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Sample records for air-sf6-air incident shock

  1. The influence of incident shock Mach number on radial incident shock wave focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Tan, Sheng; He, Liming; Rong, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaobin

    2016-04-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to investigate radial incident shock focusing on a test section where the planar incident shock wave was divided into two identical ones. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach number of 1.51, 1.84 and 2.18 were tested. CCD camera was used to obtain the schlieren photos of the flow field. Third-order, three step strong-stability-preserving (SSP) Runge-Kutta method, third-order weighed essential non-oscillation (WENO) scheme and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm were adopted to simulate the complicated flow fields characterized by shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Complex shock wave configurations and interactions (such as shock reflection, shock-vortex interaction and shock focusing) were observed in both the experiments and numerical results. Some new features were observed and discussed. The differences of structure of flow field and the variation trends of pressure were compared and analyzed under the condition of different Mach numbers while shock wave focusing.

  2. Investigation of shock focusing in a cavity with incident shock diffracted by an obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Chen, X.; He, L.-M.; Rong, K.; Deiterding, R.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out in order to investigate the focusing of a shock wave in a test section after the incident shock has been diffracted by an obstacle. A conventional shock tube was used to generate the planar shock. Incident shock Mach numbers of 1.4 and 2.1 were tested. A high-speed camera was employed to obtain schlieren photos of the flow field in the experiments. In the numerical simulations, a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme of third-order accuracy supplemented with structured dynamic mesh adaptation was adopted to simulate the shock wave interaction. Good agreement between experiments and numerical results is observed. The configurations exhibit shock reflection phenomena, shock-vortex interaction and—in particular—shock focusing. The pressure history in the cavity apex was recorded and compared with the numerical results. A quantitative analysis of the numerically observed shock reflection configurations is also performed by employing a pseudo-steady shock transition boundary calculation technique. Regular reflection, single Mach reflection and transitional Mach reflection phenomena are observed and are found to correlate well with analytic predictions from shock reflection theory.

  3. Incident Shock-Transverse Jet Interactions at Mach 1.9: Effect of Shock Impingement Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare-Behtash, H.; Lo, K. H.; Erdem, E.; Kontis, K.; Lin, J.; Ukai, T.; Obayashi, S.

    The scramjet engine is an efficient design for high-speed propulsion, requiring injection of fuel into a supersonic flow in a short amount of time. Due to the nature of the flow numerous shock waves exist within the combustor of a scramjet, significantly altering the flow characteristics and performance of the engine as the flow Mach number or attitude is changed. According to Mai et al. [1] the location of impingement of the incident shock, relative to the fuel injection location, has significant impact on the mixing and flame-holding properties. This emphasises the importance of understanding and hence the need for controlling the dynamic interactions that are created. Of course another fertile area where transverse jet injections are studied for their application is the creation of forces and moments for pitch and attitude control [2, 3].

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshinaga, T.

    1973-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra have been obtained behind incident and reflected shock waves in air and xenon at initial pressures of 0.1 and 1.0 torr using a rotating drum spectrograph and the OSU (The Ohio State University) arc-driven shock tube. These spectra were used to determine the qualitative nature of the flow as well as for making estimates of the available test time. The (n+1,n) and (n,n) band spectra of N2(+) (1st negative) were observed in the test gas behind incident shock waves in air at p1=1.0 torr and Us=9-10 km/sec. Behind reflected shock waves in air, the continuum of spectra appeared to cover almost the entire wavelength of 2,500-7,000 A for the shock-heated test gas. For xenon, the spectra for the incident shock wave cases for p1=0.1 torr show an interesting structure in which two intensely bright regions are witnessed in the time direction. The spectra obtained behind reflected shock waves in xenon were also dominated by continuum radiation but included strong absorption spectra due to FeI and FeII from the moment the reflected shock passed and on.

  5. Toxic shock syndrome: incidence and geographic distribution from a hospital medical records reporting system.

    PubMed

    Miday, R K; Wilson, E R

    1988-05-01

    A large database of hospital records maintained by the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities Professional Activity Study (CPHA-PAS) was used to estimate the temporal incidence and geographic distribution of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). The CPHA-PAS hospital-diagnosed incidence was 3.5 times the reported TSS incidence, with a gradual decrease over the time period 1981-83. Marked differences in the regional occurrence of cases may provide clues to the etiology of this complex disease.

  6. Ignition of Hydrogen-Oxygen Mixtures Behind the Incident Shock Wave Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. A.; Gerasimov, G. Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental investigation of the ignition of a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture behind an incident shock wave in a shock tube at pressures p = 0.002-0.46 MPa and temperatures T = 500-1000 K is carried out. The existence of three limits of ignition typical of the ignition of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in a spherical vessel is noted. It is shown that at pressures p ≥ 0.1 MPa the ignition of a hydrogen-oxygen mixture begins at a much lower temperature than the ignition of a hydrogen-air mixture. The measured induction times agree well with theoretical estimates.

  7. Incident shock-wave characteristics in air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium in a shock tube with unheated helium driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Jones, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Incident shock-wave velocities were measured in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube, operated as a shock tube, with air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium as test gases. Unheated helium was used as the driver gas and most data were obtained at pressures of approximately 34 and 54 MN/sq m. A range of pressure ratio across the diaphragm was obtained by varying the quiescent test-gas pressure, for a given driver pressure, from 0.0276 to 34.5 kN/sq m. Single- and double-diaphragm modes of operation were employed and diaphragms of various materials tested. Shock velocity was determined from microwave interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along the driven section (time-of-arrival gages), and to a lesser extent, measured tube-wall pressure. Velocities obtained from these methods are compared and limitations of the methods discussed. The present results are compared with theory and the effects of diaphragm mode (single or double diaphragm), diaphragm material, heating of the driver gas upon pressurization of the driver section, diaphragm opening time, interface mixing, and two-dimensional (nonplanar) flow are discussed.

  8. Hydrogen film cooling with incident and swept-shock interactions in a Mach 6.4 nitrogen free stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium as the coolant. Tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel with a nitrogen flow field to preclude combustion of the hydrogen coolant gas. A two-dimensional highly instrumented model developed in a previous test series was used. Parameters investigated included coolant mass flow rate, coolant gas, local free-stream Reynolds number, incident oblique shock strength, and a swept oblique shock. Both gases were highly effective coolants in undisturbed flow; however, both incident and swept shocks degraded that effectiveness.

  9. Incidence and mortality of sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock in intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kevin; Schorr, Christa; Reboli, Annette C; Zanotti, Sergio; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2015-08-01

    In this incidence study, of 16 074 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from 1/1/2003 to 7/31/2011, 161 cases of candidemia were identified. The incidence of sepsis (27%), severe sepsis (31%), and septic shock (40%) was remarkably high in these cases of candidemia, as was the all-cause in-hospital mortality for sepsis (30%), severe sepsis (44%), and septic shock (65%).

  10. Experimental analysis of transonic shock oscillations on a NACA 0018 at incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Christopher Allen

    A NACA 0018 airfoil model with a 3-inch chord was mounted into the trisonic wind tunnel at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi. Tunnel runs were conducted with the angle of incidence increasing from 0 degrees to 6 degrees at 1 degree increments, while the Mach number was held steady at 0.73. High-speed schlieren images were recorded at a sample rate of 4,000 Hz. A Matlab code was developed to display the spatial power spectral density distribution in the region of the shock. This code calculated the frequency spectrum at regular points along the range of shock motion and plotted the spatial distribution of frequency spectra across all the points. This identified the location of the high-amplitude frequencies, which indicated the precise range of the shock motion as well as its dominant oscillation frequency. It was found that, for each degree increase, the frequency of oscillations increased by approximately 10.8 Hz. This is equivalent to a reduced frequency increase of 0.0205 per degree.

  11. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by ...

  12. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01< y/δ < 0.4, where y is the distance from the wall and δ is the boundary layer thickness. The flame disturbance by the turbulent motions is followed by the flame interaction with the inner layer near the wall, which in turn generates a secondary-ignition kernel that produced a spherical accelerating flame, which ultimately led to the onset of detonation. After the flame reached the intermediate region, the time required for DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  13. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-07-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01< y/δ < 0.4 , where y is the distance from the wall and δ is the boundary layer thickness. The flame disturbance by the turbulent motions is followed by the flame interaction with the inner layer near the wall, which in turn generates a secondary-ignition kernel that produced a spherical accelerating flame, which ultimately led to the onset of detonation. After the flame reached the intermediate region, the time required for DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  14. Experimental results for film cooling in 2-D supersonic flow including coolant delivery pressure, geometry, and incident shock effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.; Holden, Michael S.; Baker, N. R.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to establish some design parameters important to a supersonic film cooling system in a scramjet engine. A simple non-combusting two-dimensional flow configuration was used to isolate the film cooling phenomena. Parameters investigated include coolant delivery pressure, slot height and lip thickness, and incident shock location and strength. Design guidelines for use in engineering and trade studies are presented.

  15. The Numerical Calculation of Flow Past Conical Bodies Supporting Elliptic Conical Shock Waves at Finite Angles of Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Benjamin R.

    1960-01-01

    The inverse method, with the shock wave prescribed to be an elliptic cone at a finite angle of incidence, is applied to calculate numerically the supersonic perfect-gas flow past conical bodies not having axial symmetry. Two formulations of the problem are employed, one using a pair of stream functions and the other involving entropy and components of velocity. A number of solutions are presented, illustrating the numerical methods employed, and showing the effects of moderate variation of the initial parameters.

  16. Shock-absorbing insoles reduce the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries sustained during Royal Marine training.

    PubMed

    House, Carol; Reece, Allyson; Roiz de Sa, Dan

    2013-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the incidence of lower limb overuse injuries (LLOIs) sustained during Royal Marine training could be reduced by issuing the recruits with shock-absorbing insoles (SAIs) to wear in their military boots. This was a retrospective longitudinal trial conducted in two phases. Injury data from 1,416 recruits issued with standard Saran insoles and 1,338 recruits issued with SAI were compared. The recruits in the two groups were of similar height, body mass, and aerobic fitness and followed the same training course. The incidence of LLOI sustained by the recruits was lower (p < 0.05) in the SAI Group (19.0%) compared to the Saran Insole Group (31.7%). The incidences of lower limb stress fractures, tibial periostitis, tenosynovitis of foot, achilles tendonopathy, other tendonopathy and anterior knee pain were lower (p < 0.05) in the SAI Group. Tibial stress fracture incidence was lower (p < 0.05) in the SAI Group but metatarsal and femoral stress fracture incidences were the same for the two insole groups. Thus, issuing SAIs to military recruits undertaking a sustained, arduous physical training program with a high incidence of LLOI would provide a beneficial reduction in the incidence of LLOI.

  17. Toxic shock syndrome. Incidence and survival of Staphylococcus aureus in unused tampons.

    PubMed

    Skopek, A

    1982-07-24

    In a survey of 3912 unused tampons of the two leading Australian brands, all samples were found to be free from Staphylococcus aureus. Survival rates of a standard S. aureus strain and a strain isolated in the first reported Australian case of toxic shock syndrome were investigated, in parallel, in unused tampons of a brand associated with this particular case of illness. Despite the presence of nutrient in the inocula employed, the 10(6) populations of both strains were completely inactivated in 10 days. No significant difference was observed between the percentage survival of the strain isolated from a patient with toxic shock syndrome and the standard strain. In the presence of nutrient and serum, the 10(6) population of staphylococci was inactivated in 16 days.

  18. Measured pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients and shock shapes on blunt bodies at incidence in hypersonic air and CF4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1982-01-01

    Pressure distributions, aerodynamic coefficients, and shock shapes were measured on blunt bodies of revolution in Mach 6 CF4 and in Mach 6 and Mach 10 air. The angle of attack was varied from 0 deg to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. Configurations tested were a hyperboloid with an asymptotic angle of 45 deg, a sonic-corner paraboloid, a paraboloid with an angle of 27.6 deg at the base, a Viking aeroshell generated in a generalized orthogonal coordinate system, and a family of cones having a 45 deg half-angle with spherical, flattened, concave, and cusp nose shapes. Real-gas effects were simulated for the hperboloid and paraboloid models at Mach 6 by testing at a normal-shock density ratio of 5.3 in air and 12 CF4. Predictions from simple theories and numerical flow field programs are compared with measurement. It is anticipated that the data presented in this report will be useful for verification of analytical methods for predicting hypersonic flow fields about blunt bodies at incidence.

  19. Accident investigation of the electrical shock incident at the PG and E PVUSA site Davis, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, L.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Garrett, J.O.; Tyler, R.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Accident Investigation Team (Team) assembled in response to a request from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) to understand the events surrounding the electric shock of a worker at the PVUSA site in Davis, California and to provide recommendations to prevent such events from recurring. The report gives complete details on the sequence of events surrounding the accident and identifies 27 facts related to accident itself. Four technical deficiencies in the electrical systems which require further investigation were identified. The Team believes that the root cause of this accident was related to the absence of a proactive organizational entity responsible for overall health and safety on the site. Two contributing factors were identified. First, the prototype nature and associated operational difficulties of the electrical inverter resulted in large maintenance demands. Second, several of the injured employee`s co-workers noted that he occasionally failed to use appropriate personal protective equipment, but they never reported this practice to management. The direct cause of this accident was the failure of the injured employee to wear appropriate personal protective equipment (i.e., rubber gloves). Based on the review of the facts established in this investigation, five recommendations are presented to the funding agencies to reduce the possibility of future accidents at the PVUSA site.

  20. Computer Program for Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibrium Compositions, Rocket Performance, Incident and Reflected Shocks, and Chapman-Jouguet Detonations. Interim Revision, March 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description of the equations and computer program for computations involving chemical equilibria in complex systems is given. A free-energy minimization technique is used. The program permits calculations such as (1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states (T,P), (H,P), (S,P), (T,V), (U,V), or (S,V), (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. The program considers condensed species as well as gaseous species.

  1. Incidence and Predictors of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation in Septic Shock Patients in a Medical ICU: Data from 7-Day Holter ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Guenancia, Charles; Binquet, Christine; Laurent, Gabriel; Vinault, Sandrine; Bruyère, Rémi; Prin, Sébastien; Pavon, Arnaud; Charles, Pierre-Emmanuel; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated incidence, risk factors for new-onset atrial fibrillation (NAF), and prognostic impact during septic shock in medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Methods Prospective, observational study in a university hospital. Consecutive patients from 03/2011 to 05/2013 with septic shock were eligible. Exclusion criteria were age <18 years, history of AF, transfer with prior septic shock. Included patients were equipped with long-duration (7 days) Holter ECG monitoring. NAF was defined as an AF episode lasting >30 seconds. Patient characteristics, infection criteria, cardiovascular parameters, severity of illness, support therapies were recorded. Results Among 66 patients, 29(44%) developed NAF; 10 (34%) would not have been diagnosed without Holter ECG monitoring. NAF patients were older, with more markers of heart failure (troponin and NT-pro-BNP), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), longer QRS duration and more nonsustained supra ventricular arrhythmias (<30s) on day 1 than patients who maintained sinus rhythm. By multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.06; p = 0.01) and LVEF<45% (OR: 13.01, p = 0.03) were associated with NAF. NAF did not predict 28 or 90 day mortality. Conclusions NAF is common, especially in older patients, and is associated with low ejection fraction. We did not find NAF to be independently associated with higher mortality. PMID:25965915

  2. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  3. Imploding conical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, R. T.; Skews, B. W.; Rubidge, S.; Snow, J.

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of conical shock waves imploding axisymmetrically was first studied numerically by Hornung (J Fluid Mech 409:1-12, 2000) and this prompted a limited experimental investigation into these complex flow patterns by Skews et al. (Shock Waves 11:323-326, 2002). Modification of the simulation boundary conditions, resulting in the loss of self-similarity, was necessary to image the flow experimentally. The current tests examine the temporal evolution of these flows utilising a converging conical gap of fixed width fed by a shock wave impinging at its entrance, supported by CFD simulations. The effects of gap thickness, angle and incident shock strength were investigated. The wave initially diffracts around the outer lip of the gap shedding a vortex which, for strong incident shock cases, can contain embedded shocks. The converging shock at exit reflects on the axis of symmetry with the reflected wave propagating outwards resulting in a triple point developing on the incident wave together with the associated shear layer. This axisymmetric shear layer rolls up into a mushroom-shaped toroidal vortex ring and forward-facing jet. For strong shocks, this deforms the Mach disk to the extent of forming a second triple point with the primary shock exhibiting a double bulge. Separate features resembling the Richtmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were noted in some tests. Aside from the incident wave curvature, the reflection patterns demonstrated correspond well with the V- and DV-types identified by Hornung although type S was not clearly seen, possibly due to the occlusion of the reflection region by the outer diffraction vortex at these early times. Some additional computational work explicitly exploring the limits of the parameter space for such systems has demonstrated the existence of a possible further reflection type, called vN-type, which is similar to the von Neumann reflection for plane waves. It is recommended that the parameter space be

  4. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  5. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  6. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  7. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  8. Toxic shock syndrome and tampons.

    PubMed

    Schuchat, A; Broome, C V

    1991-01-01

    There has been a substantial reduction in the incidence of toxic shock syndrome in the 10 years since the association between tampons and toxic shock syndrome was first recognized. The decreased incidence is real, and not the result of decreased reporting to the passive surveillance system. The decreased incidence of menstrual toxic shock syndrome can primarily be explained by changes in the absorbency and composition of tampons available to the consumer. The reduction in the occurrence of menstrual toxic shock syndrome can be attributed to the withdrawal of Rely brand, which consisted of a unique composition, and subsequently to the lowering of absorbency of all brands of tampons. The conclusions of the early studies of toxic shock syndrome pointed the way to prompt public health interventions and resulted in the prevention of substantial morbidity.

  9. Update: Toxic Shock Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.

    1981-01-01

    School health professionals can help reduce the incidence of Toxic Shock Syndrome by suggesting that women not use tampons continuously during menses and that tampons should not be left in place for long periods of time. Tampons should be changed every few hours and used intermittently with pads. (JN)

  10. Multiple shock-shock interference on a cylindrical leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge representative of the cowl of a rectangular hypersonic engine inlet are presented. This Mach 8 study has provided the first detailed pressure and heat transfer rate distributions on a cylinder resulting from a two-dimensional shockwave interference pattern created by two incident oblique shock waves intersecting the cylinder bow shock wave. The peak heat transfer rate was 38 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point level and occurred when the two oblique shock waves coalesced prior to intersecting the cylinder bow shock wave. Development of pressure deflection diagrams identified a new interference pattern consisting of concomitant supersonic jets separated from each other by a shear layer and submerged in the subsonic region between the bow shock wave and body.

  11. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  12. [Cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  13. Shock wave reflections in a liquid filled thin tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shota; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kameda, Masaharu

    2013-11-01

    We investigate a behavior of an underwater shock wave in a thin glass tube using an ultra high-speed camera up to 107 frames per second. We here focus on the pressure of the reflected shock wave at interfaces (water-glass wall / water-air). A shock wave is visualized using the Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique. We measure the time evolution of the shock front position and estimate the shock velocity, pressure, and internal energy as a function of the distance from the shock center. At the water-wall interface the reflected shock pressure is lower than the incident shock pressure, which agrees well with the theoretical estimation for an acoustic pressure wave. The reflected pressure at the air-water interface is much lower than the incident shock, indicating that the shape of the air-water interface may affect this reduction of the reflected pressure.

  14. Cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; Cowger, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the most common cause of in-hospital mortality for patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Mortality exceeds 50% and management is focused on a rapid diagnosis of cardiogenic shock, restoration of coronary blood flow through early revascularization, complication management, and maintenance of end-organ homeostasis. Besides revascularization, inotropes and vasodilators are potent medical therapies to assist the failing heart. Pulmonary arterial catheters are an important adjunctive tool to assess patient hemodynamics, but their use should be limited to select patients in cardiogenic shock.

  15. Treatment of shock.

    PubMed

    De Backer, D

    2011-01-01

    Shock is a life-threatening condition, resulting from different causes, and leading to tissue hypoperfusion. Symptomatic therapy associates fluids and vasoactive agents. Vasopressor and inotropic adrenergic agents remain the most commonly used to correct hypotension and/or to increase cardiac output. These agents have different haemodynamic and metabolic profiles, but the relevance of these differences on outcome has long been challenged. Recent randomized trials have shaded some light on this issue. Dopamine and norepinephrine have been the most extensively studied. These trials raised major concerns on the use of dopamine, which was associated with tachycardia and increased arrhythmic events, and may be associated with an increased risk of death especially in the subgroup of patients with cardiogenic shock. The place of epinephrine is not well defined, this agent is associated with tachycardia, increased incidence of arrhythmic events, and undesired metabolic effects.

  16. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  17. Infectious Shock and Toxic Shock Syndrome Diagnoses in Hospitals, Colorado, USA

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Michael A.; Nyquist, Ann-Christine

    2013-01-01

    In Colorado, USA, diagnoses coded as toxic shock syndrome (TSS) constituted 27.3% of infectious shock cases during 1993–2006. The incidence of staphylococcal TSS did not change significantly overall or in female patients 10–49 years of age but increased for streptococcal TSS. TSS may be underrecognized among all ages and both sexes. PMID:24188357

  18. Spectral features of the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at the termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsloo, Phillip; Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    Following the revelation that the source of the anomalous cosmic rays was, contrary to expectation, not located at the termination shock, the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism came under increased criticism. With regards to galactic cosmic rays, however, its involvement in their re-acceleration is less disputed, but the extent of this involvement had to be reaffirmed given the new parameter constraints provided by the Voyager spacecraft. Hence, the features of diffusive shock acceleration, studied in the context of the transport of galactic electrons, are investigated using a numerical cosmic-ray modulation model that makes provision for the effects of this acceleration mechanism. The imprint of diffusive shock acceleration on the energy distributions of galactic electrons arriving at the termination shock is studied, along with the interplay between this acceleration mechanism and transport processes such as drift and diffusion. An important overarching set of results is that if the energy distribution of electrons incident at the termination shock is softer than the power law associated with the shock compression ratio, the latter is adopted by the accelerated particles, while if the converse is true, the incident distribution's intensity is raised uniformly. This intensity increase is in turn dependent on how similar the incident spectrum is to the power law associated with the compression ratio. The influence of other transport processes on cosmic-ray re-acceleration hence hinges on how they alter energy distributions incident at the termination shock.

  19. Free-Flight Investigation of Heat Transfer to an Unswept Cylinder Subjected to an Incident Shock and Flow Interference from an Upstream Body at Mach Numbers up to 5.50

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Howard S.; Carr, Robert E.

    1961-01-01

    Heat-transfer rates have been measured in free flight along the stagnation line of an unswept cylinder mounted transversely on an axial cylinder so that the shock wave from the hemispherical nose of the axial cylinder intersected the bow shock of the unswept transverse cylinder. Data were obtained at Mach numbers from 2.53 to 5.50 and at Reynolds numbers based on the transverse cylinder diameter from 1.00 x 10(exp 6) to 1.87 x 10(exp 6). Shadowgraph pictures made in a wind tunnel showed that the flow field was influenced by boundary-layer separation on the axial cylinder and by end effects on the transverse cylinder as well as by the intersecting shocks. Under these conditions, the measured heat-transfer rates had inconsistent variations both in magnitude and distribution which precluded separating the effects of these disturbances. The general magnitude of the measured heating rates at Mach numbers up to 3 was from 0.1 to 0.5 of the theoretical laminar heating rates along the stagnation line for an infinite unswept cylinder in undisturbed flow. At Mach numbers above 4 the measured heating rates were from 1.5 to 2 times the theoretical rates.

  20. Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Joshua B; Levy, Zachary D; Slesinger, Todd L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Although early reperfusion strategies are essential to the management of these critically ill patients, additional treatment plans are often needed to stabilize and treat the patient before reperfusion may be possible. This article discusses pharmacologic and surgical interventions, their indications and contraindications, management strategies, and treatment algorithms.

  1. CULTURE SHOCK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEINSTEIN, GERALD; AND OTHERS

    IN A PANEL, GEORGE BRAGLE AND NATHAN GOULD STRESS TEACHER PREPARATION TO COPE WITH THE THREATENING IMPACT OF CULTURE OR REALITY SHOCK. THEY RECOMMEND MODIFYING THE ATTITUDES OF TEACHERS BY ALTERING THEIR PERCEPTIONS, PROVIDING THEM WITH DIRECT EXPERIENCE WITH THE SOCIOCULTURAL MILIEU OF GHETTO SCHOOLS, AND REQUIRING THEM TO TAKE COURSES IN THE…

  2. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Unstable Mixing of Compressible Fluids Driven by Cylindrical Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Mary Jane; Zhang, Qiang

    1996-11-01

    As an incident shock wave hits a material interface between two compressible fluids of different densities, the interface becomes unstable. Small disturbances at the interface start to grow forming spikes and bubbles. This interfacial instability is known as the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. To date, the majority of the numerical and theoretical studies are for the RM instability in plane geometry. We present a systematic study of the RM instabiliy in cylindrical geometry with curved shocks for all four classes: shock exploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (2) shock imploding from light fluid to heavy fluid; (3) shock exploding from heavy fluid to light fluid; and (4) shock imploding from heavy fluid to light fluid. A careful study and understanding of the effects of various physical parameters will be presented: including the curvature of the geometry, the incident shock strength, the amplitude of the perturbation as well as the number of fingers at the material interface, and the phenomenon of reshock.

  4. [Definition of shock types].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles. PMID:11753724

  5. Curved shock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2016-07-01

    Curved shock theory (CST) is introduced, developed and applied to relate pressure gradients, streamline curvatures, vorticity and shock curvatures in flows with planar or axial symmetry. Explicit expressions are given, in an influence coefficient format, that relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. The effect of pre-shock flow divergence/convergence, on vorticity generation, is related to the transverse shock curvature. A novel derivation for the post-shock vorticity is presented that includes the effects of pre-shock flow non-uniformities. CST applicability to unsteady flows is discussed.

  6. Localized shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Stanford, Douglas; Susskind, Leonard

    2015-03-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, , where W x ( t) = e - iHt W x e iHt . Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in t. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  7. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  8. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  9. Corotating shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of observed interplanetary shocks leads to the conclusion that a corotating forward shock has not been unambiguously identified at 1 AU. A reverse shock identified in September 1967 is a likely candidate for a corotating structure.

  10. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiogenic Shock? Cardiogenic (kar-dee-oh-JE-nik) shock is ... treated right away. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  11. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David S.; Schmidt, Stephen C.

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the shock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  12. Incident reporting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Healthcare delivery is a risky business. People view the NHS in the same light as other commercial businesses such as the hotel, retail and airline industries. The White Paper 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Secretary of State for Health, 1997) places statutory responsibilities on managers and clinicians to provide a quality service and to have accountability for clinical governance and performance management. Quality and risk are two sides of the same coin, i.e. if you have good quality you have low risk, and this firmly supports the clinical effectiveness agenda. Healthcare organizations in all sectors of care delivery need to demonstrate their high levels of achievement and commitment to continuous quality improvements. Risk management is a process for identifying, assessing and evaluating risks which have adverse effects on the quality, safety and effectiveness of service delivery, and taking positive action to eliminate or reduce them. Having an open, honest and blame-free organization which is open to improving processes and systems of care is a big step towards having staff who are committed to quality and getting things right. Near-miss, incident and indicator recording and reporting are cornerstones of any quality and risk management system.

  13. Measurement of the shock front velocity produced in a T-tube

    SciTech Connect

    Djurović, S.; Mijatović, Z.; Vujičić, B.; Kobilarov, R.; Savić, I.; Gavanski, L.

    2015-01-15

    A set of shock front velocity measurements is described in this paper. The shock waves were produced in a small electromagnetically driven shock T-tube. Most of the measurements were performed in hydrogen. The shock front velocity measurements in other gases and the velocity of the gas behind the shock front were also analyzed, as well as the velocity dependence on applied input energy. Some measurements with an applied external magnetic field were also performed. The used method of shock front velocity is simple and was shown to be very reliable. Measured values were compared with the calculated ones for the incident and reflected shock waves.

  14. Shock compression of condensed nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2001-06-01

    The physical properties of hot dense plasmas at megabar pressures are of great interest for astro- and planetary physics, inertial confinement fusion, energetics, technology and many other applications. The lecture presents the modern results of experimental investigations of equations of state, compositions, thermodynamical and transport properties, electrical conductivity and opacity of strongly coupled plasmas generated by intense shock and rarefaction waves. The experimental methods for generation of high energy densities in matter, drivers for shock waves and fast diagnostic methods are discussed. The application of intense shock waves to solid and porous targets allows us to degenerate Fermi-like plasmas with maximum pressure up to 4Gbar and temperatures 10^7 K. Compression of plasma by a series of incident and reflected shock waves allows us to decrease irreversible heating effects. As a result, such a multiple compression process becomes close to the isentropic one which permits us to reach much higher densities and lower temperatures compared to single shock compression. On the other hand, to increase the irreversibility effects and to generate high temperature plasma states the experiments on shock compression of porous samples (fine metal powder, aerogels) were performed. The shock compression of saturated metal vapors and previously compressed noble gases by incident and reflected shocks allows us to reach nonideal plasmas on the Hugoniot. The adiabatic expansion of matter initially compressed by intense shocks up to megabars gives us the chance to investigate the intermediate region between the solid and vapor phase of nonideal plasmas, including the metal-insulator transition phase and the high temperature saturation curve with critical points of metals.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  16. Effects of Fin Leading Edge Sweep on Shock-Shock Interaction at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of fin leading edge sweep on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interaction have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel. The shock interaction was produced by the intersection of a planar incident shock (16.8 deg shock angle relative to the freestream, generated by a 9 deg wedge) with the bow shock formed around a O.5-inch diameter cylindrical leading edge fin. Heating distributions along the leading edge stagnation line have been obtained using densely spaced thin film resistive-type sensors. Schlieren images were obtained to illustrate the very complex shock-shock interactions. The fin leading edge sweep angle was varied from 15-degrees swept back to 45-degrees swept forward for a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2 x 10(exp 6)/ft. Two models were utilized during the study, one with 0.025-inch spacing between gage centers, and the other 0.015-inch spacing. Gage spatial resolution on the order of 0.015-in appeared to accurately capture the narrow spike in heating. Peak heating due to shock interaction was maximized when the fin was swept forward 15 deg and 25 deg, both promoting augmentations about 7 times the baseline value. The schlieren images for these cases revealed Type 4 and Type 3 interactions, respectively.

  17. Gigabar spherical shock generation on the OMEGA laser.

    PubMed

    Nora, R; Theobald, W; Betti, R; Marshall, F J; Michel, D T; Seka, W; Yaakobi, B; Lafon, M; Stoeckl, C; Delettrez, J; Solodov, A A; Casner, A; Reverdin, C; Ribeyre, X; Vallet, A; Peebles, J; Beg, F N; Wei, M S

    2015-01-30

    This Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the capability to launch shocks of several-hundred Mbar in spherical targets--a milestone for shock ignition [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)]. Using the temporal delay between the launching of the strong shock at the outer surface of the spherical target and the time when the shock converges at the center, the shock-launching pressure can be inferred using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Peak ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar are inferred at absorbed laser intensities of ∼3×10(15)  W/cm2. The shock strength is shown to be significantly enhanced by the coupling of suprathermal electrons with a total converted energy of up to 8% of the incident laser energy. At the end of the laser pulse, the shock pressure is estimated to exceed ∼1  Gbar because of convergence effects. PMID:25679896

  18. Gigabar Spherical Shock Generation on the OMEGA Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Theobald, W.; Betti, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Lafon, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Delettrez, J.; Solodov, A. A.; Casner, A.; Reverdin, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Vallet, A.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    This Letter presents the first experimental demonstration of the capability to launch shocks of several-hundred Mbar in spherical targets—a milestone for shock ignition [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 155001 (2007)]. Using the temporal delay between the launching of the strong shock at the outer surface of the spherical target and the time when the shock converges at the center, the shock-launching pressure can be inferred using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Peak ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar are inferred at absorbed laser intensities of ˜3 ×1015 W /cm2 . The shock strength is shown to be significantly enhanced by the coupling of suprathermal electrons with a total converted energy of up to 8% of the incident laser energy. At the end of the laser pulse, the shock pressure is estimated to exceed ˜1 Gbar because of convergence effects.

  19. Shock focusing upon interaction of a shock with a cylindrical dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgievskiy, P. Yu.; Levin, V. A.; Sutyrin, O. G.

    2016-09-01

    Propagation of a strong plane shock wave through air containing a cylindrical cloud of low-concentration quartz dust is numerically modeled using Euler's equations. A one-velocity single-temperature model of dust-air mixture is used. Refraction of incident shock and formation and focusing of transversal shocks are described. Two qualitatively different interaction regimes-external and internal-are found to take place for different dust concentration values. The dependence of peak shock focusing point position and relative shock focusing intensity on volume concentration of dust in the range of from 0.01 to 0.15% is determined. With an increase of dust concentration, the peak focusing point draws near the cloud edge and moves inside the cloud, while focusing intensity significantly rises.

  20. Prospective, consecutive case series of 158 snakebite patients treated at Savannakhet provincial hospital, Lao People's Democratic Republic with high incidence of anaphylactic shock to horse derived F(ab')2 antivenom.

    PubMed

    Vongphoumy, Inthanomchanh; Chanthilat, Phankham; Vilayvong, Phongmany; Blessmann, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    Snakebites are a seriously neglected public health problem in Lao PDR. Community-based cross-sectional surveys in two districts of Savannakhet province in Southern Laos revealed an incidence of up to 1105 snakebites per 100,000 persons per year. In contrast the number of snakebite patients treated in district and provincial hospitals are low. In order to improve health care for snakebite victims, antivenom was introduced to Savannakhet provincial hospital in July 2013 and medical staff has been trained in management of venomous snakebites at the same time. After the intervention the number of snakebite patients treated at the provincial hospital increased significantly from 4 patients in 2012 to 158 snakebite patients between July 2013 and November 2015. They were included into a prospective, consecutive case series. Median age was 32 years (range 1.5-70 years) and male-to-female ratio 2.2:1. Forty patients were bitten by Malayan pit vipers, 26 by green pit vipers, 24 by cobras, including 3 cases of venom ophthalmia, 5 by kraits, 8 by non-venomous species and in 55 cases the snake could not be identified. Forty-three out of 158 patients received horse derived F(ab')2 antivenom from Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute (QSMI) in Bangkok. Twenty-three patients (53%) developed early adverse reactions (EARs) within one hour after antivenom administration, including 13 patients (30%) with severe anaphylaxis. This extremely high rate of severe EARs turns the use of antivenom into a risky intervention. In contrast a retrospective chart review from Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok found only 3.5% early reactions including 1.2% severe anaphylactic reactions using the same antivenom from QSMI between 1997 and 2006. The reason for this enormous difference remains unclear. A better understanding of the aetiology and pathophysiology behind antivenom induced anaphylaxis is crucial in order to identify patients at risk and to improve safety of antivenom administration. PMID

  1. Studies of aerothermal loads generated in regions of shock/shock interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Moselle, John R.; Lee, Jinho

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to examine the aerothermal characteristics of shock/shock/boundary layer interaction regions generated by single and multiple incident shocks. The presented experimental studies were conducted over a Mach number range from 6 to 19 for a range of Reynolds numbers to obtain both laminar and turbulent interaction regions. Detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements were made for a range of interaction types and incident shock strengths over a transverse cylinder, with emphasis on the 3 and 4 type interaction regions. The measurements were compared with the simple Edney, Keyes, and Hains models for a range of interaction configurations and freestream conditions. The complex flowfields and aerothermal loads generated by multiple-shock impingement, while not generating as large peak loads, provide important test cases for code prediction. The detailed heat transfer and pressure measurements proved a good basis for evaluating the accuracy of simple prediction methods and detailed numerical solutions for laminar and transitional regions or shock/shock interactions.

  2. A Theoretical Basis for the Scaling Law of Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical basis for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity In supersonic jets was formulated considering linear shock-shear wave interaction. Modeling of broadband shock noise with the aid of shock-turbulence interaction with special reference to linear theories is briefly reviewed. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process with the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles being relatively unimportant. The proposed hypothesis satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Low-Density Shock-Wave Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1999-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations of low-density shock-wave interactions for an incident shock impinging on a cylinder have been performed. Flow-field density gradient and surface pressure and heating define the type of interference pattern and corresponding perturbations. The maximum pressure and heat transfer level and location for various interaction types (i.e., shock-wave incidence with respect to the cylinder) are presented. A time-accurate solution of the Type IV interference is employed to demonstrate the establishment and the steadiness of the low-density flow interaction.

  4. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  5. Ion heating and energy redistribution across supercritical perpendicular shocks: Application to planetary and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Liu, Y. D.; Richardson, J. D.; Parks, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate how the ion dissipative process across supercritical perpendicular shocks depends on the shock front micro-structures. At a collisionless plasma shock, the dissipation and micro-structure of the shock font are dominated by wave-particle interactions. Comparison of the ion thermalization at different kinds of shocks, e.g., planetary and interplanetary shocks, can quantify how much interaction is occurring at the shock boundary. Investigation of this problem for diverse solar wind (SW) conditions will yield important information on the dependences of the ion thermalization and energy redistribution on plasma parameters. With the aid of a successful automatic separation method [Yang et al., 2009], the incident ions at the shock can be divided into two parts: reflected (R) ions and directly transmitted (DT) ions. Corresponding heating efficiency of each population of ions at the shock can be calculated respectively. Wilkinson & Schwartz [1990] have theorized that the amount of reflected ions at perpendicular shocks depends on plasma parameters. Based on the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) conservation laws, they found that the fraction reflected is strongly dependent on the magnitude of the ratio of specific heat capacities γ chosen in the R-H relations. The main goal of this work is to investigate how the plasma parameters, e.g. the particle velocity distribution, the plasma beta value, seed populations, etc. (from a particle dynamic point of view), control the amount of reflected ions by using one-dimensional (1-D) full-particle-cell simulations. The simulation results may help to explain the ion heating efficiency and energy redistribution at shocks observed by Cluster, Wind, Voyager, etc.

  6. The effects of pentoxifylline treatment on bacterial translocation after hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Köylüoglu, G; Bakici, M Z; Elagöz, S; Arpacik, M

    2001-03-01

    Bacterial translocation is thought to be responsible for infectious complications after hemorrhagic shock. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pentoxifylline treatment on bacterial translocation in animals subjected to hemorrhagic shock. Thirty-one Wistar albino rats (280-360 g) were divided into three groups: sham (n=10), shock (n=11), and shock-pentoxifylline (n=10). Blood was not withdrawn from sham rats. Shock rats were subjected to 30 min of shock followed by reinfusion of shed blood. Shock/pentoxifylline rats received pentoxifylline after reinfusion of shed blood. After hemorrhage and reinfusion (24 h), the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and blood samples were evaluated using quantitative microbiological techniques, and the numbers of colony-forming units were compared between groups. Cecum was removed to evaluate the bacterial population. Ileum and cecum were examined histologically. The incidence of bacterial translocation was higher in the shocked rats (63%) than in the sham shock rats (10%). Pentoxifylline reduced the incidence of shock-induced bacterial translocation to 0%. Cecal bacterial levels were significantly higher in the shock rats than in the sham and shock/pentoxifylline rats. The histological damage caused by hemorrhagic shock was prevented by pentoxifylline treatment. In conclusion, the hemorrhagic shock triggered translocation of bacteria to the mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood of rats. Pentoxifylline treatment just after shed blood transfusion significantly attenuated this phenomenon.

  7. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    PubMed

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  8. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  9. Understanding the Shock in "Culture Shock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Jim

    "Culture shock" is the expression generally associated with the frustrations that occur when persons have difficulty functioning in a different culture or when persons are exposed to individuals from another culture. Culture shock typically occurs in a 4-stage process that can unfold over varying lengths of time: the honeymoon, crisis, resolution,…

  10. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  11. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of toxic shock syndrome involved women who used tampons during their periods (menstruation). However, today less than half of cases are linked to tampon use. Toxic shock syndrome can also occur with ...

  12. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  13. Frequency shift measurement in shock-compressed materials

    DOEpatents

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1984-02-21

    A method is disclosed for determining molecular vibrational frequencies in shock-compressed transparent materials. A single laser beam pulse is directed into a sample material while the material is shock-compressed from a direction opposite that of the incident laser beam. A Stokes beam produced by stimulated Raman scattering is emitted back along the path of the incident laser beam, that is, in the opposite direction to that of the incident laser beam. The Stokes beam is separated from the incident beam and its frequency measured. The difference in frequency between the Stokes beam and the incident beam is representative of the characteristic frequency of the Raman active mode of the sample. Both the incident beam and the Stokes beam pass perpendicularly through the stock front advancing through the sample, thereby minimizing adverse effects of refraction.

  14. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can't pump ... to the body. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  15. Turbulent water coupling in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stone comminution decreases with increased pulse repetition frequency as a result of bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter (Pishchalnikov et al 2011 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130 EL87-93). If cavitation nuclei remain in the propagation path of successive lithotripter pulses, especially in the acoustic coupling cushion of the shock wave source, they will consume part of the incident wave energy, leading to reduced tensile pressure in the focal region and thus lower stone comminution efficiency. We introduce a method to remove cavitation nuclei from the coupling cushion between successive shock exposures using a jet of degassed water. As a result, pre-focal bubble nuclei lifetime quantified by B-mode ultrasound imaging was reduced from 7 to 0.3 s by a jet with an exit velocity of 62 cm s(-1). Stone fragmentation (percent mass <2 mm) after 250 shocks delivered at 1 Hz was enhanced from 22 ± 6% to 33 ± 5% (p = 0.007) in water without interposing tissue mimicking materials. Stone fragmentation after 500 shocks delivered at 2 Hz was increased from 18 ± 6% to 28 ± 8% (p = 0.04) with an interposing tissue phantom of 8 cm thick. These results demonstrate the critical influence of cavitation bubbles in the coupling cushion on stone comminution and suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of contemporary shock wave lithotripters.

  16. Spherical strong-shock generation for shock-ignition inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Lafon, M.; Anderson, K. S.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Edgell, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Shvydky, A.; Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Casner, A.; Reverdin, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Vallet, A.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments on the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' OMEGA laser have been carried out to produce strong shocks in solid spherical targets with direct laser illumination. The shocks are launched at pressures of several hundred Mbars and reach Gbar upon convergence. The results are relevant to the validation of the shock-ignition scheme and to the development of an OMEGA experimental platform to study material properties at Gbar pressures. The experiments investigate the strength of the ablation pressure and the hot-electron production at incident laser intensities of ∼2 to 6 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2} and demonstrate ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar, which is crucial to developing a shock-ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility. The timing of the x-ray flash from shock convergence in the center of the solid plastic target is used to infer the ablation and shock pressures. Laser–plasma instabilities produce hot-electrons with a moderate temperature (<100 keV). The instantaneous conversion efficiencies of laser power into hot-electron power reached up to ∼15% in the intensity spike. The large amount of hot electrons is correlated with an earlier x-ray flash and a strong increase in its magnitude. This suggests that hot electrons contribute to the augmentation of the shock strength.

  17. Spherical strong-shock generation for shock-ignition inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W.; Nora, R.; Seka, W.; Lafon, M.; Anderson, K. S.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Edgell, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Casner, A.; Reverdin, C.; Ribeyre, X.; Shvydky, A.; Vallet, A.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Betti, R.

    2015-05-12

    Recent experiments on the Laboratory for Laser Energetics’ OMEGA laser have been carried out to produce strong shocks in solid spherical targets with direct laser illumination. The shocks are launched at pressures of several hundred Mbars and reach Gbar upon convergence. The results are relevant to the validation of the shock-ignition scheme and to the development of an OMEGA experimental platform to study material properties at Gbar pressures. The experiments investigate the strength of the ablation pressure and the hot-electron production at incident laser intensities of ~2 to 6 x 10¹⁵W/cm² and demonstrate ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar, which is crucial to developing a shock-ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility. The timing of the x-ray flash from shock convergence in the center of the solid plastic target is used to infer the ablation and shock pressures. Laser–plasma instabilities produce hot-electrons with a moderate temperature (<100 keV). The instantaneous conversion efficiencies of laser power into hot-electron power reached up to ~15% in the intensity spike. The large amount of hot electrons is correlated with an earlier x-ray flash and a strong increase in its magnitude. This suggests that hot electrons contribute to the augmentation of the shock strength.

  18. Finite Time Shock Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, C.; Ruffolo, D.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    Observations of energetic ion acceleration at interplanetary shocks sometimes indicate a spectral rollover at ˜ 0.1 to 1 MeV nucl-1. This rollover is not well explained by finite shock width or thickness effects. At the same time, a typical timescale of diffusive shock acceleration is several days, implying that the process of shock acceleration at an interplanetary shock near Earth usually gives only a mild increase in energy to an existing seed particle population. This is consistent with a recent analysis of ACE observations that argues for a seed population at substantially higher energies than the solar wind. Therefore an explanation of typical spectra of interplanetary shock-accelerated ions requires a theory of finite-time shock acceleration, which for long times (or an unusually fast acceleration timescale) tends to the steady-state result of a power-law spectrum. We present analytic and numerical models of finite-time shock acceleration. For a given injection momentum p0, after a very short time there is only a small boost in momentum, at intermediate times the spectrum is a power law with a hump and steep cutoff at a critical momentum, and at longer times the critical momentum increases and the spectrum approaches the steady-state power law. The composition dependence of the critical momentum is different from that obtained for other cutoff mechanisms. The results are compared with observed spectra. Work in Thailand was supported by the Commission for Higher Education, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and the Thailand Research Fund. Work at the University of Maryland was supported by NASA contract NAS5-30927 and NASA grant PC 251428.

  19. Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves.

  20. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  1. The Interaction of Turbulence with Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G. P.; Kryukov, I. A.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Shaikh, D.

    2010-03-25

    The heliosheath was expected to be turbulent, the result of upstream turbulence and disturbances (shock waves, pressure and density enhancements, structures, etc.) being transmitted across and interacting with the heliospheric termination shock (HTS). A turbulent heliosheath has indeed been observed downstream of the HTS, but the character of the turbulence is significantly different from that of the solar wind. Here, we discuss the transmission of waves and turbulence across the HTS, both analytically and numerically, in the large plasma beta approximation, and we investigate both small amplitude and large-amplitude cases. We find that the linear theory is a reasonable approximation for small amplitude waves incident on the shock. In the case of large amplitude entropy fluctuations incident on the shock, the downstream state is initially one of coherent wave forms, but this rapidly devolves to a highly disturbed state that evolves eventually to a state dominated by vortical structures. Of particular importance, we find that the HTS generates significant levels of downstream compressible turbulence, even in their absence upstream.

  2. New radiative shocks experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehlé, C.; Benuzzi, A.; Boireau, J.-P.; Chièze, J.-P.; Grandjouan, N.; Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Malka, V.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Thais, F.; Vinci, T.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study of shocks with astrophysical relevance is performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the Ecole Polytechnique. The peculiarity of these shocks is the strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. A new experiment has been performed this year where we have observed shocks identified as radiative shocks. We study them in various experimental configurations (several speeds and geometries of the medium where the shock propagates, allowing a quasi-planar or a quasi-spherical expansion). From the measurements it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed, the electronic density, the geometrical shape and spectroscopic informations. The results will be studied with numerical simulations.

  3. Multiple Shocks, Coping and Welfare Consequences: Natural Disasters and Health Shocks in the Indian Sundarbans

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Sumit; Mazumdar, Papiya Guha; Kanjilal, Barun; Singh, Prashant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on a household survey in Indian Sundarbans hit by tropical cyclone Aila in May 2009, this study tests for evidence and argues that health and climatic shocks are essentially linked forming a continuum and with exposure to a marginal one, coping mechanisms and welfare outcomes triggered in the response is significantly affected. Data & Methods The data for this study is based on a cross-sectional household survey carried out during June 2010. The survey was aimed to assess the impact of cyclone Aila on households and consequent coping mechanisms in three of the worst-affected blocks (a sub-district administrative unit), viz. Hingalganj, Gosaba and Patharpratima. The survey covered 809 individuals from 179 households, cross cutting age and gender. A separate module on health-seeking behaviour serves as the information source of health shocks defined as illness episodes (ambulatory or hospitalized) experienced by household members. Key findings Finding reveals that over half of the households (54%) consider that Aila has dealt a high, damaging impact on their household assets. Result further shows deterioration of health status in the period following the incidence of Aila. Finding suggests having suffered multiple shocks increases the number of adverse welfare outcomes by 55%. Whereas, suffering either from the climatic shock (33%) or the health shock (25%) alone increases such risks by a much lesser extent. The multiple-shock households face a significantly higher degree of difficulty to finance expenses arising out of health shocks, as opposed to their counterparts facing only the health shock. Further, these households are more likely to finance the expenses through informal loans and credit from acquaintances or moneylenders. Conclusion This paper presented empirical evidence on how natural and health shocks mutually reinforce their resultant impact, making coping increasingly difficult and present significant risks of welfare loss, having short

  4. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  5. Incidents of Security Concern

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation addresses incidents of security concern and an incident program for addressing them. It addresses the phases of an inquiry, and it divides incidents into categories based on severity and interest types based on whether security, management, or procedural interests are involved. A few scenarios are then analyzed according to these breakdowns.

  6. FULL PARTICLE ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF ENTROPY GENERATION ACROSS A COLLISIONLESS SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhongwei; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui; Hu, Huidong; Parks, George K.; Wu, Pin; Huang, Can; Shi, Run

    2014-09-20

    Experimental data from Cluster have shown that entropy density can be generated across Earth's bow shock. These new observations are a starting point for a more sophisticated analysis that includes computer modeling of a collisionless shock using observed shock parameters as input. In this Letter, we present the first comparison between observations and particle-in-cell simulations of such entropy generation across a collisionless shock. The ion heating at the shock is dominated by the phase mixing of reflected and directly transmitted ions, which are separated from the incident ions. The electron heating is a nearly thermal process due to the conservation of their angular momentum. For both species, we calculate the entropy density across the shock, and obtain good consistency between observations and simulations on entropy generation across the shock. We also find that the entropy generation rate is reduced as the shock Mach number decreases.

  7. Are health shocks different? Evidence from a multishock survey in Laos.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Adam; Lindelow, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    Using primary data from Laos, we compare a broad range of different types of shocks in terms of their incidence, distribution between the poor and the better off, idiosyncrasy, costs, coping responses, and self-reported impacts on well-being. Health shocks are more common than most other shocks, more concentrated among the poor, more idiosyncratic, more costly, trigger more coping strategies, and highly likely to lead to a cut in consumption. Household members experiencing a health shock lost, on average, 0.6 point on a five-point health scale; the wealthier are better able to limit the health impacts of a health shock. PMID:23765700

  8. AEROFROSH: a shock condition calculator for multi-component fuel aerosol-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Haylett, D. R.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    This article introduces an algorithm that determines the thermodynamic conditions behind incident and reflected shocks in aerosol-laden flows. Importantly, the algorithm accounts for the effects of droplet evaporation on post-shock properties. Additionally, this article describes an algorithm for resolving the effects of multiple-component-fuel droplets. This article presents the solution methodology and compares the results to those of another similar shock calculator. It also provides examples to show the impact of droplets on post-shock properties and the impact that multi-component fuel droplets have on shock experimental parameters. Finally, this paper presents a detailed uncertainty analysis of this algorithm's calculations given typical experimental uncertainties.

  9. Particle acceleration during interactions between transient ion foreshock phenomena and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Drew; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Wilson, Lynn; Hietala, Heli; Omidi, Nick; Masters, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Foreshocks are regions upstream of supercritical astrophysical shock waves that are in communication with the shock via suprathermal charged particles that have been energized and reflected by the shock and are counter-streaming into the incident plasma. These regions form upstream of the quasi-parallel region of the shock, in which the angle between the magnetic field in the incident plasma and the shock normal direction is less than ~40 deg. The relative drift between the reflected suprathermal particles and the incident bulk flow is a source of free energy, which is capable of producing a variety of kinetic plasma instabilities and enhanced wave activity. Simulations and observations of Earth's and other planetary foreshocks have shown that large-scale transient phenomena can also develop due to nonlinear processes and interactions between foreshock particles and discontinuities in the incident solar wind. Several of these transient ion foreshock phenomena (TIFP), such as short large-amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMS), hot flow anomalies (HFAs), and foreshock bubbles (FBs), can result in the development of nonlinear wave activity and additional shocks upstream of the main bow shock. We present in situ observations, made by NASA's THEMIS mission, of ion and electron distributions from within and without SLAMS, HFAs, and FBs, examining the particle heating and acceleration taking place within those TIFP. The observations are compared to theoretical expectations for shock-drift acceleration, Fermi acceleration, and energy diffusion via wave-particle interactions. Our preliminary results show that SLAMS, HFAs, and FBs can be ideal particle accelerators. Finally, we develop an understanding for the upper energy limits for ion and electron acceleration in each of these TIFP at Earth's bow shock and use this to investigate how TIFP may accelerate particles at other astrophysical shocks, such as planetary and astrospherical bow shocks, shocks in stellar winds, and

  10. Shock wave mitigation using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xingtian; Colvert, Brendan; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. High-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors allow measurement during the relevant shock interaction time periods of the liquid-gas interface. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. In particular, the effects of viscous properties of the fluid are considered when using non-Newtonian dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids. Experiments have been performed with both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The impact of a shock waves on Non-newtonian fluids is compared to that of Newtonian fluids. Experiments show that non-Newtonian fluids have very strong reflection properties, acting like solid walls under the impact of a shock wave. Further work is to be performed to compare quantitatively the properties of Newtonian vs. non-Newtonian fluids.

  11. Scatttering of High-energy Particles at a Collisionless Shock Front: Dependence on the Shock Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, M.; Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Many shock acceleration theories deal with gyrophase-averaged particle distributions that depend only on the energy and pitch angle of the particles. Diffusive shock acceleration includes shock crossing as a necessary component. As long as the shock width is much smaller than the mean free path of a particle, the crossing is governed by the macroscopic fields inside the transition layer. The dynamics of high-energy particles in these fields is non-adiabatic and gyrophase dependent. The magnetic moment is not conserved in a wide range of shock angles, nor is the condition of reflection determined by the magnetic bottle relation. Instead, for a pitch angle and unknown gyrophase of an incident particle there is a finite probability of reflection. This probability varies between zero and unity in a wide range of pitch angles. In this work we investigate how the matching conditions at the shock front could be modified with the gyrophase dependence taken into account, e.g., in the form of the scattering probabilities.

  12. SCATTTERING OF HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES AT A COLLISIONLESS SHOCK FRONT: DEPENDENCE ON THE SHOCK ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Dröge, W.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.

    2015-07-10

    Many shock acceleration theories deal with gyrophase-averaged particle distributions that depend only on the energy and pitch angle of the particles. Diffusive shock acceleration includes shock crossing as a necessary component. As long as the shock width is much smaller than the mean free path of a particle, the crossing is governed by the macroscopic fields inside the transition layer. The dynamics of high-energy particles in these fields is non-adiabatic and gyrophase dependent. The magnetic moment is not conserved in a wide range of shock angles, nor is the condition of reflection determined by the magnetic bottle relation. Instead, for a pitch angle and unknown gyrophase of an incident particle there is a finite probability of reflection. This probability varies between zero and unity in a wide range of pitch angles. In this work we investigate how the matching conditions at the shock front could be modified with the gyrophase dependence taken into account, e.g., in the form of the scattering probabilities.

  13. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated? Cardiogenic shock is life threatening and requires emergency medical treatment. ... arrive. The first goal of emergency treatment for cardiogenic shock is to improve the flow of blood and ...

  14. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  15. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-01

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and a critical Mach number Mscritical of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mscritical . Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. We point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.

  16. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-13

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and amore » critical Mach number Mcriticals of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mcriticals. Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. Furthermore, we point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.« less

  17. Experimental investigation of shock wave propagation in a 90 $(°) $ ∘ branched duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Igra, O.; Mariani, C.; Tosello, R.; Leriche, D.; Houas, L.

    2014-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted examining the option of using branched duct geometry for shock wave attenuation. Experiments were done in an 80 mm 80 mm square section shock tube to which a 20-mm diameter pipe was added vertically. Pressures were recorded along the shock tube wall (static pressure) and at the branched pipe end wall (stagnation pressure). Experiments were repeated with a constant incident shock wave Mach number () and with different pipe lengths. It was found that the length of the branched pipe has a significant effect on the flow inside the branched pipe and that in the present experimental configuration, the stagnation pressure recorded at the branched pipe end wall surpasses the pressure in the main channel behind the original incident shock wave. Finally, simulations were carried out using a commercial program, Star-CCM+, to complete the description of the flow studied here. The computed pressure profiles and shock wave locations agree quite well with the present experimental data.

  18. Self-sustained shock oscillations on airfoils at transonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2001-02-01

    Self-sustained shock wave oscillations on airfoils at transonic flow conditions are associated with the phenomenon of buffeting. The physical mechanisms of the periodic shock motion are not yet fully understood even though experiments performed over fifty years ago have demonstrated the presence of oscillatory shock waves on the airfoil surfaces at high subsonic speeds. The unsteady pressure fluctuations generated by the low-frequency large-amplitude shock motions are highly undesirable from the structural integrity and aircraft maneuverability point of view. For modern supercritical wing design with thick profiles, the shock-induced fluctuations are particularly severe and methods to reduce the shock wave amplitudes to lower values or even to delay the oscillations to higher Mach numbers or incidence angles will result in expanding the buffet boundary of the airfoil. This review begins with a recapitulation of the classical work on shock-induced bubble separation and trailing edge separation of a turbulent boundary layer. The characteristics of the unsteady pressure fluctuations are used to classify the types of shock-boundary layer interaction. The various modes of shock wave motion for different flow conditions and airfoil configurations are described. The buffet boundaries obtained using the standard trailing edge pressure divergence technique and an alternative approach of measuring the divergence of normal fluctuating forces are compared to show the equivalence. The mechanisms of self-sustained shock oscillations are discussed for symmetrical circular-arc airfoils at zero incidence and for supercritical airfoils at high incidence angles with fully separated flows. The properties of disturbances in the wake are examined from linear stability analysis of two-dimensional compressible flows. The advances in high-speed computing make predictions of buffeting flows possible. Navier-Stokes solvers and approximate boundary layer-inviscid flow interaction methods are

  19. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  20. Planar shock wave sliding over a water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Jourdan, G.; Marty, A.; Allou, A.; Parisse, J.-D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we conduct experiments to study the interaction between a horizontal free water layer and a planar shock wave that is sliding over it. Experiments are performed at atmospheric pressure in a shock tube with a square cross section (200× 200 mm^2) for depths of 10, 20, and 30 mm; a 1500-mm-long water layer; and two incident planar shock waves having Mach numbers of 1.11 and 1.43. We record the pressure histories and high-speed visualizations to study the flow patterns, surface waves, and spray layers behind the shock wave. We observe two different flow patterns with ripples formed at the air-water interface for the weaker shock wave and the dispersion of a droplet mist for the stronger shock wave. From the pressure signals, we extract the delay time between the arrival of the compression wave into water and the shock wave in air at the same location. We show that the delay time evolves with the distance traveled over the water layer, the depth of the water layer, and the Mach number of the shock wave.

  1. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  2. Shocks near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  3. Anthrax-associated shock.

    PubMed

    Goldman, David L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Recent events have brought attention to the potential of Bacillus anthracis as an agent of bioterrorism. The shock like state of anthrax is invariably associated with high mortality, despite anti-microbial and supportive therapy. Multi-system dysfunction is typical, including: enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage and inflammation. Important questions concerning the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock remain unanswered, including the effects of B. anthracis infection on cardiac function. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock. PMID:18508494

  4. Investigation of shock-shock interaction and Mach reflection in laterally colliding laser-blow-off plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R. K.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2015-06-15

    Interactions of two Li plasma plumes and shock waves are investigated at various pressures (∼10{sup −5} to 3 mbar) in the argon gas ambient. Fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy are used to study the plume dynamics and characteristic emission of plasmas. The plasma plumes are created in laser-blow-off geometry. The expansion of plasma plumes in the ambient gas leads to the formation of an interaction zone. The formation of interaction zone is dependent on the ambient pressure and below a certain pressure, no significant change is observed in the shape and size of the interaction plasma. In the higher pressure, formation of interaction zone and its shape are dependent on ambient pressure. Dynamics of seed plasmas and interaction zone are also affected by the shock-shock interactions. The shock-shock interaction depends on the angle of incidence (α) between two shock waves at the initial time of interaction but as the plumes expand, the shock-shock interaction does not follow α dependence.

  5. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  6. Counseling For Future Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  7. Collisionless parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  8. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  9. Incident analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, D.W.; Buerer, A.; Leeds, S.

    1996-02-20

    This document presents information about a fire that occurred in January 1996 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This fire was caused by the spontaneous combustion of 100% fuming nitric acid. Topics discussed include: Summary of the incident; technical background; procedural background; supervision; previous incidents with 100% fuming nitric acid; and judgment of potential hazards.

  10. Cardiogenic shock in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Expósito-Ruiz, Manuela; Morante-Valle, Antonia; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Pintor-Mármol, Antonio; Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando; Mellado-Vergel, Francisco José; Machado-Casas, Juan; Tejero-Pedregosa, Armando; Lara-Torrano, Juan

    2009-03-01

    This is a review of current knowledge on cardiogenic shock (CS), with particular attention to recommended management. The bibliography for the study was compiled through a search of different databases between 1966-2008. The references cited in the selected articles were also reviewed. The selection criteria included all reports published on CS, from case reports and case series to controlled studies. Languages used were Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, and English. Cardiogenic shock is the most frequent cause of in-hospital death as a complication of acute coronary syndrome. The incidence is about 7% and, despite therapeutic advances, it continues to have an ominous prognosis, with mortality rates of over 50%. Coronary reperfusion is fundamental in the management of cardiogenic shock, particularly with the use of percutaneous coronary intervention. However, if this is not available, systemic thrombolysis may be performed together with balloon counterpulsation or the use of pressor drugs. Despite the historical importance of the Swan-Ganz catheter, this would appear to have limited use, with echocardiography nonetheless having a fundamental role in the management of CS. Although patients with cardiogenic shock often present a left ventricular ejection fraction of around 30%, survivors often have a good functional classification one year after the event. Neurohormonal and inflammatory mechanisms play a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of CS. These mechanisms are currently the target of studies looking into developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19247258

  11. The Supernova Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethe, Hans A.

    1995-08-01

    Vigorous convection is the key to the supernova mechanism. An analytic theory is presented which parallels the computations of Herant et al. Energy is delivered by neutrinos to the convecting medium. The most important quantity is p1r3, where P1 is the density outside the shock. This can be obtained from the computations of Wilson et al., since it is not affected by the convection behind the shock. It is closely related to Mdot, the rate at which matter falls in toward the center. The outgoing shock is dominated by the Hugoniot equation; the shock cannot move out until its energy is of the order of 1 foe (= 1051 ergs). Once it moves, its velocity and energy are calculated as functions of its radius. Nucleosynthesis gives an appreciable contribution to the energy. A substantial fraction of the energy is initially stored as nuclear dissociation energy, and then released as the shock moves out. This energy cannot at present be calculated from first principles, but it can be deduced from the observed energy of SN 1987A of 1.4±0.4 foe. From the result it is shown that about one-half of the infalling material goes into the shock and one-half accretes to the neutron star.

  12. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  13. Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction: Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, M.; Matsukiyo, S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles (cosmic rays) in space. While most of the past studies about particle acceleration assume the presence of a single shock, in space two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. Hietala et al. [2011] observed the collision of an interplanetary shock and the earth's bow shock and the associated acceleration of energetic ions. The kinetic natures of a shock-shock collision has not been well understood. Only the work done by using hybrid simulation was reported by Cargill et al. [1986], in which they focus on a collision of two supercritical shocks and the resultant ion acceleration. We expect similarly that electron acceleration can also occur in shock-shock collision. To investigate the electron acceleration process in a shock-shock collision, we perform one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the simulation energetic electrons are observed between the two approaching shocks before colliding. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). The reflected electrons create a temperature anisotropy and excite large amplitude waves upstream via the electron fire hose instability. The large amplitude waves can scatter the energetic electrons in pitch angle so that some of them gain large pitch angles and are easily reflected when they encounter the shocks subsequently. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, them. We further discuss observational results of an interaction of interplanetary shocks and the earth's bow shock by examining mainly Cluster data. We focus on whether or not electrons are accelerated in the shock-shock interaction.

  14. Study of a tissue protecting system for clinical applications of underwater shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Applications of underwater shock waves have been extended to various clinical therapies during the past two decades. Besides the successful contribution of extracorporeal shock waves, tissue damage especially to the vasculature has been reported. These side effects are believed to be due to the shock wave-tissue interaction and cavitation. In the present research in order to minimize shock wave induced damage a shock wave attenuating system was designed and studied. The attenuating system consisted of thin gas packed layers immersed in water, which could attenuate more than 90% of shock waves overpressure. Silver azide micro-pellets (10 mg) were ignited by irradiation of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to generate shock waves. Pressure histories were measured with fiber optic probe and PVDF needle hydrophones. The strength of incident shock waves was changed by adjusting the distance between the pellets and the layers. The whole sequences of the shock wave attenuation due to the interaction of shock waves with the dissipating layers were quantitatively visualized by double exposure holographic interferometry and time resolved high speed photography. The attenuated shock had overpressure less than threshold damage of brain tissue evaluated from histological examination of the rat brain treated by shock waves.

  15. Anaphylactic shock following oral penicillin--report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Myre, S; Zaske, D

    1976-03-01

    Two cases of anaphylactic shock secondary to oral penicillin therapy are presented. The clinical course and treatment of the two patients are discussed. Ways in which physicians and pharmacists may reduce the incidence and severity of anaphylactic reactions to penicillin are reviewed. PMID:1258884

  16. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs.

  17. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Jaber; R Ehrlich, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  18. Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy to Avoid Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are effective in the prevention of arrhythmic sudden cardiac death. Many patients receiving an ICD are affected by heart failure and are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias, which may lead to appropriate shocks. On the other hand, in this population the incidence of atrial fibrillation, giving rise to inappropriate ICD shocks, is high. Accordingly, ICD discharges occur frequently and many patients with an ICD will need concomitant antiarrhythmic drug therapy to avoid or reduce the frequency of shocks. Therapeutic agents such as β-blockers, class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs effectively suppress arrhythmias, but may have side-effects. Some drugs could eventually influence the function of ICDs by altering defibrillation or pacing threshold. Few prospective randomised trials are available, but current data suggest that amiodarone is most effective for prevention of appropriate or inappropriate ICD shocks. This review article summarises current knowledge regarding the antiarrhythmic management of patients with ICDs. PMID:27617090

  19. On the Scaling Law for Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanudula, Max

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity in supersonic jets was formulated on the basis of linear shock-shear wave interaction. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process rather than the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles. The proposed theory satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock -associated noise in supersonic jets.

  20. Shock wave treatment in medicine.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, S K; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. PMID:15933416

  1. Partial Spreading of a Laser Beam into a Light Sheet by Shock Waves and Its Use as a Shock Detection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.

    1994-01-01

    It is observed that when a laser beam is allowed to fall on a shock surface at a grazing incidence, a small part of the beam spreads out in a thin, diverging sheet of light normal to the surface, and both upstream and downstream of the shock. The phenomenon is visualized by observing a cross section of the light sheet on a screen placed normal to the laser path after it touches a shock. The light sheet disappears when the beam is moved to any other locations where there is no shock or the beam pierces the shock surface, i.e., at a non-grazing incidence. The spread angle of the light sheet is considerably higher than the angle by which the beam may bend as it passes through the shock, which produces a small difference of refractive index. Various details indicate that the spread light is a result of diffraction of a small part of the laser beam by the shock whose thickness is nearly the same as that of the laser wavelength. Shocks formed in underexpanded free jets of fully expanded Mach numbers 1.4 to 1.8 are used for this experiment. The above optical phenomenon is used as the basis of a novel shock detection technique which depends on sensing the spread light using a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The locations of the shock surfaces in the underexpanded supersonic jet, obtained using this technique, match with those inferred from the Schlieren photographs and velocity measurements. Moreover, if the shock oscillates, a periodic PMT signal is obtained which provides information about the frequency and amplitude of shock motion.

  2. Shocks in fragile matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  3. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent. PMID:27603017

  4. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent. PMID:27603017

  5. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent.

  6. Characteristics of steam flow in the case of shock wave heating and cooling in supersonic nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britan, A. B.; Testov, V. G.; Khmelevskii, A. N.

    1992-08-01

    A study is made of the effect of steam condensation on the walls of a shock tube on the formation of flow parameters in the wake of shock waves in a nozzle. In particular, attention is given to the effect of an absorbing condensate film on measurements of the absorption factor of H2O. The Reynolds number of the laminar-turbulent transition of the boundary layer behind an incident shock wave in the case of steam flow in a shock tube is determined experimentally.

  7. Experimental studies of shock wave/wall jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.; Nowak, Robert; Olsen, George

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a planar shock wave and a wall jet produced by slot cooling in turbulent hypersonic flow was experimentally studied. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure are obtained in the incident shock/wall jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for two nozzle heights. The major result is that the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks such that the peak heating in the recompression region was not significantly reduced by even the largest levels of film cooling. Regions of boundary layer separation were induced in the film cooling layer, the size of which first increased and then decreased with increasing film cooling. The size of the separated regions and magnitude of the recompression heating were not strongly influenced by the thickness of the cooling film or point of shock impingement relative to the exit plane of the nozzles.

  8. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  9. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  10. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  11. Experimental study of a shock accelerated water layer with imaging and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meekunnasombat, P.; Oakley, J. G.; Anderson, M. H.; Bonazza, R.

    A shock tube investigation of a shocked water layer is undertaken to study the mitigating effects that a liquid sheet may provide for the protection of cooling tubes in an inertial fusion energy reactor chamber. The shock wave blast from the fusion microexplosion will cause the protecting liquid layer to break apart and the liquid droplets will then be suspended throughout the chamber. Some reactor designs require clearing the chamber (approximately 115 m3) between reactions, and therefore, the understanding of how a shock-accelerated liquid layer breaks up could be a critical consideration in the design. A large vertical shock tube is used to conduct shock-accelerated liquid layer experiments to model this scenario. A planar shock wave contacts, and then accelerates, a water layer down the shock tube where it is imaged in the test section using shadowgraphy and laser sheet techniques. Quantitative data of the water layer velocity inside the shock tube is measured using an array of photodiodes. It is found that the measured velocity of the leading edge of the shocked water layer is nearly constant, and this velocity is slightly less than the particle velocity behind the incident shock.

  12. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  13. Shock destruction armor system

    DOEpatents

    Froeschner, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

  14. Impact-shocked zircons: Discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohor, B. F.; Betterton, W. J.; Krogh, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows scanning electron microscope (SEM) visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the U-Pb isotopic system.

  15. Impact-shocked zircons: discovery of shock-induced textures reflecting increasing degrees of shock metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Betterton, W.J.; Krogh, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Textural effects specifically characteristic of shock metamorphism in zircons from impact environments have not been reported previously. However, planar deformation features (PDF) due to shock metamorphism are well documented in quartz and other mineral grains from these same environments. An etching technique was developed that allows SEM visualization of PDF and other probable shock-induced textural features, such as granular (polycrystalline) texture, in zircons from a variety of impact shock environments. These textural features in shocked zircons from K/T boundary distal ejecta form a series related to increasing degrees of shock that should correlate with proportionate resetting of the UPb isotopic system. ?? 1993.

  16. Shock waves data for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  17. Anatomy of an incident

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Trujillo, Stanley; Lawton, Cindy M.; Land, Whitney M.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2016-03-23

    A traditional view of incidents is that they are caused by shortcomings in human competence, attention, or attitude. It may be under the label of “loss of situational awareness,” procedure “violation,” or “poor” management. A different view is that human error is not the cause of failure, but a symptom of failure – trouble deeper inside the system. In this perspective, human error is not the conclusion, but rather the starting point of investigations. During an investigation, three types of information are gathered: physical, documentary, and human (recall/experience). Through the causal analysis process, apparent cause or apparent causes are identifiedmore » as the most probable cause or causes of an incident or condition that management has the control to fix and for which effective recommendations for corrective actions can be generated. A causal analysis identifies relevant human performance factors. In the following presentation, the anatomy of a radiological incident is discussed, and one case study is presented. We analyzed the contributing factors that caused a radiological incident. When underlying conditions, decisions, actions, and inactions that contribute to the incident are identified. This includes weaknesses that may warrant improvements that tolerate error. Measures that reduce consequences or likelihood of recurrence are discussed.« less

  18. Prevention of overuse injuries of the foot by improved shoe shock attenuation. A randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Finestone, A; Shlamkovitch, N; Wosk, J; Laor, A; Voloshin, A; Eldad, A

    1992-08-01

    In a randomized prospective study among 390 recruits, the hypothesis that improved shoe shock attenuation could lessen the incidence of overuse injuries was tested. During the 14 weeks of training, 90% of the recruits sustained overuse injuries. Recruits training in a modified basketball shoe had a statistically significant lower incidence of metatarsal stress fractures and foot overuse injuries, compared with standard infantry boots, but their overall incidence of overuse injuries was not reduced. The effect of improved shoe shock attenuation was limited to those overuse injuries resulting from vertical impact loads.

  19. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  20. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  1. A Shocking New Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Hydro Dynamics, Inc. received a technical helping hand from NASA that made their Hydrosonic Pump (HPump) a reality. Marshall engineers resolved a bearing problem in the rotor of the pump and recommended new bearings, housings and mounting hardware as a solution. The resulting HPump is able to heat liquids with greater energy efficiency using shock waves to generate heat.

  2. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bren d’Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008–2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  3. [Survival and occurrence of molting in Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) after temperature shock].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, V L; Mello, M L; Ferraz Filho, A N; Dantas, M M

    1991-12-01

    Survival and molting occurrence were studied in specimens of Triatoma infestans over 30 days after temperature shocks. Hyperthermal and hypothermal shocks could be found to affect both survival and molting incidence as a function of temperature and period of the development phase and sex of the specimens. Considering the various test conditions, the shock at 0 degree C for 12 h was found to elicit the most deleterious effect, whereas shocks at 40 degrees C and 0 degree C even for 1 h are interpreted as affecting the hormonal balance which controls molting. Cases of a rise in post-shock survival are suggested to have been favored by heat-shock protein action.

  4. Diffraction of a shock wave by a compression corner; regular and single Mach reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayashankar, V. S.; Kutler, P.; Anderson, D.

    1976-01-01

    The two dimensional, time dependent Euler equations which govern the flow field resulting from the injection of a planar shock with a compression corner are solved with initial conditions that result in either regular reflection or single Mach reflection of the incident planar shock. The Euler equations which are hyperbolic are transformed to include the self similarity of the problem. A normalization procedure is employed to align the reflected shock and the Mach stem as computational boundaries to implement the shock fitting procedure. A special floating fitting scheme is developed in conjunction with the method of characteristics to fit the slip surface. The reflected shock, the Mach stem, and the slip surface are all treated as harp discontinuities, thus, resulting in a more accurate description of the inviscid flow field. The resulting numerical solutions are compared with available experimental data and existing first-order, shock-capturing numerical solutions.

  5. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  6. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  7. Shock-tube study of carbon monoxide dissociation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Carbon monoxide dissociation-rate data were obtained over the temperature range 5600-12,000 K. The experiments were conducted with undiluted CO to emphasize rate constants applicable to molecular gas systems. Data were obtained as time-resolved pressure measurements on the end wall of a shock tube and, in some cases, as emission histories of the C2 Swan system (0-0 band) behind incident shock waves. Results confirm the presence of C2 as an intermediate species in CO decomposition.

  8. Shock wave interaction with an abrupt area change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.

    1991-01-01

    The wave patterns that occur when a shock wave interacts with an abrupt area changed are analyzed in terms of the incident shock wave Mach number and area-jump ratio. The solutions predicted by a semi-similar models are in good agreement with those obtained numerically from the quasi-one-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations. The entropy production for the wave system is defined and the principle of minimum entropy production is used to resolve a nonuniqueness problem of the self-similar model.

  9. Shock tube measurements of specific reaction rates in branched chain CH4-CO-O2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Rate constants of two elementary bimolecular reactions involved in the oxidation of methane were determined by monitoring the exponential growth of CO flame band emission behind incident shocks in three suitably chosen gas mixtures.

  10. The Vetter-Sturtevant Shock Tube Problem in KULL

    SciTech Connect

    Ulitsky, M S

    2005-10-06

    The goal of the EZturb mix model in KULL is to predict the turbulent mixing process as it evolves from Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In this report we focus on an example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (which occurs when a shock hits an interface between fluids of different densities) with the additional complication of reshock. The experiment by Vetter & Sturtevant (VS) [1], involving a Mach 1.50 incident shock striking an air/SF{sub 6} interface, is a good one to model, now that we understand how the model performs for the Benjamin shock tube [2] and a prototypical incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor problem [3]. The x-t diagram for the VS shock tube is quite complicated, since the transmitted shock hits the far wall at {approx}2 millisec, reshocks the mixing zone slightly after 3 millisec (which sets up a release wave that hits the wall at {approx}4 millisec), and then the interface is hit with this expansion wave around 5 millisec. Needless to say, this problem is much more difficult to model than the Bejamin shock tube.

  11. Turbulent energy flux generated by shock/homogeneous-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Krishnendu; Quadros, Russell; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    High-speed turbulent flows with shock waves are characterized by high localized surface heat transfer rates. Computational predictions are often inaccurate due to the limitations in modeling of the unclosed turbulent energy flux in the highly non-equilibrium regions of shock interaction. In this paper, we investigate the turbulent energy flux generated when homogeneous isotropic turbulence passes through a nominally normal shock wave. We use linear interaction analysis where the incoming turbulence is idealized as being composed of a collection of two-dimensional planar vorticity waves, and the shock wave is taken to be a discontinuity. The nature of the post-shock turbulent energy flux is predicted to be strongly dependent on the incidence angle of the incoming waves. The energy flux correlation is also decomposed into its vortical, entropy and acoustic contributions to understand its rapid non-monotonic variation behind the shock. Three-dimensional statistics, calculated by integrating two-dimensional results over a prescribed upstream energy spectrum, are compared with available direct numerical simulation data. A detailed budget of the governing equation is also considered in order to gain insight into the underlying physics.

  12. [Incidence of inguinal hernias].

    PubMed

    Michalský, R

    2001-04-01

    Groin hernia operation is the third most frequent operation in the Czech republic. Early recurrence of the hernia after prime operation is a medical failure. The recurrences can arise after all types of operation. Incidence of recurrences, time factors of its genesis and treatment are discussed there.

  13. Critical Incidents in Negotiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This report presents imaginary dialogues between a management team and an employee team and critiques the dialogues to emphasize the significance of situations and episodes that can hasten or hamper a settlement at the negotiation table. Three critical incidents are studied within each developmental phase of the negotiation process: (1) procedural…

  14. RAPID INCIDENT RESPONSE FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will discuss WERF Contract (RFP# 03-HHE-5PP), Protocols for the Timely Investigation of Potential Health Incidents Associated with Biosolids Land Application, as a member of the project advisory committee. The contractor, University of North Carolina, started work in early June, ...

  15. Incident meteoroid flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badadjanov, P. B.; Bibarsov, R. SH.; Getman, V. S.; Kolmakov, V. M.

    1987-01-01

    Complex photographic and radar meteor observations were carried out. Using the available observational data, the density of incident flux of meteoroids was estimated over a wide mass range of 0.001 to 100 g. To avoid the influence of apparatus selectivity a special technique was applied. The main characteristics of this technique are given and discussed.

  16. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  17. Multipoint study of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kajdic, Primoz; Russell, Christopher T.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, Ernesto; Jian, Lan K.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2016-04-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks are driven in the heliosphere by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). These shocks perturb the solar wind plasma, and play an active role in the acceleration of ions to suprathermal energies. Shock fronts evolve as they move from the Sun. Their surfaces can be far from uniform and be modulated by changes in the ambient solar wind (magnetic field orientation, flow velocity), shocks rippling, and perturbations upstream and downstream from the shocks, i.e., electromagnetic waves. In this work we use multipoint observations from STEREO, WIND, and MESSENGER missions to study shock characteristics at different helio-longitudes and determine the properties of the waves near them. We also determine shock longitudinal extensions and foreshock sizes. The variations of geometry along the shock surface can result in different extensions of the wave and ion foreshocks ahead of the shocks, and in different wave modes upstream and downtream of the shocks. We find that the ion foreshock can extend up to 0.2 AU ahead of the shock, and that the upstream region with modified solar wind/waves can be very asymmetric.

  18. Shock metamorphism of deformed quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Christie, John; Tyburczy, James; Ahrens, Thomas; Pongratz, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The effect produced by shock loading (to peak pressures of 12 and 24) on deformed synthetic quartz containing a dislocation and abundant bubbles and small inclusions was investigated, and the relationships between preexisting dislocation density shock lamellae in the target material were examined. The resultant material was found to be inhomogeneously deformed and extremely fractured. Results of TEM examinations indicate that no change in dislocation density was caused by shock loading except in regions containing shock lamellae, where the dislocation density was lowered. The shock-induced defects tend to nucleate on and be controlled by preexisting stress concentrators; shock lamellae, glassy veins, and most curviplanar defects form in tension, presumably during release. An extremely mobile silica fluid is formed and injected into fractures during release, which forcibly removes crystalline fragments from vein walls. It is concluded that shock deformation in quartz is dominated by fracture and melting.

  19. Predictors and Clinical Impact of Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeong Hoon; Byeon, Kyeongmin; Yim, Hye Ran; Park, Jung Wae; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo

    2012-01-01

    Limited data are available on inappropriate shocks in Korean patients implanted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). We investigated the impact of inappropriate shocks on clinical outcomes. This retrospective, single-center study included 148 patients treated between October 1999 and June 2011. The primary outcome was a composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalization for any cardiac reason. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (interquartile range: 8 to 53). One or more inappropriate shocks occurred in 34 (23.0%) patients. A history of atrial fibrillation was the only independent predictor of inappropriate shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.89-9.15, P < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of inappropriate shock (67.7%), followed by supraventricular tachycardia (23.5%), and abnormal sensing (8.8%). A composite event of all-cause mortality or hospitalizations for any cardiac reason during follow-up was not significantly different between patients with or without inappropriate shock (inappropriate shock vs no inappropriate shock: 35.3% vs 35.4%, adjusted HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.49-2.29, P = 0.877). Inappropriate shocks do not affect clinical outcomes in patients implanted with an ICD, although the incidence of inappropriate shocks is high. PMID:22690092

  20. The chemical shock tube as a tool for studying high-temperature chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.

    1986-01-01

    Although the combustion of hydrocarbons is our primary source of energy today, the chemical reactions, or pathway, by which even the simplest hydro-carbon reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form CO2 and water may not always be known. Furthermore, even when the reaction pathway is known, the reaction rates are always under discussion. The shock tube has been an important and unique tool for building a data base of reaction rates important in the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. The ability of a shock wave to bring the gas sample to reaction conditions rapidly and homogeneously makes shock-tube studies of reaction kinetics extremely attractive. In addition to the control and uniformity of reaction conditions achieved with shock-wave methods, shock compression can produce gas temperatures far in excess of those in conventional reactors. Argon can be heated to well over 10 000 K, and temperatures around 5000 K are easily obtained with conventional shock-tube techniques. Experiments have proven the validity of shock-wave theory; thus, reaction temperatures and pressures can be calculated from a measurement of the incident shock velocity. A description is given of the chemical shock tube and auxiliary equipment and of two examples of kinetic experiments conducted in a shock tube.

  1. Superdiffusive shock acceleration and short acceleration times at interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of time profiles of particles accelerated at interplanetary shock waves has shown evidence for superdiffusive transport in the upstream region. Superdiffusive transport is characterized by a mean square displacement that grows faster than linearly in time and by non Gaussian statistics for the distribution of the particle jump lengths. In the superdiffusive framework it has been shown that particle time profiles upstream of a planar shock decay as power laws, at variance with exponential particle time profiles predicted in the case of diffusive transport. A large number of interplanetary shocks, including coronal mass ejection driven shocks, exhibit energetic particle time profiles that decay as power laws far upstream. In order to take this evidence into account, we have extended the standard theory of diffusive shock acceleration to the case of particle superdiffusive transport (superdiffusive shock acceleration). This has allowed us to derive both hard energy spectral indices and short acceleration times. This new theory has been tested for a number of interplanetary shock waves, observed by the Ulysses and the ACE spacecraft, and for the termination shock. The superdiffusive shock acceleration leads to a strong reduction of the acceleration times (even of about one order of magnitude) with respect to the diffusive shock acceleration. Thus, this new framework provides a substantial advancement in the understanding of the processes of particle acceleration and particle transport, which are among the main objectives of the new Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter space missions.

  2. Table and charts of equilibrium normal shock and shock tube properties for pure argon with velocities to 18 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure argon. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular-weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity, and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 2 to 18 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 N/sq m to 500 kN/sq m. Working charts illustrating shock tube performance with argon test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  3. SUPERDIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2012-05-10

    The theory of diffusive shock acceleration is extended to the case of superdiffusive transport, i.e., when the mean square deviation grows proportionally to t{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} > 1. Superdiffusion can be described by a statistical process called Levy random walk, in which the propagator is not a Gaussian but it exhibits power-law tails. By using the propagator appropriate for Levy random walk, it is found that the indices of energy spectra of particles are harder than those obtained where a normal diffusion is envisaged, with the spectral index decreasing with the increase of {alpha}. A new scaling for the acceleration time is also found, allowing substantially shorter times than in the case of normal diffusion. Within this framework we can explain a number of observations of flat spectra in various astrophysical and heliospheric contexts, for instance, for the Crab Nebula and the termination shock of the solar wind.

  4. Septic shock in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Knuppel, R A; Rao, P S; Cavanagh, D

    1984-03-01

    Septic shock in obstetric patients can be prevented by recognition of patients at risk and aggressive intervention in the warm-hypotensive phase. These patients must be monitored closely. Rarely will an obstetrical floor be capable of providing adequate monitoring of these patients; therefore, the patient should be transferred to an intensive care unit. Individualize therapy, but do not procrastinate in the surgical removal of the nidus of infection.

  5. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of the circulatory system. Cardiomyopathy accounted for 1% of general cardiologists' and for 7% of academic cardiologists' patient encounters. In Scandinavia, population surveys suggested an annual incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy ranging from 0.73 to 7.5 cases per 100,000 population; for Tokyo this figure is 2.6. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy in underdeveloped and in tropical countries is considerably higher than in developed countries.

  6. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  7. Shock metamorphism of carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Edward R. D.; Keil, Klaus; Stoeffler, Dieter

    1992-01-01

    Shock effects were studied in 69 carbonaceous chondrites, including CM2, CO3, CV3, ungrouped C2-C4, and CK4-6 chondrites, using optical microscopy of thin sections. It is shown that the classification scheme of Stoeffler et al. (1991) for the progressive stages of shock metamorphism in ordinary chondrites is also applicable to carbonaceous chondrites. On the basis of shock effects in olivine, the 69 carbonaceous chondrites could be assigned to four shock stage, S1 to S4. The CM2 and CO3 groups were found to be the least shocked chondrite groups, whereas the CK4-6 and CV3 were the most strongly shocked groups.

  8. Blast Loading of Epoxy Panels Using a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankow, Mark; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett

    2010-01-01

    The high strain rate mechanical response of thin polymer plates has been studied using a modified shock tube. Diagnostics include the pressure-time history of the incident and reflected pulses and the use of digital image correlation (DIC) techniques to extract the time-history of the out-of-plane displacement distribution. Additionally, finite element models have been developed to understand the plate response and to validate and modify plate material constitutive models that have been proposed.

  9. Imaging Supersonic Aircraft Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.; Stacy, Kathryn; Vieira, Gerald J.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Bowers, Albion H.

    1997-01-01

    A schlieren imaging system that uses the sun as a light source was developed it) obtain direct flow-field images of shock waves of aircraft in flight. This system was used to study how shock waves evolve to form sonic booms. The image quality obtained was limited by several optical and mechanical factors. Converting the photographs to digital images and applying digital image-processing techniques greatly improved the final quality of the images and more clearly showed the shock structures.

  10. Physics of collisionless shocks: theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  11. Shock metamorphism of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, Dieter; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1991-01-01

    This study proposes a revised petrographic classification of progressive stages of shock metamorphism of 26 ordinary chondrites. Six stages of shock (S1 to S6) are defined on the basis of shock effects in olivine and plagioclase as recognized by thin section microscopy, and the characteristic shock effects of each shock stage are described. It is concluded that shock effects and the sequence of progressively increasing degrees of shock metamorphosis are very similar in H, L, and LL groups. Differences in the frequency distribution of shock stages are relatively minor. It is suggested that the collisional histories of the H, L, and LL parent bodies were similar. Petrologic type-3 chondrites are deficient in stages S4 and S6 and, with increasing petrologic type, the frequency of stages S4 to S6 increases. It is suggested that the more porous and volatile-rich Type-3 chondrites are subject to melting at a lower shock pressure than the nonporous chondrites of higher petrologic type. Stage S3 is the most abundant in nearly all petrologic types.

  12. Management of refractory cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Reyentovich, Alex; Barghash, Maya H; Hochman, Judith S

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs in response to reduced cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume and results in tissue hypoxia. Cardiogenic shock has several underlying aetiologies, with the most common being acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Refractory cardiogenic shock presents as persistent tissue hypoperfusion despite administration of adequate doses of two vasoactive medications and treatment of the underlying aetiology. Investigators of the SHOCK trial reported a long-term mortality benefit of emergency revascularization for shock complicating AMI. Since the publication of the SHOCK trial and subsequent guideline recommendations, the increase in community-based use of percutaneous coronary intervention for this condition has resulted in a significant decline in mortality. Despite these successes in the past 15 years, mortality still remains exceptionally high, particularly in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock and summarize the data on the available therapeutics and their limitations. Although new mechanical circulatory support devices have been shown to improve haemodynamic variables in patients with shock complicating AMI, they did not improve clinical outcomes and are associated with high costs and complications. PMID:27356877

  13. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1983-07-01

    Raman scattering has been used extensively to study the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules under a variety of conditions. Here, interest is in the behavior of water molecules shocked to high pressures and temperatures. Behind the shock front the water molecules undergo changes in bonding and the molecules may become ionized. Raman spectroscopy can be used to determine the molecular species behind the shock front. In addition, changes in Raman spectra can yield information regarding inter- and intramolecular potentials and the temperature behind the shock front.

  14. Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Sauer, K.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  15. Shock metamorphism of ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, Dieter; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1991-12-01

    This study proposes a revised petrographic classification of progressive stages of shock metamorphism of 26 ordinary chondrites. Six stages of shock (S1 to S6) are defined on the basis of shock effects in olivine and plagioclase as recognized by thin section microscopy, and the characteristic shock effects of each shock stage are described. It is concluded that shock effects and the sequence of progressively increasing degrees of shock metamorphosis are very similar in H, L, and LL groups. Differences in the frequency distribution of shock stages are relatively minor. It is suggested that the collisional histories of the H, L, and LL parent bodies were similar. Petrologic type-3 chondrites are deficient in stages S4 and S6 and, with increasing petrologic type, the frequency of stages S4 to S6 increases. It is suggested that the more porous and volatile-rich Type-3 chondrites are subject to melting at a lower shock pressure than the nonporous chondrites of higher petrologic type. Stage S3 is the most abundant in nearly all petrologic types.

  16. Quasiperpendicular High Mach Number Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.; Burgess, D.; Fujimoto, M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the Universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this Letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasiperpendicular shocks across 2 orders of magnitude in Alfvén Mach number (MA ) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted time scale of ˜0.3 τc , where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally reveal the relationship between reformation and MA and focus on the magnetic structure of such shocks to further show that for the same MA , a reforming shock exhibits stronger magnetic field amplification than a shock that is not reforming.

  17. Management of refractory cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Reyentovich, Alex; Barghash, Maya H; Hochman, Judith S

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a life-threatening condition that occurs in response to reduced cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume and results in tissue hypoxia. Cardiogenic shock has several underlying aetiologies, with the most common being acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Refractory cardiogenic shock presents as persistent tissue hypoperfusion despite administration of adequate doses of two vasoactive medications and treatment of the underlying aetiology. Investigators of the SHOCK trial reported a long-term mortality benefit of emergency revascularization for shock complicating AMI. Since the publication of the SHOCK trial and subsequent guideline recommendations, the increase in community-based use of percutaneous coronary intervention for this condition has resulted in a significant decline in mortality. Despite these successes in the past 15 years, mortality still remains exceptionally high, particularly in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of cardiogenic shock and summarize the data on the available therapeutics and their limitations. Although new mechanical circulatory support devices have been shown to improve haemodynamic variables in patients with shock complicating AMI, they did not improve clinical outcomes and are associated with high costs and complications.

  18. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase. PMID:17737107

  19. Shock metamorphism in lunar samples.

    PubMed

    von Engelhardt, W; Arndt, J; Müller, W F; Stöffler, D

    1970-01-30

    Indications of shock metamorphism produced by pressures up to the megabar region have been observed in the fine material and the breccias, but very rarely in the coarser fragments of crystalline rocks. These indications are deformation structures in plagioclase and pyroxene, diaplectic plagioclase glasses, and glasses formed by shock-induced melting of lunar rocks. Two sources of shock waves have been distinguished: primary impact of meteorites and secondary impact of crater ejecta. There are two major chemical types of shock-induced melts. The differences in chemistry may be related to impact sites in mare and highland areas.

  20. Martian bow shock: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. ); Sauer, K. ); Luhmann, J.G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the MAGMA magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 {plus minus} .03 R{sub M}. The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  1. Shocks in supersonic sand.

    PubMed

    Rericha, Erin C; Bizon, Chris; Shattuck, Mark D; Swinney, Harry L

    2002-01-01

    We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge. We find the flow to be supersonic with a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to about 10% of the flow speed, and we observe shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equations agrees with a molecular dynamics simulation for experimental conditions excluding wall friction.

  2. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Adams, Chris D; Hull, Lawrence M; Gray III, George T; Prime, Michael B; Addessio, Francis L; Wynn, Thomas A; Brown, Eric N

    2012-08-24

    Beryllium metal has many excellent structural properties in addition to its unique radiation characteristics, including: high elastic modulus, low Poisson's ratio, low density, and high melting point. However, it suffers from several major mechanical drawbacks: 1) high anisotropy - due to its hexagonal lattice structure and its susceptibility to crystallographic texturing; 2) susceptibility to impurity-induced fracture - due to grain boundary segregation; and 3) low intrinsic ductility at ambient temperatures thereby limiting fabricability. While large ductility results from deformation under the conditions of compression, the material can exhibit a brittle behavior under tension. Furthermore, there is a brittle to ductile transition at approximately 200 C under tensile conditions. While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. The beryllium used in this study was Grade S200-F (Brush Wellman, Inc., Elmore, OH) material. The work focused on high strain rate deformation and examine the validity of constitutive models in deformation rate regimes, including shock, the experiments were modeled using a Lagrangian hydrocode. Two constitutive strength (plasticity) models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) models, were calibrated using the same set of quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data taken at temperatures from 77K to 873K and strain rates from 0.001/sec to 4300/sec. In spite of being calibrated on the same data, the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured wave profiles. These high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to

  3. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  4. The microcirculation in shock

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, N. A.

    1969-01-01

    Some aspects of blood fluidity in hypoperfusion with particular reference to the important role of the red cell are discussed. Changes in different organ beds and the internal fluidity of the red cell, which is of obvious importance in capillary flow are not considered. It is not certain to what extent the phenomena discussed are critical factors in morbidity and mortality in shock because of paucity of objective data but there are good reasons for assuming them to be of importance and for directing treatment towards their correction. The properties of Dextran 40 applicable to the therapy of disordered blood fluidity are described. PMID:5343581

  5. Experimental study of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by cylindrical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2005-08-01

    The paper describes the results of holographic interferometric flow visualization of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by cylindrical shock waves propagating across cylindrical interfaces. Experiments were conducted in an annular coaxial vertical diaphragmless shock tube, which can produce converging cylindrical shock waves with minimum disturbances. The shock wave converged and interacted with a cylindrical soap bubble filled with He, Ne, air, Ar, Kr, Xe, or SF6. The soap bubble was placed coaxially in the test section. The effects of density variation on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a wide range of Atwood numbers were determined. Pressure histories at different radii during the shock wave implosion and reflection from the center were measured. Double-exposure holographic interferometry was used and the motion of the converging shock wave and its interaction with the gaseous interface were visualized. The variation of the pressure at the center with interface Atwood number for constant incident shock Mach number was studied. It is found that the dominant mechanism limiting the maximum pressure at the center of convergence is related to the instability of the converging shock wave induced by its interaction with the interface. A short time after the impulsive acceleration, the interface started deforming, and the growth of these perturbations is described. The results show that after diverging shock wave interaction, the reshocked cylindrical interfaces have a higher growth rate of the turbulent mixing zone than that of the reshocked interface in a plane geometry reported by previous works.

  6. The von Neumann paradox in weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharian, A. R.; Brio, M.; Hunter, J. K.; Webb, G. M.

    2000-11-01

    We present a numerical solution of the Euler equations of gas dynamics for a weak-shock Mach reflection in a half-space. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley. A theoretical analysis supports the existence of an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. This solution is in complete agreement with the numerical solution of the unsteady transonic small-disturbance equations obtained by Hunter & Brio (2000), which provides an asymptotic description of a weak-shock Mach reflection. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved in a numerical solution of the Euler equations. The numerical solution uses six levels of grid refinement around the triple point. A delicate combination of numerical techniques is required to minimize both the effects of numerical diffusion and the generation of numerical oscillations at grid interfaces and shocks.

  7. A study of slipstreams in triple shock wave configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdeva, L.; Gavrenkov, S.; Nesterov, A.

    2015-05-01

    A shock wave appearing in supersonic gas flow reflects in different ways depending on flow conditions. It can take the form of regular or irregular reflection. For the irregular reflection configuration of three shock waves and a slipstream arises. Mathematical investigations of the development of parameters across slipstream in triple shock configuration have been made with variation of the angle of incidence of the shock wave, the shock wave Mach number and the adiabatic index of the gas. It has been shown that the characteristic mixing parameters of the slipstream increase with the increase of Mach number of the flow and the decrease of the heat capacity ratio. This leads to an increase of vortex formation and an increase of the angular spread of the slipstream. It also has been shown that the angle between the reflected wave and the slipstream diminishes with the decrease in heat capacity ratio so that the value may become of the same order as the spread angle. This may lead to quantitative changes in the whole reflection pattern near the triple point. The evident dependence of slipstream instability magnitude on the physical and chemical transformation intensity in the fluid was previously experimentally observed. The results of an analytical investigation appeared to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Shock-fitted Euler solutions to shock-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. E.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a hot spot, a single vortex and a vortex street is studied within the framework of the two dimensional compressible Euler equations. The numerical results obtained by the pseudospectral method and the finite difference MacCormack method are compared. In both the methods the shock wave is fitted as a boundary of the computational domain.

  9. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-01

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number Ms0 is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter Ms-2. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dUs/dRs now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  10. Dual Mode Shock-Expansion/Reflected-Shock Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdos, John I.; Bakos, Robert J.; Castrogiovanni, Anthony; Rogers, R. Clayton

    1998-01-01

    NASA s HYPULSE facility at GASL has been reconfigured to permit free jet testing of the Hyper-X flowpath at flight Mach numbers of 7 and 10. Among the required changes are addition of a converging-diverging nozzle to permit operation in a reflected shock tunnel mode, a 7 ft. diameter test cabin and a 30 in. diameter contoured nozzle. However, none of these changes were allowed to interfere with rapid recovery of the prior shock-expansion tunnel mode of operation, and indeed certain changes should enhance facility usefulness and productivity in either mode. A previously-developed shock-induced detonation mode of driving the facility has been successfully applied to both reflected shock tunnel operation at Mach 10 flight conditions, with tailored interface operation, and shock-expansion tunnel operation at flight conditions corresponding to Mach numbers from 12 to 25. Tailored interface operation at Mach 7 has been achieved with an unheated helium driver. In the present paper, the rationale for a dual mode shock expansion/reflected shock tunnel is discussed, and the capabilities and limitations for each mode are outlined. The physical changes in the HYPULSE facility to achieve dual mode capability are also described. Limited calibration data obtained to date in the new reflected shock tunnel mode are presented and the anticipated flight simulation map with dual mode operation is also outlined.

  11. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-15

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number M{sub s0} is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter M{sub s}{sup −2}. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dU{sub s}/dR{sub s} now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  12. Experimental and computational study of the effect of shocks on film cooling effectiveness in scramjet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamath, Pradeep S.; Holden, Michael S.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study conducted to investigate the effect of incident oblique shocks on the effectiveness of a coolant film at Mach numbers, typical of those expected in a scramjet combustor at Mach 15 to 20 flight. Computations with a parabolic code are in good agreement with the measured pressures and heat fluxes, after accounting for the influence of the shock upstream of its point of impingement on the plate, and the expansion from the trailing edge of the shock generator. The test data shows that, for the blowing rates tested, the film is rendered largely ineffective by the shock. Computations show that coolant blowing rates five to ten times those tested are required to protect against shock-induced heating. The implications of the results to scramjet combustor design are discussed.

  13. Leading edge reflection patterns for cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2016-09-01

    The unsteady reflection of cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles is investigated numerically. At the leading edge, numerical simulations show the occurrence of all types of regular and irregular reflections predicted by the pseudo-steady theory for planar shock-wave reflections over planar surfaces, although for different combinations of wedge angles and incident shock Mach number. The domain of occurrence of each reflection type and its evolution in time due to shock acceleration and to the non-planar geometry is determined and it is compared to the results of the pseudo-steady theory. The dependence of the reflection pattern on the (local) values of the wedge angle is in good agreement with the pseudo-steady theory. Less complex reflection patterns are instead observed at larger values of the leading edge shock Mach number at which the pseudo-steady theory predicts the occurrence of more complex reflection patterns.

  14. Salt stress or salt shock: which genes are we studying?

    PubMed

    Shavrukov, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the method of NaCl application, whether gradual or in a single step, plants may experience either salt stress or salt shock, respectively. The first phase of salt stress is osmotic stress. However, in the event of salt shock, plants suffer osmotic shock, leading to cell plasmolysis and leakage of osmolytes, phenomena that do not occur with osmotic stress. Patterns of gene expression are different in response to salt stress and salt shock. Salt stress initiates relatively smooth changes in gene expression in response to osmotic stress and a more pronounced change in expression of significant numbers of genes related to the ionic phase of salt stress. There is a considerable time delay between changes in expression of genes related to the osmotic and ionic phases of salt stress. In contrast, osmotic shock results in strong, rapid changes in the expression of genes with osmotic function, and fewer changes in ionic-responsive genes that occur earlier. There are very few studies in which the effects of salt stress and salt shock are described in parallel experiments. However, the patterns of changes in gene expression observed in these studies are consistently as described above, despite the use of diverse plant species. It is concluded that gene expression profiles are very different depending the method of salt application. Imposition of salt stress by gradual exposure to NaCl rather than salt shock with a single application of a high concentration of NaCl is recommended for genetic and molecular studies, because this more closely reflects natural incidences of salinity. PMID:23186621

  15. Tools and strategies for the reduction of inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks.

    PubMed

    Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Kolb, Christof; Vardas, Panos E

    2008-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have been shown to provide a survival benefit in patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients' quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. Despite recent technological advances, the incidence of inappropriate shocks remains high, thus posing a challenge that we have to meet. In the present review we summarise the available tools and the strategies that can be followed in order to reduce inappropriate ICD shocks.

  16. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  17. Racist Incident-Based Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ocampo, Carlota

    2005-01-01

    Racist incidents are potentially traumatizing forms of victimization that may lead to increased psychiatric and psychophysiological symptoms in targets. The magnitude of the problem of racist incidents in the United States is difficult to estimate; however, data from several sources permit the inference that the prevalence of racist incidents,…

  18. Experimental and numerical study of shock-driven collapse of multiple cavity arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, Matthew; Anderson, Phillip; Tully, Brett; Doyle, Hugo; Hawker, Nicholas; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a numerical and experimental investigation of the interaction of a single shock wave with multiple air-filled spherical cavities. The 5 mm diameter cavities are cast in a hydrogel, and collapsed by a shock wave generated by the impact of a projectile fired from a single-stage light-gas gun. Incident shock pressures of up to 1 GPa have been measured, and the results compared to simulations conducted using a front-tracking approach. The authors have previously studied the collapse dynamics of a single cavity. An important process is the formation of a high-speed transverse jet, which impacts the leeward cavity wall and produces a shockwave. The speed of this shock has been measured using schlieren imaging, and the density has been measured with a fibre optic probe. This confirmed the computational prediction that the produced shock is of a higher pressure than the original incident shock. When employing multiple cavity arrays, the strong shock produced by the collapse of one cavity can substantially affect the collapse of further cavities. With control over cavity placement, these effects may be utilised to intensify collapse. This intensification is experimentally measured via analysis of the optical emission.

  19. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  20. Dynamic shock studies of vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Hills, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Using gas-gun loading techniques and velocity interferometric techniques, time-resolved wave profiles have been obtained in vanadium over the stress range of 2.9 to 9.7 GPa. The risetime data indicate steepened shock structures with increasing shock amplitude. However, unlike aluminum, finite risetimes are determined even at 9.7 GPa, indicating a large effective viscosity for the material. The dynamic yield strength measured at the Hugoniot elastic limit is 0.8 GPa and is approximately twice the static yield strength. Material softening is evidenced through measurements of shock velocity and yield strength determinations in the shocked state. The yield strength of the material upon release from the shocked state is estimated to be approx.0.43 GPa and is comparable to the static yield strength. Strain-rate dependent processes may be responsible for a higher elastic shear stress sustained before relaxation to an equilibrium value. The primary mode of deformation in shocked vanadium appears to be cross slip, resulting in dislocation tangles. Deformation twins are also observed in shock-recovered specimens with an increasing number with increased shock stress. The thermal diffusivity for vanadium is low, and the shear-strength loss observed in this material is consistent with the strength loss observed for other materials which also have low thermal diffusivities. It is conceivable that the loss of shear strength may be due to long thermal recovery times resulting from inhomogeneous deformation process.

  1. How Culture Shock Affects Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barna, LaRay M.

    The paper defines the term "culture shock" and discusses the changes that this state can make in a person's behavior. Culture shock refers to the emotional and physiological reaction of high activation that is brought about by sudden immersion in a new culture. Because one's own culture shields one from the unknown and reduces the need to make…

  2. Turbulence in argon shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J. P.; I, L.

    1981-01-01

    Irregular density fluctuations with turbulent-like behaviors are found in ionizing shock fronts produced by an arc-driven shock tube. Electric probes are used as the primary diagnostic. Spectral analyses show statistical patterns which seem frozen-in and characterizable by a dominant mode and its harmonics.

  3. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  4. Augmented Shock Wave Severance of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach for severing or weakening a variety of materials. The technique employs embedding explosive cords into parallel grooves that are cut into a surface of a material. The cords are initiated simultaneously to produce shock waves that progress toward the centerline between the cords and the lower surface of the material. Intersecting incident and reflected waves augment at the centerline to fail or weaken the material in tension. No harmful debris is produced on the opposite side of the material from the explosive cords. The primary focus of the effort described in this paper was to fracture the F-16 aircraft trilaminate canopy. Also, complete severance was achieved in 2024-T4 aluminum plate stock. Possible applications are through canopy egress and crew module severance from military aircraft and separation of rocket vehicle stages and payloads. This approach offers important advantages over explosive methods currently in use.

  5. Shock temperatures in anorthite glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Mitchell, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    Temperatures of CaAl2Si2O8 (anorthite glass) shocked to pressures between 48 and 117 GPa were measured in the range from 2500 to 5600 K, using optical pyrometry techniques. The pressure dependence of the shock temperatures deviates significantly from predictions based on a single high pressure phase. At least three phase transitions, at pressures of about 55, 85, and 100 GPa and with transition energies of about 0.5 MJ/kg each (approximately 1.5 MJ/kg total) are required to explain the shock temperature data. The phase transition at 100 GPa can possibly be identified with the stishovite melting transition. Theoretical models of the time dependence of the thermal radiation from the shocked anorthite based on the geometry of the experiment and the absorptive properties of the shocked material yields good agreement with observations, indicating that it is not necessary to invoke intrinsic time dependences to explain the data in many cases.

  6. Shock normal determination for multiple-ion shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, R. L.; Coates, A. J.; Motschmann, U.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have adapted the single-ion Vinas and Scudder (1986) solution to the Rankine-Hugoniot (R-H) problem to a multiple-on solution. Using this technique, we can calculate a shock normal direction, shock speed, best estimate of the upstream and downstream magnetic field and plasma asymptotic states, and theta(sub Bn), the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field. We test the multi-ion solution with a theoretical case but are restricted to a perpendicular shock in order to close the multi-ion Rankine-Hugoniot equations. For this test case both single-ion and multi-ion solutions are equally valid. We examine parameter regimes to look for differences between single-ion and multi-ion solutions of the R-H equations, and we find that the largest differences occur for quasi-parallel shocks, small values of solar wind speed, large values of heavy ion density, and very strong and very weak shocks. For both the inbound and outbound crossing of comet Halley we have a slow solar wind speed, small values of water group ions and fairly weak shocks. We examine both the quasi-perpendicular inbound crossing and the quasi-parallel outbound crossing at comet Halley.

  7. Shock Properties of AION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James; Fiske, S. J.; Bless, Stephan

    2001-06-01

    Transparent materials have many applications for impact protection. The modeling of transparent ceramics relies heavily on a description of failure of these materials under compressive loads, generally derived from experience with opaque ceramics. However, the microstructural properties that are responsible for transparency also imply that sites for stress concentrations are much reduced when a medium is transparent. Recently there has been increasing interest in aluminum oxynitride (AlON, transparent alumina) which possesses isotropic optical and mechanic properties. We performed a series of plate impact experiments on the material. We observed an HEL of 11.0 to 11.4 GPa. We also observed a change in spall strength from 1.7 to .15 GPa as the initial shock was increased from 4.8 to 10.0 GPa.

  8. Cosmic-ray shock acceleration in oblique MHD shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Drury, L. OC.; Volk, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state hydrodynamical model of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique MHD shocks is presented. Upstream of the shock the incoming thermal plasma is subject to the adverse pressure gradient of the accelerated particles, the J x B force, as well as the thermal gas pressure gradient. The efficiency of the acceleration of cosmic-rays at the shock as a function of the upstream magnetic field obliquity and upstream plasma beta is investigated. Astrophysical applications of the results are briefly discussed.

  9. Tables and charts of equilibrium normal shock and shock tube solutions for pure CO2 with velocities to 16 km/second

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure CO2, representative of Mars and Venus atmospheres. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 1 to 16 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 Newtons per square meter to 500 kilo Newtons per square meter. The present results are applicable to shock tube flows, and to free-flight conditions for a blunt body at high velocities. Working charts illustrating idealized shock-tube performance with CO2 test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  10. Table and charts of equilibrium normal-shock and shock-tube properties for pure carbon dioxide with velocities from 1 to 16 km/sec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic and flow properties are presented in tabulated and graphical form for moving, standing, and reflected normal shock waves in pure CO2. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, isentropic exponent, velocity, and species mole fractions. Incident (moving) shock velocities are varied from 1 to 16 km/sec for a range of initial pressure of 5 N/sq m to 500 kN/sq m. The present results are applicable to shock tube flows and to freeflight conditions for a blunt body at high velocities. Working charts illustrating idealized shock tube performance with CO2 test gas and heated helium and hydrogen driver gases are also presented.

  11. Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry: shock dynamics and relation to the Guderley singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, H. G.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2001-07-01

    Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry is studied using Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics, and the results are compared with previous numerical simulations of the phenomenon by Hornung (2000). The shock shapes (for strong and weak shocks), and the location of the shock-shock (for strong shocks), are in good agreement with the numerical results, though the detail of the shock reflection structure is, of course, not resolved by shock dynamics. A guess at a mathematical form of the shock shape based on an analogy with the Guderley singularity in cylindrical shock implosion, in the form of a generalized hyperbola, fits the shock shape very well. The smooth variation of the exponent in this equation with initial shock angle from the Guderley value at zero to 0.5 at 90° supports the analogy. Finally, steady-flow shock reflection from a symmetry axis is related to the self-similar flow.

  12. Micas in experimentally shocked gneiss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, P.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Powder-propellant guns are used to shock biotites and muscovites from a gneiss at pressures between 18 and 70 GPa. It is shown that shock in biotite and muscovite can produce homogeneous and devolatilized glasses within microseconds. Shock-deformed micas are found to exhibit fracturing, kinking, and complex extinction patterns over the entire pressure range investigated. Localized melting of micas commences at 33 GPa and reaches completion at 70 GPa. Even though melted biotite and muscovite are opaque optically, they exhibit extensive microvesiculation and flow when observed with the SEM. It is confirmed through electron diffraction that biotite and muscovite have transformed to a glass. The distribution of vesicles in shock-vitrified mica reveals escape of volatiles within the short duration of the shock experiment. It is noted that experimentally shocked biotite and muscovite undergo congruent melting. It is noted that the compositions of the glasses are similar to the unshocked micas except for volatiles (H2O loss and and K loss). These unusual glasses produced from mica can be quenched by rapid cooling conditions during the shock experiment. On the basis of the results, it is pointed out that the extremely low H2O content of tektites can be reconciled with a terrestrial origin by impact.

  13. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  14. Cardiogenic shock and nutrition: safe?

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Pichard, Claude; Wernerman, Jan; Bendjelid, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a common diagnosis in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is characterized by a decreased cardiac output in the presence of adequate intravascular volume associated with an inadequate tissue perfusion including a physiological reduction in the splanchnic territory. It may occur in isolation as a reflection of cardiac pathology, or it may be part of a shock syndrome involving other pathogenic mechanisms. As the use of enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with an increase in mesenteric arterial output, EN could be deleterious by overwhelming the mechanisms of mesenteric adaptation. Accordingly, EN has been suspected to increase the risk of mesenteric ischaemia, bacterial translocation and sepsis in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. International guidelines recommend a cautious use of EN within 72 h following cardiogenic shock. Recent evidence indicates that mesenteric arterial output may decrease during parenteral nutrition administration, suggesting that parenteral nutrition could have a protective effect on splanchnic organs in ICU patients with cardiogenic shock. Contrary to former beliefs, several meta-analyses have shown that parenteral nutrition is not associated with increased mortality. Exclusive EN is associated with negative energy balance and the combination of EN with supplemental parenteral nutrition during the first days following ICU admission has been proposed to prevent negative energy balance. Such a nutritional strategy could also be beneficial for the mesenteric circulation in cardiogenic shock, and consequently may improve the clinical outcome of patients with cardiogenic shock. Clinical trials are warranted to verify these hypotheses. PMID:21086113

  15. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  16. The effects that changes in the diaphragm aperture have on the resulting shock tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houas, L.; Biamino, L.; Mariani, C.; Igra, O.; Jourdan, G.; Massol, A.

    2012-07-01

    In a conventional shock tube, the driver and the driven sections have similar (if not identical) cross-sectional area and the diaphragm opened area, upon rupturing, is practically equal to the tube cross-sectional area. Such geometry results in generating a well-formed shock wave in the tube's driven section. The present experimental work checks the effects that changes in the diaphragm ruptured area have on the generated shock and rarefaction waves. Experiments were conducted in an 80 mm by 80 mm cross section shock tube generating incident shock waves having Mach numbers within the range from 1.06 to 1.25. In each run, pressure histories were recorded along the driven and the driver sections of the shock tube. The recorded pressures reveal that progressive reduction in the diaphragm open space resulted in a weaker shock and both longer time and distance until the compression waves generated close to the diaphragm coalesces into a shock wave. In addition, reducing the open space of the diaphragm resulted in a significant slow down in the high pressure reduction prevailing in the driver section.

  17. Source and Acceleration of Energetic He(+) Ions at the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kemei

    1998-12-01

    This thesis have presented the first detailed study of the sources and the acceleration of energetic He+ ions in front of the Earth's bow shock, using data from AMPTE/IRM and AMPTE/CCE. the bow shock was an almost perfect perpendicular shock, we compared the results of a simulation to the observed event. The model provides a good quantitative description of the phase space distribution of the gyrating ions. A large portion (approximately 63%) of the incident pickup ions are reflected and gain energy in the interaction. It is also consistent with their spatial distribution in front of the shock. It is shown that a significant fraction of the upstream ions undergo more than one reflection at the bow shock, and gain substantial energy in this interaction. distributions of H+,/ He2+,/ He+ and O+ ions upstream of the shock, as well as a comparison of the observed spectra upstream of the shock and m the magnetosphere with results from the calculations, we concluded that He+ is locally accelerated. The subsequent modeling of the injection and diffusive acceleration at the shock presented evidence that pickup ions can be injected and accelerated more efficiently than solar wind plasma. pickup ions and anomalous cosmic rays.

  18. Counter-driver shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamba, T.; Nguyen, T. M.; Takeya, K.; Harasaki, T.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2015-11-01

    A "counter-driver" shock tube was developed. In this device, two counter drivers are actuated with an appropriate delay time to generate the interaction between a shock wave and a flow in the opposite direction which is induced by another shock wave. The conditions for the counter drivers can be set independently. Each driver is activated by a separate electrically controlled diaphragm rupture device, in which a pneumatic piston drives a rupture needle with a temporal jitter of better than 1.1 ms. Operation demonstrations were conducted to evaluate the practical performance.

  19. A collisionless shock wave experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.; Sgro, A.G.; Thomas, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves are a very important heating mechanism for plasmas and are commonly found in space and astrophysical environments. Collisionless shocks were studied in the laboratory more than 20 years ago, and more recently in space via in situ satellite measurements. The authors propose a new laboratory shock wave experiment to address unresolved issues related to the differences in the partition of plasma heating between electrons and ions in space and laboratory plasmas, which can have important implications for a number of physical systems.

  20. Shock temperature measurements in ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M.

    1985-07-01

    Our first shock temperature measurements on a cryogenic target are reported for NH/sub 3/. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 61 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

  1. Stishovite: Synthesis by shock wave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Carli, P. S.; Milton, D.J.

    1965-01-01

    Small amounts of stishovite were separated from specimens of explosively shocked sandstones, novaculite, and single-crystal quartz. Estimated peak pressures for the syntheses ranged from 150 to 280 kilobars, and shock temperatures were from 150?? to 900??C. No coesite was detected in any sample. It is suggested that quartz can invert during shock to a short-range-order phase, with sixfold coordination. A small portion of this phase may develop the long-range order of stishovite, and, during the more protracted decrease of the pressure pulse through the stability field of coesite accompanying meteorite crater formation, a portion may invert to coesite.

  2. Slow shocks around the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is inferred from this study that magnetohydrodynamic slow shocks can exist in the vicinity of the sun. The study uses a two-hole corona model, the sub-Alfvenic streams originating from the edge of the polar open-field regions are forced to turn towards equator in coronal space following the curved boundary of the closed field region. When the streamlines from the opposite poles merge at a neutral point, their directions become parallel to the neutral sheet. An oblique slow shock can develop near or at the neutral point, the shock extends polewards to form a surface of discontinuity around the sun.

  3. ENA Enhancements from the Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, Harald; Fuselier, Stephen; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Lee, Martin; Moebius, Eberhard; Wurz, Peter; Reisenfeld, Daniel; Funsten, Herbert; Roelof, Edmond; McComas, David; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    The Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX), launched in October 2008, consists of two major Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) detectors IBEX-hi (0.38-6keV) and IBEX-lo (0.01-2keV). In mid 2009, IBEX finished its first full sky map in the light of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs). Detailed and dedicated data analyses of these sky maps revealed a large-scale structure that was unexpected and not predicted in any of the models prior to IBEX launch. This structure called "the Ribbon" is now under intensive investigation and first model attempts are now being explored to explain its location in the sky and its possible formation. Fine structure can be seen in this "Ribbon" and there is strong indication of temporal variations. The source of this "Ribbon" is not yet known and it could consist of several components, for instance, a static component whose source is distant deeper in the heliosheath, and a dynamic component that is close to or at the termination shock. A close look at the data shows that the peak energy of the Ribbon is near 1keV, which strongly indicates an association with the charged ions in the solar wind, either the thermal ions or the entrained pickup ions. We concentrate here on the population of reflected thermal ions, such as those observed by Cluster/CODIF at the Earth's bow shock. A large fraction of the incident thermal ions forms a gyrotropic conical distribution making a large angle with respect to the upstream magnetic field direction. These backstream-ing ions will charge exchange with interstellar neutral atoms and thus may form a major source of the observed ENA flux which then forms the Ribbon. At much higher energies (¿30 keV) Voyager observed beams streaming away from the termination shock at radial distances up to 7AU from the shock crossing, so it may be possible to preserve the backstreaming 1 keV beams over such distances. This component could explain the time variability and the fine structure of the Ribbon observed by IBEX. However

  4. Shock-fitted Euler solutions to shock-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of a planar shock wave with one or more vortexes is computed using a pseudospectral method and a finite difference method. The development of the spectral method is emphasized. In both methods the shock wave is fitted as a boundary of the computational domain. The results show good agreement between both computational methods. The spectral method is, however, restricted to smaller time steps and requires use of filtering techniques. Previously announced in STAR as N82-28061

  5. Shock-fitted Euler solutions to shock vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, M. D.; Zang, T. A.; Mussaini, M. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of a planar shock wave with one or more vortexes is computed using a pseudospectral method and a finite difference method. The development of the spectral method is emphasized. In both methods the shock wave is fitted as a boundary of the computational domain. The results show good agreement between both computational methods. The spectral method is, however, restricted to smaller time steps and requires use of filtering techniques.

  6. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  7. Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Sensitivity to Upstream Geometric Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Laura; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2012-11-01

    Shock boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) can have drastic effects on the performance of external aerodynamics and propulsion systems in high speed flight vehicles. In such systems, the upstream and boundary conditions of the flow are uncertain, and the sensitivity of SBLIs to perturbations in these conditions is unknown. The sensitivity of two SBLIs - a compression corner interaction and an incident shock interaction - to small geometric perturbations was investigated using particle image velocity measurements. Tests were performed in a continuously operated, low aspect ratio, Mach 2.1 wind tunnel. The shock was generated by a 1.1mm high 20° wall-mounted compression wedge, and various configurations of small (h < 0 . 2 δ) steady bumps were introduced upstream on the opposite wall. 100 perturbed cases were tested in order to generate a dataset which is well suited for validation of CFD codes. Both SBLIs were very sensitive to perturbations in a given region and insensitive to perturbations outside of it. Depending on the location of the perturbations, the compression corner interaction could be significantly strengthened or weakened. The position of the incident SBLI was also a strong function of both the location and size of the upstream perturbations.

  8. Rarefaction shock in the near wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebold, D.; Hershkowitz, N.; Eliezer, S.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and fluid theory find a stationary rarefaction shock in the near wake of an electrically grounded obstacle placed in a steady state, supersonic plasma flow. The shock is only found when two electron temperatures, differing by at least an order of magnitude, are present. These shocks are analogous to rarefaction shocks in plasma free expansions.

  9. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-01

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO2-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 μm were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  10. Shocks in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-01

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1 GeV shock formation and the consequent gravitational wave emission provide a signal detectable by current and planned gravitational wave experiments, allowing them to strongly constrain conditions present in the primordial Universe as early as 10-30 sec after the big bang.

  11. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-04

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO{sub 2}-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 {mu}m were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  12. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  13. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Talking to Your Child About Menstruation Cellulitis MRSA Staph Infections What Are Germs? Why Is Hand ... in? Feeling Fresh All About Menstruation Staph Infections MRSA Toxic Shock Syndrome Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  14. Collisionless ion dynamics in the shock front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedalin, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In the vicinity of the shock front the dynamics of ions is governed by the macroscopic regular electric and magnetic field of the shock. Upon crossing the shock the thermal ions form a non-gyrotropic distribution. The pressure of these non-gyrotropic ions shapes the downstream magnetic field. High-energy ions behave in the shock front as test particles under the influence on the macroscopic fields. The reflection and transmission coefficients of high-energy ions at an oblique shock front is not sensitive to the shock structure and depends only on the global magnetic field change at the shock.

  15. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Mitigating Shock Waves Using Solid Obstacles with Semi-Circular Grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amen, Nicholas; Cajal, Arturo; Eliasson, Veronica

    2015-11-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to assess the effectiveness of multiple obstacles with semi-circular grooves placed along a logarithmic spiral curve as a method to attenuate a shock wave. Previous research has shown that the use of multiple obstacles arranged in a log spiral configuration can attenuate a shock wave by reducing the energy of the wave. In this study, four different obstacle cross-sections in the same log spiral configuration were considered. All spirals had square cross-sections with zero, one, two, or three semi-circular grooves in each face. They were placed inside a shock tube where the incident, reflected, and transmitted shocks were visualized with high-speed schlieren imaging and the pressure histories were recorded with four pressure transducers. Each case was studied varying shock Mach numbers between M =1.1 and M =1.5. The pressure traces were used to establish incident, reflected, and transmitted shock strength and wave speed. Results for the zero groove case were compared to that of the one, two, and three groove cross-sections which show that increasing the number of grooves has a profound effect on the generation of the reflected wave and impacts the transmitted wave via vortex generation behind the spiral.

  17. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Zaug, J M; Bastea, S; Goncharov, A F; Militzer, B

    2011-07-31

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultrafast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 {micro}m). We further report a fast transition in shock wave compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high-density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  18. Observations of Electromagnetic Whistler Precursors at Supercritical Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Koval, A.; Szabo, Adam; Breneman, A.; Cattell, C. A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Maruca, B. A.; Pulupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of electromagnetic precursor waves, identified as whistler mode waves, at supercritical interplanetary shocks using the Wind search coil magnetometer. The precursors propagate obliquely with respect to the local magnetic field, shock normal vector, solar wind velocity, and they are not phase standing structures. All are right-hand polarized with respect to the magnetic field (spacecraft frame), and all but one are right-hand polarized with respect to the shock normal vector in the normal incidence frame. They have rest frame frequencies f(sub ci) < f much < f(sub ce) and wave numbers 0.02 approx < k rho (sub ce) approx <. 5.0. Particle distributions show signatures of specularly reflected gyrating ions, which may be a source of free energy for the observed modes. In one event, we simultaneously observe perpendicular ion heating and parallel electron acceleration, consistent with wave heating/acceleration due to these waves. Al though the precursors can have delta B/B(sub o) as large as 2, fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar shock transitions in three of the four events.

  19. Experimental investigation of a twice-shocked spherical gas inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehn, Nicholas; Weber, Chris; Oakley, Jason; Anderson, Mark; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of experiments and simulations studying the behavior of a spherical gas inhomogeneity impulsively accelerated by an incident and a reflected shock wave. Two Atwood numbers are studied using soap film to create argon and sulfur-hexafluoride bubbles impacted by a planar shock wave of strength M = 1.33. The experiments are performed in a 9.2-m-long vertical shock tube with a square internal cross-section, 25.4 cm per side. The bubbles are released from an injector that is pneumatically retracted into the side of the shock tube. For the scenario involving an Argon bubble free falling in ambient nitrogen (A = 0.176), the reshock occurs during the tail end of the bubble's compression regime after it has already shown slight growth and vortex core development. For the SF6 bubble free falling in ambient nitrogen (A = 0.681), the reshock occurs later in the bubble's developmental stage. The flow is visualized with planar Mie scattering and temporal evolutions are analyzed for the spatial dimensions, growth rates and vorticity estimates. PIV analysis is performed for several instances using the soap film as tracer particles. These trends are compared to simulations performed with the Eulerian AMR hydrodynamics code Raptor from LLNL.

  20. Shock metamorphism of granulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Thompson, T. D.; Hoerz, F.; Bauer, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an extensive series of shock-recovery experiments performed on both nonporous crystalline basalt and its granulated and sieved counterpart to study the role of porosity and grain size in shock motomorphic effects under otherwise identical conditions. Shocked samples are compared with unshocked starting material in terms of textural and mineralogical modifications attributable to shock. A comparative petrographic and chemical characterization is presented of pulverized and sieved lunar basalt 75035 shocked between 6 and 75 GPa in comparison with holocrystalline disks of the same basalts shocked in 10 earlier experiments. Specifically, a petrographic classification of shock features is given, along with an estimation of relative amounts of shock glasses and a chemical characterization of shock glasses in each shocked granular basalt.

  1. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  2. Altitude Modulates Concussion Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Currie, Dustin W.; Comstock, R. Dawn; Clark, Joseph F.; Bailes, Julian E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent research indicates that the volume and/or pressure of intracranial fluid, a physiology affected by one’s altitude (ie, elevation above sea level), may be associated with the likelihood and/or severity of a concussion. The objective was to employ an epidemiological field investigation to evaluate the relationship between altitude and concussion rate in high school sports. Hypothesis: Because of the physiologies that occur during acclimatization, including a decline in intracranial compliance (a “tighter fit”), increased altitude may be related to a reduction in concussion rates in high school athletes. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data on concussions and athlete exposures (AEs) between 2005-2006 and 2011-2012 were obtained from a large national sample of high schools (National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System [High School RIO]) and were used to calculate total, competition, and practice concussion rates for aggregated sports and for football only. Results: Altitude of participating schools ranged from 7 to 6903 ft (median, 600 ft), and a total of 5936 concussions occurred in 20,618,915 exposures (2.88 per 10,000 AEs). When concussion rates were dichotomized by altitude using the median, elevated altitude was associated with a reduction in concussion rates overall (rate ratio [RR], 1.31; P < .001), in competition (RR, 1.31; P < .001), and in practice (RR, 1.29; P < .001). Specifically, high school sports played at higher altitude demonstrated a 31% reduction (95% confidence interval [CI], 25%-38%) in the incidence of total reported concussions. Likewise, concussion rates at increased altitude were reduced 30% for overall exposures, 27% for competition exposures, and 28% for practice exposures in football players (P < .001). Conclusion: The results of this epidemiological investigation indicate increased physiological responses to altitude may be associated with a reduction in sports

  3. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  4. Strength of Shocked Aluminum Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Feng, R.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum oxynitride (AlON) is a polycrystalline and transparent ceramic. An accurate characterization of its shock response is critically important for its applications as transparent armor. Shock wave profiles measured in a series of plate impact experiments on AlON [Thornhill, et al., SCCM-2005, 143-146 (2006)] have been reanalyzed using finite element wave propagation simulations and considering an effective strength behavior that is pressure- and time-dependent. The results show a stiffer shock response than that calculated previously using the jump conditions. The material has a Hugoniot elastic limit of 10.37 GPa and sustains a maximum shear stress of 4.38 GPa for shock compressions up to a shock stress of 96 GPa. The mean stress response determined from the simulations displays no sign of phase transformation and corresponds to a linear shock speed-particle velocity relation with a slope of 0.857. These results have been successfully summarized into an AlON material model consisting of compression-dependent nonlinear elasticity, pressure-dependent equilibrium strength, and over-stress relaxation. The wave profiles simulated with the model show very good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  5. Particle acceleration at collisionless shocks: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zank, G.P.; Li Gang; Webb, G.M.; Le Roux, J.A.; Florinski, V.; Ao, X.; Rice, W.K.M.

    2005-08-01

    An overview of shock acceleration is presented, focusing primarily on interplanetary shocks and the termination shock as examples. An extended discussion of recent advances in modeling real solar energetic particle (SEP) and energetic storm particle (ESP) events is presented. When the energy of accelerated particles becomes very large, their back reaction on the flow can result in a shock that is significantly mediated, and as an example, we consider some results for the termination shock.

  6. Turbulent shock processing, relevant to shock-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. Freddy

    2008-04-01

    The evolution of interstellar clouds following the passage of a supernova shock is an important astrophysical phenomenon; the shock passage may trigger star formation and the post-shock flow surrounding the clouds will strip them of material, effectively limiting cloud life times. Experiments conducted at the Omega laser attempt to (a) quantify the mass-stripping of a single cloud, and (b) simulate the effects of nearby clouds interacting with each other. A strong shock is driven (using 5 kJ of the 30 kJ Omega laser) into a cylinder filled with low-density foam with embedded 120 μm Al spheres simulating interstellar clouds. The density ratio between Al and foam is ˜9. Material is continuously being stripped from a cloud at a rate which is inconsistent with laminar models for mass-stripping; the cloud is fully stripped by 80 ns-100 ns, ten times faster than the laminar model. A new model for turbulent mass-stripping is developed [1,2] that agrees with the observed rate and which should scale to astrophysical conditions. Two interacting spherical clouds are observed to turn their upstream sections to face each other, a result that is completely opposite of earlier work [3] on two interacting cylinders. The difference between these two cases is explained by the relative strength of shocks reflected from the clouds. [1] J.F. Hansen et al, ``Experiment on the Mass-Stripping of an Interstellar Cloud Following Shock Passage,'' Astrophys. J. 662, 379-388 (2007). [2] J.F. Hansen et al, ``Experiment on the mass-stripping of an interstellar cloud in a high Mach number post-shock flow,'' Phys. Plasmas 14, 056505 (2007). [3] C. Tomkins et al, ``A quantitative study of the interaction of two Richtmyer-Meshkov-unstable gas cylinders,'' Phys. Fluids. 15, 986 (2003).

  7. Harnessing Critical Incidents for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patahuddin, Sitti Maesuri; Lowrie, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A critical incident is a situation or event that holds significance for learning, both for the students and teachers. This paper presents four examples of critical incidents from a Year 7 teacher's lesson excerpts in Indonesia involving teaching of fractions, to show how they shaped classroom situation, brought forward elements of conflict, and…

  8. The dissociation of shock-heated carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the dissociation kinetics of undiluted carbon monoxide over the 5,600 to 12,000 K temperature range. Data are presented that have been obtained as time-resolved pressure measurements on the end wall of a shock tube and radiation emission of a C2 Swan system (0-0 band) behind incident shock waves. The decomposition of CO is complex and includes a chain with C2 as an intermediate species. The dissociation rate for the overall process has been found to be independent of the proportions of the collision partners M = CO, C, and O. The rate constant found is on the average about 10 times that previously measured with argon as the collision partner.

  9. Permanent oil shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1987-05-01

    The two basic factors of the world's oil supply are (1) geologic (discoveries) and (2) economic (distribution). Petroleum geologist have done such a good job of finding oil that it looks as easy as growing crops, and their engineers deliver the petroleum like clockwork. Consequently, the public and many planners consider global distribution to be the only supply problem and attribute all price swings to simple economics. They erroneously ignore critical long-term geological facts and assume that cash spent = oil found. This premise is invalid where no oil exists or where prospects are poor. Most people are unaware that the global quality of geological/oil prospects has declined so much that the amount of new oil found per wildcat well has dropped 50% since a 1969 peak. Discoveries of the most critical but easiest to find giant fields (each with over 500 million bbl of recoverable oil) are now stalled at 315 known worldwide. They are simply no longer finding enough new crude oil to replace the world's huge consumption of 20 billion bbl (840 billion gal) per year. OPEC oil price shocks no. 1 (1973) and no. 2 (1979) were relatively easy to handle. During the 1960s, several new giant non-OPEC oil fields and provinces were discovered worldwide offshore and in Arctic Alaska by the exploratory breakthrough of electronic digital seismic surveys, and engineers perfected the requisite marine production technology. By lucky coincidence, these virgin giant fields came on stream at just the right time during the 1970s, and the OPEC nations were temporarily brought to heel. But the 1986 oil glut reconfirmed that Saudi Arabia can make - or break - the price of any fuel in the world - at will. Non-OPEC oil production is now topping out and will be declining virtually everywhere within 10 years.

  10. Hydraulic shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a hydraulic shock absorber including a piston reciprocating in a cylinder, a piston upper chamber and a piston lower chamber which are oil-tightly separated by the piston, piston ports formed through the piston in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber, and return ports formed outside of the piston ports in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber. It also includes a sheet ring-like non-return valve provided above the piston and fitted to a piston rod, valve holes formed through the non-return valve in opposed relation with the piston ports. A ring-like non-return valve stopper fixed to the piston rod on an upper side of the non-return valve with a small spaced defined between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper, and a spring is interposed between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper for normally urging the non-return valve to an upper surface of the piston. Movement of the piston to the piston upper chamber allows oil to flow from the piston upper chamber through the piston ports to the piston lower chamber, while the return ports are closed by the non-return valve to generate a vibration damping force by resistance upon pass of the oil through the piston parts. The improvement described here comprises a groove formed in an upper surface of the piston facing the non-return valve and aligned with the valve holes, the groove being in the circle where the piston ports lie and being in communication with the piston ports.

  11. The evolution and cellular structure of a detonation subsequent to a head-on interaction with a shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, Barbara B.; Zhu, YuJian; Lee, John H.S.; Ng, Hoi Dick; Ju, Yiguang

    2007-12-15

    This paper analyzes the results of a head-on collision between a detonation and a planar shock wave. The evolution of the detonation cellular structure subsequent to the frontal collision was examined through smoked foil experiments. It is shown that a large reduction in cell size is observed following the frontal collision, and that the detonation cell widths are correlated well with the chemical kinetic calculations from the ZND model. From chemical kinetic calculations, the density increase caused by shock compression appears to be the main factor leading to the significant reduction in cell size. It was found that depending on the initial conditions, the transition to the final cellular pattern can be either smooth or spotty. This phenomenon appears to be equivalent to Oppenheim's strong and mild reflected shock ignition experiments. The difference between these two transitions is, however, more related to the stability of the incident detonation and the strength of the perturbation generated by the incident shock. (author)

  12. Evidence for specularly reflected ions upstream from the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.

    1982-01-01

    Ion velocity distributions in the form of bunches of gyrating particles traveling along helical paths have been observed moving sunward immediately upstream from quasi-parallel parts of the earth's bow shock using Los Alamos/Garching instruments on ISEE-1 and -2. These distributions have characteristics which indicate that they are produced by the nearly specular reflection at the shock of a portion of the incident solar wind ions. In particular, the guiding center motion and the gyrospeeds of the gyrating ions are quantitatively consistent with simple geometrical considerations for specular reflection. These considerations reveal that specularly reflected ions can escape upstream when the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the local shock normal is less than 45 deg but not when the angle is greater than 45 deg. These upstream gyrating ions are an important signature of one of the processes by which solar wind streaming energy is dissipated into other forms of energy at the shock.

  13. Low Pressure Evidence of High Pressure Shock: Thermal Histories and Annealing in Shocked Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.; Hu, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we look at the mineralogy associated with shock veins in several highly shocked L chondrites to better understand shock conditions and the importance of thermal history in creating and destroying high-pressure minerals.

  14. Construction and Characterization of a Shock Tube for Ignition and Pollutant Formation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prykull, Cory; Dreiker, Robert; Fernandes, Marcos; Eldeeb, Mazen; Akih-Kumgeh, Ben

    2013-11-01

    Shock tubes are versatile research facilities with wide applications in aerodynamics, high-temperature chemical kinetics and medical research. We discuss the construction and the gas dynamics characterization of such a facility for combustion studies with a focus on ignition and pollutant formation. Measures to achieve high quality post-reflected shock conditions with minimal shock-boundary layer interactions are discussed. Characterization of the facility is first carried out using non-reactive gases in order to assess the quality of the post-reflected shock conditions and the available test times. The incident velocity is determined using fast response pressure transducers. Experimentally observed post-reflected shock pressure profiles are compared with predictions of one dimensional shock equations, which also allow for the calculation of temperature. Subsequent shock tube ignition experiments are carried out for selected fuel and oxidizer systems from the literature in order to validate and thereby, demonstrate the suitability of the facility for combustion studies. Further measurements of soot volume fractions under fuel rich conditions are realized by means of laser extinction.

  15. Experimental study on a heavy-gas cylinder accelerated by cylindrical converging shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, T.; Zhai, Z.; Luo, X.; Yang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability behavior of a heavy-gas cylinder accelerated by a cylindrical converging shock wave is studied experimentally. A curved wall profile is well-designed based on the shock dynamics theory [Phys. Fluids, 22: 041701 (2010)] with an incident planar shock Mach number of 1.2 and a converging angle of in a mm square cross-section shock tube. The cylinder mixed with the glycol droplets flows vertically through the test section and is illuminated horizontally by a laser sheet. The images obtained only one per run by an ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) combined with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are first presented and the complete evolution process of the cylinder is then captured in a single test shot by a high-speed video camera combined with a high-power continuous laser. In this way, both the developments of the first counter-rotating vortex pair and the second counter-rotating vortex pair with an opposite rotating direction from the first one are observed. The experimental results indicate that the phenomena induced by the converging shock wave and the reflected shock formed from the center of convergence are distinct from those found in the planar shock case.

  16. Shock Interaction with Substrate in a Shock Induced Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, Kevin

    To further the knowledge of the Shock Induced Spray Process (SISP), an experimental apparatus which simulates Centerline's Waverider thermal spray gun was created which uses an unsteady flow to propel solid particles onto a substrate by the use of a shock wave to produce a coating. Experiments were conducted at a variety of operating supply pressures, firing frequencies, and stand off distances. A qualitative analysis was done using a custom Schlieren system along with a high speed camera. Insight into the flow behaviour in the SISP was established with the definition of six distinct phases. The formation of a bow shock, which is known to be detrimental to the SISP operation, is shown to be more prominent in the cases with higher supply pressure and close proximity of the apparatus exit to the substrate than with changes in firing frequency.

  17. PVDF Shock Compression Sensors in Shock Wave Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, F.

    2004-07-01

    Early works have shown that highly reproducible piezoelectric film PVDF (Poly(vinylidene fluoride)) can be reliably used in a wide range of precise stress and stress-rate measurements. The direct stress-derivative or stress-rate PVDF signals have nanosecond resolution and higher operating stress limits than any other technique. PVDF stress gauges have been used in many fields of shock wave physics. The present paper summarizes some of original applications of the PVDF gauges. Blast and shock in air measurements will be presented. Pressure responses of inert materials and polymer-materials will be recalled. Furthermore, example of pressure and particle velocity histories using PVDF and laser interferometry (VISAR) will be presented. Simultaneous measurements using VISAR and PVDF gauge will be discussed. The question of the validity of shock pressure profiles obtained with "in situ" PVDF gauges in one High Explosive in a detonation regime will be discussed.

  18. Experimental studies of transpiration cooling with shock interaction in hypersonic flow, part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    transpiration-cooled panels. The regions of shockwave/boundary layer interaction examined in these studies were induced by oblique shocks generated with a sharp, flat plate, inclined to the freestream at angles of 5 degrees, 7.5 degrees, and 10 degrees. It was found that, in the absence of an incident shock, transpiration cooling was a very effective method for reducing both the heat transfer and the skin friction loads on the surface. The helium coolant was found to be significantly more effective than nitrogen, because of its low molecular weight and high specific heat. The studies of shock-wave/transpiration-cooled surface interaction demonstrated that the interaction region between the incident shock and the low-momentum transpiration-cooled boundary layer did not result in a significant increase in the size of attached or separated interaction regions, and did not result in significant flowfield distortions above the interaction region. The increase in heating downstream of the shock-impingement point could easily be reduced to the values without shock impingement by a relatively small increase in the transpiration cooling in this region. Surprisingly, this increase in cooling rate did not result in a significant increase in size of the region ahead of the incident shock or create a significantly enlarged interaction region with a resultant increase in the distortion level in the inviscid flow. Thus, transpiration cooling appears to be a very effective technique to cool the internal surfaces of scramjet engines, where shocks in the engine would induce large local increases in wall heating and create viscous/inviscid interactions that could significantly disturb the smooth flow through the combustor. However, if hydrogen is used as the coolant, burning upstream of shock impingement might result in localized hot spots. Clearly, further research is needed in this area.

  19. Earth's bow shock: Power aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedykh, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    The process of energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, or rather, to convecting magnetospheric plasma, appears to be rather complicated. The bow shock front is the main converter of solar wind kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy [Ponomarev, Sedykh, J. of Atm. Solar-Terr. Phys. V. 68. 2006; Ponomarev, Sedykh et al., Geomagn. and Aeron., 2009]. Solar wind undergoes significant changes in its parameters during its passing through the bow shock front. Indeed, at the bow point, when crossing the front, the magnetic field tangential component and magnetic energy density increase by factors of almost 4 and approximately 15, respectively. In describing the bow shock, we followed [Whang, 1987; Ponomarev et al., 2006]. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component when crossing the bow shock front means that the front carries an electric current. It is possible to show that electric current is diverging in this layer, that is the front is the generator of the current. Since plasma with magnetic field passes through the bow shock front, electric field arises in the front reference system. Thus, the bow shock front is a source of electric power. The direction of electric current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component. It is this current which sets convection in motion. Energetically, this external current is necessary for maintaining convection of plasma in the inhomogeneous system (geomagnetosphere). The generator at the bow shock front can be a sufficient source of power for supplying energy to substorm processes [Sedykh, Sun and Geosphere, 2011]. The sign of power does not depend on the IMF sign, and energy flux is always directed into the magnetosphere. The magnitude of the power is different and is realized in different regions of the magnetosphere depending on the IMF direction. When the Bz-component is negative, the electric convection field is larger, with the anticonvection field being smaller, than for

  20. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  1. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    DOE PAGES

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may bemore » interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.« less

  2. Metabolic theory of septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Pravda, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock is a life threatening condition that can develop subsequent to infection. Mortality can reach as high as 80% with over 150000 deaths yearly in the United States alone. Septic shock causes progressive failure of vital homeostatic mechanisms culminating in immunosuppression, coagulopathy and microvascular dysfunction which can lead to refractory hypotension, organ failure and death. The hypermetabolic response that accompanies a systemic inflammatory reaction places high demands upon stored nutritional resources. A crucial element that can become depleted early during the progression to septic shock is glutathione. Glutathione is chiefly responsible for supplying reducing equivalents to neutralize hydrogen peroxide, a toxic oxidizing agent that is produced during normal metabolism. Without glutathione, hydrogen peroxide can rise to toxic levels in tissues and blood where it can cause severe oxidative injury to organs and to the microvasculature. Continued exposure can result in microvascular dysfunction, capillary leakage and septic shock. It is the aim of this paper to present evidence that elevated systemic levels of hydrogen peroxide are present in septic shock victims and that it significantly contributes to the development and progression of this frequently lethal condition. PMID:24892019

  3. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-01

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  4. Is this septic shock? A rare case of distributive shock.

    PubMed

    Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Fior, Alberto; Santos, Ana; Reis, Luís; Bento, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of shock in a patient without significant clinical history, admitted to the intensive care unit for suspected septic shock. The patient was initially treated with fluid therapy without improvement. A hypothesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was postulated following the confirmation of severe hypoalbuminemia, hypotension, and hemoconcentration--a combination of three symptoms typical of the disease. The authors discussed the differential diagnosis and also conducted a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:25607273

  5. Evolution of ion distributions across the nearly perpendicular bow shock - Specularly and non-specularly reflected-gyrating ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Bame, S. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Russell, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Data from ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft were used to study the evolution of the ion distributions in the perpendicular terrestrial bow shock. The plasma data were taken during passage of the spacecraft downstream of and through the shock. Solar wind ions had velocities ranging from Mach 2-12.4, and reflected ions featured a relative density of 1-3 percent of the solar wind density at Mach 2 to 15-25 percent at Mach 8-12. Computer simulations have indicated that the ions provide essential dissipation at the shock and gyrate about the magnetic field lines in the plasma rest frame at a speed twice that of the normal incident solar wind flow. The ion density decreases by up to two orders of magnitude at the forward end of the foot of the shock profile, suggesting that the ions are reflected by the shock specularly, and may enhance downstream ion thermalization.

  6. Idiot Savants: Rate of Incidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, A. Lewis

    1977-01-01

    A survey of 300 public residential facilities for the mentally retarded revealed a .06 percent incidence rate for idiot savants, persons of low intelligence who possess an unusually high skill in some special task. (CL)

  7. Shock Compression of Simulated Adobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us = 2.26up + 0.33) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement. The research was funded by DSTL through a WSTC contract.

  8. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, B.O.; Chavez, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  9. Incidence of Narcolepsy in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Oberle, Doris; Drechsel-Bäuerle, Ursula; Schmidtmann, Irene; Mayer, Geert; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Following the 2009 pandemic, reports of an association between an AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine and narcolepsy were published. Besides determining background incidence rates for narcolepsy in Germany this study aimed at investigating whether there was a change in incidence rates of narcolepsy between the pre-pandemic, pandemic, and the post-pandemic period on the population level. Design: Retrospective epidemiological study on the incidence of narcolepsy with additional capture-recapture analysis. Setting: German sleep centers. Patients or Participants: Eligible were patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD10 Code G47.4) within the period from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. Interventions: None; observational study. Measurements and Results: A total of 342 sleep centers were invited to participate in the study. Adequate and suitable data were provided by 233 sleep centers (68.1%). A total of 1,198 patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy within the observed period were included, of whom 106 (8.8%) were children and adolescents under the age of 18 years and 1,092 (91.2%) were adults. In children and adolescents, the age-standardized adjusted incidence rate significantly increased from 0.14/100,000 person-years in the pre-pandemic period to 0.50/100,000 person-years in the post-pandemic period (incidence density ratio, IDR 3.57; 95% CI 1.94–7.00). In adults, no significant change was detectable. This increase started in spring 2009. Conclusions: For the years 2007–2011, valid estimates for the incidence of narcolepsy in Germany were provided. In individuals under 18, the incidence rates continuously increased from spring 2009. Citation: Oberle D, Drechsel-Bäuerle U, Schmidtmann I, Mayer G, Keller-Stanislawski B. Incidence of narcolepsy in Germany. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1619–1628. PMID:25902804

  10. Shock tube study of the reaction H plus O2 plus Ar yields HO2 plus Ar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.; Houghton, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Rate coefficient data for the recombination reaction H + 02 + Ar yields H02 + Ar have been determined from studies of lean hydrogen-oxygen mixtures behind incident shock waves over the temperature range of 948 to 1125 K. Hydroxyl radical concentration profiles were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and rate data were obtained through analysis of induction time and exponential growth parameter data. Analysis of the data yielded a rate coefficient which was generally lower than most of the more recent values obtained from shock tube studies. The effect of boundary layer formation on the conditions behind the shock was also examined and found to be negligible.

  11. Vibration and shock test report for the H1616-1 container and the Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Joseph, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed random vibration and shock tests on a tritium hydride transport vessel that was packaged in an H1616-1 container. The objective of the tests was to determine if the hydride transport vessel remains leaktight under vibration and shock normally incident to transport, which is a requirement that the hydride transport vessel must meet to be shipped in the H1616-1. Helium leak tests before and after the vibration and shock tests showed that the hydride transport vessel remained leaktight under the specified conditions. There were no detrimental effects on the containment vessel of the H1616-1.

  12. Racial differences in melanoma incidence.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I. K.

    1979-01-01

    The incidences of malignant melanoma recorded by 59 population-based cancer registries were investigated to determine the effects of racial and skin-colour differences. White populations exhibited a wide range of melanoma incidences and females commonly, though not invariably, had a higher incidence than males. Non-white populations experienced in general a much lower incidence of melanoma although there was some overlap of white and non-white rates. No predominant sex difference emerged among non-whites. Populations of African descent were found to have a higher incidence than those of Asiatic origin, but it was concluded that this was due largely to the high frequency of tumours among Africans on the sole of the foot. A clear negative correlation between degree of skin pigmentation and melanoma incidence emerged for the exposed body sites. These data provide strong support for the hypotheses that UV radiation is a major cause of malignant melanoma and that melanin pigmentation protects against it. Further research is required to elucidate the aetiology of melanoma of the sole of the foot. PMID:475965

  13. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  14. Experimental study of unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena on shock-tube wall using fast-response temperature-sensitive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental study that used a fast-response temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to investigate the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena occurring on a shock-tube wall. To understand these phenomena in detail, a fast-response TSP with high temperature sensitivity developed for transient temperature measurement was applied to the wall. The shock-tube experiment was carried out under the over-tailored condition, with a pressure ratio of 110 for test gases of air in driver/driven tubes. The following aspects were clarified using the TSP: (a) the TSP could be used to visualize the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena and estimate the quantitative heat flux on the shock-tube wall; (b) an x-t diagram based on the TSP response showed shock-tube wall characteristics that included the incident/reflected shocks, laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition, streaks in the turbulent boundary layer, reflected shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and waves reflected from a contact surface; (c) the TSP graphically showed that a transition front from the plate's leading edge and turbulent spots moved with 80% of the free-stream velocity behind the incident shock. In addition, the TSP could track the growth of the turbulent spots on the wall.

  15. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to

  16. Electron Dynamics in Perpendicular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Roth, I.

    2003-12-01

    A full particle electromagnetic code in the Darwin approximation is used to investigate the dynamics of the electrons in a fast magnetosonic shock. We assume a perpendicular geometry where x points into the shock and the electromagnetic field structure is E=(Ex,E_y,0) and B=(0,0,Bz). The 1D3V code has open boundaries with upstream and downstream particles traversing the left and right boundaries, respectively, while the shock structure remains in the simulation box. Two shock strengths are considered, including a near critical shock with alfvenic Mach number Ma ˜ 2 and a supercritical shock with Ma ˜ 3--4. The simulation is initiated by loading the particles according to profiles modeled from conservation laws (Rankine-Hugoniot). Particles and fields are then left to evolve and, once the ion dynamics develops, a self-consistent shock structure forms. Importantly, due to the partial decoupling of ions and electrons which occurs in the magnetic ramp, the electrostatic field Ex builds up a large spike whose role is to slow down the ions. In the supercritical case a significant fraction of ions are reflected and accumulate in the foot, which leads to the process of cyclical shock reformation. We record the trajectories of selected electrons in order to analyse their behavior in the cross field structure of the ramp. We specially look for a possible ``superadiabatic heating'', a process described by previous authors [Balikhin and Gedalin (1994); Ball and Galloway (1998)]. The latter is expected to occur for extreme cases where the gradient of the electrostatic potential, which reflects the ions, is so strong that the electrons are accelerated across a large fraction of the ramp during one cyclotron gyration. The required potential difference across the ramp δ φ * depends upon its half width Δ , namely eδ φ*/mve^2≈(0.2/βe)~(Δ /λe; )2(r+1)2. Here, λ e is the electron inertia length c/ω pe and r is the compression ratio. Our study improves upon the above

  17. Shock Sensitivity of energetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.

    1980-01-01

    Viscoplastic deformation is examined as the principal source of hot energy. Some shock sensitivity data on a proposed model is explained. A hollow sphere model is used to approximate complex porous matrix of energetic materials. Two pieces of shock sensitivity data are qualitatively compared with results of the proposed model. The first is the p2 tau law. The second is the desensitization of energetic materials by a ramp wave applied stress. An approach to improve the model based on experimental observations is outlined.

  18. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  19. Method of making shock cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, R. F.; Cummins, W. T.

    1984-10-16

    A method of making an energy-absorbing shock cell for mounting bumper devices on legs of offshore oil rig structures having inner and outer metal tubes connected by an intervening vulcanized rubber sleeve maintained under compression adhesively bonded to the inner and outer metal tubes. The shock cell is made by a series of operations in which portions of the metal tubes are coated with adhesive material, and the rubber sleeve is bonded to the adhesive coated areas by vulcanization and post-vulcanized heating.

  20. Cation disorder in shocked orthopyroxene.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dundon, R. W.; Hafner, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    The study of cation distributions over nonequivalent lattice sites in minerals may reveal information on the history of temperature and pressure in rocks. Chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene specimens were shocked under well-controlled conditions in the laboratory in order to provide a basis for the interpretation of more complex natural materials. As a result of the investigation it is concluded that the distribution of magnesium and iron over the M1 and M2 positions in Bamle enstatite shocked at 1 megabar is highly disordered. It corresponds to an equilibrium distribution of at least 1000 C.

  1. Multi-scale Shock Technique

    2009-08-01

    The code to be released is a new addition to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code. LAMMPS is developed and maintained by Sandia, is publicly available, and is used widely by both natioanl laboratories and academics. The new addition to be released enables LAMMPS to perform molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves using the Multi-scale Shock Simulation Technique (MSST) which we have developed and has been previously published. This technique enables molecular dynamics simulations of shockmore » waves in materials for orders of magnitude longer timescales than the direct, commonly employed approach.« less

  2. Shocking Results About Exploding Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Early light curves of supernovae are dominated by the emission of surface material that has been heated and ejected by the supernova shock. Studying this shock cooling can provide unique constraints on the radius of the progenitor, which is important for comparisons to stellar modeling, populations of massive stars, and pre-explosion imaging. Here I summarize both numerical and semi-analytic work to model this phase and apply it to current and future observations. I discuss a wide range of events, from the fairly common Type IIP supernovae to the exotic Type I superluminous supernovae for which their exact progenitors are still elusive.

  3. Supercriticality of ICME and CIR shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Smith, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) and corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks are characterized in terms of supercriticality introduced by Edmiston and Kennel (1984) to classify shocks based on whether dissipation is provided by electron resistivity alone or also requires ion viscosity. The condition for determining supercriticality is a critical Mach number, MC, a function of θBn, the angle between the upstream magnetic field, B, and the normal to the shock surface, n, and β, the ratio of the plasma and magnetic pressures. The criterion was subsequently revised by Kennel (1987) to include dissipation by electron thermal as well as electrical conductivity. Two early separate studies of ICME and CIR shocks motivated our investigation that included several improvements. We use Kennel (1987) and shocks identified by WIND near 1 AU and by Ulysses near 5 AU from the same solar cycle to provide Occurrence Probability Distributions and statistical information for all parameters. We answer three questions (1) Is the supercriticality of ICME and CIR shocks different? (2) If so, why? (3) Does the latter MC criterion change the answers? Our conclusions are (1) about two thirds of CIR shocks are supercritical as compared to one third of ICME shocks, (2) although ICME shock speeds are typically higher than CIR shocks, the fast-mode wave speeds are even higher at 1 AU than that of CIR shocks at ~5 AU causing a reduction in Mach numbers, and (3) CIR shocks are also more supercritical than ICME shocks using both criteria with slight differences.

  4. Observations of the termination shock and heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The termination shock was crossed by Voyager 1 in 2004 and by Voyager 2 in 2007. This paper will review the observations at the shock and describe what observations in the heliosheath teach us about this shock. The termination shock presented several surprises. The speed decrease began 60 days in front of the ramp region, suggesting the shock was mediated by energetic particles. The thermal plasma downstream of the shock was still supersonic which allowed us to infer that most of the energy from the bulk flow went into the pickup ions. The ACRs were not accelerated where the Voyagers crossed the shock, so the ACR source must be in the flanks of the shock or elsewhere than the shock. The shock was a good accelerator of few MeV ions, the termination shock particles. Subsequent measurements of flow in the heliosheath suggest that the shock is compressed at the southern pole giving a shock which is blunter in the azimuthal than meridional direction. A recent sharp drop in the energetic particle fluxes may tell us the width of the flank region.

  5. Rarefaction shock waves in shock-compressed diamond <110> crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, Romain; Lin, You; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; White, Carter; Oleynik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Piston-driven shock compression of diamond <110> crystal was simulated by molecular dynamics using the REBO potential. At piston velocities between 2 and 5 km/s and corresponding pressures 117 GPA < P < 278 GPa, diamond sample undergoes a polymorphic phase transition, characterized by the coexistence of two elastically compressed phases, low-pressure phase A and high-pressure phase B. This phase transition results in the splitting of the shock wave into two elastic shock waves, composed of pure phase A and a mixture of phases A and B. Upon removal of the piston, a release wave is observed at the rear of the sample, turning into a rarefaction shock wave where the material undergoes the reverse phase transition from coexisting phases to the original low-pressure phase. For strong plastic waves induced by larger piston velocities the release wave propagates as a rarefaction wave without any phase transition corresponding to the adiabatic expansion along the plastic branch of the Hugoniot.

  6. Analytical solutions of hypersonic type IV shock - shock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Michael John

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the effects of a type IV shock interaction at high Mach numbers. This interaction occurs when an impinging oblique shock wave intersects the most normal portion of a detached bow shock. The flowfield which develops is complicated and contains an embedded jet of supersonic flow, which may be unsteady. The jet impinges on the blunt body surface causing very high pressure and heating loads. Understanding this type of interaction is vital to the designers of cowl lips and leading edges on air- breathing hypersonic vehicles. This analytical model represents the first known attempt at predicting the geometry of the interaction explicitly, without knowing beforehand the jet dimensions, including the length of the transmitted shock where the jet originates. The model uses a hyperbolic equation for the bow shock and by matching mass continuity, flow directions and pressure throughout the flowfield, a prediction of the interaction geometry can be derived. The model has been shown to agree well with the flowfield patterns and properties of experiments and CFD, but the prediction for where the peak pressure is located, and its value, can be significantly in error due to a lack of sophistication in the model of the jet fluid stagnation region. Therefore it is recommended that this region of the flowfield be modeled in more detail and more accurate experimental and CFD measurements be used for validation. However, the analytical model has been shown to be a fast and economic prediction tool, suitable for preliminary design, or for understanding the interactions effects, including the basic physics of the interaction, such as the jet unsteadiness. The model has been used to examine a wide parametric space of possible interactions, including different Mach number, impinging shock strength and location, and cylinder radius. It has also been used to examine the interaction on power-law shaped blunt bodies, a possible candidate for

  7. Fresh look at floating shock fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, PETER-M.

    1990-01-01

    A fast implicit upwind procedure for the two-dimensional Euler equations is described that allows accurate computations of shocked flows on nonadapted meshes. Away from shocks, the second-order accurate upwinding is based on the split-coefficient-matrix (SCM) method. In the presence of shocks, the difference stencils are modified using a floating shock fitting technique. Rapid convergence to steady-state solutions is attained with a diagonalized approximate factorization (AF) algorithm. Results are presented for Riemann's problem, for a regular shock reflection at an inviscid wall, for supersonic flow past a cylinder, and for a transonic airfoil. All computed shocks are ideally sharp and in excellent agreement with other numerical results or 'exact' solutions. Most importantly, this has been accomplished on unusually crude meshes without any attempt to align grid lines with shock fronts or to cluster grid lines around shocks.

  8. Shock State of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M.; Nishiizumi, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Chan, Q. H. S.; Martinez, J.; Caffee, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental aspects of any astromaterial is its shock history, since this factor elucidates critical historical events, and also because shock metamorphism can alter primary mineralogical and petrographic features, and reset chronologies.

  9. Acidic Weathering Generated from Shocked Sulphide Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, E. D.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The study tests the links between shock processes and low temperature alteration using petrological characterisation and trace elements. Enhanced silicate weathering and mobility of Mn, Co, Ni is found to be linked to shocked sulphide structures.

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  11. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, T.; Alexander, K. D.; Berger, E.

    2016-10-01

    Through detailed multi-wavelength observations and modeling, we present the discovery and characterization a reverse shock in GRB 160509A. This result highlights the unique power of radio observations in the study of GRB reverse shocks.

  12. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  13. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates

  14. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  15. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  16. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  17. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  18. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  19. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  20. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  1. Model for shock wave chaos.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Aslan R; Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, u(t) + 1/2(u(2)-uu(s))x = f(x,u(s)) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x = 0 for any t ≥ 0. Here, u(s)(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations. PMID:23521260

  2. Shock characterization of toad pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degree}, 60{degree} and 80{degree}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degree}C (125{degree}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degree}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degree}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Shock characterization of TOAD pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, N.J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 80{degrees}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degrees}C (125{degrees}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degrees}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degrees}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves.

  4. Economic Shocks, Wealth, and Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Smith, James P.; Thomas, Duncan

    2003-01-01

    The immediate effects of the Asian crisis on the well-being of Indonesians are examined using the Indonesia Family Life Survey, an ongoing longitudinal household survey. There is tremendous diversity in the effect of the shock: for some households, it was devastating; for others it brought new opportunities. A wide array of mechanisms was adopted…

  5. Model for shock wave chaos.

    PubMed

    Kasimov, Aslan R; Faria, Luiz M; Rosales, Rodolfo R

    2013-03-01

    We propose the following model equation, u(t) + 1/2(u(2)-uu(s))x = f(x,u(s)) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x = 0 for any t ≥ 0. Here, u(s)(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  6. Electrokinetic instability of isotachophoresis shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Giancarlo; Santiago, Juan; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) is an electrokinetic focusing technique used in a variety of life science and analytical chemistry applications. In ITP, an electrokinetic shock wave forms at the interface between leading and trailing electrolytes with relatively high and low conductivities. The ITP interface is self-sharpening, as restoring electromigration fluxes counteract molecular diffusion. However, the large electric field gradient at the shock interface also gives rise to free charge and strong electrostatic body forces. At large applied currents, electrostatic forces cause recirculating flows which destabilize the ITP interface. We performed stability analysis and direct simulation of ITP shocks through numerical solutions to the coupled Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations using a quasi-electroneutral approximation. In both experiments and numerical simulations, we observe two modes of instability: 1) a distorted ITP interface which is steady in time, and 2) an oscillating perturbation which persists. In addition, at the highest simulated electric fields, we observe transition towards more chaotic oscillatory modes. We use our stability analysis and numerical simulations to characterize instability of ITP shocks using two dimensionless parameters.

  7. Shock formation within sonoluminescence bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, V.Q.; Szeri, A.J.; Young, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    A strong case has been made by several authors that sharp, spherically symmetric shocks converging on the center of a spherical bubble driven by a strong acoustic field give rise to rapid compression and heating that produces the brief flash of light known as sonoluminescence. The formation of such shocks is considered. It is found that, although at the main collapse the bubble wall does indeed launch an inwardly-traveling compression wave, and although the subsequent reflection of the wave at the bubble center produces a very rapid temperature peak, the wave is prevented from steepening into a sharp shock by an adverse gradient in the sound speed caused by heat transfer. It is shown that the mathematical characteristics of the flow can be prevented from accumulating into a shock front by this adverse sound speed gradient. A range of results is presented for a variety of bubble ambient radii and sound field amplitudes suggested by experiments. The time scale of the peak temperature in the bubble is set by the dynamics of the compression wave: this is typically in the range 100{endash}300 ps (FWHM) in concert with recent measurements of the sonoluminescence pulse width. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Modeling wildfire incident complexity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire management in the United States and elsewhere is challenged by substantial uncertainty regarding the location and timing of fire events, the socioeconomic and ecological consequences of these events, and the costs of suppression. Escalating U.S. Forest Service suppression expenditures is of particular concern at a time of fiscal austerity as swelling fire management budgets lead to decreases for non-fire programs, and as the likelihood of disruptive within-season borrowing potentially increases. Thus there is a strong interest in better understanding factors influencing suppression decisions and in turn their influence on suppression costs. As a step in that direction, this paper presents a probabilistic analysis of geographic and temporal variation in incident management team response to wildfires. The specific focus is incident complexity dynamics through time for fires managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The modeling framework is based on the recognition that large wildfire management entails recurrent decisions across time in response to changing conditions, which can be represented as a stochastic dynamic system. Daily incident complexity dynamics are modeled according to a first-order Markov chain, with containment represented as an absorbing state. A statistically significant difference in complexity dynamics between Forest Service Regions is demonstrated. Incident complexity probability transition matrices and expected times until containment are presented at national and regional levels. Results of this analysis can help improve understanding of geographic variation in incident management and associated cost structures, and can be incorporated into future analyses examining the economic efficiency of wildfire management.

  9. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  10. Shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    This study involved the shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP), in particular, the equation of state as measured by the shock Hugoniot. Tests were done between 1 and 11 GPa impact shock pressure. The Hugoniot parameters were determined to be: {rho}{sub 0}= 1.743, C{sub 0} = 2.20, and S = 2.33.

  11. Shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.

    1992-09-01

    This study involved the shock characterization of Diallyl Phthalate (DAP), in particular, the equation of state as measured by the shock Hugoniot. Tests were done between 1 and 11 GPa impact shock pressure. The Hugoniot parameters were determined to be: [rho][sub 0]= 1.743, C[sub 0] = 2.20, and S = 2.33.

  12. A Study of Fundamental Shock Noise Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation in shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. This numerical approach is validated by comparison with results obtained by linear theory for a small-disturbance case. Analysis of the perturbation energy with Myers' energy corollary demonstrates that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction of acoustic disturbances with shocks. This analysis suggests that shock motion generates acoustic and entropy disturbance energy. Shock deformation is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a vortex ring with a shock. These numerical simulations demonstrate the generation of both an acoustic wave and contact surfaces. The acoustic wave spreads cylindrically. The sound intensity is highly directional and the sound pressure increases with increasing shock strength. The numerically determined relationship between the sound pressure and the Mach number is found to be consistent with experimental observations of shock noise. This consistency implies that a dominant physical process in the generation of shock noise is modeled in this study.

  13. Vasopressor weaning in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Daniel L; Hanneman, Sandra K

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose optimal weaning of vasopressors in patients with septic shock. Topics discussed include pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock, treatment guidelines for sepsis, autoregulation of blood flow, vasopressors used in septic shock, weaning recommendations, monitor alarms in the intensive care unit, and new directions in sepsis research.

  14. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159... MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with liquid... shocks that are ten times the force of gravity (10g) and have a duration of 20-25 milliseconds...

  15. Shock-wave behavior in explosive monocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.J.

    1994-09-09

    The shock response of explosive monocrystals is strongly anisotropic. Shock initiation sensitivity depends strongly on crystal orientation in PETN. This can be understood in terms of steric hindrance to shear during the shock-induced deformation of the molecular crystal. This initiation mechanism appears to be tribochemical rather than thermal.

  16. Calculating Flows With Interfering Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1993-01-01

    Equilibrium Air Shock Interference, EASI, program takes account of dissociation of air molecules. Revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from interference of shock waves. Expands methods to solve problems involving six shock-wave interference patterns on two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with equilibrium, chemically-reacting gas mixture. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. Stability of shocks relating to the shock ignition inertial fusion energy scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Davie, C. J. Bush, I. A.; Evans, R. G.

    2014-08-15

    Motivated by the shock ignition approach to improve the performance of inertial fusion targets, we make a series of studies of the stability of shock waves in planar and converging geometries. We examine stability of shocks moving through distorted material and driving shocks with non-uniform pressure profiles. We then apply a fully 3D perturbation, following this spherically converging shock through collapse to a distorted plane, bounce and reflection into an outgoing perturbed, broadly spherical shock wave. We find broad shock stability even under quite extreme perturbation.

  18. Reliable estimation of shock position in shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    The displacement method for estimating shock position in a shock-capturing compressible hydrodynamics code is introduced. Common estimates use simulation data within the captured shock, but the displacement method uses data behind the shock, making the estimate consistent with and as reliable as estimates of material parameters obtained from averages or fits behind the shock. The displacement method is described in the context of a steady shock in a one-dimensional lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and demonstrated on a piston problem and a spherical blast wave.The displacement method's estimates of shock position are much better than common estimates in such applications.

  19. 40 CFR 68.81 - Incident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... investigation began; (3) A description of the incident; (4) The factors that contributed to the incident; and... job tasks are relevant to the incident findings including contract employees where applicable....

  20. 40 CFR 68.81 - Incident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... investigation began; (3) A description of the incident; (4) The factors that contributed to the incident; and... job tasks are relevant to the incident findings including contract employees where applicable....

  1. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  2. Culture shock: Improving software quality

    SciTech Connect

    de Jong, K.; Trauth, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of software quality can represent a significant shock to an individual who has been developing software for many years and who believes he or she has been doing a high quality job. The very idea that software includes lines of code and associated documentation is foreign and difficult to grasp, at best. Implementation of a software quality program hinges on the concept that software is a product whose quality needs improving. When this idea is introduced into a technical community that is largely ''self-taught'' and has been producing ''good'' software for some time, a fundamental understanding of the concepts associated with software is often weak. Software developers can react as if to say, ''What are you talking about. What do you mean I'm not doing a good job. I haven't gotten any complaints about my code yetexclamation'' Coupling such surprise and resentment with the shock that software really is a product and software quality concepts do exist, can fuel the volatility of these emotions. In this paper, we demonstrate that the concept of software quality can indeed pose a culture shock to developers. We also show that a ''typical'' quality assurance approach, that of imposing a standard and providing inspectors and auditors to assure its adherence, contributes to this shock and detracts from the very goal the approach should achieve. We offer an alternative, adopted through experience, to implement a software quality program: cooperative assistance. We show how cooperation, education, consultation and friendly assistance can overcome this culture shock. 3 refs.

  3. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Li, Jun; Liu, Wenda; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2015-11-01

    We study laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation for shock ignition using both fluid and PIC simulations. Typical parameters for OMEGA experiments are used with a density scale length of 170 μm and a pulse length of ~ 15 ps. A series of simulations with laser intensities between 2 × 1015 and 5 × 1016 W/cm2 finds that stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) increases significantly with the incident intensity, limiting the transmitted intensity at the 0.17nc to be under 3 × 1015 W/cm2. It is also found that proper modeling of the SBS reflectivity requires realistic flow profiles and seed levels for the electromagnetic fields. The majority of the hot electrons are found to be from stimulated Raman scattering and of moderate energies. However, high energy electrons of preheating threat can still be generated from the two-plasmon-decay instability. This work was supported by DOE under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and DE-SC0012316; by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734; and by NSCF under Grant No. 11129503.

  4. Interplanetary Shocks Lacking Type 2 Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Maekela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks (approximately 34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed approximately 535 km/s) and only approximately 40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km/s and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration approximately +6.8 m/s (exp 2)), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration approximately 3.5 m/s (exp 2)). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is

  5. INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS LACKING TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Maekelae, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks ({approx}34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed {approx}535 km s{sup -1}) and only {approx}40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km s{sup -1} and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration {approx}+6.8 m s{sup -2}), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration {approx}-3.5 m s{sup -2}). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is predominant

  6. First-principles calculation of the reflectance of shock-compressed xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M. Stegailov, V. V.

    2015-05-15

    Within electron density functional theory (DFT), the reflectance of radiation from shock-compressed xenon plasma is calculated. The dependence of the reflectance on the frequency of the incident radiation and on the plasma density is considered. The Fresnel formula is used. The expression for the longitudinal dielectric tensor in the long-wavelength limit is used to calculate the imaginary part of the dielectric function (DF). The real part of the DF is determined by the Kramers-Kronig transformation. The results are compared with experimental data. An approach is proposed to estimate the plasma frequency in shock-compressed xenon.

  7. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  8. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan B.; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury. PMID:23927195

  9. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  10. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  11. Design and initial operational characteristics of a shock tube-Raman scattering calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. W. L.; Kroeger, G. A.; Smith, M. S.

    1983-09-01

    A shock tube system has been designed and constructed to provide a high-temperature, local thermal equilibrium gas sample for the determination of Raman scattering cross sections. The shock tube was designed for operation over the temperature (T) range of 800 < or = T < or = 4000 K and the number density (n) range of 0.2 < or = n < or = 2.1 amagat. The fabricated steel shock tube was 6.98 m long with a 6.35-cm inner diameter; the driven/driver section length ratio was 1.88. The initial demonstration of a laser Raman-shock tube system for high-temperature cross section and calibration measurements was accomplished. The incident Mach number range of 4 to 5 was studied with the driver gas and N2 as the driven species using a seamless shock tube and the same tube which was retrofitted with a stainless steel tube liner. The Raman spectra obtained with the seamless steel tube revealed effects of rust particles which has been scrubbed from the tube wall. Upon insertion of the stainless steel liner, these effects were reduced to small corrections to the Raman signal. Vibrational Raman spectra of shock-heated N2 were acquired using a frequency-doubled ruby laser, spectrometer dispersion, and a single PMT detection channel.

  12. Shock temperature measurement using neutron resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, V W; Bowman, J David; Funk, D J; Morgan, G L; Rabie, R L; Ragan, C E; Quintana, J P; Stacy, H L

    2005-04-01

    We report a direct measurement of temperature in a shocked metal using Doppler broadening of neutron resonances. The 21.1-eV resonance in 182W was used to measure the temperature in molybdenum shocked to approximately 63 GPa. An explosively launched aluminum flyer produced a planar shock in a molybdenum target that contained a 1-mm thick layer doped with 1.7 at. %(182)W. A single neutron pulse, containing resonant neutrons of less than 1 mus duration, probed the shocked material. Fits to the neutron time-of-flight data were used to determine the temperature of the shocked molybdenum.

  13. Calorimetric thermobarometry of experimentally shocked quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocker, Katherine D.; Gooding, James L.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1994-01-01

    Structural damage in experimentally shock-metamorphosed, granular quartz is quantitatively measurable by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Shock-induced loss of crystallinity is witnessed by disappearance of the alpha/beta phase transformation and evolution of a broad endoenthalpic strain peak at 650-900 K. The strain-energy peak grows rapidly at less than 10 GPa but declines with increasing shock pressure; it approaches zero at 32 GPa where vitrification is extensive. Effects of grain size and post-shock thermal history must be better understood before calorimetric thermobarometry of naturally shocked samples becomes possible.

  14. On the simulation of ballistic shock loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollburg, Uwe

    1987-01-01

    Blast or penetrator-impact induced shocks are characterized by high acceleration levels, particularily in the higher frequency range and for a short time duration. These shocks are dangerous for the equipment of ships, combat vehicles, airplanes or spacecraft structures. As ballistic shock loads are insufficiently simulated by laboratory test machines, researchers designed a ballistic shock simulator. The impact induced shocks are simulated by an explosive and the vehicle to be bombarded is replaced by a simplified structure. This structure is suitable to accommodate any equipment which can be tested up to their load limits.

  15. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios

    2010-12-15

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  16. Serious Incident Management in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Ike; Thorley-Smith, Sara

    2007-01-01

    As part of its efforts to ensure school safety, the government of New South Wales, Australia, has developed simulation exercises to better prepare principals to manage serious incidents, in collaboration with police. This article describes two initiatives implemented across NSW. The exercises provide principals in both secondary and primary…

  17. Incidents Unsuitable for Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, R. Murray; And Others

    Educators from over 30 countries judged the suitability of incidents in moral education in the context of their native environment. Participants were 54 secondary school principals or teachers, most of whom were graduate students or married to graduate students at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were given descriptions of 23…

  18. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  19. Solar Sources of ``Driverless'' Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Mäkelä, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2010-03-01

    We identify the solar sources of a large number of interplanetary (IP) shocks that do not have a discernible driver as observed by spacecraft along the Sun-Earth line. At the Sun, these ``driverless'' shocks are associated with fast and wide CMEs. Most of the CMEs were also driving shocks near the Sun, as evidenced by the association of IP type II radio bursts. Thus, all these shocks are driven by CMEs and they are not blast waves. Normally limb CMEs produce driverless shocks at 1 AU. But some disk-center CMEs also result in driverless shocks because of deflection by nearby coronal holes. We estimate the angular deflection to be in the range 20°-60°. We also compared the influence of nearby coronal holes on a set of CMEs that resulted in magnetic clouds. The influence is nearly three times larger in the case of driverless shocks, confirming the large deflection required.

  20. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  1. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  2. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  3. Corrugation of Relativistic Magnetized Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Ramos, Oscar; Gremillet, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    As a shock front interacts with turbulence it develops corrugation, which induces outgoing wave modes in the downstream plasma. For a fast shock wave, the incoming wave modes can either be fast magnetosonic waves originating downstream, outrunning the shock, or eigenmodes of the upstream plasma drifting through the shock. Using linear perturbation theory in relativistic MHD, this paper provides a general analysis of the corrugation of relativistic magnetized fast shock waves resulting from their interaction with small amplitude disturbances. Transfer functions characterizing the linear response for each of the outgoing modes are calculated as a function of the magnetization of the upstream medium and as a function of the nature of the incoming wave. Interestingly, if the latter is an eigenmode of the upstream plasma, we find that there exists a resonance at which the (linear) response of the shock becomes large or even diverges. This result may have profound consequences on the phenomenology of astrophysical relativistic magnetized shock waves.

  4. Instabilities and Structure Evolution in Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Visco, A. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Reighard, A. B.; Knauer, J.

    2007-11-01

    Radiative shocks, systems in which radiation transport across the shock front contributes substantially to the properties and dynamics of the shock, occur frequently in astrophysical systems, motivating our high-energy-density experiments. Recent laser-driven experiments have produced collapsed shocks by launching 10-20 μm drive disks of Be into shock tubes of Xe gas at atmospheric pressure. This method produces strongly radiative shocks at well over 100 km/sec. Experiments using x-ray pinhole radiography of collapsed radiative shocks have revealed evidence of structure evolution, perhaps through instability mechanisms. Recent experiments provided simultaneous normal and oblique data. Theoretical work related to structure growth will also be reported. This research was sponsored by the NNSA through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058, DE-FG52-04NA0064, and the NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship.

  5. A new facility for studying shock-wave passage over dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. Y.; Marks, B. D.; Johnston, H. Greg; Mannan, M. Sam; Petersen, E. L.

    2016-03-01

    Dust explosion hazards in areas where coal and other flammable materials are found have caused unnecessary loss of life and halted business operations in some instances. The elimination of secondary dust explosion hazards, i.e., reducing dust dispersion, can be characterized in shock tubes to understand shock-dust interactions. For this reason, a new shock-tube test section was developed and integrated into an existing shock-tube facility. The test section has large windows to allow for the use of the shadowgraph technique to track dust-layer growth behind a passing normal shock wave, and it is designed to handle an initial pressure of 1 atm with an incident shock wave Mach number as high as 2 to mimic real-world conditions. The test section features an easily removable dust pan with inserts to allow for adjustment of the dust-layer thickness. The design also allows for changing the experimental variables such as initial pressure, shock Mach number (Ms), dust-layer thickness, and the characteristics of the dust itself. The characterization experiments presented herein demonstrate the advantages of the authors' test techniques toward providing new physical insights over a wider range of data than what have been available heretofore in the literature. Limestone dust with a layer thickness of 3.2 mm was subjected to Ms = 1.23, 1.32, and 1.6 shock waves, and dust-layer rise height was mapped with respect to time after shock passage. Dust particles subjected to a Ms = 1.6 shock wave rose more rapidly and to a greater height with respect to shock wave propagation than particles subjected to Ms = 1.23 and 1.32 shock waves. Although these results are in general agreement with the literature, the new data also highlight physical trends for dust-layer growth that have not been recorded previously, to the best of the authors' knowledge. For example, the dust-layer height rises linearly until a certain time where the growth rate is dramatically reduced, and in this second

  6. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  7. Modeling Wildfire Incident Complexity Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire management in the United States and elsewhere is challenged by substantial uncertainty regarding the location and timing of fire events, the socioeconomic and ecological consequences of these events, and the costs of suppression. Escalating U.S. Forest Service suppression expenditures is of particular concern at a time of fiscal austerity as swelling fire management budgets lead to decreases for non-fire programs, and as the likelihood of disruptive within-season borrowing potentially increases. Thus there is a strong interest in better understanding factors influencing suppression decisions and in turn their influence on suppression costs. As a step in that direction, this paper presents a probabilistic analysis of geographic and temporal variation in incident management team response to wildfires. The specific focus is incident complexity dynamics through time for fires managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The modeling framework is based on the recognition that large wildfire management entails recurrent decisions across time in response to changing conditions, which can be represented as a stochastic dynamic system. Daily incident complexity dynamics are modeled according to a first-order Markov chain, with containment represented as an absorbing state. A statistically significant difference in complexity dynamics between Forest Service Regions is demonstrated. Incident complexity probability transition matrices and expected times until containment are presented at national and regional levels. Results of this analysis can help improve understanding of geographic variation in incident management and associated cost structures, and can be incorporated into future analyses examining the economic efficiency of wildfire management. PMID:23691014

  8. Coagulation disorders in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Thijs, L G; de Boer, J P; de Groot, M C; Hack, C E

    1993-01-01

    Abnormalities in coagulation and fibrinolysis are frequently observed in septic shock. The most pronounced clinical manifestation is disseminated intravascular coagulation. Recent studies in human volunteers and animal models have clarified the early dynamics and route of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. In healthy subjects subjected to a low dose of either endotoxin or TNF an imbalance in the procoagulant and the fibrinolytic mechanisms is apparent, resulting in a procoagulant state. Also in patients with septic shock a dynamic process of coagulation and fibrinolysis is ongoing with evidence of impaired fibrinolysis. These abnormalities have prognostic significance; the extent of disturbances of coagulation and fibrinolysis is related to the development of multiple organ failure and death.

  9. Shock Properties of Fansteel85

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Nellis, W J

    2008-08-22

    The shock response of Fansteel85 was investigated in the pressure range 10-90 GPa. The linear U{sub s}-U{sub p} coefficients were found to be C = 4.160 {+-} .015 km/s and S = 1.195 {+-} .015. Ultrasound measurements yielded C{sub L} = 4.827 and C{sub T} = 2.101, implying a bulk sound speed C{sub B} = 4.173, which is in excellent agreement with the measured value for C. The Hugoniot elastic limit was determined to be 3.11 {+-} .05 GPa at U{sub p} = .0595 {+-} .001 km/s and U{sub s} = 4.886 {+-} .01 km/s. The speed of sound in the material behind the shock front was determined to be 5.10 {+-} .06 km/s at 10.2 GPa and 5.25 {+-} .06 km/s at 20.6 GPa.

  10. Shock response of dry sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Chhabildas, Lalit C..; Vogler, Tracy John; Brown, Justin L.

    2007-08-01

    The dynamic compaction of sand was investigated experimentally and computationally to stresses of 1.8 GPa. Experiments have been performed in the powder's partial compaction regime at impact velocities of approximately 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 km/s. The experiments utilized multiple velocity interferometry probes on the rear surface of a stepped target for an accurate measurement of shock velocity, and an impedance matching technique was used to deduce the shock Hugoniot state. Wave profiles were further examined for estimates of reshock states. Experimental results were used to fit parameters to the P-Lambda model for porous materials. For simple 1-D simulations, the P-Lambda model seems to capture some of the physics behind the compaction process very well, typically predicting the Hugoniot state to within 3%.

  11. Shock Hugoniot of 1215 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, N. S.; Rosenberg, Z.

    1996-05-01

    1215 steel is almost pure iron with 0.1 percent or less carbon. Information pertaining to deformation of this material under shock loading is useful to simulate penetration of projectiles of different shapes, such as fragments or rods, in propellants storage containments made from almost pure iron. In this paper we present the dynamic response of 1215 steel to shock wave loading to 30 GPa. Manganin gauges were used to record the stress wave profiles in these experiments. The Hugoniot data in the stress-particle velocity plane was obtained to 30 GPa. Hugoniot elastic limit was found to be 1.37±0.05 GPa. Phase transformation (α-ɛ) takes place at about 13.2±0.2 GPa, which agrees with the value determined by Barker and Hollenbach using VISAR. Hugoniot does not show any softening at stresses below 13 GPa.

  12. Multi-spacecraft analysis of the ion ramp of interplanetary shocks and bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Koval, Andriy; Zastenker, Georgy; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir

    2016-07-01

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the Earth. Fast forward shocks driven by coronal mass ejections or by interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams can be encountered in the interplanetary space, whereas the bow shock is a standing fast reverse shock formed by interaction of the supersonic solar wind with the Earth magnetic field. Both types of shocks are responsible for a transformation of a part of the energy of the directed solar wind motion to plasma heating and to acceleration of reflected particles to high energies. These processes are closely related to shock front structure. The paper compares the structure of low-Mach number fast forward interplanetary shocks registered by Wind and ACE with observations of bow shock crossings observed by Cluster, THEMIS, and Spektr-R spacecraft. An application of the high-time resolution data allows us to distinguish formation mechanisms of both types of shocks.

  13. Reevaluation of the linkage between acute hemorrhagic shock and bacterial translocation in the rat.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, M T; Rodriguez, L F; Chen, C Y; Smith, G S; Russell, D H; Myers, S I; Cocanour, C S; Reed, R L; Miller, T A

    1993-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the conditions under which acute periods of hemorrhagic shock induce bacterial translocation. Rats (at least six per group) were anesthetized intraperitoneally with the barbiturate, pentobarbital (50 or 65 mg/kg), or the inhalation anesthetic methoxyflurane. Following anesthesia, the femoral artery was catheterized, from which blood was withdrawn to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mmHg for 30, 60, or 90 min, followed by reinfusion of shed blood. Instrumented, but nonshocked animals served as controls. Rats were sacrificed at 0, 2, or 24 hr postshock, and quantitative bacterial cultures of the mesenteric lymph node complex (MLN), liver, and spleen were made. Within groups, the effects of heparinization were also determined. In pentobarbital-treated animals, regardless of the extent of heparinization, consistent translocation to both MLN and distant organs occurred when shock was prolonged for 90 min, and assessment of translocation was made 24 hr after reinfusion of shed blood. Furthermore, a mortality rate of approximately 30% was found in rats subjected to this protocol. The magnitude of translocation was less consistent, and did not differ from that in sham shock controls, under other conditions of shock and evaluation. In rats anesthetized with methoxyflurane, no mortality occurred, and no statistical significance between the incidence or degree of translocation in shocked animals vs. sham shock controls could be demonstrated, regardless of the shock protocol. In additional studies, effects of these anesthetics on intestinal morphology and superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) flow in the context of hemorrhagic shock were assessed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8348683

  14. Suppressive and facilitative effects of shock intensity and interresponse times followed by shock.

    PubMed

    Everly, Jessica B; Perone, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food presentation. Shock followed either long or short interresponse times. Shock intensity was raised from 0.05 mA to 0.4 mA or 0.8 mA. Overall, shock contingent on long interresponse times punished long interresponse times and increased response rates. Shock contingent on short interresponse times punished short interresponse times and decreased response rates. In Experiment 1, raising the range of interresponse times that produced shock enhanced these effects. In Experiment 2, the effects of shock intensity depended on the interresponse times that produced shock. When long interresponse times produced shock, low intensities increased response rates. High intensities decreased response rates. When short interresponse times produced shock, high shock intensities punished short interresponse times and decreased response rates more than low intensities. The results may explain why punishment procedures occasionally facilitate responding and establish parameters for future studies of punishment.

  15. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  16. Shock dynamics of phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, Antonio

    2014-04-15

    A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas–liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts. -- Highlights: •A new generalisation of van der Waals equation of state. •Description of phase transitions in terms of shock dynamics of state curves. •Proof of the universality of equations of state for a general class of models. •Interpretation of triple points as confluence of classical shock waves. •Correspondence table between thermodynamics and nonlinear conservation laws.

  17. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  18. Density shocks in confined microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva; Biodynamics Team

    2014-11-01

    Motile microorganisms are often subject to different types of boundary confinement in their natural environment, but the effects of confinement on their dynamics are poorly understood. We consider an idealized model of confined microswimmers restricted to move in a two-dimensional Hele-Shaw cell. We then impose two different types of boundary confinement: circular and sidewalls confinement. We study how boundaries trigger the emergence of global modes. In the case of circular confinement, the microswimmers can spontaneously organize themselves into a single vortex state when the radius of the circular boundary is below a certain critical value, reminiscent to what have been observed in recent experiments of bacterial suspensions. In the case of sidewalls confinement in a rectangular channel, the microswimmers form density shock, via interaction with the sidewalls and background flow. We show that, through controlling the strength of background flow, we can manipulate the density shock to form at the back or front of the swimmer clusters or the suppression of the shock which gives rise to a uniform traveling wave of swimmers.

  19. Shock desensitizing of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shockwave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in support of these ideas.

  20. Incident Shock-Transverse Jet Interactions at Mach 1.9: Effect of Different Jet Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Lo, K. H.; Erdem, E.; Kontis, K.

    Transverse jet injections into a high-speed freestream have been studied due to their applications in attitude control of aerospace vehicles, by creating an imbalance in pressure, and also the injection of fuel for supersonic combustion ramjets (scramjet) [1, 2, 3, 4].

  1. Shock tube measurements of specific reaction rates in the branched chain CH4-CO-O2 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Rate constants of two elementary bimolecular reactions involved in the oxidation of methane have been determined by monitoring the exponential growth of CO flame band emission behind incident shocks in three suitably chosen gas mixtures. The data do not support a mechanism which invokes the four center process CH3 + O2 yields CH2O + OH for the reaction of methyl with oxygen.

  2. Table and Charts of Equilibrium Normal-shock Properties for Pure Hydrogen with Velocities to 70 km/sec. Revised.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Errors found in the original edition are corrected. Refinement was made in procedures for solving the conservation relations for an incident (moving), standing, and reflected normal shock, as well as in computational methods for determining thermochemical-equilibrium hydrogen properties. A six-species hydrogen model replaces the original four-species model, and the heat of formation and spectroscopic constants used in this six-species model are listed in appendix A. In appendix B, comparisons are made between a number of methods for determining equilibrium thermodynamic properties for hydrogen for several values of pressure and temperatures to 50000 K. A comparison is also performed between the present method and a second method for determining thermodynamic properties and flow velocity behind an incident shock into pure hydrogen and behind a reflected shock.

  3. Addressing the problem of uniform converging spherical shock wave in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitishinskiy, M.; Efimov, S.; Yanuka, D.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved parameters of plasma compressed by a shock wave generated by the underwater electrical explosion of a spherical wire array are presented. The plasma was preliminarily formed inside a capillary placed at the equatorial plane along the axis of the array. Temporal evolution analysis of Hα and C II spectral lines showed that the plasma density increases from its initial value of ˜3 × 1017 cm-3 up to ˜5.5 × 1017 cm-3 within 300 ± 25 ns. These results were found to be in agreement with those of the model that considers the adiabatic compression of the plasma by the converging capillary walls caused by interaction with the incident shock wave with a pressure of ˜3 × 109 Pa at a radius of 1.5 mm. The latter results coincide well with those of the 1D hydrodynamic modeling, which assumes uniformity of the converging shock wave.

  4. Shock wave and material vapour plume propagation during excimer laser ablation of aluminium samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Greif, R.; Russo, R. E.

    1999-10-01

    A probe beam deflection technique was utilized to measure the propagation of a shock wave and material vapour plume generated during excimer laser ablation of aluminium samples. The measured transit time of the laser-induced shock wave was compared with the prediction based on an ideal blast-wave model, using the Sedov-Taylor solution. The prediction of the incident laser energy converted into the laser-induced gasdynamic flow utilizing this blast-wave model overestimated the efficiency, even under conditions when the measured shock-wave velocity follows the correct model relation. The propagation of material vapour was measured from the deflection of the probe beam at later times. The propagation velocity of material vapour ranged from 20-40 m s-1 with a greater velocity near the target surface.

  5. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  6. A geometry for sub-nanosecond X-ray diffraction from laser-shocked polycrystalline foils

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, Justin; Higginbotham, Andrew; Kimminau, Giles; Murphy, William; Nagler, Bob; Whitcher, Thomas; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Butterfield, Martin; El-Dasher, Bassem; McNaney, James; Milathianaki, Despina; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce; Davies, Huw; Thornton, Lee; Park, Nigel; Lukezic, Stan

    2007-12-12

    In situ picosecond X-ray diffraction has proved to be a useful tool in furthering our understanding of the response of shocked crystals at the lattice level. To date the vast majority of this work has used single crystals as the shocked samples, owing to their diffraction efficiency, although the study of the response of polycrystalline samples is clearly of interest for many applications. We present here the results of experiments to develop sub-nanosecond powder/polycrystalline diffraction using a cylindrical pinhole camera. By allowing the incident X-ray beam to impinge on the sample at non-normal angles, the response of grains making a variety of angles to the shock propagation direction can potentially be interrogated.

  7. A computational study on oblique shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Md. Saddam Hossain; Rahman, Saeedur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Matsuo, S.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical computation of an oblique shock wave incident on a turbulent boundary layer was performed for free stream flow of air at M∞ = 2.0 and Re1 = 10.5×106 m-1. The oblique shock wave was generated from a 8° wedge. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation with k-ω SST turbulence model was first utilized for two dimensional (2D) steady case. The results were compared with the experiment at the same flow conditions. Further, to capture the unsteadiness, a 2D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with sub-grid scale model WMLES was performed which showed the unsteady effects. The frequency of the shock oscillation was computed and was found to be comparable with that of experimental measurement.

  8. Development of an incident reporting system.

    PubMed

    Puetz, K

    1988-08-01

    Incident reports document occurrences that are not consistent with routine hospital procedures or routine patient care; they are one measure of the quality of patient care. Waukesha (Wisconsin) Memorial Hospital has developed an incident reporting system that allows analysis of incidents by type and location of occurrence so trends can be identified. The hospital has also developed an "incident rate," which is useful for analyzing incident occurrences in relation to patient census.

  9. Global Incidence of Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Tielsch, James M

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the incidence of preterm birth depends on accurate assessment of gestational age and pregnancy outcomes. In many countries, such data are not routinely collected, making global estimates difficult. A recent systematic approach to this problem has estimated a worldwide incidence of 11.1 per 100 live births in 2010. Significant variation in rates by country and region of the world was noted, but this variation is smaller than observed for a number of other important reproductive outcomes. Rates range from approximately 5% in some northern European countries to over 15% in some countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Time trends suggest that preterm birth incidence is increasing, but much of this change may reflect changes in medically induced early delivery practices as improvements in survival of preterm infants has improved. Whether there have been major changes in spontaneous preterm birth is unknown. New approaches to classifying etiologic heterogeneity have been proposed and offer the promise of developing specific interventions to address the range of underlying causes of this important health problem. PMID:26111559

  10. Thermal and Supra-thermal Electron Properties at Quasi-perpendicular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundkvist, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a statistical study of how the solar wind electron core and halo sub-populations are individually changed when crossing the Earth's quasi-perpendicular bow shock. Thermodynamical quantities are defined and obtained by fitting model functions to the electron distributions sampled by the THEMIS spacecraft. We find that while the core is compressed, the halo is often deflated behind the shock. Both are isotropically heated on a timescale of less than three seconds, and the ratio of the downstream to upstream temperature is a factor five to six for both populations. The partial pressure ratio between the solar wind core and halo populations is of the order of 10 both upstream and downstream. The κ of the halo Kappa distribution goes from an upstream value of κup=2.5 to a downstream value κdown=4.5, taking the halo from a critically balanced non-equilibrium thermodynamical state in the solar wind to a state in thermal near-equilibrium behind the shock.We find that there is an inverse dependence of the core and halo temperature, density, κ and energy density upon the Mach number. Slower shocks are more effective at compressing and heating the core and the halo.The difference in electron energy density normalized to incident proton kinetic energy density is inversely dependent on Mach number. At Earth's bow shock, the core electron heating accounts for around 10% of the available incident ram energy, while the halo only 1%. This quantitiy depends on Mach number but does not seem to depend on the shock θ_Bn angle.

  11. Geomagnetic avtivity triggered by interplanetary shocks: The shock impact angle as a controlling factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Tsurutani, B.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    We study the influence of interplanetary (IP) shock impact angles in the shock geoeffectiveness focusing on simulations and observations. In our simulations, we use OpenGGCM simulations to study the magnetospheric and ionospheric responses to shock impacts. Three cases are presented here: two inclined shocks, with 3.7 and 7.4 Mach numbers, and a frontal shock, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with Mach number of 7.4. We find that, in the two inclined cases, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the magnetotail is compressed from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm. By comparing the strong inclined shock and the frontal shock, we find that, despite the inclined shock having a larger Mach number, the frontal shock leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation. In our observational study, we present a survey of IP shocks at 1 AU using Wind and ACE satellite data from Jan 1995 to Dec 2013 to study the same shock-related effects. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index (enhanced AL index), is used to quantify substorm strength. The jumps of the SML index triggered by shock impacts is investigated in terms of shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong and almost frontal shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The highest correlations (R = 0.78) occurs for fixed shock speed and varying the shock impact angle. We attribute this result

  12. The use of percutaneous left ventricular assist device in high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Akhondi, Andre Babak; Lee, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with high-risk coronary lesions may be denied coronary artery bypass grafting due to excessive comorbidities. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may be a feasible revascularization strategy in high-risk patients who present with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock. Historically, the use if intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in high-risk PCI and cardiogenic shock. However, recent data has shown that elective IABP insertion did not reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events following PCI. The use of a left ventricular assist device is a reasonable and safe alternative compared with IABP counterpulsation, giving greater cardiac output and hemodynamic support in patients undergoing high-risk PCI and in those with severe cardiogenic shock. This review outlines a case of severe cardiogenic shock and hemodynamic instability where high-risk PCI is a reasonable option.

  13. Development of a broadband reflectivity diagnostic for laser driven shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Ali, S J; Bolme, C A; Collins, G W; Jeanloz, R

    2015-04-01

    A normal-incidence visible and near-infrared shock wave optical reflectivity diagnostic was constructed to investigate changes in the optical properties of materials under dynamic laser compression. Documenting wavelength- and time-dependent changes in the optical properties of laser-shock compressed samples has been difficult, primarily due to the small sample sizes and short time scales involved, but we succeeded in doing so by broadening a series of time delayed 800-nm pulses from an ultrafast Ti:sapphire laser to generate high-intensity broadband light at nanosecond time scales. This diagnostic was demonstrated over the wavelength range 450-1150 nm with up to 16 time displaced spectra during a single shock experiment. Simultaneous off-normal incidence velocity interferometry (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) characterized the sample under laser-compression and also provided an independent reflectivity measurement at 532 nm wavelength. The shock-driven semiconductor-to-metallic transition in germanium was documented by the way of reflectivity measurements with 0.5 ns time resolution and a wavelength resolution of 10 nm.

  14. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Desjouy, C. Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Marsden, O.

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Development of a broadband reflectivity diagnostic for laser driven shock compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S. J.; Bolme, C. A.; Collins, G. W.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-04-01

    A normal - incidence visible and near - infrared Shock Wave Optical Reflectivity Diagnostic (SWORD) was constructed to investigate changes in the optical properties of materials under dynamic laser compression . Documenting wavelength - and time - dependent changes in the optical properties of laser - shock compressed samples has been difficult, primarily due to the small sample sizes and short time scales involved , but we succeeded in doing so by broadening a series of time delayed 800 - nm pulses from an ultra fast Ti: sapphire laser to generate high - intensity broadband light at nanosecond time scales . This diagnostic was demonstrated over the wavelength range 450 to 1150 nm with up to 16 time displaced spectra during a single shock experiment. Simultaneous off - normal incidence velocity interferometry (VISAR) characterize d the sample under laser - compression , and also provide d a n independent reflectivity measurement at 532 nm wavelength . Lastly, the shock - driven semiconductor - to - metallic transition in germanium was documented by way of reflectivity measurements with 0.5 ns time resolution and a wavelength resolution of 10 nm .

  16. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  17. Analysis of shock pulses for environmental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications for shock testing of components that will be used on the Space Shuttle vehicles require very high acceleration levels. A special shock machine was built for testing of rocket components to determine if they can meet the specified accelerations. Calibrations of transducers and methods to monitor the shock tests raised several signature-analysis questions. In this report, calibration capabilities of shock accelerometers are found to be limited to 10,000g. Equivalency of the mechanical shock test and the rocket pyrotechnic shock are examined, and two simple relationships for equivalency are proposed. Five different pulse signature-analysis techniques are tested on analytical and experimental pulse data and recommendations are made for the signature technique which most clearly identifies the magnitude of the impulse applied to the test specimen.

  18. Shock-induced phase transformation in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Luke L.

    2010-09-01

    A TEM study of pure tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys explosively shocked at a peak pressure of 30 GPa is presented. While no omega phase was found in shock-recovered pure Ta and Ta-5W which mainly contain a cellular dislocation structure, a shock-induced omega phase was found in Ta-10W which contains evenly distributed dislocations with a density higher than 1 × 1012 cm - 2. The shock-induced \\alpha ~\\mathrm {(bcc)}\\rightarrow \\omega (hexagonal) transition occurs when the dynamic recovery of dislocations becomes largely suppressed in Ta-10W shocked under dynamic-pressure conditions. A dislocation-based mechanism is proposed for the shock-induced phase transformation.

  19. Limiting Temperatures of Spherical Shock Wave Implosion.

    PubMed

    Liverts, Michael; Apazidis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Spherical shock wave implosion in argon is studied both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that as the strength of the converging shock increases the nonideal gas effects become dominant and govern the evolution of thermal and transport gas properties limiting the shock acceleration, lowering the gas adiabatic index and the achievable energy density at the focus. Accounting for multiple-level ionization, excitation, Coulomb interaction and radiation effects, the limiting equilibrium temperatures to be achieved during the shock implosion are estimated. Focal temperatures of the order of 30 000 K are measured in experiments where converging spherical shock waves are created using a conventional gas-dynamic shock tube facility. PMID:26799021

  20. Advances in Monitoring and Management of Shock

    PubMed Central

    Mtaweh, Haifa; Trakas, Erin V.; Su, Erik; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Aneja, Rajesh K.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Shock continues to be the proximate cause of death for many childhood diseases and imposes a significant burden. Early recognition and treatment of pediatric shock, regardless of etiology, decreases mortality and improves outcome. In addition to the conventional parameters (e.g., heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), urine output (UOP), and central venous pressure (CVP)), biomarkers and non-invasive methods of measuring cardiac output are now available to monitor and treat shock. In this article, we emphasize how fluid resuscitation is the cornerstone of shock resuscitation although the choice and amount of fluid may vary based on the etiology of shock. Other emerging treatments for shock i.e., temperature control, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)/Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD) are also discussed briefly in this article. PMID:23639660

  1. Shock compaction of high- Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S.T.; Nellis, W.J.; McCandless, P.C.; Brocious, W.F. ); Seaman, C.L.; Early, E.A.; Maple, M.B. . Dept. of Physics); Kramer, M.J. ); Syono, Y.; Kikuchi, M. )

    1990-09-01

    We present the results of shock compaction experiments on high-{Tc} superconductors and describe the way in which shock consolidation addresses critical problems concerning the fabrication of high J{sub c} bulk superconductors. In particular, shock compaction experiments on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} show that shock-induced defects can greatly increase intragranular critical current densities. The fabrication of crystallographically aligned Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} samples by shock-compaction is also described. These experiments demonstrate the potential of the shock consolidation method as a means for fabricating bulk high-{Tc} superconductors having high critical current densities.

  2. Reflected-shock initiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, E.N.; Hull, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    In a study of initiations caused by reflected shock from a high-impedance boundary, attempts to establish sufficient conditions for initiative are described. Shock polar analysis is used to discover the ranges of various flow regimes, general shock structures and pressure estimates of states behind the reflected wave. Using this knowledge, wave structure growth rates from hydrocode simulations are estimated and standard-shock initiation criteria are used; experiments are designed in which the initiation from a reflected-shock wave structure appears likely. Two experiments are described in which a reflected-shock wave from a uranium surface initiated PBX 9502. The experimental evidence is in good agreement with the assumptions and results of the analysis.

  3. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Britton, Charles L.; Pearce, James; Jagadish, Usha; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2008-11-11

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  4. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Britton, Charles L [Alcoa, TN; Pearce, James [Lenoir City, TN; Jagadish, Usha [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod K [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-02

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  5. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  6. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  7. Punishment shock intensity and basal skin resistance.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A

    1965-11-01

    The relationship between punishment shock intensity and basal skin resistance (BSR) was investigated in two sessions with human females selected for their ability to maintain a fairly substantial operant rate under a wide range of shock intensities. In both sessions each button-pressing response was reinforced with a counter tally. Subjects were paid one cent for each 20 counts. In session 1, punishment followed each response during alternate 4-min periods; in session 2 punishment was programmed in all 4-min periods. Shock intensities were presented randomly among the 4-min shock periods, with the restriction that the first three presentations occurred in ascending order. Operant responding showed some suppression at higher shock intensities in session 1, with substantial recovery in most subjects during session 2. Respondent behavior was characterized by greater activity at successively higher intensities, with recovery at all shock levels, especially the lowest levels, apparent during the second session.

  8. Effects of shock pressures on calcic plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, R. V.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Calcic plagioclase single crystals were subjected to shock loading up to a pressure of 496 kbar; optical and electron microscope studies were conducted to investigate the shock-induced effects on the mineral, which is found in terrestrial and lunar rocks and in meteorites. It was observed that up to 287 kbar pressure, the recovered samples are essentially crystalline, while samples subjected to pressures between 300 and 400 kbar are almost 100% diaplectic glasses, suggesting shock transformation in the solid state. Samples shock-loaded to pressures greater than 400 kbar yielded glasses with refractive indices similar to those of thermally fused glass. It is concluded that planar features, absent in all the specimens, may not be definitive shock indicators, but may be linked to local heterogeneous dynamic stresses experienced by plagioclase grains within shocked rocks.

  9. Shock metamorphic effects in lunar microcraters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.; Gibbons, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed petrographic descriptions and results of electron microprobe analyses are presented for impact glasses as well as shocked and unshocked minerals associated with individual lunar microcraters (diameters of 0.4 to 4.4 mm). Rocks of four typical lunar lithologies are studied: anorthosite, anorthositic norite, ophitic basalt, and polymict breccia. Textures, mineralogies, and chemical compositions are examined along a radial traverse through each microcrater; i.e., across the impact glasses lining the crater wall, the shock-metamorphosed zone immediately underlying the glass liner, and the unshocked host rock. The microcraters are discussed in a sequence of increasing mineralogical complexity of the host rock (from anorthosite to polymict breccia) in order to distinguish shock effects among mineral types. The shock metamorphic features observed are found to be comparable to those reported in shocked basalt from Lonar Crater, India, and are categorized into five shock-intensity classes with pressures experimentally calibrated.

  10. Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Choy, Y C

    2006-12-01

    Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia is an important tool for quality improvement and maintenance of high safety standards in anaesthetic services. It is now widely accepted as a useful quality improvement technique for reducing morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia and has become part of the many quality assurance programmes of many general hospitals under the Ministry of Health. Despite wide-spread reservations about its value, critical incident monitoring is a classical qualitative research technique which is particularly useful where problems are complex, contextual and influenced by the interaction of physical, psychological and social factors. Thus, it is well suited to be used in probing the complex factors behind human error and system failure. Human error has significant contributions to morbidities and mortalities in anaesthesia. Understanding the relationships between, errors, incidents and accidents is important for prevention and risk management to reduce harm to patients. Cardiac arrests in the operating theatre (OT) and prolonged stay in recovery, constituted the bulk of reported incidents. Cardiac arrests in OT resulted in significant mortality and involved mostly de-compensated patients and those with unstable cardiovascular functions, presenting for emergency operations. Prolonged-stay in the recovery extended period of observation for ill patients. Prolonged stay in recovery was justifiable in some cases, as these patients needed a longer period of post-operative observation until they were stable enough to return to the ward. The advantages of the relatively low cost, and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information, which can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems and to plan further initiatives for patient safety makes critical incident monitoring a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety. The contribution of critical incident reporting to the issue of patient safety is

  11. Early Warning: Development of Confidential Incident Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OLeary, Mike J.; Chappell, Sheryl L.; Connell, Linda (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Accidents hardly ever happen without warning. The combination, or sequence, of failures and mistakes that cause an accident may indeed be unique but the individual failures and mistakes rarely are. In the USA in 1974 the crews on two different aircraft misunderstood the same aeronautical chart and descended towards their destination dangerously early towards a mountain. The first crew were in good weather conditions and could see the mountain and resolved their misinterpretation of the chart. The second crew six weeks later were not so lucky. In cloud they had no clues to point out their mistake nor the presence of the mountain. The resulting crash and the ensuing inquiry, which brought to light the previous incident, shocked the country but gave it the impetus to instigate a safety reporting system. This system eventually became the NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS). The programme collects incident reports from pilots, controllers, mechanics, cabin attendants and many others involved in aviation operations. By disseminating this safety information the ASRS has helped enormously to give US airlines and airspace the highest safety standards. Accident prevention is a goal sought by everyone in the aviation industry and establishing effective incident reporting programmes can go a long way toward achieving that goal. This article will describe the steps and issues required to establish an incident reporting system. The authors summarize the lessons learned from the ASRS, now in its twentieth year of operation and from the Confidential Human Factors Reporting (HER) Programme run by British Airways, an airline that is a recognized world leader in safety reporting and analysis. The differences between government and airline operation of confidential safety reporting systems will be addressed.

  12. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  13. The earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Onsager, T.G.; Thomsen, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies directly pertaining to the earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath are reviewed, and some comparisons are made with data on other planets. Topics considered in detail include the electron foreshock, the ion foreshock, the quasi-parallel shock, the quasi-perpendicular shock, and the magnetosheath. Information discussed spans a broad range of disciplines, from large-scale macroscopic plasma phenomena to small-scale microphysical interactions. 184 refs.

  14. Survival of carbon grains in shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seab, C. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Supernova shocks play a significant part in the life of an interstellar grain. In a typical 10 to the 9th power year lifetime, a grain will be hit by an average of 10 shocks of 100 km s(sup -1) or greater velocity, and even more shocks of lower velocity. Evaluation of the results of this frequent shock processing is complicated by a number of uncertainties, but seems to give about 10 percent destruction of silicate grains and about half that for graphite grains. Because of the frequency of shocking, the mineralogy and sizes of the grain population is predominately determined by shock processing effects, and not by the initial grain nucleation and growth environment. One consequence of the significant role played by interstellar shocks is that a certain fraction (up to 5 percent) of the carbon should be transformed into the diamond phase. Diamond transformation is observed in the laboratory at threshold shock pressures easily obtainable in grain-grain collisions in supernova shocks. Yields for transforming graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon, and other nearly pure carbon solids into diamond are quite high. Impurities up to at least the 10 percent level (for oxygen) are tolerated in the process. The typical size diamond expected from shock transformation agrees well with the observed sizes in the Lewis et al. findings in meteoritic material. Isotropic anomalies already contained in the grain are likely to be retained through the conversion process, while others may be implanted by the shock if the grain is close to the supernova. The meteoritic diamonds are likely to be the results of transformation of carbon grains in grain-grain collisions in supernova shock waves.

  15. Intravenous adrenaline for shock in neonates.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruchi; Singh, D K

    2010-09-01

    Dopamine and dobutamine have been widely used to treat shock with variable success in newborns. In this retrospective data analysis, we report on the use of adrenaline in 20 neonates with birth asphyxia and shock that was refractory to dopamine and dobutamine. We concluded that adrenaline is a safe and effective drug that can be used as an add-on therapy to dopamine and/or dobutamine in newborns with shock secondary to birth asphyxia.

  16. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Graham, Robert A.; Morosin, Bruno

    1988-01-01

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

  17. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1987-04-20

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  18. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1988-11-08

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  19. On the generation of dispersive shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    We review various methods for the analysis of initial-value problems for integrable dispersive equations in the weak-dispersion or semiclassical regime. Some methods are sufficiently powerful to rigorously explain the generation of modulated wavetrains, so-called dispersive shock waves, as the result of shock formation in a limiting dispersionless system. They also provide a detailed description of the solution near caustic curves that delimit dispersive shock waves, revealing fascinating universal wave patterns.

  20. Shock-boundary-layer interaction in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey is given on the study of transonic shock/boundary layer effects in flight. Then the possibility of alleviating the adverse shock effects through passive shock control is discussed. A Swedish flight experiment on a swept wing attack aircraft is used to demonstrate how it is possible to reduce the extent of separated flow and increase the drag-rise Mach number significantly using a moderate amount of perforation of the surface.

  1. Melanoma incidence and frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Orjan; Johansson, Olle

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing steadily in many countries since 1960, but the underlying mechanism causing this increase remains elusive. The incidence of melanoma has been linked to the distance to frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting towers. In the current study, the authors sought to determine if there was also a related link on a larger scale for entire countries. Exposure-time-specific incidence was extracted from exposure and incidence data from 4 different countries, and this was compared with reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. Geographic differences in melanoma incidence were compared with the magnitude of this environmental stress. The exposure-time-specific incidence from all 4 countries became almost identical, and they were approximately equal to the reported age-specific incidence of melanoma. A correlation between melanoma incidence and the number of locally receivable FM transmitters was found. The authors concluded that melanoma is associated with exposure to FM broadcasting.

  2. Compressible gas properties of UF/sub 6/ for isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harloff, G.J.

    1984-11-01

    Isentropic, normal shock, and oblique shock tables are given for the real gas UF/sub 6/ for Mach numbers up to 22. An evaluation of the real gas effects is given. A computer program listing is included.

  3. The development of an environmental disturbance model for large space structures after the onset of thermal shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamsath, N.; Bainum, P. M.; Krishna, R.

    1986-01-01

    Expressions for the temperature response across a thin large space structure during and immediately following the onset of thermal shock are obtained as a function of the properties of the material and the solar incidence angle. The thermal gradients induced due to solar radiation heating result in thermal deformation. From the temperature gradient information, expressions are developed for the time history of the thermally induced deflections based on the thermoelastic relationships. The effect of the variation of the solar incidence angle and the variation of the emissivity of the surface is considered. From the deflection time history, a model of the disturbance moments is developed and evaluated for different solar incidence angles.

  4. Comparison of the single/multi transverse jets under the influence of shock wave in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Rahimi Takami, M.; Heidari, H. R.; Fallah, Keivan; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the effects of the shock wave on sonic transverse hydrogen through single and multi-jets for supersonic combustion were investigated numerically. This study presents the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between fuel jets (single or multi array) and incident shock waves into a Mach 4.0 crossflow. Parametric studies were conducted on the performance of the shock wave by using the RANS equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. In a parametric study, both the streamwise spacing and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied. For all downstream mixing, the associated flow behavior was found to be a direct result of both the type of injection (single/Multi jet) and interactions between shock waves and injectors. According to the results, shock wave reduces the maximum concentration of the hydrogen jet more than 20% in both single and multi jet. Furthermore, a significant increase (approximately 40%) occurs in the mixing of the hydrogen jet at downstream when shock generator is presented in the multi jet with PR=0.27. Moreover, hydrogen-air mixing rate extends in streamwise direction as the jet space increases. Thus, an enhanced mixing zone occurs in the in far downstream of the jet and the shock wave.

  5. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  6. Public access defibrillation: a shocking idea?

    PubMed

    Woollard, M

    2001-06-01

    Currently, survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United Kingdom is poor. Ambulance response standards require that an ambulance reach 75 per cent of cardiac arrests within 8 min. But a short time to defibrillation from the onset of collapse is a key predictor of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The Department of Health has recently implemented a lay responder defibrillation programme, with the aim of shortening this time interval for victims in public places. This initiative utilizes automated external defibrillators (AEDs), which provide written and recorded voice prompts to minimize training requirements and errors in use. Lay responder AED programmes with very short response times have reported survival to discharge rates of up to 53 per cent for patients presenting in ventricular fibrillation (VF). This compares well with the results of a meta-analysis that reported a survival rate of only 6.4 per cent for traditional defibrillator-equipped ambulance systems. The annual incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in England is 123 per 100,000 population. Approximately half of these present in VF, and could benefit from an AED programme. But only 16 per cent of cardiac arrests occur in a public place. It has been calculated that there are approximately 5,000 instances of VF in public places each year in England. If half of these patients can be reached and administered a first shock within 4 min of their collapse, an additional 400 victims may survive each year. Given the current investment by the DoH of 2 million pounds, this suggests a cost per life saved of approximately 505 pounds over a 10 year period. PMID:11450941

  7. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  8. Basic Shock Physiology and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brian K

    2016-05-01

    Veterinarians practicing emergency medicine and/or working with exotic animals must be well versed in the pathophysiology of shock because many exotic pets present with an acute crisis or an acute manifestation of a chronic process causing poor organ perfusion. This article discusses the pathophysiology of shock and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which may lead to organ dysfunction, organ failure, sepsis, and death. The physiology of perfusion, perfusion measurements, categories of shock, and altered function of the immune system, gastrointestinal barrier, and coagulation system are discussed. Veterinarians providing emergency care to patients with shock must also be aware of comorbidities. PMID:27131156

  9. Gigabar shock wave in a laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of research on generating a powerful shock wave with a pressure of up to several gigabars in a laboratory experiment is reviewed. The focus is on results which give a possibility of shock-wave experiments to study an equation of state of matter (EOS) at the level of gigabar pressure. The proposals are discussed to achieve a plane record-pressure shock wave driven by laser-accelerated fast electrons with respect to EOS-experiment as well as to prospective method of inertial fusion target (ICF) ignition as shock ignition.

  10. 3D model of bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, M.; Ravkilde, T.; Kristensen, L. E.; Cabrit, S.; Field, D.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Shocks produced by outflows from young stars are often observed as bow-shaped structures in which the H2 line strength and morphology are characteristic of the physical and chemical environments and the velocity of the impact. Aims: We present a 3D model of interstellar bow shocks propagating in a homogeneous molecular medium with a uniform magnetic field. The model enables us to estimate the shock conditions in observed flows. As an example, we show how the model can reproduce rovibrational H2 observations of a bow shock in OMC1. Methods: The 3D model is constructed by associating a planar shock with every point on a 3D bow skeleton. The planar shocks are modelled with a highly sophisticated chemical reaction network that is essential for predicting accurate shock widths and line emissions. The shock conditions vary along the bow surface and determine the shock type, the local thickness, and brightness of the bow shell. The motion of the cooling gas parallel to the bow surface is also considered. The bow shock can move at an arbitrary inclination to the magnetic field and to the observer, and we model the projected morphology and radial velocity distribution in the plane-of-sky. Results: The morphology of a bow shock is highly dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field and the inclination of the flow. Bow shocks can appear in many different guises and do not necessarily show a characteristic bow shape. The ratio of the H2 v = 2-1 S(1) line to the v = 1-0 S(1) line is variable across the flow and the spatial offset between the peaks of the lines may be used to estimate the inclination of the flow. The radial velocity comes to a maximum behind the apparent apex of the bow shock when the flow is seen at an inclination different from face-on. Under certain circumstances the radial velocity of an expanding bow shock can show the same signatures as a rotating flow. In this case a velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow direction is a projection

  11. Raman spectroscopies in shock-compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering have been used to measure temperatures and changes in molecular vibrational frequencies for detonating and shocked materials. Inverse Raman and Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopies have been suggested as diagnostic probes for determining and phenomenology of shock-induced chemical reactions. The practicality, advantages, and disadvantages of using Raman scattering techniques as diagnostic probes of microscopic phenomenology through and immediately behind the shock front of shock-compressed molecular systems are discussed.

  12. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  13. Calculated shock pressures in the aquarium test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. N.

    1982-04-01

    A new method of analysis has been developed for determintion of shock pressures in aquarium tests on commercial explosives. This test consists of photographing the expanding cylindrical tube wall (which contains the detonation products) and the shock wave in water surrounding the explosive charge. By making a least-squares fit to the shock-front data, it is possible to determine the peak shock-front pressure as a function of distance from the cylinder wall. This has been done for 10-cm and 20-cm-diam ANFO (ammonium nitrate/fuel oil) and aluminized ANFO (7.5 wt% Al) aquarium test data.

  14. Laboratory Astrophysics: Study of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Lanz, T.; Stehlé, C.; Michaut, C.

    2002-12-01

    Radiative shocks are high Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. They might be encountered in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction of supernovae with the intestellar medium etc. A numerical one dimensional (1D) stationary study of the coupling between hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is being performed. An estimate of the error made by the 1D approach in the radiative transfer treatment is done by an approximate short characteristics approach. It shows, for exemple, how much of the radiation escapes from the medium in the configuration of the experiment. The experimental study of these shocks has been performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the École Polytechnique (France). We have observed several shocks identified as radiative shocks. The shock waves propagate at about 50 km/s in a tiny 10 mm3 shock tube filled with gaz. From the measurements, it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed and the electronic density.

  15. Shock-induced defects in bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper examples of the shock-induced defects produced during shock compression which correlate with microstructure/mechanical property changes induced in materials due to shock prestraining are discussed. The characteristics of the shock impulse(peak shock pressure, pulse duration, and rarefaction rate) imparted to the material under investigation and the shock-induced defects produced in numerous metals and alloys are compared with their deformation behavior at ordinary rates of deformation. Examples of the range of defects observed in shock-recovered metals and alloys, include: dislocations, deformation twins, point defects, and residual metastable remnants from pressure-induced phase transformations. Results concerning the influence of interstitial content on the propensity of {omega}-phase formation and its structure in high-purity and A-7O Ti are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium and A-7O (3,700 ppm oxygen) titanium were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and soft shock-recovery techniques. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} pressure-induced phase transformation in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correspond with the suppression of deformation twinning.

  16. Accretion shock geometries in the magnetic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    The first self consistent shock models for the AM Herculis-type systems successfully identified the dominant physical processes and their signatures. These homogenous shock models predict unpolarized, Rayleigh-Jeans optical spectra with sharp cutoffs and rising polarizations as the shocks become optically thin in the ultraviolet. However, the observed energy distributions are generally flat with intermediate polarizations over a broad optical band. These and other observational evidence support a non-homogenous accretion profile which may extend over a considerable fraction of the stellar surface. Both the fundamental assumptions underlying the canonical 1-D shock model and the extension of this model to inhomogenous accretion shocks were identified, for both radial and linear structures. The observational evidence was also examined for tall shocks and little evidence was found for relative shock heights in excess of h/R(1) greater than or equal to 0.1. For several systems, upper limits to the shock height can be obtained from either x ray or optical data. These lie in the region h/R(1) is approximately 0.01 and are in general agreement with the current physical picture for these systems. The quasi-periodic optical variations observed in several magnetic variables may eventually prove to be a major aid in further understanding their accretion shock geometries.

  17. Calculated shock pressures in the aquarium test

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    A new method of analysis has been developed for determination of shock pressures in aquarium tests on commercial explosives. This test consists of photographing the expanding cylindrical tube wall (which contains the detonation products) and the shock wave in water surrounding the explosive charge. By making a least-squares fit to the shock-front data, it is possible to determine the peak shock-front pressure as a function of distance from the cylinder wall. This has been done for 10-cm and 20-cm-diam ANFO (ammonium nitrate/fuel oil) and aluminized ANFO (7.5 wt% Al) aquarium test data.

  18. Stationary one-dimensional dispersive shock waves.

    PubMed

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Kamchatnov, Anatoly M

    2012-02-01

    We address shock waves generated upon the interaction of tilted plane waves with negative refractive index defects in defocusing media with linear gain and two-photon absorption. We found that, in contrast to conservative media where one-dimensional dispersive shock waves usually exist only as nonstationary objects expanding away from a defect or generating beam, the competition between gain and two-photon absorption in a dissipative medium results in the formation of localized stationary dispersive shock waves, whose transverse extent may considerably exceed that of the refractive index defect. One-dimensional dispersive shock waves are stable if the defect strength does not exceed a certain critical value.

  19. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  20. Electron physics in shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The non-relativistic shocks that we find in the solar wind (no matter if driven by CMEs or encounters with planets) are dominated by ion dynamics. Therefore a detailed treatment of electrons is often neglegted to gain significant reductions in computational effort. With recent super computers and massively parallel codes it is possible to perform self-consistent kinetic simulations using particle in cell code. This allows to study the heating of the electrons as well as the acceleration to superthermal energies. These energetic electrons are interesting for couple of reasons. e.g. as an influence on plasma instabilities or for the generation of plasma waves.

  1. Epidemic of "shocks" in telephone operators: lessons for the medical community.

    PubMed

    Yassi, A; Weeks, J L; Samson, K; Raber, M B

    1989-04-01

    In January 1986 two brief power failures occurring within an hour of each other affected the operation of visual display terminals in a section of the Manitoba Telephone System. After the power failures three operators reported an alarming tingling sensation in their arms and one side of their body, which they called "shocks". Other operators then began to report incidents of numbness and tingling in their limbs, face or head as well as other, diffuse symptoms. During the next 2 weeks 92 such incidents were reported by 55 operators. The media carried alarming headlines, and medical practitioners perpetuated the label of "electric shock". Despite extensive investigation, which revealed no electrical fault, the section was closed by the regulatory authority, and an independent medical panel was convened to review the findings. The panel concluded that there was no immediate hazard to life or health and recommended continued workplace assessment and follow-up of affected operators; however, because the panel lacked electrical engineering expertise, uncertainty persisted as to the cause of the events. The reports of incidents persisted, peaking in association with continued rumours of diagnoses of "nerve damage". In the fall of 1987 a multidisciplinary committee ruled out as causative factors all known hazards other than electrostatic shock and occupational stress. This costly and lengthy investigation underlines the danger in regarding collective stress reaction as a diagnosis of exclusion. It highlights the need to scrutinize objective evidence before validating potentially unfounded concerns and underlines the desirability of considering the psychosocial effects of technology and regimented tasks.

  2. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection or severe allergic reactions ) Certain medicines that significantly reduce heart function or ...

  3. A critical analysis of sarcoidosis incidence assessment.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2013-01-01

    Valid sarcoidosis incidence assessment is contingent on access to medical care, thoroughness of reportage, assiduity of radiographic interpretation, employment and health care screening policies, misclassification, and population ethnicity. To diminish ambiguity and foster inter-population comparison, the term "sarcoidosis incidence" must be modified to convey the methodology employed in compiling the numerator. In age-delimited cohorts, valid comparison to population incidence requires age adjustment due to the age-dependency of incidence. The "true incidence" of sarcoidosis is a notional concept: more than 90% of cases are subclinical and radiographically inevident. Occupational causal inference based on incidence differential vs. populations has been undermined by methodological differences in ascertainment and computation.

  4. Shock-resolving direct numerical simulations of strong turbulence interacting with a normal shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    In many natural and engineering systems, turbulence is found to interact with shock waves. Thus, canonical interactions between isotropic turbulence and a normal shock have been studied extensively, theoretically and numerically, though theories assume the shock to be a discontinuity and most simulations have used shock-capturing schemes which may miss details of the structure of the shock, especially for weak shocks in relatively strong turbulence. We present results on this regime from shock-resolving direct numerical simulations at a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. Our focus is on the shock structure and the effect on turbulence downstream of the shock. We study the distribution of velocity gradients, in particular dilatation across the shock and compare with theory available. We characterize turbulent shock jumps which are found to depart from the laminar theory as they depend not only on the mean Mach number but also on the Reynolds and turbulent Mach number. Changes experienced by thermodynamic variables across the shock will also be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  5. Characterizing interplanetary shocks for development and optimization of an automated solar wind shock detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, M. D.; Wrobel, J. S.; Cosentino, K. C.; Reinard, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    Human evaluation of solar wind data for interplanetary (IP) shock identification relies on both heuristics and pattern recognition, with the former lending itself to algorithmic representation and automation. Such detection algorithms can potentially alert forecasters of approaching shocks, providing increased warning of subsequent geomagnetic storms. However, capturing shocks with an algorithmic treatment alone is challenging, as past and present work demonstrates. We present a statistical analysis of 209 IP shocks observed at L1, and we use this information to optimize a set of shock identification criteria for use with an automated solar wind shock detection algorithm. In order to specify ranges for the threshold values used in our algorithm, we quantify discontinuities in the solar wind density, velocity, temperature, and magnetic field magnitude by analyzing 8 years of IP shocks detected by the SWEPAM and MAG instruments aboard the ACE spacecraft. Although automatic shock detection algorithms have previously been developed, in this paper we conduct a methodical optimization to refine shock identification criteria and present the optimal performance of this and similar approaches. We compute forecast skill scores for over 10,000 permutations of our shock detection criteria in order to identify the set of threshold values that yield optimal forecast skill scores. We then compare our results to previous automatic shock detection algorithms using a standard data set, and our optimized algorithm shows improvements in the reliability of automated shock detection.

  6. Concussion Incidence in Professional Football

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, John T.; Connolly, James G.; Yuk, Frank; Gometz, Alex; Rasouli, Jonathan; Lovell, Mark; Choudhri, Tanvir

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the United States alone, millions of athletes participate in sports with potential for head injury each year. Although poorly understood, possible long-term neurological consequences of repetitive sports-related concussions have received increased recognition and attention in recent years. A better understanding of the risk factors for concussion remains a public health priority. Despite the attention focused on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in football, gaps remain in the understanding of the optimal methodology to determine concussion incidence and position-specific risk factors. Purpose: To calculate the rates of concussion in professional football players using established and novel metrics on a group and position-specific basis. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Athletes from the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 National Football League (NFL) seasons were included in this analysis of publicly available data. Concussion incidence rates were analyzed using established (athlete exposure [AE], game position [GP]) and novel (position play [PP]) metrics cumulatively, by game unit and position type (offensive skill players and linemen, defensive skill players and linemen), and by position. Results: In 480 games, there were 292 concussions, resulting in 0.61 concussions per game (95% CI, 0.54-0.68), 6.61 concussions per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 5.85-7.37), 1.38 concussions per 100 GPs (95% CI, 1.22-1.54), and 0.17 concussions per 1000 PPs (95% CI, 0.15-0.19). Depending on the method of calculation, the relative order of at-risk positions changed. In addition, using the PP metric, offensive skill players had a significantly greater rate of concussion than offensive linemen, defensive skill players, and defensive linemen (P < .05). Conclusion: For this study period, concussion incidence by position and unit varied depending on which metric was used. Compared with AE and GP, the PP metric found that the relative risk of concussion for

  7. Guderley reflection for higher Mach numbers in a standard shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachucho, A.; Skews, B. W.

    2012-03-01

    An experimental study shows that the Guderley reflection (GR) of shock waves can be produced in a standard shock tube. A new technique was utilised which comprises triple point of a developed weak Mach reflection undergoing a number of reflections off the ceiling and floor of the shock tube before arriving at the test section. Both simple perturbation sources and diverging ramps were used to generate a transverse wave in the tube which then becomes the weak reflected wave of the reflection pattern. Tests were conducted for three ramp angles (10°, 15°, and 20°) and two perturbation sources for a range of Mach numbers (1.10-1.40) and two shock tube expansion chamber lengths (2.0 and 4.0 m). It was found that the length of the Mach stem of the reflection pattern is the overall vertical distance traveled by the triple point. Images with equivalent Mach stem lengths in the order of 2.0 m were produced. All tests showed evidence of the fourth wave of the GR, namely the expansion wave behind the reflected shock wave. A shocklet terminating the expansion wave was also identified in a few cases mainly for incident wave Mach numbers of approximately 1.20.

  8. Optical measurements of the mutual reflection of two-plane shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F.J.; Skews, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    A bifurcated shock tube is used to create two synchronized waves of equal strength. Essentially a single shock wave is split symmetrically in two, the two waves then are later brought back together at a trailing edge of a wedge to interact, the plane of symmetry acting as an ideal rigid wall. The normal method of studying mach reflections is to allow a plane shock wave to impinge on a wedge, however the boundary layer growth on the wedge surface effectively ensures that the flow direction behind the Mach stem does not have to satisfy the boundary condition of being parallel to the surface of the wedge. Thus the transition from regular to Mach reflection occurs at higher angles of incidence than theory allows. The present experiment was initiated to generate data on the ideal cause of reflection off a plane wall. The advantage of the new system is that like classical theory and computational solutions of the inviscid Euler equations, the boundary layer no slip condition is not imposed at the plane of reflection. Optical methods are used to investigate the post-shock flow, as well as to help explain the complex interactions which occur when the two shock waves are not synchronized. These interactions show many very interesting features and clearly indicate the need for higher resolution measurements such as are obtained using holographic interferometry, and also to extend the work to different wedge angles and Mach numbers.

  9. Impact of the indigenous flora in animal models of shock and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Carol L; Hess, Donavon J; Erlandsen, Stanley L

    2004-12-01

    Septicemia is currently the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and shock and trauma patients are the source of much of the morbidity and mortality associated with septicemia. There is substantial evidence that the composition of the indigenous flora plays an important role in modulating outcome variables in animal models of shock and sepsis. Germ-free animals that lack an indigenous flora are not as susceptible to shock as their conventionally reared counterparts. And, in conventionally reared animals, the composition of the intestinal flora can also modulate outcome in shock and sepsis. For example, certain bacterial species/strains disseminate from the intestinal tract more easily than others, antibiotic-induced alterations of the flora can modulate the incidence of systemic spread, and a certain threshold number of intestinal bacteria facilitates extraintestinal dissemination. The composition of the intestinal flora can also affect intestinal permeability, the production of inflammatory mediators, and the responses of immune cells in extraintestinal sites. And, there is evidence that prior exposure to endotoxin, via either the oral or systemic route, can influence outcome in animals challenged with parenteral endotoxin, a widely used model of endotoxin shock. The general composition of intestinal flora of experimental animals can be characterized with relative ease. This knowledge can aid data interpretation, either to help explain irreproducible or expected results or to verify that observed differences are likely related to the dependent variable studied rather than the composition of the indigenous flora.

  10. Computational Meso-Scale Study of Representative Unit Cubes for Inert Spheres Subject to Intense Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Cameron; Najjar, Fady; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2012-11-01

    Modern-engineered high explosive (HE) materials can consist of a matrix of solid, inert particles embedded into an HE charge. When this charge is detonated, intense shock waves are generated. As these intense shocks interact with the inert particles, large deformations occur in the particles while the incident shock diffracts around the particle interface. We will present results from a series of 3-D DNS of an intense shock interacting with unit-cube configurations of inert particles embedded into nitromethane. The LLNL multi-physics massively parallel hydrodynamics code ALE3D is used to carry out high-resolution (4 million nodes) simulations. Three representative unit-cube configurations are considered: primitive cubic, face-centered and body-centered cubic for two particle material types of varying impedance ratios. Previous work has only looked at in-line particles configurations. We investigate the time evolution of the unit cell configurations, vorticity being generated by the shock interaction, as well as the velocity and acceleration of the particles until they reach the quasi-steady regime. LLNL-ABS-567694. CSS was supported by a summer internship through the HEDP program at LLNL. FMN's work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. 78 FR 38949 - Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing Timely Cyber Incident Response

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC): Providing... Technology (NIST) is seeking information relating to Computer Security Incident Coordination (CSIC). NIST is... Computer Security Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) to coordinate effectively when responding to...

  12. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    PubMed

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  13. Shocks, star formation and the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, A.

    2015-12-01

    The interstellar medium (ISM) is constantly evolving due to unremitting injection of energy in various forms. Energetic radiation transfers energy to the ISM: from the UV photons, emitted by the massive stars, to X- and γ-ray ones. Cosmic rays are another source of energy. Finally, mechanical energy is injected through shocks or turbulence. Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies. They are associated to star formation (through jets and bipolar outflows), life (via stellar winds), and death (in AGB stellar winds or supernovae explosion). The dynamical processes leading to the formation of molecular clouds also generate shocks where flows of interstellar matter collide. Because of their ubiquity, the study of interstellar shocks is also a useful probe to the other mechanisms of energy injection in the ISM. This study must be conducted in order to understand the evolution of the interstellar medium as a whole, and to address various questions: what is the peculiar chemistry associated to shocks, and what is their contribution to the cycle of matter in galaxies ? What is the energetic impact of shocks on their surroundings on various scales, and hence what is the feedback of stars on the galaxies ? What are the scenarios of star formation, whether this star formation leads to the propagation of shocks, or whether it is triggered by shock propagation ? What is the role of shocks in the acceleration of cosmic rays ? Can they shed light on their composition and diffusion processes ? In order to progress on these questions, it is paramount to interpret the most precise observations with the most precise models of shocks. From the observational point of view, the James Webb Space Telescope represents a powerful tool to better address the above questions, as it will allow to observe numerous shock tracers in the infrared range at an unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution.

  14. Water in Shocks and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, D. A.; Melnick, G. J.; Stauffer, J. R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bergin, E. A.; Kleiner, S. C.; Patten, B. M.; Plume, R.; Tolls, V.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, Y. F.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Harwit, M.; Erickson, N. R.; Howe, J. E.; Snell, R. L.; Koch, D. G.; Schieder, R.; Winnewisser, G.; Chin, G.

    1999-12-01

    We have observed water vapor emission from several protostellar outflow regions with SWAS, including the sources Orion-KL, NGC 2071, NGC 1333 IRAS 4, L1157, RCrA, and L1689N. Observations of the 110}-1{01 water transition toward each of these sources have revealed the presence of broad line emission accompanied by narrow absorption in quiescent foreground gas or -- in the case of Orion-KL, by a narrow emission line component. In each case, the width of the broad emission line component, typically 20 - 40 km s-1 (FWHM), suggests an origin in the outflowing gas. From the observed line fluxes, we estimate water abundances ranging from 10-6 in low mass outflow regions to several x 10-4 in the Orion-KL region. These values are all significantly larger than the water abundance estimates of few x 10-9 - 10-7 derived from SWAS observations of quiescent regions, implying that the water abundances are enhanced in outflow regions. Such enhancements are indeed expected to result from the effects of shocks in (1) vaporizing icy grain mantles and/or (2) producing water in the gas-phase (by means of neutral-neutral reactions that are negligibly slow at the low temperatures of quiescent clouds but rapid at the elevated temperatures present behind a shock.)

  15. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  16. Shock finding on a moving-mesh - II. Hydrodynamic shocks in the Illustris universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Pfrommer, Christoph; Nelson, Dylan; Vogelsberger, Mark; Genel, Shy; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sijacki, Debora; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamical shocks are a manifestation of the non-linearity of the Euler equations and play a fundamental role in cosmological gas dynamics. In this work, we identify and analyse shocks in the Illustris simulation, and contrast the results with those of non-radiative runs. We show that simulations with more comprehensive physical models of galaxy formation pose new challenges for shock finding algorithms due to radiative cooling and star-forming processes, prompting us to develop a number of methodology improvements. We find in Illustris a total shock surface area which is about 1.4 times larger at the present epoch compared to non-radiative runs, and an energy dissipation rate at shocks which is higher by a factor of around 7. Remarkably, shocks with Mach numbers above and below mathcal {M}≈ 10 contribute about equally to the total dissipation across cosmic time. This is in sharp contrast to non-radiative simulations, and we demonstrate that a large part of the difference arises due to strong black hole radio-mode feedback in Illustris. We also provide an overview of the large diversity of shock morphologies, which includes complex networks of halo-internal shocks, shocks on to cosmic sheets, feedback shocks due to black holes and galactic winds, as well as ubiquitous accretion shocks. In high-redshift systems more massive than 1012 M⊙, we discover the existence of a double accretion shock pattern in haloes. They are created when gas streams along filaments without being shocked at the outer accretion shock, but then forms a second, roughly spherical accretion shock further inside.

  17. 40 CFR 68.60 - Incident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... began; (3) A description of the incident; (4) The factors that contributed to the incident; and, (5) Any... findings shall be reviewed with all affected personnel whose job tasks are affected by the findings....

  18. Development of a shock noise prediction code for high-speed helicopters - The subsonically moving shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadghighi, H.; Holz, R.; Farassat, F.; Lee, Yung-Jang

    1991-01-01

    A previously defined airfoil subsonic shock-noise prediction formula whose result depends on a mapping of the time-dependent shock surface to a time-independent computational domain is presently coded and incorporated in the NASA-Langley rotor-noise prediction code, WOPWOP. The structure and algorithms used in the shock-noise prediction code are presented; special care has been taken to reduce computation time while maintaining accuracy. Numerical examples of shock-noise prediction are presented for hover and forward flight. It is confirmed that shock noise is an important component of the quadrupole source.

  19. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  20. A shock-tube determination of the CN ground state dissociation energy and electronic transition moments for the CN violet and red band systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.; Nicholls, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The CN ground state dissociation energy and the sum of squares of the electronic transition moments of the CN violet bands have been simultaneously determined from spectral emission measurements behind incident shock waves. The unshocked test gases were composed of various CO2-CO-N2-Ar mixtures, and the temperatures behind the incident shocks ranged from 3500 to 8000 K. The variation of the electronic transition moment with internuclear separation was found to be small for both the CN violet and red band systems.

  1. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carper, D. M.; Nied, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental and analytical investigation of the thermal shock phenomena in ceramic matrix composites is detailed. The composite systems examined were oxide-based, consisting of an aluminosilicate matrix with either polycrystalline aluminosilicate or single crystal alumina fiber reinforcement. The program was divided into three technical tasks; baseline mechanical properties, thermal shock modeling, and thermal shock testing. The analytical investigation focused on the development of simple expressions for transient thermal stresses induced during thermal shock. The effect of various material parameters, including thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and thermal expansion, were examined analytically for their effect on thermal shock performance. Using a simple maximum stress criteria for each constituent, it was observed that fiber fracture would occur only at the most extreme thermal shock conditions and that matrix fracture, splitting parallel to the reinforcing fiber, was to be expected for most practical cases. Thermal shock resistance for the two material systems was determined experimentally by subjecting plates to sudden changes in temperature on one surface while maintaining the opposite surface at a constant temperature. This temperature change was varied in severity (magnitude) and in number of shocks applied to a given sample. The results showed that for the most severe conditions examined that only surface matrix fracture was present with no observable fiber fracture. The impact of this damage on material performance was limited to the matrix dominated properties only. Specifically, compression strength was observed to decrease by as much as 50 percent from the measured baseline.

  2. Existence Regions of Shock Wave Triple Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Chernyshev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to create the classification for shock wave triple configurations and their existence regions of various types: type 1, type 2, type 3. Analytical solutions for limit Mach numbers and passing shock intensity that define existence region of every type of triple configuration have been acquired. The ratios that conjugate…

  3. Post-shock relaxation in crystalline nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Rivera, Luis A.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of shocked (100)-oriented crystalline nitromethane were carried out to determine the rates of relaxation behind the shock wave. The forces were described by the fully flexible non-reactive Sorescu-Rice-Thompson force field [D. C. Sorescu, B. M. Rice, and D. L. Thompson, J. Phys. Chem. B 104, 8406 (2000)], 10.1021/jp000942q. The time scales for local and overall thermal equilibration in the shocked crystal were determined. The molecular center-of-mass and atomic kinetic energy distributions rapidly reach substantially different local temperatures. Several picoseconds are required for the two distributions to converge, corresponding to establishment of thermal equilibrium in the shocked crystal. The decrease of the molecular center-of-mass temperature and the increase of the atomic temperature behind the shock front exhibit essentially exponential dependence on time. Analysis of covalent bond distance distributions ahead of, immediately behind, and well behind the shock front showed that the effective bond stretching potentials are essentially harmonic. Effective force constants for the C-N, C-H, and N-O bonds immediately behind the shock front are larger by factors of 1.6, 2.5, and 2.0, respectively, than in the unshocked crystal; and by factors of 1.2, 2.2, and 1.7, respectively, compared to material sufficiently far behind the shock front to be essentially at thermal equilibrium.

  4. Shock-induced arrhythmogenesis in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayanova, Natalia; Eason, James

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this article is the investigation of the electrical behavior of the normal myocardium following the delivery of high-strength defibrillation shocks. To achieve its goal, the study employs a complex three-dimensional defibrillation model of a slice of the canine heart characterized with realistic geometry and fiber architecture. Defibrillation shocks of various strengths and electrode configurations are delivered to the model preparation in which a sustained ventricular tachycardia is induced. Instead of analyzing the post-shock electrical events as progressions of transmembrane potential maps, the study examines the evolution of the postshock phase singularities (PSs) which represent the organizing centers of reentry. The simulation results demonstrate that the shock induces numerous PSs the majority of which vanish before the reentrant wavefronts associated with them complete half of a single rotation. Failed shocks are characterized with one or more PSs that survive the initial period of PS annihilation to establish a new postshock arrhythmia. The increase in shock strength results in an overall decrease of the number of PSs that survive over 200 ms after the end of the shock; however, the exact behavior of the PSs is strongly dependent on the shock electrode configuration.

  5. Instability of spherically imploding shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Hilko, B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of spherically imploding shock waves has increased recently due to their particular applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the Spherical Pinch (SP). In particular, the stability of spherically imploding shock waves plays a critical role in the ultimate success of ICF and SP. The instability of spherically imploding shock waves is now systematically investigated. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandresakhar`s approach to the stability of spherical flames together. The governing equations for disturbances are derived and they use the condition that perturbed gas flow is potential. The three dimensional perturbation velocity profile and a shock front perturbation are solved by using the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions in the shock front. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained by solving the system of ordinary differential equations. This enables them to study the time history of the spherically imploding shock wave subject to perturbations. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. Preliminary results are presented.

  6. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. The paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third-order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation is quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  7. Computing unsteady shock waves for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows,, Kristine r.; Caughey, David A.; Casper, Jay

    1994-01-01

    The computation of unsteady shock waves, which contribute significantly to noise generation in supersonic jet flows, is investigated. This paper focuses on the difficulties of computing slowly moving shock waves. Numerical error is found to manifest itself principally as a spurious entropy wave. Calculations presented are performed using a third order essentially nonoscillatory scheme. The effect of stencil biasing parameters and of two versions of numerical flux formulas on the magnitude of spurious entropy are investigated. The level of numerical error introduced in the calculation in quantified as a function of shock pressure ratio, shock speed, Courant number, and mesh density. The spurious entropy relative to the entropy jump across a static shock decreases with increasing shock strength and shock velocity relative to the grid, but is insensitive to Courant number. The structure of the spurious entropy wave is affected by the choice of flux formulas and algorithm biasing parameters. The effect of the spurious numerical waves on the calculation of sound amplification by a shock wave is investigated. For this class of problem, the acoustic pressure waves are relatively unaffected by the spurious numerical phenomena.

  8. PRECURSORS TO INTERSTELLAR SHOCKS OF SOLAR ORIGIN

    SciTech Connect

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-08-20

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the “foreshock” that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  9. The shock Hugoniot of glass microballoons

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.; Helm, F.

    1994-12-01

    Shock Hugoniot measurements were made on glass microballoons. Input pressures ranging from 0.37-3.9 GPa produced compression from 860-690%. The Hugoniot curves were found to be anomalous in that the density shocked to decreases with increasing pressure.

  10. Numerical simulations of shocks encountering clumpy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Langton, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a clumpy region containing many individual clouds. Our work incorporates a sub-grid turbulence model which for the first time makes this investigation feasible. We vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the clouds and the ratio of total cloud mass to intercloud mass within the clumpy region. Cloud material becomes incorporated into the flow. This 'mass loading' reduces the Mach number of the shock and leads to the formation of a dense shell. In cases in which the mass loading is sufficient the flow slows enough that the shock degenerates into a wave. The interaction evolves through up to four stages: initially the shock decelerates; then its speed is nearly constant; next the shock accelerates as it leaves the clumpy region; finally, it moves at a constant speed close to its initial speed. Turbulence is generated in the post-shock flow as the shock sweeps through the clumpy region. Clouds exposed to turbulence can be destroyed more rapidly than a similar cloud in an 'isolated' environment. The lifetime of a downstream cloud decreases with increasing cloud-to-intercloud mass ratio. We briefly discuss the significance of these results for starburst superwinds and galaxy evolution.

  11. Benjamin Franklin and Shock-Induced Amnesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in…

  12. Spherical Strong-Shock Inferences on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    A milestone for shock ignition is to experimentally verify the generation of several hundred Mbar shocks at shock-ignition-relevant laser intensities. This paper presents the first experimental evidence of strong shocks generated in a spherical geometry. Using the temporal delay between the launch of the strong shock at the outer surface of the spherical target and the time when the shock converges at the center, the shock properties can be inferred using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Peak ablation pressures exceeding 200 Mbar are inferred at laser intensities of ~ 3 ×1015 W/cm2. The shock strength is significantly enhanced by the coupling of copius amounts of hot electrons, up to 2 kJ with Thot ~ 50 to 100 keV. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  13. Shock-induced melting and rapid solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Gourdin, W.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1987-08-01

    Model calculations are presented to estimate that approx.50 GPa is required to completely shock melt metal powders with quenching at rates up to 10/sup 8/ K/s. Experiments are discussed for powders of a Cu-Zr alloy compacted in the usual way at 16 GPa and melted by shocking to 60 GPa. 12 refs.

  14. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  15. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with...

  16. Heat Shock Proteins: Mediators of Atherosclerotic Development.

    PubMed

    Deniset, Justin F; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins play important housekeeping roles in a variety of cells within the body during normal control conditions. The many different functions for heat shock proteins in the cell depend upon the specific heat shock protein involved. Each protein is nominally differentiated based upon its molecular size. However, in addition to their role in normal cell function, heat shock proteins may play an even more important role as pro-survival proteins conserved through evolution to protect the cell from a variety of stresses. The ability of a cell to withstand these environmental stresses is critical to its capacity to adapt and remain viable. Loss of this ability may lead to pathological states. Abnormal localization, structure or function of the heat shock proteins has been associated with many pathologies, including those involving heart disease. Heat shock proteins like HSP60 and HSP70 in particular have been identified as playing important roles in inflammation and immune reactions. Inflammation has been identified recently as an important pathological risk factor for heart disease. It is perhaps not surprising therefore, that heat shock protein family has been increasingly identified as an important intracellular pathway associated with inflammatory-mediated heart conditions including atherosclerosis. This paper reviews the evidence in support of a role for heat shock proteins in cardiovascular disease and the potential to target these proteins to alter the progression of atherosclerotic disease.

  17. Biological Effects of Shock Waves on Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Janardhanraj, S.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Gopalan, Jagadeesh

    Shock waves have been successfully used for disintegrating kidney stones[1], noninvasive angiogenic approach[2] and for the treatment of osteoporosis[3]. Recently shock waves have been used to treat different medical conditions including intestinal anastomosis[4], wound healing[5], Kienböck's disease[6] and articular cartilage defects[7].

  18. The Bacillus subtilis heat shock stimulon

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    All organisms respond to a sudden increase in temperature by the so-called heat shock response. This response results in the induction of a subset of genes, designated heat shock genes coding for heat shock proteins, which allow the cell to cope with the stress regimen. Research carried out during the last 10 years with eubacteria has revealed that the heat shock genes of a given species fall into different classes (regulons), where each class is regulated by a different transcriptional regulator, which could be an alternative sigma factor, a transcriptional activator, or a transcriptional repressor. All regulons of a single species constitute the heat shock stimulon. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 200 genes representing over 7% of the transcriptionally active genes are induced at least 3-fold in response to a heat shock. This response becomes apparent within the first minute after exposure to heat stress, is transient, and is coordinated by at least 5 transcriptional regulator proteins, including 2 repressors, an alternate sigma-factor, and a 2-component signal transduction system. A detailed analysis of the regulation of all known heat shock genes has shown that they belong to at least 6 regulons that together comprise the B subtilis heat shock stimulon. Potential thermosensors are discussed in this article. PMID:14984053

  19. Weak shock wave reflection from concave surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Sebastien; Skews, Beric

    2013-07-01

    The reflection of very weak shock waves from concave curved surfaces has not been well documented in the past, and recent studies have shown the possible existence of a variation in the accepted reflection configuration evolution as a shock wave encounters an increasing gradient on the reflecting surface. The current study set out to investigate this anomaly using high-resolution photography. Shock tube tests were done on various concave circular and parabolic geometries, all with zero initial ramp angle. Although the results have limitations due to the achievable image resolution, the results indicate that for very weak Mach numbers, M S < 1.1, there may be a region in which the reflection configuration resembles that of a regular reflection, unlike for the stronger shock wave case. This region exists after the triple point of the Mach reflection meets the reflecting surface and prior to the formation of the additional shock structures that represent a transitioned regular reflection. The Mach and transitioned regular reflections at 1.03 < M s < 1.05 also exhibit no signs of a visible shear layer, or a clear discontinuity at the triple point, and are thus also apparently different in the weak shock regime than what has been described for stronger shocks, similar to what has been shown for weak shocks reflecting off a plane wedge.

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Vinci, T.; Boireau, L.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Osaki, N.; Herpe, G.; Falize, E.; Loupias, B.; Atzeni, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the radiative shock from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It is based on the whole experimental results obtained at Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, École Polytechnique). Radiative shocks are high-Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. These shocks are involved in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction between supernovae and the interstellar medium. In laboratory, these radiative shocks are generated using high power lasers. New diagnostics have been implemented to study the geometrical shape of the shock and the front shock density. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and temperature. The modeling of these phenomena is mainly performed through numerical simulations (1D and 2D) and analytical studies. We exhibit results obtained from several radiative hydrodynamics codes. As a result, it is possible to discuss about the influence of the geometry and physical parameters introduced in the 1D and 2D models.

  1. Precursors To Interstellar Shocks of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-08-01

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the “foreshock” that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  2. Precursors to Interstellar Shocks of Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    On or about 2012 August 25, the Voyager 1 spacecraft crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma. In the nearly three years that the spacecraft has been in interstellar space, three notable particle and field disturbances have been observed, each apparently associated with a shock wave propagating outward from the Sun. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the third and most impressive of these disturbances, with brief comparisons to the two previous events, both of which have been previously reported. The shock responsible for the third event was first detected on 2014 February 17 by the onset of narrowband radio emissions from the approaching shock, followed on 2014 May 13 by the abrupt appearance of intense electron plasma oscillations generated by electrons streaming outward ahead of the shock. Finally, the shock arrived on 2014 August 25, as indicated by a jump in the magnetic field strength and the plasma density. Various disturbances in the intensity and anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays were also observed ahead of the shock, some of which are believed to be caused by the reflection and acceleration of cosmic rays by the magnetic field jump at the shock, and/or by interactions with upstream plasma waves. Comparisons to the two previous weaker events show somewhat similar precursor effects, although differing in certain details. Many of these effects are very similar to those observed in the region called the "foreshock" that occurs upstream of planetary bow shocks, only on a vastly larger spatial scale.

  3. Going to Teach in Prisons: Culture Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Randall

    2005-01-01

    Novice prison teachers experience confusion and disorientation--culture shock--when they go to teach in prison because teaching and prison cultures collide. The stages of acculturation associated with culture shock are predictable and so are the identities and experiences of teachers who are positioned by the cultural dynamics of prison teaching.…

  4. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  5. Whistler Waves Associated with Weak Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velez, J. C. Ramirez; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Kajdic, P.; Jian,, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of 98 weak interplanetary shocks measured by the dual STEREO spacecraft over approximately 3 years during the past solar minimum. We study the occurrence of whistler waves associated with these shocks, which on average are high beta shocks (0.2 < Beta < 10). We have compared the waves properties upstream and downstream of the shocks. In the upstream region the waves are mainly circularly polarized, and in most of the cases (approx. 75%) they propagate almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field (<30 deg.). In contrast, the propagation angle with respect to the shock normal varies in a broad range of values (20 deg. to 90 deg.), suggesting that they are not phase standing. We find that the whistler waves can extend up to 100,000 km in the upstream region but in most cases (88%) are contained in a distance within 30,000 km from the shock. This corresponds to a larger region with upstream whistlers associated with IP shocks than previously reported in the literature. The maximum amplitudes of the waves are observed next to the shock interface, and they decrease as the distance to the shock increases. In most cases the wave propagation direction becomes more aligned with the magnetic field as the distance to the shock increases. These two facts suggest that most of the waves in the upstream region are Landau damping as they move away from the shock. From the analysis we also conclude that it is likely that the generation mechanism of the upstream whistler waves is taking place at the shock interface. In the downstream region, the waves are irregularly polarized, and the fluctuations are very compressive; that is, the compressive component of the wave clearly dominates over the transverse one. The majority of waves in the downstream region (95%) propagate at oblique angles with respect to the ambient magnetic field (>60 deg.). The wave propagation with respect to the shock-normal direction has no preferred direction and varies similarly to

  6. How the bow shock does it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.

    1995-07-01

    Between the world of living organisms and inanimate objects exists a zone inhabited by animate, but nonliving, physical entities. These fascinating, and often nonlinear systems exhibit characteristics which in many ways mimic that of simple biological organisms. They seem to have an instinctive desire to accomplish certain tasks, and devise many creative strategies to achieve their goal. The bow shock, the topic of this paper, is one of the inhabitants of this zone and it forms due to solar wind interaction with the Earth's magnetic field. As one would expect, its goal is to decelerate and divert the supersonic solar wind flow around the magnetosphere. But unlike the usual shock waves, it has to accomplish the task without the use of collisions; quite a challenge indeed. A bigger challenge, however, has been for us to use space age technology and supercomputers to find out how the bow shock does it! We have made much progress; many of the pixels are in place but the picture is not complete. What we have found is a truly fascinating and complex story which is a testament to the creativeness of the bow shock. Depending on the upstream Mach number (ratio of the solar wind speed to the sound speed) and location on the paraboloid surface of the shock, a different strategy for dissipation of the flow energy into heat is utilized. In some regimes, the transition from upstream to downstream takes place on short ( ˜100 km) length scales, while in others, the shock transition is masked with an extended region of electromagnetic waves and turbulence. As part of the dissipation process, electrons and ions are reflected off the shock. The interaction between the solar wind and the reflected particles forms the foreshock, a region extending many Earth radii upstream of the shock. The foreshock is populated by a variety of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves, making it a great natural laboratory for studies of nonlinear wave-particle interactions. Among these are the fast

  7. Classical MHD shocks: theory and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.

    2005-08-01

    Recent results are surveyed in the investigation of the behavior of shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and corresponding structures in dissipative/resistive plasma flows. In contrast to evolutionary shocks, a solution of the problem of the nonevolutionary shock interaction with small perturbations is either nonunique or does not exist. The peculiarity of non-ideal MHD is in that some nonevolutionary shocks have dissipative structures. Since this structure is always non-plane, it can reveal itself in problems where transverse perturbations do not exist due to symmetries restrictions. We discuss the numerical behavior of nonevolutionary shocks and argue that they necessarily disappear once the problem is solved in a genuinely three-dimensional statement.

  8. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  9. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Tokar, R. L.; Skoug, R. M.; Szabo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Using multi-spacecraft observations primarily from ACE and WIND and from IMP 8 and Geotail when available, the 3-dimensional structure of interplanetary shocks on the hundred Earth radii scale will be discussed. The complete magnetic field, and solar wind ion and electron data sets were used to fit the shocks with a full non-linear least squares fitting "Rankine-Hugoniot" technique yielding the local shock surface normals and speeds with associated uncertainties. Multi-spacecraft results reveal that on the distance scale of ACE's L1 halo orbit the shocks deviate from a simple planar geometry. This result has important consequences for the prediction of the exact arrival times of interplanetary shocks at the Earth's magnetosphere, and hence, on the reliability of space weather predictions. It also has implications on the coherence scale of solar wind structures and their evolution from the Sun to Earth.

  10. Shock-produced olivine glass: First observation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T.J.; Lally, J.S.; Nord, G.L.; Christie, J.M.; Heuer, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of an experimentally shock-deformed single crystal of natural peridot, (Mg0.88Fe 0.12SiO4 recovered from peak pressures of about 56 ?? 109 pascals revealed the presence of amorphous zones located within crystalline regions with a high density of tangled dislocations. This is the first reported observation ofolivine glass. The shocked sample exhibits a wide variation in the degree of shock deformation on a small scale, and the glass appears to be intimately associated with the highest density of dislocations. This study suggests that olivine glass may be formed as a result of shock at pressures above about 50 to 55 ?? 109 pascals and that further TEM observations of naturally shocked olivines may demonstrate the presence of glass.

  11. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable.

  12. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar`s approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel`dovich`s approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Overdriven shocks in solids and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of overdriven shocks in solids and liquids is analyzed in terms of the underlying physical concepts, without resorting to formal mathematics. Two dissipative processes are required for the existence of a steady-wave shock, namely plastic flow in a solid, or viscous flow in a liquid, and heat transport in either a solid or liquid. The first requirement is the analog of Rayleigh's theorem for gases, and the second requirement extends Rayleigh's findings. For metals, the shock analysis yields approximate plastic flow data at strain rates approaching 10{sup 12}s{sup {minus}1}. The shock risetime in solid or liquid metals is predicted to decrease to around a picosecond, as the shock strength increases through the overdriven threshold. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Supermagnetosonic Jets behind a Collisionless Quasiparallel Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, H.; Vainio, R.; Laitinen, T. V.; Vaivads, A.; Andreeova, K.; Palmroth, M.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lucek, E. A.; Reme, H.

    2009-12-11

    The downstream region of a collisionless quasiparallel shock is structured containing bulk flows with high kinetic energy density from a previously unidentified source. We present Cluster multispacecraft measurements of this type of supermagnetosonic jet as well as of a weak secondary shock front within the sheath, that allow us to propose the following generation mechanism for the jets: The local curvature variations inherent to quasiparallel shocks can create fast, deflected jets accompanied by density variations in the downstream region. If the speed of the jet is super(magneto)sonic in the reference frame of the obstacle, a second shock front forms in the sheath closer to the obstacle. Our results can be applied to collisionless quasiparallel shocks in many plasma environments.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of hypersonic shock waves

    PubMed

    Ramos; Mate; Tejeda; Fernandez; Montero

    2000-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is shown to be an efficient diagnostic methodology for the study of hypersonic shock waves. As a test, absolute density and rotational population profiles have been measured across five representative normal shock waves of N2 generated in a free jet, spanning the Mach number range 7.7shock waves shows a largely bimodal rotational distribution function with additional contribution of scattered molecules, in close analogy with the velocity distribution function known from helium shock waves [G. Pham-Van-Diep et al., Science 245, 624 (1989)]. Quantitative data on invariance trends of density profiles and properties of the wake beyond the shock waves are reported.

  16. Radiative shock calculations in various media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Boireau, L.; Leygnac, S.; Cornille, M.; Stehle, C.

    2002-06-01

    We are modeling shocks with structures governed by their radiative precursor. At this point, we are assuming a geometrically-plan shock in an ionized gas, which behaves differently than in a perfect gas. The ionization structure and the excitation energy are calculated from the local temperatures and densities, using hydrogen-like model atoms. This approach can thus be applied to heavy elements like Xenon, which is used in the experiment of astrophysical radiative shocks with the laser of the LULI, at the Ecole Polytechnique (France). After studying in details the shocks in Xenon, we now calculate the atomic data for multiple chemical elements as Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon which are everywhere in astrophysical objects, and as Argon, Krypton which are monoatomic gases. We thus investigate the jump conditions in different media and we will try to propose a phenomenological description of the radiative shocks in the stellar objects and their envelopes.

  17. Organic synthesis in experimental impact shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of shocks created with a high-energy laser demonstrate that the efficacy of organic production depends on the molecular, not just the elemental composition of the shocked gas. In a methane-rich mixture that simulates a low-temperature equilibrium mixture of cometary material, hydrogen cyanide and acetylene were produced with yields of 5 x 10(17) molecules per joule. Repeated shocking of the methane-rich mixture produced amine groups, suggesting the possible synthesis of amino acids. No organic molecules were produced in a carbon dioxide-rich mixture, which is at odds with thermodynamic equilibrium approaches to shock chemistry and has implications for the modeling of shock-produced organic molecules on early Earth.

  18. Post-Shock Temperature Measurements of Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Payton, J. R.; Obst, A. W.; Stewart, S. T.; Kennedy, G. B.

    2006-07-28

    Post-shock temperature is an important quantity in shock physics experiments for constraining the dynamic equations of state of materials. A high-speed, infrared, multi-wavelength pyrometer has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for measurements in the temperature range from 400 to 1200 K. With customized front end optics, permitting concurrent VISAR measurements in the same optical path, validation experiments on aluminum have been conducted at the new Shock Compression Laboratory at Harvard University. Under <1 millitorr vacuum, a post-shock temperature of 495 K {+-} 30 K was recorded from a polished free surface of aluminum 2024-T4 subject to a peak shock pressure of 34.8{+-}0.8 GPa, in excellent agreement with the equation of state and previous experiments.

  19. Shock Timing Technique for the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    2000-10-03

    Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

  20. Underwater shock focusing by composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Eliasson, Veronica

    2011-11-01

    Underwater explosions are threats to the structural integrity of naval vessels. In particular, if a convergent section is present on the vessel, the shock wave can focus and produce extremely high pressures near the focal region. Based on previous research on converging shock waves, a logarithmic spiral duct is considered to be an efficient shape to focus shock waves onto the focal region. Here, underwater shock tests on logarithmic spiral-shaped structures made of plastic, metal and fiber composites are conducted. High-speed schlieren photography is used to visualize the shock waves. Simultaneously, ultrafast pressure readings are recorded by laboratory- made pressure sensors, which are able to measure pressures up to 10 GPa. Comparisons between the various types of surrounding materials will be presented. The results can explore the use of composite materials in future marine applications. Supported by ONR through a MURI grant number N00014-06-1-0730.

  1. Shock-produced olivine glass - First observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Ahrens, T. J.; Lally, J. S.; Nord, G. L., Jr.; Christie, J. M.; Heuer, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of an experimentally shock-deformed single crystal of natural peridot, /Mg(0.88)Fe(0.12)/2SiO4, recovered from peak pressures of about 56 billion pascals revealed the presence of amorphous zones located within crystalline regions with a high density of tangled dislocations. This is the first reported observation of olivine glass. The shocked sample exhibits a wide variation in the degree of shock deformation on a small scale, and the glass appears to be intimately associated with the highest density of dislocations. This study suggests that olivine glass may be formed as a result of shock at pressures above about 50 to 55 billion pascals and that further TEM observations of naturally shocked olivines may demonstrate the presence of glass.

  2. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  3. Numerical simulation of shock and bubble dynamics in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2002-11-01

    Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of stone comminution (and potential for tissue damage) during shockwave lithotripsy requires knowledge of the complex stress fields associated with both the incident focussing shock and the dynamics of cavitation bubbles that it induces. While simple models from geometrical acoustics and subsequent modeling of spherical bubbles in isolation (Gilmore equation) can provide estimates, high-speed photography in vitro reveals a far more complex flow with bubble number densities that are sufficiently high such that collective effects associated with a cloud of bubbles are important. This talk will describe a modeling effort aimed at estimating stresses from these complex lithotripter generated flow fields. We compute the time-dependent, compressible, ensemble-averaged two-phase flow equations with a finite-difference scheme. Detailed modeling of the dynamics of bubbles (on the microscale) and high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing schemes are employed. The model is compared to hydrophone and passive cavitation detection measurements, as well as qualitative comparison with high-speed photography. Finally, we explore collective bubble mechanisms ranging from defocusing and shielding of the stone (for high bubble densities in the focal region) to enhanced stresses due to concerted cloud collapse in a dual-pulse lithotripsy configuration. [Work supported by NIH P01 DK-43881 and NSF under grant CTS-9979258.

  4. Dengue haemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome in India.

    PubMed

    Lall, R; Dhanda, V

    1996-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe haemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. Increased capillary permeability is the diagnostic feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). The pathophysiology of DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is related to sequential infection with different serotypes of the virus, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental or host factors and a combination of various risk factors. Infection due to low virulence strains is assumed to be the reason for the infrequent incidence of serious dengue disease in India. Since all four serotypes of the dengue virus have been implicated in various outbreaks in this country and several outbreaks of DHF/DSS have been recorded since the first report in 1963, further epidemics of the disease are likely. The situation is aggravated by the recent emergence of DHF/DSS in Sri Lanka. In view of the potential of this disease to spread, effective preventive and control measures should be a priority.

  5. Severe sepsis and septic shock in the elderly: An overview.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Prashant; Juneja, Deven; Singh, Omender

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of severe sepsis and septic shock is increasing in the older population leading to increased admissions to the intensive care units (ICUs). The elderly are predisposed to sepsis due to co-existing co-morbidities, repeated and prolonged hospitalizations, reduced immunity, functional limitations and above all due to the effects of aging itself. A lower threshold and a higher index of suspicion is required to diagnose sepsis in this patient population because the initial clinical picture may be ambiguous, and aging increases the risk of a sudden deterioration in sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Management is largely based on standard international guidelines with a few modifications. Age itself is an independent risk factor for death in patients with severe sepsis, however, many patients respond well to timely and appropriate interventions. The treatment should not be limited or deferred in elderly patients with severe sepsis only on the grounds of physician prejudice, but patient and family preferences should also be taken into account as the outcomes are not dismal. Future investigations in the management of sepsis should not only target good functional recovery but also ensure social independence and quality of life after ICU discharge. PMID:24701398

  6. [Diagnostic apparatus in the shock trauma room].

    PubMed

    Beck, A; Bischoff, M; Gebhard, F; Huber-Lang, M; Kinzl, L; Schmelz, A

    2004-10-01

    Opinions vary with regard to the equipment and structural furnishings required for adequate management of the trauma patient in the dedicated shock suite. In order to assess the current situation in Germany, we conducted a survey of the 76 centers participating in the Polytrauma Registry of the DGU. Fifty-one questionnaires were returned by centers representing all levels of care. Responses revealed, for example, that not all centers possess capabilities for conventional radiography in the shock suite (7/51). Only 20 centers had a fixed table; the remaining 24 hospitals used either an image converter or a mobile X-ray unit. A dedicated ultrasound scanner was provided for the shock suite in 39 of 51 centers responding. Dedicated computed tomography scanners were provided for the shock suite in only eight centers (one dedicated trauma center, three level 3 centers, four university hospitals). All eight scanners use helical CT technology; at least three of the units are 8- or 16-slice. Of 51 shock suites, 12 are air-conditioned in compliance with sterile criteria (and are officially designated as surgical suites), while the remaining 39 are not. In acute cases, emergency surgeries can be performed in the shock suite in 37 centers, but not in the remaining 14 shock suites. According to the survey, slightly less than half of the hospitals responding are un-satisfied with the shock suite infrastructure ( n=24) and, of these, 13 centers are actively planning changes (the necessary financial resources have been guaranteed in 10 centers). Fourteen centers desire changes but do not currently have the required money. Information provided by Philips and Siemens suggests that the cost of furnishing a new shock suite ranges between 1.4 and 1.7 million euros. Responses to our survey show that a large gap remains between wishes and reality in the technical infrastructure in many shock suites in Germany.

  7. Shock Propagation Modeling in Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haill, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Shock compression of foams is an intriguing research area that challenges our abilities to model experiments using computer simulations that span 9 orders of magnitude in spatial scales from the atomistic scale through the mesoscale and up to the continuum levels. Experiments test shock compression of dense polymers, polymer foams, and high-Z doped foams. Random distributions of polymer fibers, variations in pore size, and non-uniformities in the bulk properties of the foam (such as mean density) lead to spread in the experimental data. Adding dopants to foams introduces new complexities and the effect of the distribution and sizes of dopant particles must be characterized and understood. Therefore we turn to computer simulation to illumine the intricacies of the experiments that cannot be directly measured. This paper overviews of our range of methods to model pure and platinum-doped poly-methyl-pentene (PMP) foams. At the nanometer scale, hydrodynamic simulations compare favorably to classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of porous foams, verifying models of foam vaporization under strong shock conditions. Inhomogeneous mesoscale and homogenized continuum simulations present contrasting pictures of shocked foams. Mesoscale simulations at the micron scale have diffuse shock widths that depend upon the pore size, and post-shock vorticity results in fluctuations about the mean post-shock state and lower mean pressures and temperatures. Homogenized simulations, in the limit of zero pore size, have narrow shock widths, steady post-shock states, and higher mean pressures and temperature that compare favorably with 1D analysis of experiments. We reconcile the contrasting mesoscale and continuum views using theoretical turbulent corrections to the Hugoniot jump condition to show a consistent picture of shocked foams over 9 orders of spatial scale. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  8. Combining Observations of Shock-induced Minerals with Calculations to Constrain the Shock History of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, P. S.; Xie, Z.; Sharp, T. G.

    2007-12-01

    All available evidence from shock Hugoniot and release adiabat measurements and from shock recovery experiments supports the hypothesis that the conditions for shock-induced phase transitions are similar to the conditions under which quasistatic phase transitions are observed. Transitions that require high temperatures under quasistatic pressures require high temperatures under shock pressures. The high-pressure phases found in shocked meteorites are almost invariably associated with shock melt veins. A shock melt vein is analogous to a pseudotachylite, a sheet of locally melted material that was quenched by conduction to surrounding cooler material. The mechanism by which shock melt veins form is not known; possible mechanisms include shock collisions, shock interactions with cracks and pores, and adiabatic shear. If one assumes that the phases within the vein crystallized in their stability fields, then available static high-pressure data constrain the shock pressure range over which the vein solidified. Since the veins have a sheet-like geometry, one may use one-dimensional heat flow calculations to constrain the cooling and crystallization history of the veins (Langenhorst and Poirier, 2000). Although the formation mechanism of a melt vein may involve transient pressure excursions, pressure equilibration of a mm-wide vein will be complete within about a microsecond, whereas thermal equilibration will require seconds. Some of our melt vein studies have indicated that the highly-shocked L chondrite meteorites were exposed to a narrow range of shock pressures, e.g., 18-25 GPa, over a minimum duration of the order of a second. We have used the Autodyn(TM) wave propagation code to calculate details of plausible impacts on the L-chondrite parent body for a variety of possible parent body stratigraphies. We infer that some meteorites probably represent material that was shocked at a depth of >10 km in their parent bodies.

  9. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  10. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  11. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  12. Shock dynamics of phase diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A thermodynamic phase transition denotes a drastic change of state of a physical system due to a continuous change of thermodynamic variables, as for instance pressure and temperature. The classical van der Waals equation of state is the simplest model that predicts the occurrence of a critical point associated with the gas-liquid phase transition. Nevertheless, below the critical temperature theoretical predictions of the van der Waals theory significantly depart from the observed physical behaviour. We develop a novel approach to classical thermodynamics based on the solution of Maxwell relations for a generalised family of nonlocal entropy functions. This theory provides an exact mathematical description of discontinuities of the order parameter within the phase transition region, it explains the universal form of the equations of state and the occurrence of triple points in terms of the dynamics of nonlinear shock wave fronts.

  13. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  14. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  15. Current topics in shock waves; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Shock Waves and Shock Tubes, 17th, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, July 17-21, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.W.

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on shock waves are presented. The general topics addressed include: shock formation, focusing, and implosion; shock reflection and diffraction; turbulence; laser-produced plasmas and waves; ionization and shock-plasma interaction; chemical kinetics, pyrolysis, and soot formation; experimental facilities, techniques, and applications; ignition of detonation and combustion; particle entrainment and shock propagation through particle suspension; boundary layers and blast simulation; computational methods and numerical simulation.

  16. Are incidence and epidemiology of anaerobic bacteremia really changing?

    PubMed

    Vena, A; Muñoz, P; Alcalá, L; Fernandez-Cruz, A; Sanchez, C; Valerio, M; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    Incidence, prognosis and need of performing blood cultures for anaerobic bacteria are under debate, mainly due to the belief that the presence of anaerobes in blood can be easily suspected on clinical basis. We aimed to assess these three points in a retrospective analysis of a 10-year experience in our tertiary hospital. All episodes of significant anaerobic bacteremia diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 were included. Risk factors for mortality and clinical predictability of anaerobic bacteremia were evaluated in 113 randomly selected episodes. Overall incidence of anaerobic bacteremia was 1.2 episodes/1000 admissions, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. B. fragilis group (38.1 %) and Clostridium spp. (13.7 %) were the most frequent isolated microorganisms. As for the clinical study, 43.4 % of the patients had a comorbidity classified as ultimately fatal or rapidly fatal according to the McCabe and Jackson scale. Clinical manifestations suggestive of anaerobic involvement were present in only 55 % of the patients. Twenty-eight patients (24.8 %) died during the hospitalization. Independent predictive factors of mortality were a high Charlson's comorbidity index and presentation with septic shock, whereas, an adequate source control of the infection was associated with a better outcome. In our centre, incidence of anaerobic bacteremia remained stable during the last decade. The routine use of anaerobic BCs seems to be adequate, since in about half of the cases anaerobes could not be suspected on clinical bases. Moreover, prompt source control of infection is essential in order to reduce mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. PMID:26017663

  17. Are incidence and epidemiology of anaerobic bacteremia really changing?

    PubMed

    Vena, A; Muñoz, P; Alcalá, L; Fernandez-Cruz, A; Sanchez, C; Valerio, M; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    Incidence, prognosis and need of performing blood cultures for anaerobic bacteria are under debate, mainly due to the belief that the presence of anaerobes in blood can be easily suspected on clinical basis. We aimed to assess these three points in a retrospective analysis of a 10-year experience in our tertiary hospital. All episodes of significant anaerobic bacteremia diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 were included. Risk factors for mortality and clinical predictability of anaerobic bacteremia were evaluated in 113 randomly selected episodes. Overall incidence of anaerobic bacteremia was 1.2 episodes/1000 admissions, with no significant changes during the 10-year study period. B. fragilis group (38.1 %) and Clostridium spp. (13.7 %) were the most frequent isolated microorganisms. As for the clinical study, 43.4 % of the patients had a comorbidity classified as ultimately fatal or rapidly fatal according to the McCabe and Jackson scale. Clinical manifestations suggestive of anaerobic involvement were present in only 55 % of the patients. Twenty-eight patients (24.8 %) died during the hospitalization. Independent predictive factors of mortality were a high Charlson's comorbidity index and presentation with septic shock, whereas, an adequate source control of the infection was associated with a better outcome. In our centre, incidence of anaerobic bacteremia remained stable during the last decade. The routine use of anaerobic BCs seems to be adequate, since in about half of the cases anaerobes could not be suspected on clinical bases. Moreover, prompt source control of infection is essential in order to reduce mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

  18. Thermally induced apoptosis, necrosis, and heat shock protein expression in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Alfred S; Najjar, Amer M; Diller, Kenneth R

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to compare the heat shock responses of cells grown in 2D and 3D culture environments as indicated by the level of heat shock protein 70 expression and the incidence of apoptosis and necrosis of prostate cancer cell lines in response to graded hyperthermia. PC3 cells were stably transduced with a dual reporter system composed of two tandem expression cassettes-a conditional heat shock protein promoter driving the expression of green fluorescent protein (HSPp-GFP) and a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter controlling the constitutive expression of a "beacon" red fluorescent protein (CMVp-RFP). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional cultures of PC3 prostate cancer cells were grown in 96-well plates for evaluation of their time-dependent response to supraphysiological temperature. To induce controlled hyperthermia, culture plates were placed on a flat copper surface of a circulating water manifold that maintained the specimens within ±0.1°C of a target temperature. Hyperthermia protocols included various combinations of temperature, ranging from 37°C to 57°C, and exposure times of up to 2 h. The majority of protocols were focused on temperature and time permutations, where the response gradient was greatest. Post-treatment analysis by flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the incidences of apoptosis (annexin V-FITC stain), necrosis (propidium iodide (PI) stain), and HSP70 transcription (GFP expression). Cells grown in 3D compared with 2D culture showed reduced incidence of apoptosis and necrosis and a higher level of HSP70 expression in response to heat shock at the temperatures tested. Cells responded differently to hyperthermia when grown in 2D and 3D cultures. Three-dimensional culture appears to enhance survival plausibly by activating protective processes related to enhanced-HSP70 expression. These differences highlight the importance of selecting physiologically relevant 3D models in assessing cellular responses to hyperthermia in

  19. Shock compression dynamics under a microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a tabletop laser flyer launch system1 that solves many of the problems that plagued previous efforts. Using a novel mechanism where a spatially-uniform laser pulse creates a shock in a glass substrate just underneath a metal foil, we can launch tiny (0.7 mm diameter x 100 μm thick) flyers at speeds ranging from 0-5 km/s and the foils are flat, cold and intact. This tabletop launch system, where we often launch 100 flyers per day, provides a platform for a wide variety of time-resolved spectroscopies. The shocked material is viewed by a microscope objective that transmits near-infrared light from a photon Doppler velocimeter to monitor the flyer, and collects the light for spectroscopic and video images. Fluorescent probes, which have been highly developed for the biomedical sciences, have proven especially useful for these experiments. Using emission measurements, we have investigated the fundamental mechanisms of many shock wave effects including: viscoelastic compression of high molecular weight polymers, visualization of shocks in porous media such as sand, where we can observe the behavior of individual grains of sand, shock attenuation by passing the shock through reactive materials that undergo endothermic chemical reactions, and shock initiation of nanoenergetic materials.

  20. Dispersion discontinuities of strong collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    Linear fluid equations are used to estimate wave train properties of strong collisionless shocks. Fast shocks exhibit several dispersion changes with increasing Mach number. For perpendicular propagation into a finite-beta plasma, an ion cyclotron radius trailing wave train exists only for (M sub F)2 is smaller than 2. Oblique fast shocks have a leading ion inertia wave train if M sub A is smaller than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2 and a trailing electron inertia train if M sub A is greater than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2. If the downstream sound speed exceeds the flow speed, linear wave theory predicts a trailing ion acoustic structure which probably resides within the magnetic shock. For a turbulent shock model in which an effective electron-ion collision frequency exceeds the lower hybrid frequency, ions decouple from the magnetic field; the shock wave train now trails with electron inertia and electron gyroradius lengths. Comparisons of this turbulent model and observations on the earth's bow shock are made.