partly be due to efficient CCMs that enable heterokont eukaryotes such as diatoms to continue fixing CO2 in the face of strong CO2 drawdown. Finally, our work represents the first attempt to relate in situ microbial gene expression to contemporaneous CO2 flux measurements in the ocean.

  10. Estimation of continuous anthropogenic CO2 using CO2, CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardag, S. N.; Gerbig, C.; Janssens-Maenhout, G.; Levin, I.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate different methods for estimating anthropogenic CO2 using modelled continuous atmospheric concentrations of CO2 alone, as well as CO2 in combination with the surrogate tracers CO, δ13C(CO2) and Δ14C(CO2). These methods are applied at three hypothetical stations representing rural, urban and polluted conditions. We find that independent of the tracer used, an observation-based estimate of continuous anthropogenic CO2 is not feasible at rural measurement sites due to the low signal to noise ratio of anthropogenic CO2 estimates at such settings. At urban and polluted sites, potential future continuous Δ14C(CO2) measurements with a precision of 5 ‰ or better are most promising for anthropogenic CO2 determination (precision ca. 10-20%), but the insensitivity against CO2 contributions from biofuel emissions may reduce its accuracy in the future. Other tracers, such as δ13C(CO2) and CO could provide an accurate and already available alternative if all CO2 sources in the catchment area are well characterized with respect to their isotopic signature and CO to anthropogenic CO2 ratio. We suggest a strategy for calibrating these source characteristics on an annual basis using precise Δ14C(CO2) measurements on grab samples. The precision of anthropogenic CO2 determination using δ13C(CO2) is largely determined by the measurement precision of δ13C(CO2) and CO2. The precision when using the CO-method is mainly limited by the variation of natural CO sources and CO sinks. At present, continuous anthropogenic CO2 could be determined using the tracers δ13C(CO2) and/or CO with a precision of about 30 %, a mean bias of about 10 % and without significant diurnal discrepancies. This allows significant improvement, validation and bias reduction of highly resolved emission inventories using atmospheric observation and regional modelling.

  11. Bubble Stripping as a Tool To Reduce High Dissolved CO2 in Coastal Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koweek, David A; Mucciarone, David A; Dunbar, Robert B

    2016-04-01

    High dissolved CO2 concentrations in coastal ecosystems are a common occurrence due to a combination of large ecosystem metabolism, shallow water, and long residence times. Many important coastal species may have adapted to this natural variability over time, but eutrophication and ocean acidification may be perturbing the water chemistry beyond the bounds of tolerance for these organisms. We are currently limited in our ability to deal with the geochemical changes unfolding in our coastal ocean. This study helps to address this deficit of solutions by introducing bubble stripping as a novel geochemical engineering approach to reducing high CO2 in coastal marine ecosystems. We use a process-based model to find that air/sea gas exchange rates within a bubbled system are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than within a nonbubbled system. By coupling bubbling-enhanced ventilation to a coastal ecosystem metabolism model, we demonstrate that strategically timed bubble plumes can mitigate exposure to high CO2 under present-day conditions and that exposure mitigation is enhanced in the more acidic conditions predicted by the end of the century. We argue that shallow water CO2 bubble stripping should be considered among the growing list of engineering approaches intended to increase coastal resilience in a changing ocean.

  12. Bubble Stripping as a Tool To Reduce High Dissolved CO2 in Coastal Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koweek, David A; Mucciarone, David A; Dunbar, Robert B

    2016-04-01

    High dissolved CO2 concentrations in coastal ecosystems are a common occurrence due to a combination of large ecosystem metabolism, shallow water, and long residence times. Many important coastal species may have adapted to this natural variability over time, but eutrophication and ocean acidification may be perturbing the water chemistry beyond the bounds of tolerance for these organisms. We are currently limited in our ability to deal with the geochemical changes unfolding in our coastal ocean. This study helps to address this deficit of solutions by introducing bubble stripping as a novel geochemical engineering approach to reducing high CO2 in coastal marine ecosystems. We use a process-based model to find that air/sea gas exchange rates within a bubbled system are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than within a nonbubbled system. By coupling bubbling-enhanced ventilation to a coastal ecosystem metabolism model, we demonstrate that strategically timed bubble plumes can mitigate exposure to high CO2 under present-day conditions and that exposure mitigation is enhanced in the more acidic conditions predicted by the end of the century. We argue that shallow water CO2 bubble stripping should be considered among the growing list of engineering approaches intended to increase coastal resilience in a changing ocean. PMID:26988138

  13. Direct measurements of CO2 flux in the Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, Siv K.; McGillis, Wade R.; Bariteau, Ludovic; Fairall, C. W.; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Zappa, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    During summer 2006 eddy correlation CO2 fluxes were measured in the Greenland Sea using a novel system set-up with two shrouded LICOR-7500 detectors. One detector was used exclusively to determine, and allow the removal of, the bias on CO2 fluxes due to sensor motion. A recently published correction method for the CO2-H2O cross-correlation was applied to the data set. We show that even with shrouded sensors the data require significant correction due to this cross-correlation. This correction adjusts the average CO2 flux by an order of magnitude from -6.7 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1 to -0.61 × 10-2 mol m-2 day-1, making the corrected fluxes comparable to those calculated using established parameterizations for transfer velocity.

  14. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  15. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  16. Air-sea interaction and surface flux in non-equilibrium sea-states

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, G.; Ek, M.; Mahrt, L.

    1994-12-31

    The wind forcing over the ocean determines the air-sea exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum which affect and drive the surface wave dynamics and the mixed layer circulation. In turn, it has been shown that wave dynamics and wave age affect ocean surface roughness and air-sea exchange processes so that the wind flow is not always in equilibrium with the ocean surface waves. This effect of wave spectrum on surface roughness has been discussed by many authors; yet it is rarely, if ever, accounted for in flux parameterization in models of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Proper representation of these effects in both remote sensors` signal to geophysical-parameter models and in physical models of the ocean and the atmosphere on all scales is essential given the increased reliance of ocean monitoring systems on remote sea-surface sensors and the fundamental sensitivity of physical models to surface fluxes. In this paper the authors present a methodology for modeling these effects from data along with some results from data analyses of observations taken in two field experiments.

  17. Air-sea interaction at the subtropical convergence south of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault, M.; Lutjeharms, J.R.E.; Ballegooyen, R.C. van

    1994-12-31

    The oceanic region south of Africa plays a key role in the control of Southern Africa weather and climate. This is particularly the case for the Subtropical Convergence region, the northern border of the Southern Ocean. An extensive research cruise to investigate this specific front was carried out during June and July 1993. A strong front, the Subtropical Convergence was identified, however its geographic disposition was complicated by the presence of an intense warm eddy detached from the Agulhas current. The warm surface water in the eddy created a strong contrast between it and the overlying atmosphere. Oceanographic measurements (XBT and CTD) were jointly made with radiosonde observations and air-sea interaction measurements. The air-sea interaction measurement system included a Gill sonic anemometer, an Ophir infrared hygrometer, an Eppley pyranometer, an Eppley pyrgeometer and a Vaissala temperature and relative humidity probe. Turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were calculated in real time using the inertial dissipation method and the bulk method. All these measurements allowed a thorough investigation of the net heat loss of the ocean, the deepening of the mixed layer during a severe storm as well as the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and ocean-atmosphere exchanges.

  18. Impacts of Air-Sea Interaction on Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Wang, Bin; Braun, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of hurricane-ocean coupling on intensity and track of tropical cyclones (TCs) is investigated through idealized numerical experiments using a coupled hurricane-ocean model. The focus is placed on how air-sea interaction affects TC tracks and intensity. It is found that the symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) cooling is primarily responsible for the TC weakening in the coupled experiments because the induced asymmetric circulation associated with the asymmetric SST anomalies is weak and shallow. The track difference between the coupled and fixed SST experiments is generally small because of the competing processes. One is associated with the modified TC asymmetries. The asymmetric SST anomalies - weaken the surface fluxes in the rear and enhance the fluxes in the front. As a result, the enhanced diabatic heating is located on the southern side for a westward-moving TC, tending to shift the TC southward. The symmetric SST anomalies weakens the TC intensity and thus the dymmetrization process, leading to more prominent TC asymmetries. The other is associated with the weakening of the beta drift resulting from the weakening of the TC outer strength. In the coupled experiment, the weakening of the beta drift leads to a more northward shift. By adjusting the vortex outer strength of the initial vortices, the beta drift can vary while the effect of air-sea interaction changes little. Two types of track differences simulated in the previous numerical studies are obtained.

  19. Resolving the abundance and air-sea fluxes of airborne microorganisms in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Mayol, Eva; Jiménez, María A; Herndl, Gerhard J; Duarte, Carlos M; Arrieta, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    Airborne transport of microbes may play a central role in microbial dispersal, the maintenance of diversity in aquatic systems and in meteorological processes such as cloud formation. Yet, there is almost no information about the abundance and fate of microbes over the oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth's surface and are the likely source and final destination of a large fraction of airborne microbes. We measured the abundance of microbes in the lower atmosphere over a transect covering 17° of latitude in the North Atlantic Ocean and derived estimates of air-sea exchange of microorganisms from meteorological data. The estimated load of microorganisms in the atmospheric boundary layer ranged between 6 × 10(4) and 1.6 × 10(7) microbes per m(2) of ocean, indicating a very dynamic air-sea exchange with millions of microbes leaving and entering the ocean per m(2) every day. Our results show that about 10% of the microbes detected in the boundary layer were still airborne 4 days later and that they could travel up to 11,000 km before they entered the ocean again. The size of the microbial pool hovering over the North Atlantic indicates that it could play a central role in the maintenance of microbial diversity in the surface ocean and contribute significantly to atmospheric processes.

  20. Biopolymers form a gelatinous microlayer at the air-sea interface when Arctic sea ice melts

    PubMed Central

    Galgani, Luisa; Piontek, Judith; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The interface layer between ocean and atmosphere is only a couple of micrometers thick but plays a critical role in climate relevant processes, including the air-sea exchange of gas and heat and the emission of primary organic aerosols (POA). Recent findings suggest that low-level cloud formation above the Arctic Ocean may be linked to organic polymers produced by marine microorganisms. Sea ice harbors high amounts of polymeric substances that are produced by cells growing within the sea-ice brine. Here, we report from a research cruise to the central Arctic Ocean in 2012. Our study shows that microbial polymers accumulate at the air-sea interface when the sea ice melts. Proteinaceous compounds represented the major fraction of polymers supporting the formation of a gelatinous interface microlayer and providing a hitherto unrecognized potential source of marine POA. Our study indicates a novel link between sea ice-ocean and atmosphere that may be sensitive to climate change. PMID:27435531

  1. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  2. Occurrence and air-sea exchange of phthalates in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Lohmann, Rainer; Caba, Armando; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Air and seawater samples were taken simultaneously to investigate the distribution and air-sea gas exchange of phthalates in the Arctic onboard the German Research Ship FS Polarstern. Samples were collected on expeditions ARK XX1&2 from the North Sea to the high Arctic (60 degrees N-85 degrees N) in the summer of 2004. The concentration of sigma6 phthalates (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-i-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)) ranged from 30 to 5030 pg L(-1) in the aqueous dissolved phase and from 1110 to 3090 pg m(-3) in the atmospheric gas phase. A decreasing latitudinal trend was present in the seawater and to a lesser degree in the atmosphere from the Norwegian coast to the high Arctic. Overall, deposition dominated the air-sea gas exchange for DEHP, while volatilization from seawater took place in the near-coast environment. The estimated net gas deposition of DEHP was 5, 30, and 190 t year(-1) for the Norwegian Sea, the Greenland Sea, and the Arctic, respectively. This suggests that atmospheric transport and deposition of phthalates is a significant process for their occurrence in the remote Atlantic and Arctic Ocean.

  3. Resolving the abundance and air-sea fluxes of airborne microorganisms in the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Mayol, Eva; Jiménez, María A.; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Arrieta, Jesús M.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne transport of microbes may play a central role in microbial dispersal, the maintenance of diversity in aquatic systems and in meteorological processes such as cloud formation. Yet, there is almost no information about the abundance and fate of microbes over the oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth's surface and are the likely source and final destination of a large fraction of airborne microbes. We measured the abundance of microbes in the lower atmosphere over a transect covering 17° of latitude in the North Atlantic Ocean and derived estimates of air-sea exchange of microorganisms from meteorological data. The estimated load of microorganisms in the atmospheric boundary layer ranged between 6 × 104 and 1.6 × 107 microbes per m2 of ocean, indicating a very dynamic air-sea exchange with millions of microbes leaving and entering the ocean per m2 every day. Our results show that about 10% of the microbes detected in the boundary layer were still airborne 4 days later and that they could travel up to 11,000 km before they entered the ocean again. The size of the microbial pool hovering over the North Atlantic indicates that it could play a central role in the maintenance of microbial diversity in the surface ocean and contribute significantly to atmospheric processes. PMID:25400625

  4. Sorption enhanced CO2 methanation.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, Andreas; Gallandat, Noris; Probst, Benjamin; Suter, Riccardo; Callini, Elsa; Ferri, Davide; Arroyo, Yadira; Erni, Rolf; Geerlings, Hans; Züttel, Andreas

    2013-06-28

    The transformation from the fatuous consumption of fossil energy towards a sustainable energy circle is most easily marketable by not changing the underlying energy carrier but generating it from renewable energy. Hydrocarbons can be principally produced from renewable hydrogen and carbon dioxide collected by biomass. However, research is needed to increase the energetic and economic efficiency of the process. We demonstrate the enhancement of CO2 methanation by sorption enhanced catalysis. The preparation and catalytic activity of sorption catalysts based on Ni particles in zeolites is reported. The functioning of the sorption catalysis is discussed together with the determination of the reaction mechanism, providing implications for new ways in catalysis. PMID:23673365

  5. Air-sea exchange of dimethylsulfide in the Southern Ocean: Measurements from SO GasEx compared to temperate and tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B. W.; Fairall, C. W.; Archer, S. D.; Huebert, B. J.

    2011-04-01

    In the Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment (SO GasEx), we measured an atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentration of 118 ± 54 pptv (1σ), a DMS sea-to-air flux of 2.9 ± 2.1 μmol m-2 d-1 by eddy covariance, and a seawater DMS concentration of 1.6 ± 0.7 nM. Dividing flux by the concurrent air-sea concentration difference yields the transfer velocity of DMS (kDMS). The kDMS in the Southern Ocean was significantly lower than previous measurements in the equatorial east Pacific, Sargasso Sea, northeast Atlantic, and southeast Pacific. Normalizing kDMS for the temperature dependence in waterside diffusivity and solubility results in better agreement among various field studies and suggests that the low kDMS in the Southern Ocean is primarily due to colder temperatures. The higher solubility of DMS at a lower temperature results in greater airside control and less transfer of the gas by bubbles formed from breaking waves. The final normalized DMS transfer velocity is similar to k of less soluble gases such as carbon dioxide in low-to-moderate winds; in high winds, DMS transfer velocity is significantly lower because of the reduced bubble-mediated transfer.

  6. Comparison of the One-electron Oxidations of CO-Bridged vs Unbridged Bimetallic Complexes: Electron-transfer Chemistry of Os2Cp2(CO)4 and Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp = η5-C5H5, Cp* = η5-C5Me5)

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, Derek R.; Bullock, R. Morris; Lee, Richmond; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Geiger, William J.

    2014-09-22

    The one-electron oxidations of two dimers of half-sandwich osmium carbonyl complexes have been examined by electrochemistry, spectro-electrochemistry, and computational methods. The all-terminal carbonyl complex Os2Cp2(CO)4 (1, Cp = η5-C5H5) undergoes a reversible one-electron anodic reaction at E1/2 = 0.41 V vs ferrocene in CH2Cl2/0.05 M [NBu4][B(C6F5)4], giving a rare example of a metal-metal bonded radical cation unsupported by bridging ligands. The IR spectrum of 1+ is consistent with an approximately 1:1 mixture of anti and gauche structures for the 33 e- radical cation in which it has retained all-terminal bonding of the CO ligands. DFT calculations, including orbital-occupancy-perturbed Mayer bond-order analyses, show that the HOMOs of anti-1 and gauche-1 are metal-ligand delocalized. Removal of an electron from 1 has very little effect on the Os-Os bond order, accounting for the resistance of 1+ to heterolytic cleavage. The Os-Os bond distance is calculated to decrease by 0.10 Å and 0.06 Å as a consequence of one-electron oxidation of anti-1 and gauche-1, respectively. The CO-bridged complex Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp* = η5-C5Me5), trans-2, undergoes a more facile oxidation, E1/2 = - 0.11 V, giving a persistent radical cation shown by solution IR analysis to preserve its bridged-carbonyl structure. However, ESR analysis of frozen solutions of 2+ is interpreted in terms of the presence of two isomers, most likely anti-2+ and trans-2+, at low temperature. Calculations show that the HOMO of trans-2 is highly delocalized over the metal-ligand framework, with the bridging carbonyls accounting for about half of the orbital makeup. The Os-Os bond order again changes very little with removal of an electron, and the Os-Os bond length actually undergoes minor shortening. Calculations suggest that the second isomer of 2+ has both the trans CO-bridged and the anti all-terminal CO structures. DRL and WEG acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation under

  7. Air-sea interaction and formation of the Asian summer monsoon onset vortex over the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoxiong; Guan, Yue; Liu, Yimin; Yan, Jinghui; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-01-01

    In spring over the southern Bay of Bengal (BOB), a vortex commonly develops, followed by the Asian summer monsoon onset. An analysis of relevant data and a case study reveals that the BOB monsoon onset vortex is formed as a consequence of air-sea interaction over BOB, which is modulated by Tibetan Plateau forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast over the South Asian area during the spring season. Tibetan Plateau forcing in spring generates a prevailing cold northwesterly over India in the lower troposphere. Strong surface sensible heating is then released, forming a prominent surface cyclone with a strong southwesterly along the coastal ocean in northwestern BOB. This southwesterly induces a local offshore current and upwelling, resulting in cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The southwesterly, together with the near-equatorial westerly, also results in a surface anticyclone with descending air over most of BOB and a cyclone with ascending air over the southern part of BOB. In the eastern part of central BOB, where sky is clear, surface wind is weak, and ocean mixed layer is shallow, intense solar radiation and low energy loss due to weak surface latent and sensible heat fluxes act onto a thin ocean layer, resulting in the development of a unique BOB warm pool in spring. Near the surface, water vapor is transferred from northern BOB and other regions to southeastern BOB, where surface sensible heating is relatively high. The atmospheric available potential energy is generated and converted to kinetic energy, thereby resulting in vortex formation. The vortex then intensifies and moves northward, where SST is higher and surface sensible heating is stronger. Meanwhile, the zonal-mean kinetic energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy in the area east of the vortex, and the vortex turns eastward. Eventually, southwesterly sweeps over eastern BOB and merges with the subtropical westerly, leading to the onset of the Asian summer monsoon.

  8. Simulation and Observation of Global Variations in Surface Exchange and Atmospheric Mixing Ratios of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, A.; Conner-Gausepohl, S.; Kawa, S.; Baker, I. T.; Zhu, Z.; Brown, M.; Vay, S.; Wofsy, S. C.; Philpott, A.; Collatz, G.; Schaefer, K.; Kleist, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have performed a simulation of hourly variations of terrestrial surface fluxes and the atmospheric mixing ratio of carbon dioxide from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2004, and have evaluated the simulation by comparison to a number of observations. Terrestrial photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration were computed using the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB), driven by diurnally-varying weather analyzed by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS), with vegetation parameters specified using imagery from the NOAA Advanced High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). CO2 emissions due to the combustion of fossil fuel and to air-sea gas exchange were also prescribed as boundary forcing to the atmospheric transport Parameterized Chemical Transport model (PCTM). Preliminary results showed reasonable agreement with spatial and synoptic variations, but suffered from a systematic offset with respect to the observed seasonal cycle of CO2 at many flask observing stations. Subsequent analysis showed that these problems were traceable to temporal interpolation of the satellite vegetation imagery and the treatment of leaf-to-canopy scaling in SiB, which have both been substantially revised as a result of these analyses. Comparisons to eddy covariance data at several sites, to tower-based continuous observations of CO2 mixing ratio, and to data collected by airborne sampling show that the coupled simulation successfully captures many features of the observed temporal and spatial variations of terrestrial surface exchange and atmospheric transport of CO2. The simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of both surface exchange and atmospheric transport of CO2 to synoptic weather events in middle latitudes, and suggest that high-frequency variations in continental [CO2] data can be interpreted in terms of surface flux anomalies.

  9. Impacts of elevated CO2 on plant-microbial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, S.; Herman, D.; Nuccio, E. E.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Brodie, E.; He, Z.; Zhou, J.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 levels are predicted to alter C cycling and terrestrial ecosystem functions through effects on plant-microbial interactions. Under elevated CO2, plants transfer more C belowground. However, the fate, transformation and consequence of this extra C in soil are not well understood. We examined the influence of eCO2 on the belowground C cycling using Avena fatua, a common Mediterranean annual grass, with its root associated microbial community across multiple plant growth stages over one-growing season. Avena grown under eCO2 (700 ppm) 13CO2 increased both total C allocated belowground and the amount of root-derived 13C in the mineral-associated fraction. Although eCO2 did not show any significant impact on the abundance (quantified by qPCR) and composition (assessed by MiSeq 16S and ITS sequencing) of rhizosphere microbial community at any sampling time point, small but significant shifts on rhizosphere microbial functional potential were detected using GeoChip 5.0. In addition, the rhizosphere effect (i.e., impact of roots on rhizosphere community versus bulk soil) was much stronger in plants grown under eCO2 than these under ambient CO2 (aCO2). The rhizosphere enriched genes included key functional genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling as well as stress response. The signal intensities of a number of C cycling genes shifted significantly in rhizosphere communities associated with plants grown under eCO2, and many of these genes are involved in the decomposition of low molecular weight C compounds. When plants became senescent, the abundance of some genes encoding enzymes capable of decomposing macromolecular C compounds (e.g., xylanase, endopolygalacturonase) were significant higher in the rhizosphere of Avena grown in eCO2 than aCO2 condition, which may be due to the higher amount of Avena root debris detected at the end of season. Understanding modulations of plant-microbial interactions due to changing climate may allow improved

  10. Effects of diffusion impairment on O2 and CO2 time courses in pulmonary capillaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Simultaneous time courses for O2 and CO2 exchange along the capillary have been calculated for homogeneous lungs, allowing for O2-CO2 interactions, dissolved O2, and chemical reaction rates. As diffusing capacity (Dl) was reduced, the transfer of CO2 and O2 was impaired by similar amounts, in spite of the 20-fold greater diffusing capacity for CO2. The reason why CO2 is affected so much is that the slope of the content against partial pressure is so much greater in blood than tissue for this gas. Because of the shapes of their respective dissociation curves, O2 transfer was most affected at normal ventilation-perfusion ratios, whereas CO2 was most affected at high ratios. Exercise exaggerated the impairment of transfer of both gases.

  11. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2.

  12. A numerical coupled model for studying air-sea-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Le Ngoc

    1995-10-01

    A numerical coupled model of air-sea-wave interaction is developed to study the influence of ocean wind waves on dynamical, turbulent structures of the air-sea system and their impact on coupled modeling. The model equations for both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers include equations for: (1) momentum, (2) a k-ɛ turbulence scheme, and (3) stratification in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The model equations are written in the same form for both the atmosphere and ocean. In this model, wind waves are considered as another source of turbulent energy in the upper layer of the ocean besides turbulent energy from shear production. The dissipation ɛ at the ocean surface is written as a linear combination of terms representing dissipation from mean flow and breaking waves. The ɛ from breaking waves is estimated by using similarity theory and observed data. It is written in terms of wave parameters such as wave phase speed, height, and length, which are then expressed in terms of friction velocity. Numerical experiments are designed for various geostrophic winds, wave heights, and wave ages, to study the influence of waves on the air-sea system. The numerical simulations show that the vertical profiles of ɛ in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers (AOBL) are similar. The magnitudes of ɛ in the oceanic surface zone are much larger than those in the atmospheric surface zone and in the interior of the oceanic boundary layer (OBL). The model predicts ɛ distributions with a surface zone of large dissipation which was not expected from similarity scaling based on observed wind stress and surface buoyancy. The simulations also show that waves have a strong influence on eddy viscosity coefficients (EVC) and momentum fluxes, and have a dominated effect on the component of fluxes in the direction of the wind. The depth of large changes in flux magnitudes and EVC in the ocean can reach to 10-20 m. The simulations of surface drift currents confirm that

  13. Development status of regenerable solid amine CO2 control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K., Jr.; Nalette, T. A.; Cusick, R. J.; Reysa, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of solid amine/water desorbed (SAWD) CO2 control systems is reviewed. The design of the preprototype SAWD I CO2 system on the basis of a three-man metabolic load at the 3.8 mm Hg ambient CO2 level, and the functions of the CO2 removal, CO2 storage/delivery, controller, and life test laboratory support packages are described. The development of a full-scale multiple canister SAWD II preprototype system, which is capable of conducting the CO2 removal/concentration function in a closed-loop atmosphere revitalization system during zero-gravity operation, is examined. The operation of the SAWD II system, including the absorption and desorption cycles, is analyzed. A reduction in the thermal mass of the canister and the system's energy transfer technique result in efficient energy use. The polyether foam, nylon felt, nickel foam, spring retained, and metal bellows bed tests performed to determine the design of the zero-gravity canister are studied; metal bellows are selected for the canister's configuration.

  14. Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean distributions of CFC-11, CO2 and Δ14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachkar, Z.; Orr, J. C.; Dutay, J.-C.; Delecluse, P.

    2006-07-01

    Global-scale tracer simulations are typically made at coarse resolution without explicitly modeling eddies. Here we ask what role do eddies play in ocean uptake, storage, and meridional transport of transient tracers. We made global anthropogenic transient-tracer simulations in non-eddying (2°cosφ×2°, ORCA2) and eddying (½°cosφ×½°, ORCA05) versions of the ocean general circulation model OPA9. We focus on the Southern Ocean where tracer air-sea fluxes are largest. Eddies have little effect on global and regional bomb Δ14C uptake and storage. Yet for anthropogenic CO2 and CFC-11, increased eddy activity reduces southern extratropical uptake by 28% and 25% respectively. There is a similar decrease in corresponding inventories, which provides better agreement with observations. With higher resolution, eddies strengthen upper ocean vertical stratification and reduce excessive ventilation of intermediate waters by 20% between 60° S and 40° S. By weakening the Residual Circulation, i.e., the sum of Eulerian mean flow and the opposed eddy-induced flow, eddies reduce the supply of tracer-impoverished deep waters to the surface near the Antarctic divergence, thus reducing the air-sea tracer flux. Consequently, inventories for both CFC-11 and anthropogenic CO2 decrease because their mixed layer concentrations in that region equilibrate with the atmosphere on relatively short time scales (15 days and 6 months, respectively); conversely, the slow air-sea equilibration of bomb Δ14C of 6 years, gives surface waters little time to exchange with the atmosphere before they are subducted.

  15. Optical properties of heusler alloys Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreder, E. I.; Svyazhin, A. D.; Belozerova, K. A.

    2013-11-01

    The results of an investigation of optical properties and the calculations of the electronic structure of Co2FeSi, Co2FeAl, Co2CrAl, and Co2CrGa Heusler alloys are presented. The main focus of our attention is the study of the spectral dependence of the real part (ɛ1) and imaginary part (ɛ2) of the dielectric constant in the range of wavelengths λ = 0.3-13 μm using the ellipsometric method. An anomalous behavior of the optical conductivity σ(ω) has been found in the infrared range in the Co2CrAl and Co2CrGa alloys, which differs substantially from that in the Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl alloys. The results obtained are discussed based on the calculations of the electronic structure.

  16. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  17. Oceanic Whitecaps and Their Role in Air-Sea Exchange Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazman, R. E.

    The book is based on the proceedings of the 1983 Whitecap Workshop, held at University College, Galway, Ireland. The 22 full-length papers and 18 abstracts of poster presentations that it contains cover a wide range of topics. The small-scale air-sea exchange processes triggered by the breaking of wind-generated gravity waves serve as the common ground from which specialized excursions are made into the fields of acoustics and optics of bubbly water, statistics and hydrodynamics of water waves, remote sensing, atmospheric electricity, and physicochemical hydrodynamics of bubbles, droplets, and water surfaces coated with organic films. The book opens with “The Life and Science of Alfred H. Woodcock” by Duncan Blanchard (State University of New York, Albany).

  18. CO2CARE - Site Closure Assessment Research - Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wipki, Mario; Liebscher, Axel; Kühn, Michael; Lüth, Stefan; Durucan, Sevket; Deflandre, Jean-Pierre; Wollenweber, Jens; Chadwick, Andy; Böhm, Gualtiero

    2013-04-01

    The EU project CO2CARE, which started in January 2011, supports the large scale demonstration of CCS technology by addressing requirements of operators and regulators face in terms of CO2 storage site abandonment. The CO2CARE consortium, consisting of 24 project partners from universities, research institutes, and the industry, investigate technologies and procedures for abandonment and post-closure safety, satisfying the regulatory requirements for the transfer of responsibility. Nine key injections sites in Europe, USA, Japan, and Australia, each with a specific (hydro) geological and environmental character, were selected for investigations. These sites can be divided into the CO2 storage types on-shore, off-shore, natural CO2 reservoir, depleted gas reservoirs, and saline aquifers. The project mainly focuses on three key areas: - well abandonment and long-term integrity; - reservoir management and prediction from closure to the long-term; - risk management methodologies for long-term safety. These key areas are in turn closely linked to the three high-level requirements of the EU Directive 2009/31/EC, Article 18 for CO2 storage which are: (i) absence of any detectable leakage, (ii) conformity of actual behaviour of the injected CO2 with the modeled behaviour, and (iii) the storage site is evolving towards a situation of long-term stability. The identification of criteria and the development of site abandonment procedures and technologies, which guarantee the fulfillment of the high-level requirements, are the major objectives in CO2CARE. These criteria have to be fulfilled prior to subsequent transfer of responsibility to the competent authorities, typically 20 or 30 years after site closure. Finally, the essential results of the different working groups in CO2CARE will feed into overall guidelines for regulatory compliance and "Best Practice" for site abandonment. Dissemination of the results will show policy makers and the general public how site abandonment

  19. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    The climate and environmental impacts of the current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. A discussion on CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering covers limestone and seawater availability and cost; reaction rates and densities; effectiveness in CO2 sequestration; and environmental impacts and benefits.

  20. Contribution of seasonal sub-Antarctic surface water variability to millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2 over the last deglaciation and Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2015-02-01

    The Southern Ocean is thought to have played a key role in past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2,atm) changes. Three main factors are understood to control the Southern Ocean's influence on CO2,atm, via their impact on surface ocean pCO2 and therefore regional ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes: 1) the efficiency of air-sea gas exchange, which may be attenuated by seasonal- or annual sea-ice coverage or the development of a shallow pycnocline; 2) the supply of CO2-rich water masses from the sub-surface and the deep ocean, which is associated with turbulent mixing and surface buoyancy- and/or wind forcing; and 3) biological carbon fixation, which depends on nutrient availability and is therefore influenced by dust deposition and/or upwelling. In order to investigate the possible contributions of these processes to millennial-scale CO2,atm variations during the last glacial and deglacial periods, we make use of planktonic foraminifer census counts and stable oxygen- and carbon isotope measurements in the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) from marine sediment core MD07-3076Q in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic. These data are interpreted on the basis of a comparison of core-top and modern seawater isotope data, which permits an assessment of the seasonal biases and geochemical controls on the stable isotopic compositions of G. bulloides and N. pachyderma (s.). Based on a comparison of our down-core results with similar data from the Southeast Atlantic (Cape Basin) we infer past basin-wide changes in the surface hydrography of the sub-Antarctic Atlantic. We find that millennial-scale rises in CO2,atm over the last 70 ka are consistently linked with evidence for increased spring upwelling, and enhanced summer air-sea exchange in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic. Parallel evidence for increased summer export production would suggest that seasonal changes in upwelling and air-sea exchange exerted a dominant influence on surface pCO2 in

  1. Gulf of Mexico Air/Sea Interaction: Measurements and Initial Data Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Huang, C. H.; Roberts, P. T.; Bariteau, L.; Fairall, C. W.; Gibson, W.; Ray, A.

    2011-12-01

    Corporate, government, and university researchers collaborated to develop an atmospheric boundary layer environmental observations program on an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The primary goals of this project were to provide data to (1) improve our understanding of boundary layer processes and air-sea interaction over the Gulf of Mexico; (2) improve regional-scale meteorological and air quality modeling; and (3) provide a framework for advanced offshore measurements to support future needs such as emergency response, exploration and lease decisions, wind energy research and development, and meteorological and air quality forecasting. In October 2010, meteorological and oceanographic sensors were deployed for an extended period (approximately 12 months) on a Chevron service platform (ST 52B, 90.5W, 29N) to collect boundary layer and sea surface data sufficient to support these objectives. This project has significant importance given the large industrial presence in the Gulf, sizeable regional population nearby, and the recognized need for precise and timely pollutant forecasts. Observations from this project include surface meteorology; sodar marine boundary layer winds; microwave radiometer profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and liquid water; ceilometer cloud base heights; water temperature and current profiles; sea surface temperature; wave height statistics; downwelling solar and infrared radiation; and air-sea turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. This project resulted in the collection of an unprecedented set of boundary layer measurements over the Gulf of Mexico that capture the range of meteorological and oceanographic interactions and processes that occur over an entire year. This presentation will provide insight into the logistical and scientific issues associated with the deployment and operations of unique measurements in offshore areas and provide results from an initial data analysis of boundary layer processes over the Gulf of

  2. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  3. Assessing Air-Sea Interaction in the Evolving NASA GEOS Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayson, Carol Anne; Roberts, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how the climate responds to variations in forcing, one necessary component is to understand the full distribution of variability of exchanges of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and ocean. Surface heat and moisture fluxes are critical to the generation and decay of many coupled air-sea phenomena. These mechanisms operate across a number of scales and contain contributions from interactions between the anomalous (i.e. non-mean), often extreme-valued, flux components. Satellite-derived estimates of the surface turbulent and radiative heat fluxes provide an opportunity to assess results from modeling systems. Evaluation of only time mean and variability statistics, however only provides limited traceability to processes controlling what are often regime-dependent errors. This work will present an approach to evaluate the representation of the turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface in the current and evolving Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model. A temperature and moisture vertical profile-based clustering technique is used to identify robust weather regimes, and subsequently intercompare the turbulent fluxes and near-surface parameters within these regimes in both satellite estimates and GEOS-driven data sets. Both model reanalysis (MERRA) and seasonal-to-interannual coupled GEOS model simulations will be evaluated. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the distribution of the fluxes including extremes, and the representation of near-surface forcing variables directly related to their estimation. Results from these analyses will help identify the existence and source of regime-dependent biases in the GEOS model ocean surface turbulent fluxes. The use of the temperature and moisture profiles for weather-state clustering will be highlighted for its potential broad application to 3-D output typical of model simulations.

  4. Towards More Realistic Simulation of Air-Sea Interaction over Lakes on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot; Soto, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing and extended to three dimensions, including the introduction of realistic coastlines. Previous studies of Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions suggested that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality that limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  5. Compact optical system for imaging underwater and through the air/sea interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, Derek; Mullen, Linda; Laux, Alan

    2012-06-01

    Typical line-of-sight (LOS)/monostatic optical imaging systems include a laser source and receiver that are co-located on the same platform. The performance of such systems is deteriorated in turbid ocean water due to the large amount of light that is scattered on the path to and from an object of interest. Imagery collected with the LOS/monostatic system through the air/sea interface is also distorted due to wave focusing/defocusing effects. The approach of this project is to investigate an alternate, non-line-of-sight (NLOS)/bistatic approach that offers some advantages over these traditional LOS/monostatic imaging techniques. In this NLOS system the laser and receiver are located on separate platforms with the laser located closer to the object of interest. As the laser sequentially scans the underwater object, a time-varying intensity signal corresponding to reflectivity changes in the object is detected by the distant receiver. A modulated laser illuminator is used to communicate information about the scan to the distant receiver so it can recreate the image with the collected scattered light. This NLOS/bistatic configuration also enables one to view an underwater target through the air-sea interface (transmitter below the surface and receiver above the surface) without the distortions experienced with the LOS/monostatic sensor. In this paper, we will review the results of recent laboratory water tank experiments where an underwater object was imaged with the receiver both below and above the sea surface.

  6. A climatology of air-sea interactions at the Mediterranean LION and AZUR buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniaux, Guy; Prieur, Louis; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Giordani, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The LION and AZUR buoys (respectively at 42.1°N 4.7°E and 43.4°N 7.8°E) provide an extended data set since respectively 1999 and 2001 to present for studying air-sea interactions in the northwestern Mediterranean basin. The two buoys are located where high wind events occur (resp. north western and north easterly gale winds), that force and condition deep oceanic winter convection in that region. A short-term climatology (resp. 13 and 11 years) of air-sea interactions has been developed, which includes classical meteo-oceanic parameters, but also waves period and significant wave heights and radiative fluxes. Moreover turbulent surface fluxes have been estimated from various bulk parameterizations, in order to estimate uncertainties on fluxes. An important dispersion of turbulent fluxes is found at high wind speeds according to the parameterization used, larger than taking into account the second order effects of cool skin, warm layer and waves. An important annual cycle affects air temperatures (ATs), SSTs and turbulent fluxes at the two buoys. The annual cycle of ATs and SSTs can be well reconstructed from the first two annual harmonics, while for the turbulent heat fluxes the erratic occurrence of high and low flux events, well correlated with high/dry and low windy periods, strongly affect their annual and interannual cycles. The frequency of high surface heat fluxes and high wind stress is found highest during the autumn and winter months, despite the fact that north-westerly gale winds occur all year long at LION buoy. During calm weather period, ATs and SSTs experience an important diurnal cycle (on average 1 and 0.5°C respectively), that affect latent and sensible heat fluxes. Finally, an estimate of the interannual variability of the turbulent fluxes in Autumn and Winter is discussed, in order to characterize their potential role on deep ocean convection.

  7. Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic-tunnel-junction spin-valve without [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Shim, Tae-Hun; Park, Jea-Gun

    2015-11-27

    We design a Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based p-MTJ spin-valve without a [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic (SyAF) layer to greatly reduce the 12-inch wafer fabrication cost of the p-MTJ spin-valve. This spin-valve achieve a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of 158% and an exchange field (H ex) of 1.4 kOe at an ex situ annealing temperature of >350 °C, which ensures writing error immunity. In particular, the TMR ratio strongly depends on the body-center-cubic capping-layer nanoscale thickness (t bcc), i.e., the TMR ratio peaks at t bcc = 0.6 nm. PMID:26536817

  8. Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic-tunnel-junction spin-valve without [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Eun; Shim, Tae-Hun; Park, Jea-Gun

    2015-11-01

    We design a Co2Fe6B2/MgO-based p-MTJ spin-valve without a [Co/Pt] n lower synthetic-antiferromagnetic (SyAF) layer to greatly reduce the 12-inch wafer fabrication cost of the p-MTJ spin-valve. This spin-valve achieve a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of 158% and an exchange field (H ex) of 1.4 kOe at an ex situ annealing temperature of >350 °C, which ensures writing error immunity. In particular, the TMR ratio strongly depends on the body-center-cubic capping-layer nanoscale thickness (t bcc), i.e., the TMR ratio peaks at t bcc = 0.6 nm.

  9. Exploring the influence of surface waves in the carbon dioxide transfer velocity between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier; Francisco Herrera, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Loza, Lucía; Osuna, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements have been carried out in order to better understand the possible influence of ocean surface waves in the transfer of carbon dioxide between the ocean and atmosphere in the coastal zone. The CO2 fluxes are being analysed and results are shown in a contribution by Gutiérrez-Loza et al., in this session. Here we try to highlight the findings regarding the transfer velocity (kCO2) once we have incorporated direct measurements of carbon dioxide concentration in the water side. In this study direct measurements of CO2 fluxes were obtained with an eddy covariance tower located in the shoreline equipped with an infrared open-path gas analyzer (LI-7500, LI-COR) and a sonic anemometer (R3-100 Professional Anemometer, Gill Instruments), both at about 13 m above the mean sea level, and sampling at 20 Hz. For some period of time simultaneous information of waves was recorded with a sampling rate of 2 Hz using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (Workhorse Sentinel, Teledyne RD Instruments) at 10 m depth and 350 m away from the tower. Besides, recently the concentration of CO2 in water has also been recorded making use of a SAMI-CO2 instrument. A subtle effect of the wave field is detected in the estimated kCO2. Looking into details of the surface currents being detected very near the air-sea interface through an ADPC, a certain association can be found with the gas transfer velocity. Furthermore, some of the possible effects of breaking wave induced turbulence in the coastal zone is to be addressed. This work represents a RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793) contribution. The support from CB-2011-01-168173 CONACYT project is greatly acknowledged.

  10. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  11. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  12. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  13. Effect of sea sprays on air-sea momentum exchange at severe wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yu.; Ezhova, E.; Semenova, A.; Soustova, I.

    2012-04-01

    Wind-wave interaction at extreme wind speed is of special interest now in connection with the problem of explanation of the sea surface drag saturation at the wind speed exceeding 30 m/s. The idea on saturation (and even reduction) of the coefficient of aerodynamic resistance of the sea surface at hurricane wind speed was first suggested in [1] on the basis of theoretical analysis of sensitivity of maximum wind speed in a hurricane to the ratio of the enthalpy and momentum exchange coefficients. Both field [2-4] and laboratory [5] experiments confirmed that at hurricane wind speed the sea surface drag coefficient is significantly reduced in comparison with the parameterization obtained at moderate to strong wind conditions. Two groups of possible theoretical mechanisms for explanation of the effect of the sea surface drag reduction can be specified. In the first group of models developed in [6,7], the sea surface drag reduction is explained by peculiarities of the air flow over breaking waves. Another approach more appropriate for the conditions of developed sea exploits the effect of sea drops and sprays on the wind-wave momentum exchange. Papers[8,9] focused on the effect of the sea drops on stratification of the air-sea boundary layer similar to the model of turbulent boundary layer with the suspended particles [10], while papers [11-13] estimated the momentum exchange of sea drops and air-flow. A mandatory element of the spray induced momentum flux is a parameterization of the momentum exchange between droplets and air flow, which determines the "source function" in the momentum balance equation. In this paper a model describing the motion of a spume droplet, the wind tear away from the crest of a steep surface wave, and then falling into the water. We consider two models for the injection of droplets into the air flow. The first one assumes that the drop starts from the surface at the orbital velocity of the wave. In the second model we consider droplets from

  14. Structurally simple complexes of CO2.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Luke J; Robertson, Katherine N; Kemp, Richard A; Tuononen, Heikki M; Clyburne, Jason A C

    2015-03-01

    The ability to bind CO2 through the formation of low-energy, easily-broken, bonds could prove invaluable in a variety of chemical contexts. For example, weak bonds to CO2 would greatly decrease the cost of the energy-intensive sorbent-regeneration step common to most carbon capture technologies. Furthermore, exploration of this field could lead to the discovery of novel CO2 chemistry. Reduction of complexed carbon dioxide might generate chemical feedstocks for the preparation of value-added products, particularly transportation fuels or fuel precursors. Implementation on a large scale could help to drastically reduce CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. However, literature examples of weakly bonded complexes of CO2 are relatively few and true coordination complexes to a 'naked' CO2 fragment are nearly unheard of. In this review article, a variety of complexes of CO2 featuring diverse binding modes and reactivity will be examined. Topics covered include: (A) inclusion complexes of CO2 in porous materials. (B) Zwitterionic carbamates produced from the reaction of CO2 with polyamines. (C) Carbamate salts produced from reaction of CO2 with two equivalents of an amine. (D) Insertion products of CO2 into acid-base adducts (e.g., metal complexes). (E) Lewis acid-base activated CO2, such as frustrated Lewis pair complexes. (F) Simple base-CO2 adducts, wherein the base-CO2 bond is the only interaction formed. Complexes in the last category are of particular interest, and include imidazol-2-carboxylates (N-heterocyclic carbene adducts of CO2) as well as a few other examples that lie outside NHC chemistry.

  15. Temporal variability of the anthropogenic CO2 storage in the Irminger Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, F. F.; Vázquez-Rodríguez, M.; Louarn, E.; Padín, X. A.; Mercier, H.; Ríos, A. F.

    2008-12-01

    The anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) estimates from cruises spanning more than two decades (1981-2006) in the Irminger Sea area of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre reveal a large variability in the Cant storage rates. During the early 1990's, the Cant storage rates (2.3±0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1) doubled the average rate for 1981-2006 (1.1±0.1 mol C m-2 yr-1), whilst a remarkable drop to almost half that average followed from 1997 onwards. The Cant storage evolution runs parallel to chlorofluorocarbon-12 inventories and is in good agreement with Cant uptake rates of increase calculated from sea surface pCO2 measurements. The contribution of the Labrador Seawater to the total inventory of Cant in the Irminger basin dropped from 66% in the early 1990s to 49% in the early 2000s. The North Atlantic Oscillation shift from a positive to a negative phase in 1996 led to a reduction of air-sea heat loss in the Labrador Sea. The consequent convection weakening accompanied by an increase in stratification has lowered the efficiency of the northern North Atlantic CO2 sink.

  16. OAFlux Satellite-Based High-Resolution Analysis of Air-Sea Turbulent Heat, Moisture, and Momentum Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lisan

    2016-04-01

    The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has recently developed a new suite of products: the satellite-based high-resolution (HR) air-sea turbulent heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes over the global ocean from 1987 to the present. The OAFlux-HR fluxes are computed from the COARE bulk algorithm using air-sea variables (vector wind, near-surface humidity and temperature, and ocean surface temperature) derived from multiple satellite sensors and multiple missions. The vector wind time series are merged from 14 satellite sensors, including 4 scatterometers and 10 passive microwave radiometers. The near-surface humidity and temperature time series are retrieved from 11 satellite sensors, including 7 microwave imagers and 4 microwave sounders. The endeavor has greatly improved the depiction of the air-sea turbulent exchange on the frontal and meso-scales. The OAFlux-HR turbulent flux products are valuable datasets for a broad range of studies, including the study of the long-term change and variability in the oean-surface forcing functions, quantification of the large-scale budgets of mass, heat, and freshwater, and assessing the role of the ocean in the change and variability of the Earth's climate.

  17. Second international conference on air-sea interaction and on meteorology and oceanography of the coastal zone

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This conference was held September 22--27, 1994 in Lisbon, Portugal. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on air-sea interactions. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  18. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  19. Isotopic CO2 Instrumentation for UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is the largest component of anthroprogenic green house gas emissions. Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important for understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Instrumentation mounted on UAV aircraft would enable important spatial isotopic CO2 information. However, current isotopic CO2 instrumentation have unfavorable attributes for UAV use, such as high power requirements, high cost, high weight, and large size. Here we present the early development of a compact isotopic CO2 instrument that is designed to nullify effects of pressure, temperature and moisture, and will ultimately be suitable for UAV deployment.

  20. Storing CO2 underground shows promising results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweigel, Peter; Gale, John

    Long-term underground storage of CO2 is an important element in concepts to reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions as the use of fossil fuels continues. The first results of a multinational research project evaluating the injection of CO2 into a saline aquifer in the North Sea are validating this method of CO2 reduction, and are serving to further define the research needed to develop the technology for large-scale applicability. Reducing the emission of substances that have potentially harmful effects on global climate— for example, CO2—has become a central issue of environmental policy at least since the 1997 Kyoto conference on climate change.

  1. Aminosilicone solvents for CO(2) capture.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert J; Grocela-Rocha, Teresa A; O'Brien, Michael J; Genovese, Sarah; Wood, Benjamin R; Lewis, Larry N; Lam, Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata; Kniajanski, Sergei; Draper, Sam; Enick, Robert M; Johnson, J Karl; Xie, Hong-bin; Tapriyal, Deepak

    2010-08-23

    This work describes the first report of the use of an aminosilicone solvent mix for the capture of CO(2). To maintain a liquid state, a hydroxyether co-solvent was employed which allowed enhanced physisorption of CO(2) in the solvent mixture. Regeneration of the capture solvent system was demonstrated over 6 cycles and absorption isotherms indicate a 25-50 % increase in dynamic CO(2) capacity over 30 % MEA. In addition, proof of concept for continuous CO(2) absorption was verified. Additionally, modeling to predict heats of reaction of aminosilicone solvents with CO(2) was in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases.

  3. Selecting CO2 Sources for CO2 Utilization by Environmental-Merit-Order Curves.

    PubMed

    von der Assen, Niklas; Müller, Leonard J; Steingrube, Annette; Voll, Philip; Bardow, André

    2016-02-01

    Capture and utilization of CO2 as alternative carbon feedstock for fuels, chemicals, and materials aims at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil resource use. For capture of CO2, a large variety of CO2 sources exists. Since they emit much more CO2 than the expected demand for CO2 utilization, the environmentally most favorable CO2 sources should be selected. For this purpose, we introduce the environmental-merit-order (EMO) curve to rank CO2 sources according to their environmental impacts over the available CO2 supply. To determine the environmental impacts of CO2 capture, compression and transport, we conducted a comprehensive literature study for the energy demands of CO2 supply, and constructed a database for CO2 sources in Europe. Mapping these CO2 sources reveals that CO2 transport distances are usually small. Thus, neglecting transport in a first step, we find that environmental impacts are minimized by capturing CO2 first from chemical plants and natural gas processing, then from paper mills, power plants, and iron and steel plants. In a second step, we computed regional EMO curves considering transport and country-specific impacts for energy supply. Building upon regional EMO curves, we identify favorable locations for CO2 utilization with lowest environmental impacts of CO2 supply, so-called CO2 oases. PMID:26752014

  4. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    PubMed

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  5. Microbial Growth under Supercritical CO2

    PubMed Central

    Peet, Kyle C.; Freedman, Adam J. E.; Hernandez, Hector H.; Britto, Vanya; Boreham, Chris; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.

    2015-01-01

    Growth of microorganisms in environments containing CO2 above its critical point is unexpected due to a combination of deleterious effects, including cytoplasmic acidification and membrane destabilization. Thus, supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is generally regarded as a sterilizing agent. We report isolation of bacteria from three sites targeted for geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) that are capable of growth in pressurized bioreactors containing scCO2. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes from scCO2 enrichment cultures revealed microbial assemblages of varied complexity, including representatives of the genus Bacillus. Propagation of enrichment cultures under scCO2 headspace led to isolation of six strains corresponding to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subterraneus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus safensis, and Bacillus megaterium. Isolates are spore-forming, facultative anaerobes and capable of germination and growth under an scCO2 headspace. In addition to these isolates, several Bacillus type strains grew under scCO2, suggesting that this may be a shared feature of spore-forming Bacillus spp. Our results provide direct evidence of microbial activity at the interface between scCO2 and an aqueous phase. Since microbial activity can influence the key mechanisms for permanent storage of sequestered CO2 (i.e., structural, residual, solubility, and mineral trapping), our work suggests that during GCS microorganisms may grow and catalyze biological reactions that influence the fate and transport of CO2 in the deep subsurface. PMID:25681188

  6. New insights into fCO2 variability in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean using SMOS SSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker Brown, C.; Boutin, J.; Merlivat, L.

    2015-12-01

    Complex oceanic circulation and air-sea interaction make the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (ETPO) a highly variable source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Although the scientific community have amassed 70 000 surface fugacities of carbon dioxide (fCO2) data points within the ETPO region over the past 25 years, the spatial and temporal resolution of this data set is insufficient to fully quantify the seasonal to interannual variability of the region, a region where fCO2 has been observed to fluctuate by > 300 μatm. Upwelling and rainfall events dominate the surface physical and chemical characteristics of the ETPO, with both yielding unique signatures in sea surface temperature and salinity. Thus, we explore the potential of using a statistical description of fCO2 within sea-surface salinity-temperature space. These SSS/SST relationships are based on in situ surface ocean CO2 atlas (SOCAT) data collected within the ETPO. This statistical description is then applied to high-resolution (0.25°) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) sea surface salinity (SSS) and Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) sea surface temperature (SST) in order to compute regional fCO2. As a result, we are able to resolve fCO2 at sufficiently high resolution to elucidate the influence that various physical processes have on the fCO2 of the surface ETPO. Normalised (to 2014) oceanic fCO2 between July 2010 and June 2014 within the entire ETPO was 39 (±10.7) μatm supersaturated with respect to 2014 atmospheric partial pressures, and featured a CO2 outgassing of 1.51 (±0.41) mmol m-2 d-1. Values of fCO2 within the ETPO were found to be broadly split between the Gulf of Panama region and the rest of the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean. The northwest, central and offshore regions were supersaturated, with wintertime wind-jet-driven upwelling found to constitute the first-order control on fCO2 values. This contrasts with the southeastern/Gulf of Panama region, where heavy

  7. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  8. Historical changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and dimethyl sulphide (DMS) emissions in the eutrophied Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gypens, N.; Borges, A. V.; Lancelot, C.

    2012-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities after the Second World War have severely increased river nutrient [nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)] loads to European coastal areas. The resulting N: P: Si imbalance (compared to phytoplankton requirements) stimulated in the Southern North Sea the growth of Phaeocystis colonies modifying the functioning of the ecosystem and, therefore, the carbon but also the biogenic sulphur cycles. Phaeocystis is a significant producer of DMSP (dimethylsulphide propionate), the precursor of DMS. When emitted to the atmosphere the DMS has a cooling effect on the climate contrarily to the CO2 greenhouse gas. Since the late 1990's specific nutrient reduction policies have however considerably reduced P loads while N is maintained. In this application we explore, with a mathematical tool, the effects of changing N and P loads on air-sea CO2 exchanges and DMS marine emissions. The chosen model is the MIRO-CO2-DMS, a complex biogeochemical model describing carbon, biogenic sulphur and nutrient cycles in the marine domain. Model simulations are performed for the contemporary period since 1950, using real forcing fields for sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric CO2 and RIVERSTRAHLER model simulations for river carbon and nutrient loads. Results are discussing the importance of human activities and river inputs of carbon and nutrients on the eutrophication of coastal areas, their ability to absorb atmospheric CO2 and the importance of DMS emissions associated with phytoplankton blooms, especially Phaeocystis.

  9. Exogenously produced CO2 doubles the CO2 efflux from three north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Buelo, Cal D.; Cole, Jonathan J.; Pace, Michael L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well established that lakes are typically sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. However, it remains unclear what portion of CO2 efflux is from endogenously processed organic carbon or from exogenously produced CO2 transported into lakes. We estimated high-frequency CO2 and O2 efflux from three north temperate lakes in summer to determine the proportion of the total CO2 efflux that was exogenously produced. Two of the lakes were amended with nutrients to experimentally enhance endogenous CO2 uptake. In the unfertilized lake, 50% of CO2 efflux was from exogenous sources and hydrology had a large influence on efflux. In the fertilized lakes, endogenous CO2 efflux was negative (into the lake) yet exogenous CO2 made the lakes net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Shifts in hydrologic regimes and nutrient loading have the potential to change whether small lakes act primarily as reactors or vents in the watershed.

  10. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  11. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pseudo-data Inversions of California CO2 Fluxes Combining Tower Measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 with OCO2 Column CO2 Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M. L.; Jeong, S.; Bagley, J.; Frankenberg, C.; Parazoo, N.; Keeling, R. F.; Graven, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    The majority (~ 80 %) of California's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are likely CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion (ffCO2). While bottom-up estimates of State-annual total ffCO2 emissions are expected to be accurate to ~ 5-10% (68% confidence), net CO2 exchange at smaller spatial and temporal scales (and emissions of other GHGs) are likely less certain. Here, we report initial results of a Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) pseudo-data inversion study combining simulated total and radiocarbon CO2 sampling from a 10-site ground-based tower network with OCO2 satellite column CO2 retrievals. Fossil and biosphere CO2 signals are computed for tower and OCO2 observations across urban and rural areas of California including the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area using the WRF-STILT transport model simulations coupled with prior fluxes from VULCAN (ffCO2) and CASA (bioCO2) fluxes respectively. Nominal uncertainties are assigned to the prior ffCO2 fluxes and estimated for the model-measurement differences including WRF and STILT model uncertainties and background subtraction. Reductions in posterior uncertainties for regional ffCO2 emissions are estimated for the tower pseudo-data using Bayesian inversions for monthly periods in multiple seasons. Ongoing work will include incorporation of OCO2 pseudo-data to estimate additional uncertainty reductions obtained for ffCO2 and bioCO2 exchange signals across California's urban and rural regions.

  13. Non-thermal 10 micrometers CO2 emission lines in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms for the excitation of strong 10 micrometer CO2 emission lines seen on Mars and Venus are examined. Line absorption of near IR solar flux directly by CO2 or by H2O with collisional transfer of energy to CO2 are proposed as likely excitation mechanisms. Altitudes for peak 10 micrometer emission are estimated to be near 80 km for Mars and 120 km for Venus.

  14. Nonthermal 10 micron CO2 emission lines in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. A.; Betz, A. L.; Mclaren, R. A.; Townes, C. H.; Sutton, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms are examined for excitation of strong 10-micron CO2 emission lines seen on Mars and Venus. Line absorption of near-infrared solar flux directly by CO2 or H2O with collisional transfer of energy to CO2 are proposed as likely excitation mechanisms. Altitudes for peak 10-micron emission are estimated to be near 80 km for Mars and 120 km for Venus.

  15. Infrared polarization spectroscopy of CO 2 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahabi, Z. T.; Li, Z. S.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-04-01

    Polarisation spectroscopy (PS) was used to probe CO 2 gas concentration in a CO 2/N 2 binary mixture at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The CO 2 molecules were probed by a direct laser excitation to an overtone and combination vibrational state. The tuneable narrow linewidth infrared laser radiation at 2 μm was obtained by Raman shifting of the output from a single-longitudinal-mode pulsed alexandrite laser-system to the second Stokes component in a H 2 gas cell. Infrared polarisation spectroscopy (IRPS) and time-resolved infrared laser-induced fluorescence (IRLIF) spectra were collected. A linear dependence of the IRPS signal on the CO 2 mole fraction has been found. This indicates that the IRPS signal is only weakly affected by the molecular collisions and that the inter- and intra- molecular energy transfer processes do not strongly influence the molecular alignment at the time scale of the measurements. Thus IRPS holds great potential for quantitative instantaneous gas concentration diagnostics in general. This is especially important for molecules which do not posses an accessible optical transition such as CO, CO 2 and N 2O. In addition, an accurate experimental method to measure the extinction ratio of the IR polarisers employed in this study has been developed and applied. With its obvious merits as simplicity, easy alignment and high accuracy, the method can be generalized to all spectral regions, different polarisers and high extinction ratios.

  16. Modeling of collision induced absorption spectra of CO2-CO2 pairs for planetary atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borysow, Aleksandra

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the proposal was to model the rototranslational and rotovibrational collision induced absorption spectral bands of importance for the radiative transfer analysis of the atmosphere of Venus. Our main task has involved CO2 pairs. The approach is not straightforward: whereas computational techniques to compute CIA spectra of small linear molecules exist, and were successfully applied to molecules like H2 or N2, they fail when applied to large molecules like CO2. For small molecules one can safely assume that the interaction potential is isotropic. The same approximation does not work for CO2, and when employed, it gives an incorrect band shape and only 50 percent of the CIA intensity.

  17. Extreme subseasonal tropical air-sea interactions and their relation to ocean thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Ian D.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with extreme, rapid timescale tropical air-sea interactions and the influence of large-scale oceanic conditions on these interactions. The focus is on two types of extreme events: equatorial Indian Ocean cooling events and tropical cyclones. Cooling events occur on timescales of a few days to several weeks, in which atmospheric forcing causes Sea Surface Temperature (SST) cooling in the range of 1--5K, in both observational and coupled climate models. Cooling events are driven by changes in air-sea enthalpy fluxes and Ekman upwelling. Because the cooling due to Ekman upwelling depends on thermocline depth, large-scale oceanic conditions influence SST cooling. La Nina and negative Indian Ocean Dipole conditions are conducive to a shallower southwest equatorial thermocline, resulting in greater intraseasonal SST cooling during these interannual events; El Nino and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions lead to a deeper thermocline and reduced SST cooling. Results indicate that cooling events are related to the eastward propagation of convective patterns that resemble the Madden-Julian Oscillation. For tropical cyclones, the response of intensity to cyclone-induced SST cooling was explored over 10-years of observational data. For slow moving (V/ f < 100km) tropical cyclones, it was found that the SST cooling response increases along with storm intensity from category 0--2 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. However, from category 2--5 the magnitude of SST cooling decreases. This result confirms model predictions indicating a prominent role for oceanic feedback controlling tropical cyclone intensity. Thus, only storms that develop in regions containing deep mixed layer and thermocline can achieve high intensity, and entrainment cooling is weaker for these storms. The SST-intensity response in observations was compared to the GFDL Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM) for the periods 2005 and 2006--2009. The GHM was modified in 2006 to include a

  18. Key site abandonment steps in CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, M.; Wipki, M.; Durucan, S.; Deflandre, J.-P.; Lüth, S.; Wollenweber, J.; Chadwick, A.; Böhm, G.

    2012-04-01

    CO2CARE is an EU funded project within FP7-research, which started in January 2011 with a funding period of three years. The project objectives will be achieved through an international consortium consisting of 23 partners from Europe, USA, Canada, Japan, and Australia, belonging to universities, research institutes, and energy companies. According to the EC Guidance Document 3, the lifetime of a CO2 storage site can be generally subdivided into 6 phases: 1. assessment, 2. characterisation, 3. development, 4. operation, 5. post-closure/pre-transfer, and 6. post transfer. CO2CARE deals with phases 5 and 6. The main goals of the project are closely linked to the three high-level requirements of the EU Directive 2009/31/EC, Article 18 for CO2 storage which are: (i) absence of any detectable leakage, (ii) conformity of actual behaviour of the injected CO2 with the modelled behaviour, and (iii) the storage site is evolving towards a situation of long-term stability. These criteria have to be fulfilled prior to subsequent transfer of responsibility to the competent authorities, typically 20 or 30 years after site closure. CO2CARE aims to formulate robust procedures for site abandonment which will meet the regulatory requirements and ensure long-term integrity of the storage complex. We present key results from the first year of the project via a report on international regulatory requirements on CO2 geological storage and site abandonment that includes a general overview on the current state-of-the art in abandonment methodologies in the oil and gas industry worldwide. Due to the long time-frames involved in CO2 storage (in the range of several thousands of years), the behaviour of a system with respect to, for example, long-term well stability can be demonstrated only by using long-term predictive modelling tools to study potential leakage pathways. Trapping mechanisms for CO2 are of high interest concerning a quantitative estimation of physically captured, capillary

  19. Catalytic Reduction of CO2 by Renewable Organohydrides.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chern-Hooi; Holder, Aaron M; Hynes, James T; Musgrave, Charles B

    2015-12-17

    Dihydropyridines are renewable organohydride reducing agents for the catalytic reduction of CO2 to MeOH. Here we discuss various aspects of this important reduction. A centerpiece, which illustrates various general principles, is our theoretical catalytic mechanism for CO2 reduction by successive hydride transfers (HTs) and proton transfers (PTs) from the dihydropyridine PyH2 obtained by 1H(+)/1e(-)/1H(+)/1e(-) reductions of pyridine. The Py/PyH2 redox couple is analogous to NADP(+)/NADPH in that both are driven to effect HTs by rearomatization. High-energy radical intermediates and their associated high barriers/overpotentials are avoided because HT involves a 2e(-) reduction. A HT-PT sequence dictates that the reduced intermediates be protonated prior to further reduction for ultimate MeOH formation; these protonations are aided by biased cathodes that significantly lower the local pH. In contrast, cathodes that efficiently reduce H(+) such as Pt and Pd produce H2 and create a high interfacial pH, both obstructing dihydropyridine production and formate protonation and thus ultimately CO2 reduction by HTPTs. The role of water molecule proton relays is discussed. Finally, we suggest future CO2 reduction strategies by organic (photo)catalysts. PMID:26722706

  20. Impacts of Atmospheric Modes of Variability on Air-Sea Heat Exchange in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Yasser O.; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Josey, Simon A.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Raitsos, Dionissios E.

    2014-05-01

    The potential impacts on Red Sea surface heat exchange of various major modes of atmospheric variability are investigated using the NASA Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric reanalysis and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Flux dataset (OAFlux) merged satellite+reanalysis dataset. The mode impacts on surface net heat flux are quantified by calculating the heat flux anomaly that corresponds to a unit positive value of each index for each grid point. The seasonal effects of the atmospheric forcing are investigated considering two and four typical seasons of a calendar year. Considering two seasons, the impacts are strongest during the winter-centered part of the year (October to March) mainly over the northern sub-basin. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic - West Russia Pattern (EAWR), and the Indian Monsoon Index (IMI) have the greatest effects. They generate negative anomalies (by definition additional ocean heat loss) of 7-12 W/m2 in the northern Red Sea basin mean net heat flux for a unit positive value of the mode index. During the summer (April to September), the signal is smaller and the East Atlantic (EA) and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) modes have the strongest impact which is now located in the southern Red Sea (sub-basin anomalies of 4 W/m2 for unit positive mode index, negative for EA and positive for MEI). Results obtained by analysis carried out on the traditional four-season basis reveal that indices impact peaks during the typical boreal winter (DJF) with average anomalies of 12-18 W/m2 to be found in the northern part. It is noteworthy that during the winter, the EAWR generates negative anomalies around 30 W/m2 over the most of the central Red Sea. During the spring (MAM), summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) the anomalies are considerably lower, especially during the spring when the mode impacts are negligible. Atmospheric modes have a stronger effect on air-sea heat flux over the northern

  1. Tropical Intraseasonal Air-Sea Exchanges during the 1997 Pacific Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Chou, S.-H.; Wang, Zihou

    1999-01-01

    The Madden Julian Oscillations (MJO) and associated westerly wind (WW) events account for much of the tropical intraseasonal variability (TISV). The TISV has been suggested as an important stochastic forcing that may be one of the underlying causes for the observed irregularities of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Recent observational studies and theories of interannual to interdecadal-scale variability suggest that ENSO may arise from different mechanisms depending on the basic states. The Pacific warming event of 1997, being associated with a period of strong MJO and WW events, serves as a natural experiment for studying the possible role of TISV in triggering an ENSO event. We have performed a combined statistical and composite analysis of surface WW events based on the assimilated surface wind and sea level pressure for the period of 1980-1993, the SSM/I wind for the period of 1988-1997, and OLR. Results indicates that extratropical forcing contribute significantly to the evolution of MJO and establishment of WW events over the Pacific warm pool. Following the major WW events, there appeared an eastward extension of equatorial warm SST anomalies from the western Pacific warm pool. Such tropical-extratropical interaction is particularly clear in the winter of 96-97 that leads to the recent warming event in 1997/98. From the above discussion, our current study on this subject is based on the hypothesis that 1) there is an enhanced air-sea interaction associated with TISV and the northerly surges from the extratropics in the initial phase of the 97/98 warming event, and 2) the relevant mechanisms are functions of the basic state of the coupled system (in terms of SST distribution and atmospheric mean circulation) that varies at the interannual and interdecadal time scale. We are analyzing the space-time structure of the northerly surges, their association with air-sea fluxes and upper ocean responses during the period of September 1996 to June 1997. The

  2. Drivers of pCO2 dynamics in two contrasting coral reef lagoons: The influence of submarine groundwater discharge (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyronak, T.; Santos, I. R.; Erler, D.; Maher, D. T.; Eyre, B.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon chemistry of coral reef lagoons can be highly variable over short time scales. While much of the diel variability in seawater carbon chemistry is explained by biological processes, external sources such as river and groundwater seepage may deliver large amounts of organic and inorganic carbon to coral reefs and represent a poorly understood feedback to ocean acidification. Here, we assess the impact of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on pCO2 variability in two coral reef lagoons with distinct SGD driving mechanisms. Diel variability of pCO2 in the two ecosystems was explained by a combination of biological drivers and SGD inputs. In Rarotonga, a South Pacific volcanic island, SGD was driven primarily by a steep terrestrial hydraulic gradient, and the lagoon was influenced by the high pCO2 (5,501 μatm) of the fresh groundwater. In Heron Island, a Great Barrier Reef coral cay, SGD was dominated by seawater recirculation through sediments (i.e. tidal pumping) and pCO2 was mainly impacted through the stimulation of biological processes. The Rarotonga water column had a relatively higher average pCO2 (549 μatm) than Heron Island (471 μatm). However, pCO2 exhibited a greater diel range in Heron Island (778 μatm) than in Rarotonga (507 μatm). The Rarotonga lagoon received 31.2 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 from SGD, while the Heron Island lagoon received 12.3 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. Over the course of this study both systems were sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (3.00 to 9.67 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1), with SGD-derived CO2 contributing a large portion to the air-sea CO2 flux. The relationship between both water column pH and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) and radon (222Rn) concentrations indicate that SGD may enhance the local acidification of some coral reef lagoons. Studies measuring the carbon chemistry of coral reefs (e.g. community metabolism, calcification rates) may need to consider SGD-derived CO2.

  3. CO2 sequestration: Storage capacity guideline needed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.; Hickman, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum reserves are classified for the assessment of available supplies by governmental agencies, management of business processes for achieving exploration and production efficiency, and documentation of the value of reserves and resources in financial statements. Up to the present however, the storage capacity determinations made by some organizations in the initial CO2 resource assessment are incorrect technically. New publications should thus cover differences in mineral adsorption of CO2 and dissolution of CO2 in various brine waters.

  4. R&D100: CO2 Memzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeff; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Vanegas, Juan

    2015-11-19

    By combining a water droplet loaded with CO2 enzymes in an ultrathin nanopore on a flexible substrate, researchers at Sandia National Laboratories realized the first technology that meets and exceeds DOE targets for cost-effective CO2 capture. When compared with the nearest membrane competitor, this technology delivers a three times permeation rate, twenty times higher selectivity, and ten time lower fabrication cost. The CO2 Memzyme has the potential to remove 90% of CO2 emissions and is forecasted to save the U.S. coal industry $90 billion a year compared to conventional technology.

  5. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  6. CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

    2004-02-27

    The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

  7. Reactivity of CO2 Activated on Transition Metals and Sulfur Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuaki; Tanaka, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Dicationic dicarbonyl [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) (bpy = 2,2'- bipyridyl) exists as equilibrium mixtures with [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(COOH)](+) and [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(CO2)](0) depending on the pH in H2O. Those three complexes work as the precursors to CO, HCOOH production, and CO2 carrier, respectively, in electro- and photochemical CO2 reduction in aqueous solutions. However, [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) loses the catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction under aprotic conditions because [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) is not regenerated from [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(CO2)](0) in the absence of proton sources. Analogous monocarbonylruthenium complexes such as [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(CO)](2+) and [Ru(bpy)2(qu)(CO)](2+) catalyze CO2 reduction in the absence and presence of proton sources. Both complexes are reproduced through oxide transfer from the corresponding Ru-CO2 to CO2 in CO2 reduction and produce the same amount of CO and CO3(2-) in the absence of proton donors. The reduction of CO2 catalyzed by polypyridylrhenium complexes in the presence of proton sources takes place via essentially the similar mechanism as that in the case of ruthenium complexes. On the other hand, CO evolution in CO2 reduction under aprotic conditions is ascribed to the dissociation of CO from a dimeric Re-C(O)OC(O)O-Re scaffold. Visible-light irradiation to a catalytic system composed of [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+)/[Ru(bpy)3](2+)/Me2NH2(+)/Me2NH as the catalyst, photosensitizer, proton donor, and nucleophile in addition to the electron donor, respectively, in CO2-saturated CH3CN selectively produces N,N-dimethylformamide without concomitant CO and HCOOH formation. Structurally robust μ3-S of reduced metal-sulfur clusters provides a suitable site for reductive activation of CO2 with retention of the framework. Indeed, CO2 activated on μ3-S of [Fe6Mo2S8(SEt)3](5-) is fixed at the carbonyl carbon of thioesters trapped on a neighboring iron of the cluster, and α-keto acids are produced catalytically. Furthermore, two-electron reduction of [(CpMen)3M3S3](2+) (n

  8. Nocturnal intermittency in surface CO2 concentrations in sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data obtained over four adjacent fields of differing management practices in Zimbabwe illustrate the role of atmospheric intermittency as a mechanism for transferring CO2 between the surface and the atmosphere above. At night, limited atmospheric mixing permits CO2 concentrations to increase to leve...

  9. Shaft sealing issue in CO2 storage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonné, A.-C.; Charlier, R.; Collin, F.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage is an innovating approach to tackle climate changes through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Deep saline aquifers, depleted oil and gas reservoirs and unmineable coal seams are among the most studied reservoirs. However other types of reservoir, such as abandonned coal mines, could also be used for the storage of carbon dioxide. In this case, the problem of shaft sealing appears to be particularly critical regarding to the economic, ecologic and health aspects of geological storage. The purpose of the work is to study shaft sealing in the framework of CO2 storage projects in abandoned coal mines. The problem of gas transfers around a sealing system is studied numerically using the finite elements code LAGAMINE, which has been developped for 30 years at the University of Liege. A coupled hydro-mechanical model of unsaturated geomaterials is used for the analyses. The response of the two-phase flow model is first studied through a simple synthetic problem consisting in the injection of gas in a concrete-made column. It stands out of this first modeling that the advection of the gas phase represents the main transfer mechanism of CO2 in highly unsaturated materials. Furthermore the setting of a bentonite barrier seal limits considerably the gas influx into the biosphere. A 2D axisymetric hydromechanical modeling of the Anderlues natural gas storage site is then performed. The geological and hydrogeological contexts of the site are used to define the problem, for the initial and boundary conditions, as well as the material properties. In order to reproduce stress and water saturation states in the shale before CO2 injection in the mine, different phases corresponding to the shaft sinking, the mining and the set up of the sealing system are simulated. The system efficiency is then evaluated by simulating the CO2 injection with the imposed pressure at the shaft wall. According to the modeling, the low water saturation of concrete and

  10. Using an ensemble data set of turbulent air-sea fluxes to evaluate the IPSL climate model in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina; Servonnat, Jerome; Braconnot, Pascale

    2014-05-01

    Low-latitude turbulent ocean-atmosphere fluxes play a major role in the ocean and atmosphere dynamics, heat distribution and availability for meridional transport to higher latitudes, as well as for the global freshwater cycle. Their representation in coupled ocean-atmosphere models is thus of chief importance in climate simulations. Despite numerous reports of important observational uncertainties in large-scale turbulent flux products, only few model flux evaluation studies attempt to quantify and directly consider these uncertainties. To address this problem for large-scale, climatological flux evaluation, we assemble a comprehensive database of 14 climatological surface flux products, including in situ-based, satellite, hybrid and reanalysis data sets. We develop an associated analysis protocol and use it together with this database to offer an observational ensemble approach to model flux evaluation. We use this approach to perform an evaluation of the representation of the intertropical turbulent air-sea fluxes in a suite of CMIP5 historical simulations run with different recent versions of the IPSL model. To enhance model understanding, we consider both coupled and forced atmospheric model configurations. For the same purpose, we not only analyze the surface fluxes, but also their associated meteorological state variables and inter-variable relationships. We identify an important, systematic underestimation of the near-surface wind speed and a significant exaggeration of the sea-air temperature contrast in all the IPSL model versions considered. Furthermore, the coupled model simulations develop important sea surface temperature and associated air humidity bias patterns. Counterintuitively, these biases do not systematically transfer to significant biases in the surface fluxes. This is due to a combination of compensation of effects and the large flux observational spread. Our analyses reveal several inconsistencies in inter-variable relationships between

  11. CO2 Interaction with Geomaterials (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, V.; Howard, B. H.; Lynn, R. J.; Warzinski, R. P.; Hur, T.; Myshakin, E. M.; Lopano, C. L.; Voora, V. K.; Al-Saidi, W. A.; Jordan, K. D.; Cygan, R. T.; Guthrie, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas #3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or “geopolymer”) theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2

  12. Electronic spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics of Co(2+)-methanol clusters: Co2+ (CH3OH)n (n = 4-7).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher J; Faherty, Kieron P; Stringer, Kay L; Metz, Ricardo B

    2005-03-01

    Solvated cluster ions Co2+ (CH3OH)n (n = 4-7) have been produced by electrospray and studied using photofragment spectroscopy. There are notable differences between the photodissociation spectra of these complexes and the analogous water complexes. Co2+ (CH3OH)6 absorbs significantly more strongly than Co2+ (H2O)6. The photodissociation spectra of Co2+ (CH3OH)n (n = 4, 5 and 6) are very similar, which suggests that they share the Co2+ (CH3OH)4 chromophore, with additional solvent molecules in the second shell. In contrast, our earlier studies indicate that Co2+ (H2O)6 is six coordinate, and its spectrum is significantly different from that of Co2+ (H2O)4. The larger clusters Co2+ (CH3OH)n (n = 5-7) dissociate by simple loss of one or more solvent molecules. Larger clusters tend to lose more solvent molecules, especially at higher photon energies. As with the corresponding water cluster, Co2+ (CH3OH)4 photodissociates by proton transfer through a salt-bridge intermediate. This is accompanied by a modest kinetic energy release of 170 kJ mol(-1) and occurs with a lifetime of 145 ns.

  13. Decline of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Arctic atmosphere and reversal of air-sea gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Jantunen, L. M.; Falconer, R. L.; Barrie, L. A.; Fellin, P.

    1995-02-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are the most abundant organochlorine pesticides in the arctic atmosphere and ocean surface water. A compilation of measurements made between 1979-93 from stations in the Canadian and Norwegian Arctic and from cruises in the Bering and Chukchi seas indicates that atmospheric concentrations of α-HCH have declined significantly (p < 0.01), with a time for 50% decrease of about 4 y in summer-fall and 6 y in winter-spring. The 1992-93 levels of about 100 pg m-3 are 2-4 fold lower than values in the mid-1980s. The trend in γ-HCH is less pronounced, but a decrease is also suggested from measurements in the Canadian Arctic and the Bering-Chukchi seas. HCHs in ocean surface water have remained relatively constant since the early 1980s. The decline in atmospheric α-HCH has reversed the net direction of air-sea gas exchange to the point where some northern waters are now sources of the pesticide to the atmosphere instead of sinks.

  14. Oceanic distributions and air-sea fluxes of biogenic halocarbons in the open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuck, Adele L.; Turner, Suzanne M.; Liss, Peter S.

    2005-10-01

    Surface seawater and atmospheric concentrations of methyl iodide, chloroiodomethane, bromoform, dichlorobromomethane, and chlorodibromethane were measured during three open ocean cruises in the Atlantic and Southern oceans. The measurements spanned a longitudinal range of 115°, between 50°N and 65°S. The saturation anomalies and the instantaneous air-sea fluxes of the gases during one of these cruises (ANT XVIII/1) are presented and discussed. Methyl iodide and chloroiodomethane were highly supersaturated (>1000%) throughout the temperate and tropical regions, with calculated mean fluxes of 15 and 5.5 nmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The oceanic emissions of the brominated compounds were less substantial, and a significant area of the temperate Atlantic Ocean was found to be a sink for bromoform. Correlation analyses have been used to investigate possible controls on the concentrations of these gases. In particular, the relationship of CH3I with sea surface temperature and light is discussed, with the tentative conclusion that this compound may be formed abiotically.

  15. Air-Sea Methane Flux after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, J.; Sweeney, C.; Kiene, R. P.; McGillis, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key questions associated with the Deepwater Horizon's (DWH) oil leak involves understanding how much of its methane is still entrained in deep waters. Analysis of air-sea fluxes reveals a slight decrease in average aqueous CH4 from 3.3 nM in June to 3.1 and 2.8 nM in August and September, respectively. The flux estimate showed higher methane flux to the atmosphere after the blowout was capped (3.8 μmol m-2 d-1 in August) compared to 0.024 μmol m-2 d-1 during the leak. Almost all observations were within the range of historical levels. The exception was one large peak to the southwest of the wellhead, but its contribution to atmospheric methane is found to be insignificant compared to the total amount of methane released by the leak. This result supports findings that DWH methane remained entrained in the deep waters and consequently is available for biological degradation and threatens to deplete oxygen, adding further stress to an area that already suffers from anoxic-induced dead zones.

  16. Distinctive precursory air-sea signals between regular and super El Niños

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Li, Tim; Behera, Swadhin K.; Doi, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Statistically different precursory air-sea signals between a super and a regular El Niño group are investigated, using observed SST and rainfall data, and oceanic and atmospheric reanalysis data. The El Niño events during 1958-2008 are first separated into two groups: a super El Niño group (S-group) and a regular El Niño group (R-group). Composite analysis shows that a significantly larger SST anomaly (SSTA) tendency appears in S-group than in R-group during the onset phase [April-May(0)], when the positive SSTA is very small. A mixed-layer heat budget analysis indicates that the tendency difference arises primarily from the difference in zonal advective feedback and the associated zonal current anomaly ( u'). This is attributed to the difference in the thermocline depth anomaly ( D') over the off-equatorial western Pacific prior to the onset phase, as revealed by three ocean assimilation products. Such a difference in D' is caused by the difference in the wind stress curl anomaly in situ, which is mainly regulated by the anomalous SST and precipitation over the Maritime Continent and equatorial Pacific.

  17. Air-sea exchange fluxes of synthetic polycyclic musks in the North Sea and the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiyong; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Temme, Christian; Heemken, Olaf; Ruck, Wolfgang

    2007-08-15

    Synthetic polycyclic musk fragrances Galaxolide (HHCB) and Tonalide (AHTN) were measured simultaneously in air and seawater in the Arctic and the North Sea and in the rural air of northern Germany. Median concentrations of gas-phase HHCB and AHTN were 4 and 18 pg m(-3) in the Arctic, 28 and 18 pg m(-3) in the North Sea, and 71 and 21 pg m(-3) in northern Germany, respectively. Various ratios of HHCB/AHTN implied that HHCB is quickly removed by atmospheric degradation, while AHTN is relatively persistent in the atmosphere. Dissolved concentrations ranged from 12 to 2030 pg L(-1) for HHCB and from below the method detection limit (3 pg L(-1)) to 965 pg L(-1) for AHTN with median values of 59 and 23 pg L(-1), respectively. The medians of volatilization fluxes for HHCB and AHTN were 27.2 and 14.2 ng m(-2) day(-1) and the depositional fluxes were 5.9 and 3.3 ng m(-2) day(-1), respectively, indicating water-to-air volatilization is a significant process to eliminate HHCB and AHTN from the North Sea. In the Arctic, deposition fluxes dominated the air-sea gas exchange of HHCB and AHTN, suggesting atmospheric input controls the levels of HHCB and AHTN in the polar region.

  18. Application of the Hilbert-Huang Transform to the Estimation of Air-Sea Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Song, Jinbao; Huang, Yansong; Fan, Conghui

    2013-06-01

    The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is applied to analyzing the turbulent time series obtained within the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean. A method based on the HHT is introduced to reduce the influence of non-turbulent motions on the eddy-covariance based flux by removing non-turbulent modes from the time series. The scale dependence of the flux is examined and a gap mode is identified to distinguish between turbulent modes and non-turbulent modes. To examine the effectiveness of this method it is compared with three conventional methods (block average, moving-window average, and multi-resolution decomposition). The data used are from three sonic anemometers installed on a moored buoy at about 6, 4 and 2.7 m height above the sea surface. For each method, along-wind and cross-wind momentum fluxes and sensible heat fluxes at the three heights are calculated. According to the assumption of a constant-flux layer, there should be no significant difference between the fluxes at the three heights. The results show that the fluxes calculated using HHT exhibit a smaller difference and higher correlation than the other methods. These results support the successful application of HHT to the estimation of air-sea turbulent fluxes.

  19. A Unified Air-Sea Visualization System: Survey on Gridding Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, Harsh; Moorhead, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The goal is to develop a Unified Air-Sea Visualization System (UASVS) to enable the rapid fusion of observational, archival, and model data for verification and analysis. To design and develop UASVS, modelers were polled to determine the gridding structures and visualization systems used, and their needs with respect to visual analysis. A basic UASVS requirement is to allow a modeler to explore multiple data sets within a single environment, or to interpolate multiple datasets onto one unified grid. From this survey, the UASVS should be able to visualize 3D scalar/vector fields; render isosurfaces; visualize arbitrary slices of the 3D data; visualize data defined on spectral element grids with the minimum number of interpolation stages; render contours; produce 3D vector plots and streamlines; provide unified visualization of satellite images, observations and model output overlays; display the visualization on a projection of the users choice; implement functions so the user can derive diagnostic values; animate the data to see the time-evolution; animate ocean and atmosphere at different rates; store the record of cursor movement, smooth the path, and animate a window around the moving path; repeatedly start and stop the visual time-stepping; generate VHS tape animations; work on a variety of workstations; and allow visualization across clusters of workstations and scalable high performance computer systems.

  20. Mechanisms controlling the SST air-sea heat flux feedback and its dependence on spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Ute; Czaja, Arnaud; Marshall, John

    2016-05-01

    The turbulent air-sea heat flux feedback (α , in {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} ) is a major contributor to setting the damping timescale of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. In this study we compare the spatial distribution and magnitude of α in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, as estimated from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The comparison is rationalized in terms of an upper bound on the heat flux feedback, associated with "fast" atmospheric export of temperature and moisture anomalies away from the marine boundary layer, and a lower bound associated with "slow" export. It is found that regions of cold surface waters (≤ 10° C) are best described as approaching the slow export limit. This conclusion is not only valid at the synoptic scale resolved by the reanalysis data, but also on basin scales. In particular, it applies to the heat flux feedback acting as circumpolar SST anomaly scales are approached in the Southern Ocean, with feedbacks of ≤ 10 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . In contrast, the magnitude of the heat flux feedback is close to that expected from the fast export limit over the Gulf Stream and its recirculation with values on the order of ≈40 {W m}^{-2}{ K}^{-1} . Further analysis suggests that this high value reflects a compensation between a moderate thermodynamic adjustment of the boundary layer, which tends to weaken the heat flux feedback, and an enhancement of the surface winds over warm SST anomalies, which tend to enhance the feedback.

  1. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  2. Sites of Action of Elevated CO2 on Leaf Development in Rice: Discrimination between the Effects of Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Koichi; Konno, Masae; Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Miyao, Mitsue

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations (eCO2) trigger various plant responses. Despite intensive studies of these responses, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this work, we investigated when and how leaf physiology and anatomy are affected by eCO2 in rice plants. We analyzed the most recently fully expanded leaves that developed successively after transfer of the plant to eCO2. To discriminate between the effects of eCO2 and those of nitrogen deficiency, we used three different levels of N application. We found that a decline in the leaf soluble protein content (on a leaf area basis) at eCO2 was only observed under N deficiency. The length and width of the leaf blade were reduced by both eCO2 and N deficiency, whereas the blade thickness was increased by eCO2 but was not affected by N deficiency. The change in length by eCO2 became detectable in the secondly fully expanded leaf, and those in width and thickness in the thirdly fully expanded leaf, which were at the leaf developmental stages P4 and P3, respectively, at the onset of the eCO2 treatment. The decreased blade length at eCO2 was associated with a decrease in the epidermal cell number on the adaxial side and a reduction in cell length on the abaxial side. The decreased width resulted from decreased numbers of small vascular bundles and epidermal cell files. The increased thickness was ascribed mainly to enhanced development of bundle sheath extensions at the ridges of vascular bundles. These observations enable us to identify the sites of action of eCO2 on rice leaf development. PMID:24406628

  3. Detecting sinks and sources of CO2 and CH4 by ferrybox-based measurements in the Baltic Sea: Three case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Bernd; Gülzow, Wanda; Sadkowiak, Bernd; Rehder, Gregor

    2014-12-01

    A fully automated measurement system for recording of the surface water CO2 partial pressure, pCO2, was deployed on VOS (voluntary observation ship) "Finnpartner/Finnmaid" in 2003. Since 2009, an amendment of the system also allows for the continuous detection of the surface water partial pressure of methane, pCH4. The ship commutes regularly at 2-3 day intervals between the Gulf of Finland (Helsinki) and the Mecklenburg Bight (Lübeck) in the southwest of the Baltic Sea. The pCO2 data in the central Gotland Sea showed a pronounced seasonality that was mainly controlled by the biological production and decomposition of organic matter in combination with stratification/mixing of the water column. CO2 consumption in spring/summer caused pCO2 that were by up to 300 μatm below the atmospheric level. In contrast, the pCO2 exceeded the atmospheric values during autumn/winter when deep mixing transports CO2-enriched water to the surface. To identify the central Baltic Sea as a sink or source for atmospheric CO2, an air-sea CO2 gas exchange balance was established for three selected years (2005, 2008 and 2009). During each year the surface water acted as a net sink for atmospheric CO2 with uptake rates ranging between 0.60 and 0.89 mol m- 2 yr- 1. The rates correspond approximately to the enhanced carbon burial in sediments during the last century and suggest a link between eutrophication and CO2 uptake. The data of the surface methane concentration are used to focus on situations were extraordinarily high methane concentrations were observed. Temporary methane peaks were observed south of the Island of Gotland, which could clearly be attributed to frequent upwelling events. Between spring 2012 and 2013, Finnmaid went at a few occasions to St. Petersburg in the east of the Gulf of Finland. Methane concentration of up to 130 nmol L- 1 where found close to the River Neva mouth but decreased rapidly to the west. The plume of methane-enriched waters was observed farthest to

  4. Changes in the Arctic Ocean CO2 sink (1996-2007): A regional model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manizza, M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C. N.; Key, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid recent decline of Arctic Ocean sea ice area increases the flux of solar radiation available for primary production and the area of open water for air-sea gas exchange. We use a regional physical-biogeochemical model of the Arctic Ocean, forced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research atmospheric reanalysis, to evaluate the mean present-day CO2 sink and its temporal evolution. During the 1996-2007 period, the model suggests that the Arctic average sea surface temperature warmed by 0.04°C a-1, that sea ice area decreased by ˜0.1 × 106 km2 a-1, and that the biological drawdown of dissolved inorganic carbon increased. The simulated 1996-2007 time-mean Arctic Ocean CO2 sink is 58 ± 6 Tg C a-1. The increase in ice-free ocean area and consequent carbon drawdown during this period enhances the CO2 sink by ˜1.4 Tg C a-1, consistent with estimates based on extrapolations of sparse data. A regional analysis suggests that during the 1996-2007 period, the shelf regions of the Laptev, East Siberian, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas experienced an increase in the efficiency of their biological pump due to decreased sea ice area, especially during the 2004-2007 period, consistent with independently published estimates of primary production. In contrast, the CO2 sink in the Barents Sea is reduced during the 2004-2007 period due to a dominant control by warming and decreasing solubility. Thus, the effect of decreasing sea ice area and increasing sea surface temperature partially cancel, though the former is dominant.

  5. On the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the persistence of the Southern Annular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bei; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Nie, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Using the daily atmosphere and ocean reanalysis data, this study highlights the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the variability of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Our analysis shows that the SAM-induced meridional dipolar sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, through surface heat fluxes, can maintain persistent lower tropospheric temperature anomalies, which further results in anomalous eddy momentum forcing enhancing the persistence of the SAM. With the Finite Amplitude Wave Activity diagnosis, we illustrate that response of the eddy momentum forcing to SST anomalies can be attributed to changes in both baroclinic processes as baroclinic eddy generation and barotropic processes as wave breaking thus resultant diffusive eddy mixing, with the former confined at high latitudes and the latter strongest at midlatitudes. Spectral analysis further suggests that the above air-sea interactions are important for bimonthly and longer time scale SAM variations. The dipolar SST pattern may be an indicator for predicting subseasonal and interseasonal variabilities of the SAM.

  6. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  7. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-11-08

    Overview of an ongoing, 2 year research project partially funded by APRA-E to create a novel, synthetic analogue of carbonic anhydrase and incorporate it into a membrane for removal of CO2 from flue gas in coal power plants. Mechanism background, preliminary feasibility study results, molecular modeling of analogue-CO2 interaction, and program timeline are provided.

  8. Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z; Dong, J. H.

    2008-10-01

    This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team members expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

  9. CO2 Capture with Enzyme Synthetic Analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Cordatos, Harry

    2010-03-01

    Project overview provides background on carbonic anhydrase transport mechanism for CO2 in the human body and proposed approach for ARPA-E project to create a synthetic enzyme analogue and utilize it in a membrane for CO2 capture from flue gas.

  10. Evasion of CO2 Injected into the Ocean in the Context of CO2 Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H. S.

    2002-05-01

    The injection captured CO2 into the deep ocean is one potential option for sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. Aspects of this potential option include cost, effects on the marine environment and the eventual evasion of injected CO2 to the atmosphere. Estimates of evasion are considered in the context of long-term scenarios for future CO2 emissions, including illustrative cases leading to stabilization of CO2 concentration at various levels. Ocean carbon cycle model results are used to illustrate how the timing of evasion of injected CO2 fits with current conceptions of the timing of future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Of course, some CO2 emissions would be immediately incurred from the effort required to capture, transport and inject CO2. Modeled residence time for CO2 injected into the deep ocean exceeds the 100 year time scale usually considered in scenarios for future emissions, and the potential impacts of climate change. Illustrative cases leading monotonically to constant CO2 concentration have been highlighted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to give guidance on possible timing of emission reductions that may be required to stabilize CO2 concentrations at various levels. For cases considered, significant modeled evasion does not occur until long after CO2 emissions have reached a maximum and begun to decline. Illustrative cases can also lead to a maximum in CO2 concentration followed by a decline to lower, possibly constant, concentrations. In such cases, injection of emissions into the deep ocean leads to lower maximum CO2 concentrations, with less effect on concentrations later on in time. Alternative illustrative cases leading to stabilization of CO2 concentration provide a perspective to view evasion of injected CO2 in relation to emissions from technologies in the distant future.

  11. Role of Rective Mineral Surface Area on the CO2 Mineralisation of CO2 Under Natural Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuddas, P.; Rillard, J.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of complex reactions between CO2 rich fluids and rock is fundamental to secured, long-term CO2 storage in geological reservoirs. A natural hydrothermal field is considered to be a useful analogue of carbon dioxide mineralization because it integrates the long-term interaction signal. The hydrothermal field of Galicia (Spain) is characterized by co-genetic fluids resulting from a mostly homogeneous granite reservoir with pCO2 partial pressure ranging from 104 to105 Pa and pH from 10 to 6. Fluids are characterized by an increase of major elements (Ca, Mg, K and Na) and alkalinity, both correlated to pCO2. We evaluated the effects of deep CO2 perturbation on the fluid-rock interaction system. Mineral reactivity which produces changes in the fluid mineral composition is mainly dependent on the 'real' reactive surface area. The mineral surface area participating in reactions resulting from this pCO2 gradient was estimated by an inverse model approach. Input data was based on the chemical composition of the fluids we sampled. The rate of mineral dissolution was estimated by the observed pH and equilibrium conditions. Moreover, the major elemental concentrations allowed us to quantify the variation of the reactive surface area of minerals involved with the overall water-rock interaction. The irreversible mass transfer process, ruled by the continuum equilibrium condition, was defined by the overall degree of reaction advancement, using a set of polynomial equations solved independently of time scale. We found that reactive surface area of calcite, albite and K-feldspar increases by 2 orders of magnitude over the entire CO2 fluid-rock interaction process, while the reactive surface area of biotite increases by 4 orders of magnitude. This shows that fluid neutralisation and consequent CO2 mineralization under the form of carbonate species is greatly dependent on the behaviour of the reactive surface area of the mineral association in this geological

  12. CLOUDS, AEROSOLS, RADIATION AND THE AIR-SEA INTERFACE OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN: ESTABLISHING DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Bretherton, Chris; McFarquhar, Greg; Protat, Alain; Quinn, Patricia; Siems, Steven; Jakob, Christian; Alexander, Simon; Weller, Bob

    2014-09-29

    A workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy was convened at the University of Washington to discuss the state of knowledge of clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction over the Southern Ocean and to identify strategies for reducing uncertainties in their representation in global and regional models. The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system and is a unique pristine environment, yet other than from satellite, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, radiation and the air-sea interface in this region. Consequently, much is unknown about atmospheric and oceanographic processes and their linkage in this region. Approximately 60 scientists, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and senior researchers working in atmospheric and oceanic sciences at U.S. and foreign universities and government laboratories, attended the Southern Ocean Workshop. It began with a day of scientific talks, partly in plenary and partly in two parallel sessions, discussing the current state of the science for clouds, aerosols and air-sea interaction in the Southern Ocean. After the talks, attendees broke into two working groups; one focused on clouds and meteorology, and one focused on aerosols and their interactions with clouds. This was followed by more plenary discussion to synthesize the two working group discussions and to consider possible plans for organized activities to study clouds, aerosols and the air-sea interface in the Southern Ocean. The agenda and talk slides, including short summaries of the highlights of the parallel session talks developed by the session chars, are available at http://www.atmos.washington.edu/socrates/presentations/SouthernOceanPresentations/.

  13. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  14. Zinc depolarized electrochemical CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    Two zinc depolarized electrochemical carbon dioxide concentrator concepts were analytically and experimentally evaluated for portable life support system carbon dioxide (CO2) removal application. The first concept, referred to as the zinc hydrogen generator electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator, uses a ZHG to generate hydrogen for direct use in an EDC. The second concept, referred to as the zinc/electrochemical depolarized concentrator, uses a standard EDC cell construction modified for use with the Zn anode. The Zn anode is consumed and subsequently regenerated, thereby eliminating the need to supply H2 to the EDC for the CO2 removal process. The evaluation was based primarily on an analytical evaluation of the two ZnDCs at projected end item performance and hardware design levels. Both ZnDC concepts for PLSS CO2 removal application were found to be noncompetitive in both total equivalent launch weight and individual extravehicular activity mission volume when compared to other candidate regenerable PLSS CO2 scrubbers.

  15. Venting of CO2 at Enceladus’ Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley G.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Tom B.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2015-11-01

    Enceladus has CO2 surface deposits in its South Polar Region that have been recently mapped by J.-P. Combe et al. (2015 AGU Fall Meeting). Assuming that these are CO2 frost, we show how they can be formed. We use an ocean-water circulation model [1] that specifies pressure gradients that drive water to the surface from a relatively gas-rich, subsurface ocean. We now examine the movement of CO2 to the surface; formation of shallow CO2 gas pockets in the ice; and the venting of CO2, when at least some of the gas freezes to form frost. If the local heat flow is known (cf. [2]), then the depths of the corresponding gas pockets can be calculated. References: [1] Matson et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 53-62. [2] Howett et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res. 116, E03003. Acknowledgements: AGD thanks the NASA OPR Program for support.

  16. The ins and outs of CO2.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3(-). The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3(-) use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3(-) active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3(-) can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3(-) pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3(-). Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation.

  17. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  18. The ins and outs of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  19. Response of air-sea carbon fluxes and climate to orbital forcing changes in the Community Climate System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, M.; Peacock, S.; Moore, K.; Lindsay, K.

    2010-07-01

    A global general circulation model coupled to an ocean ecosystem model is used to quantify the response of carbon fluxes and climate to changes in orbital forcing. Compared to the present-day simulation, the simulation with the Earth's orbital parameters from 115,000 years ago features significantly cooler northern high latitudes but only moderately cooler southern high latitudes. This asymmetry is explained by a 30% reduction of the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation that is caused by an increased Arctic sea ice export and a resulting freshening of the North Atlantic. The strong northern high-latitude cooling and the direct insolation induced tropical warming lead to global shifts in precipitation and winds to the order of 10%-20%. These climate shifts lead to regional differences in air-sea carbon fluxes of the same order. However, the differences in global net air-sea carbon fluxes are small, which is due to several effects, two of which stand out: first, colder sea surface temperature leads to a more effective solubility pump but also to increased sea ice concentration which blocks air-sea exchange, and second, the weakening of Southern Ocean winds that is predicted by some idealized studies occurs only in part of the basin, and is compensated by stronger winds in other parts.

  20. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and (14)C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes. PMID:27187527

  1. Biological and physical controls in the Southern Ocean on past millennial-scale atmospheric CO2 changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, Julia; Skinner, Luke C.; Lippold, Jörg; Vogel, Hendrik; Frank, Norbert; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Waelbroeck, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Millennial-scale climate changes during the last glacial period and deglaciation were accompanied by rapid changes in atmospheric CO2 that remain unexplained. While the role of the Southern Ocean as a 'control valve' on ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been emphasized, the exact nature of this role, in particular the relative contributions of physical (for example, ocean dynamics and air-sea gas exchange) versus biological processes (for example, export productivity), remains poorly constrained. Here we combine reconstructions of bottom-water [O2], export production and 14C ventilation ages in the sub-Antarctic Atlantic, and show that atmospheric CO2 pulses during the last glacial- and deglacial periods were consistently accompanied by decreases in the biological export of carbon and increases in deep-ocean ventilation via southern-sourced water masses. These findings demonstrate how the Southern Ocean's 'organic carbon pump' has exerted a tight control on atmospheric CO2, and thus global climate, specifically via a synergy of both physical and biological processes.

  2. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  3. Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

    2009-06-07

    Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

  4. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs.

  5. CO2 Accounting and Risk Analysis for CO2 Sequestration at Enhanced Oil Recovery Sites.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenxue; Viswanathan, Hari; Middleton, Richard; Pan, Feng; Ampomah, William; Yang, Changbing; Jia, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian; Balch, Robert; Grigg, Reid; White, Mark

    2016-07-19

    Using CO2 in enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is a promising technology for emissions management because CO2-EOR can dramatically reduce sequestration costs in the absence of emissions policies that include incentives for carbon capture and storage. This study develops a multiscale statistical framework to perform CO2 accounting and risk analysis in an EOR environment at the Farnsworth Unit (FWU), Texas. A set of geostatistical-based Monte Carlo simulations of CO2-oil/gas-water flow and transport in the Morrow formation are conducted for global sensitivity and statistical analysis of the major risk metrics: CO2/water injection/production rates, cumulative net CO2 storage, cumulative oil/gas productions, and CO2 breakthrough time. The median and confidence intervals are estimated for quantifying uncertainty ranges of the risk metrics. A response-surface-based economic model has been derived to calculate the CO2-EOR profitability for the FWU site with a current oil price, which suggests that approximately 31% of the 1000 realizations can be profitable. If government carbon-tax credits are available, or the oil price goes up or CO2 capture and operating expenses reduce, more realizations would be profitable. The results from this study provide valuable insights for understanding CO2 storage potential and the corresponding environmental and economic risks of commercial-scale CO2-sequestration in depleted reservoirs. PMID:27362472

  6. CO2 deserts: implications of existing CO2 supply limitations for carbon management.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Richard S; Clarens, Andres F; Liu, Xiaowei; Bielicki, Jeffrey M; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-10-01

    Efforts to mitigate the impacts of climate change will require deep reductions in anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the scale of gigatonnes per year. CO2 capture and utilization and/or storage technologies are a class of approaches that can substantially reduce CO2 emissions. Even though examples of this approach, such as CO2-enhanced oil recovery, are already being practiced on a scale >0.05 Gt/year, little attention has been focused on the supply of CO2 for these projects. Here, facility-scale data newly collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was processed to produce the first comprehensive map of CO2 sources from industrial sectors currently supplying CO2 in the United States. Collectively these sources produce 0.16 Gt/year, but the data reveal the presence of large areas without access to CO2 at an industrially relevant scale (>25 kt/year). Even though some facilities with the capability to capture CO2 are not doing so and in some regions pipeline networks are being built to link CO2 sources and sinks, much of the country exists in "CO2 deserts". A life cycle analysis of the sources reveals that the predominant source of CO2, dedicated wells, has the largest carbon footprint further confounding prospects for rational carbon management strategies.

  7. Distribution and air-sea exchange of mercury (Hg) in polluted marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnato, E.; Sprovieri, M.; Bitetto, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Calabrese, S.; Di Stefano, V.; Oliveri, E.; Parello, F.; Mazzola, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is emitted in the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources, these last accounting for one third of the total emissions. Since the pre-industrial age, the atmospheric deposition of mercury have increased notably, while ocean emissions have doubled owing to the re-emission of anthropogenic mercury. Exchange between the atmosphere and ocean plays an important role in cycling and transport of mercury. We present the preliminary results from a study on the distribution and evasion flux of mercury at the atmosphere/sea interface in the Augusta basin (SE Sicily, southern Italy), a semi-enclosed marine area affected by a high degree of contamination (heavy metals and PHA) due to the oil refineries placed inside its commercial harbor. It seems that the intense industrial activity of the past have lead to an high Hg pollution in the bottom sediments of the basin, whose concentrations are far from the background mercury value found in most of the Sicily Strait sediments. The release of mercury into the harbor seawater and its dispersion by diffusion from sediments to the surface, make the Augusta basin a potential supplier of mercury both to the Mediterranean Sea and the atmosphere. Based on these considerations, mercury concentration and flux at the air-sea interface of the Bay have been estimated using a real-time atomic adsorption spectrometer (LUMEX - RA915+) and an home-made accumulation chamber, respectively. Estimated Total Atmospheric Mercury (TGM) concentrations during the cruise on the bay were in the range of 1-3 ng · m-3, with a mean value of about 1.4 ng · m-3. These data well fit with the background Hgatm concentration values detected on the land (1-2 ng · m-3, this work), and, more in general, with the background atmospheric TGM levels found in the North Hemisphere (1.5-1.7 ng · m-3)a. Besides, our measurements are in the range of those reported for other important polluted marine areas. The mercury evasion flux at the air-sea interface

  8. MP3 - A Meteorology and Physical Properties Package to explore Air:Sea interaction on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange of mass, heat and momentum at the air:sea interface are profound influences on our environment. Titan presents us with an opportunity to study these processes in a novel physical context. The MP3 instrument, under development for the proposed Discovery mission TiME (Titan Mare Explorer) is an integrated suite of small, simple sensors that combines the a traditional meteorology package with liquid physical properties and depth-sounding. In TiME's 6-Titan-day (96-day) nominal mission, MP3 will have an extended measurement opportunity in one of the most evocative environments in the solar system. The mission and instrument benefit from APL's expertise and experience in marine as well as space systems. The topside meteorology sensors (METH, WIND, PRES, TEMP) will yield the first long-duration in-situ data to constrain Global Circulation Models. The sea sensors (TEMP, TURB, DIEL, SOSO) allow high cadence bulk composition measurements to detect heterogeneities as the TiME capsule drifts across Ligeia, while a depth sounder (SONR) will measure the bottom profile. The combination of these sensors (and vehicle dynamics, ACCL) will characterize air:sea exchange. In addition to surface data, a measurement subset (ACCL, PRES, METH, TEMP) is made during descent to characterize the structure of the polar troposphere and marine boundary layer. A single electronics box inside the vehicle performs supervising and data handling functions and is connected to the sensors on the exterior via a wire and fiber optic harness. ACCL: MEMS accelerometers and angular rate sensors measure the vehicle motion during descent and on the surface, to recover wave amplitude and period and to correct wind measurements for vehicle motion. TEMP: Precision sensors are installed at several locations above and below the 'waterline' to measure air and sea temperatures. Installation of topside sensors at several locations ensures that at least one is on the upwind side of the vehicle. PRES: The

  9. Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization†

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Roberto; Carnelli, Lino; Simon, Anna; Kao, Albert; Monforte, Alessandra d’Arminio; Riccò, Moreno; Bianchi, Daniele; Belcher, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a biologically catalyzed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was modeled and evaluated at an industrial scale. A yeast display system in Saccharomyces cerevisae was used to screen several carbonic anhydrase isoforms and mineralization peptides for their impact on CO2 hydration, CaCO3 mineralization, and particle settling rate. Enhanced rates for each of these steps in the CaCO3 mineralization process were confirmed using quantitative techniques in lab-scale measurements. The effect of these enhanced rates on the CO2 capture cost in an industrial scale CO2 mineralization process using coal fly ash as the CaO source was evaluated. The model predicts a process using bCA2- yeast and fly ash is ~10% more cost effective per ton of CO2 captured than a process with no biological molecules, a savings not realized by wild-type yeast and high-temperature stable recombinant CA2 alone or in combination. The levelized cost of electricity for a power plant using this process was calculated and scenarios in which this process compares favorably to CO2 capture by MEA absorption process are presented. PMID:25289021

  10. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  11. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinckley, D.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Rice, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average alpha-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average gamma-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (alpha-HCH, average 79% saturation; gamma-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for alpha-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of gamma-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  12. Occurrence and air/sea-exchange of novel organic pollutants in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, R.; Xie, Z.

    2006-12-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that several classes of chemicals act as biologically relevant signalling substances. Among these chemicals, many, including PCBs, DDT and dioxins, are semi-volatile, persistent, and are capable of long-range atmospheric transport via atmospheric circulation. Some of these compounds, e.g. phthalates and alkylphenols (APs) are still manufactured and consumed worldwide even though there is clear evidence that they are toxic to aquatic organisms and can act as endocrine disruptors. Concentrations of NP, t-OP and NP1EO, DMP, DEP, DBP, BBP, and DEHP have been simultaneously determined in the surface sea water and atmosphere of the North Sea. Atmospheric concentrations of NP and t-OP ranged from 7 to 110 pg m - 3, which were one to three orders of magnitude below coastal atmospheric concentrations already reported. NP1EO was detected in both vapor and particle phases, which ranged from 4 to 50 pg m - 3. The concentrations of the phthalates in the atmosphere ranged from below the method detection limit to 3.4 ng m - 3. The concentrations of t-OP, NP, and NP1EO in dissolved phase were 13-300, 90-1400, and 17-1660 pg L - 1. DBP, BBP, and DEHP were determined in the water phase with concentrations ranging from below the method detection limit to 6.6 ng L - 1. This study indicates that atmospheric deposition of APs and phthalates into the North Sea is an important input pathway. The net fluxes indicate that the air sea exchange is significant and, consequently the open ocean and polar areas will be an extensive sink for APs and phthalates.

  13. Atmospheric organochlorine pollutants and air-sea exchange of hexachlorocyclohexane in the Bering and Chukchi seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel A.; Bidleman, Terry F.; Rice, Clifford P.

    1991-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been found in Arctic fish, marine mammals, birds, and plankton for some time. The lack of local sources and remoteness of the region imply long-range transport and deposition of contaminants into the Arctic from sources to the south. While on the third Soviet-American Joint Ecological Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (August 1988), high-volume air samples were taken and analyzed for Organochlorine pesticides. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated camphenes, and chlordane (listed in order of abundance, highest to lowest) were quantified. The air-sea gas exchange of HCH was estimated at 18 stations during the cruise. Average α-HCH concentrations in concurrent atmosphere and surface water samples were 250 pg m-3 and 2.4 ng L-1, respectively, and average γ-HCH concentrations were 68 pg m-3 in the atmosphere and 0.6 ng L-1 in surface water. Calculations based on experimentally derived Henry's law constants showed that the surface water was undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere at most stations (α-HCH, average 79% saturation; γ-HCH, average 28% saturation). The flux for α-HCH ranged from -47 ng m-2 day-1 (sea to air) to 122 ng m-2 d-1 (air to sea) and averaged 25 ng m-2 d-1 air to sea. All fluxes of γ-HCH were from air to sea, ranged from 17 to 54 ng m-2 d-1, and averaged 31 ng m-2 d-1.

  14. Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambal

    2013-01-01

    A durable, high-capacity regenerable sorbent can remove CO2 from the breathing loop under a Martian atmosphere. The system design allows near-ambient temperature operation, needs only a small temperature swing, and sorbent regeneration takes place at or above 8 torr, eliminating the potential for Martian atmosphere to leak into the regeneration bed and into the breathing loop. The physical adsorbent can be used in a metabolic, heat-driven TSA system to remove CO2 from the breathing loop of the astronaut and reject it to the Martian atmosphere. Two (or more) alternating sorbent beds continuously scrub and reject CO2 from the spacesuit ventilation loop. The sorbent beds are cycled, alternately absorbing CO2 from the vent loop and rejecting the adsorbed material into the environment at a high CO2 partial pressure (above 8 torr). The system does not need to run the adsorber at cryogenic temperatures, and uses a much smaller temperature swing. The sorbent removes CO2 via a weak chemical interaction. The interaction is strong enough to enable CO2 adsorption even at 3 to 7.6 torr. However, because the interaction between the surface adsorption sites and the CO2 is relatively weak, the heat input needed to regenerate the sorbent is much lower than that for chemical absorbents. The sorbent developed in this project could potentially find use in a large commercial market in the removal of CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants, if regulations are put in place to curb carbon emissions from power plants.

  15. Geological factors affecting CO2 plume distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frailey, S.M.; Leetaru, H.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the lateral extent of a CO2 plume has important implications with regards to buying/leasing pore volume rights, defining the area of review for an injection permit, determining the extent of an MMV plan, and managing basin-scale sequestration from multiple injection sites. The vertical and lateral distribution of CO2 has implications with regards to estimating CO2 storage volume at a specific site and the pore pressure below the caprock. Geologic and flow characteristics such as effective permeability and porosity, capillary pressure, lateral and vertical permeability anisotropy, geologic structure, and thickness all influence and affect the plume distribution to varying degrees. Depending on the variations in these parameters one may dominate the shape and size of the plume. Additionally, these parameters do not necessarily act independently. A comparison of viscous and gravity forces will determine the degree of vertical and lateral flow. However, this is dependent on formation thickness. For example in a thick zone with injection near the base, the CO2 moves radially from the well but will slow at greater radii and vertical movement will dominate. Generally the CO2 plume will not appreciably move laterally until the caprock or a relatively low permeability interval is contacted by the CO2. Conversely, in a relatively thin zone with the injection interval over nearly the entire zone, near the wellbore the CO2 will be distributed over the entire vertical component and will move laterally much further with minimal vertical movement. Assuming no geologic structure, injecting into a thin zone or into a thick zone immediately under a caprock will result in a larger plume size. With a geologic structure such as an anticline, CO2 plume size may be restricted and injection immediately below the caprock may have less lateral plume growth because the structure will induce downward vertical movement of the CO2 until the outer edge of the plume reaches a spill

  16. Computational analysis for dry-ice sublimation assisted CO2 jet impingement flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Songmi; Lee, Jaeseon

    2015-11-01

    The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the novel gas-solid two-phase jet impingement are investigated computationally. When the high pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) flow passes through a nozzle or orifice, it experiences the sudden expansion and the rapid temperature drop occurred by Joule-Thomson effect. This temperature drop causes the lower bulk jet fluid temperature than the CO2 sublimation line, so dry-ice becomes formed. By using CO2 gas-solid mixture as a working fluid of jet impingement, it is expected the heat transfer enhancement can be achieved due to the low bulk temperature and the additional phase change latent heat. In this study, 2D CFD model is created to predict the cooling effect of gas-solid CO2 jet. The gas-solid CO2 flow is considered by Euler-Lagrangian approach of mixed phase and the additional heat transfer module is embedded to account for the sublimation phenomena of the solid state CO2. The jet flow and heat transfer performance of gas-solid CO2 jet is investigated by the variance of flow parameter like Reynolds number, solid phase concentration and jet geometries.

  17. Natural Analog for Geologic Storage of CO2: CO2 accumulation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Xu, T.; Liu, N.; Zhou, B.

    2012-12-01

    Natural accumulations of CO2 are potential analogues of CO2 geological storage that can provide useful information on the behaviour of supercritical CO2 in reservoirs. Natural CO2 accumulations are common across Northeast China, and, although they occur in a wide variety of geological settings, their distribution is principally controlled by the Mesozoic-Cenozoic rift basins and associated Quaternary volcanism. High CO2 concentrations (>60 CO2%) in natural gas reservoirs are usually related to volcanism and magmatism, and possesses mantle-genetic origin. CO2 reservoirs consist of sandstone, volcanic rocks and carbonate rocks with the buried depth from 2000-3000 m. Dawsonite is recognized in almost all of the CO2-bearing basin, which has been proved to share the same carbon source with CO2 in the reservoirs in Songliao basin, Hailaer basin and Donghai basin. Petrographic data show that dawsonite is abundant in feldspar- rich sandstone, volcanic rock fragment-rich sandstones and tuff. In some cases, high percentage of dawsonite cement constitutes a diagenetic seal, which occurs in the reservoir-mudstone caprock and prevents upward leakage of CO2. Besides dawsonite, mantle-genetic CO2 flux leads to the formation of calcite, ankerite and siderite. The statistics of porosity and permeability measured from the dawsonite-bearing sandstone and dawsonite-absent sandstone with the almost same burial depth in Songliao basin show that the mantle-genetic CO2 flux result in lower reservoir quality, suggesting that mineral trapping for CO2 is significant. Chemical analyses of formation water in Songliao basin and Hailaer basin indicate that the concentrations of TDS, HCO3-,CO32-, Mg2+,Ca2+ and Na+ + K+ in dawsonite-bearing sandstone are higher than that in dawsonite-absent sandstone. Distribution of CO2 and dawsonite is constrainted by the regional caprocks in the Songliao basin. The charging time of the mantle-genetic CO2 in China dates from 50 to 25 Ma.

  18. The Oceanic Sink for Anthropogenic CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, Chris; Feely, R. A.; Gruber, N.; Key, Robert; Lee, K.; Bullister, J.L.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wong, C. S.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Tilbrook, B.; Millero, F. J.; Peng, T.-H.; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno

    2004-01-01

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for ~48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  19. The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2.

    PubMed

    Sabine, Christopher L; Feely, Richard A; Gruber, Nicolas; Key, Robert M; Lee, Kitack; Bullister, John L; Wanninkhof, Rik; Wong, C S; Wallace, Douglas W R; Tilbrook, Bronte; Millero, Frank J; Peng, Tsung-Hung; Kozyr, Alexander; Ono, Tsueno; Rios, Aida F

    2004-07-16

    Using inorganic carbon measurements from an international survey effort in the 1990s and a tracer-based separation technique, we estimate a global oceanic anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) sink for the period from 1800 to 1994 of 118 +/- 19 petagrams of carbon. The oceanic sink accounts for approximately 48% of the total fossil-fuel and cement-manufacturing emissions, implying that the terrestrial biosphere was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere of about 39 +/- 28 petagrams of carbon for this period. The current fraction of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions stored in the ocean appears to be about one-third of the long-term potential.

  20. Iron in the Ross Sea: 1. Impact on CO2 fluxes via variation in phytoplankton functional group and non-Redfield stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2005-03-01

    We present new model results examining nutrient and carbon biogeochemistry within the Ross Sea, focusing on the sensitivity of ecosystem dynamics to taxon-specific nutrient utilization parameters and the impact of alleviating Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth. The coupled ice-atmosphere-ocean ecosystem (CIAO) model of the Ross Sea was modified to include air-sea CO2 exchange and non-Redfield C/N/P uptake ratios of the dominant phytoplankton taxa. Model results show that the Ross Sea was a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2, driven by the high primary productivity prior to the onset of Fe limitation. Taxon-specific C/N/P uptake ratios controlled the relative rate of removal of each macronutrient, while Fe availability constrained the absolute magnitude of utilization. When Redfield C/N/P stoichiometry was applied to both phytoplankton taxa, net primary production (NPP) was overestimated in areas normally dominated by diatoms and underestimated in regions of Phaeocystis antarctica dominance, and macronutrient dynamics were misrepresented. Simulated shifts in phytoplankton taxonomic composition significantly altered uptake of atmospheric CO2 when the phytoplankton were dominated by diatoms (-70%) or P. antarctica (+35%). The ability to bloom later in the season afforded P. antarctica a relatively greater role than diatoms in controlling the air-sea flux of CO2 in the Ross Sea. In response to alleviation of Fe limitation, both total Ross Sea NPP and CO2 uptake increased by 30%. The response of the carbon cycle to Fe fertilization was predicted to be complex, and its magnitude and nature were dictated by patterns of macronutrient utilization.

  1. Experimental study of CO2 dissolution a convection phenomenon at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salem, Imen; Chevalier, Sylvie; Faisal, Titly Farhana; Abderrahmane, Hamid; Sassi, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    The density driven convection phenomenon has a significant role in enhancing the CO2 geological storage capacity. Deep saline aquifers are targeted for large scale geological sequestration. Once the CO2 is injected in saline aquifer, the supercritical CO2 rises up, forms a thin layer of free phase CO2, and the dissolution and molecular diffusion of the dissolved CO2 in brine begins. The CO2 saturated brine is denser than the original brine leading to gravitational convection of CO2 saturated brine. Convection accelerates the dissolution process and thus improves the safety and the efficiency of the sequestration. Laboratory experiments have been previously performed with experimental set-ups allowing the visualization of the phenomenon (1) eventually combined to the measurements of the dissolved CO2 mass transfer (2) as a function of the permeability of the medium. The visualization of the process was possible as Hele-Shaw cells at atmospheric pressure were used. Pressurized cylindrical vessel containing porous media allows measuring mass transfer of CO2 using the pressure decay concept (3) but visualization of the convection/dissolution was not possible for these setups. In this work, we performed experiments in a pressurized transparent cell similar to a Hele-Shaw cell but with bigger aperture. Permeability was varied by changing the size of the glass beads filling the cell. Bromocrysol green was used as a dye to track the pH change due to the presence of dissolved CO2 (1). The phenomenon is captured by a high resolution camera. We studied the effect of the pressure and of the permeability on the fingering pattern, the onset and the timescale of the phenomenon and the quantitative mass transfer of dissolved CO2. Experiments were validated on numerical simulations performed using STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) developed by the PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Hydrology group of the Department of Energy, USA. (1) Kneafsey, T

  2. 3D modelling of the early martian climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.; Millour, E.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Kerber, L.; Leconte, J.; Marcq, E.; Haberle, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young Sun and a CO2 atmosphere with surface pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet. Previous studies had suggested that they could have warmed the planet thanks to their scattering greenhouse effect. However, even assuming parameters that maximize this effect, it does not exceed +15 K. Combined with the revised CO2 spectroscopy and the impact of surface CO2 ice on the planetary albedo, we find that a CO2 atmosphere could not have raised the annual mean temperature above 0 °C anywhere on the planet. The collapse of the atmosphere into permanent CO2 ice caps is predicted for pressures higher than 3 bar, or conversely at pressure lower than 1 bar if the obliquity is low enough. Summertime diurnal mean surface temperatures above 0 °C (a condition which could have allowed rivers and lakes to form) are predicted for obliquity larger than 40° at high latitudes but not in locations where most valley networks or layered sedimentary units are observed. In the absence of other warming mechanisms, our climate model results are thus consistent

  3. CO2 Sensing and CO2 Regulation of Stomatal Conductance: Advances and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Engineer, Cawas B; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Negi, Juntaro; Israelsson-Nordström, Maria; Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Iba, Koh; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form epidermal stomatal gas-exchange valves in plants and regulate the aperture of stomatal pores in response to changes in the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ([CO2]) in leaves. Moreover, the development of stomata is repressed by elevated CO2 in diverse plant species. Evidence suggests that plants can sense [CO2] changes via guard cells and via mesophyll tissues in mediating stomatal movements. We review new discoveries and open questions on mechanisms mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements and CO2 modulation of stomatal development, which together function in the CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance and gas exchange in plants. Research in this area is timely in light of the necessity of selecting and developing crop cultivars that perform better in a shifting climate. PMID:26482956

  4. Influence of post-Tehuano oceanographic processes in the dynamics of the CO2 system in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapa-Balcorta, Cecilia; Hernandez-Ayon, J. Martin; Durazo, Reginaldo; Beier, Emilio; Alin, Simone R.; López-Pérez, Andrés.

    2015-12-01

    This investigation reports, for the first time, results of CO2 system variables in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, located in the Mexican tropical Pacific. We quantified the post-Tehuano concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH (April 2013). These values were used to calculate pCO2, aragonite saturation (ΩAr), and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2). The intense vertical stratification was found to contribute to the biogeochemical processes in surface waters (<70 m). However, in post-Tehuano conditions, high pCO2 (˜1000 µatm) and DIC concentrations (2200 µmol kg-1), as well as low ΩAr (˜1.1) and pH (˜7.5), remain in surface waters for a few days after Tehuano winds have weakened. We identified four oceanographic areas: (a) a highly mixed region due to previous Tehuano events; (b) coastal upwelling in the western region; (c) mesoscale eddies; (d) a poleward surface coastal current. The first three promoted the influence of Subtropical Subsurface Water in the chemistry of surface waters, whereas the coastal current contributed to the horizontal advection of DIC. The calculated CO2 fluxes ranged from -2.3 mmol m-2 d-1 in areas with stratified waters to over 25 mmol m-2 d-1 for mixed areas. Positive values indicate an ocean-to-atmosphere flux. Our findings suggest that the Gulf of Tehuantepec is a major source of CO2 into the atmosphere.

  5. How secure is subsurface CO2 storage? Controls on leakage in natural CO2 reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miocic, Johannes; Gilfillan, Stuart; McDermott, Christopher; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only industrial scale technology available to directly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuelled power plants and large industrial point sources to the atmosphere. The technology includes the capture of CO2 at the source and transport to subsurface storage sites, such as depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or saline aquifers, where it is injected and stored for long periods of time. To have an impact on the greenhouse gas emissions it is crucial that there is no or only a very low amount of leakage of CO2 from the storage sites to shallow aquifers or the surface. CO2 occurs naturally in reservoirs in the subsurface and has often been stored for millions of years without any leakage incidents. However, in some cases CO2 migrates from the reservoir to the surface. Both leaking and non-leaking natural CO2 reservoirs offer insights into the long-term behaviour of CO2 in the subsurface and on the mechanisms that lead to either leakage or retention of CO2. Here we present the results of a study on leakage mechanisms of natural CO2 reservoirs worldwide. We compiled a global dataset of 49 well described natural CO2 reservoirs of which six are leaking CO2 to the surface, 40 retain CO2 in the subsurface and for three reservoirs the evidence is inconclusive. Likelihood of leakage of CO2 from a reservoir to the surface is governed by the state of CO2 (supercritical vs. gaseous) and the pressure in the reservoir and the direct overburden. Reservoirs with gaseous CO2 is more prone to leak CO2 than reservoirs with dense supercritical CO2. If the reservoir pressure is close to or higher than the least principal stress leakage is likely to occur while reservoirs with pressures close to hydrostatic pressure and below 1200 m depth do not leak. Additionally, a positive pressure gradient from the reservoir into the caprock averts leakage of CO2 into the caprock. Leakage of CO2 occurs in all cases along a fault zone, indicating that

  6. Study on CO2 global recycling system.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Niwa, S

    2001-09-28

    In order to assist in finding ways to mitigate CO2 emission and to slow the depletion of fossil fuels we have established and evaluated a representative system, which consists of three technologies developed in our laboratory. These technologies were in CO2 recovery, hydrogen production and methanol synthesis and in addition we established the necessary supporting systems. Analysis of outline designs of the large scale renewable energy power generation system and this system and energy input for building plant, energy input for running plant has been conducted based on a case using this system for a 1000-MW coal fired power plant, followed by an evaluation of the material balance and energy balance. The results are as follows. Energy efficiency is 34%, the CO2 reduction rate is 41%, the balance ratio of the energy and CO2 of the system is 2.2 and 1.8, respectively, on the assumption that the primary renewable energy is solar thermal power generation, the stationary CO2 emission source is a coal-fired power plant and the generation efficiency of the methanol power plant is 60%. By adopting the system, 3.7 million tons of CO2 can be recovered, approximately 2.7 million tons of methanol can be produced, and 15.4 billion kWh of electricity can be generated per year. Compared to generating all electrical power using only coal, approximately 2.6 million tons of coal per year can be saved and approximately 2.15 million tons of CO2 emission can be reduced. Therefore, it is clearly revealed that this system would be effective to reduce CO2 emissions and to utilize renewable energy.

  7. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    PubMed

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-01

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  8. CO2-selective, Hybrid Membranes by Silation of Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-09-01

    Hybrid membranes are feasible candidates for the separation of CO2 from gas produced in coal-based power generation since they have the potential to combine the high selectivity of polymer membranes and the high permeability of inorganic membranes. An interesting method for producing hybrid membranes is the silation of an inorganic membrane. In this method, trichloro- or alkoxy-silanes interact with hydroxyl groups on the surface of γ-AlO3 or TiO2, binding organic groups to that surface. By varying the length of these organic groups on the organosilane, it should be possible to tailor the effective pore size of the membrane. Similarly, the addition of “CO2-phillic” groups to the silating agent allows for the careful control of surface affinity and the enhancement of surface diffusion mechanisms. This method of producing hybrid membranes selective to CO2 was first attempted by Hyun [1] who silated TiO2 with phenyltriethoxysilane. Later, Way [2] silated γ-AlO3 with octadecyltrichlorosilane. Both researchers were successful in producing membranes with improved selectivity toward CO2, but permeability was not maintained at a commercially applicable level. XPS data indicated that the silating agent did not penetrate into the membrane pores and separation actually occurred in a thin “polymer-like” surface layer. The present study attempts to overcome the mass transfer problems associated with this technique by producing the desired monolayer coverage of silane, and thus develop a highly-permeable CO2-selective hybrid membrane.

  9. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlyingmore » two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.« less

  10. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-30

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlyingmore » two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.« less

  11. Physical-Biogeochemical Interactions that Alter the Uptake of Atmospheric CO2 in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, S. R.; Hakkinen, S. M.; McClain, C. R.

    2009-04-01

    The Barents Sea is characterized by significant calcification rates during summer promoted by intense coccolithophore blooms that peak during August. Coccolithophores, among which Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi) is the most abundant and widespread species, are considered to be the most productive calcifying organisms on Earth. They inhabit the surface layer (MLD 20m) in highly stratified waters where light intensity is high. E. huxleyi often forms massive blooms in temperate and sub-polar oceans. Coupling of the coccolithophore organic carbon and carbonate pumps interact to consume (photosynthesis) and produce (calcification) CO2. The so-called Rain Ratio, defined as the ratio of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) to particulate organic carbon (POC) in exported biogenic matter, determines the relative strength of the two biological carbon pumps and influences the flux of CO2 across the surface ocean - atmosphere interface. Here we use a combination of satellite ocean color algorithms, coupled ice-ocean model products, an SST-dependent pCO2 algorithm, and gas exchange parameterization to describe the seasonal and decadal variability of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Barents Sea. Model-derived SST and SSS (1955-2008) are used in conjunction with the pCO2 algorithm and carbonate chemistry to derive decadal trends of sea-air CO2 flux, pH and calcite saturation state. Phytoplankton and calcite production have strong spatial variability. Nutrient supply, biomass and calcite concentrations are modulated by light and MLD seasonal cycle. The size, intensity, and location of coccolithophore blooms vary from year to year, but the peak bloom is always in June in the Central Basin of the sub-polar North Atlantic (45oW - 10oW, 50oN - 65oN) and August in the Barents Sea. Calcification rates range from 5% to 27% of net primary production. The Barents Sea PIC production is about twice that of the Central Basin. Predicted freshening and warming of polar seas may increase stratification

  12. Coastal ocean CO2-carbonic acid-carbonate sediment system of the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas J.; MacKenzie, Fred T.; Lerman, Abraham

    2006-03-01

    from the Hawaiian Ocean Time series and the calculated air-sea CO2 exchange agrees well with a recent independent estimate of this flux derived from measurements from diverse coastal ecosystems scaled up to the global coastal ocean area.

  13. On the Vertical Gradient in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stine, A. R.; Fung, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Attempts to constrain surface fluxes of carbon from atmospheric measurements of carbon dioxide have primarily focused on surface boundary layer measurements, because information about surface fluxes is least diluted close to the locations where the fluxes occur. However, errors in model ventilation of air in the vertical can be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes. Satellites which measure column integrated CO2 are expected to represent a major advance in part because they observe the entire atmospheric column. Recent work has highlighted the fact that vertical gradients in carbon concentrations can give us information about where vertical mixing errors are likely to be misinterpreted as local surface fluxes, but passive tracer evidence suggests that models that capture vertical profiles on the ocean do poorly on the land (and vice versa), suggesting that the problem of correctly treating vertical mixing in inverse studies is more fundamental than picking the "best" model. We consider observations of the vertical gradient in CO2 from aircrafts and from a comparison of satellites that observe in the near infrared (which observe the column integrated CO2 field) and the thermal infrared (which observe the upper troposphere). We evaluate the feasibility of using these satellites for determining the vertical gradient in CO2. We examine how observations of the vertical gradient of CO2 allow us to differentiate the imprint of vertical mixing and the imprint in surface fluxes on the observed field of atmospheric CO2.

  14. Advanced CO2 Removal and Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alptekin, Gokhan; Dubovik, Margarita; Copeland, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    An advanced system for removing CO2 and H2O from cabin air, reducing the CO2, and returning the resulting O2 to the air is less massive than is a prior system that includes two assemblies . one for removal and one for reduction. Also, in this system, unlike in the prior system, there is no need to compress and temporarily store CO2. In this present system, removal and reduction take place within a single assembly, wherein removal is effected by use of an alkali sorbent and reduction is effected using a supply of H2 and Ru catalyst, by means of the Sabatier reaction, which is CO2 + 4H2 CH4 + O2. The assembly contains two fixed-bed reactors operating in alternation: At first, air is blown through the first bed, which absorbs CO2 and H2O. Once the first bed is saturated with CO2 and H2O, the flow of air is diverted through the second bed and the first bed is regenerated by supplying it with H2 for the Sabatier reaction. Initially, the H2 is heated to provide heat for the regeneration reaction, which is endothermic. In the later stages of regeneration, the Sabatier reaction, which is exothermic, supplies the heat for regeneration.

  15. The overlooked tropical oceanic CO2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibánhez, J. Severino P.; Araujo, Moacyr; Lefèvre, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The intense rainfall in the tropical Atlantic spatially overlaps with the spread of the Amazon plume. Based on remote-sensed sea surface salinity and rainfall, we removed the contribution of rainfall to the apparent Amazon plume area, thus refining the quantification of its extension (0.84 ± 0.06 × 106 km2 to 0.89 ± 0.06 × 106 km2). Despite the previous overestimation of the Amazon plume area due to the influence of rainfall (>16%), our calculated annual CO2 flux based on rainfall-corrected sea surface CO2 fugacity confirms that the Amazon River plume is an atmospheric CO2 sink of global importance (-7.61 ± 1.01 to -7.85 ± 1.02 Tg C yr-1). Yet we show that current sea-air CO2 flux assessments for the tropical Atlantic could be overestimated in about 10% by neglecting the CO2 sink associated to the Amazon plume. Thus, including the Amazon plume, the sea-air CO2 exchange for the tropical Atlantic is estimated to be 81.1 ± 1.1 to 81.5 ± 1.1 Tg C yr-1.

  16. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  17. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    2003-01-01

    The CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM) project was performed to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes developed in this project are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications, such as In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) and In Situ Consumables Production (ISCP). These membrane materials may be used in a variety of ISRU systems, for example as the atmospheric inlet filter for an ISPP process to enhance the concentration of CO2 for use as a reactant gas, to passively separate argon and nitrogen trace gases from CO2 for habitat pressurization, to provide a system for removal of CO2 from breathing gases in a closed environment, or within a process stream to selectively separate CO2 from other gaseous components. The membranes identified and developed for CAM were evaluated for use in candidate ISRU processes and other gas separation applications, and will help to lay the foundation for future unmanned sample return and human space missions. CAM is a cooperative project split among three institutions: Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. Investigating 14CO2 chamber methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The radiogenic isotope of carbon (14C) is an exceptionally useful tool in studying soil respired CO2, providing information about soil turnover rates, depths of production and the biological sources of production through partitioning. Unfortunately, little work has been done to thoroughly investigate the possibility of inherent biases in the current measurement techniques for 14CO2, caused by disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime, because of high costs and sampling logistics. Our aim in this study is to investigate the degree of bias present in the current sampling methodologies using a numerical model and laboratory calibration device. Four chamber techniques were tested numerically with varying fraction modern of production, δ13C of production, collar lengths, flux rates and diffusivities. Two of the chambers were then tested on the lab calibration device. One of these chambers, Iso-FD, has recently been tested for its use as a 13CO2 chamber and it does not induce gas transport fractionation biases present in other 13CO2 sampling methodologies. We then implemented it in the field to test its application as a 14CO2 chamber because of its excellent performance as a 13CO2chamber. Presented here are the results from the numerical modeling experiment, the laboratory calibration experiment and preliminary field results from the Iso-FD chamber.

  19. CO2 cooling in terrestrial planet thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Hunten, D. M.; Roble, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the recent progress in the debate on the CO2-O relaxation rate, its temperature dependence, and its corresponding impact on the thermospheric heat budgets of Venus, Earth, and Mars. This comparative approach provides the broadest range of conditions under which a common CO2-O relaxation rate should provide consistent results. New global mean calculations are presented for the heat budgets of these three planets using large CO2-O relaxation rates that have been inferred recently from Earth CO2 radiance measurements and laboratory studies. Results indicate that available Venus and Mars data constrain the CO2-O relaxation rate to be 2-4 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s at 300 K. For Venus, this strong cooling serves as an effective thermostat that gives rise to a small variation of thermospheric temperatures over the solar cycle, just as observed. Conversely, CO2 cooling does not appear to be dominant in the dayside heat budget of the Mars thermosphere over most of the solar cycle. For the Earth, this strong cooling implies that the lower thermosphere does not typically require significant eddy diffusion or heat conduction. However, global-scale dynamics or an additional heating mechanism may be needed to restore calculated temperatures to observed values when relaxation rates exceeding 2 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s are employed.

  20. Development of an industrial CO2 laser for mask marking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Jung, Chin Mann; Kim, Jeong Mook; Kim, Kwang Suk; Kwon, Seong Ouk; Lee, Sang Mock; Kim, Duk Hyun

    1992-06-01

    We developed and commercialized an industrial pulsed TEA CO2 laser with high power and high repetition rate for printing characters and figures. Several commercial models have been investigated in design and performance. We improved its quality to the level of commercial TEA CO2 laser by an endurance test for each parts of laser system. The maximum pulse energy and repetition rate of our laser were above 5 J/pulse and 20 pps, respectively. Moreover, we designed the resolving power could be possible to 10 line/mm. Many optical parts were localized and lowered much in cost. Only few parts were imported and almost 90% in cost were localized. Also, to accelerate the commercialization by the joint company, the training and transfer of technology were pursued in the joint participation in design and assembly by company researchers from the early stage.

  1. The Effect of Excess Electron and hole on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on Rutile (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen-Jin; Wen, Bo; Bandaru, Sateesh; Krack, Matthias; Lau, M W; Liu, Li-Min

    2016-01-01

    CO2 capture and conversion into useful chemical fuel attracts great attention from many different fields. In the reduction process, excess electron is of key importance as it participates in the reaction, thus it is essential to know whether the excess electrons or holes affect the CO2 conversion. Here, the first-principles calculations were carried out to explore the role of excess electron on adsorption and activation of CO2 on rutile (110) surface. The calculated results demonstrate that CO2 can be activated as CO2 anions or CO2 cation when the system contains excess electrons and holes. The electronic structure of the activated CO2 is greatly changed, and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of CO2 can be even lower than the conduction band minimum of TiO2, which greatly facilities the CO2 reduction. Meanwhile, the dissociation process of CO2 undergoes an activated CO2(-) anion in bend configuration rather than the linear, while the long crossing distance of proton transfer greatly hinders the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 on the rutile (110) surface. These results show the importance of the excess electrons on the CO2 reduction process. PMID:26984417

  2. The Effect of Excess Electron and hole on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on Rutile (110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wen-Jin; Wen, Bo; Bandaru, Sateesh; Krack, Matthias; Lau, Mw; Liu, Li-Min

    2016-03-01

    CO2 capture and conversion into useful chemical fuel attracts great attention from many different fields. In the reduction process, excess electron is of key importance as it participates in the reaction, thus it is essential to know whether the excess electrons or holes affect the CO2 conversion. Here, the first-principles calculations were carried out to explore the role of excess electron on adsorption and activation of CO2 on rutile (110) surface. The calculated results demonstrate that CO2 can be activated as CO2 anions or CO2 cation when the system contains excess electrons and holes. The electronic structure of the activated CO2 is greatly changed, and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of CO2 can be even lower than the conduction band minimum of TiO2, which greatly facilities the CO2 reduction. Meanwhile, the dissociation process of CO2 undergoes an activated CO2‑ anion in bend configuration rather than the linear, while the long crossing distance of proton transfer greatly hinders the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 on the rutile (110) surface. These results show the importance of the excess electrons on the CO2 reduction process.

  3. The Effect of Excess Electron and hole on CO2 Adsorption and Activation on Rutile (110) surface

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Jin; Wen, Bo; Bandaru, Sateesh; Krack, Matthias; Lau, MW; Liu, Li-Min

    2016-01-01

    CO2 capture and conversion into useful chemical fuel attracts great attention from many different fields. In the reduction process, excess electron is of key importance as it participates in the reaction, thus it is essential to know whether the excess electrons or holes affect the CO2 conversion. Here, the first-principles calculations were carried out to explore the role of excess electron on adsorption and activation of CO2 on rutile (110) surface. The calculated results demonstrate that CO2 can be activated as CO2 anions or CO2 cation when the system contains excess electrons and holes. The electronic structure of the activated CO2 is greatly changed, and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of CO2 can be even lower than the conduction band minimum of TiO2, which greatly facilities the CO2 reduction. Meanwhile, the dissociation process of CO2 undergoes an activated CO2− anion in bend configuration rather than the linear, while the long crossing distance of proton transfer greatly hinders the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 on the rutile (110) surface. These results show the importance of the excess electrons on the CO2 reduction process. PMID:26984417

  4. Will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase if anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, A. H.; Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall carbon sinks would dominate. However, these models have typically neglected the permafrost carbon pool, which has the potential to introduce an additional terrestrial source of carbon to the atmosphere. Here we use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, which has recently been expanded to include permafrost carbon stocks and exchanges with the atmosphere. In a scenario of zeroed CO2 and sulphate aerosol emissions, we assess whether the warming induced by specified constant concentrations of non-CO2 greenhouse gases could slow the CO2 decline following zero emissions, or even reverse this trend and cause CO2 to increase over time. We find that a radiative forcing from non-CO2 gases of approximately 0.6 W m-2 results in a near balance of CO2 emissions from the terrestrial biosphere and uptake of CO2 by the oceans, resulting in near-constant atmospheric CO2 concentrations for at least a century after emissions are eliminated. At higher values of non-CO2 radiative forcing, CO2 concentrations increase over time, regardless of when emissions cease during the 21st century. Given that the present-day radiative forcing from non-CO2 greenhouse gases is about 0.95 W m-2, our results suggest that if we were to eliminate all CO2 and aerosols emissions without also decreasing non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions, CO2 levels would increase over time, resulting in a small increase in climate warming. The sudden and total cessation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is an unlikely future scenario. However, such cessation experiments provide a useful method for evaluating the relative strength of the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle feedbacks in the presence of forcing from non-CO2 greenhouse gasses.

  5. Global CO2 simulation using GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Oda, T.; Saito, M.; Valsala, V.; Belikov, D.; Saeki, T.; Saito, R.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Yoshida, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Bril, A.; Oshchepkov, S.; Andres, R. J.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigating the distribution and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes is an active research topic in the field of contemporary carbon cycle dynamics. The technique central to this effort is atmospheric inverse modeling with which surface CO2 fluxes are estimated by making corrections to a priori flux estimates such that mismatches between model-predicted and observed CO2 concentrations are minimized. Past investigations were carried out by utilizing CO2 measurements collected in global networks of surface-based monitoring sites. Now, datasets of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) retrieved from spectral soundings collected by GOSAT are available for complementing the surface-based CO2 observations. These space-based XCO2 data are expected to enhance the spatiotemporal coverage of the existing surface observation network and thus reduce uncertainty associated with the surface flux estimates. We estimated monthly CO2 fluxes in 64 sub-continental regions from a subset of the surface-based GLOBALVIEW CO2 data and the GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals. We further simulated CO2 concentrations in 3-D model space using the surface flux estimates obtained. In this presentation, we report the result of a comparison between the simulated CO2 concentrations and independent surface observations. As part of an effort in inter-comparing GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates, we also look at results yielded with XCO2 data retrieved with the PPDF-DOAS algorithm and those made available by the NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space team. For this study, we used version 08.1 of the National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric transport model, which was driven by the Japan Meteorological Agency's JCDAS wind analysis data. The CO2 forward simulations were performed on 2.5° × 2.5° horizontal grids at 32 vertical levels between the surface and the top of the atmosphere. The a priori flux dataset used was comprised of the sum of four

  6. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket". PMID:21708387

  7. Commitment accounting for CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Socolow, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived energy infrastructure that burns fossil fuels represents a multi-decade 'commitment' to emit CO2. Today's global power sector, alone, represents hundreds of billions of tons of still unrealized 'committed emissions' of CO2. And every year, substantial new commitments to future emissions are made, as new power plants are built. The socioeconomic inertia of these commitments is a major barrier to climate change mitigation. Here, we quantify these annual commitments by a bottom-up analysis of all power plants commissioned between 1950 and 2011; assigning emission commitments to the year when each generator came on line. We find, assuming 40-year commitments, that the global commitment to future emissions from the world's generators in 2011 (the most recent year in our analysis) was 318 Gt CO2, of which 216 Gt CO2 were commitments from the world's coal-fired generators and 134 Gt CO2 were commitments from China's generators. Annual new global commitments exceeded 15 Gt CO2 per year in every year since 2000. Moreover, between 2005-2010 (the latest year of available emissions data), new global commitments were more than twice as large as actual emissions from all power plants. Country-specific ratios of new committed emissions to actual emissions, averaged over 1990-2010 were 4.1 for China, 2.6 for India, 0.9 for the EU, and 0.6 for the US. We urge that the reporting of annual CO2 emissions, already widely institutionalized, be augmented by 'commitment accounting' which makes these future emissions salient. Annual committed emissions and annual emissions of primary power infrastructure. New committed emissions (light green) have grown from approximately 4 Gt CO2 per year in 1960 to roughly 10 Gt CO2 per year between 1970-1995, and then to more than 15 Gt CO2 per year since 2000. Throughout this period, new committed emissions have exceeded annual emissions (blue curve, source: IEA). Although the commitments made 30-40 years ago have largely been realized (dark

  8. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  9. Sequestering CO2 in the Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantz, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    Calera’s Carbonate Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation (CMAP) technology with beneficial reuse has been called, “game-changing” by Carl Pope, Director of the Sierra Club. Calera offers a solution to the scale of the carbon problem. By capturing carbon into the built environment through carbonate mineralization, Calera provides a sound and cost-effective alternative to Geologic Sequestration and Terrestrial Sequestration. The CMAP technology permanently converts carbon dioxide into a mineral form that can be stored above ground, or used as a building material. The process produces a suite of carbonate-containing minerals of various polymorphic forms. Calera product can be substituted into blends with ordinary Portland cements and used as aggregate to produce concrete with reduced carbon, carbon neutral, or carbon negative footprints. For each ton of product produced, approximately half a ton of carbon dioxide can be sequestered using the Calera process. Coal and natural gas are composed of predominately istopically light carbon, as the carbon in the fuel is plant-derived. Thus, power plant CO2 emissions have relatively low δ13C values.The carbon species throughout the CMAP process are identified through measuring the inorganic carbon content, δ13C values of the dissolved carbonate species, and the product carbonate minerals. Measuring δ13C allows for tracking the flue gas CO2 throughout the capture process. Initial analysis of the capture of propane flue gas (δ13C ˜ -25 ‰) with seawater (δ13C ˜ -10 ‰) and industrial brucite tailings from a retired magnesium oxide plant in Moss Landing, CA (δ13C ˜ -7 ‰ from residual calcite) produced carbonate mineral products with a δ13C value of ˜ -20 ‰. This isotopically light carbon, transformed from flue gas to stable carbonate minerals, can be transferred and tracked through the capture process, and finally to the built environment. CMAP provides an economical solution to global warming by producing

  10. Exercise carbon dioxide (CO2) retention with inhaled CO2 and breathing resistance.

    PubMed

    Shykoff, Barbara E; Warkander, Dan E

    2012-01-01

    Combined effects on respiratory minute ventilation (VE)--and thus, on end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(ET)CO2)--of breathing resistance and elevated inspired carbon dioxide (CO2) had not been determined during heavy exercise. In this Institutional Review Board-approved, dry, sea-level study, 12 subjects in each of three phases exercised to exhaustion at 85% peak oxygen uptake while V(E) and P(ET)CO2 were measured. Participants inhaled 0%, 1%, 2% or 3% CO2 in air, or 0% or 2% CO2 in oxygen, with or without breathing resistance, mimicking the U.S. Navy's MK 16 rebreather underwater breathing apparatus (UBA). Compared to air baseline (0% inspired CO2 in air without resistance): (1) Oxygen decreased baseline V(E) (p < 0.01); (2) Inspired CO2 increased V(E) and P(ET)CO2 (p < 0.01); (3) Resistance decreased V(E) (p < 0.01); (4) Inspired CO2 with resistance elevated P(ET)CO2 (p < 0.01). In air, V(E) did not change from that with resistance alone. In oxygen, V(E) returned to oxygen baseline. End-exercise P(ET)CO2 exceeded 60 Torr (8.0 kPa) in three tests. Subjects identified hypercapnia poorly. Results support dual optimization of arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and respiratory effort. Because elevated CO2 may not increase V(E) if breathing resistance and VE are high, rebreather UBA safety requires very low inspired CO2.

  11. Fingerprinting captured CO2 using natural tracers: Determining CO2 fate and proving ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Gilfillan, Stuart; Johnston, Gareth; Stuart, Finlay; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    In the long term, captured CO2 will most likely be stored in large saline formations and it is highly likely that CO2 from multiple operators will be injected into a single saline formation. Understanding CO2 behavior within the reservoir is vital for making operational decisions and often uses geochemical techniques. Furthermore, in the event of a CO2 leak, being able to identify the owner of the CO2 is of vital importance in terms of liability and remediation. Addition of geochemical tracers to the CO2 stream is an effective way of tagging the CO2 from different power stations, but may become prohibitively expensive at large scale storage sites. Here we present results from a project assessing whether the natural isotopic composition (C, O and noble gas isotopes) of captured CO2 is sufficient to distinguish CO2 captured using different technologies and from different fuel sources, from likely baseline conditions. Results include analytical measurements of CO2 captured from a number of different CO2 capture plants and a comprehensive literature review of the known and hypothetical isotopic compositions of captured CO2 and baseline conditions. Key findings from the literature review suggest that the carbon isotope composition will be most strongly controlled by that of the feedstock, but significant fractionation is possible during the capture process; oxygen isotopes are likely to be controlled by the isotopic composition of any water used in either the industrial process or the capture technology; and noble gases concentrations will likely be controlled by the capture technique employed. Preliminary analytical results are in agreement with these predictions. Comparison with summaries of likely storage reservoir baseline and shallow or surface leakage reservoir baseline data suggests that C-isotopes are likely to be valuable tracers of CO2 in the storage reservoir, while noble gases may be particularly valuable as tracers of potential leakage.

  12. The nature of the CO2 -concentrating mechanisms in a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Clement, Romain; Dimnet, Laura; Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms are widespread in aquatic ecosystems where they may be limited by the supply of inorganic carbon. Their carbon dioxide-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) involving transporters and carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are well known, but the contribution of a biochemical CCM involving C4 metabolism is contentious. The CCM(s) present in the marine-centric diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, were studied in cells exposed to high or low concentrations of CO2 , using a range of approaches. At low CO2 , cells possessed a CCM based on active uptake of CO2 (70% contribution) and bicarbonate, while at high CO2 , cells were restricted to CO2 . CA was highly and rapidly activated on transfer to low CO2 and played a key role because inhibition of external CA produced uptake kinetics similar to cells grown at high CO2 . The activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) and the PEP-regenerating enzyme, pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), were lower in cells grown at low than at high CO2 . The ratios of PEPC and PPDK to ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were substantially lower than 1, even at low CO2 . Our data suggest that the kinetic properties of this species results from a biophysical CCM and not from C4 type metabolism. PMID:26529678

  13. A SOLAS challenge: How can we test test feedback loops involving air-sea exchange?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebert, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    It is now well accepted that the Earth System links biological and physical processes in the water, on land, and in the air, creating countless feedback loops and dependencies that are at best difficult to quantify. One example of interest to SOLAS scientists is the suspension and long-range transport of dust from Asia, which may or may not interact with acidic air pollutants, that may increase the biological availability of iron, thereby increasing primary productivity in parts of the Pacific. This could increase DMS emissions and modify the radiative impact of Pacific clouds, affecting the climate and the hydrological system that limits the amount of dust lofted each year. Air-sea exchange is central to many such feedbacks: Variations in productivity in upwelling waters off Peru probably change DMS emissions and modify the stratocumulus clouds that blanket that region, thereby feeding back to productivity. The disparate time and space scales of the controlling processes make it difficult to observationally constrain such systems without the use of multi-year time-series and intensive multiplatform process studies. Unfortunately, much of the infrastructure for funding Earth science is poorly suited for supporting multidisciplinary research. For example, NSF's program managers are organized into disciplines and sub-disciplines, and rely on disciplinary reviewer communities that are protective of their slices of the funding pie. It is easy to find authors of strong, innovative, cross-disciplinary (yet unsuccessful) proposals who say they'll never try it again, because there is so little institutional support for interfacial research. Facility issues also complicate multidisciplinary projects, since there are usually several allocating groups that don't want to commit their ships, airplanes, or towers until the other groups have done so. The result is that there are very few examples of major interdisciplinary projects, even though IGBP core programs have articulated

  14. Advanced CO2 Removal Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Verma, Sunita; Forrest, Kindall; LeVan, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced CO2 Removal Technical Task Agreement covers three active areas of research and development. These include a study of the economic viability of a hybrid membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system, sorbent materials development, and construction of a database of adsorption properties of important fixed gases on several adsorbent material that may be used in CO2 removal systems. The membrane/adsorption CO2 removal system was proposed as a possible way to reduce the energy consumption of the four-bed molecular sieve system now in use. Much of the energy used by the 4BMS is used to desorb water removed in the device s desiccant beds. These beds might be replaced by a desiccating membrane that moves the water from [he incoming stream directly into the outlet stream. The approach may allow the CO2 removal beds to operate at a lower temperature. A comparison between models of the 4BMS and hybrid systems is underway at Vanderbilt University. NASA Ames Research Center has been investigating a Ag-exchanged zeolites as a possible improvement over currently used Ca and Na zeolites for CO2 removal. Silver ions will complex with n:-bonds in hydrocarbons such as ethylene, giving remarkably improved selectivity for adsorption of those materials. Bonds with n: character are also present in carbon oxides. NASA Ames is also continuing to build a database for adsorption isotherms of CO2, N2, O2, CH4, and Ar on a variety of sorbents. This information is useful for analysis of existing hardware and design of new processes.

  15. Photolytic production of CO2 on Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Brown, R. H.

    2008-09-01

    Carbon Dioxide has been detected on the surface of Iapetus by Cassini's VIMS instrument at the 4.26 micron band. This CO2 is concentrated on the equatorial leading side, where we also see an abundance of dark material. The residence time of free CO2 on the surface of Iapetus is very short, thus the CO2 is unlikely to be in the form of frost; it is more likely that the CO2 is tightly bound in the form of complexed molecules. We explore the possibility of photolytically generating CO2 from a mixture of the carbon rich material and water ice that matches the expected composition of the dark material on Iapetus' surface. An ice regolith was created with flash frozen water that was crushed into sub-millimeter shards and mixed with amorphous 13C. The regolith was placed in a vacuum chamber with a surface area of 10 cm2 and a thickness of 2 cm and exposed to UV light from a deuterium lamp with peaks of flux centered around 121 and 160 nm. Temperatures were varied between 60 and 130K at a pressure of 10-8 torr. Both CO and CO2 were produced by photolytic reactions and detected by a mass spectrometer. Applying these results to Iapetus, Jeans escape calculations show that CO2 generated by photolysis will remain gravitationally bound to Iapetus for between 100 and 200 years, ballistically scattering across the surface until it is sequestered in a polar cold trap or escapes to space. The average particle will interact with the surface more than 1000 times before escaping unless interactions with surface grains causes it to become complexed, such as adsorption. We are continuing to evaluate the photochemistry for this simulated Iapetus surface using a Nicolet IR spectrometer to identify all the products generated and estimate the associated production rate.

  16. CO(2) Fixation in Opuntia Roots.

    PubMed

    Ting, I P; Dugger, W M

    1966-03-01

    Nonautotrophic CO(2) metabolism in Opuntia echinocarpa roots was studied with techniques of manometry and radiometry. The roots were grown in a one-quarter strength nutrient solution for several days; the distal 2 cm was used for physiological studies. The roots assimilated significant quantities of (14)CO(2) and appeared to show a crassulacean-type acid metabolism with respect to quality and quantity. Most of the (14)C activity was associated with the distal portion of the elongating root indicating correlation with metabolic activity. The (14)CO(2) assimilation was comparable to a crassulacean leaf succulent, but 3 times greater than that found for stem tissue of the same Opuntia species.The rates of O(2) and CO(2) exchange and estimated CO(2) fixation were 180, 123, and 57 mul/g per hour. A respiratory quotient of 0.66 was found.The products of (14)CO(2) fixation were similar in most respects to reported experiments with leaf succulents. Equilibration of the predominant malic acid with isocitric, succinic, and fumaric acids was not evident. The latter observation was interpreted as metabolic isolation of the fixation products rather than poor citric acid cycle activity.A rapid turnover of the fixed (14)CO(2) was measured by following decarboxlyation kinetics and by product analysis after a postincubation period. The first order rate constant for the steady state release was 4.4 x 10(-3) min(-1) with a half-time of 157.5 minutes. Amino acids decayed at a more rapid rate than organic acids.

  17. Rising CO2 Levels Will Intensify Phytoplankton Blooms in Eutrophic and Hypertrophic Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Verspagen, Jolanda M. H.; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.; Finke, Jan F.; Visser, Petra M.; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  18. CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, Kobra; Loehnert, Ulrich; Turner, David; Ebell, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra In this study, we developed an algorithm for retrieving the CO2 vertical profile from atmospheric ground-based zenith spectra in the mid IR. Providing the CO2 profile from continuous (24h/day) ground-based spectra would be a great potential for studying the carbon cycle, the evaluation of satellite measurements or the assessment of numerical models, which forecast the near-surface CO2 flux. In order to retrieve the CO2 profile, we used observations of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) that was installed at the JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), Germany in 2012. AERI measures downwelling infrared radiances from 520 cm-1 (3.3 μm) to 3020 cm-1 (19 μm) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm-1 and a temporal resolution of 1 minute. In a first step, we performed sensitivity studies for finding the most-suited spectral bands with highest sensitivity to the mean column amount of CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR). Then an algorithm, known as AERIoe (Turner and Löhnert 2014), was applied to retrieve the mean column amount of CO2 VMR using simulated radiances in clear sky cases. AERIoe is a variational retrieval algorithm to provide information on Temperature, humidity, trace gases and clouds. The simulated AERI radiances were generated by a line by line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) using model temperature, humidity and CO2 profile. The retrieval results of mean column amount of CO2 VMR are in good agreement with the true ones. In addition to the mean column amount, we modified AERIoe to retrieve the CO2 vertical profile. First results reveal that there is more than 1 degree of freedom for CO2 profile. We will show results how the retrieval method is refined to optimally exploit the information on the CO2 profile contained in the AERI measurements.

  19. Rising CO2 levels will intensify phytoplankton blooms in eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Verspagen, Jolanda M H; Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Finke, Jan F; Visser, Petra M; Van Donk, Ellen; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aquatic ecosystems has received surprisingly little attention. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict dynamic changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH and alkalinity during phytoplankton bloom development. We tested the model in chemostat experiments with the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at different CO2 levels. The experiments showed that dense blooms sequestered large amounts of atmospheric CO2, not only by their own biomass production but also by inducing a high pH and alkalinity that enhanced the capacity for DIC storage in the system. We used the model to explore how phytoplankton blooms of eutrophic waters will respond to rising CO2 levels. The model predicts that (1) dense phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters can deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration to limiting levels and raise the pH over a relatively wide range of atmospheric CO2 conditions, (2) rising atmospheric CO2 levels will enhance phytoplankton blooms in low- and moderately alkaline waters with high nutrient loads, and (3) above some threshold, rising atmospheric CO2 will alleviate phytoplankton blooms from carbon limitation, resulting in less intense CO2 depletion and a lesser increase in pH. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the model predictions were qualitatively robust. Quantitatively, the predictions were sensitive to variation in lake depth, DIC input and CO2 gas transfer across the air-water interface, but relatively robust to variation in the carbon uptake mechanisms of phytoplankton. In total, these findings warn that rising CO2 levels may result in a marked intensification of

  20. Carbon Dioxide Clusters: (CO_2)_6 to (CO_2)13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2011-06-01

    We recenty reported assignments of specific infrared bands in the CO_2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn) to (CO_2)_6, (CO_2)_7, (CO_2)_9, (CO_2)10, (CO_2)11, (CO_2)12, and (CO_2)13. Spectra are obtained by direct absorption using a rapid-scan tuneable diode laser spectrometer to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion and assignments are facilitated by recent calculations of Takeuchi based on the Murthy potential. (CO_2)_6 is a symmetric top with S_6 point group symmetry which can be thought of as a stack of two planar cyclic trimers. (CO_2)13 is also an S_6 symmetric top, and consists of a single CO_2 monomer surrounded by an slightly distorted icosahedral cage. The remaining clusters are asymmetric tops without symmetry. Here we report additional CO_2 cluster results. Calculations based on the SAPT-s potential indicate that the structure of (CO_2)10 may be slightly different from that given by Takeuchi/Murthy. An additional band is observed for each of (CO_2)13 and (CO_2)10. A feature observed at 2378.2 wn is assigned as a (CO_2)_6 parallel combination band involving the sum of a fundamental and a low-lying intermolecular vibration. Most significantly, two bands are assigned to a second isomer of (CO_2)_6. This is also a symmetric top, but now with S_4 symmetry. The two symmetric hexamer isomers observed spectroscopically correspond well with the lowest energy structures given by both the SAPT-s and Murthy intermolecular potentials. [1] J. Norooz Oliaee, M. Dehgany, N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, and A.R.W. McKellar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 1297 (2011). [2] H. Takeuchi, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 5703 (2008); C.S. Murthy, S.F. O'Shea, and I.R. McDonald, Mol. Phys. 50, 531 (1983). [3] R. Bukowski, J. Sadlej, B. Jeziorski, P. Jankowski, K. Szalewicz, S.A. Kucharski, H.L. Williams, and B.M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 110, 3785 (1999)

  1. Amine modeling for CO2 capture: internals selection.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Prakash; Aichele, Clint P

    2013-04-16

    Traditionally, trays have been the mass-transfer device of choice in amine absorption units. However, the need to process large volumes of flue gas to capture CO2 and the resultant high costs of multiple trains of large trayed columns have prompted process licensors and vendors to investigate alternative mass-transfer devices. These alternatives include third-generation random packings and structured packings. Nevertheless, clear-cut guidelines for selection of packings for amine units are lacking. This paper provides well-defined guidelines and a consistent framework for the choice of mass-transfer devices for amine absorbers and regenerators. This work emphasizes the role played by the flow parameter, a measure of column liquid loading and pressure, in the type of packing selected. In addition, this paper demonstrates the significant economic advantage of packings over trays in terms of capital costs (CAPEX) and operating costs (OPEX).

  2. CO2 Dissolution in Variable Aperture Fractures: Controlling Parameters and Proposed Constitutive Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Rajaram, H.; Glass, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 injected into fractured reservoirs will migrate largely through fractures as a connected supercritical phase. After completion of the injection phase pressures in the reservoir will begin to dissipate and CO2 will eventually become entrapped as a residual phase. Predicting the rates at which trapped CO2 will dissolve into the resident brine is important to understanding the potential for long-term storage. Within individual fractures, the distribution and geometry of entrapped CO2 will be controlled by the relative influence of capillary, gravitational, and viscous forces within the fracture. For the case of fractures bounded by a low porosity/permeability matrix, CO2 dissolution will be driven predominantly by diffusive/advective transport from the CO2-brine interface. We explore the relative influence of the initial entrapped CO2 geometry and mean velocity of flowing brine on CO2 dissolution rates. Our systematic simulations use a percolation-based model of phase invasion and depth-averaged models of flow, transport, and mass transfer. The invasion model provides a physically based distribution of entrapped phase within the fracture and the mass transfer model implicitly calculates interphase mass transfer from discrete regions of entrapped entrapped CO2 without the need for empirical mass transfer relationships. Results demonstrate behavior across a wide range of initial entrapped phase distributions, with entrapped phase saturations ranging from zero to near the percolation threshold. Interfacial area evolves with a near-linear dependence on entrapped phase saturation during dissolution in each simulation, and fracture-scale intrinsic mass transfer rate coefficients exhibit a nonlinear dependence on Peclet number and a negligible dependence on entrapped phase saturation. These observations from a wide range of simulations provide a basis for the development of a set of constitutive relationships that quantify interphase mass transfer in variable

  3. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  4. The Influence of Tropical Air-Sea Interaction on the Climate Impact of Aerosols: A Hierarchical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W. C.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to investigate the influence of tropical air-sea feedbacks on climate impacts of aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We construct four different models by coupling the atmospheric component of CESM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), to four different ocean models: (i) the Data Ocean Model (DOM; prescribed SST), (i) Slab Ocean Model (SOM; thermodynamic coupling), (iii) Reduced Gravity Ocean Model (RGOM; dynamic coupling), and (iv) the Parallel Ocean Program (POP; full ocean model). These four models represent progressively increasing degree of coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean. The RGOM model, in particular, is tuned to produce a good simulation of ENSO and the associated tropical air-sea interaction, without being impacted by the climate drifts exhibited by fully-coupled GCMs. For each method of coupling, a pair of numerical experiments, including present day (year 2000) and preindustrial (year 1850) sulfate aerosol loading, were carried out. Our results indicate that the inclusion of air-sea interaction has large impacts on the spatial structure of the climate response induced by aerosols. In response to sulfate aerosol forcing, ITCZ shifts southwards as a result of the anomalous clockwise MMC change which transports moisture southwardly across the Equator. We present analyses of the regional response to sulfate aerosol forcing in the equatorial Pacific as well as the zonally-averaged response. The decomposition of the change in the net surface energy flux shows the most dominant terms are net shortwave radiative flux at the surface and latent heat flux. Further analyses show all ocean model simulations simulate a positive change of northward atmospheric energy transport across the Equator in response to the perturbed radiative sulfate forcing. This positive northward atmospheric energy transport change plays a role in compensating partially cooling caused by sulfate aerosols.

  5. CO2 flux estimation accuracy evaluation of Global and Regional atmospheric CO2 mission concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Miller, C.; Weidner, R. J.; Duren, R. M.; Sander, S.; Eldering, A.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework to evaluate mission-science-return quantitatively as a function of instrument payload, observation frequency, orbit, and sampling strategy for space-based remote sensing. The OSSE framework integrates GEOSChem and its adjoint system to perform forward/inverse modeling of the simulated measurements. During 2011-2012, we extended the OSSE framework to evaluate CO2 mission concepts in collaboration with the NASA's carbon monitoring system (CMS) flux pilot project team. In this paper, we employ the OSSE framework to analyze the science impact of multiple, simultaneous space-based column CO2 observations from simulated combinations of GOSAT, OCO-2, OCO-3, and a geo-stationary mission concept (GEOFTS). The OSSE process involved generating a CO2 concentration forecast, sampling the CO2 field at the appropriate time and location for each satellite sensor, incorporating realistic cloud climatologies to generate accurate clear-sky viewing statistics, retrieving CO2 profile simulaton in the presence of measurement noise, and finally assimilating the simulated column CO2 retrievals to estimate CO2 fluxes and flux uncertainty reductions. The OSSE process was applied over one-year-long mission period (2009/Jan - 2009/Dec) and the CO2 flux estimation error was analyzed to compute the probability density function (PDF) of CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction. The global OSSEs were performed in 2deg x 2.5 deg spatial resolution with the monthly-average CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction as the science-impact metric. Regional OSSEs were performed in 0.5 deg by 0.666 deg over N. America and the weekly average of the CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction was employed as the science-impact metric. We discuss the results and the projected performance of planned and potential space-based CO2 observing systems.

  6. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  7. The supply chain of CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Steven J.; Peters, Glen P.; Caldeira, Ken

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are conventionally attributed to the country where the emissions are produced (i.e., where the fuels are burned). However, these production-based accounts represent a single point in the value chain of fossil fuels, which may have been extracted elsewhere and may be used to provide goods or services to consumers elsewhere. We present a consistent set of carbon inventories that spans the full supply chain of global CO2 emissions, finding that 10.2 billion tons CO2 or 37% of global emissions are from fossil fuels traded internationally and an additional 6.4 billion tons CO2 or 23% of global emissions are embodied in traded goods. Our results reveal vulnerabilities and benefits related to current patterns of energy use that are relevant to climate and energy policy. In particular, if a consistent and unavoidable price were imposed on CO2 emissions somewhere along the supply chain, then all of the parties along the supply chain would seek to impose that price to generate revenue from taxes collected or permits sold. The geographical concentration of carbon-based fuels and relatively small number of parties involved in extracting and refining those fuels suggest that regulation at the wellhead, mine mouth, or refinery might minimize transaction costs as well as opportunities for leakage. PMID:22006314

  8. Direct CO2-Methanation of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Klaus; Fleige, Michael; Rachow, Fabian; Israel, Johannes; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Already discovered by Paul Sabatier in 1902 the Hydrogenation according to CO2 + 4H2 ->CH4 + 2H2O nowadays is discussed in the course of the "Power-to-Gas" approach to utilize excess energy from renewable electricity generation in times of oversupply of electricity. We investigate the behavior of this process in a simulated flue gas atmosphere of conventional base load power plants, which could be used as constant sources of the reactant CO2. In relation to an approach related to carbon capture and cycling, the conversion of CO2 directly from the flue gas of a conventional power plant is a new aspect and has several advantages: The conversion of CO2 into methane could be integrated directly into the combustion process. Even older power plants could be upgraded and used as a possible source for CO2, in the same sense as the amine cleaning of flue gas, as a post combustion process. Further, waste heat of the power plant could be used as process energy for the catalytic reaction. Therefore the influence of different flue gas compositions such as varying contents of nitrogen and residual oxygen are tested in a laboratory scale. The heterogeneous catalysis process is investigated with regard to conversion rates, yield and selectivity and long-term stability of the Ni-catalyst. Also the influence of typical contaminations like SO2 is investigated and will be presented.

  9. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification. PMID:27075987

  10. Atmospheric CO2 stabilization and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken

    2008-10-01

    We use a coupled climate/carbon-cycle model to examine the consequences of stabilizing atmospheric CO2 at different levels for ocean chemistry. Our simulations show the potential for major damage to at least some ocean ecosystems at atmospheric CO2 stabilization levels as low as 450 ppm. Before the industrial revolution, more than 98% of corals reefs were surrounded by waters that were >3.5 times saturated with respect to their skeleton materials (aragonite). If atmospheric CO2 is stabilized at 450 ppm only 8% of existing coral reefs will be surrounded by water with this saturation level. Also at this CO2 level 7% of the ocean South of 60°S will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite, and parts of the high latitude ocean will experience a decrease in pH by more than 0.2 units. Results presented here provide an independent and additional basis for choosing targets of atmospheric CO2 stabilization levels.

  11. Direct Copolymerization of CO2 and Diols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Masazumi; Ito, Kazuki; Honda, Masayoshi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Direct polymerization of CO2 and diols is promising as a simple and environmental-benign method in place of conventional processes using high-cost and/or hazardous reagents such as phosgene, carbon monoxide and epoxides, however, there are no reports on the direct method due to the inertness of CO2 and severe equilibrium limitation of the reaction. Herein, we firstly substantiate the direct copolymerization of CO2 and diols using CeO2 catalyst and 2-cyanopyridine promotor, providing the alternating cooligomers in high diol-based yield (up to 99%) and selectivity (up to >99%). This catalyst system is applicable to various diols including linear C4-C10 α,ω-diols to provide high yields of the corresponding cooligomers, which cannot be obtained by well-known methods such as copolymerization of CO2 and cyclic ethers and ring-opening polymerization of cyclic carbonates. This process provides us a facile synthesis method for versatile polycarbonates from various diols and CO2 owing to simplicity of diols modification.

  12. Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean distributions of CFC-11, CO2, and Δ14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachkar, Z.; Orr, J. C.; Dutay, J.-C.; Delecluse, P.

    2007-10-01

    Global-scale tracer simulations are typically made at coarse resolution without explicitly modelling eddies. Here we ask what role do eddies play in ocean uptake, storage, and meridional transport of transient tracers. We made global anthropogenic transient-tracer simulations in coarse-resolution (2°cosφ×2°, ORCA2) and eddy-permitting (½°cosφ×½°, ORCA05) versions of the ocean general circulation model OPA9. Our focus is on surface-to-intermediate waters of the southern extratropics where air-sea tracer fluxes, tracer storage, and meridional tracer transport are largest. Eddies have little effect on global and regional bomb Δ14C uptake and storage. Yet for anthropogenic CO2 and CFC-11, refining the horizontal resolution reduced southern extratropical uptake by 25% and 28%, respectively. There is a similar decrease in corresponding inventories, which yields better agreement with observations. With higher resolution, eddies strengthen upper ocean vertical stratification and reduce excessive ventilation of intermediate waters by 20% between 60° S and 40° S. By weakening the residual circulation, i.e., the sum of Eulerian mean flow and the opposed eddy-induced flow, eddies reduce the supply of tracer-impoverished deep waters to the surface near the Antarctic divergence, thus reducing the air-sea tracer flux. Thus in the eddy permitting model, surface waters in that region have more time to equilibrate with the atmosphere before they are transported northward and subducted. As a result, the eddy permitting model's inventories of CFC-11 and anthropogenic CO2 are lower in that region because mixed-layer concentrations of both tracers equilibrate with the atmosphere on relatively short time scales (15 days and 6 months, respectively); conversely, bomb Δ14C's air-sea equilibration time of 6 years is so slow that, even in the eddy permitting model, there is little time for surface concentrations to equilibrate with the atmosphere, i.e., before surface waters are

  13. CO2-Binding-Organic-Liquids-Enhanced CO2 Capture using Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Kutnyakov, Igor; Koech, Phillip K.; Zwoster, Andy; Howard, Chris; Zheng, Feng; Freeman, Charles J.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A new solvent-based CO2 capture process couples the unique attributes of non-aqueous, CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) with the newly discovered polarity-swing-assisted regeneration (PSAR) process that is unique to switchable ionic liquids. Laboratory measurements with PSAR indicate the ability to achieve a regeneration effect at 75°C comparable to that at 120°C using thermal regeneration only. Initial measurements also indicate that the kinetic behavior of CO2 release is also improved with PSAR. Abstract cleared PNWD-SA-9743

  14. Light-duty vehicle CO2 targets consistent with 450 ppm CO2 stabilization.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra L; Wallington, Timothy J; Maas, Heiko; Hass, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    We present a global analysis of CO2 emission reductions from the light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet consistent with stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration at 450 ppm. The CO2 emission reductions are described by g CO2/km emission targets for average new light-duty vehicles on a tank-to-wheel basis between 2010 and 2050 that we call CO2 glide paths. The analysis accounts for growth of the vehicle fleet, changing patterns in driving distance, regional availability of biofuels, and the changing composition of fossil fuels. New light-duty vehicle fuel economy and CO2 regulations in the U.S. through 2025 and in the EU through 2020 are broadly consistent with the CO2 glide paths. The glide path is at the upper end of the discussed 2025 EU range of 68-78 g CO2/km. The proposed China regulation for 2020 is more stringent than the glide path, while the 2017 Brazil regulation is less stringent. Existing regulations through 2025 are broadly consistent with the light-duty vehicle sector contributing to stabilizing CO2 at approximately 450 ppm. The glide paths provide long-term guidance for LDV powertrain/fuel development. PMID:24798684

  15. Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2release experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2007-09-15

    A new field facility was used to study CO2 migrationprocesses and test techniques to detect and quantify potential CO2leakage from geologic storage sites. For 10 days starting 9 July 2007,and for seven days starting 5 August 2007, 0.1 and 0.3 t CO2 d-1,respectively, were released from a ~;100-m long, sub-water table (~;2.5-mdepth) horizontal well. The spatio-temporal evolution of leakage wasmapped through repeated grid measurements of soil CO2 flux (FCO2). Thesurface leakage onset, approach to steady state, and post-release declinematched model predictions closely. Modeling suggested that minimal CO2was taken up by groundwater through dissolution, and CO2 spread out ontop of the water table. FCO2 spatial patterns were related to well designand soil physical properties. Estimates of total CO2 discharge along withsoil respiration and leakage discharge highlight the influence ofbackground CO2 flux variations on detection of CO2 leakagesignals.

  16. Spring carbonate chemistry dynamics of surface waters in the northern East China Sea: Water mixing, biological uptake of CO2, and chemical buffering capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wei-Dong; Chen, Jian-Fang; Jin, Hai-Yan; Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Jin-Wen; He, Xian-Qiang; Bai, Yan

    2014-09-01

    We investigated sea surface total alkalinity (TAlk), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved oxygen (DO), and satellite-derived chlorophyll-a in the connection between the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea (ECS) during April to early May 2007. In spring, Changjiang dilution water (CDW), ECS offshore water, and together with Yellow Sea water (YSW) occupied the northern ECS. Using 16 day composite satellite-derived chlorophyll-a images, several algal blooms were identified in the CDW and ECS offshore water. Correspondingly, biological DIC drawdown of 73 ± 20 μmol kg-1, oversaturated DO of 10-110 μmol O2 kg-1, and low fugacity of CO2 of 181-304 μatm were revealed in these two waters. YSW also showed CO2 uptake in spring, due to the very low temperature. However, its intrusion virtually counteracted CO2 uptake in the northern ECS. In the CDW and the ECS offshore water, Revelle factor was 9.3-11.7 and 8.9-10.6, respectively, while relatively high Revelle factor values of 11.4-13.0 were revealed in YSW. In the ECS offshore water, the observed relationship between DIC drawdown and oversaturated DO departed from the Redfield ratio, indicating an effect of chemical buffering capacity on the carbonate system during air-sea reequilibration. Given the fact that the chemical buffering capacity slows down the air-sea reequilibration of CO2, the early spring DIC drawdown may have durative effects on the sea surface carbonate system until early summer. Although our study is subject to limited temporal and spatial coverage of sampling, these insights are fundamental to understanding sea surface carbonate chemistry dynamics in this important ocean margin.

  17. Constraining Oceanic Sources and Sinks of CO2 by Inverse Modeling: A First Step Toward Assimilation of In Situ and Remote Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doney, Scott

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of this collaborative project, lead by Nicholas Gruber at UCLA, is to better quantify the air-sea fluxes of pre-industrial and anthropogenic carbon dioxide CO2 for the global ocean with a newly developed inverse method. The method involves using ocean general circulation models (OGCMs) to characterize the subsurface distribution of tracers injected for different regions of the ocean surface. By linearly combining a series of these basis (or Greens) functions, one should be able to recreate any arbitrary ocean tracer field. In our case, we are using the global database of ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from the WOCE/JGOFS global CO2 survey from the 1990s. The observed DIC field has been partitioned into pre-industrial and anthropogenic components using the empirical C* technique. We then solve for an optimal combination of the regional basis functions that best match the two sets observations in a least-squares sense with singular value decomposition. This in turn provides solutions for the regional air-sea CO2 fluxes (pre-industrial and anthropogenic) that are independent of more traditional estimates derived from surface water disequilibria in the partial pressure of CO2 and wind speed gas exchange parameterizations. We are apply the method to a suite of nine different OGCMs to test the robustness of the derived surface fluxes fields to differences in ocean circulation. Together with a collegue Keith Lindsay at NCAR, S. Doney's role in this project was to create the appropriate steady-state and temporally evolving basis functions from the NCAR CSM-1 ocean circulation model. Because of a slow start across the project in defining a common set of experimental protocols, we requested and were given a one year, no cost extension. Both the steady-state and temporally evolving basis functions were delivered to the UCLA group for further analysis. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  18. CO2 mitigation via accelerated limestone weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rau, G.H.; Knauss, K.G.; Langer, W.H.; Caldeira, K.

    2004-01-01

    Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL: CO22+ + CaCO3 + H2O ??? Ca2+ + 2HCO3- as a low-tech, inexpensive, high-capacity, environmentally-friendly CO2 capture and sequestration technology was evaluated. With access to seawater and limestone being essential to this approach, significant limestone resources were close to most CO2-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Waste fines, representing > 20% of current US crushed limestone production (> 109 tons/yr), could be used as an inexpensive source of AWL carbonate. AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean would significantly reduce effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct atmospheric or ocean CO2 disposal. Indeed, the increase in ocean Ca2+ and bicarbonate offered by AWL should enhance growth of corals and other calcifying marine organisms.

  19. Sequestration of CO2 by concrete carbonation.

    PubMed

    Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Mora, Pedro; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2010-04-15

    Carbonation of reinforced concrete is one of the causes of corrosion, but it is also a way to sequester CO2. The characteristics of the concrete cover should ensure alkaline protection for the steel bars but should also be able to combine CO2 to a certain depth. This work attempts to advance the knowledge of the carbon footprint of cement. As it is one of the most commonly used materials worldwide, it is very important to assess its impact on the environment. In order to quantify the capacity of cement based materials to combine CO