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Sample records for air-stimulated atp release

  1. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  2. ATP release through pannexon channels.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed 'pannexon'. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  3. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  4. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Fujita, T.; Malmstrom, H.S.; Nedergaard, M.; Ren, Y.F.; Dirksen, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  5. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  6. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bjaelde, Randi G.; Arnadottir, Sigrid S.; Overgaard, Morten T.; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2013-01-01

    Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30), which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1) cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin) reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%)-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1) and vesicular transport (nocodazole). These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ~90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP) or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50%) or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8 and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells. PMID:24065923

  7. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  8. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  9. Effect of SJAMP on ATP release of platelet.

    PubMed

    Guo, T; Shen, D; Song, S; Wei, W

    1999-01-01

    The aggregation and ATP release of placelet of normal subjects were measured by platelet lumi-aggregometer. It was found that the aggregation curve induced by SJAMP at the concentration of 100 mg/L was a typical second phase aggregation. There existed a certain lag between platelet aggregation and secretion. The secretion actually began slightly after the second phase of aggregation, suggesting that the second phase aggregation induced by SJAMP is not dependent upon the release of contents of dense granule alone. If platelets were incubated with cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, the second phase aggregation was inhibited and no ATP was released. The results indicated that the aggregation and release reaction induced by SJAMP were dependent upon the generation of prostaglandin endoperoxides and TXA2 in normal subjects. The amount of ATP release was 0.69 +/- 0.22 nmol/10(8) platelets as stimulated with SJAMP (100 mg/L). But the amount of ATP release were 1.60 +/- 0.25 and 1.37 +/- 0.15 nmol/10(8) platelets when platelets were stimulated with ADP (5 mumol/L) and collagen (5 mg/L). The amount of ATP release induced by SJAMP was significantly lower than that of ADP and collagen. These findings indicated that SJAMP was a weaker agonist than ADP in terms of platelets release reaction.

  10. Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Eyup; Zhou, Sitong; DeCourcey, James; Wang, Yixuan; Waugh, Richard E; Wan, Jiandi

    2015-09-22

    Piezo proteins (Piezo1 and Piezo2) are recently identified mechanically activated cation channels in eukaryotic cells and associated with physiological responses to touch, pressure, and stretch. In particular, human RBCs express Piezo1 on their membranes, and mutations of Piezo1 have been linked to hereditary xerocytosis. To date, however, physiological functions of Piezo1 on normal RBCs remain poorly understood. Here, we show that Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs by controlling the shear-induced calcium (Ca(2+)) influx. We find that, in human RBCs treated with Piezo1 inhibitors or having mutant Piezo1 channels, the amounts of shear-induced ATP release and Ca(2+) influx decrease significantly. Remarkably, a critical extracellular Ca(2+) concentration is required to trigger significant ATP release, but membrane-associated ATP pools in RBCs also contribute to the release of ATP. Our results show how Piezo1 channels are likely to function in normal RBCs and suggest a previously unidentified mechanotransductive pathway in ATP release. Thus, we anticipate that the study will impact broadly on the research of red cells, cellular mechanosensing, and clinical studies related to red cell disorders and vascular disease.

  11. Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Eyup; Zhou, Sitong; DeCourcey, James; Wang, Yixuan; Waugh, Richard E.; Wan, Jiandi

    2015-01-01

    Piezo proteins (Piezo1 and Piezo2) are recently identified mechanically activated cation channels in eukaryotic cells and associated with physiological responses to touch, pressure, and stretch. In particular, human RBCs express Piezo1 on their membranes, and mutations of Piezo1 have been linked to hereditary xerocytosis. To date, however, physiological functions of Piezo1 on normal RBCs remain poorly understood. Here, we show that Piezo1 regulates mechanotransductive release of ATP from human RBCs by controlling the shear-induced calcium (Ca2+) influx. We find that, in human RBCs treated with Piezo1 inhibitors or having mutant Piezo1 channels, the amounts of shear-induced ATP release and Ca2+ influx decrease significantly. Remarkably, a critical extracellular Ca2+ concentration is required to trigger significant ATP release, but membrane-associated ATP pools in RBCs also contribute to the release of ATP. Our results show how Piezo1 channels are likely to function in normal RBCs and suggest a previously unidentified mechanotransductive pathway in ATP release. Thus, we anticipate that the study will impact broadly on the research of red cells, cellular mechanosensing, and clinical studies related to red cell disorders and vascular disease. PMID:26351678

  12. ATP-Releasing Nucleotides: Linking DNA Synthesis to Luciferase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ji, Debin; Mohsen, Michael G; Harcourt, Emily M; Kool, Eric T

    2016-02-01

    A new strategy is reported for the production of luminescence signals from DNA synthesis through the use of chimeric nucleoside tetraphosphate dimers in which ATP, rather than pyrophosphate, is the leaving group. ATP-releasing nucleotides (ARNs) were synthesized as derivatives of the four canonical nucleotides. All four derivatives are good substrates for DNA polymerase, with Km values averaging 13-fold higher than those of natural dNTPs, and kcat values within 1.5-fold of those of native nucleotides. Importantly, ARNs were found to yield very little background signal with luciferase. DNA synthesis experiments show that the ATP byproduct can be harnessed to elicit a chemiluminescence signal in the presence of luciferase. When using a polymerase together with the chimeric nucleotides, target DNAs/RNAs trigger the release of stoichiometrically large quantities of ATP, thereby allowing sensitive isothermal luminescence detection of nucleic acids as diverse as phage DNAs and short miRNAs.

  13. Honing in on the ATP Release Channel in Taste Cells.

    PubMed

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    Studies over the last 8 years have identified 3 potential channels that appear to release ATP from Type II cells in response to taste stimuli. These studies have taken different methodological approaches but have all provided data supporting their candidate channel as the ATP release channel. These potential channels include Pannexin 1, Connexins (30 and/or 43), and most recently, the Calhm1 channel. Two papers in this issue of Chemical Senses provide compelling new evidence that Pannexin 1 is not the ATP release channel. Tordoff et al. did a thorough behavioral analysis of the Pannexin1 knock out mouse and found that these animals have the same behavioral responses as wild type mice for 7 different taste stimuli that were tested. Vandenbeuch et al. presented an equally thorough analysis of the gustatory nerve responses in the Pannexin1 knock out mouse and found no differences compared with controls. Thus when the role of Pannexin 1 is analyzed at the systems level, it is not required for normal taste perception. Further studies are needed to determine the role of this hemichannel in taste cells.

  14. Hemolysis is a primary ATP-release mechanism in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jacek; Orlov, Sergei N; Furuya, Kishio; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2014-09-25

    The hypothesis that regulated ATP release from red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to nitric oxide-dependent control of local blood flow has sparked much interest in underlying release mechanisms. Several stimuli, including shear stress and hypoxia, have been found to induce significant RBC ATP release attributed to activation of ATP-conducting channels. In the present study, we first evaluated different experimental approaches investigating stimulated RBC ATP release and quantifying hemolysis. We then measured ATP and free hemoglobin in each and every RBC supernatant sample to directly assess the contribution of hemolysis to ATP release. Hypotonic shock, shear stress, and hypoxia, but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate agonists, significantly enhanced ATP release. It tightly correlated, however, with free hemoglobin in RBC supernatants, indicating that lysis was responsible for most, if not all, ATP release. Luminescence ATP imaging combined with simultaneous infrared cell imaging showed that ATP was released exclusively from lysing cells with no contribution from intact cells. In summary, with all stimuli tested, we found no evidence of regulated ATP release from intact RBCs other than by cell lysis. Such a release mechanism might be physiologically relevant in vivo, eg, during exercise and hypoxia where intravascular hemolysis, predominantly of senescent cells, is augmented.

  15. Bacterial RTX toxins allow acute ATP release from human erythrocytes directly through the toxin pore.

    PubMed

    Skals, Marianne; Bjaelde, Randi G; Reinholdt, Jesper; Poulsen, Knud; Vad, Brian S; Otzen, Daniel E; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2014-07-01

    ATP is as an extracellular signaling molecule able to amplify the cell lysis inflicted by certain bacterial toxins including the two RTX toxins α-hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli and leukotoxin A (LtxA) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Inhibition of P2X receptors completely blocks the RTX toxin-induced hemolysis over a larger concentration range. It is, however, at present not known how the ATP that provides the amplification is released from the attacked cells. Here we show that both HlyA and LtxA trigger acute release of ATP from human erythrocytes that preceded and were not caused by cell lysis. This early ATP release did not occur via previously described ATP-release pathways in the erythrocyte. Both HlyA and LtxA were capable of triggering ATP release in the presence of the pannexin 1 blockers carbenoxolone and probenecid, and the HlyA-induced ATP release was found to be similar in erythrocytes from pannexin 1 wild type and knock-out mice. Moreover, the voltage-dependent anion channel antagonist TRO19622 had no effect on ATP release by either of the toxins. Finally, we showed that both HlyA and LtxA were able to release ATP from ATP-loaded lipid (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine) vesicles devoid of any erythrocyte channels or transporters. Again we were able to show that this happened in a non-lytic fashion, using calcein-containing vesicles as controls. These data show that both toxins incorporate into lipid vesicles and allow ATP to be released. We suggest that both toxins cause acute ATP release by letting ATP pass the toxin pores in both human erythrocytes and artificial membranes.

  16. ATP Release from Vascular Endothelia Occurs Across Cx43 Hemichannels and Is Attenuated during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zug, Stephanie; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Extracellular ATP is an important signaling molecule for vascular adaptation to limited oxygen availability (hypoxia). Here, we pursued the contribution of vascular endothelia to extracellular ATP release under hypoxic conditions. Methodology, Principal Findings We gained first insight from studying ATP release from endothelia (HMEC-1) pre-exposed to hypoxia. Surprisingly, we found that ATP release was significantly attenuated following hypoxia exposure (2% oxygen, 22±3% after 48 h). In contrast, intracellular ATP was unchanged. Similarly, lactate-dehydrogenase release into the supernatants was similar between normoxic or hypoxic endothelia, suggesting that differences in lytic ATP release between normoxia or hypoxia are minimal. Next, we used pharmacological strategies to study potential mechanisms for endothelial-dependent ATP release (eg, verapamil, dipyridamole, 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, anandamide, connexin-mimetic peptides). These studies revealed that endothelial ATP release occurs – at least in part - through connexin 43 (Cx43) hemichannels. A real-time RT-PCR screen of endothelial connexin expression showed selective repression of Cx43 transcript and additional studies confirmed time-dependent Cx43 mRNA, total and surface protein repression during hypoxia. In addition, hypoxia resulted in Cx43-serine368 phosphorylation, which is known to switch Cx43 hemi-channels from an open to a closed state. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these studies implicate endothelial Cx43 in hypoxia-associated repression of endothelial ATP release. PMID:18665255

  17. Nonmetal haptens induce ATP release from keratinocytes through opening of pannexin hemichannels by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Onami, Kaoru; Kimura, Yutaka; Ito, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-07-01

    Although extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (eATP) has a crucial role in the sensitization phase of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), the mechanism by which hapten causes keratinocyte cell death and ATP release is unknown. We examined the time course of cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ATP release in HaCaT cells and in normal human keratinocytes after exposure to nonmetal haptens, NiCl2, or irritants. Both haptens and irritants caused cell death of keratinocytes but with different time courses. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly reduced only nonmetal hapten-induced cell death as assessed by propidium iodide exclusion. We examined the effects of antioxidants and pannexin (Panx) inhibitors on cell death, ROS production, and ATP release by chemical-treated HaCaT cells. Nonmetal hapten-induced cell death, but not NiCl2- or irritant-related cell death, was dependent on reactivity to thiol residues in the cells. NAC reduced cell death and ATP release, whereas antioxidants and Panx inhibitors did not inhibit cell death but significantly attenuated ATP release. Panx1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed ATP release from hapten-exposed HaCaT cells. Intraperitoneal injection of a Panx1 inhibitor attenuated murine CHS. These findings suggest that nonmetal hapten reactivity to thiol residues causes membrane disruption of keratinocytes and ROS production that leads to ATP release through opening of Panx hemichannels. PMID:24531690

  18. Negative feedback of extracellular ADP on ATP release in goldfish hepatocytes: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Pafundo, Diego E; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J

    2010-06-21

    A mathematical model was built to account for the kinetic of extracellular ATP (ATPe) and extracellular ADP (ADPe) concentrations from goldfish hepatocytes exposed to hypotonicity. The model was based on previous experimental results on the time course of ATPe accumulation, ectoATPase activity, and cell viability [Pafundo et al., 2008]. The kinetic of ATPe is controlled by a lytic ATP flux, a non-lytic ATP flux, and ecto-ATPase activity, whereas ADPe kinetic is governed by a lytic ADP flux and both ecto-ATPase and ecto-ADPase activities. Non-lytic ATPe efflux was included as a diffusion equation modulated by ATPe activation (positive feedback) and ADPe inhibition (negative feedback). The model yielded physically meaningful and stable steady-state solutions, was able to fit the experimental time evolution of ATPe and simulated the concomitant kinetic of ADPe. According to the model during the first minute of hypotonicity the concentration of ATPe is mainly governed by both lytic and non-lytic ATP efflux, with almost no contribution from ecto-ATPase activity. Later on, ecto-ATPase activity becomes important in defining the time dependent decay of ATPe levels. ADPe inhibition of the non-lytic ATP efflux was strong, whereas ATPe activation was minimal. Finally, the model was able to predict the consequences of partial inhibition of ecto-ATPase activity on the ATPe kinetic, thus emulating the exposure of goldfish cells to hypotonic medium in the presence of the ATP analog AMP-PCP. The model predicts this analog to both inhibit ectoATPase activity and increase non-lytic ATP release.

  19. Imaging and characterization of stretch-induced ATP release from alveolar A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Mechano-transduction at cellular and tissue levels often involves ATP release and activation of the purinergic signalling cascade. In the lungs, stretch is an important physical stimulus but its impact on ATP release, the underlying release mechanisms and transduction pathways are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of unidirectional stretch on ATP release from human alveolar A549 cells by real-time luciferin–luciferase bioluminescence imaging coupled with simultaneous infrared imaging, to monitor the extent of cell stretch and to identify ATP releasing cells. In subconfluent (<90%) cell cultures, single 1 s stretch (10–40%)-induced transient ATP release from a small fraction (≤1.5%) of cells that grew in number dose-dependently with increasing extent of stretch. ATP concentration in the proximity (≤150 μm) of releasing cells often exceeded 10 μm, sufficient for autocrine/paracrine purinoreceptor stimulation of neighbouring cells. ATP release responses were insensitive to the putative ATP channel blockers carbenoxolone and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropyl-amino) benzoic acid, but were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and bafilomycin. In confluent cell cultures, the maximal fraction of responding cells dropped to <0.2%, but was enhanced several-fold in the wound/scratch area after it was repopulated by new cells during the healing process. Fluo8 fluorescence experiments revealed two types of stretch-induced intracellular Ca2+ responses, rapid sustained Ca2+ elevations in a limited number of cells and delayed secondary responses in neighbouring cells, seen as Ca2+ waves whose propagation was consistent with extracellular diffusion of released ATP. Our experiments revealed that a single >10% stretch was sufficient to initiate intercellular purinergic signalling in alveolar cells, which may contribute to the regulation of surfactant secretion and wound healing. PMID:23247110

  20. Imaging and characterization of stretch-induced ATP release from alveolar A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Grygorczyk, Ryszard; Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Abstract  Mechano-transduction at cellular and tissue levels often involves ATP release and activation of the purinergic signalling cascade. In the lungs, stretch is an important physical stimulus but its impact on ATP release, the underlying release mechanisms and transduction pathways are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of unidirectional stretch on ATP release from human alveolar A549 cells by real-time luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence imaging coupled with simultaneous infrared imaging, to monitor the extent of cell stretch and to identify ATP releasing cells. In subconfluent (<90%) cell cultures, single 1 s stretch (10-40%)-induced transient ATP release from a small fraction (1.5%) of cells that grew in number dose-dependently with increasing extent of stretch. ATP concentration in the proximity (150 μm) of releasing cells often exceeded 10 μm, sufficient for autocrine/paracrine purinoreceptor stimulation of neighbouring cells. ATP release responses were insensitive to the putative ATP channel blockers carbenoxolone and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropyl-amino) benzoic acid, but were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and bafilomycin. In confluent cell cultures, the maximal fraction of responding cells dropped to <0.2%, but was enhanced several-fold in the wound/scratch area after it was repopulated by new cells during the healing process. Fluo8 fluorescence experiments revealed two types of stretch-induced intracellular Ca(2+) responses, rapid sustained Ca(2+) elevations in a limited number of cells and delayed secondary responses in neighbouring cells, seen as Ca(2+) waves whose propagation was consistent with extracellular diffusion of released ATP. Our experiments revealed that a single >10% stretch was sufficient to initiate intercellular purinergic signalling in alveolar cells, which may contribute to the regulation of surfactant secretion and wound healing.

  1. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-04-01

    Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l(−1) at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l(−1), respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min(−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l(−1) (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l(−1). Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  2. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l−1 at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l−1, respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l−1 (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l−1. Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  3. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  4. Dorsal horn neurons release extracellular ATP in a VNUT-dependent manner that underlies neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Ozono, Yui; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Salter, Michael W.; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors in the spinal cord by extracellular ATP is essential for neuropathic hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury (PNI). However, the cell type responsible for releasing ATP within the spinal cord after PNI is unknown. Here we show that PNI increases expression of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) in the spinal cord. Extracellular ATP content ([ATP]e) within the spinal cord was increased after PNI, and this increase was suppressed by exocytotic inhibitors. Mice lacking VNUT did not show PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and had attenuated hypersensitivity. These phenotypes were recapitulated in mice with specific deletion of VNUT in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) neurons, but not in mice lacking VNUT in primary sensory neurons, microglia or astrocytes. Conversely, ectopic VNUT expression in SDH neurons of VNUT-deficient mice restored PNI-induced increase in [ATP]e and pain. Thus, VNUT is necessary for exocytotic ATP release from SDH neurons which contributes to neuropathic pain. PMID:27515581

  5. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  6. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-12-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering.

  7. ATP hydrolysis assists phosphate release and promotes reaction ordering in F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Biu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-01-01

    F1-ATPase (F1) is a rotary motor protein that can efficiently convert chemical energy to mechanical work of rotation via fine coordination of its conformational motions and reaction sequences. Compared with reactant binding and product release, the ATP hydrolysis has relatively little contributions to the torque and chemical energy generation. To scrutinize possible roles of ATP hydrolysis, we investigate the detailed statistics of the catalytic dwells from high-speed single wild-type F1 observations. Here we report a small rotation during the catalytic dwell triggered by the ATP hydrolysis that is indiscernible in previous studies. Moreover, we find in freely rotating F1 that ATP hydrolysis is followed by the release of inorganic phosphate with low synthesis rates. Finally, we propose functional roles of the ATP hydrolysis as a key to kinetically unlock the subsequent phosphate release and promote the correct reaction ordering. PMID:26678797

  8. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  9. Mice Lacking Pannexin 1 Release ATP and Respond Normally to All Taste Qualities.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Anderson, Catherine B; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is required for the transmission of all taste qualities from taste cells to afferent nerve fibers. ATP is released from Type II taste cells by a nonvesicular mechanism and activates purinergic receptors containing P2X2 and P2X3 on nerve fibers. Several ATP release channels are expressed in taste cells including CALHM1, Pannexin 1, Connexin 30, and Connexin 43, but whether all are involved in ATP release is not clear. We have used a global Pannexin 1 knock out (Panx1 KO) mouse in a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results confirm that Panx1 channels are absent in taste buds of the knockout mice and that other known ATP release channels are not upregulated. Using a luciferin/luciferase assay, we show that circumvallate taste buds from Panx1 KO mice normally release ATP upon taste stimulation compared with wild type (WT) mice. Gustatory nerve recordings in response to various tastants applied to the tongue and brief-access behavioral testing with SC45647 also show no difference between Panx1 KO and WT. These results confirm that Panx1 is not required for the taste evoked release of ATP or for neural and behavioral responses to taste stimuli.

  10. Impairment of vesicular ATP release affects glucose metabolism and increases insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shohei; Miyaji, Takaaki; Hiasa, Miki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uematsu, Akira; Iwatsuki, Ken; Shibata, Atsushi; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine cells store ATP in secretory granules and release it along with hormones that may trigger a variety of cellular responses in a process called purinergic chemical transmission. Although the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) has been shown to be involved in vesicular storage and release of ATP, its physiological relevance in vivo is far less well understood. In Vnut knockout (Vnut−/−) mice, we found that the loss of functional VNUT in adrenal chromaffin granules and insulin granules in the islets of Langerhans led to several significant effects. Vesicular ATP accumulation and depolarization-dependent ATP release were absent in the chromaffin granules of Vnut−/− mice. Glucose-responsive ATP release was also absent in pancreatic β-cells in Vnut−/− mice, while glucose-responsive insulin secretion was enhanced to a greater extent than that in wild-type tissue. Vnut−/− mice exhibited improved glucose tolerance and low blood glucose upon fasting due to increased insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrated an essential role of VNUT in vesicular storage and release of ATP in neuroendocrine cells in vivo and suggest that vesicular ATP and/or its degradation products act as feedback regulators in catecholamine and insulin secretion, thereby regulating blood glucose homeostasis. PMID:25331291

  11. Impairment of vesicular ATP release affects glucose metabolism and increases insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shohei; Miyaji, Takaaki; Hiasa, Miki; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uematsu, Akira; Iwatsuki, Ken; Shibata, Atsushi; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2014-10-21

    Neuroendocrine cells store ATP in secretory granules and release it along with hormones that may trigger a variety of cellular responses in a process called purinergic chemical transmission. Although the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) has been shown to be involved in vesicular storage and release of ATP, its physiological relevance in vivo is far less well understood. In Vnut knockout (Vnut(-/-)) mice, we found that the loss of functional VNUT in adrenal chromaffin granules and insulin granules in the islets of Langerhans led to several significant effects. Vesicular ATP accumulation and depolarization-dependent ATP release were absent in the chromaffin granules of Vnut(-/-) mice. Glucose-responsive ATP release was also absent in pancreatic β-cells in Vnut(-/-) mice, while glucose-responsive insulin secretion was enhanced to a greater extent than that in wild-type tissue. Vnut(-/-) mice exhibited improved glucose tolerance and low blood glucose upon fasting due to increased insulin sensitivity. These results demonstrated an essential role of VNUT in vesicular storage and release of ATP in neuroendocrine cells in vivo and suggest that vesicular ATP and/or its degradation products act as feedback regulators in catecholamine and insulin secretion, thereby regulating blood glucose homeostasis.

  12. Release of noradrenaline and ATP by electrical stimulation and nicotine in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed

    von Kügelgen, I; Starke, K

    1991-10-01

    were marked decreases of electrically evoked contractions (by 94%), the electrically evoked overflow ATP (by 66%), nicotine-evoked contractions (by 97%) and the nicotine-evoked overflow of ATP (by 70%). It is concluded that both electrical stimulation and nicotine release noradrenaline and ATP in guinea-pig vas deferens. Only part of the evoked overflow of ATP (about 32%) is neural in origin. Another part probably originates from smooth muscle cells where it is released by neurogenic noradrenaline acting at alpha 1-adrenoceptors. Corelease leads to cotransmission: electrically as well as nicotine-evoked contractions consist of adrenergic and purinergic components. Varying types of stimulation release cotransmitter mixtures of varying composition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1662775

  13. Two non-vesicular ATP release pathways in the mouse erythrocyte membrane

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Wang, Junjie; Spray, David C.; Scemes, Eliana; Dahl, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocytes are exceptionally suited for analysis of non-exocytotic release mechanisms of ATP, because these cells under physiological conditions lack vesicles. Previous studies have indicated, that Pannexin1 (Panx1) provides a key ATP permeation pathway in many cell types, including human and frog erythrocytes. Here we show that erythrocytes of Panx1-/- mice lend further support to this conclusion. However, ATP release, although attenuated, was still observed in Panx1-/- mouse erythrocytes. In contrast to Panx1+/+ cells, this release was not correlated with uptake of extracellularly applied dyes, was insensitive to Panx1 channel blockers, and was inhibited by dipyridamole and stimulated by iloprost. Thus, in erythrocytes, two independent pathways mediate the release of ATP. We also show that glyburide is a strong inhibitor of Panx1 channels. PMID:21983290

  14. The adjuvant MF59 induces ATP release from muscle that potentiates response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vono, Maria; Taccone, Marianna; Caccin, Paola; Gallotta, Marilena; Donvito, Giovanna; Falzoni, Simonetta; Palmieri, Emiliano; Pallaoro, Michele; Rappuoli, Rino; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Gregorio, Ennio; Montecucco, Cesare; Seubert, Anja

    2013-12-24

    Vaccines are the most effective agents to control infections. In addition to the pathogen antigens, vaccines contain adjuvants that are used to enhance protective immune responses. However, the molecular mechanism of action of most adjuvants is ill-known, and a better understanding of adjuvanticity is needed to develop improved adjuvants based on molecular targets that further enhance vaccine efficacy. This is particularly important for tuberculosis, malaria, AIDS, and other diseases for which protective vaccines do not exist. Release of endogenous danger signals has been linked to adjuvanticity; however, the role of extracellular ATP during vaccination has never been explored. Here, we tested whether ATP release is involved in the immune boosting effect of four common adjuvants: aluminum hydroxide, calcium phosphate, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and the oil-in-water emulsion MF59. We found that intramuscular injection is always associated with a weak transient release of ATP, which was greatly enhanced by the presence of MF59 but not by all other adjuvants tested. Local injection of apyrase, an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, inhibited cell recruitment in the muscle induced by MF59 but not by alum or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. In addition, apyrase strongly inhibited influenza-specific T-cell responses and hemagglutination inhibition titers in response to an MF59-adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccine. These data demonstrate that a transient ATP release is required for innate and adaptive immune responses induced by MF59 and link extracellular ATP with an enhanced response to vaccination. PMID:24324152

  15. ATP release and contraction mediated by different P2-receptor subtypes in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Katsuichi; Katsuragi, Takeshi; Fujiki, Sono; Sato, Chiemi; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    1997-01-01

    The present study was addressed to clarify the subtypes of P2-purinoceptor involved in ATP release and contraction evoked by α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-mATP) and other P2-agonists in guinea-pig ileum.α,β-mATP 100 μM produced a transient and steep contraction followed by ATP release from tissue segments. These maximum responses appeared with different time-courses and their ED50 values were 5 and 25 μM, respectively. The maximum release of ATP by α,β-mATP was markedly reduced by 250 μM suramin, 30 μM pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,5′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and 30 μM reactive blue 2 (RB-2), P2-receptor antagonists. However, the contractile response was inhibited by suramin, tetrodotoxin and atropine, but not by PPADS and RB-2.Although the contraction caused by α,β-mATP was strongly diminished by Ca2+-removal and nifedipine, and also by tetrodotoxin and atropine at 0.3 μM, the release of ATP was virtually unaffected by these procedures.UTP, β,γ-methylene ATP (β,γ-mATP) and ADP at 100 μM elicited a moderate release of ATP. The release caused by UTP was virtually unaffected by RB-2. However, these P2-agonists failed to elicit a contraction of the segment.The potency order of all the agonists tested for the release of ATP was α,β-mATP>UTP>β,γ-mATP>ADP.In superfusion experiments with cultured smooth muscle cells from the ileum, α,β-mATP (100 μM) enhanced the release of ATP 5 fold above the basal value. This evoked release was inhibited by RB-2.These findings suggest that ATP release and contraction induced by P2-agonists such as α,β-mATP in the guinea-pig ileum result mainly from stimulation of different P2-purinoceptors, P2Y-like purinoceptors on the smooth muscles and, probably, P2X-purinoceptors on cholinergic nerve terminals, respectively. However, the ATP release may also be mediated, in part, by P2U-receptors, because UTP caused RB-2-insensitive ATP release. PMID:9283712

  16. Cell swelling-induced ATP release is tightly dependent on intracellular calcium elevations

    PubMed Central

    Boudreault, Francis; Grygorczyk, Ryszard

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical stresses release ATP from a variety of cells by a poorly defined mechanism(s). Using custom-designed flow-through chambers, we investigated the kinetics of cell swelling-induced ATP secretion, cell volume and intracellular calcium changes in epithelial A549 and 16HBE14o− cells, and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Fifty per cent hypotonic shock triggered transient ATP release from cell confluent monolayers, which consistently peaked at around 1 min 45 s for A549 and NIH/3T3, and at 3 min for 16HBE14o− cells, then declined to baseline within the next 15 min. Whereas the release time course had a similar pattern for the three cell types, the peak rates differed significantly (294 ± 67, 70 ± 22 and 17 ± 2.8 pmol min−1 (106 cells)−1, for A549, 16HBE14o− and NIH/3T3, respectively). The concomitant volume changes of substrate-attached cells were analysed by a 3-dimensional cell shape reconstruction method based on images acquired from two perpendicular directions. The three cell types swelled at a similar rate, reaching maximal expansion in 1 min 45 s, but differed in the duration of the volume plateau and regulatory volume decrease (RVD). These experiments revealed that ATP release does not correlate with either cell volume expansion and the expected activation of stretch-sensitive channels, or with the activation of volume-sensitive, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid-inhibitable anion channels during RVD. By contrast, ATP release was tightly synchronized, in all three cell types, with cytosolic calcium elevations. Furthermore, loading A549 cells with the calcium chelator BAPTA significantly diminished ATP release (71% inhibition of the peak rate), while the calcium ionophore ionomycin triggered ATP release in the absence of cell swelling. Lowering the temperature to 10°C almost completely abolished A549 cell swelling-induced ATP release (95% inhibition of the peak rate). These results strongly suggest that calcium-dependent exocytosis plays a

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum is a key organella in bradykinin-triggered ATP release from cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sato, Chiemi; Usune, Sadaharu; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2007-09-01

    ATP has broad functions as an autocrine/paracrine molecule. The mode of ATP release and its intracellular source, however, are little understood. Here we show that bradykinin via B(2)-receptor stimulation induces the extracellular release of ATP via the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)]-signaling pathway in cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. It was found that bradykinin also increased the production of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and 2-APB-inhibitable [Ca(2+)](i). The evoked release of ATP was suppressed by the Ca(2+)-channel blockers, nifedipine, and verapamil. Moreover, the extracellular release of ATP was elicited by photoliberation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3). Bradykinin caused a quick and transient accumulation of intracellular ATP from cells treated with 1% perchloric acid solution (PCA), but not with the cell lysis buffer. Peak accumulation was prevented by 2-APB and thapsigargin, but not by nifedipine or verapamil, inhibitors of extracellular release of ATP. These findings suggest that bradykinin elicits the extracellular release of ATP that is mediated by the Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) signaling and, finally, leads to a Ca(2+)-dependent export of ATP from the cells. Furthermore, the bradykinin-induced transient accumulation of ATP in the cells treated with PCA may imply a possible release of ATP from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  18. Nonsynaptic Communication Through ATP Release from Volume-Activated Anion Channels in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Fields, R. Douglas; Ni, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    The release of neuronal messengers outside synapses has broad biological implications, particularly with regard to communication between axons and glia. We identify a mechanism for nonsynaptic, nonvesicular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from axons through volume-activated anion channels (VAACs) activated by microscopic axon swelling during action potential firing. We used a combination of single-photon imaging of ATP release, together with imaging for intrinsic optical signals, intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+), time-lapse video, and confocal microscopy, to investigate action potential–induced nonsynaptic release of this neurotransmitter. ATP release from cultured embryonic dorsal root ganglion axons persisted when bafilomycin or botulinum toxin was used to block vesicular release, whereas pharmacological inhibition of VAACs or prevention of action potential–induced axon swelling inhibited ATP release and disrupted activity-dependent signaling between axons and astrocytes. This nonvesicular, nonsynaptic communication could mediate various activity-dependent interactions between axons and nervous system cells in normal conditions, development, and disease. PMID:20923934

  19. Identification of ATP-Binding Regions in the RyR1 Ca2+ Release Channel

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Olga B.; Baker, Mariah R.; Tran, Tina P.; Le, Tri; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2012-01-01

    ATP is an important modulator of gating in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), also known as a Ca2+ release channel in skeletal muscle cells. The activating effect of ATP on this channel is achieved by directly binding to one or more sites on the RyR1 protein. However, the number and location of these sites have yet to be determined. To identify the ATP-binding regions within RyR1 we used 2N3ATP-2′,3′-Biotin-LC-Hydrazone (BioATP-HDZ), a photo-reactive ATP analog to covalently label the channel. We found that BioATP-HDZ binds RyR1 specifically with an IC50 = 0.6±0.2 mM, comparable with the reported EC50 for activation of RyR1 with ATP. Controlled proteolysis of labeled RyR1 followed by sequence analysis revealed three fragments with apparent molecular masses of 95, 45 and 70 kDa that were crosslinked by BioATP-HDZ and identified as RyR1 sequences. Our analysis identified four glycine-rich consensus motifs that can potentially constitute ATP-binding sites and are located within the N-terminal 95-kDa fragment. These putative nucleotide-binding sequences include amino acids 699–704, 701–706, 1081–1084 and 1195–1200, which are conserved among the three RyR isoforms. Located next to the N-terminal disease hotspot region in RyR1, these sequences may communicate the effects of ATP-binding to channel function by tuning conformational motions within the neighboring cytoplasmic regulatory domains. Two other labeled fragments lack ATP-binding consensus motifs and may form non-canonical ATP-binding sites. Based on domain topology in the 3D structure of RyR1 it is also conceivable that the identified ATP-binding regions, despite their wide separation in the primary sequence, may actually constitute the same non-contiguous ATP-binding pocket within the channel tetramer. PMID:23144945

  20. Glucocorticoid regulation of ATP release from spinal astrocytes underlies diurnal exacerbation of neuropathic mechanical allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Taniguchi, Marie; Akamine, Takahiro; Kanado, Yuki; Ozono, Yui; Masuda, Takahiro; Kohro, Yuta; Matsunaga, Naoya; Tsuda, Makoto; Salter, Michael W.; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variations in pain hypersensitivity are common in chronic pain disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are enigmatic. Here, we report that mechanical pain hypersensitivity in sciatic nerve-injured mice shows pronounced diurnal alterations, which critically depend on diurnal variations in glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. Diurnal enhancement of pain hypersensitivity is mediated by glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of the extracellular release of ATP in the spinal cord, which stimulates purinergic receptors on microglia in the dorsal horn. We identify serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase-1 (SGK-1) as the key molecule responsible for the glucocorticoid-enhanced release of ATP from astrocytes. SGK-1 protein levels in spinal astrocytes are increased in response to glucocorticoid stimuli and enhanced ATP release by opening the pannexin-1 hemichannels. Our findings reveal an unappreciated circadian machinery affecting pain hypersensitivity caused by peripheral nerve injury, thus opening up novel approaches to the management of chronic pain. PMID:27739425

  1. Extracellular ATP released by osteoblasts is a key local inhibitor of bone mineralisation.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Key, Michelle L; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Arnett, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous ATP (>1 µM) prevents bone formation in vitro by blocking mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. This effect is thought to be mediated via both P2 receptor-dependent pathways and a receptor-independent mechanism (hydrolysis of ATP to produce the mineralisation inhibitor pyrophosphate, PP(i)). Osteoblasts are also known to release ATP constitutively. To determine whether this endogenous ATP might exert significant biological effects, bone-forming primary rat osteoblasts were cultured with 0.5-2.5 U/ml apyrase (which sequentially hydrolyses ATP to ADP to AMP + 2 P(i)). Addition of 0.5 U/ml apyrase to osteoblast culture medium degraded extracellular ATP to <1% of control levels within 2 minutes; continuous exposure to apyrase maintained this inhibition for up to 14 days. Apyrase treatment for the first 72 hours of culture caused small decreases (≤25%) in osteoblast number, suggesting a role for endogenous ATP in stimulating cell proliferation. Continuous apyrase treatment for 14 days (≥0.5 U/ml) increased mineralisation of bone nodules by up to 3-fold. Increases in bone mineralisation were also seen when osteoblasts were cultured with the ATP release inhibitors, NEM and brefeldin A, as well as with P2X1 and P2X7 receptor antagonists. Apyrase decreased alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity by up to 60%, whilst increasing the activity of the PP(i)-generating ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases (NPPs) up to 2.7-fold. Both collagen production and adipocyte formation were unaffected. These data suggest that nucleotides released by osteoblasts in bone could act locally, via multiple mechanisms, to limit mineralisation.

  2. Real time imaging of live cell ATP leaking or release events by chemiluminescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yun

    2008-12-18

    The purpose of this research was to expand the chemiluminescence microscopy applications in live bacterial/mammalian cell imaging and to improve the detection sensitivity for ATP leaking or release events. We first demonstrated that chemiluminescence (CL) imaging can be used to interrogate single bacterial cells. While using a luminometer allows detecting ATP from cell lysate extracted from at least 10 bacterial cells, all previous cell CL detection never reached this sensitivity of single bacteria level. We approached this goal with a different strategy from before: instead of breaking bacterial cell membrane and trying to capture the transiently diluted ATP with the firefly luciferase CL assay, we introduced the firefly luciferase enzyme into bacteria using the modern genetic techniques and placed the CL reaction substrate D-luciferin outside the cells. By damaging the cell membrane with various antibacterial drugs including antibiotics such as Penicillins and bacteriophages, the D-luciferin molecules diffused inside the cell and initiated the reaction that produces CL light. As firefly luciferases are large protein molecules which are retained within the cells before the total rupture and intracellular ATP concentration is high at the millmolar level, the CL reaction of firefly luciferase, ATP and D-luciferin can be kept for a relatively long time within the cells acting as a reaction container to generate enough photons for detection by the extremely sensitive intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera. The result was inspiring as various single bacterium lysis and leakage events were monitored with 10-s temporal resolution movies. We also found a new way of enhancing diffusion D-luciferin into cells by dehydrating the bacteria. Then we started with this novel single bacterial CL imaging technique, and applied it for quantifying gene expression levels from individual bacterial cells. Previous published result in single cell gene expression quantification

  3. ATP-mediated release of arachidonic acid metabolites from venular endothelium causes arteriolar dilation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L W; Ligon, A L; Hester, R L

    2001-06-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that venular administration of ATP resulted in endothelium-dependent dilation of adjacent arterioles through a mechanism involving cyclooxygenase products. Forty-three male golden hamsters were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (60 mg/kg ip), and the cremaster muscle was prepared for in vivo microscopy. ATP (100 microM) injected into venules dilated adjacent arterioles from a mean diameter of 51 +/- 4 to 76 +/- 6 microm (P < 0.05, n = 6). To remove the source of endothelial-derived relaxing factors, the venules were then perfused with air bubbles to disrupt the endothelium. Resting arteriolar diameter was not altered after disruption of the venular endothelium (51 +/- 5 microm), and the responses to venular ATP infusions were significantly attenuated (59 +/- 4 microm, P < 0.05). To determine whether the relaxing factor was a cyclooxygenase product, ATP infusion studies were repeated in the absence and presence of indomethacin (28 microM). Under control conditions, ATP (100 microM) infusion into the venule caused an increase in mean arteriolar diameter from 55 +/- 4 to 78 +/- 3 microm (P < 0.05, n = 6). In the presence of indomethacin, mean resting arteriolar tone was not significantly altered (49 +/- 4 microm), and the response to ATP was significantly attenuated (54 +/- 4 microm, P < 0.05, n = 6). These studies show that increases in venular ATP concentrations stimulate the release of cyclooxygenase products, possibly from the venular endothelium, to vasodilate the adjacent arteriole. PMID:11356617

  4. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  5. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  6. ATP released by electrical stimuli elicits calcium transients and gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-12-11

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, with an EC(50) value of 7.8 +/- 3.1 microm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 mum suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y(2) receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 mum ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca(2+) homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  7. ATP modulation of Ca2+ release by type-2 and type-3 inositol (1, 4, 5)-triphosphate receptors. Differing ATP sensitivities and molecular determinants of action.

    PubMed

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Wagner, Larry E; Iwai, Miwako; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Yule, David I

    2008-08-01

    ATP enhances Ca(2+) release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R). However, the three isoforms of InsP(3)R are reported to respond to ATP with differing sensitivities. Ca(2+) release through InsP(3)R1 is positively regulated at lower ATP concentrations than InsP(3)R3, and InsP(3)R2 has been reported to be insensitive to ATP modulation. We have reexamined these differences by studying the effects of ATP on InsP(3)R2 and InsP(3)R3 expressed in isolation on a null background in DT40 InsP(3)R knockout cells. We report that the Ca(2+)-releasing activity as well as the single channel open probability of InsP(3)R2 was enhanced by ATP, but only at submaximal InsP(3) levels. Further, InsP(3)R2 was more sensitive to ATP modulation than InsP(3)R3 under similar experimental conditions. Mutations in the ATPB sites of InsP(3)R2 and InsP(3)R3 were generated, and the functional consequences of these mutations were tested. Surprisingly, mutation of the ATPB site in InsP(3)R3 had no effect on ATP modulation, suggesting an additional locus for the effects of ATP on this isoform. In contrast, ablation of the ATPB site of InsP(3)R2 eliminated the enhancing effects of ATP. Furthermore, this mutation had profound effects on the patterns of intracellular calcium signals, providing evidence for the physiological significance of ATP binding to InsP(3)R2.

  8. Impaired ATP release from red blood cells promotes their adhesion to endothelial cells: A mechanism of hypoxemia after transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongmei; Zennadi, Rahima; Xu, Bruce X.; Eu, Jerry P.; Torok, Jordan A.; Telen, Marilyn J.; McMahon, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) has been linked to disappointing clinical outcomes in the critically ill, but specific mechanisms of organ dysfunction after transfusion remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that RBC storage impairs the ability of RBCs to release ATP and that impaired ATP-release was injurious in vivo, in part through increased RBC adhesion. Design Prospective, controlled, mechanistic study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Human and mouse blood donors; nude mouse transfusion recipients. Interventions Manipulation of ATP release, supplemental ATP, and antibodies to RBC and endothelial adhesion receptors were used in vitro and in vivo to probe the roles of released ATP and adhesion in responses to (transfused) RBCs. Measurements and main results The ability of stored RBCs to release ATP declined markedly within 14 days after collection, despite relatively stable levels of ATP within the RBCs. Inhibiting ATP release promoted the adhesion of stored RBCs to endothelial cells in vitro and RBC sequestration in the lungs of transfused mice in vivo. Unlike transfusion of fresh human RBCs, stored-RBC transfusion in mice decreased blood oxygenation and increased extravasation of RBCs into the lung’s alveolar airspaces. Similar findings were seen with transfusion of fresh RBCs treated with the ATP-release inhibitors glibenclamide and carbenoxolone. These findings were prevented by either co-infusion of an ATP analog or pre-transfusion incubation of the RBCs with an antibody against the erythrocyte adhesion receptor LW (Landsteiner-Wiener; ICAM-4). Conclusions The normal flow of RBCs in pulmonary microvessels depends in part on the release of anti-adhesive ATP from RBCs, and storage-induced deficiency in ATP release from transfused RBCs may promote or exacerbate microvascular pathophysiology in the lung, in part through increased RBC adhesion. PMID:21765360

  9. Fluid Shear-Induced ATP Secretion Mediates Prostaglandin Release in MC3T3-E1 Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Genetos, Damian C.; Geist, Derik J.; Dawei, Liu; Donahue, Henry J.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    ATP is rapidly released from osteoblasts in response to mechanical load. We examined the mechanisms involved in this release and established that shear-induced ATP release was mediated through vesicular fusion and was dependent on Ca2+ entry into the cell via L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Degradation of secreted ATP by apyrase prevented shear-induced PGE2 release. Introduction Fluid shear induces a rapid rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoblasts that mediates many of the cellular responses associated with mechanotransduction in bone. A potential mechanism for this increase in [Ca2+]i is the activation of purinergic (P2) receptors resulting from shear-induced extracellular release of ATP. This study was designed to determine the effects of fluid shear on ATP release and the possible mechanisms associated with this release. Methods MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts were plated on type I collagen, allowed to proliferate to 90% confluency, then subjected to 12 dynes/cm2 laminar fluid flow using a parallel plate flow chamber. ATP release into the flow media was measured using a luciferin/luciferase assay. Inhibitors of channels, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and vesicular formation were added prior to shear and maintained in the flow medium for the duration of the experiment. Results and Conclusions Fluid shear produced a transient increase in ATP release compared to static MC3T3-E1 cells (59.8±15.7nM vs. 6.2±1.8nM, respectively), peaking within 1 min of onset. Inhibition of calcium entry through the L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel (L-VSCC) with nifedipine or verapamil significantly attenuated shear-induced ATP release. Channel inhibition had no effect on basal ATP release in static cells. Ca2+ -dependent ATP release in response to shear appeared to result from vesicular release, and not through gap hemichannels, since vesicle disruption with N-ethylmaleimide, brefeldin A, or monensin prevented increases in flow-induced ATP

  10. Increased astrocytic ATP release results in enhanced excitability of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae Ung; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Furuya, Kishio; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hida, Hideki; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Satoshi; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2013-02-01

    Astrocytes, a major subtype of glia, interact with neurons as a supportive partner supplying energy sources and growth factors. Astrocytes regulate the activity of neighboring neurons by releasing chemical transmitters (gliotransmitters). However, the precise role of gilotransmitters in regulating neuronal activity is still under debate. Here, we report that a subtle enhancement in the release of one gliotransmitter, ATP, affects synaptic potentiation from an analysis of mice containing an astrocyte-selective (GFAP) mutation. We found that, relative to normal mice, weaker stimulation induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in mutant mice, indicating that the threshold to induce LTP was lowered in the mutant. While excitatory transmission was normal in the mutant, inhibitory GABAergic transmission was suppressed. We found that a low concentration of adenosine selectively attenuated inhibitory neuronal activity and lowered the threshold to induce LTP in wild type mice. In comparison, adenosine A(1) receptor antagonism reversed the lowered LTP threshold back to normal in the mutant mouse. We verified that adenosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of mutant mice were slightly elevated compared to wild type mice. This was apparently caused by an increase in ATP release from mutant astrocytes that could provide a source of augmented adenosine levels in the mutant. ATP is thought to suppress the excitability of neuronal circuits; however, a small increase in ATP release can result in a suppressed inhibitory tone and enhanced excitability of neuronal circuitry. These findings demonstrate that ATP released from astrocytes acts in a bidirectional fashion to regulate neuronal excitability depending on concentration. PMID:23018918

  11. ATP Released by Injured Neurons Activates Schwann Cells

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Samuele; Bergamin, Elisanna; Rodella, Umberto; Duregotti, Elisa; Scorzeto, Michele; Jalink, Kees; Montecucco, Cesare; Rigoni, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT), perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), and muscle fiber. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of adenosine triphosphate as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within Schwann cells that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ. PMID:27242443

  12. Pannexin1-Mediated ATP Release Provides Signal Transmission Between Neuro2A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Rodolfo M.

    2013-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1), a protein related to the gap junction proteins of invertebrates, forms nonjunctional channels that open upon depolarization and in response to mechanical stretch and purinergic receptor stimulation. Importantly, ATP can be released through Panx1 channels, providing a possible role for these channels in non-vesicular signal transmission. In this study we expressed exogenous human and mouse Panx1 in the gap junction deficient Neuro2A neuroblastoma cell line and explored the contribution of Panx1 channels to cell–cell communication as sites of ATP release. Electrophysiological (patch clamp) recordings from Panx1 transfected Neuro2A cells revealed membrane conductance that increased beyond 0 mV when applying voltage ramps from −60 to +100 mV; threshold was correlated with extracellular K+, so that at 10 mM K+, channels began to open at −30 mV. Evaluation of cell–cell communication using dual whole cell recordings from cell pairs revealed that activation of Panx1 current in one cell of the pair induced an inward current in the second cell after a latency of 10–20 s. This paracrine response was amplified by an ATPase inhibitor (ARL67156, 100 µM) and was blocked by the ATP-degrading enzyme apyrase (6.7 U/ml), by the P2 receptor antagonist suramin (50 µM) and by the Panx1 channel blocker carbenoxolone. These results provide additional evidence that ATP release through Panx1 channels can mediate nonsynaptic bidirectional intercellular communication. Furthermore, current potentiation by elevated K+ provides a mechanism for enhancement of ATP release under pathological conditions. PMID:22359052

  13. Toll-Like Receptor-Triggered Calcium Mobilization Protects Mice against Bacterial Infection through Extracellular ATP Release

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hua; Teng, Yunfei; Tan, Binghe; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Mingyao; Jiang, Wenzheng

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP), released as a “danger signal” by injured or stressed cells, plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses, but the relationship between ATP release and innate immune responses is still uncertain. In this study, we demonstrated that ATP was released through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-associated signaling in both Escherichia coli-infected mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Pam3CSK4-treated macrophages. This ATP release could be blocked completely only by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), not by carbenoxolone (CBX), flufenamic acid (FFA), or probenecid, suggesting the key role of exocytosis in this process. Furthermore, LPS-induced ATP release could also be reduced dramatically through suppressing calcium mobilization by use of U73122, caffeine, and thapsigargin (TG). In addition, the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and CCL-2 was enhanced significantly by ATP, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria was also promoted significantly by ATP stimulation. Furthermore, extracellular ATP reduced the number of invading bacteria and protected mice from peritonitis by activating purinergic receptors. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was overtly increased by ATP in antibacterial immune responses. Accordingly, if we blocked the P2X- and P2Y-associated signaling pathway by using suramin and pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid), tetrasodium salt (PPADS), the ATP-enhanced immune response was restrained significantly. Taken together, our findings reveal an internal relationship between danger signals and TLR signaling in innate immune responses, which suggests a potential therapeutic significance of calcium mobilization-mediated ATP release in infectious diseases. PMID:25245808

  14. Phosphocholine-Modified Macromolecules and Canonical Nicotinic Agonists Inhibit ATP-Induced IL-1β Release.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Andreas; Küllmar, Mira; Wilker, Sigrid; Richter, Katrin; Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Mathes, Verena; Timm, Thomas; Lerner, Sabrina; Klein, Jochen; Kaufmann, Andreas; Bauer, Stefan; Padberg, Winfried; Kummer, Wolfgang; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Fronius, Martin; Schweda, Elke K H; Lochnit, Günter; Grau, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    IL-1β is a potent proinflammatory cytokine of the innate immune system that is involved in host defense against infection. However, increased production of IL-1β plays a pathogenic role in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sepsis, stroke, and transplant rejection. To prevent detrimental collateral damage, IL-1β release is tightly controlled and typically requires two consecutive danger signals. LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is a prototypical first signal inducing pro-IL-1β synthesis, whereas extracellular ATP is a typical second signal sensed by the ATP receptor P2X7 that triggers activation of the NLRP3-containing inflammasome, proteolytic cleavage of pro-IL-1β by caspase-1, and release of mature IL-1β. Mechanisms controlling IL-1β release, even in the presence of both danger signals, are needed to protect from collateral damage and are of therapeutic interest. In this article, we show that acetylcholine, choline, phosphocholine, phosphocholine-modified LPS from Haemophilus influenzae, and phosphocholine-modified protein efficiently inhibit ATP-mediated IL-1β release in human and rat monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing subunits α7, α9, and/or α10. Of note, we identify receptors for phosphocholine-modified macromolecules that are synthesized by microbes and eukaryotic parasites and are well-known modulators of the immune system. Our data suggest that an endogenous anti-inflammatory cholinergic control mechanism effectively controls ATP-mediated release of IL-1β and that the same mechanism is used by symbionts and misused by parasites to evade innate immune responses of the host.

  15. Phosphocholine-Modified Macromolecules and Canonical Nicotinic Agonists Inhibit ATP-Induced IL-1β Release.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Andreas; Küllmar, Mira; Wilker, Sigrid; Richter, Katrin; Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Mathes, Verena; Timm, Thomas; Lerner, Sabrina; Klein, Jochen; Kaufmann, Andreas; Bauer, Stefan; Padberg, Winfried; Kummer, Wolfgang; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Fronius, Martin; Schweda, Elke K H; Lochnit, Günter; Grau, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    IL-1β is a potent proinflammatory cytokine of the innate immune system that is involved in host defense against infection. However, increased production of IL-1β plays a pathogenic role in various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, sepsis, stroke, and transplant rejection. To prevent detrimental collateral damage, IL-1β release is tightly controlled and typically requires two consecutive danger signals. LPS from Gram-negative bacteria is a prototypical first signal inducing pro-IL-1β synthesis, whereas extracellular ATP is a typical second signal sensed by the ATP receptor P2X7 that triggers activation of the NLRP3-containing inflammasome, proteolytic cleavage of pro-IL-1β by caspase-1, and release of mature IL-1β. Mechanisms controlling IL-1β release, even in the presence of both danger signals, are needed to protect from collateral damage and are of therapeutic interest. In this article, we show that acetylcholine, choline, phosphocholine, phosphocholine-modified LPS from Haemophilus influenzae, and phosphocholine-modified protein efficiently inhibit ATP-mediated IL-1β release in human and rat monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing subunits α7, α9, and/or α10. Of note, we identify receptors for phosphocholine-modified macromolecules that are synthesized by microbes and eukaryotic parasites and are well-known modulators of the immune system. Our data suggest that an endogenous anti-inflammatory cholinergic control mechanism effectively controls ATP-mediated release of IL-1β and that the same mechanism is used by symbionts and misused by parasites to evade innate immune responses of the host. PMID:26202987

  16. Impaired skeletal muscle blood flow control with advancing age in humans: attenuated ATP release and local vasodilation during erythrocyte deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Skeletal muscle blood flow is coupled with the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in young adults, whereby the erythrocyte functions as an oxygen sensor and releases ATP during deoxygenation to evoke vasodilation. Whether this function is impaired in humans of advanced age is unknown. Objective To test the hypothesis that older adults demonstrate impaired muscle blood flow and lower intravascular ATP during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation. Methods and Results We show impaired forearm blood flow (FBF) responses during two conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation (systemic hypoxia and graded handgrip exercise) with age, and this is due to reduced local vasodilation. In young adults, both hypoxia and exercise significantly increased venous [ATP] and ATP effluent (FBF × [ATP]) draining skeletal muscle. In contrast, hypoxia and exercise did not increase [ATP]v in older adults, and both [ATP]v and ATP effluent were substantially reduced compared with young despite similar levels of deoxygenation. Next, we demonstrate that this cannot be explained by augmented extracellular ATP hydrolysis in whole blood with age. Finally, we found that deoxygenation-mediated ATP release from isolated erythrocytes is essentially non-existent in older adults. Conclusions Skeletal muscle blood flow during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation is markedly reduced in aging humans, and reductions in plasma ATP and erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may be a novel mechanism underlying impaired vasodilation and oxygen delivery during hypoxemia with advancing age. Because aging is associated with elevated risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and exercise intolerance, interventions targeting erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may offer therapeutic potential. PMID:22647875

  17. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-01

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  18. Vesicular expression and release of ATP from dopaminergic neurons of the mouse retina and midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tracy; Jobling, Andrew I.; Greferath, Ursula; Chuang, Trinette; Ramesh, Archana; Fletcher, Erica L.; Vessey, Kirstan A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) is required for active accumulation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) into vesicles for purinergic neurotransmission, however, the cell types that express VNUT in the central nervous system remain unknown. This study characterized VNUT expression within the mammalian retina and brain and assessed a possible functional role in purinergic signaling. Two native isoforms of VNUT were detected in mouse retina and brain based on RNA transcript and protein analysis. Using immunohistochemistry, VNUT was found to co-localize with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive, dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, however, VNUT expression in extranigral non-DA neurons was also observed. In the retina, VNUT labeling was found to co-localize solely with TH-positive DA-cells. In the outer retina, VNUT-positive interplexiform cell processes were in close contact with horizontal cells and cone photoreceptor terminals, which are known to express P2 purinergic-receptors. In order to assess function, dissociated retinal neurons were loaded with fluorescent ATP markers (Quinacrine or Mant-ATP) and the DA marker FFN102, co-labeled with a VNUT antibody and imaged in real time. Fluorescent ATP markers and FFN102 puncta were found to co-localize in VNUT positive neurons and upon stimulation with high potassium, ATP marker fluorescence at the cell membrane was reduced. This response was blocked in the presence of cadmium. These data suggest DA neurons co-release ATP via calcium dependent exocytosis and in the retina this may modulate the visual response by activating purine receptors on closely associated neurons. PMID:26500494

  19. Integrin-mediated transactivation of P2X7R via hemichannel-dependent ATP release stimulates astrocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alvaro; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl; Kong, Milene; Cárdenas, Areli; Burgos-Bravo, Francesca; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    Our previous reports indicate that ligand-induced αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 engagement increases focal adhesion formation and migration of astrocytes. Additionally, ligated integrins trigger ATP release through unknown mechanisms, activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), and the uptake of Ca(2+) to promote cell adhesion. However, whether the activation of P2X7R and ATP release are required for astrocyte migration and whether αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 receptors communicate with P2X7R via ATP remains unknown. Here, cells were stimulated with Thy-1, a reported αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 ligand. Results obtained indicate that ATP was released by Thy-1 upon integrin engagement and required the participation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospholipase-C gamma (PLCγ) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R). IP3R activation leads to increased intracellular Ca(2+), hemichannel (Connexin-43 and Pannexin-1) opening, and ATP release. Moreover, silencing of the P2X7R or addition of hemichannel blockers precluded Thy-1-induced astrocyte migration. Finally, Thy-1 lacking the integrin-binding site did not stimulate ATP release, whereas Thy-1 mutated in the Syndecan-4-binding domain increased ATP release, albeit to a lesser extent and with delayed kinetics compared to wild-type Thy-1. Thus, hemichannels activated downstream of an αVβ3 integrin-PI3K-PLCγ-IP3R pathway are responsible for Thy-1-induced, hemichannel-mediated and Syndecan-4-modulated ATP release that transactivates P2X7Rs to induce Ca(2+) entry. These findings uncover a hitherto unrecognized role for hemichannels in the regulation of astrocyte migration via P2X7R transactivation induced by integrin-mediated ATP release.

  20. Conserved mechanisms of microtubule-stimulated ADP release, ATP binding, and force generation in transport kinesins

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Joseph; Farabella, Irene; Yu, I-Mei; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Houdusse, Anne; Topf, Maya; Moores, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based ATP-powered motors, important for multiple, essential cellular functions. How microtubule binding stimulates their ATPase and controls force generation is not understood. To address this fundamental question, we visualized microtubule-bound kinesin-1 and kinesin-3 motor domains at multiple steps in their ATPase cycles—including their nucleotide-free states—at ∼7 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy. In both motors, microtubule binding promotes ordered conformations of conserved loops that stimulate ADP release, enhance microtubule affinity and prime the catalytic site for ATP binding. ATP binding causes only small shifts of these nucleotide-coordinating loops but induces large conformational changes elsewhere that allow force generation and neck linker docking towards the microtubule plus end. Family-specific differences across the kinesin–microtubule interface account for the distinctive properties of each motor. Our data thus provide evidence for a conserved ATP-driven mechanism for kinesins and reveal the critical mechanistic contribution of the microtubule interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03680.001 PMID:25209998

  1. TRPA1 and TRPV4 activation in human odontoblasts stimulates ATP release.

    PubMed

    Egbuniwe, O; Grover, S; Duggal, A K; Mavroudis, A; Yazdi, M; Renton, T; Di Silvio, L; Grant, A D

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism of pain in dentine hypersensitivity is poorly understood but proposed to result from the activation of dental sensory neurons in response to dentinal fluid movements. Odontoblasts have been suggested to contribute to thermal and mechanosensation in the tooth via expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. However, a mechanism by which odontoblasts could modulate neuronal activity has not been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated functional TRP channel expression in human odontoblast-like cells and measured ATP release in response to TRP channel activation. Human immortalized dental pulp cells were driven toward an odontoblast phenotype by culture in conditioned media. Functional expression of TRP channels was determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and ratiometric calcium imaging with Fura-2. ATP release was measured using a luciferin-luciferase assay. Expression of mRNA for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4 but not TRPM8 was detected in odontoblasts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression of TRPV4 protein was detected by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde and the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A caused a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that was inhibited by the selective antagonists HC030031, AP18, and HC067047, respectively. In contrast, exposure to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or the TRPM8 agonist icilin had no effect on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Treatment with allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde, or GSK1016790A caused an increase in ATP concentration in culture medium that was abolished by preincubation with TRP channel antagonists. These data demonstrate that activation of TRPA1 and TRPV4 channels in human odontoblast-like cells can stimulate ATP release. We were unable to confirm the presence of thermosensitive TRPV1 and TRPM8 that has previously been reported in odontoblasts

  2. TRPA1 and TRPV4 Activation in Human Odontoblasts Stimulates ATP Release

    PubMed Central

    Egbuniwe, O.; Grover, S.; Duggal, A.K.; Mavroudis, A.; Yazdi, M.; Renton, T.; Di Silvio, L.; Grant, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of pain in dentine hypersensitivity is poorly understood but proposed to result from the activation of dental sensory neurons in response to dentinal fluid movements. Odontoblasts have been suggested to contribute to thermal and mechanosensation in the tooth via expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. However, a mechanism by which odontoblasts could modulate neuronal activity has not been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated functional TRP channel expression in human odontoblast-like cells and measured ATP release in response to TRP channel activation. Human immortalized dental pulp cells were driven toward an odontoblast phenotype by culture in conditioned media. Functional expression of TRP channels was determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and ratiometric calcium imaging with Fura-2. ATP release was measured using a luciferin-luciferase assay. Expression of mRNA for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4 but not TRPM8 was detected in odontoblasts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression of TRPV4 protein was detected by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. The TRPA1 agonists allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde and the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A caused a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration that was inhibited by the selective antagonists HC030031, AP18, and HC067047, respectively. In contrast, exposure to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin or the TRPM8 agonist icilin had no effect on intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Treatment with allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamaldehyde, or GSK1016790A caused an increase in ATP concentration in culture medium that was abolished by preincubation with TRP channel antagonists. These data demonstrate that activation of TRPA1 and TRPV4 channels in human odontoblast-like cells can stimulate ATP release. We were unable to confirm the presence of thermosensitive TRPV1 and TRPM8 that has previously been reported in odontoblasts. PMID

  3. Piperine Suppresses Pyroptosis and Interleukin-1β Release upon ATP Triggering and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yi-Dan; Bai, Wen-Jing; Li, Chen-Guang; Xu, Li-Hui; Wei, Hong-Xia; Pan, Hao; He, Xian-Hui; Ouyang, Dong-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Piperine is a phytochemical present in black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn) and other related herbs, possessing a wide array of pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory effects. Previously, we demonstrated that piperine has therapeutic effects on bacterial sepsis in mice, but the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influences of piperine on pyroptosis in murine macrophages. The results showed that piperine dose-dependently inhibited ATP-induced pyroptosis, thereby suppressing interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) release in LPS-primed bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774A.1 cells. Accompanying this, ATP-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation was greatly suppressed by piperine, whereas AMPK agonist metformin counteracted piperine’s inhibitory effects on pyroptosis. Moreover, piperine administration greatly reduced both peritoneal and serum IL-1β levels in the mouse model intraperitoneally infected with Escherichia coli, suggestive of suppressing systemic inflammation and pyroptosis. Our data indicated that piperine could protect macrophages from pyroptosis and reduced IL-1β and HMGB1 release by suppressing ATP-induced AMPK activation, suggesting that piperine may become a potential therapeutic agent against bacterial sepsis. PMID:27812336

  4. The human carotid body releases acetylcholine, ATP and cytokines during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kåhlin, Jessica; Mkrtchian, Souren; Ebberyd, Anette; Hammarstedt-Nordenvall, Lalle; Nordlander, Britt; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Prabhakar, Nanduri; Poellinger, Lorenz; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I

    2014-08-01

    Studies on experimental animals established that the carotid bodies are sensory organs for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and that the ensuing chemosensory reflex is a major regulator of cardiorespiratory functions during hypoxia. However, little information is available on the human carotid body responses to hypoxia. The present study was performed on human carotid bodies obtained from surgical patients undergoing elective head and neck cancer surgery. Our results show that exposing carotid body slices to hypoxia for a period as brief as 5 min markedly facilitates the release of ACh and ATP. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia for 1 h induces an increased release of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that type 1 cells of the human carotid body express an array of cytokine receptors as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ACh and ATP are released from the human carotid body in response to hypoxia, suggesting that these neurotransmitters, as in several experimental animal models, play a role in hypoxic signalling also in the human carotid body. The finding that the human carotid body releases cytokines in response to hypoxia adds to the growing body of information suggesting that the carotid body may play a role in detecting inflammation, providing a link between the immune system and the nervous system.

  5. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  6. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  7. Release of ATP during host cell killing by enteropathogenic E. coli and its role as a secretory mediator.

    PubMed

    Crane, John K; Olson, Ruth A; Jones, Heather M; Duffey, Michael E

    2002-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) causes severe, watery diarrhea in children. We investigated ATP release during EPEC-mediated killing of human cell lines and whether released adenine nucleotides function as secretory mediators. EPEC triggered a release of ATP from all human cell lines tested: HeLa, COS-7, and T84 (colon cells) as measured using a luciferase kit. Accumulation of ATP in the supernatant medium was enhanced if an inhibitor of 5'-ectonucleotidase was included and was further enhanced if an ATP-regenerating system was added. In the presence of the inhibitor/regenerator, ATP concentrations in the supernatant medium reached 1.5-2 microM 4 h after infection with wild-type EPEC strains. In the absence of the inhibitor/regenerator system, extracellular ATP was rapidly broken down to ADP, AMP, and adenosine. Conditioned medium from EPEC-infected cells triggered a brisk chloride secretory response in intestinal tissues studied in the Ussing chamber (rabbit distal colon and T84 cell monolayers), whereas conditioned medium from uninfected cells and sterile filtrates of EPEC bacteria did not. The short-circuit current response to EPEC-conditioned medium was completely reversed by adenosine receptor blockers, such as 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline and MRS1754. EPEC killing of host cells releases ATP, which is broken down to adenosine, which in turn stimulates secretion via apical adenosine A2b receptors. These findings provide new insight into how EPEC causes watery diarrhea. PMID:12065294

  8. Regulation of blood flow distribution in skeletal muscle: role of erythrocyte-released ATP

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate tissue O2 levels in skeletal muscle is vital for normal physiology and requires a well regulated and appropriately distributed convective O2 supply. Inherent in this fundamental physiological process is the requirement for a mechanism which both senses tissue O2 need and locally adjusts flow to appropriately meet that need. Over the past several years we and others have suggested that, in skeletal muscle, O2 carrying erythrocytes participate in the regulation of total blood flow and its distribution by releasing ATP. Importantly, the release of this vasoactive molecule must be both rapid and well controlled if it is to serve an important physiological role. Here we provide insights into three distinct regulated signalling pathways within the erythrocyte that are activated by exposure to reduced O2 tension or in response to binding of agonists to the prostacyclin or β-adrenergic receptors. Although much has been learned about the role of the erythrocyte in perfusion of skeletal muscle, much remains to be understood. However, what is clear is that the long established passive carrier of O2 also contributes to the regulation of the distribution of microvascular perfusion in skeletal muscle by virtue of its capacity to release ATP. PMID:22586223

  9. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25125498

  10. Extracellular ATP stimulates exocytosis via localized Ca(2+) release from acidic stores in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Zhengxing; Ding, Jiuping; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2006-04-01

    Three different methods, membrane capacitance (C(m)) measurement, amperometry and FM dye labeling were used to investigate the role of extracellular ATP in insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta cells. We found that extracellular application of ATP mobilized intracellular Ca(2+) stores and synchronously triggered vigorous exocytosis. No influence of ATP on the readily releasable pool of vesicles was observed, which argues against a direct modulation of the secretory machinery at a level downstream of Ca(2+) elevation. The stimulatory effects of ATP were greatly reduced by intracellular perfusion of BAPTA but not EGTA, suggesting a close spatial association of fusion sites with intracellular Ca(2+) releasing sites. ATP-induced Ca(2+) transients and exocytosis were not blocked by thapsigargin (TG), by a ryanodine receptor antagonist or by dissipation of pH in acidic stores by monensin alone, but they were greatly attenuated by IP(3) receptor inhibition as well as ionomycin plus monensin, suggesting involvement of IP(3)-sensitive acidic Ca(2+) stores. Taken together, our data suggest that extracellular ATP triggers exocytosis by mobilizing spatially limited acidic Ca(2+) stores through IP(3) receptors. This mechanism may explain how insulin secretion from the pancreas is coordinated through diffusible ATP that is co-released with insulin. PMID:16536741

  11. Synergistic effects of C-peptide and insulin on low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocytes participate in the matching of oxygen (O2) delivery with local need in skeletal muscle via the release of O2 and the vasodilator, ATP. It was reported that a concentration of insulin found in humans with insulin resistance inhibits low O2-induced ATP release. However, in vivo, insulin is coreleased with connecting peptide (C-peptide) at equimolar concentrations, but because of the shorter insulin half-life, the peptides circulate at ratios of C-peptide to insulin ranging from 1:1 to 6:1. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that C-peptide and insulin work synergistically to maintain low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes. Using a thin-film tonometer to alter O2 tension, we determined that either C-peptide or insulin alone inhibits low O2-induced ATP release in a concentration-dependent manner; however, coadministration of the peptides at a 1:1 ratio does not (n = 5; P < 0.05). Because this ratio of C-peptide to insulin is not present in vivo for extended periods, we also investigated the effect of additional physiological ratios on ATP release. In the presence of insulin concentrations that would be found in fasting humans (0.05 nM), C-peptide to insulin ratios of 4:1 and 6:1 did not adversely affect low O2-induced ATP release. However, at a concentration of insulin found in the peripheral circulation of humans under postprandial conditions (0.5 nM), a ratio of C-peptide to insulin of 6:1 inhibited low O2-induced ATP release (n = 5). These findings demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized synergism between C-peptide and insulin that could have physiological importance in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:24089376

  12. ATP releasing connexin 30 hemichannels mediate flow-induced calcium signaling in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Per; Burford, James L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    ATP in the renal tubular fluid is an important regulator of salt and water reabsorption via purinergic calcium signaling that involves the P2Y2 receptor, ENaC, and AQP2. Recently, we have shown that connexin (Cx) 30 hemichannels are localized to the non-junctional apical membrane of cells in the distal nephron-collecting duct (CD) and release ATP into the tubular fluid upon mechanical stimuli, leading to reduced salt and water reabsorption. Cx30(-/-) mice show salt-dependent elevations in BP and impaired pressure-natriuresis. Thus, we hypothesized that increased tubular flow rate leads to Cx30-dependent purinergic intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signaling in the CD. Cortical CDs (CCDs) from wild type and Cx30(-/-) mice were freshly dissected and microperfused in vitro. Using confocal fluorescence imaging and the calcium-sensitive fluorophore pair Fluo-4 and Fura Red, we found that increasing tubular flow rate from 2 to 20 nl/min caused a significant 2.1-fold elevation in [Ca(2+)]i in wild type CCDs. This response was blunted in Cx30(-/-) CCDs ([Ca(2+)]i increased only 1.2-fold, p < 0.0001 vs. WT, n = 6 each). To further test our hypothesis we performed CD [Ca(2+)]i imaging in intact mouse kidneys in vivo using multiphoton microscopy and micropuncture delivery of the calcium-sensitive fluorophore Rhod-2. We found intrinsic, spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in free-flowing CDs of wild type but not Cx30(-/-) mice. The [Ca(2+)]i oscillations were sensitive also to P2-receptor inhibition by suramin. Taken together, these data confirm that mechanosensitive Cx30 hemichannels mediate tubular ATP release and purinergic calcium signaling in the CD which mechanism plays an important role in the regulation of CD salt and water reabsorption. PMID:24137132

  13. Role of glycogenolysis in stimulation of ATP release from cultured mouse astrocytes by transmitters and high K+ concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Bai, Qiufang; Zhou, Lijun; Cai, Liping; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of glycogenolysis in stimulated release of ATP as a transmitter from astrocytes. Within the last 20 years our understanding of brain glycogenolysis has changed from it being a relatively uninteresting process to being a driving force for essential brain functions like production of transmitter glutamate and homoeostasis of potassium ions (K+) after their release from excited neurons. Simultaneously, the importance of astrocytic handling of adenosine, its phosphorylation to ATP and release of some astrocytic ATP, located in vesicles, as an important transmitter has also become to be realized. Among the procedures stimulating Ca2+-dependent release of vesicular ATP are exposure to such transmitters as glutamate and adenosine, which raise intra-astrocytic Ca2+ concentration, or increase of extracellular K+ to a depolarizing level that opens astrocytic L-channels for Ca2+ and thereby also increase intra-astrocytic Ca2+ concentration, a prerequisite for glycogenolysis. The present study has confirmed and quantitated stimulated ATP release from well differentiated astrocyte cultures by glutamate, adenosine or elevated extracellular K+ concentrations, measured by a luciferin/luciferase reaction. It has also shown that this release is virtually abolished by an inhibitor of glycogenolysis as well as by inhibitors of transmitter-mediated signaling or of L-channel opening by elevated K+ concentrations. PMID:24328680

  14. ATP is released from autophagic vesicles to the extracellular space in a VAMP7-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fader, Claudio Marcelo; Aguilera, Milton Osmar; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-12-01

    Autophagy is a normal degradative pathway that involves the sequestration of cytoplasmic components and organelles in a vacuole called autophagosome. SNAREs proteins are key molecules of the vesicle fusion machinery. Our results indicate that in a mammalian tumor cell line a subset of VAMP7 (V-SNARE)-positive vacuoles colocalize with LC3 at the cell periphery (focal adhesions) upon starvation. The re-distribution of VAMP7 positive structures is a microtubule-dependent event, with the participation of the motor protein KIF5 and the RAB7 effector RILP. Interestingly, most of the VAMP7-labeled vesicles were loaded with ATP. Moreover, in cells subjected to starvation, these structures fuse with the plasma membrane to release the nucleotide to the extracellular medium. Summarizing, our results show the molecular components involved in the release of ATP to extracellular space, which is recognized as an important autocrine/paracrine signal molecule that participates in the regulation of several cellular functions such as immunogenicity of cancer cell death or inflammation.

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis attenuates ATP-mediated inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release through expression of a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Larry; Atanasova, Kalina R.; Bui, Phuong Q.; Lee, Jungnam; Hung, Shu-Chen; Yilmaz, Özlem; Ojcius, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular pathogens evade the innate immune response in order to survive and proliferate within infected cells. We show that Porphyromonas gingivalis, an intracellular opportunistic pathogen, uses a nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDK) homolog to inhibit innate immune responses due to stimulation by extracellular ATP, which acts as a danger signal that binds to P2X7 receptors and induces activation of an inflammasome and caspase-1. Thus, infection of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) with wild-type P. gingivalis results in inhibition of ATP-induced caspase-1 activation. However, ndk-deficient P. gingivalis is less effective than wild-type P. gingivalis in reducing ATP-mediated caspase-1 activation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, from infected GECs. Furthermore, P. gingivalis NDK modulates release of high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a pro-inflammatory danger signal, which remains associated with chromatin in healthy cells. Unexpectedly, infection with either wild-type or ndk-deficient P. gingivalis causes release of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytosol. But HMGB1 is released to the extracellular space when uninfected GECs are further stimulated with ATP, and there is more HMGB1 released from the cells when ATP-treated cells are infected with ndk-deficient mutant than wild-type P. gingivalis. Our results reveal that NDK plays a significant role in inhibiting P2X7-dependent inflammasome activation and HMGB1 release from infected GECs. PMID:25828169

  16. Identification of ATP-binding regions in the RyR1 Ca²⁺ release channel.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga B; Baker, Mariah R; Tran, Tina P; Le, Tri; Serysheva, Irina I

    2012-01-01

    ATP is an important modulator of gating in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), also known as a Ca²⁺ release channel in skeletal muscle cells. The activating effect of ATP on this channel is achieved by directly binding to one or more sites on the RyR1 protein. However, the number and location of these sites have yet to be determined. To identify the ATP-binding regions within RyR1 we used 2N₃ATP-2',3'-Biotin-LC-Hydrazone (BioATP-HDZ), a photo-reactive ATP analog to covalently label the channel. We found that BioATP-HDZ binds RyR1 specifically with an IC₅₀ = 0.6±0.2 mM, comparable with the reported EC50 for activation of RyR1 with ATP. Controlled proteolysis of labeled RyR1 followed by sequence analysis revealed three fragments with apparent molecular masses of 95, 45 and 70 kDa that were crosslinked by BioATP-HDZ and identified as RyR1 sequences. Our analysis identified four glycine-rich consensus motifs that can potentially constitute ATP-binding sites and are located within the N-terminal 95-kDa fragment. These putative nucleotide-binding sequences include amino acids 699-704, 701-706, 1081-1084 and 1195-1200, which are conserved among the three RyR isoforms. Located next to the N-terminal disease hotspot region in RyR1, these sequences may communicate the effects of ATP-binding to channel function by tuning conformational motions within the neighboring cytoplasmic regulatory domains. Two other labeled fragments lack ATP-binding consensus motifs and may form non-canonical ATP-binding sites. Based on domain topology in the 3D structure of RyR1 it is also conceivable that the identified ATP-binding regions, despite their wide separation in the primary sequence, may actually constitute the same non-contiguous ATP-binding pocket within the channel tetramer.

  17. Shockwaves induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells through ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dahui; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Zhang, Wenyan; Bao, Yi; Qin, Daming; Wang, Chengxue; Tan, Lei; Qi, Baochang; Zhu, Dong; Zhang, Xizheng; Yu, Tiecheng

    2013-06-01

    Shockwave treatment promotes bone healing of nonunion fractures. In this study, we investigated whether this effect could be due to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) release-induced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteoprogenitor cells. Cultured bone marrow-derived hMSCs were subjected to shockwave treatment and ATP release was assessed. Osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hMSCs were evaluated by examining alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin production, and calcium nodule formation. Expression of P2X7 receptors and c-fos and c-jun mRNA was determined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. P2X7-siRNA, apyrase, P2 receptor antagonists, and p38 MAPK inhibitors were used to evaluate the roles of ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and p38 MAPK signaling in shockwave-induced osteogenic hMSCs differentiation. Shockwave treatment released significant amounts (≈ 7 μM) of ATP from hMSCs. Shockwaves and exogenous ATP induced c-fos and c-jun mRNA transcription, p38 MAPK activation, and hMSC differentiation. Removal of ATP with apyrase, targeting of P2X7 receptors with P2X7-siRNA or selective antagonists, or blockade of p38 MAPK with SB203580 prevented osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings indicate that shockwaves release cellular ATP that activates P2X7 receptors and downstream signaling events that caused osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. We conclude that shockwave therapy promotes bone healing through P2X7 receptor signaling, which contributes to hMSC differentiation.

  18. Shockwaves Induce Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through ATP Release and Activation of P2X7 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dahui; Junger, Wolfgang G.; Yuan, Changji; Zhang, Wenyan; Bao, Yi; Qin, Daming; Wang, Chengxue; Tan, Lei; Qi, Baochang; Zhu, Dong; Zhang, Xizheng; Yu, Tiecheng

    2014-01-01

    Shockwave fractures treatment promotes bone healing of nonunion fractures. In this study, we investigated whether this effect could be due to adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP) release-induced differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into osteoprogenitor cells. Cultured bone marrow-derived hMSCs were subjected to shockwave treatment and ATP release was assessed. Osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hMSCs were evaluated by examining alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin production, and calcium nodule formation. Expression of P2X7 receptors and c-fos and c-jun mRNA was determined with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. P2X7-siRNA, apyrase, P2 receptor antagonists, and p38 MAPK inhibitors were used to evaluate the roles of ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and p38 MAPK sig naling in shockwave-induced osteogenic hMSCs differentiation. Shockwave treatment released significant amounts (~7 μM) of ATP from hMSCs. Shockwaves and exogenous ATP induced c-fos and c-jun mRNA transcription, p38 MAPK activation, and hMSC differentiation. Removal of ATP with apyrase, targeting of P2X7 receptors with P2X7-siRNA or selective antagonists, or blockade of p38 MAPK with SB203580 prevented osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings indicate that shockwaves release cellular ATP that activates P2X7 receptors and downstream signaling events that caused osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. We conclude that shockwave therapy promotes bone healing through P2X7 receptor signaling, which contributes to hMSC differentiation. PMID:23404811

  19. cAMP/Protein Kinase A Activates Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator for ATP Release from Rat Skeletal Muscle during Low pH or Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weisong; Ballard, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in ATP release from skeletal muscle at low pH. These experiments investigate the signal transduction mechanism linking pH depression to CFTR activation and ATP release, and evaluate whether CFTR is involved in ATP release from contracting muscle. Lactic acid treatment elevated interstitial ATP of buffer-perfused muscle and extracellular ATP of L6 myocytes: this ATP release was abolished by the non-specific CFTR inhibitor, glibenclamide, or the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTRinh-172, suggesting that CFTR was involved, and by inhibition of lactic acid entry to cells, indicating that intracellular pH depression was required. Muscle contractions significantly elevated interstitial ATP, but CFTRinh-172 abolished the increase. The cAMP/PKA pathway was involved in the signal transduction pathway for CFTR-regulated ATP release from muscle: forskolin increased CFTR phosphorylation and stimulated ATP release from muscle or myocytes; lactic acid increased intracellular cAMP, pCREB and PKA activity, whereas IBMX enhanced ATP release from myocytes. Inhibition of PKA with KT5720 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced ATP release from muscle. Inhibition of either the Na+/H+-exchanger (NHE) with amiloride or the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) with SN6 or KB-R7943 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced release of ATP from muscle, suggesting that these exchange proteins may be involved in the activation of CFTR. Our data suggest that CFTR-regulated release contributes to ATP release from contracting muscle in vivo, and that cAMP and PKA are involved in the activation of CFTR during muscle contractions or acidosis; NHE and NCX may be involved in the signal transduction pathway. PMID:23226244

  20. Inhibition of Connexin 43 Hemichannel-Mediated ATP Release Attenuates Early Inflammation During the Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Bennett W.; Rhett, Joshua Matthew; Bainbridge, Heather; Fann, Stephen A.; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the last 50 years, the use of medical implants has increased dramatically. Failure of implanted devices and biomaterials is a significant source of morbidity and increasing healthcare expenditures. An important cause of implant failure is the host inflammatory response. Recent evidence implicates extracellular ATP as an important inflammatory signaling molecule. A major pathway for release of cytoplasmic ATP into the extracellular space is through connexin hemichannels, which are the unpaired constituents of gap junction intercellular channels. Blockade of hemichannels of the connexin 43 (Cx43) isoform has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve healing. We have developed a Cx43 mimetic peptide (JM2) that targets the microtubule-binding domain of Cx43. The following report investigates the role of the Cx43 microtubule-binding domain in extracellular ATP release by Cx43 hemichannels and how this impacts early inflammatory events of the foreign body reaction. Methods: In vitro Cx43 hemichannel-mediated ATP release by cultured human microvascular endothelial cells subjected to hypocalcemic and normocalcemic conditions was measured after application of JM2 and the known hemichannel blocker, flufenamic acid. A submuscular silicone implant model was used to investigate in vivo ATP signaling during the early foreign body response. Implants were coated with control pluronic vehicle or pluronic carrying JM2, ATP, JM2+ATP, or known hemichannel blockers and harvested at 24 h for analysis. Results: JM2 significantly inhibited connexin hemichannel-mediated ATP release from cultured endothelial cells. Importantly, the early inflammatory response to submuscular silicone implants was inhibited by JM2. The reduction in inflammation by JM2 was reversed by the addition of exogenous ATP to the pluronic vehicle. Conclusions: These data indicate that ATP released through Cx43 hemichannels into the vasculature is an important signal driving the early inflammatory

  1. Cellular release of and response to ATP as key determinants of the set-point of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Insel, P A

    2000-04-21

    The determinants of "basal" activity of signaling pathways regulating cellular responses are poorly defined. One possibility is that cells release factors to establish the set-point of such pathways. Here we show that treatment of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with the nucleotidase apyrase decreases basal arachidonic acid release and cAMP production 30-40% and that inhibitors of P2Y receptor action also affect basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. Changing medium prominently increases extracellular levels of ATP in Madin-Darby canine kidney, COS-7, and HEK-293 cells. Mechanical stimulation of ATP release likely occurs in virtually every experimental protocol with cultured cells, implicating such release and P2Y receptor activation as critical in establishing the set-point for signal transduction pathways. PMID:10766795

  2. Cellular release of and response to ATP as key determinants of the set-point of signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Insel, P A

    2000-04-21

    The determinants of "basal" activity of signaling pathways regulating cellular responses are poorly defined. One possibility is that cells release factors to establish the set-point of such pathways. Here we show that treatment of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells with the nucleotidase apyrase decreases basal arachidonic acid release and cAMP production 30-40% and that inhibitors of P2Y receptor action also affect basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. Changing medium prominently increases extracellular levels of ATP in Madin-Darby canine kidney, COS-7, and HEK-293 cells. Mechanical stimulation of ATP release likely occurs in virtually every experimental protocol with cultured cells, implicating such release and P2Y receptor activation as critical in establishing the set-point for signal transduction pathways.

  3. Timing of inorganic phosphate release modulates the catalytic activity of ATP-driven rotary motor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    F1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein driven by ATP hydrolysis. The rotary motion of F1-ATPase is tightly coupled to catalysis, in which the catalytic sites strictly obey the reaction sequences at the resolution of elementary reaction steps. This fine coordination of the reaction scheme is thought to be important to achieve extremely high chemomechanical coupling efficiency and reversibility, which is the prominent feature of F1-ATPase among molecular motor proteins. In this study, we intentionally change the reaction scheme by using single-molecule manipulation, and we examine the resulting effect on the rotary motion of F1-ATPase. When the sequence of the products released, that is, ADP and inorganic phosphate, is switched, we find that F1 frequently stops rotating for a long time, which corresponds to inactivation of catalysis. This inactive state presents MgADP inhibition, and thus, we find that an improper reaction sequence of F1-ATPase catalysis induces MgADP inhibition.

  4. Timing of inorganic phosphate release modulates the catalytic activity of ATP-driven rotary motor protein.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    F1-ATPase is a rotary motor protein driven by ATP hydrolysis. The rotary motion of F1-ATPase is tightly coupled to catalysis, in which the catalytic sites strictly obey the reaction sequences at the resolution of elementary reaction steps. This fine coordination of the reaction scheme is thought to be important to achieve extremely high chemomechanical coupling efficiency and reversibility, which is the prominent feature of F1-ATPase among molecular motor proteins. In this study, we intentionally change the reaction scheme by using single-molecule manipulation, and we examine the resulting effect on the rotary motion of F1-ATPase. When the sequence of the products released, that is, ADP and inorganic phosphate, is switched, we find that F1 frequently stops rotating for a long time, which corresponds to inactivation of catalysis. This inactive state presents MgADP inhibition, and thus, we find that an improper reaction sequence of F1-ATPase catalysis induces MgADP inhibition.

  5. Histamine Induces ATP Release from Human Subcutaneous Fibroblasts, via Pannexin-1 Hemichannels, Leading to Ca2+ Mobilization and Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Paramos-de-Carvalho, Diogo; Certal, Mariana; Costa, Maria Adelina; Costa, Cristina; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Sévigny, Jean; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the regulation of connective tissue ATP-mediated mechano-transduction and remodeling may be an important link to the pathogenesis of chronic pain. It has been demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine plays an important role in painful fibrotic diseases. Here we analyzed the involvement of ATP in the response of human subcutaneous fibroblasts to histamine. Acute histamine application caused a rise in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via H1 receptor activation. Histamine-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially attenuated by apyrase, an enzyme that inactivates extracellular ATP, and by blocking P2 purinoceptors with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt and reactive blue 2. [Ca2+]i accumulation caused by histamine was also reduced upon blocking pannexin-1 hemichannels with 10Panx, probenecid, or carbenoxolone but not when connexin hemichannels were inhibited with mefloquine or 2-octanol. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, also did not block histamine-induced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Prolonged exposure of human subcutaneous fibroblast cultures to histamine favored cell growth and type I collagen synthesis via the activation of H1 receptor. This effect was mimicked by ATP and its metabolite, ADP, whereas the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, partially attenuated histamine-induced cell growth and type I collagen production. Expression of pannexin-1 and ADP-sensitive P2Y1 receptor on human subcutaneous fibroblasts was confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization and cell growth through the cooperation of H1 and P2 (probably P2Y1) receptors. PMID:23918924

  6. ATP-dependent release of glucocorticoid receptors from the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Y; DeFranco, D B

    1996-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) have the capacity to shuttle between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, sharing that trait with other steroid receptors and unrelated nuclear proteins of diverse function. Although nuclear import of steroid receptors, like that of nearly all other karyophilic proteins examined to date, requires ATP, there appear to be different energetic requirements for export of proteins, including steroid receptors, from nuclei. In an attempt to reveal which steps, if any, in the nuclear export pathway utilized by steroid receptors require ATP, we have used indirect immunofluorescence to visualize GRs within cells subjected to a reversible ATP depletion. Under conditions which lead to >95% depletion of cellular ATP levels within 90 min, GRs remain localized within nuclei and do not efflux into the cytoplasm. Under analogous conditions of ATP depletion, transfected progesterone receptors are also retained within nuclei. Importantly, GRs which accumulate within nuclei of ATP-depleted cells are distinguished from nuclear receptors in metabolically active cells by their resistance to in situ extraction with a hypotonic, detergent-containing buffer. GRs in ATP-depleted cells are not permanently trapped in this nuclear compartment, as nuclear receptors rapidly regain their capacity to be extracted upon restoration of cellular ATP, even in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. More extensive extraction of cells with high salt and detergent, coupled with DNase I digestion, established that a significant fraction of GRs in ATP-depleted cells are associated with an RNA-containing nuclear matrix. Quantitative Western blot (immunoblot) analysis confirmed the dramatic increase in GR binding to the nuclear matrix of ATP-depleted cells, while confocal microscopy revealed that GRs are bound to the matrix throughout all planes of the nucleus. ATP depletion does not lead to wholesale collapse of nuclear proteins onto the matrix, as the interaction of a

  7. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-dependent calcium influx and ATP release in mouse and rat gastric epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Boudaka, Ammar Abdullkader; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Tominaga, Makoto; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and its physiological meaning in mouse and rat gastric epithelia. METHODS: RT-PCR and immunochemistry were used to detect TRPV4 mRNA and protein expression in mouse stomach and a rat normal gastric epithelial cell line (RGE1-01), while Ca2+-imaging and electrophysiology were used to evaluate TRPV4 channel activity. ATP release was measured by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Gastric emptying was also compared between WT and TRPV4 knockout mice. RESULTS: TRPV4 mRNA and protein were detected in mouse tissues and RGE1-01 cells. A TRPV4-specific agonist (GSK1016790A) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and/or evoked TRPV4-like current activities in WT mouse gastric epithelial cells and RGE1-01 cells, but not TRPV4KO cells. GSK1016790A or mechanical stimuli induced ATP release from RGE1-01 cells while TRPV4 knockout mice displayed delayed gastric emptying in vivo. CONCLUSION: TRPV4 is expressed in mouse and rat gastric epithelium and contributes to ATP release and gastric emptying. PMID:27350729

  8. Cutting off the power: inhibition of leukemia cell growth by pausing basal ATP release and P2X receptor signaling?

    PubMed

    Ledderose, Carola; Woehrle, Tobias; Ledderose, Stephan; Strasser, Katharina; Seist, Richard; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2016-09-01

    T cells respond to antigen stimulation with the rapid release of cellular ATP, which stimulates an autocrine feedback mechanism that regulates calcium influx through P2X receptors. This autocrine purinergic feedback mechanism plays an essential role in the activation of T cells resulting in cell proliferation and clonal expansion. We recently reported that increases in mitochondrial ATP production drive this stimulation-induced purinergic signaling mechanism but that low-level mitochondrial ATP production fuels basal T cell functions required to maintain vigilance of unstimulated T cells. Here we studied whether defects in these purinergic signaling mechanisms are involved in the unwanted proliferation of leukemia T cells. We found that acute leukemia T cells (Jurkat) possess a larger number and more active mitochondria than their healthy counterparts. Jurkat cells have higher intracellular ATP concentrations and generat more extracellular ATP than unstimulated T cells from healthy donors. As a result, increased purinergic signaling through P2X1 and P2X7 receptors elevates baseline levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) in Jurkat cells. We found that pharmacological inhibition of this basal purinergic signaling mechanism decreases mitochondrial activity, Ca(2+) signaling, and cell proliferation. Similar results were seen in the leukemic cell lines THP-1, U-937, and HL-60. Combined treatment with inhibitors of P2X1 or P2X7 receptors and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine completely blocked Jurkat cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that increased mitochondrial metabolism promotes autocrine purinergic signaling and uncontrolled proliferation of leukemia cells. These findings suggest that deranged purinergic signaling can result in T cell malignancy and that therapeutic targeting aimed at purinergic signaling is a potential strategy to combat T cell leukemia.

  9. Cutting off the power: inhibition of leukemia cell growth by pausing basal ATP release and P2X receptor signaling?

    PubMed

    Ledderose, Carola; Woehrle, Tobias; Ledderose, Stephan; Strasser, Katharina; Seist, Richard; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2016-09-01

    T cells respond to antigen stimulation with the rapid release of cellular ATP, which stimulates an autocrine feedback mechanism that regulates calcium influx through P2X receptors. This autocrine purinergic feedback mechanism plays an essential role in the activation of T cells resulting in cell proliferation and clonal expansion. We recently reported that increases in mitochondrial ATP production drive this stimulation-induced purinergic signaling mechanism but that low-level mitochondrial ATP production fuels basal T cell functions required to maintain vigilance of unstimulated T cells. Here we studied whether defects in these purinergic signaling mechanisms are involved in the unwanted proliferation of leukemia T cells. We found that acute leukemia T cells (Jurkat) possess a larger number and more active mitochondria than their healthy counterparts. Jurkat cells have higher intracellular ATP concentrations and generat more extracellular ATP than unstimulated T cells from healthy donors. As a result, increased purinergic signaling through P2X1 and P2X7 receptors elevates baseline levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) in Jurkat cells. We found that pharmacological inhibition of this basal purinergic signaling mechanism decreases mitochondrial activity, Ca(2+) signaling, and cell proliferation. Similar results were seen in the leukemic cell lines THP-1, U-937, and HL-60. Combined treatment with inhibitors of P2X1 or P2X7 receptors and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine completely blocked Jurkat cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate that increased mitochondrial metabolism promotes autocrine purinergic signaling and uncontrolled proliferation of leukemia cells. These findings suggest that deranged purinergic signaling can result in T cell malignancy and that therapeutic targeting aimed at purinergic signaling is a potential strategy to combat T cell leukemia. PMID:27020575

  10. Synthesis and release of ATP by soluble mitochondrial F1 in complex with its inhibitor protein during dimethylsulfoxide-water transitions.

    PubMed

    Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Sandoval, F; García, J J; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1998-07-01

    Soluble mitochondrial F1 and F1 in complex with the natural ATPase inhibitor protein (F1-IP) catalyze the spontaneous synthesis of [gamma-32P]ATP from medium [32P]phosphate and enzyme-bound ADP when incubated in media with dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO); under these conditions, the synthesized [gamma-32P]ATP is not released into the media, it remains tightly bound to the enzymes [Gómez-Puyou, A., Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M. & de Meis, L. (1986) Eur. J. Biochem. 159, 133-140]. Some of the characteristics of the synthesized [gamma-32P]ATP were studied in F1 and F1-IP (ATPase activities of 70 and 1-3 micromol x min(-1) x mg(-1), respectively). In Me2SO media, gamma-phosphate of synthesized ATP in F1 or F1-IP exchanges with medium phosphate. From the rates of the exchange reaction, the half-times for hydrolysis of the synthesized ATP in F1 and F1-IP were calculated: 45 min and 58 min for F1 and F1-IP, respectively. The course that synthesized [gamma-32P]ATP follows after dilution of the Me2SO synthetic mixture with aqueous buffer was determined. After dilution, the half-life of synthesized ATP in F1 was less than 1 min. In F1-IP, ATP was also hydrolyzed, but at significantly lower rates. In F1-IP, dilution also produced release of the synthesized [gamma-32P]ATP. This was assayed by the accessibility of [gamma-32P]ATP to hexokinase. About 25% of [gamma-32P]ATP synthesized in F1-IP, but not in F1, was released into the media after dilution with aqueous buffer that contained 20 mM phosphate. Release of tightly bound ATP required the binding energy of phosphate and solvation of F1-IP, however, the particular kinetics of F1-IP were also central for medium ATP synthesis in the absence of electrochemical H+ gradients.

  11. ATP is required for the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome from inhibition by the mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. This system acts by inhibiting the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase to target securin for degradation. APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20. The molecular mechanisms of the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint, including the release of APC/C from inhibition, remain obscure. It has been reported that polyubiquitylation by the APC/C is required for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint [Reddy SK, Rape M, Margansky WA, Kirschner MW (2007) Nature, 446:921–924]. We confirmed the involvement of polyubiquitylation, but found that another process, which requires ATP cleavage at the β–γ position (as opposed to α–β bond scission involved in ubiquitylation), is essential for the release of APC/C from checkpoint inhibition. ATP (β–γ) cleavage is required both for the dissociation of MCC components from APC/C and for the disassembly of free MCC, whereas polyubiquitylation is involved only in the former process. We find that the requirement for ATP (β–γ) cleavage is not due to the involvement of the 26S proteasome and that the phenomena observed are not due to sustained activity of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B, caused by inhibition of the degradation of cyclin B. Thus, some other energy-consuming process is needed for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint. PMID:20212161

  12. OSCILLATING FLUID FLOW ACTIVATION OF GAP JUNCTION HEMICHANNELS INDUCES ATP RELEASE FROM MLO-Y4 OSTEOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Genetos, Damian C.; Kephart, Curtis J.; Zhang, Yue; Yellowley, Clare E.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loads are required for optimal bone mass. One mechanism whereby mechanical loads are transduced into localized cellular signals is strain-induced fluid flow through lacunae and canaliculi of bone. Gap junctions (GJ) between osteocytes and osteoblasts provides a mechanism whereby flow-induced signals are detected by osteocytes and transduced to osteoblasts. We have demonstrated the importance of GJ and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in intracellular calcium and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases in response to flow. Unapposed connexons, or hemichannels, are themselves functional and may constitute a novel mechanotransduction mechanism. Using MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts and MLO-Y4 osteocytes, we examined the time course and mechanism of hemichannel activation in response to fluid flow, the composition of the hemichannels, and the role of hemichannels in flow-induced ATP release. We demonstrate that fluid flow activates hemichannels in MLO-Y4, but not MC3T3-E1, through a mechanism involving protein kinase C, which induces ATP and PGE2 release. PMID:17301958

  13. N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels regulate differentially the release of noradrenaline, ATP and β-NAD in blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lisa M.; Yamboliev, Ilia A.; Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.

    2009-01-01

    Using HPLC techniques we evaluated the electrical field stimulation-evoked overflow of noradrenaline (NA), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) in the presence of low nanomolar concentrations of ω-conotoxin GVIA or ω-agatoxin IVA in the canine mesenteric arteries and veins. ω-conotoxin GVIA abolished the evoked overflow of NA and β-NAD in artery and vein, whereas the evoked overflow of ATP remained unchanged in the presence of ω-conotoxin GVIA. ω-agatoxin IVA significantly reduced the evoked overflow of ATP and β-NAD. The overflow of NA remained largely unaffected by ω-agatoxin IVA, except at 16 Hz in the vein where the overflow of NA was reduced by about 50%. Artery and vein exhibited similar expression levels of the α1B (CaV2.2, N-type) subunit, whereas the vein showed greater levels of the α1A (CaV2.1, P/Q-type) subunit than artery. Therefore, there are at least two release sites for NA, β-NAD and ATP in the canine mesenteric artery and vein: an N-type-associated site releasing primarily NA, β-NAD and some ATP, and a P/Q-type-associated site releasing ATP, β-NAD and some NA. The N-type-mediated mechanisms are equally expressed in artery and vein, whereas the P/Q-type-mediated mechanisms are more pronounced in the vein and may ensure additional neurotransmitter release at higher levels of neural activity. In artery, β-NAD caused a dual effect consisting of vasodilatation or vasoconstriction depending on concentrations, whereas vein responded with vasodilatation only. In contrast, ATP caused vasoconstriction in both vessels. β-NAD and ATP may mediate disparate functions in the canine mesenteric resistive and capacitative circulations. PMID:18824011

  14. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function. PMID:11443051

  15. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function.

  16. ATP Induced Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression and Release from Osteoarthritis Synovial Fibroblasts Is Mediated by Purinergic Receptor P2X4

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kerstin; Aeschlimann, André; Jordan, Suzana; Gay, Renate; Gay, Steffen; Sprott, Haiko

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neuromodulator involved in nociceptive hypersensitivity in the central nervous system, is also expressed in synoviocytes of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. We investigated the role of P2 purinoreceptors in the induction of BDNF expression in synovial fibroblasts (SF) of OA and RA patients. Cultured SF from patients with symptomatic knee OA and RA were stimulated with purinoreceptor agonists ATP, ADP, or UTP. The expression of BDNF mRNA was measured by quantitative TaqMan PCR. BDNF release into cell culture supernatants was monitored by ELISA. P2X4 expression in synovial tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry. Endogenous P2X4 expression was decreased by siRNA transfection before ATP stimulation. Kinase pathways were blocked before ATP stimulation. BDNF mRNA expression levels in OASF were increased 2 h and 5 h after ATP stimulation. Mean BDNF levels in cell culture supernatants of unstimulated OASF and RASF were 19 (±9) and 67 (±49) pg/ml, respectively. BDNF levels in SF supernatants were only elevated 5 h after ATP stimulation. BDNF mRNA expression in OASF was induced both by P2X receptor agonists ATP and ADP, but not by UTP, an agonist of P2Y purinergic receptors. The ATP-induced BDNF mRNA expression in OASF was decreased by siRNA-mediated reduction of endogenous P2X4 levels compared to scrambled controls. Inhibition of p38, but not p44/42 signalling reduced the ATP-mediated BDNF mRNA induction. Here we show a functional role of the purinergic receptor P2X4 and p38 kinase in the ATP-induced expression and release of the neurotrophin BDNF in SF. PMID:22715356

  17. Shockwaves increase T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression through ATP release, P2X7 receptors, and FAK activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tiecheng; Junger, Wolfgang G; Yuan, Changji; Jin, An; Zhao, Yi; Zheng, Xueqing; Zeng, Yanjun; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-03-01

    Shockwaves elicited by transient pressure disturbances are used to treat musculoskeletal disorders. Previous research has shown that shockwave treatment affects T-cell function, enhancing T-cell proliferation and IL-2 expression by activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Here we investigated the signaling pathway by which shockwaves mediate p38 MAPK phosphorylation. We found that shockwaves at an intensity of 0.18 mJ/mm(2) induce the release of extracellular ATP from human Jurkat T-cells at least in part by affecting cell viability. ATP released into the extracellular space stimulates P2X7-type purinergic receptors that induce the activation of p38 MAPK and of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by phosphorylation on residues Tyr397 and Tyr576/577. Elimination of released ATP with apyrase or inhibition of P2X7 receptors with the antagonists KN-62 or suramin significantly weakens FAK phosphorylation, p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation. Conversely, addition of exogenous ATP causes phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK. Silencing of FAK expression also reduces these cell responses to shockwave treatment. We conclude that shockwaves enhance p38 MAPK activation, IL-2 expression, and T-cell proliferation via the release of cellular ATP and feedback mechanisms that involve P2X7 receptor activation and FAK phosphorylation.

  18. Bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signaling in human subcutaneous fibroblasts involves ATP release via hemichannels leading to P2Y12 receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain involves connective tissue remodeling triggered by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin. Fibroblast cells signaling involve changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). ATP has been related to connective tissue mechanotransduction, remodeling and chronic inflammatory pain, via P2 purinoceptors activation. Here, we investigated the involvement of ATP in bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signals in human subcutaneous fibroblasts. Results Bradykinin, via B2 receptors, caused an abrupt rise in [Ca2+]i to a peak that declined to a plateau, which concentration remained constant until washout. The plateau phase was absent in Ca2+-free medium; [Ca2+]i signal was substantially reduced after depleting intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin. Extracellular ATP inactivation with apyrase decreased the [Ca2+]i plateau. Human subcutaneous fibroblasts respond to bradykinin by releasing ATP via connexin and pannexin hemichannels, since blockade of connexins, with 2-octanol or carbenoxolone, and pannexin-1, with 10Panx, attenuated bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas inhibitors of vesicular exocytosis, such as brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1, were inactive. The kinetics of extracellular ATP catabolism favors ADP accumulation in human fibroblast cultures. Inhibition of ectonucleotidase activity and, thus, ADP formation from released ATP with POM-1 or by Mg2+ removal from media reduced bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau. Selective blockade of the ADP-sensitive P2Y12 receptor with AR-C66096 attenuated bradykinin [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas the P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor antagonists, respectively MRS 2179 and MRS 2211, were inactive. Human fibroblasts exhibited immunoreactivity against connexin-43, pannexin-1 and P2Y12 receptor. Conclusions Bradykinin induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via connexin and pannexin-1-containing hemichannels leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization through the cooperation of B2 and P2Y12 receptors. PMID

  19. Expression and role of gap junction protein connexin43 in immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP release in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Peng, Weijiao; Chen, Xiaoli; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is the best characterized gap junction protein that allows the direct exchange of signaling molecules during cell-to-cell communications. The immunological functions and ATP permeable properties of Cx43 have been insensitively examined in mammals. The similar biological significance of Cx43 in lower vertebrates, however, is not yet understood. In the present study we identified and characterized a Cx43 ortholog (termed PoCx43) from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and investigated its role in immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP release. PoCx43 mRNA transcripts are widely distributed in all tested normal tissues and cells with predominant expression in the brain, and are significantly up-regulated by LPS, poly(I:C) and zymosan challenges and Edwardsiella tarda infections as well, suggesting that PoCx43 expression was modulated by the inflammatory stresses. In addition, cyclic AMP (cAMP), an essential second messenger, also plays an important role in regulating PoCx43 gene expression, by which the PoCx43-mediated gap junctional communication may be regulated. Furthermore, overexpression of PoCx43 in Japanese flounder FG-9307 cells significantly potentiates the LPS- and poly(I:C)-induced extracellular ATP release and this enhanced ATP release was attenuated by pre-incubation with Cx43 inhibitor carbenoxolone. In a complementary experiment, down-regulation of PoCx43 endogenous expression in FG-9307 cells with small interfering RNA also significantly reduced the PAMP-induced extracellular ATP release, suggesting that PoCx43 is an important ATP release conduit under the immune challenge conditions. Finally, we showed that extracellular ATP stimulation led to an increased PoCx43 expression which probably provides a feedback mechanism in regulating PoCx43 expression at the transcriptional level. These findings suggest that PoCx43 is an inducible immune response gene and an important conduit for immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP

  20. Expression and role of gap junction protein connexin43 in immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP release in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Peng, Weijiao; Chen, Xiaoli; Geng, Xuyun; Zhan, Wenbin; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) is the best characterized gap junction protein that allows the direct exchange of signaling molecules during cell-to-cell communications. The immunological functions and ATP permeable properties of Cx43 have been insensitively examined in mammals. The similar biological significance of Cx43 in lower vertebrates, however, is not yet understood. In the present study we identified and characterized a Cx43 ortholog (termed PoCx43) from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and investigated its role in immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP release. PoCx43 mRNA transcripts are widely distributed in all tested normal tissues and cells with predominant expression in the brain, and are significantly up-regulated by LPS, poly(I:C) and zymosan challenges and Edwardsiella tarda infections as well, suggesting that PoCx43 expression was modulated by the inflammatory stresses. In addition, cyclic AMP (cAMP), an essential second messenger, also plays an important role in regulating PoCx43 gene expression, by which the PoCx43-mediated gap junctional communication may be regulated. Furthermore, overexpression of PoCx43 in Japanese flounder FG-9307 cells significantly potentiates the LPS- and poly(I:C)-induced extracellular ATP release and this enhanced ATP release was attenuated by pre-incubation with Cx43 inhibitor carbenoxolone. In a complementary experiment, down-regulation of PoCx43 endogenous expression in FG-9307 cells with small interfering RNA also significantly reduced the PAMP-induced extracellular ATP release, suggesting that PoCx43 is an important ATP release conduit under the immune challenge conditions. Finally, we showed that extracellular ATP stimulation led to an increased PoCx43 expression which probably provides a feedback mechanism in regulating PoCx43 expression at the transcriptional level. These findings suggest that PoCx43 is an inducible immune response gene and an important conduit for immune challenge-induced extracellular ATP

  1. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  2. TENSION ON THE LINKER GATES THE ATP-DEPENDENT RELEASE OF DYNEIN FROM MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Frank B.; Dewitt, Mark A.; Bilyard, Thomas; Htet, Zaw Min; Belyy, Vladislav; Chan, Danna D.; Chang, Amy Y.; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric motor that transports intracellular cargoes towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs). In contrast to other processive motors, stepping of the dynein motor domains (heads) is not precisely coordinated. Therefore, the mechanism of dynein processivity remains unclear. Here, by engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the motor, we show that dynein processivity minimally requires a single active head and a second inert MT binding domain. Processivity arises from a high ratio of MT-bound to unbound time, and not from interhead communication. Additionally, nucleotide-dependent microtubule release is gated by tension on the linker domain. Intramolecular tension sensing is observed in dynein’s stepping motion at high interhead separations. We developed a quantitative model for the stepping characteristics of dynein and its response to chemical and mechanical perturbation. PMID:25109325

  3. Tension on the linker gates the ATP-dependent release of dynein from microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Frank B.; Dewitt, Mark A.; Bilyard, Thomas; Htet, Zaw Min; Belyy, Vladislav; Chan, Danna D.; Chang, Amy Y.; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-08-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a dimeric motor that transports intracellular cargoes towards the minus end of microtubules (MTs). In contrast to other processive motors, stepping of the dynein motor domains (heads) is not precisely coordinated. Therefore, the mechanism of dynein processivity remains unclear. Here, by engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the motor, we show that dynein processivity minimally requires a single active head and a second inert MT-binding domain. Processivity arises from a high ratio of MT-bound to unbound time, and not from interhead communication. In addition, nucleotide-dependent microtubule release is gated by tension on the linker domain. Intramolecular tension sensing is observed in dynein’s stepping motion at high interhead separations. On the basis of these results, we propose a quantitative model for the stepping characteristics of dynein and its response to chemical and mechanical perturbation.

  4. A selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor rescues low Po2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes: implication for vascular control

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Ellsworth, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocytes, via release of ATP in areas of low oxygen (O2) tension, are components of a regulatory system for the distribution of perfusion in skeletal muscle ensuring optimal O2 delivery to meet tissue needs. In type 2 diabetes (DM2), there are defects in O2 supply to muscle as well as a failure of erythrocytes to release ATP. The goal of this study was to ascertain if a phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, cilostazol, would rescue low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes and, thereby, enable these cells to dilate isolated erythrocyte-perfused skeletal muscle arterioles exposed to decreased extraluminal O2. Erythrocytes were obtained from healthy humans (HH; n = 12) and humans with DM2 (n = 17). We determined that 1) PDE3B is similarly expressed in both groups, 2) mastoparan 7 (Gi activation) stimulates increases in cAMP in HH but not in DM2 erythrocytes, and 3) pretreatment of DM2 erythrocytes with cilostazol resulted in mastoparan 7-induced increases in cAMP not different from those in HH cells. Most importantly, cilostazol restored the ability of DM2 erythrocytes to release ATP in response to low O2. In contrast with perfusion with HH erythrocytes, isolated hamster retractor muscle arterioles perfused with DM2 erythrocytes constricted in response to low extraluminal PO2. However, in the presence of cilostazol (100 μM), DM2 erythrocytes induced vessel dilation not different from that seen with HH erythrocytes. Thus rescue of low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes by cilostazol restored the ability of erythrocytes to participate in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:21963837

  5. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  6. Structural responses to the photolytic release of ATP in frog muscle fibres, observed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, A K; Bershitsky, S Y; Burns, R; He, Z H; Ferenczi, M A

    1999-11-01

    1. Structural changes following the photolytic release of ATP were observed in single, permeabilised fibres of frog skeletal muscle at 5-6 C, using time-resolved, low-angle X-ray diffraction. The structural order in the fibres and their isometric function were preserved by cross-linking 10-20 % of the myosin cross-bridges to the thin filaments. 2. The time courses of the change in force, stiffness and in intensity of the main equatorial reflections (1,0) and (1,1), of the third myosin layer line (M3) at a reciprocal spacing of (14.5 nm)-1 on the meridian and of the first myosin-actin layer line (LL1) were measured with 1 ms time resolution. 3. In the absence of Ca2+, photolytic release of ATP in muscle fibres initially in the rigor state caused the force and stiffness to decrease monotonically towards their values in relaxed muscle fibres. 4. In the presence of Ca2+, photolytic release of ATP resulted in an initial rapid decrease in force, followed by a slower increase to the isometric plateau. Muscle fibre stiffness decreased rapidly to approximately 65 % of its value in rigor. 5. In the absence of Ca2+, changes on the equator, in LL1 and in M3 occurred with a time scale comparable to that of the changes in tension and stiffness. 6. In the presence of Ca2+, the changes on the equator and LL1 occurred simultaneously with the early phase of tension decrease. The changes in the intensity of M3 (IM3) occurred on the time scale of the subsequent increase in force. The time courses of the changes in tension and IM3 were similar following the photolytic release of 0. 33 or 1.1 mM ATP. However the gradual return towards the rigor state began earlier when only 0.33 mM ATP was released. 7. In the presence of Ca2+, the time course of changes in IM3 closely mimicked that of force development following photolytic release of ATP. This is consistent with models that propose that force development results from a change in the average orientation of cross-bridges, although other

  7. Divergent effects of low-O(2) tension and iloprost on ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes: implications for O(2) supply to skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Randy S; Goldman, Daniel; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellis, Christopher G; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2010-08-01

    Erythrocytes release both O(2) and a vasodilator, ATP, when exposed to reduced O(2) tension. We investigated the hypothesis that ATP release is impaired in erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) and that this defect compromises the ability of these cells to stimulate dilation of resistance vessels. We also determined whether a general vasodilator, the prostacyclin analog iloprost (ILO), stimulates ATP release from healthy human (HH) and DM2 erythrocytes. Finally, we used a computational model to compare the effect on tissue O(2) levels of increases in blood flow directed to areas of increased O(2) demand (erythrocyte ATP release) with nondirected increases in flow (ILO). HH erythrocytes, but not DM2 cells, released increased amounts of ATP when exposed to reduced O(2) tension (Po(2) < 30 mmHg). In addition, isolated hamster skeletal muscle arterioles dilated in response to similar decreases in extraluminal O(2) when perfused with HH erythrocytes, but not when perfused with DM2 erythrocytes. In contrast, both HH and DM2 erythrocytes released ATP in response to ILO. In the case of DM2 erythrocytes, amounts of ATP released correlated inversely with glycemic control. Modeling revealed that a functional regulatory system that directs blood flow to areas of need (low O(2)-induced ATP release) provides appropriate levels of tissue oxygenation and that this level of the matching of O(2) delivery with demand in skeletal muscle cannot be achieved with a general vasodilator. These results suggest that the inability of erythrocytes to release ATP in response to exposure to low-O(2) tension could contribute to the peripheral vascular disease of DM2. PMID:20511412

  8. ATPase-defective derivatives of Escherichia coli DnaK that behave differently with respect to ATP-induced conformational change and peptide release.

    PubMed

    Barthel, T K; Zhang, J; Walker, G C

    2001-10-01

    We have characterized the effects of the T199S, T199A, and K70A mutations on the biochemical activity and in vivo functioning of Escherichia coli DnaK. Threonine-199 is the site of autophosphorylation of DnaK, and the lysine residue of bovine Hsc70 corresponding to K70 of DnaK has been shown to be essential for the hydrolysis of ATP. The dnaK alleles T199A and K70A are completely unable, and the T199S allele is only partially able, to complement the defects of a DeltadnaK mutant. The ATPase activities of the DnaK T199A and DnaK K70A proteins are nearly abolished, while the ATPase activity of the DnaK T199S protein has a steady-state rate similar to that of wild-type DnaK. The DnaK T199S protein also retains approximately 13% of the autophosphorylation activity of wild-type DnaK, while the autophosphorylation activities of the T199A and K70A derivatives are completely abolished. All four DnaK proteins bind a model peptide substrate, and the wild-type, T199A, and T199S DnaK proteins release the peptide with similar kinetics upon the addition of ATP. The DnaK K70A protein, in contrast, does not release the peptide upon the addition of ATP. ATP induces a conformational change in the wild-type, T199A, and T199S DnaK proteins but not in the DnaK K70A protein. The T199A and K70A mutations both disrupt the ATPase activity of DnaK but have profoundly different effects on the ATP-induced conformational change and peptide release activities of DnaK, implying that the two mutations affect different steps in the functional cycle of DnaK. The DnaK T199S protein represents a new class of DnaK mutant, one which has near-normal levels of ATPase activity and undergoes an ATP-induced conformational change that results in the release of peptide but which is not able to fully complement loss of DnaK function in the cell. PMID:11544208

  9. Fast charge translocations associated with partial reactions of the Na,K-pump: I. Current and voltage transients after photochemical release of ATP.

    PubMed

    Borlinghaus, R; Apell, H J; Läuger, P

    1987-01-01

    Nonstationary electric currents are described which are generated by the Na,K-pump. Flat membrane sheets 0.2-1 micron in diameter containing a high density of oriented Na,K-ATPase molecules are bound to a planar lipid bilayer acting as a capacitive electrode. In the aqueous phase adjacent to the bound membrane sheets, ATP is released within milliseconds from an inactive, photolabile precursor ("caged" ATP) by an intense flash of light. After the ATP-concentration jump, transient current and voltage signals can be recorded in the external circuit corresponding to a translocation of positive charge across the pump protein from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side. These electrical signals which can be suppressed by inhibitors of the Na,K-ATPase require the presence of Na+ but not of K+ in the aqueous medium. The intrinsic pump current Ip(t) can be evaluated from the recorded current signal, using estimated values of the circuit parameters of the compound membrane system. Ip(t) exhibits a biphasic behavior with a fast rising period, followed by a slower decline towards a small quasi-stationary current. The time constant of the rising phase of Ip(t) is found to depend on the rate of photochemical ATP release. Further information on the microscopic origin of the current transient can be obtained by double-flash experiments and by chymotrypsin modification of the protein. These and other experiments indicate that the observed charge-translocation is associated with early events in the normal transport cycle. After activation by ATP, the pump goes through the first steps of the cycle and then enters a long-lived state from which return to the initial state is slow. PMID:3041002

  10. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes. PMID:7051582

  11. Shock wave treatment enhances cell proliferation and improves wound healing by ATP release-coupled extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation.

    PubMed

    Weihs, Anna M; Fuchs, Christiane; Teuschl, Andreas H; Hartinger, Joachim; Slezak, Paul; Mittermayr, Rainer; Redl, Heinz; Junger, Wolfgang G; Sitte, Harald H; Rünzler, Dominik

    2014-09-26

    Shock wave treatment accelerates impaired wound healing in diverse clinical situations. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of shock waves have not yet been fully revealed. Because cell proliferation is a major requirement in the wound healing cascade, we used in vitro studies and an in vivo wound healing model to study whether shock wave treatment influences proliferation by altering major extracellular factors and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. We identified extracellular ATP, released in an energy- and pulse number-dependent manner, as a trigger of the biological effects of shock wave treatment. Shock wave treatment induced ATP release, increased Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation, and enhanced proliferation in three different cell types (C3H10T1/2 murine mesenchymal progenitor cells, primary human adipose tissue-derived stem cells, and a human Jurkat T cell line) in vitro. Purinergic signaling-induced Erk1/2 activation was found to be essential for this proliferative effect, which was further confirmed by in vivo studies in a rat wound healing model where shock wave treatment induced proliferation and increased wound healing in an Erk1/2-dependent fashion. In summary, this report demonstrates that shock wave treatment triggers release of cellular ATP, which subsequently activates purinergic receptors and finally enhances proliferation in vitro and in vivo via downstream Erk1/2 signaling. In conclusion, our findings shed further light on the molecular mechanisms by which shock wave treatment exerts its beneficial effects. These findings could help to improve the clinical use of shock wave treatment for wound healing.

  12. Mechanosensory and ATP Release Deficits following Keratin14-Cre-Mediated TRPA1 Deletion Despite Absence of TRPA1 in Murine Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Palygin, Oleg; Weyer, Andy D.; Barabas, Marie E.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Staruschenko, Alexander; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Keratinocytes are the first cells that come into direct contact with external tactile stimuli; however, their role in touch transduction in vivo is not clear. The ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is essential for some mechanically-gated currents in sensory neurons, amplifies mechanical responses after inflammation, and has been reported to be expressed in human and mouse skin. Other reports have not detected Trpa1 mRNA transcripts in human or mouse epidermis. Therefore, we set out to determine whether selective deletion of Trpa1 from keratinocytes would impact mechanosensation. We generated K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice lacking TRPA1 in K14-expressing cells, including keratinocytes. Surprisingly, Trpa1 transcripts were very poorly detected in epidermis of these mice or in controls, and detection was minimal enough to preclude observation of Trpa1 mRNA knockdown in the K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice. Unexpectedly, these K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice nonetheless exhibited a pronounced deficit in mechanosensitivity at the behavioral and primary afferent levels, and decreased mechanically-evoked ATP release from skin. Overall, while these data suggest that the intended targeted deletion of Trpa1 from keratin 14-expressing cells of the epidermis induces functional deficits in mechanotransduction and ATP release, these deficits are in fact likely due to factors other than reduction of Trpa1 expression in adult mouse keratinocytes because they express very little, if any, Trpa1. PMID:26978657

  13. Mechanosensory and ATP Release Deficits following Keratin14-Cre-Mediated TRPA1 Deletion Despite Absence of TRPA1 in Murine Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zappia, Katherine J; Garrison, Sheldon R; Palygin, Oleg; Weyer, Andy D; Barabas, Marie E; Lawlor, Michael W; Staruschenko, Alexander; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2016-01-01

    Keratinocytes are the first cells that come into direct contact with external tactile stimuli; however, their role in touch transduction in vivo is not clear. The ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is essential for some mechanically-gated currents in sensory neurons, amplifies mechanical responses after inflammation, and has been reported to be expressed in human and mouse skin. Other reports have not detected Trpa1 mRNA transcripts in human or mouse epidermis. Therefore, we set out to determine whether selective deletion of Trpa1 from keratinocytes would impact mechanosensation. We generated K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice lacking TRPA1 in K14-expressing cells, including keratinocytes. Surprisingly, Trpa1 transcripts were very poorly detected in epidermis of these mice or in controls, and detection was minimal enough to preclude observation of Trpa1 mRNA knockdown in the K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice. Unexpectedly, these K14Cre-Trpa1fl/fl mice nonetheless exhibited a pronounced deficit in mechanosensitivity at the behavioral and primary afferent levels, and decreased mechanically-evoked ATP release from skin. Overall, while these data suggest that the intended targeted deletion of Trpa1 from keratin 14-expressing cells of the epidermis induces functional deficits in mechanotransduction and ATP release, these deficits are in fact likely due to factors other than reduction of Trpa1 expression in adult mouse keratinocytes because they express very little, if any, Trpa1. PMID:26978657

  14. Near Infrared-Guided Smart Nanocarriers for MicroRNA-Controlled Release of Doxorubicin/siRNA with Intracellular ATP as Fuel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Penghui; Wang, Chen; Zhao, Jingjing; Xiao, Anqi; Shen, Qi; Li, Linting; Li, Jianxin; Zhang, Junfeng; Min, Qianhao; Chen, Jiangning; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-03-22

    In chemotherapy, it is a great challenge to recruit endogenous stimuli instead of external intervention for targeted delivery and controlled release; microRNAs are the most promising candidates due to their vital role during tumorigenesis and significant expression difference. Herein, to amplify the low abundant microRNAs in live cells, we designed a stimuli-responsive DNA Y-motif for codelivery of siRNA and Dox, in which the cargo release was achieved via enzyme-free cascade amplification with endogenous microRNA as trigger and ATP (or H(+)) as fuel through toehold-mediated strand displacement. Furthermore, to realize controlled release in tumor cells, smart nanocarriers were constructed with stimuli-responsive Y-motifs, gold nanorods, and temperature-sensitive polymers, whose surfaces could be reversibly switched between PEG and RGD states via photothermal conversion. The PEG corona kept the nanocarriers stealth during blood circulation to protect the Y-motifs against nuclease digestion and enhance passive accumulation, whereas the exposed RGD shell under near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at tumor sites facilitated the specific receptor-mediated endocytosis by tumor cells. Through modulating NIR laser, microRNA, or ATP expressions, the therapy efficacies to five different cell lines were finely controlled, presenting NIR-guided accumulation, massive release, efficient gene silence, and severe apoptosis in HeLa cells; in vivo study showed that a low dosage of nanocarriers synergistically inhibited the tumor growth by silencing gene expression and inducing cell apoptosis under mild NIR irradiation, though they only brought minimum damage to normal organs. The combination of nanomaterials, polymers, and DNA nanomachines provided a promising tool for designing smart nanodevices for disease therapy. PMID:26905935

  15. Extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel FA; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-01-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to cxontrol gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.1 Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.2 A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death. PMID:20009563

  16. The food dye FD&C Blue No. 1 is a selective inhibitor of the ATP release channel Panx1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Jackson, David George; Dahl, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    The food dye FD&C Blue No. 1 (Brilliant Blue FCF [BB FCF]) is structurally similar to the purinergic receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), which is a well-known inhibitor of the ionotropic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). The P2X7R functionally interacts with the membrane channel protein pannexin 1 (Panx1) in inflammasome signaling. Intriguingly, ligands to the P2X7R, regardless of whether they are acting as agonists or antagonists at the receptor, inhibit Panx1 channels. Thus, because both P2X7R and Panx1 are inhibited by BBG, the diagnostic value of the drug is limited. Here, we show that the food dye BB FCF is a selective inhibitor of Panx1 channels, with an IC50 of 0.27 µM. No significant effect was observed with concentrations as high as 100 µM of BB FCF on P2X7R. Differing by just one hydroxyl group from BB FCF, the food dye FD&C Green No. 3 exhibited similar selective inhibition of Panx1 channels. A reverse selectivity was observed for the P2X7R antagonist, oxidized ATP, which in contrast to other P2X7R antagonists had no significant inhibitory effect on Panx1 channels. Based on its selective action, BB FCF can be added to the repertoire of drugs to study the physiology of Panx1 channels. Furthermore, because Panx1 channels appear to be involved directly or indirectly through P2X7Rs in several disorders, BB FCF and derivatives of this "safe" food dye should be given serious consideration for pharmacological intervention of conditions such as acute Crohn's disease, stroke, and injuries to the central nervous system.

  17. Two-Photon Activation of p-Hydroxyphenacyl Phototriggers: Toward Spatially Controlled Release of Diethyl Phosphate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Givens, Richard S; Elles, Christopher G

    2016-03-31

    Two-photon activation of the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) photoactivated protecting group is demonstrated for the first time using visible light at 550 nm from a pulsed laser. Broadband two-photon absorption measurements reveal a strong two-photon transition (>10 GM) near 4.5 eV that closely resembles the lowest-energy band at the same total excitation energy in the one-photon absorption spectrum of the pHP chromophore. The polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption band is consistent with excitation to the same S3 ((1)ππ*) excited state for both one- and two-photon activation. Monitoring the progress of the uncaging reaction under nonresonant excitation at 550 nm confirms a quadratic intensity dependence and that two-photon activation of the uncaging reaction is possible using visible light in the range 500-620 nm. Deprotonation of the pHP chromophore under mildly basic conditions shifts the absorption band to lower energy (3.8 eV) in both the one- and two-photon absorption spectra, suggesting that two-photon activation of the pHP chromophore may be possible using light in the range 550-720 nm. The results of these measurements open the possibility of spatially and temporally selective release of biologically active compounds from the pHP protecting group using visible light from a pulsed laser.

  18. Two-Photon Activation of p-Hydroxyphenacyl Phototriggers: Toward Spatially Controlled Release of Diethyl Phosphate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Givens, Richard S; Elles, Christopher G

    2016-03-31

    Two-photon activation of the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) photoactivated protecting group is demonstrated for the first time using visible light at 550 nm from a pulsed laser. Broadband two-photon absorption measurements reveal a strong two-photon transition (>10 GM) near 4.5 eV that closely resembles the lowest-energy band at the same total excitation energy in the one-photon absorption spectrum of the pHP chromophore. The polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption band is consistent with excitation to the same S3 ((1)ππ*) excited state for both one- and two-photon activation. Monitoring the progress of the uncaging reaction under nonresonant excitation at 550 nm confirms a quadratic intensity dependence and that two-photon activation of the uncaging reaction is possible using visible light in the range 500-620 nm. Deprotonation of the pHP chromophore under mildly basic conditions shifts the absorption band to lower energy (3.8 eV) in both the one- and two-photon absorption spectra, suggesting that two-photon activation of the pHP chromophore may be possible using light in the range 550-720 nm. The results of these measurements open the possibility of spatially and temporally selective release of biologically active compounds from the pHP protecting group using visible light from a pulsed laser. PMID:26962676

  19. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  20. Energy transduction in ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elston, Timothy; Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts use the free energy stored in transmembrane ion gradients to manufacture ATP by the action of ATP synthase. This enzyme consists of two principal domains. The asymmetric membrane-spanning Fo portion contains the proton channel, and the soluble F1 portion contains three catalytic sites which cooperate in the synthetic reactions. The flow of protons through Fo is thought to generate a torque which is transmitted to F1 by an asymmetric shaft, the coiled-coil γ-subunit. This acts as a rotating `cam' within F1, sequentially releasing ATPs from the three active sites. The free-energy difference across the inner membrane of mitochondria and bacteria is sufficient to produce three ATPs per twelve protons passing through the motor. It has been suggested that this protonmotive force biases the rotor's diffusion so that Fo constitutes a rotary motor turning the γ shaft. Here we show that biased diffusion, augmented by electrostatic forces, does indeed generate sufficient torque to account for ATP production. Moreover, the motor's reversibility - supplying torque from ATP hydrolysis in F1 converts the motor into an efficient proton pump - can also be explained by our model.

  1. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... device that measures the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from platelets following aggregation.... Simultaneous measurements of platelet aggregation and ATP release are used to evaluate platelet...

  2. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized Cd

  3. ATP regulation in bioproduction.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-12-10

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is consumed as a biological energy source by many intracellular reactions. Thus, the intracellular ATP supply is required to maintain cellular homeostasis. The dependence on the intracellular ATP supply is a critical factor in bioproduction by cell factories. Recent studies have shown that changing the ATP supply is critical for improving product yields. In this review, we summarize the recent challenges faced by researchers engaged in the development of engineered cell factories, including the maintenance of a large ATP supply and the production of cell factories. The strategies used to enhance ATP supply are categorized as follows: addition of energy substrates, controlling pH, metabolic engineering of ATP-generating or ATP-consuming pathways, and controlling reactions of the respiratory chain. An enhanced ATP supply generated using these strategies improves target production through increases in resource uptake, cell growth, biosynthesis, export of products, and tolerance to toxic compounds.

  4. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-15

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP](c)) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of K(ATP) channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mM) caused no detectable increase in [ATP](c), monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25-luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mM) with a significant increase in [ATP](c). Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mM glucose with increases in [ATP](c). Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of K(ATP) channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mM) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mM) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mM lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP](c). High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed K(ATP) channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells.

  5. Novel Air Stimulation MR-Device for Intraoral Quantitative Sensory Cold Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Ben; Meier, Michael L.; Hou, Mei-Yin; Parkinson, Charles; Ettlin, Dominik A.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of neuroimaging in dental research provides exciting opportunities for relating excitation of trigeminal neurons to human somatosensory perceptions. Cold air sensitivity is one of the most frequent causes of dental discomfort or pain. Up to date, devices capable of delivering controlled cold air in an MR-environment are unavailable for quantitative sensory testing. This study therefore aimed at constructing and evaluating a novel MR-compatible, computer-controlled cold air stimulation apparatus (CASA) that produces graded air puffs. CASA consisted of a multi-injector air jet delivery system (AJS), a cold exchanger, a cooling agent, and a stimulus application construction. Its feasibility was tested by performing an fMRI stimulation experiment on a single subject experiencing dentine cold sensitivity. The novel device delivered repetitive, stable air stimuli ranging from room temperature (24.5°C ± 2°C) to −35°C, at flow rates between 5 and 17 liters per minute (l/min). These cold air puffs evoked perceptions similar to natural stimuli. Single-subject fMRI-analysis yielded brain activations typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, insular and cingulate cortices, somatosensory, cerebellar, and frontal brain regions. Thus, the novel CASA allowed for controlled, repetitive quantitative sensory testing by using air stimuli at graded temperatures (room temperature down to −35°C) while simultaneously recording brain responses. No MR-compatible stimulation device currently exists that is capable of providing non-contact natural-like stimuli at a wide temperature range to tissues in spatially restricted areas such as the mouth. The physical characteristics of this novel device thus holds promise for advancing the field of trigeminal and spinal somatosensory research, namely with respect to comparing therapeutic interventions for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:27445771

  6. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  7. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  8. Radioprotective effects of ATP in human blood ex vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Swennen, Els L.R. Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Van den Beucken, Twan; Bast, Aalt

    2008-03-07

    Damage to healthy tissue is a major limitation of radiotherapy treatment of cancer patients, leading to several side effects and complications. Radiation-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines is thought to be partially responsible for the radiation-associated complications. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of extracellular ATP on markers of oxidative stress, radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage in irradiated blood ex vivo. ATP inhibited radiation-induced TNF-{alpha} release and increased IL-10 release. The inhibitory effect of ATP on TNF- {alpha} release was completely reversed by adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate, indicating a P2Y{sub 11} mediated effect. Furthermore, ATP attenuated radiation-induced DNA damage immediate, 3 and 6 h after irradiation. Our study indicates that ATP administration alleviates radiation-toxicity to blood cells, mainly by inhibiting radiation-induced inflammation and DNA damage.

  9. Evidence for Extracellular ATP as a Stress Signal in a Single-Celled Organism

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venketesh

    2015-01-01

    ATP is omnipresent in biology and acts as an extracellular signaling molecule in mammals. Information regarding the signaling function of extracellular ATP in single-celled eukaryotes is lacking. Here, we explore the role of extracellular ATP in cell volume recovery during osmotic swelling in the amoeba Dictyostelium. Release of micromolar ATP could be detected during cell swelling and regulatory cell volume decrease (RVD) phases during hypotonic challenge. Scavenging ATP with apyrase caused profound cell swelling and loss of RVD. Apyrase-induced swelling could be rescued by 100 μM βγ-imidoATP. N-Ethylmalemide (NEM), an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, caused heightened cell swelling, loss of RVD, and inhibition of ATP release. Amoebas with impaired contractile vacuole (CV) fusion (drainin knockout [KO] cells) displayed increased swelling but intact ATP release. One hundred micromolar Gd3+ caused cell swelling while blocking any recovery by βγ-imidoATP. ATP release was 4-fold higher in the presence of Gd3+. Cell swelling was associated with an increase in intracellular nitric oxide (NO), with NO-scavenging agents causing cell swelling. Swelling-induced NO production was inhibited by both apyrase and Gd3+, while NO donors rescued apyrase- and Gd3+-induced swelling. These data suggest extracellular ATP released during cell swelling is an important signal that elicits RVD. Though the cell surface receptor for ATP in Dictyostelium remains elusive, we suggest ATP operates through a Gd3+-sensitive receptor that is coupled with intracellular NO production. PMID:26048010

  10. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  11. Polarized ATP distribution in urothelial mucosal and serosal space is differentially regulated by stretch and ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqun

    2015-11-15

    Purinergic signaling is a major pathway in regulating bladder function, and mechanical force stimulates urothelial ATP release, which plays an important role in bladder mechanotransduction. Although urothelial ATP release was first reported almost 20 years ago, the way in which release is regulated by mechanical force, and the presence of ATP-converting enzymes in regulating the availability of released ATP is still not well understood. Using a set of custom-designed Ussing chambers with the ability to manipulate mechanical forces applied on the urothelial tissue, we have demonstrated that it is stretch and not hydrostatic pressure that induces urothelial ATP release. The experiments reveal that urothelial ATP release is tightly controlled by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction. We have further shown that stretch-induced urothelial ATP release is insensitive to temperature (4°C). Interestingly, stretch-induced ATP release shows polarized distribution, with the ATP concentration in mucosal chamber (nanomolar level) about 10 times higher than the ATP concentration in serosal chamber (subnanomolar level). Furthermore, we have consistently observed differential ATP lifetime kinetics in the mucosal and serosal chambers, which is consistent with our immunofluorescent localization data, showing that ATP-converting enzymes ENTPD3 and alkaline phosphatase are expressed on urothelial basal surface, but not on the apical membrane. In summary, our data indicate that urothelial ATP release is finely regulated by stretch speed, magnitude, and direction, and extracellular ATP signaling is likely to be differentially regulated by ectonucleotidase, which results in temporally and spatially distinct ATP kinetics in response to mechanical stretch. PMID:26336160

  12. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  13. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]c) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of KATP channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mm) caused no detectable increase in [ATP]c, monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25–luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mm) with a significant increase in [ATP]c. Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mm glucose with increases in [ATP]c. Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of KATP channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mm) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mm) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mm lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP]c. High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed KATP channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells. PMID:12381816

  14. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  15. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles.

  16. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  17. Extracellular ATP protects endothelial cells against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Aho, Joonas; Helenius, Mikko; Vattulainen-Collanus, Sanna; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Koskenvuo, Juha

    2016-09-01

    Cell damage can lead to rapid release of ATP to extracellular space resulting in dramatic change in local ATP concentration. Evolutionary, this has been considered as a danger signal leading to adaptive responses in adjacent cells. Our aim was to demonstrate that elevated extracellular ATP or inhibition of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1/CD39) activity could be used to increase tolerance against DNA-damaging conditions. Human endothelial cells, with increased extracellular ATP concentration in cell proximity, were more resistant to irradiation or chemically induced DNA damage evaluated with the DNA damage markers γH2AX and phosphorylated p53. In our rat models of DNA damage, inhibiting CD39-driven ATP hydrolysis with POM-1 protected the heart and lung tissues against chemically induced DNA damage. Interestingly, the phenomenon could not be replicated in cancer cells. Our results show that transient increase in extracellular ATP can promote resistance to DNA damage.

  18. The role of mitochondrially derived ATP in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Divya; Shields, Lauren Y; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Haddad, Dominik; Lin, Wei; Gerencser, Akos A; Kim, Hwajin; Brand, Martin D; Edwards, Robert H; Nakamura, Ken

    2015-09-11

    Synaptic mitochondria are thought to be critical in supporting neuronal energy requirements at the synapse, and bioenergetic failure at the synapse may impair neural transmission and contribute to neurodegeneration. However, little is known about the energy requirements of synaptic vesicle release or whether these energy requirements go unmet in disease, primarily due to a lack of appropriate tools and sensitive assays. To determine the dependence of synaptic vesicle cycling on mitochondrially derived ATP levels, we developed two complementary assays sensitive to mitochondrially derived ATP in individual, living hippocampal boutons. The first is a functional assay for mitochondrially derived ATP that uses the extent of synaptic vesicle cycling as a surrogate for ATP level. The second uses ATP FRET sensors to directly measure ATP at the synapse. Using these assays, we show that endocytosis has high ATP requirements and that vesicle reacidification and exocytosis require comparatively little energy. We then show that to meet these energy needs, mitochondrially derived ATP is rapidly dispersed in axons, thereby maintaining near normal levels of ATP even in boutons lacking mitochondria. As a result, the capacity for synaptic vesicle cycling is similar in boutons without mitochondria as in those with mitochondria. Finally, we show that loss of a key respiratory subunit implicated in Leigh disease markedly decreases mitochondrially derived ATP levels in axons, thus inhibiting synaptic vesicle cycling. This proves that mitochondria-based energy failure can occur and be detected in individual neurons that have a genetic mitochondrial defect.

  19. Pathway of processive ATP hydrolysis by kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susan P.; Webb, Martin R.; Brune, Martin; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct measurement of the kinetics of kinesin dissociation from microtubules, the release of phosphate and ADP from kinesin, and rebinding of kinesin to the microtubule have defined the mechanism for the kinesin ATPase cycle. The processivity of ATP hydrolysis is ten molecules per site at low salt concentration but is reduced to one ATP per site at higher salt concentration. Kinesin dissociates from the microtubule after ATP hydrolysis. This step is rate-limiting. The subsequent rebinding of kinesin · ADP to the microtubule is fast, so kinesin spends only a small fraction of its duty cycle in the dissociated state. These results provide an explanation for the motility differences between skeletal myosin and kinesin. PMID:7854446

  20. Regulation of purinergic signaling in biliary epithelial cells by exocytosis of SLC17A9-dependent ATP-enriched vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Meghana N; Woo, Kangmee; Kresge, Charles; Bugde, Abhijit; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Lewis, Matthew A; Feranchak, Andrew P

    2011-07-15

    ATP in bile is a potent secretogogue, stimulating biliary epithelial cell (BEC) secretion through binding apical purinergic receptors. In response to mechanosensitive stimuli, BECs release ATP into bile, although the cellular basis of ATP release is unknown. The aims of this study in human and mouse BECs were to determine whether ATP release occurs via exocytosis of ATP-enriched vesicles and to elucidate the potential role of the vesicular nucleotide transporter SLC17A9 in purinergic signaling. Dynamic, multiscale, live cell imaging (confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and a luminescence detection system with a high sensitivity charge-coupled device camera) was utilized to detect vesicular ATP release from cell populations, single cells, and the submembrane space of a single cell. In response to increases in cell volume, BECs release ATP, which was dependent on intact microtubules and vesicular trafficking pathways. ATP release occurred as stochastic point source bursts of luminescence consistent with exocytic events. Parallel studies identified ATP-enriched vesicles ranging in size from 0.4 to 1 μm that underwent fusion and release in response to increases in cell volume in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. Present in all models, SLC17A9 contributed to ATP vesicle formation and regulated ATP release. The findings are consistent with the existence of an SLC17A9-dependent ATP-enriched vesicular pool in biliary epithelium that undergoes regulated exocytosis to initiate purinergic signaling.

  1. Dynamic Regulation of Cell Volume and Extracellular ATP of Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leal Denis, M. Florencia; Alvarez, H. Ariel; Lauri, Natalia; Alvarez, Cora L.; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The peptide mastoparan 7 (MST7) triggered in human erythrocytes (rbcs) the release of ATP and swelling. Since swelling is a well-known inducer of ATP release, and extracellular (ATPe), interacting with P (purinergic) receptors, can affect cell volume (Vr), we explored the dynamic regulation between Vr and ATPe. Methods and Treatments We made a quantitative assessment of MST7-dependent kinetics of Vr and of [ATPe], both in the absence and presence of blockers of ATP efflux, swelling and P receptors. Results In rbcs 10 μM MST7 promoted acute, strongly correlated changes in [ATPe] and Vr. Whereas MST7 induced increases of 10% in Vr and 190 nM in [ATPe], blocking swelling in a hyperosmotic medium + MST7 reduced [ATPe] by 40%. Pre-incubation of rbcs with 10 μM of either carbenoxolone or probenecid, two inhibitors of the ATP conduit pannexin 1, reduced [ATPe] by 40–50% and swelling by 40–60%, while in the presence of 80 U/mL apyrase, an ATPe scavenger, cell swelling was prevented. While exposure to 10 μM NF110, a blocker of ATP-P2X receptors mediating sodium influx, reduced [ATPe] by 48%, and swelling by 80%, incubation of cells in sodium free medium reduced swelling by 92%. Analysis and Discussion Results were analyzed by means of a mathematical model where ATPe kinetics and Vr kinetics were mutually regulated. Model dependent fit to experimental data showed that, upon MST7 exposure, ATP efflux required a fast 1960-fold increase of ATP permeability, mediated by two kinetically different conduits, both of which were activated by swelling and inactivated by time. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest that, following MST7 exposure, ATP is released via two conduits, one of which is mediated by pannexin 1. The accumulated ATPe activates P2X receptors, followed by sodium influx, resulting in cell swelling, which in turn further activates ATP release. Thus swelling and P2X receptors constitute essential components of a positive feedback loop

  2. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:27295623

  3. Behavior and stability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during chlorine disinfection.

    PubMed

    Nescerecka, Alina; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2016-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis is a cultivation-independent alternative method for the determination of bacterial viability in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated water. Here we investigated the behavior and stability of ATP during chlorination in detail. Different sodium hypochlorite doses (0-22.4 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure) were applied to an Escherichia coli pure culture suspended in filtered river water. We observed decreasing intracellular ATP with increasing chlorine concentrations, but extracellular ATP concentrations only increased when the chlorine dose exceeded 0.35 mg L(-1). The release of ATP from chlorine-damaged bacteria coincided with severe membrane damage detected with flow cytometry (FCM). The stability of extracellular ATP was subsequently studied in different water matrixes, and we found that extracellular ATP was stable in sterile deionized water and also in chlorinated water until extremely high chlorine doses (≤11.2 mg-Cl2 L(-1); 5 min exposure). In contrast, ATP decreased relatively slowly (k = 0.145 h(-1)) in 0.1 μm filtered river water, presumably due to degradation by either extracellular enzymes or the fraction of bacteria that were able to pass through the filter. Extracellular ATP decreased considerably faster (k = 0.368 h(-1)) during batch growth of a river water bacterial community. A series of growth potential tests showed that extracellular ATP molecules were utilized as a phosphorus source during bacteria proliferation. From the combined data we conclude that ATP released from bacteria at high chlorine doses could promote bacteria regrowth, contributing to biological instability in drinking water distribution systems.

  4. ATP as a cotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a major intracellular energy source is well-established. In addition, ATP and related nucleotides have widespread extracellular actions via the ionotropic P2X (ligand-gated cation channels) and metabotropic P2Y (G protein-coupled) receptors. Numerous experimental techniques, including myography, electrophysiology and biochemical measurement of neurotransmitter release, have been used to show that ATP has several major roles as a neurotransmitter in peripheral nerves. When released from enteric nerves of the gastrointestinal tract it acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, mediating descending muscle relaxation during peristalsis. ATP is also an excitatory cotransmitter in autonomic nerves; 1) It is costored with noradrenaline in synaptic vesicles in postganglionic sympathetic nerves innervating smooth muscle preparations, such as the vas deferens and most arteries. When coreleased with noradrenaline, ATP acts at postjunctional P2X1 receptors to evoke depolarisation, Ca(2+) influx, Ca(2+) sensitisation and contraction. 2) ATP is also coreleased with acetylcholine from postganglionic parasympathetic nerves innervating the urinary bladder and again acts at postjunctional P2X1 receptors, and possibly also a P2X1+4 heteromer, to elicit smooth muscle contraction. In both cases the neurotransmitter actions of ATP are terminated by dephosphorylation by extracellular, membrane-bound enzymes and soluble nucleotidases released from postganglionic nerves. There are indications of an increased contribution of ATP to control of blood pressure in hypertension, but further research is needed to clarify this possibility. More promising is the upregulation of P2X receptors in dysfunctional bladder, including interstitial cystitis, idiopathic detrusor instability and overactive bladder syndrome. Consequently, these roles of ATP are of great therapeutic interest and are increasingly being targeted by pharmaceutical companies.

  5. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  6. Lysosomal ATP imaging in living cells by a water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing-Huan; Geng, Zhi-Rong; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Cui; Zhang, Zhi-Yang; Wang, Zhi-Lin

    2016-09-15

    Lysosomes in astrocytes and microglia can release ATP as the signaling molecule for the cells through ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. At present, fluorescent probes that can detect ATP in lysosomes have not been reported. In this work, we have developed a new water-soluble cationic polythiophene derivative that can be specifically localized in lysosomes and can be utilized as a fluorescent probe to sense ATP in cells. PEMTEI exhibits high selectivity and sensitivity to ATP at physiological pH values and the detection limit of ATP is as low as 10(-11)M. The probe has low cytotoxicity, good permeability and high photostability in living cells and has been applied successfully to real-time monitoring of the change in concentrations of ATP in lysosomes though fluorescence microscopy. We also demonstrated that lysosomes in Hela cells can release ATP through Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis in response to drug stimuli.

  7. ATP technology, a tool for monitoring microbes in cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Czechowski, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    Rapid and accurate measurement of microbes is important for controlling the formation of troublesome microbial slimes in cooling water systems. One method for accomplishing this involves the measurement of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP), a compound used to store and transfer energy in microbial cells. Cellular ATP is determined by chemically rupturing cells, which releases ATP that reacts with a luciferase reagent (the firefly enzyme). This reaction produces light which can be detected by a sensitive luminometer/photometer. The amount of light produced is proportional to the amount of ATP in the cell. A quantitative indication of biological activity is obtained in minutes, compared to traditional plating methods which often require days of incubation. The use of ATP for microbial detection has been available for many years; however, industrial usage was limited because the ATP procedure was neither easy to perform nor was it cost effective. Recently, advances in instrument technology, extractant chemistry and enzyme stability have made ATP detection more practical and less expensive. ATP technology can be used for determining microbial content in cooling water systems, predicting biocide effectiveness, and monitoring efficacy of biocides in cooling systems. A good correlation (0.85) was found between microbial ATP values and bacterial Colony Forming Units (CFU) in cooling waters. ATP technology was used to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of a biocide in a test system within 1 hour after biocide addition. Test results accurately predicted the biocide efficacy in the cooling tower. Effectiveness of other biocides in cooling systems were monitored with results being obtained within minutes after sampling. These findings indicate the potential for ATP technology to be an effective tool in monitoring microbes in cooling water systems.

  8. The detection of micromolar pericellular ATP pool on lymphocyte surface by using lymphoid ecto-adenylate kinase as intrinsic ATP sensor.

    PubMed

    Yegutkin, Gennady G; Mikhailov, Andrey; Samburski, Sergei S; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2006-08-01

    Current models of extracellular ATP turnover include transient release of nanomolar ATP concentrations, triggering of signaling events, and subsequent ectoenzymatic inactivation. Given the high substrate specificity for adenylate kinase for reversible reaction (ATP + AMP <--> 2ADP), we exploited lymphoid ecto-adenylate kinase as an intrinsic probe for accurate sensing pericellular ATP. Incubation of leukemic T- and B-lymphocytes with [3H]AMP or [alpha-32P]AMP induces partial nucleotide conversion into high-energy phosphoryls. This "intrinsic" AMP phosphorylation occurs in time- and concentration-dependent fashions via nonlytic supply of endogenous gamma-phosphate-donating ATP, remains relatively resistant to bulk extracellular ATP scavenging by apyrase, and is diminished after lymphocyte pretreatment with membrane-modifying agents. This enzyme-coupled approach, together with confocal imaging of quinacrine-labeled ATP stores, suggests that, along with predominant ATP accumulation within cytoplasmic granules, micromolar ATP concentrations are constitutively retained on lymphoid surface without convection into bulk milieu. High basal levels of inositol phosphates in the cells transfected with ATP-selective human P2Y2-receptor further demonstrate that lymphocyte-surrounding ATP is sufficient for triggering purinergic responses both in autocrine and paracrine fashions. The ability of nonstimulated lymphocytes to maintain micromolar ATP halo might represent a novel route initiating signaling cascades within immunological synapses and facilitating leukocyte trafficking between the blood and tissues.

  9. Extracellular ATP mediates Ca2+ signaling in cultured myenteric neurons via a PLC-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kimball, B C; Yule, D I; Mulholland, M W

    1996-04-01

    In the myenteric plexus, ATP is released as a neurotransmitter by "purinergic" nerves, relaxing visceral smooth muscle. We report a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving receptor-mediated release of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Primary cultures of myenteric neurons from guinea pigs taenia coli were loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fura 2-acetoxymethyl ester (AM) and examined using digital imaging microscopy. Superfusion of single neurons with ATP (0.01-1,000 microM) resulted in concentration-dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) that were independent of extracellular Ca2+. Decrements in peak [Ca2+]i were seen with repetitive ATP exposure. Responsiveness of myenteric neurons to purinergic agonists (100 microM) was consistent with action at a neuronal P 2y purinoceptor: 2-chloro-ATP = ATP = 2-methyl-thio-ATP (MeSATP) > ADP > alpha, beta-MeATP = beta,gamma-MeATP > AMP > adenosine. ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients were inhibited dose dependently by suramin, a nonspecific P2 antagonist, and reactive blue 2, a specific P 2y antagonist. ATP and cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM) appear to release an identical intracellular Ca2+ store. Preincubation with the aminosteroid U-73122 (10 microM) inhibited ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients by 71 +/- 7%, whereas phorbol ester pretreatment (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, 100 nM, 5 min) caused a 76 +/- 4% inhibition. Peak [Ca2+]i evoked by ATP was not affected by preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml, 24 h) or nifedipine (10 microM). These data suggest a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving purinoceptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC), with release of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores.

  10. Altered responsiveness to extracellular ATP enhances acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is secreted from hepatocytes under physiological conditions and plays an important role in liver biology through the activation of P2 receptors. Conversely, higher extracellular ATP concentrations, as observed during necrosis, trigger inflammatory responses that contribute to the progression of liver injury. Impaired calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis is a hallmark of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity, and since ATP induces mobilization of the intracellular Ca2+ stocks, we evaluated if the release of ATP during APAP-induced necrosis could directly contribute to hepatocyte death. Results APAP overdose resulted in liver necrosis, massive neutrophil infiltration and large non-perfused areas, as well as remote lung inflammation. In the liver, these effects were significantly abrogated after ATP metabolism by apyrase or P2X receptors blockage, but none of the treatments prevented remote lung inflammation, suggesting a confined local contribution of purinergic signaling into liver environment. In vitro, APAP administration to primary mouse hepatocytes and also HepG2 cells caused cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, exposure of HepG2 cells to APAP elicited significant release of ATP to the supernatant in levels that were high enough to promote direct cytotoxicity to healthy primary hepatocytes or HepG2 cells. In agreement to our in vivo results, apyrase treatment or blockage of P2 receptors reduced APAP cytotoxicity. Likewise, ATP exposure caused significant higher intracellular Ca2+ signal in APAP-treated primary hepatocytes, which was reproduced in HepG2 cells. Quantitative real time PCR showed that APAP-challenged HepG2 cells expressed higher levels of several purinergic receptors, which may explain the hypersensitivity to extracellular ATP. This phenotype was confirmed in humans analyzing liver biopsies from patients diagnosed with acute hepatic failure. Conclusion We suggest that under pathological conditions

  11. Glucose generates sub-plasma membrane ATP microdomains in single islet beta-cells. Potential role for strategically located mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, H J; Pouli, A E; Ainscow, E K; Jouaville, L S; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    1999-05-01

    Increases in the concentration of free ATP within the islet beta-cell may couple elevations in blood glucose to insulin release by closing ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels and activating Ca2+ influx. Here, we use recombinant targeted luciferases and photon counting imaging to monitor changes in free [ATP] in subdomains of single living MIN6 and primary beta-cells. Resting [ATP] in the cytosol ([ATP]c), in the mitochondrial matrix ([ATP]m), and beneath the plasma membrane ([ATP]pm) were similar ( approximately 1 mM). Elevations in extracellular glucose concentration (3-30 mM) increased free [ATP] in each domain with distinct kinetics. Thus, sustained increases in [ATP]m and [ATP]pm were observed, but only a transient increase in [ATP]c. However, detectable increases in [ATP]c and [ATP]pm, but not [ATP]m, required extracellular Ca2+. Enhancement of glucose-induced Ca2+ influx with high [K+] had little effect on the apparent [ATP]c and [ATP]m increases but augmented the [ATP]pm increase. Underlying these changes, glucose increased the mitochondrial proton motive force, an effect mimicked by high [K+]. These data support a model in which glucose increases [ATP]m both through enhanced substrate supply and by progressive Ca2+-dependent activation of mitochondrial enzymes. This may then lead to a privileged elevation of [ATP]pm, which may be essential for the sustained closure of KATP channels. Luciferase imaging would appear to be a useful new tool for dynamic in vivo imaging of free ATP concentration.

  12. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease. PMID:26195825

  13. Modeling K,ATP-Dependent Excitability in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jonathan R.; Cooper, Paige; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, K,ATP channels respond to changes in glucose to regulate cell excitability and insulin release. Confirming a high sensitivity of electrical activity to K,ATP activity, mutations that cause gain of K,ATP function cause neonatal diabetes. Our aim was to quantitatively assess the contribution of K,ATP current to the regulation of glucose-dependent bursting by reproducing experimentally observed changes in excitability when K,ATP conductance is altered by genetic manipulation. A recent detailed computational model of single cell pancreatic β-cell excitability reproduces the β-cell response to varying glucose concentrations. However, initial simulations showed that the model underrepresents the significance of K,ATP activity and was unable to reproduce K,ATP conductance-dependent changes in excitability. By altering the ATP and glucose dependence of the L-type Ca2+ channel and the Na-K ATPase to better fit experiment, appropriate dependence of excitability on K,ATP conductance was reproduced. Because experiments were conducted in islets, which contain cell-to-cell variability, we extended the model from a single cell to a three-dimensional model (10×10×10 cell) islet with 1000 cells. For each cell, the conductance of the major currents was allowed to vary as was the gap junction conductance between cells. This showed that single cell glucose-dependent behavior was then highly variable, but was uniform in coupled islets. The study highlights the importance of parameterization of detailed models of β-cell excitability and suggests future experiments that will lead to improved characterization of β-cell excitability and the control of insulin secretion. PMID:25418087

  14. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease.

  15. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  16. ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A; Leshinsky, E; Ganoth, D; Heller, H

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-requiring conjugation of ubiquitin with proteins plays a role in the energy-dependent degradation of intracellular proteins. To examine whether such conjugates are indeed intermediates in protein breakdown, conjugates of 125I-labeled lysozyme with ubiquitin were isolated and incubated with a fraction of reticulocyte extract that lacks the enzymes that carry out ubiquitin-protein conjugation. ATP markedly stimulated degradation of the lysozyme moiety of ubiquitin conjugates to products soluble in trichloroacetic acid. By contrast, free 125I-labeled lysozyme was not degraded under these conditions, unless ubiquitin and the three enzymes required for ubiquitin conjugation were supplemented. Mg2+ was absolutely required for conjugate breakdown. Of various nucleotides, only CTP replaced ATP. Nonhydrolyzable analogs of ATP were not effective. In the absence of ATP, free lysozyme is released from ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates by isopeptidases present in the extract. Thus, ATP is involved in both the formation and the breakdown of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Images PMID:6324208

  17. Energy transduction in the F1 motor of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-11-01

    ATP synthase is the universal enzyme that manufactures ATP from ADP and phosphate by using the energy derived from a transmembrane protonmotive gradient. It can also reverse itself and hydrolyse ATP to pump protons against an electrochemical gradient. ATP synthase carries out both its synthetic and hydrolytic cycles by a rotary mechanism. This has been confirmed in the direction of hydrolysis, after isolation of the soluble F1 portion of the protein and visualization of the actual rotation of the central `shaft' of the enzyme with respect to the rest of the molecule, making ATP synthase the world's smallest rotary engine. Here we present a model for this engine that accounts for its mechanochemical behaviour in both the hydrolysing and synthesizing directions. We conclude that the F1 motor achieves its high mechanical torque and almost 100% efficiency because it converts the free energy of ATP binding into elastic strain, which is then released by a coordinated kinetic and tightly coupled conformational mechanism to create a rotary torque.

  18. Mechanical modulation of ATP-binding affinity of V1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tirtom, Naciye Esma; Okuno, Daichi; Nakano, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Ken; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    V(1)-ATPase is a rotary motor protein that rotates the central shaft in a counterclockwise direction hydrolyzing ATP. Although the ATP-binding process is suggested to be the most critical reaction step for torque generation in F(1)-ATPase (the closest relative of V(1)-ATPase evolutionarily), the role of ATP binding for V(1)-ATPase in torque generation has remained unclear. In the present study, we performed single-molecule manipulation experiments on V(1)-ATPase from Thermus thermophilus to investigate how the ATP-binding process is modulated upon rotation of the rotary shaft. When V(1)-ATPase showed an ATP-waiting pause, it was stalled at a target angle and then released. Based on the response of the V(1)-ATPase released, the ATP-binding probability was determined at individual stall angles. It was observed that the rate constant of ATP binding (k(on)) was exponentially accelerated with forward rotation, whereas the rate constant of ATP release (k(off)) was exponentially reduced. The angle dependence of the k(off) of V(1)-ATPase was significantly smaller than that of F(1)-ATPase, suggesting that the ATP-binding process is not the major torque-generating step in V(1)-ATPase. When V(1)-ATPase was stalled at the mean binding angle to restrict rotary Brownian motion, k(on) was evidently slower than that determined from free rotation, showing the reaction rate enhancement by conformational fluctuation. It was also suggested that shaft of V(1)-ATPase should be rotated at least 277° in a clockwise direction for efficient release of ATP under ATP-synthesis conditions.

  19. ATP synthase with its gamma subunit reduced to the N-terminal helix can still catalyze ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mnatsakanyan, Nelli; Hook, Jonathon A; Quisenberry, Leah; Weber, Joachim

    2009-09-25

    ATP synthase uses a unique rotary mechanism to couple ATP synthesis and hydrolysis to transmembrane proton translocation. As part of the synthesis mechanism, the torque of the rotor has to be converted into conformational rearrangements of the catalytic binding sites on the stator to allow synthesis and release of ATP. The gamma subunit of the rotor, which plays a central role in the energy conversion, consists of two long helices inside the central cavity of the stator cylinder plus a globular portion outside the cylinder. Here, we show that the N-terminal helix alone is able to fulfill the function of full-length gamma in ATP synthesis as long as it connects to the rest of the rotor. This connection can occur via the epsilon subunit. No direct contact between gamma and the c ring seems to be required. In addition, the results indicate that the epsilon subunit of the rotor exists in two different conformations during ATP synthesis and ATP hydrolysis.

  20. TCDD decreases ATP levels and increases reactive oxygen production through changes in mitochondrial F F{sub 1}-ATP synthase and ubiquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, Howard G. . E-mail: shertzhg@ucmail.uc.edu; Genter, Mary Beth; Shen, Dongxiao; Nebert, Daniel W.; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P.

    2006-12-15

    Mitochondria generate ATP and participate in signal transduction and cellular pathology and/or cell death. TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) decreases hepatic ATP levels and generates mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage, which is exacerbated by increasing mitochondrial glutathione redox state and by inner membrane hyperpolarization. This study identifies mitochondrial targets of TCDD that initiate and sustain reactive oxygen production and decreased ATP levels. One week after treating mice with TCDD, liver ubiquinone (Q) levels were significantly decreased, while rates of succinoxidase and Q-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities were increased. However, the expected increase in Q reduction state following TCDD treatment did not occur; instead, Q was more oxidized. These results could be explained by an ATP synthase defect, a premise supported by the unusual finding that TCDD lowers ATP/O ratios without concomitant changes in respiratory control ratios. Such results suggest either a futile cycle in ATP synthesis, or hydrolysis of newly synthesized ATP prior to release. The TCDD-mediated decrease in Q, concomitant with an increase in respiration, increases complex 3 redox cycling. This acts in concert with glutathione to increase membrane potential and reactive oxygen production. The proposed defect in ATP synthase explains both the greater respiratory rates and the lower tissue ATP levels.

  1. [Preparation of ATP-2Na loaded liposome and its effect on tissues energy state in myocardial ischemic mice].

    PubMed

    Pi, Feng-mei; Tu, Xi-de; Wu, Yue

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to improve liposome encapsulation efficiency of water soluble drug ATP-2Na with hydrophobic ion pairing method, and evaluate its effect on tissues energy state in myocardial ischemia mice. Ion pair complex of ATP-2Na with HTAB was prepared first; then the liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method. The size and zeta potential of ATP-2Na liposome were investigated. Its effect on tissues energy state in myocardium ischemia mice was evaluated by detecting ATP-2Na concentration in tissues and blood after injection in comparison to ATP-2Na solution. The diameters and zeta potential of ATP-2Na liposomes were (144.0 +/- 2.7) nm and (+16.2 +/- 1.6) mV, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was (85.02 +/- 2.31) %. The in vitro drug release pattern from liposomes matches with Weibull equation. Compared with ATP-2Na solution, ATP-2Na liposome increased the ATP concentration of blood in myocardial ischemic mice very significantly; compared with blank, ATP-2Na liposome increased ATP content of myocardium and liver in myocaridal ischemic mice significantly, but ATP-2Na solution didn't show this effect. ATP-2Na liposome might have an advantage in improving tissue energy state on myocaridal ischemic animals.

  2. The Role of Mitochondrially Derived ATP in Synaptic Vesicle Recycling*♦

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Divya; Shields, Lauren Y.; Mendelsohn, Bryce A.; Haddad, Dominik; Lin, Wei; Gerencser, Akos A.; Kim, Hwajin; Brand, Martin D.; Edwards, Robert H.; Nakamura, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic mitochondria are thought to be critical in supporting neuronal energy requirements at the synapse, and bioenergetic failure at the synapse may impair neural transmission and contribute to neurodegeneration. However, little is known about the energy requirements of synaptic vesicle release or whether these energy requirements go unmet in disease, primarily due to a lack of appropriate tools and sensitive assays. To determine the dependence of synaptic vesicle cycling on mitochondrially derived ATP levels, we developed two complementary assays sensitive to mitochondrially derived ATP in individual, living hippocampal boutons. The first is a functional assay for mitochondrially derived ATP that uses the extent of synaptic vesicle cycling as a surrogate for ATP level. The second uses ATP FRET sensors to directly measure ATP at the synapse. Using these assays, we show that endocytosis has high ATP requirements and that vesicle reacidification and exocytosis require comparatively little energy. We then show that to meet these energy needs, mitochondrially derived ATP is rapidly dispersed in axons, thereby maintaining near normal levels of ATP even in boutons lacking mitochondria. As a result, the capacity for synaptic vesicle cycling is similar in boutons without mitochondria as in those with mitochondria. Finally, we show that loss of a key respiratory subunit implicated in Leigh disease markedly decreases mitochondrially derived ATP levels in axons, thus inhibiting synaptic vesicle cycling. This proves that mitochondria-based energy failure can occur and be detected in individual neurons that have a genetic mitochondrial defect. PMID:26126824

  3. Interdependence of ATP signalling and pannexin channels; the servant was really the master all along?

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael F

    2015-12-15

    Pannexin channels are recognized as important conduits for the release of ATP, which contributes to purinergic signalling. Pathologically, ATP release via these channels acts as a find-me signal for apoptotic cell clearance. Accordingly, there is considerable and growing interest in understanding the function and regulation of pannexin channels. In a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal, Boyce et al. provide evidence that the surface expression of pannexin channels is regulated by extracellular ATP. They propose a model in which ATP triggers pannexin channel internalization through a pathway involving clathrin- and caveolin-independent entry into early endosomes. Intriguingly, their evidence suggests that internalization is initiated through the association of ATP with pannexin channels themselves as well as ionotropic purinergic receptor 7 (P2X7) receptors. PMID:26613946

  4. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  5. Fine-tuned ATP signals are acute mediators in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Ellegaard, Maria; Syberg, Susanne; Andersen, Christina K B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Vang, Ole; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2015-12-01

    Osteocytes are considered the primary mechanosensors of bone, but the signaling pathways they apply in mechanotransduction are still incompletely investigated and characterized. A growing body of data strongly indicates that P2 receptor signaling among osteoblasts and osteoclasts has regulatory effects on bone remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesized that ATP signaling is also applied by osteocytes in mechanotransduction. We applied a short fluid pulse on MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells during real-time detection of ATP and demonstrated that mechanical stimulation activates the acute release of ATP and that these acute ATP signals are fine-tuned according to the magnitude of loading. ATP release was then challenged by pharmacological inhibitors, which indicated a vesicular release pathway for acute ATP signals. Finally, we showed that osteocytes express functional P2X2 and P2X7 receptors and respond to even low concentrations of nucleotides by increasing intracellular calcium concentration. These results indicate that in osteocytes, vesicular ATP release is an acute mediator of mechanical signals and the magnitude of loading. These and previous results, therefore, implicate purinergic signaling as an early signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

  6. Skeletal muscle ATP kinetics are impaired in frail mice.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Yang, Huanle; Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P; Yano, Toshiyuki; Leppo, Michelle K; Steenbergen, Charles; Walston, Jeremy; Weiss, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    The interleukin-10 knockout mouse (IL10(tm/tm)) has been proposed as a model for human frailty, a geriatric syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle (SM) weakness, because it develops an age-related decline in SM strength compared to control (C57BL/6J) mice. Compromised energy metabolism and energy deprivation appear to play a central role in muscle weakness in metabolic myopathies and muscular dystrophies. Nonetheless, it is not known whether SM energy metabolism is altered in frailty. A combination of in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and biochemical assays was used to measure high-energy phosphate concentrations, the rate of ATP synthesis via creatine kinase (CK), the primary energy reserve reaction in SM, as well as the unidirectional rates of ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi) in hind limb SM of 92-week-old control (n = 7) and IL10(tm/tm) (n = 6) mice. SM Phosphocreatine (20.2 ± 2.3 vs. 16.8 ± 2.3 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05), ATP flux via CK (5.0 ± 0.9 vs. 3.1 ± 1.1 μmol/g/s, p < 0.01), ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi → ATP) (0.58 ± 0.3 vs. 0.26 ± 0.2 μmol/g/s, p < 0.05) and the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis (∆G ∼ATP) were significantly lower and [Pi] (2.8 ± 1.0 vs. 5.3 ± 2.0 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05) markedly higher in IL10(tm/tm) than in control mice. These observations demonstrate that, despite normal in vitro metabolic enzyme activities, in vivo SM ATP kinetics, high-energy phosphate levels and energy release from ATP hydrolysis are reduced and inorganic phosphate is elevated in a murine model of frailty. These observations do not prove, but are consistent with the premise, that energetic abnormalities may contribute metabolically to SM weakness in this geriatric syndrome.

  7. Functional studies of ATP sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    ATP sulfurylase from Penicillium chrysogenum has a specific activity (V/sub max/) of 6-7 units x mg protein/sup -1/ determined with the physiological substrates of MgATP and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and assayed by (A) initial velocity measurements with APS kinase and inorganic pyrophosphatase present and (B) analysis of nonlinear reaction progress curves. The fact both assays give the same results show the intrinsic activity of ATP sulfurylase is much higher than previously reported. In initial velocity dead-end inhibition studies, the sulfate analog S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -/ is a competitive inhibitor of SO/sub 42/..sqrt.. and a noncompetitive inhibitor of MgATP. Monovalent oxyanions such as NO/sub 3//sup -/, ClO/sub 3//sup -/, ClO/sub 4//sup -/, and FSO/sub 3//sup -/ behave as uncompetitive inhibitors of MgATP and thus seem not to be true sulfate analogs. The reverse reaction was assayed by the pyrophosphate dependent release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ from AP/sup 35/S. Product inhibition by MgATP or SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ is competitive with APS and mixed-type with PP/sub i/. Imidodiphosphate can serve as an alternative substrate for PP/sub i/. ATP sulfurylase binds (but does not hydrolyze) APS. A Scatchard plot of the APS binding is nonlinear, suggesting at least two types of sites. The cumulative results are qualitatively consistent with the random addition of MgATP and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and the ordered release of first MgPP/sub i/ then APS, with APS release being partially rate limiting. Certain quantitative discrepancies suggest either an unknown variable (e.g. enzyme concentration) complicates the analysis or, in light of binding studies that the actual mechanism is more complicated (e.g. alternating sites) than any of the conventional models examined.

  8. ATP/ADP Turnover and Import of Glycolytic ATP into Mitochondria in Cancer Cells Is Independent of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Klatt, Sandra C; Gooz, Monika Beck; Lemasters, John J

    2016-09-01

    Non-proliferating cells oxidize respiratory substrates in mitochondria to generate a protonmotive force (Δp) that drives ATP synthesis. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), a component of Δp, drives release of mitochondrial ATP(4-) in exchange for cytosolic ADP(3-) via the electrogenic adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which leads to a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio up to >100-fold greater than matrix ATP/ADP. In rat hepatocytes, ANT inhibitors, bongkrekic acid (BA), and carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the F1FO-ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin (OLIG), inhibited ureagenesis-induced respiration. However, in several cancer cell lines, OLIG but not BA and CAT inhibited respiration. In hepatocytes, respiratory inhibition did not collapse ΔΨ until OLIG, BA, or CAT was added. Similarly, in cancer cells OLIG and 2-deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, depolarized mitochondria after respiratory inhibition, which showed that mitochondrial hydrolysis of glycolytic ATP maintained ΔΨ in the absence of respiration in all cell types studied. However in cancer cells, BA, CAT, and knockdown of the major ANT isoforms, ANT2 and ANT3, did not collapse ΔΨ after respiratory inhibition. These findings indicated that ANT did mediate mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchange in cancer cells. We propose that suppression of ANT contributes to low cytosolic ATP/ADP, activation of glycolysis, and a Warburg metabolic phenotype in proliferating cells.

  9. Measurement of ATP-Induced Membrane Potential Changes in IVD cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Silvia; Rodriguez, Brittany; Barrera, Carlos; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) triggers biological responses in a wide variety of cells and tissues and activates signaling cascades that affect cell membrane potential and excitability. It has been demonstrated that compressive loading promotes ATP production and release by intervertebral disc (IVD) cells, while a high level of extracellular ATP accumulates in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD. In this study, a noninvasive system was developed to measure ATP-induced changes in the membrane potential of porcine IVD cells using the potential sensitive dye di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS).The responses of NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells to ATP were examined in monolayer and 3-dimensional cultures. It was found that the pattern and magnitude of membrane potential change in IVD cells induced by extracellular ATP depended on cell type, culture condition, and ATP dose. In addition, gene expression of P2X4 purinergic receptor was found in both cell types. Inhibition of the ATP-induced response by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulfonate (PPADS), a non-competitive inhibitor of P2 receptors, suggests that ATP may modulate the biological activities of IVD cells via P2 purinergic receptors. PMID:25386223

  10. Journey in guidelines for lipid management: From adult treatment panel (ATP)-I to ATP-III and what to expect in ATP-IV.

    PubMed

    Talwalkar, P G; Sreenivas, C G; Gulati, Ashish; Baxi, Hemang

    2013-07-01

    Adult Treatment Panel (ATP), an expert panel to supervise cholesterol management was set up under the aegis of National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) in 1985. Since then NCEP-ATP has been revising and framing guidelines to enable clinician to deliver better treatment to cardiovascular patients and to educate general people. As a result, considerable reduction in cardiovascular related deaths has been observed in recent times. All three ATP guidelines viz. ATP-I, ATP-II and ATP-III have targeted low density lipoprotein as their primary goal. The ATP-III guideline was updated in the light of evidences from 5-major clinical trials and was released in 2004. It added therapeutic lifestyle changes, concept of risk equivalents, Framingham CHD-risk score non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) as secondary target and gave strong emphasis on metabolic risk factors. The earlier treat-to-target paradigm faced fierce criticism from clinicians across the globe because of insufficient proof of safety and benefits of treating patients with respect to an individual's low density lipoprotein (LDL) level. Further, demonstration of non-HDL-C and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio as strong predictors of overall cardiovascular risk foresees new guidelines. A tailored-treatment approach was suggested instead of LDL-C target based treatment approach which was soundly based on direct clinical trials evidences and proposes treatment based on individual's overall 5- to 10-year cardiovascular risk irrespective of LDL-C level, leading to lower number of people on high dose/s of statins. Recent report of the Cholesterol Treatment Trialist's Collaborators meta-analysis strongly supported primary prevention of LDL with statins in low risk individuals and showed that its benefits completely outweighed its known hazards. Markers other than LDL-C like apolipoprotein B, non-HDL-C and total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio would take precedence in the risk assessment and strong emphasis would

  11. Coupling of CFTR Cl- channel gating to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Baukrowitz, T; Hwang, T C; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-03-01

    For cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels to open, they must be phosphorylated by protein kinase A and then exposed to a hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate, such as ATP. To test whether channel opening is linked to ATP hydrolysis, we applied VO4 and BeF3 to CFTR channels in inside-out patches excised from cardiac myocytes. These inorganic phosphate analogs interrupt ATP hydrolysis cycles by binding tightly in place of the released hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate. The analogs acted only on CFTR channels opened by ATP and locked them open, increasing their mean open time by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These findings establish that opening and closing of CFTR channels are coupled to an ATP hydrolysis cycle.

  12. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  13. Redox regulation of ATP sulfurylase in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Prioretti, Laura; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte; Giordano, Mario

    2016-09-30

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first step of sulfur assimilation in photosynthetic organisms. An ATPS type A is mostly present in freshwater cyanobacteria, with four conserved cysteine residues. Oceanic cyanobacteria and most eukaryotic algae instead, possess an ATPS-B containing seven to ten cysteines; five of them are conserved, but only one in the same position as ATPS-A. We investigated the role of cysteines on the regulation of the different algal enzymes. We found that the activity of ATPS-B from four different microorganisms was enhanced when reduced and decreased when oxidized. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the ATPS-B from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana showed that the residue Cys-247 was presumably involved in the redox regulation. The absence of this residue in the ATPS-A of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. instead, was consistent with its lack of regulation. Some other conserved cysteine residues in the ATPS from T. pseduonana and not in Synechocystis sp.were accessible to redox agents and possibly play a role in the enzyme regulation. Furthermore, the fact that oceanic cyanobacteria have ATPS-B structurally and functionally closer to that from most of eukaryotic algae than to the ATPS-A from other cyanobacteria suggests that life in the sea or freshwater may have driven the evolution of ATPS. PMID:27613093

  14. Redox regulation of ATP sulfurylase in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Prioretti, Laura; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte; Giordano, Mario

    2016-09-30

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first step of sulfur assimilation in photosynthetic organisms. An ATPS type A is mostly present in freshwater cyanobacteria, with four conserved cysteine residues. Oceanic cyanobacteria and most eukaryotic algae instead, possess an ATPS-B containing seven to ten cysteines; five of them are conserved, but only one in the same position as ATPS-A. We investigated the role of cysteines on the regulation of the different algal enzymes. We found that the activity of ATPS-B from four different microorganisms was enhanced when reduced and decreased when oxidized. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the ATPS-B from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana showed that the residue Cys-247 was presumably involved in the redox regulation. The absence of this residue in the ATPS-A of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. instead, was consistent with its lack of regulation. Some other conserved cysteine residues in the ATPS from T. pseduonana and not in Synechocystis sp.were accessible to redox agents and possibly play a role in the enzyme regulation. Furthermore, the fact that oceanic cyanobacteria have ATPS-B structurally and functionally closer to that from most of eukaryotic algae than to the ATPS-A from other cyanobacteria suggests that life in the sea or freshwater may have driven the evolution of ATPS.

  15. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP]venous and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP]v (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP]v) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP]v increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144–161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP]v increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans. PMID:23429876

  16. Selective and ATP-driven transport of ions across supported membranes into nanoporous carriers using gramicidin A and ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Mille, Christian; Ng, Jovice B S; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Corkery, Robert W; Bergström, Lennart

    2013-02-28

    We report a robust and versatile membrane protein based system for selective uptake and release of ions from nanoporous particles sealed with ion-tight lipid bilayers of various compositions that is driven by the addition of ATP or a chemical potential gradient. We have successfully incorporated both a passive ion channel-type peptide (gramicidin A) and a more complex primary sodium ion transporter (ATP synthase) into the supported lipid bilayers on solid nanoporous silica particles. Protein-mediated controlled release/uptake of sodium ions across the ion-tight lipid bilayer seal from or into the nanoporous silica carrier was imaged in real time using a confocal laser scanning microscope and the intensity changes were quantified. ATP-driven transport of sodium ions across the supported lipid bilayer against a chemical gradient was demonstrated. The possibility of designing durable carriers with tight lipid membranes, containing membrane proteins for selective ion uptake and release, offers new possibilities for functional studies of single or cascading membrane protein systems and could also be used as biomimetic microreactors for controlled synthesis of inorganic multicomponent materials.

  17. ATP requirement for chloroplast protein import is set by the Km for ATP hydrolysis of stromal Hsp70 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; McNeilage, Robert T; Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2014-03-01

    The 70-kD family of heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) is involved in a number of seemingly disparate cellular functions, including folding of nascent proteins, breakup of misfolded protein aggregates, and translocation of proteins across membranes. They act through the binding and release of substrate proteins, accompanied by hydrolysis of ATP. Chloroplast stromal Hsp70 plays a crucial role in the import of proteins into plastids. Mutations of an ATP binding domain Thr were previously reported to result in an increase in the Km for ATP and a decrease in the enzyme's kcat. To ask which chloroplast stromal chaperone, Hsp70 or Hsp93, both of which are ATPases, dominates the energetics of the motor responsible for protein import, we made transgenic moss (Physcomitrella patens) harboring the Km-altering mutation in the essential stromal Hsp70-2 and measured the effect on the amount of ATP required for protein import into chloroplasts. Here, we report that increasing the Km for ATP hydrolysis of Hsp70 translated into an increased Km for ATP usage by chloroplasts for protein import. This thus directly demonstrates that the ATP-derived energy long known to be required for chloroplast protein import is delivered via the Hsp70 chaperones and that the chaperone's ATPase activity dominates the energetics of the reaction.

  18. Calcium-Binding Properties of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum As Influenced by ATP, Caffeine, Quinine, and Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Arselio P.

    1968-01-01

    Calcium retained at binding sites of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle requires 10-5 - 10-4 M ATP to exchange with 45Ca added to the medium. The ATP requirement for Ca exchangeability was observed with respect to the "intrinsic" Ca of the reticulum membranes and the fraction of Ca that is "actively" bound in the presence of ATP. Furthermore, a concentration of free Ca in the medium higher than 10-8 M is required for ATP to promote Ca exchangeability. This exchangeability is not influenced by caffeine, quinine, procaine, and tetracaine, and Ca that is either nonexchangeable (in the absence of ATP) or exchangeable (in the presence of ATP) is released by 1–5 mM quinine or tetracaine, but neither caffeine (6 mM) nor procaine (2–5 mM) has this effect. Quinine or tetracaine also releases Ca and Mg bound passively to the reticulum membranes. A possible role of ATP in maintaining the integrity of cellular membranes is discussed, and the effects of caffeine, quinine, and of local anesthetics on the binding of Ca by the isolated reticulum are related to the effects of these agents on 45Ca fluxes and on the twitch output observed in whole muscles. PMID:5682486

  19. Kinetics of extracellular ATP from goldfish hepatocytes: a lesson from mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Chara, Osvaldo; Pafundo, Diego E; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J

    2009-07-01

    In goldfish hepatocytes, hypotonic exposure leads to cell swelling, followed by a compensatory shrinkage termed RVD. It has been previously shown that ATP is accumulated in the extracellular medium of swollen cells in a non-linear fashion, and that extracellular ATP (ATPe) is an essential intermediate to trigger RVD. Thus, to understand how RVD proceeds in goldfish hepatocytes, we developed two mathematical models accounting for the experimental ATPe kinetics reported recently by Pafundo et al. in Am. J. Physiol. 294, R220-R233, 2008. Four different equations for ATPe fluxes were built to account for the release of ATP by lytic (J(L)) and nonlytic mechanisms (J(NL)), ATPe diffusion (J(D)), and ATPe consumption by ectonucleotidases (J(V)). Particular focus was given to J(NL), defined as the product of a time function (J(R)) and a positive feedback mechanism whereby ATPe amplifies J(NL). Several J (R) functions (Constant, Step, Impulse, Gaussian, and Lognormal) were studied. Models were tested without (model 1) or with (model 2) diffusion of ATPe. Mathematical analysis allowed us to get a general expression for each of the models. Subsequently, by using model dependent fit (simulations) as well as model analysis at infinite time, we observed that: - use of J(D) does not lead to improvements of the models. - Constant and Step time functions are only applicable when J(R)=0 (and thus, J(NL)=0), so that the only source of ATPe would be J(L), a result incompatible with experimental data. - use of impulse, Gaussian, and lognormal J(R)s in the models led to reasonable good fits to experimental data, with the lognormal function in model 1 providing the best option. Finally, the predictive nature of model 1 loaded with a lognormal J(R) was tested by simulating different putative in vivo scenarios where J(V) and J(NL) were varied over ample ranges.

  20. The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product functions as an ATP channel.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, E H; Prat, A G; Gerweck, L; Seneveratne, T; Arceci, R J; Kramer, R; Guidotti, G; Cantiello, H F

    1993-01-01

    The multidrug resistance (mdr1) gene product, P-glycoprotein, is responsible for the ATP-dependent extrusion of a variety of compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs, from cells. The data presented here show that cells with increased levels of the P-glycoprotein release ATP to the medium in proportion to the concentration of the protein in their plasma membrane. Furthermore, measurements of whole-cell and single-channel currents with patch-clamp electrodes indicate that the P-glycoprotein serves as an ATP-conducting channel in the plasma membrane. These findings suggest an unusual role for the P-glycoprotein. PMID:7678345

  1. Intravascular ATP and the regulation of blood flow and oxygen delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is a complex response that integrates multiple signals that allow for blood flow and oxygen supply to match oxygen demand appropriately. Here, we discuss the potential role of intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a primary factor in these responses and put forth the hypothesis that deficient ATP release contributes to impairments in vascular control exhibited in aged and diseased populations. PMID:25390296

  2. Ultrasensitive bioluminescent determinations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for investigating the energetics of host-grown microbes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, J. H.; Dhople, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    Stability and optimal concentrations of reagents were studied in bioluminescence assay of ATP levels. Luciferase enzyme was prepared and purified using Sephadex G-100. Interdependencies between enzyme and luciferin concentrations in presence of optimal Mg are illustrated. Optimal ionic strength was confirmed to be 0.05 M for the four buffers tested. Adapted features of the R- and H-systems are summarized, as well as the percentages of ATP pools released from representative microbes by heat and chloroform.

  3. A target responsive aptamer machine for label-free and sensitive non-enzymatic recycling amplification detection of ATP.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Peng, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Based on a new target-triggered aptamer molecular machine, a label-free and non-enzymatic target recycling amplification strategy for sensitive fluorescence detection of ATP in human serums is described. The presence of the target ATP together with the DNA fuel strand initiates the operation of the aptamer machine and leads to cyclic reuse of ATP and the release of many G-quadruplex sequences, which associate with a fluorescent dye to generate significantly amplified fluorescence signals to achieve sensitive detection of ATP. PMID:26853492

  4. KCl -Permeabilized Pancreatic Islets: An Experimental Model to Explore the Messenger Role of ATP in the Mechanism of Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that islet depolarization with KCl opens connexin36 hemichannels in β-cells of mouse pancreatic islets allowing the exchange of small metabolites with the extracellular medium. In this study, the opening of these hemichannels has been further characterized in rat islets and INS–1 cells. Taking advantage of hemicannels’opening, the uptake of extracellular ATP and its effect on insulin release were investigated. 70 mM KCl stimulated light emission by luciferin in dispersed rat islets cells transduced with the fire-fly luciferase gene: it was suppressed by 20 mM glucose and 50 μM mefloquine, a specific connexin36 inhibitor. Extracellular ATP was taken up or released by islets depolarized with 70 mM KCl at 5 mM glucose, depending on the external ATP concentration. 1 mM ATP restored the loss of ATP induced by the depolarization itself. ATP concentrations above 5 mM increased islet ATP content and the ATP/ADP ratio. No ATP uptake occurred in non-depolarized or KCl-depolarized islets simultaneously incubated with 50 μM mefloquine or 20 mM glucose. Extracellular ATP potentiated the secretory response induced by 70 mM KCl at 5 mM glucose in perifused rat islets: 5 mM ATP triggered a second phase of insulin release after the initial peak triggered by KCl-depolarization itself; at 10 mM, it increased both the initial, KCl-dependent, peak and stimulated a greater second phase of secretion than at 5 mM. These stimulatory effects of extracellular ATP were almost completely suppressed by 50 μM mefloquine. The magnitude of the second phase of insulin release due to 5 mM extracellular ATP was decreased by addition of 5 mM ADP (extracellular ATP/ADP ratio = 1). ATP acts independently of KATP channels closure and its intracellular concentration and its ATP/ADP ratio seems to regulate the magnitude of both the first (triggering) and second (amplifying) phases of glucose-induced insulin secretion. PMID:26444014

  5. Extracellular ATP is cytotoxic to mononuclear phagocytes but does not induce killing of intracellular Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Barletta, Raúl G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2007-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne's disease, a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. ATP has been reported to induce cell death of macrophages and killing of Mycobacterium species in human and murine macrophages. In this study we investigated the short-term effect of ATP on the viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected bovine mononuclear phagocytes and the bacilli within them. Addition of 5 mM ATP to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected bovine monocytes resulted in 50% cytotoxicity of bovine monocytes at 24 h. Addition of 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) ATP triethylammonium salt (Bz-ATP), which is a longer-lived ATP homologue and purinergic receptor agonist, significantly increased the uptake of YO-PRO, which is a marker for membrane pore activation by P2X receptors. Addition of Bz-ATP also stimulated lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activity in infected bovine monocytes. Neither ATP nor Bz-ATP reduced the survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine mononuclear phagocytes. Likewise, addition of ATP or Bz-ATP was cytotoxic to murine macrophage cell lines (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1 cells) but did not affect the intracellular survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, nor were the numbers of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium or Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells altered in bovine mononuclear phagocytes or J774A.1 cells following ATP or Bz-ATP treatment. These data suggest that extracellular ATP does not induce the killing of intracellular M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine mononuclear phagocytes.

  6. Aptamer loaded MoS2 nanoplates as nanoprobes for detection of intracellular ATP and controllable photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Li; Ding, Lin; Tian, Jiangwei; Bao, Lei; Hu, Yaoping; Ju, Huangxian; Yu, Jun-Sheng

    2015-09-01

    In this work we designed a MoS2 nanoplate-based nanoprobe for fluorescence imaging of intracellular ATP and photodynamic therapy (PDT) via ATP-mediated controllable release of 1O2. The nanoprobe was prepared by simply assembling a chlorine e6 (Ce6) labelled ATP aptamer on MoS2 nanoplates, which have favorable biocompatibility, unusual surface-area-to-mass ratio, strong affinity to single-stranded DNA, and can quench the fluorescence of Ce6. After the nanoprobe was internalized into the cells and entered ATP-abundant lysosomes, its recognition to ATP led to the release of the single-stranded aptamer from MoS2 nanoplates and thus recovered the fluorescence of Ce6 at an excitation wavelength of 633 nm, which produced a highly sensitive and selective method for imaging of intracellular ATP. Meanwhile, the ATP-mediated release led to the generation of 1O2 under 660 nm laser irradiation, which could induce tumor cell death with a lysosomal pathway. The controllable PDT provided a model approach for design of multifunctional theranostic nanoprobes. These results also promoted the development and application of MoS2 nanoplate-based platforms in biomedicine.In this work we designed a MoS2 nanoplate-based nanoprobe for fluorescence imaging of intracellular ATP and photodynamic therapy (PDT) via ATP-mediated controllable release of 1O2. The nanoprobe was prepared by simply assembling a chlorine e6 (Ce6) labelled ATP aptamer on MoS2 nanoplates, which have favorable biocompatibility, unusual surface-area-to-mass ratio, strong affinity to single-stranded DNA, and can quench the fluorescence of Ce6. After the nanoprobe was internalized into the cells and entered ATP-abundant lysosomes, its recognition to ATP led to the release of the single-stranded aptamer from MoS2 nanoplates and thus recovered the fluorescence of Ce6 at an excitation wavelength of 633 nm, which produced a highly sensitive and selective method for imaging of intracellular ATP. Meanwhile, the ATP

  7. Release of adenosine triphosphate by adenosine diphosphate in whole blood and in erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, R; Weissbach, G; Kuhlisch, E

    1997-12-01

    In whole blood samples from thrombocytopenic patients, large amounts of ATP were released by ADP, exceeding the level obtained with samples from normal persons by far. Because we suspected that the high potential of ATP in erythrocytes would be the main source for this phenomenon, the release of ATP by ADP was measured in whole blood samples from normal, thrombocytopenic, and leukocytopenic persons and in suspensions of washed erythrocytes. The release was recorded by a Whole Blood Lumi-Aggregometer type 500 VS (Chrono-Log Corporation, Havertown, PA) using the luciferin-luciferase system. Not only in samples from thrombocytopenic persons but also with normal platelet count, increasing amounts of ATP were released with increasing ADP concentrations, finally exceeding the ATP releasable from thrombocytes by thrombin. The amounts of ADP required to match the ATP release of thrombin were closely correlated with the platelet counts in the samples. With lower platelet counts, the release mechanism from erythrocytes could be stimulated more easily by low concentrations of ADP. The binding of ADP to platelets occurred with ostensibly higher affinity. The phenomenon of overshooting ATP release was also observed in samples from extremely leukocytopenic patients. A very large release of ATP was also achieved in suspensions of washed erythrocytes. In this way our hypothesis of ATP release from erythrocytes by ADP was confirmed again. The mechanism of the release from erythrocytes remains unclear. We speculate that its purpose is to regulate extracellular nucleotides in the circulating blood.

  8. Intradermal administration of ATP augments methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating in young males and females.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-10-15

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is a key neurotransmitter contributing to heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Given that sympathetic cholinergic nerves also release ATP, ATP may play an important role in modulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. However, the pattern of response may differ between males and females given reports of sex-related differences in the peripheral mechanisms governing these heat loss responses. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated in 17 young adults (8 males, 9 females) at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 0.3 mM ATP, 3) 3 mM ATP, or 4) 30 mM ATP. At all skin sites, methacholine was coadministered in a concentration-dependent manner (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). In both males and females, CVC was elevated with the lone infusion of 30 mM ATP (both P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 and 3 mM ATP compared with control (all P >0.27). However, 0.3 mM ATP induced a greater increase in CVC compared with control in response to 100 mM methacholine infusion in males (P < 0.05). In females, 0.3 mM ATP infusion resulted in a lower concentration of methacholine required to elicit a half-maximal response (EC50) (P < 0.05). In both males and females, methacholine-induced sweating was unaffected by any concentration of ATP (all P > 0.44). We demonstrate that ATP enhances cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation albeit the pattern of response differs between males and females. Furthermore, we show that ATP does not modulate cholinergic sweating. PMID:26290105

  9. On the peripheral and central chemoreception and control of breathing: an emerging role of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Gourine, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Peripheral and central respiratory chemoreceptors are ultimately responsible for maintenance of constant levels of arterial PO2, PCO2 and [H+], protecting the brain from hypoxia and ensuring that the breathing is always appropriate for metabolism. The aim of this discussion is to shed some light on the potential mechanisms of chemosensory transduction– the process which links chemosensory mechanisms to the central nervous mechanisms controlling breathing. Recent experimental data suggest that the purine nucleotide ATP acts as a common mediator of peripheral and central chemosensory transduction (within the carotid body and the medulla oblongata, respectively). In response to a decrease in PO2 (hypoxia) oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body release ATP to activate chemoafferent fibres of the carotid sinus nerve which transmit this information to the brainstem respiratory centres. In response to an increase in PCO2/[H+] (hypercapnia) chemosensitive structures located on the ventral surface of the medulla oblongata rapidly release ATP, which acts locally within the medullary respiratory network. The functional role of ATP released at both sites is similar – to evoke adaptive enhancement in breathing. Understanding the mechanisms of ATP release in response to chemosensory stimulation may prove to be essential for further detailed analysis of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying respiratory chemosensitivity. PMID:16141266

  10. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation. PMID:26986520

  11. Role of Ca2+ in responses of airway epithelia to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, flagellin, ATP, and thapsigargin.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhu; Bettega, Kelly; Carroll, Susheela; Buchholz, Kerry R; Machen, Terry E

    2007-01-01

    Neither Pseudomonas aeruginosa nor flagellin affected cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca](i)) in airway epithelial cell lines JME and Calu-3, but bacteria or flagellin activated NF-kappaB, IL-8 promoter, and IL-8 secretion. ATP (purinergic agonist) and thapsigargin (blocks Ca(2+) pump, releases endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+), and triggers Ca(2+) entry through plasma membrane channels) both increased [Ca](i) but hardly stimulated NF-kappaB and IL-8. ATP and thapsigargin elicited larger, synergistic activations of NF-kappaB and IL-8 secretion when combined with flagellin. BAPTA-AM (to buffer [Ca](i)) or Ca(2+)-free solution reduced increases in [Ca](i) due to ATP or thapsigargin and also reduced NF-kappaB activation and IL-8 secretion triggered by flagellin, ATP, thapsigargin, ATP + flagellin, and thapsigargin + flagellin. IL-8 promoter analysis showed that AP-1 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)beta/nuclear factor for IL-6 (NF-IL6) sites were important for IL-8 expression, and the NF-kappaB-binding site was critical for activation by all agonists and for activation by [Ca](i). Thus increased [Ca](i) was not required for P. aeruginosa- or flagellin-activated NF-kappaB and IL-8 expression and secretion, and increased [Ca](i) was only weakly stimulatory during activation by ATP or thapsigargin. However, ATP- or thapsigargin-induced increases in [Ca](i) synergized with flagellin or P. aeruginosa, and buffering or reducing [Ca](i) reduced these responses. Thus [Ca](i) plays an important regulatory role in P. aeruginosa- or flagellin-activated innate immune responses in airway epithelia. Dose-dependent responses indicated that flagellin-ATP synergism occurred most prominently at ATP concentrations ([ATP]) > 10 microM and [flagellin] >10(-8) g/ml and during steady increases rather than oscillations in [Ca](i). PMID:16963531

  12. Top-down control analysis of ATP turnover, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    1999-08-01

    Control analysis was used to analyse the internal control of rat hepatocyte metabolism. The reactions of the cell were grouped into nine metabolic blocks linked by five key intermediates. The blocks were glycogen breakdown, glucose release, glycolysis, lactate production, NADH oxidation, pyruvate oxidation, mitochondrial proton leak, mitochondrial phosphorylation and ATP consumption. The linking intermediates were intracellular glucose-6-phosphate, pyruvate and ATP levels, cytoplasmic NADH/NAD ratio and mitochondrial membrane potential. The steady-state fluxes through the blocks and the levels of the intermediates were measured in the absence and presence of specific effectors of hepatocyte metabolism. Application of the multiple modulation approach gave the kinetic responses of each block to each intermediate (the elasticities). These were then used to calculate all of the control coefficients, which describe the degree of control each block had over the level of each intermediate, and over the rate of each process. Within this full description of control, many different interactions could be identified. One key finding was that the processes that consumed ATP had only 35% of the control over the rate of ATP consumption. Instead, the reactions that produced ATP exerted the most control over ATP consumption rate; particularly important were mitochondrial phosphorylation (30% of control) and glycolysis (19%). The rate of glycolysis was positively controlled by the glycolytic enzymes themselves (66% of control) and by ATP consumption (47%). Mitochondrial production of ATP, including oxidative, proton leak and phosphorylation processes, had negative control over glycolysis (-26%; the Pasteur effect). In contrast, glycolysis had little control over the rate of ATP production by the mitochondria (-10%; the Crabtree effect). Control over the flux through the mitochondrial phosphorylation block was shared between pyruvate oxidation (23%), ATP consumption (28%) and the

  13. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation.

  14. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells.

  15. The effect of dimethylsulfoxide on adenine nucleotide binding and ATP synthesis by beef-heart mitochondrial F1 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Beharry, S; Bragg, P D

    1991-04-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO; 30%, v/v) promotes the formation of ATP from ADP and phosphate catalyzed by soluble mitochondrial F1 ATPase. The effects of this solvent on the adenine nucleotide binding properties of beef-heart mitochondrial F1 ATPase were examined. The ATP analog adenylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate bound to F1 at 1.9 and 1.0 sites in aqueous and Me2SO systems, respectively, with a KD value of 2.2 microM. Lower affinity sites were present also. Binding of ATP or adenylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate at levels near equimolar with the enzyme occurred to a greater extent in the absence of Me2SO. Addition of ATP to the nucleotide-loaded enzyme resulted in exchange of about one-half of the bound ATP. This occurred only in an entirely aqueous medium. ATP bound in Me2SO medium was not released by exogenous ATP. Comparison of the effect of different concentrations of Me2SO on ADP binding to F1 and ATP synthesis by the enzyme showed that binding of ADP was diminished by concentrations of Me2SO lower than those required to support ATP synthesis. However, one site could still be filled by ADP at concentrations of Me2SO optimal for ATP synthesis. This site is probably a noncatalytic site, since the nucleotide bound there was not converted to ATP in 30% Me2SO. The ATP synthesized by F1 in Me2SO originated from endogenous bound ADP. We conclude that 30% Me2SO affects the adenine nucleotide binding properties of the enzyme. The role of this in the promotion of the formation of ATP from ADP and phosphate is discussed.

  16. Nuclear genetic defects of mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hejzlarová, K; Mráček, T; Vrbacký, M; Kaplanová, V; Karbanová, V; Nůsková, H; Pecina, P; Houštěk, J

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of ATP synthase, the key enzyme of mitochondrial energy provision belong to the most severe metabolic diseases presenting as early-onset mitochondrial encephalo-cardiomyopathies. Up to now, mutations in four nuclear genes were associated with isolated deficiency of ATP synthase. Two of them, ATP5A1 and ATP5E encode enzyme's structural subunits alpha and epsilon, respectively, while the other two ATPAF2 and TMEM70 encode specific ancillary factors that facilitate the biogenesis of ATP synthase. All these defects share a similar biochemical phenotype with pronounced decrease in the content of fully assembled and functional ATP synthase complex. However, substantial differences can be found in their frequency, molecular mechanism of pathogenesis, clinical manifestation as well as the course of the disease progression. While for TMEM70 the number of reported patients as well as spectrum of the mutations is steadily increasing, mutations in ATP5A1, ATP5E and ATPAF2 genes are very rare. Apparently, TMEM70 gene is highly prone to mutagenesis and this type of a rare mitochondrial disease has a rather frequent incidence. Here we present overview of individual reported cases of nuclear mutations in ATP synthase and discuss, how their analysis can improve our understanding of the enzyme biogenesis.

  17. Action of ATP on ventricular automaticity.

    PubMed

    Stark, G; Domanowits, H; Sterz, F; Stark, U; Bachernegg, M; Kickenweiz, E; Decrinis, M; Laggner, A N; Tritthart, H A

    1994-11-01

    ATP is an effective treatment of supraventricular tachycardia when the atrioventricular (AV) node is part of the reentrant circuit. However, the lower a pace-maker in the pacemaker hierarchy, the more sensitive it is to adenosine. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ATP on ventricular automaticity in in vivo and in vitro conditions. Wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia in 46 patients was treated with 6, 12, and 18 mg ATP as sequential intravenous (i.v.) bolus. ATP terminated tachycardias in 67%. Bolus infusion ATP caused < or = 6.4-s asystole that was self-limited. Perfusion of isolated spontaneously beating guinea pig heart with 100 microM ATP completely suppressed ventricular automaticity. After ATP-infusion was discontinued, the first ventricular beat was evident after 3.1 +/- 0.9 s and sinus node activity recovered with a time constant of 3.0 +/- 1.1 s. Because sinus node and ventricular automaticity recovered within seconds after ATP infusion was discontinued in vitro, recovery in vivo is also likely to be determined by the short half-life (+1/2) of ATP. PMID:7532751

  18. Autocrine and paracrine roles for ATP and serotonin in mouse taste buds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijen A; Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-11-01

    Receptor (type II) taste bud cells secrete ATP during taste stimulation. In turn, ATP activates adjacent presynaptic (type III) cells to release serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE). The roles of these neurotransmitters in taste buds have not been fully elucidated. Here we tested whether ATP or 5-HT exert feedback onto receptor (type II) cells during taste stimulation. Our previous studies showed NE does not appear to act on adjacent taste bud cells, or at least on receptor cells. Our data show that 5-HT released from presynaptic (type III) cells provides negative paracrine feedback onto receptor cells by activating 5-HT(1A) receptors, inhibiting taste-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization in receptor cells, and reducing ATP secretion. The findings also demonstrate that ATP exerts positive autocrine feedback onto receptor (type II) cells by activating P2Y1 receptors and enhancing ATP secretion. These results begin to sort out how purinergic and aminergic transmitters function within the taste bud to modulate gustatory signaling in these peripheral sensory organs.

  19. Autocrine and paracrine roles for ATP and Serotonin in mouse taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijen A.; Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor (Type II) taste bud cells secrete ATP during taste stimulation. In turn, ATP activates adjacent Presynaptic (Type III) cells to release serotonin (5 hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE). The roles of these neurotransmitters in taste buds have not been fully elucidated. Here we tested whether ATP or 5-HT exert feedback onto Receptor (Type II) cells during taste stimulation. Our previous studies showed NE does not appear to act on adjacent taste bud cells, or at least on Receptor cells. Our data show that 5-HT released from Presynaptic (Type III) cells provides negative paracrine feedback onto Receptor cells by activating 5-HT1A receptors, inhibiting taste-evoked Ca2+ mobilization in Receptor cells and reducing ATP secretion. The findings also demonstrate that ATP exerts positive autocrine feedback onto Receptor (Type II) cells by activating P2Y1 receptors and enhancing ATP secretion. These results begin to sort out how purinergic and aminergic transmitters function within the taste bud to modulate gustatory signalling in these peripheral sensory organs. PMID:19890001

  20. Allosteric opening of the polypeptide-binding site when an Hsp70 binds ATP

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ruifeng; Sarbeng, Evans Boateng; Liu, Qun; Le, Katherine Quynh; Xu, Xinping; Xu, Hongya; Yang, Jiao; Wong, Jennifer Li; Vorvis, Christina; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Qinglian

    2013-01-01

    The 70kD heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones essential for cellular protein folding and proteostasis. Each Hsp70 has two functional domains: a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) that binds and hydrolyzes ATP, and a substrate-binding domain (SBD) that binds extended polypeptides. NBD and SBD interact little when in ADP; however, ATP binding allosterically couples the polypeptide- and ATP-binding sites. ATP binding promotes polypeptide release; polypeptide rebinding stimulates ATP hydrolysis. This allosteric coupling is poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structure of an intact Hsp70 from Escherichia coli in an ATP-bound state at 1.96 Å resolution. NBD-ATP adopts a unique conformation, forming extensive interfaces with a radically changed SBD that has its α-helical lid displaced and the polypeptide-binding channel of its β-subdomain restructured. These conformational changes together with our biochemical tests provide a long-sought structural explanation for allosteric coupling in Hsp70 activity. PMID:23708608

  1. ATP/ADP Ratio, the Missed Connection between Mitochondria and the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Eduardo N.; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells generate the bulk of cellular ATP by fully oxidizing respiratory substrates in mitochondria. Respiratory substrates cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through only one channel, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC). Once in the matrix, respiratory substrates are oxidized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle to generate mostly NADH that is further oxidized in the respiratory chain to generate a proton motive force comprised mainly of membrane potential (ΔΨ) to synthesize ATP. Mitochondrial ΔΨ then drives release of ATP−4 from the matrix in exchange for ADP−3 in the cytosol via the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Thus, mitochondrial function in non-proliferating cells drives a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio, essential to inhibit glycolysis. By contrast, the bioenergetics of the Warburg phenotype of proliferating cells is characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial metabolism. Suppressed mitochondrial function leads to lower production of mitochondrial ATP and hence lower cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios that favor enhanced glycolysis. Thus, cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio is a key feature that determines if cell metabolism is predominantly oxidative or glycolytic. Here, we describe two novel mechanisms to explain the suppression of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: the relative closure of VDAC by free tubulin and inactivation of ANT. Both mechanisms contribute to low ATP/ADP ratios that activate glycolysis. PMID:25229666

  2. ATP decreases mechanical sensitivity of muscle thin-fiber afferents in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Teru; Kubo, Asako; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-08-01

    ATP is an energy rich substance contained in cells in the order of mM. It is released when cells are damaged and when muscle is compressed or contracted. Subcutaneous injection of ATP induces pain-related behavior and hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimulation in rats. However, the effects of ATP in muscle have not been fully studied. In the present study we examined the effects of ATP on muscle C-fiber afferent activities using single fiber recordings, and on nociceptive behavior. Muscle C-fiber activities were recorded in vitro using extensor digitorum longus muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations excised from rats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital. ATP (100 μM and 1 mM, but not 1 μM) superfused for 5 min before the mechanical stimulation suppressed the mechanical responses of muscle thin fibers irrespective of whether they excited the fiber. This suppressive effect was reversed by P2X receptor antagonists PPADS (100 μM) and suramin (300 μM). We also found that subcutaneous injection of ATP (10 mM) induced nociceptive behavior, whereas intramuscular injection had no effect. These findings showed that effects of ATP on muscle afferents differ from those on cutaneous afferents.

  3. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  4. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2'(3')-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5' triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s(-1), whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s(-1). These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement.

  5. Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) supplements are not orally bioavailable: a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nutritional supplements designed to increase adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations are commonly used by athletes as ergogenic aids. ATP is the primary source of energy for the cells, and supplementation may enhance the ability to maintain high ATP turnover during high-intensity exercise. Oral ATP supplements have beneficial effects in some but not all studies examining physical performance. One of the remaining questions is whether orally administered ATP is bioavailable. We investigated whether acute supplementation with oral ATP administered as enteric-coated pellets led to increased concentrations of ATP or its metabolites in the circulation. Methods Eight healthy volunteers participated in a cross-over study. Participants were given in random order single doses of 5000 mg ATP or placebo. To prevent degradation of ATP in the acidic environment of the stomach, the supplement was administered via two types of pH-sensitive, enteric-coated pellets (targeted at release in the proximal or distal small intestine), or via a naso-duodenal tube. Blood ATP and metabolite concentrations were monitored by HPLC for 4.5 h (naso-duodenal tube) or 7 h (pellets) post-administration. Areas under the concentration vs. time curve were calculated and compared by paired-samples t-tests. Results ATP concentrations in blood did not increase after ATP supplementation via enteric-coated pellets or naso-duodenal tube. In contrast, concentrations of the final catabolic product of ATP, uric acid, were significantly increased compared to placebo by ~50% after administration via proximal-release pellets (P = 0.003) and naso-duodenal tube (P = 0.001), but not after administration via distal-release pellets. Conclusions A single dose of orally administered ATP is not bioavailable, and this may explain why several studies did not find ergogenic effects of oral ATP supplementation. On the other hand, increases in uric acid after release of ATP in the proximal

  6. Urothelial ATP exocytosis: regulation of bladder compliance in the urine storage phase.

    PubMed

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Mochizuki, Tsutomu; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Ryohei; Imura, Yoshio; Morizawa, Yosuke; Hiasa, Miki; Miyaji, Takaaki; Kira, Satoru; Araki, Isao; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Iwatsuki, Ken; Nomura, Masatoshi; de Groat, William C; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2016-01-01

    The bladder urothelium is more than just a barrier. When the bladder is distended, the urothelium functions as a sensor to initiate the voiding reflex, during which it releases ATP via multiple mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying this ATP release in response to the various stretch stimuli caused by bladder filling remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate these mechanisms. By comparing vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-deficient and wild-type male mice, we showed that ATP has a crucial role in urine storage through exocytosis via a VNUT-dependent mechanism. VNUT was abundantly expressed in the bladder urothelium, and when the urothelium was weakly stimulated (i.e. in the early filling stages), it released ATP by exocytosis. VNUT-deficient mice showed reduced bladder compliance from the early storage phase and displayed frequent urination in inappropriate places without a change in voiding function. We conclude that urothelial, VNUT-dependent ATP exocytosis is involved in urine storage mechanisms that promote the relaxation of the bladder during the early stages of filling. PMID:27412485

  7. Urothelial ATP exocytosis: regulation of bladder compliance in the urine storage phase

    PubMed Central

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Mochizuki, Tsutomu; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Ryohei; Imura, Yoshio; Morizawa, Yosuke; Hiasa, Miki; Miyaji, Takaaki; Kira, Satoru; Araki, Isao; Fujishita, Kayoko; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Youichi; Ichikawa, Reiko; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Iwatsuki, Ken; Nomura, Masatoshi; de Groat, William C.; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Takeda, Masayuki; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2016-01-01

    The bladder urothelium is more than just a barrier. When the bladder is distended, the urothelium functions as a sensor to initiate the voiding reflex, during which it releases ATP via multiple mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying this ATP release in response to the various stretch stimuli caused by bladder filling remain largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate these mechanisms. By comparing vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-deficient and wild-type male mice, we showed that ATP has a crucial role in urine storage through exocytosis via a VNUT-dependent mechanism. VNUT was abundantly expressed in the bladder urothelium, and when the urothelium was weakly stimulated (i.e. in the early filling stages), it released ATP by exocytosis. VNUT-deficient mice showed reduced bladder compliance from the early storage phase and displayed frequent urination in inappropriate places without a change in voiding function. We conclude that urothelial, VNUT-dependent ATP exocytosis is involved in urine storage mechanisms that promote the relaxation of the bladder during the early stages of filling. PMID:27412485

  8. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  9. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion.

  10. Tyrphostin inhibition of ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and fos-protein expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erlinge, D.; Heilig, M.; Edvinsson, L.

    1996-01-01

    1. We and others have shown that extracellular ATP (adenosine triphosphate), released from sympathetic nerves and platelets, stimulates growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). To study the importance of tyrosine kinases for ATP-mediated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells we used tyrphostins, a recently developed group of highly specific inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. 2. ATP induced a powerful concentration-dependent increase in DNA synthesis measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation in rat aorta SMC (RASMC) and an increase in total cell number after 72 h of incubation as measured by an enzymatic cell proliferation assay. Tyrphostin 25 (10(-5) M) had no effect per se on basal DNA synthesis but reduced ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis and increase in cell number in a dose-dependent manner. Higher concentrations of ATP could not reverse the inhibitory effect of tyrphostin 25. The potency of several (six) other tyrphostins was also examined and found to be slightly greater than tyrphostin 25 with equal efficacy. 3. When RASMC were incubated with 10(-5) M ATP for 2 h, nearly all of the cells (87 +/- 5%) were intensely stained with an antibody to the Fos protein while in the controls only 1 +/- 2% of the cells were weakly stained. Tyrphostin 25 greatly reduced the Fos-protein staining (14 +/- 2%). 4. ATP induced a concentration-dependent increase in 45Ca(2+)-influx and formation of inositol phosphates (IPtotal) in RASMC. These effects were not inhibited by tyrphostin 25. 5. Tyrphostin 25 did not alter ATP-induced contraction in ring segments of rat aorta. 6. In conclusion, tyrphostin 25 inhibited ATP-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and Fos-protein expression, but not ATP-induced 45Ca(2+)-influx, inositolphosphate-production or vasoconstriction. This indicates that the mitogenic effect of ATP on vascular smooth muscle cells is dependent on tyrosine kinases in contrast to the contractile effect of ATP in blood vessels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8799578

  11. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  12. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mm lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nm. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mm lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 μm, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTRinh-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both KATP channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism. PMID:20819945

  13. Mutations in the Atp1p and Atp3p subunits of yeast ATP synthase differentially affect respiration and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Francis, Brian R; White, Karen H; Thorsness, Peter E

    2007-04-01

    ATP1-111, a suppressor of the slow-growth phenotype of yme1Delta lacking mitochondrial DNA is due to the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 111 of the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (Atp1p in yeast). The suppressing activity of ATP1-111 requires intact beta (Atp2p) and gamma (Atp3p) subunits of mitochondrial ATP synthase, but not the stator stalk subunits b (Atp4p) and OSCP (Atp5p). ATP1-111 and other similarly suppressing mutations in ATP1 and ATP3 increase the growth rate of wild-type strains lacking mitochondrial DNA. These suppressing mutations decrease the growth rate of yeast containing an intact mitochondrial chromosome on media requiring oxidative phosphorylation, but not when grown on fermentable media. Measurement of chronological aging of yeast in culture reveals that ATP1 and ATP3 suppressor alleles in strains that contain mitochondrial DNA are longer lived than the isogenic wild-type strain. In contrast, the chronological life span of yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA and containing these mutations is shorter than that of the isogenic wild-type strain. Spore viability of strains bearing ATP1-111 is reduced compared to wild type, although ATP1-111 enhances the survival of spores that lacked mitochondrial DNA.

  14. The Walter B. Cannon Physiology in Perspective Lecture, 2007. ATP-sensitive K+ channels and disease: from molecule to malady.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Frances M

    2007-10-01

    This essay is based on a lecture given to the American Physiological Society in honor of Walter B. Cannon, an advocate of homeostasis. It focuses on the role of the ATP-sensitive potassium K(+) (K(ATP)) channel in glucose homeostasis and, in particular, on its role in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The beta-cell K(ATP) channel comprises pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR1 subunits, and mutations in either type of subunit can result in too little or too much insulin release. Here, I review the latest information on the relationship between K(ATP) channel structure and function, and consider how mutations in the K(ATP) channel genes lead to neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism.

  15. The Walter B. Cannon Physiology in Perspective Lecture, 2007. ATP-sensitive K+ channels and disease: from molecule to malady.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Frances M

    2007-10-01

    This essay is based on a lecture given to the American Physiological Society in honor of Walter B. Cannon, an advocate of homeostasis. It focuses on the role of the ATP-sensitive potassium K(+) (K(ATP)) channel in glucose homeostasis and, in particular, on its role in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The beta-cell K(ATP) channel comprises pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR1 subunits, and mutations in either type of subunit can result in too little or too much insulin release. Here, I review the latest information on the relationship between K(ATP) channel structure and function, and consider how mutations in the K(ATP) channel genes lead to neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism. PMID:17652156

  16. Extracellular ATP enhances radiation-induced brain injury through microglial activation and paracrine signaling via P2X7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jue; Pan, Rui; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Tang, Yamei

    2015-11-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors by extracellular ATP (eATP) released from injured cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuronal disorders. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ion-selective purinergic receptor, is associated with microglial activation and paracrine signaling. However, whether ATP and P2X7R are involved in radiation-induced brain injury (RBI) remains to be determined. Here, we found that the eATP level was elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of RBI patients and was associated with the clinical severity of the disorder. In our experimental model, radiation treatment increased the level of eATP in the supernatant of primary cultures of neurons and glial cells and in the CSF of irradiated mice. In addition, ATP administration activated microglia, induced the release of the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, and promoted neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, blockade of ATP-P2X7R interaction using P2X7 antagonist Brilliant Blue G or P2X7 knockdown suppressed radiation-induced microglial activation and proliferation in the hippocampus, and restored the spatial memory of irradiated mice. Finally, we found that the PI3K/AKT and nuclear factor κB mediated pathways were downstream of ATP-P2X7R signaling in RBI. Taken together, our results unveiled the critical role of ATP-P2X7R in brain damage in RBI, suggesting that inhibition of ATP-P2X7R axis might be a potential strategy for the treatment of patients with RBI. PMID:26122280

  17. Extracellular ATP enhances radiation-induced brain injury through microglial activation and paracrine signaling via P2X7 receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jue; Pan, Rui; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Tang, Yamei

    2015-11-01

    Activation of purinergic receptors by extracellular ATP (eATP) released from injured cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuronal disorders. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ion-selective purinergic receptor, is associated with microglial activation and paracrine signaling. However, whether ATP and P2X7R are involved in radiation-induced brain injury (RBI) remains to be determined. Here, we found that the eATP level was elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of RBI patients and was associated with the clinical severity of the disorder. In our experimental model, radiation treatment increased the level of eATP in the supernatant of primary cultures of neurons and glial cells and in the CSF of irradiated mice. In addition, ATP administration activated microglia, induced the release of the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, and promoted neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, blockade of ATP-P2X7R interaction using P2X7 antagonist Brilliant Blue G or P2X7 knockdown suppressed radiation-induced microglial activation and proliferation in the hippocampus, and restored the spatial memory of irradiated mice. Finally, we found that the PI3K/AKT and nuclear factor κB mediated pathways were downstream of ATP-P2X7R signaling in RBI. Taken together, our results unveiled the critical role of ATP-P2X7R in brain damage in RBI, suggesting that inhibition of ATP-P2X7R axis might be a potential strategy for the treatment of patients with RBI.

  18. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G.; Møller, Lisbeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6–8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  19. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6-8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  20. A sensitive ligase-based ATP electrochemical assay using molecular beacon-like DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Ni, Xiaoqi

    2010-05-15

    A sensitive and selective ligase-based signal-on electrochemical sensing method for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) detection had been developed using molecular beacon (MB)-like DNA. In this method, the biotin-tagged MB-like DNA was self-assembled onto a gold electrode to form a stem-loop structure by means of facile gold-thiol chemistry, which resulted in blockage of electronic transmission. It was eT OFF state. In the presence of ATP, two nucleotide fragments which were complementary to the loop of the MB-like DNA could be ligated by the ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase. Hybridization of the ligated DNA with the MB-like DNA induced a significant conformational change in this surface-confined DNA structure, which in turn released the biotin from the surface allowing free exchange of electrons with the electrode generating a measurable electrochemical signal (eT ON). The resulting change in electron transfer efficiency was readily measured by differential pulse voltammetry at target ATP concentrations as low as 0.05 nM and with linear response range from 0.1 to 1000 nM. Moreover, it was also able to discriminate ATP from its analogues. The proposed method had been successfully applied to the determination of ATP in the Escherichia coli O157:H7 extracts of water samples, and the linear response was found between the concentrations of 10(3) and 10(7) cfu/mL.

  1. Nucleotide release by airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Sesma, Juliana I; Seminario, Lucia; Esther, Charles R; Kreda, Silvia M

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic events regulating the airways' innate defenses are initiated by the release of purines from the epithelium, which occurs constitutively and is enhanced by chemical or mechanical stimulation. While the external triggers have been reviewed exhaustively, this chapter focuses on current knowledge of the receptors and signaling cascades mediating nucleotide release. The list of secreted purines now includes ATP, ADP, AMP and nucleotide sugars, and involves at least three distinct mechanisms reflecting the complexity of airway epithelia. First, the constitutive mechanism involves ATP translocation to the ER/Golgi complex as energy source for protein folding, and fusion of Golgi-derived vesicles with the plasma membrane. Second, goblet cells package ATP with mucins into granules, which are discharged in response to P2Y(2)R activation and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. Finally, non-mucous cells support a regulated mechanism of ATP release involving protease activated receptor (PAR)-elicited G(12/13) activation, leading to the RhoGEF-mediated exchange of GDP for GTP on RhoA, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Together, these pathways provide fine tuning of epithelial responses regulated by purinergic signaling events. PMID:21560042

  2. Loss of apical monocilia on collecting duct principal cells impairs ATP secretion across the apical cell surface and ATP-dependent and flow-induced calcium signals.

    PubMed

    Hovater, Michael B; Olteanu, Dragos; Hanson, Elizabeth L; Cheng, Nai-Lin; Siroky, Brian; Fintha, Attila; Komlosi, Peter; Liu, Wen; Satlin, Lisa M; Bell, P Darwin; Yoder, Bradley K; Schwiebert, Erik M

    2008-06-01

    Renal epithelial cells release ATP constitutively under basal conditions and release higher quantities of purine nucleotide in response to stimuli. ATP filtered at the glomerulus, secreted by epithelial cells along the nephron, and released serosally by macula densa cells for feedback signaling to afferent arterioles within the glomerulus has important physiological signaling roles within kidneys. In autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) mice and humans, collecting duct epithelial cells lack an apical central cilium or express dysfunctional proteins within that monocilium. Collecting duct principal cells derived from an Oak Ridge polycystic kidney (orpk ( Tg737 ) ) mouse model of ARPKD lack a well-formed apical central cilium, thought to be a sensory organelle. We compared these cells grown as polarized cell monolayers on permeable supports to the same cells where the apical monocilium was genetically rescued with the wild-type Tg737 gene that encodes Polaris, a protein essential to cilia formation. Constitutive ATP release under basal conditions was low and not different in mutant versus rescued monolayers. However, genetically rescued principal cell monolayers released ATP three- to fivefold more robustly in response to ionomycin. Principal cell monolayers with fully formed apical monocilia responded three- to fivefold greater to hypotonicity than mutant monolayers lacking monocilia. In support of the idea that monocilia are sensory organelles, intentionally harsh pipetting of medium directly onto the center of the monolayer induced ATP release in genetically rescued monolayers that possessed apical monocilia. Mechanical stimulation was much less effective, however, on mutant orpk collecting duct principal cell monolayers that lacked apical central monocilia. Our data also show that an increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) primes the ATP pool that is released in response to mechanical stimuli. It also appears that hypotonic cell swelling and

  3. Vesicular ATP is the predominant cause of intercellular calcium waves in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bowser, David N; Khakh, Baljit S

    2007-06-01

    Brain astrocytes signal to each other and neurons. They use changes in their intracellular calcium levels to trigger release of transmitters into the extracellular space. These can then activate receptors on other nearby astrocytes and trigger a propagated calcium wave that can travel several hundred micrometers over a timescale of seconds. A role for endogenous ATP in calcium wave propagation in hippocampal astrocytes has been suggested, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we explored how calcium waves arise and directly tested whether endogenously released ATP contributes to astrocyte calcium wave propagation in hippocampal astrocytes. We find that vesicular ATP is the major, if not the sole, determinant of astrocyte calcium wave propagation over distances between approximately 100 and 250 microm, and approximately 15 s from the point of wave initiation. These actions of ATP are mediated by P2Y1 receptors. In contrast, metabotropic glutamate receptors and gap junctions do not contribute significantly to calcium wave propagation. Our data suggest that endogenous extracellular astrocytic ATP can signal over broad spatiotemporal scales.

  4. ATP is not involved in α1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2015-12-15

    Recent publications suggest that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation by exogenous agonists such as phenylephrine in resistance arteries cause contraction through the release of ATP from within the vascular smooth muscle cells. This ATP exits the cell through pannexin-1 channels to act back "autocrine-like" on P2 receptors on the smooth muscle that cause the contraction. In this work we directly test this hypothesis by using a selective P2X1 purinoceptor antagonist NF449 (1-10µM) against phenylephrine and ATP concentration-response curves in small mesenteric arteries of the rat and thoracodorsal arteries of the mouse. We show that NF449 is a simple competitive antagonist of ATP with a pKB of 6.43 and 6.41 in rat and mouse arteries, respectively, but did not antagonise phenylephrine concentration-response curves. This work cautions against the growing overstated role of the reputed pannexin-1/ATP release axis following α1-adrenoceptor activation in small resistance arteries.

  5. Extracellular ATP Selectively Upregulates Ecto-Nucleoside Triphosphate Diphosphohydrolase 2 and Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase by Rat Cortical Astrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Brisevac, Dusica; Adzic, Marija; Laketa, Danijela; Parabucki, Ana; Milosevic, Milena; Lavrnja, Irena; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Sévigny, Jean; Kipp, Markus; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda

    2015-11-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern which induces reactive response of astrocytes after brain insult, including morphological remodeling of astrocytes, proliferation, chemotaxis, and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The responses induced by eATP are under control of ecto-nucleotidases, which catalyze sequential hydrolysis of ATP to adenosine. In the mammalian brain, ecto-nucleotidases comprise three enzyme families: ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases 1-3 (NTPDase1-3), ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phospodiesterases 1-3 (NPP1-3), and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), which crucially determine ATP/adenosine ratio in the pericellular milieu. Altered expression of ecto-nucleotidases has been demonstrated in several experimental models of human brain dysfunctions. In the present study, we have explored the pattern of NTPDase1-3, NPP1-3, and eN expression by cultured cortical astrocytes challenged with 1 mmol/L ATP (eATP). At the transcriptional level, eATP upregulated expression of NTPDase1, NTPDase2, NPP2, and eN, while, at translational and functional levels, these were paralleled only by the induction of NTPDase2 and eN. Additionally, eATP altered membrane topology of eN, from clusters localized in membrane domains to continuous distribution along the cell membrane. Our results suggest that eATP, by upregulating NTPDase2 and eN and altering the enzyme membrane topology, affects local kinetics of ATP metabolism and signal transduction that may have important roles in the process related to inflammation and reactive gliosis. PMID:26080748

  6. Oxygen Nanocarrier for Combined Cancer Therapy: Oxygen-Boosted ATP-Responsive Chemotherapy with Amplified ROS Lethality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Fan, Xiujun; Sheng, Zonghai; Gong, Ping; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Baozhen; Ni, Dapeng; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-09-01

    Oxygen nanocarrier (A/D-ONC) with a polymeric core entrapping hemoglobin and a cationic lipid shell absorbing a DOX-intercalating DNA duplex is developed. After endocytosis oxygenated A/D-ONC donates O2 to cancer cells that acts therapeutically by: (1) increasing intracellular ATP content that promotes DOX release, thereby converting ATP to the trigger of detrimental chemotherapy; (2) by synchronously increasing the ROS amount to amplify the lethality to cancer cells.

  7. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  8. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  9. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  10. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  11. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  12. Hepatic heterogeneity in the response to ATP studied in the bivascularly perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Minguetti-Câmara, V C; Constantin, J; Suzuki-Kemmelmeier, F; Ishii-Iwamoto, E L; Bracht, A

    1998-02-01

    The zonation of the purinergic action of ATP in the hepatic parenchyma was investigated in the bivascularly perfused rat liver by means of anterograde and retrograde perfusion. Livers from fed rats were used, and ATP was infused according to four different experimental protocols: (A) anterograde perfusion and ATP infusion via the portal vein; (B) anterograde perfusion and ATP via the hepatic artery; (C) retrograde perfusion and ATP via the hepatic vein; (D) retrograde perfusion and ATP via the hepatic artery. The following metabolic parameters were measured: glucose release, lactate production and oxygen consumption. The hemodynamic effects were evaluated by measuring the sinusoidal mean transit times by means of the indicator-dilution technique. ATP was infused during 20 min at four different rates (between 0.06-0.77 micromol min[-1] g liver[-1]; 20-200 microM) in each of the four experimental protocols. The results that were obtained allow several conclusions with respect to the localization of the effects of ATP along the hepatic acini: (1) In retrograde perfusion the sinusoidal mean transit times were approximately twice those observed in anterograde perfusion. ATP increased the sinusoidal mean transit times only in retrograde perfusion (protocols C and D). The effect was more pronounced with protocol D. These results allow the conclusion that the responsive vasoconstrictive elements are localized in a pre-sinusoidal region; (2) All hepatic cells, periportal as well as perivenous, were able to metabolize ATP, so that concentration gradients were generated with all experimental protocols. Extraction of ATP was more pronounced in retrograde perfusion, an observation that can be attributed, partly at least, to the longer sinusoidal transit times. In anterograde perfusion, the extraction of ATP was time-dependent, a phenomenon that cannot be satisfactorily explained with the available data; (3) ATP produced a transient initial inhibition of oxygen uptake when

  13. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  14. Tau binds ATP and induces its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mina; Corbo, Christopher P; Alonso, Alejandra Del C

    2014-02-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein mainly found in neurons. The protein is associated with process of microtubule assembly, which plays an important role in intracellular transport and cell structure of the neuron. Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases specifically associated with tau abnormalities. While a well-defined mechanism remains unknown, most facts point to tau as a prominent culprit in neurodegeneration. In most cases of Tauopathies, aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau have been found. Two proposals are present when discussing tau toxicity, one being the aggregation of tau proteins and the other points toward a conformational change within the protein. Previous work we carried out showed tau hyperphosphorylation promotes tau to behave abnormally resulting in microtubule assembly disruption as well as a breakdown in tau self-assembly. We found that tau's N-terminal region has a putative site for ATP/GTP binding. In this paper we demonstrate that tau is able to bind ATP and not GTP, that this binding induces tau self-assembly into filaments. At 1 mM ATP the filaments are 4-7 nm in width, whereas at 10 mM ATP the filaments appeared to establish lateral interaction, bundling and twisting, forming filaments that resembled the Paired Helical Filaments (PHF) isolated from Alzheimer disease brain. ATP-induced self-assembly is not energy dependent because the nonhydrolysable analogue of the ATP induces the same assembly. PMID:24258797

  15. Synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP and the phosphate-ATP exchange reaction in soluble mitochondrial F1 in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Pérez-Hernández, G; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1999-12-01

    an increase in water activity. The effect of solvent is fully reversible. In comparison to other enzymes, F1 seems unique in that solvent controls the equilibrium that exists within an enzyme population. This results from the effect of solvent on the partition of Pi between the catalytic site and the medium, and the large energetic barrier that prevents release of ATP from the catalytic site. In the presence of dimethylsulfoxide and Pi, ATP is continuously hydrolyzed and synthesized with formation and uptake of Pi from the medium. This process is essentially an exchange reaction analogous to the phosphate-ATP exchange reaction that is catalyzed by the ATP synthase in coupled energy transducing membranes.

  16. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  17. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Nielsen, Jens-Jung; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2009-12-01

    ATP has been proposed to play multiple roles in local skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation and modulating sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of arterial ATP infusion and exercise on leg muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations to gain insight into the interstitial and intravascular mechanisms by which ATP causes muscle vasodilation and sympatholysis. Leg hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotide and NE concentrations were measured during 1) femoral arterial ATP infusion (0.42 +/- 0.04 and 2.26 +/- 0.52 micromol/min; mean +/- SE) and 2) one-leg knee-extensor exercise (18 +/- 0 and 37 +/- 2 W) in 10 healthy men. Arterial ATP infusion and exercise increased leg blood flow (LBF) in the experimental leg from approximately 0.3 l/min at baseline to 4.2 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 l/min, respectively, whereas it was reduced or unchanged in the control leg. During arterial ATP infusion, muscle interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations remained unchanged in both legs, but muscle interstitial NE increased from approximately 5.9 nmol/l at baseline to 8.3 +/- 1.2 and 8.7 +/- 0.7 nmol/l in the experimental and control leg, respectively (P < 0.05), in parallel to a reduction in arterial pressure (P < 0.05). During exercise, however, interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations increased in the contracting muscle (P < 0.05), but not in inactive muscle, whereas interstitial NE concentrations increased similarly in both active and inactive muscles. These results suggest that the vasodilatory and sympatholytic effects of intraluminal ATP are mainly mediated via endothelial purinergic receptors. Intraluminal ATP and muscle contractions appear to modulate sympathetic nerve activity by inhibiting the effect of NE rather than blunting its local concentration. PMID:19797688

  18. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  19. The nucleotide exchange factor MGE exerts a key function in the ATP-dependent cycle of mt-Hsp70-Tim44 interaction driving mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H C; Westermann, B; Neupert, W; Brunner, M

    1996-01-01

    Import of preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix is driven by the ATP-dependent interaction of mt-Hsp70 with the peripheral inner membrane import protein Tim44 and the preprotein in transit. We show that Mge1p, a co-chaperone of mt-Hsp70, plays a key role in the ATP-dependent import reaction cycle in yeast. Our data suggest a cycle in which the mt-Hsp70-Tim44 complex forms with ATP: Mge1p promotes assembly of the complex in the presence of ATP. Hydrolysis of ATP by mt-Hsp70 occurs in complex with Tim44. Mge1p is then required for the dissociation of the ADP form of mt-Hsp70 from Tim44 after release of inorganic phosphate but before release of ADP. ATP hydrolysis and complex dissociation are accompanied by tight binding of mt-Hsp70 to the preprotein in transit. Subsequently, the release of mt-Hsp70 from the polypeptide chain is triggered by Mge1p which promotes release of ADP from mt-Hsp70. Rebinding of ATP to mt-Hsp70 completes the reaction cycle. Images PMID:8918457

  20. Magnetic field affects enzymatic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A

    2008-10-01

    The rate of ATP synthesis by creatine kinase extracted from V. xanthia venom was shown to depend on the magnetic field. The yield of ATP produced by enzymes with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions in catalytic sites increases by 7-8% at 55 mT and then decreases at 80 mT. For enzyme with 25Mg2+ ion in a catalytic site, the ATP yield increases by 50% and 70% in the fields 55 and 80 mT, respectively. In the Earth field the rate of ATP synthesis by enzyme, in which Mg2+ ion has magnetic nucleus 25Mg, is 2.5 times higher than that by enzymes, in which Mg2+ ion has nonmagnetic, spinless nuclei 24Mg or 26Mg. Both magnetic field effect and magnetic isotope effect demonstrate that the ATP synthesis is an ion-radical process, affected by Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling in the intermediate ion-radical pair. PMID:18774801

  1. Sensing muscle ischemia: coincident detection of acid and ATP via interplay of two ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Fierro, Leonardo; Williams, Frank G.; Spelta, Valeria; Naves, Ligia A.; Knowles, Michelle; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; Almers, Wolfhard; Elde, Robert P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ischemic pain – examples include the chest pain of a heart attack and the leg pain of a 30 second sprint – occurs when muscle gets too little oxygen for its metabolic need. Lactic acid cannot act alone to trigger ischemic pain because the pH change is so small. Here we show that another compound released from ischemic muscle, ATP (adenosine tri-phosphate), works together with acid by increasing the pH sensitivity of ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel #3), the molecule used by sensory neurons to detect lactic acidosis. Our data argue that ATP acts by binding to P2X receptors that form a molecular complex with ASICs; the receptor on sensory neurons appears to be P2X5, an electrically quiet ion channel. Coincident detection of acid and ATP should confer sensory selectivity for ischemia over other conditions of acidosis. PMID:21092862

  2. KR-31761, a novel K+(ATP)-channel opener, exerts cardioprotective effects by opening both mitochondrial K+(ATP) and Sarcolemmal K+(ATP) channels in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced heart injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Hun; Seo, Ho-Won; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Chung, Hun-Jong; Won, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Chang-Soo; Kwon, Suk-Hyung; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2009-02-01

    The cardioprotective effects of KR-31761, a newly synthesized K+(ATP) opener, were evaluated in rat models of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) heart injury. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia/30-min reperfusion, KR-31761 perfused prior to ischemia significantly increased both the left ventricular developed pressure (% of predrug LVDP: 17.8, 45.1, 54.2, and 62.6 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) and double product (DP: heart rate x LVDP; % of predrug DP: 17.5, 44.9, 56.2, and 64.5 for the control, 1 microM, 3 microM, and 10 microM, respectively) at 30-min reperfusion while decreasing the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). KR-31761 (10 microM) significantly increased the time to contracture during the ischemic period, whereas it concentration-dependently decreased the lactate dehydrogenase release during reperfusion. All these parameters were significantly reversed by 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, 100 microM) and glyburide (1 microM), selective and nonselective blockers of the mitochondrial K+(ATP) (mitoK+(ATP)) channel and K+(ATP) channel, respectively. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30-min occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery/2.5-h reperfusion, KR-31761 administered 15 min before the onset of ischemia significantly decreased the infarct size (72.2%, 55.1%, and 47.1% for the control, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v., and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v., respectively); and these effects were completely and almost completely abolished by 5-HD (10 mg/kg, i.v.) and HMR-1098, a selective blocker of sarcolemmal K+(ATP) (sarcK+(ATP)) channel (6 mg/kg, i.v.) administered 5 min prior to KR-31761 (72.3% and 67.9%, respectively). KR-31761 only slightly relaxed methoxamine-precontracted rat aorta (IC50: > 30.0 microM). These results suggest that KR-31761 exerts potent cardioprotective effects through the opening of both mitoK+(ATP) and sarcK+(ATP) channels in rat hearts with a minimal vasorelaxant effect.

  3. Exercise sensitizes skeletal muscle to extracellular ATP for IL-6 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Verdejo, R; Casas, M; Galgani, J E; Jaimovich, E; Buvinic, S

    2014-04-01

    Active skeletal muscle synthesizes and releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays important roles in the organism's adaptation to exercise. Autocrine/paracrine ATP signaling has been shown to modulate IL-6 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of physical activity modifies the ATP-induced IL-6 expression. BalbC mice were either subject to 5 weeks voluntary wheel running (VA) or kept sedentary (SED). Flexor digitorum brevis muscles were dissected, stimulated with different ATP concentrations (0-100 μM) and IL-6 mRNA levels were measured using qPCR. ATP evoked a concentration-dependent rise in IL-6 mRNA in both SED and VA mice. VA mice however, had significantly higher ATP sensitivity (pD2 pharmacological values: VA=5.58±0.02 vs. SED=4.95±0.04, p<0.05). Interestingly, in VA mice we observed a positive correlation between the level of physical activity and the IL-6 mRNA increase following fiber stimulation with 10 μM ATP. In addition, there were lower P2Y2- and higher P2Y14-receptor mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of VA compared to SED mice, showing plasticity of nucleotide receptors with exercise. These results suggest that exercise increases skeletal muscle ATP sensitivity, a response dependent on the level of physical activity performed. This could have an important role in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise and training.

  4. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca(2+) to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca(2+) as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca(2+) as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca(2+) is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca(2+) started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca(2+) interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca(2+) low forced cells to restrict Ca(2+) signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca(2+) signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca(2+) must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca(2+) homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca(2+) and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally

  5. Functional expression of a heterologous nickel-dependent, ATP-independent urease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Milne, N; Luttik, M A H; Cueto Rojas, H F; Wahl, A; van Maris, A J A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2015-07-01

    In microbial processes for production of proteins, biomass and nitrogen-containing commodity chemicals, ATP requirements for nitrogen assimilation affect product yields on the energy producing substrate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a current host for heterologous protein production and potential platform for production of nitrogen-containing chemicals, uptake and assimilation of ammonium requires 1 ATP per incorporated NH3. Urea assimilation by this yeast is more energy efficient but still requires 0.5 ATP per NH3 produced. To decrease ATP costs for nitrogen assimilation, the S. cerevisiae gene encoding ATP-dependent urease (DUR1,2) was replaced by a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene encoding ATP-independent urease (ure2), along with its accessory genes ureD, ureF and ureG. Since S. pombe ure2 is a Ni(2+)-dependent enzyme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express native Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes, the S. pombe high-affinity nickel-transporter gene (nic1) was also expressed. Expression of the S. pombe genes into dur1,2Δ S. cerevisiae yielded an in vitro ATP-independent urease activity of 0.44±0.01 µmol min(-1) mg protein(-1) and restored growth on urea as sole nitrogen source. Functional expression of the Nic1 transporter was essential for growth on urea at low Ni(2+) concentrations. The maximum specific growth rates of the engineered strain on urea and ammonium were lower than those of a DUR1,2 reference strain. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures with urea as nitrogen source, the engineered strain exhibited an increased release of ammonia and reduced nitrogen content of the biomass. Our results indicate a new strategy for improving yeast-based production of nitrogen-containing chemicals and demonstrate that Ni(2+)-dependent enzymes can be functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae.

  6. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca(2+) to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca(2+) as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca(2+) as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca(2+) is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca(2+) started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca(2+) interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca(2+) low forced cells to restrict Ca(2+) signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca(2+) signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca(2+) must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca(2+) homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca(2+) and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally

  7. Circulating ATP-induced vasodilatation overrides sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosenmeier, Jaya B; Hansen, Jim; González-Alonso, José

    2004-07-01

    Despite increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery increase during exercise in humans in proportion to the local metabolic demand, a phenomenon coupled to local reductions in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and concomitant increases in circulating ATP. We tested the hypothesis that circulating ATP contributes to local blood flow and O2 delivery regulation by both inducing vasodilatation and blunting the augmented sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. In eight healthy subjects, we first measured leg blood flow (LBF) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during three hyperaemic conditions: (1) intrafemoral artery adenosine infusion (vasodilator control), (2) intrafemoral artery ATP infusion (vasodilator), and (3) mild knee-extensor exercise (approximately 20 W), and then compared the responses with the combined infusion of the vasoconstrictor drug tyramine, which evokes endogenous release of noradrenaline from sympathetic nerve endings. In all three hyperaemic conditions, LBF equally increased from approximately 0.5 +/- 0.1 l min(-1) at rest to approximately 3.6 +/- 0.3 l min(-1), with no change in MAP. Tyramine caused significant leg vasoconstriction during adenosine infusion (53 +/- 5 and 56 +/- 5% lower LBF and leg vascular conductance, respectively, P < 0.05), which was completely abolished by both ATP infusion and exercise. In six additional subjects resting in the sitting position, intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP increased LBF and leg vascular conductance 27 +/- 3-fold, despite concomitant increases in venous noradrenaline and muscle sympathetic nerve activity of 2.5 +/- 0.2- and 2.4 +/- 0.1-fold, respectively. Maximal ATP-induced vasodilatation at rest accounted for 78% of the peak LBF during maximal bicycling exercise. Our findings in humans demonstrate that circulating ATP is capable of regulating local skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery by causing substantial vasodilatation and negating

  8. Exercise sensitizes skeletal muscle to extracellular ATP for IL-6 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Verdejo, R; Casas, M; Galgani, J E; Jaimovich, E; Buvinic, S

    2014-04-01

    Active skeletal muscle synthesizes and releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays important roles in the organism's adaptation to exercise. Autocrine/paracrine ATP signaling has been shown to modulate IL-6 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of physical activity modifies the ATP-induced IL-6 expression. BalbC mice were either subject to 5 weeks voluntary wheel running (VA) or kept sedentary (SED). Flexor digitorum brevis muscles were dissected, stimulated with different ATP concentrations (0-100 μM) and IL-6 mRNA levels were measured using qPCR. ATP evoked a concentration-dependent rise in IL-6 mRNA in both SED and VA mice. VA mice however, had significantly higher ATP sensitivity (pD2 pharmacological values: VA=5.58±0.02 vs. SED=4.95±0.04, p<0.05). Interestingly, in VA mice we observed a positive correlation between the level of physical activity and the IL-6 mRNA increase following fiber stimulation with 10 μM ATP. In addition, there were lower P2Y2- and higher P2Y14-receptor mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of VA compared to SED mice, showing plasticity of nucleotide receptors with exercise. These results suggest that exercise increases skeletal muscle ATP sensitivity, a response dependent on the level of physical activity performed. This could have an important role in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise and training. PMID:24022572

  9. BRET-linked ATP assay with luciferase.

    PubMed

    Borghei, Golnaz; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2014-09-01

    Taking advantage of BRET, a mutant firefly luciferase with higher pH- and thermo-stability than the wild-type could be coupled with the red-emitting fluorescent protein of mCherry in both a fused and unfused format. The BRET pair allows >40% of the light emitted to be red shifted over 600 nm to the mCherry acceptor wavelength. Taking the expected quantum yield for mCherry (0.22), a good fit to predicted light transfer is shown, with no other losses. Two measurements are considered for ATP determination: (a) a ratiometric technique for ATP measurement using both donor and acceptor emission intensities, making the calibration slope independent of protein concentration in a broad range. This measurement was limited by the BRET efficiency and the low quantum yield of the mCherry acceptor, but this detection limit might be improved with other fluorescent proteins with higher quantum yield. The fused BRET pair also resulted in a small increase in the BRET ratio. (b) An ATP dependent shift in the wavelength maximum using just the acceptor mCherry emission was also proposed for ATP determination. This did not require a high BRET efficiency and only uses emission above 600 nm to obtain the acceptor emission maximum, but not its intensity; it is independent of protein concentration across a broad range. This offers a novel and robust method for determination of ATP between 10(-11) to 10(-5) M with an easy baseline calibration with ATP concentration >10(-4) M.

  10. Modulation of Root Skewing in Arabidopsis by Apyrases and Extracellular ATP.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingyan; Wang, Bochu; Farris, Ben; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2015-11-01

    When plant primary roots grow along a tilted surface that is impenetrable, they can undergo a slanted deviation from the direction of gravity called skewing. Skewing is induced by touch stimuli which the roots experience as they grow along the surface. Touch stimuli also induce the release of extracellular ATP (eATP) into the plant's extracellular matrix, and two apyrases (NTPDases) in Arabidopsis, APY1 and APY2, can help regulate the concentration of eATP. The primary roots of seedlings overexpressing APY1 show less skewing than wild-type plants. Plants suppressed in their expression of APY1 show more skewing than wild-type plants. Correspondingly, chemical inhibition of apyrase activity increased skewing in mutants and wild-type roots. Exogenous application of ATP or ATPγS also increased skewing in wild-type roots, which could be blocked by co-incubation with a purinergic receptor antagonist. These results suggest a model in which gradients of eATP set up by differential touch stimuli along roots help direct skewing in roots growing along an impenetrable surface.

  11. ATP from synaptic terminals and astrocytes regulates NMDA receptors and synaptic plasticity through PSD-95 multi-protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Lalo, U.; Palygin, O.; Verkhratsky, A.; Grant, S. G. N.; Pankratov, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of astrocyte-secreted molecules, such as ATP, for the slow modulation of synaptic transmission in central neurones. Biophysical mechanisms underlying the impact of gliotransmitters on the strength of individual synapse remain, however, unclear. Here we show that purinergic P2X receptors can bring significant contribution to the signalling in the individual synaptic boutons. ATP released from astrocytes facilitates a recruitment of P2X receptors into excitatory synapses by Ca2+-dependent mechanism. P2X receptors, co-localized with NMDA receptors in the excitatory synapses, can be activated by ATP co-released with glutamate from pre-synaptic terminals and by glia-derived ATP. An activation of P2X receptors in turn leads to down-regulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors via Ca2+-dependent de-phosphorylation and interaction with PSD-95 multi-protein complex. Genetic deletion of the PSD-95 or P2X4 receptors obliterated ATP-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Impairment of purinergic modulation of NMDA receptors in the PSD-95 mutants dramatically decreased the threshold of LTP induction and increased the net magnitude of LTP. Our findings show that synergistic action of glia- and neurone-derived ATP can pre-modulate efficacy of excitatory synapses and thereby can have an important role in the glia-neuron communications and brain meta-plasticity. PMID:27640997

  12. ATP from synaptic terminals and astrocytes regulates NMDA receptors and synaptic plasticity through PSD-95 multi-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Lalo, U; Palygin, O; Verkhratsky, A; Grant, S G N; Pankratov, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of astrocyte-secreted molecules, such as ATP, for the slow modulation of synaptic transmission in central neurones. Biophysical mechanisms underlying the impact of gliotransmitters on the strength of individual synapse remain, however, unclear. Here we show that purinergic P2X receptors can bring significant contribution to the signalling in the individual synaptic boutons. ATP released from astrocytes facilitates a recruitment of P2X receptors into excitatory synapses by Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism. P2X receptors, co-localized with NMDA receptors in the excitatory synapses, can be activated by ATP co-released with glutamate from pre-synaptic terminals and by glia-derived ATP. An activation of P2X receptors in turn leads to down-regulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors via Ca(2+)-dependent de-phosphorylation and interaction with PSD-95 multi-protein complex. Genetic deletion of the PSD-95 or P2X4 receptors obliterated ATP-mediated down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Impairment of purinergic modulation of NMDA receptors in the PSD-95 mutants dramatically decreased the threshold of LTP induction and increased the net magnitude of LTP. Our findings show that synergistic action of glia- and neurone-derived ATP can pre-modulate efficacy of excitatory synapses and thereby can have an important role in the glia-neuron communications and brain meta-plasticity. PMID:27640997

  13. Wide Nanoscopic Pore of Maxi-Anion Channel Suits its Function as an ATP-Conductive Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sabirov, Ravshan Z.; Okada, Yasunobu

    2004-01-01

    The newly proposed function of the maxi-anion channel as a conductive pathway for ATP release requires that its pore is sufficiently large to permit passage of a bulky ATP4− anion. We found a linear relationship between relative permeability of organic anions of different size and their relative ionic mobility (measured as the ratio of ionic conductance) with a slope close to 1, suggesting that organic anions tested with radii up to 0.49 nm (lactobionate) move inside the channel by free diffusion. In the second approach, we, for the first time, succeeded in pore sizing by the nonelectrolyte exclusion method in single-channel patch-clamp experiments. The cutoff radii of PEG molecules that could access the channel from intracellular (1.16 nm) and extracellular (1.42 nm) sides indicated an asymmetry of the two entrances to the channel pore. Measurements by symmetrical two-sided application of PEG molecules yielded an average functional pore radius of ∼1.3 nm. These three estimates are considerably larger than the radius of ATP4− (0.57–0.65 nm) and MgATP2− (∼0.60 nm). We therefore conclude that the nanoscopic maxi-anion channel pore provides sufficient room to accommodate ATP and is well suited to its function as a conductive pathway for ATP release in cell-to-cell communication. PMID:15345546

  14. The ectoenzyme E-NPP3 negatively regulates ATP-dependent chronic allergic responses by basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih Han; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kusu, Takashi; Kayama, Hisako; Okumura, Ryu; Ikeda, Kayo; Shimada, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Obata-Ninomiya, Kazushige; Kurashima, Yosuke; Sato, Shintaro; Umemoto, Eiji; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Karasuyama, Hajime; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2015-02-17

    Crosslinking of the immunoglobulin receptor FcεRI activates basophils and mast cells to induce immediate and chronic allergic inflammation. However, it remains unclear how the chronic allergic inflammation is regulated. Here, we showed that ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase-phosphodiesterase 3 (E-NPP3), also known as CD203c, rapidly induced by FcεRI crosslinking, negatively regulated chronic allergic inflammation. Basophil and mast cell numbers increased in Enpp3(-/-) mice with augmented serum ATP concentrations. Enpp3(-/-) mice were highly sensitive to chronic allergic pathologies, which was reduced by ATP blockade. FcεRI crosslinking induced ATP secretion from basophils and mast cells, and ATP activated both cells. ATP clearance was impaired in Enpp3(-/-) cells. Enpp3(-/-)P2rx7(-/-) mice showed decreased responses to FcεRI crosslinking. Thus, ATP released by FcεRI crosslinking stimulates basophils and mast cells for further activation causing allergic inflammation. E-NPP3 decreases ATP concentration and suppresses basophil and mast cell activity. PMID:25692702

  15. The modulation of haemolymph arginine kinase on the extracellular ATP induced bactericidal immune responses in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Jia, Zhihao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-07-01

    Arginine kinase is an important phosphagen kinase (PK) which plays an essential role in ATP buffering systems in invertebrates. In the present study, an arginine kinase (designated CgAK) was isolated by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) affinity chromatography from the haemolymph of Crassostrea gigas. CgAK could directly bind to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner with the dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.46 × 10(-6) M. The interaction with LPS significantly decreased the ATP hydrolytic activity of CgAK, which in turn lead to the accumulation of ATP in vitro. The extracellular ATP stimulation could induce Ca(2+) influx, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the release of lysosomal enzyme in the cellular immune response. In addition, ATP stimulation provoked the bactericidal activity towards Escherichia coli, and the scavenging ROS with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) abrogated the bactericidal activity, indicating that ATP stimulation could induce ROS-dependent antimicrobial activity in haemocytes. Collectively, the results demonstrated that the haemolymph CgAK could serve as an important purinergic regulator to modulate extracellular ATP, which might further have an important effect on the purinergic signaling-activated innate immune response of oyster.

  16. Regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Long, Qinqiang; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is paramount to energy homeostasis, metabolism, signaling, and apoptosis in cells. Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase), a molecular motor, is the ultimate ATP generator and a key determinant of mitochondrial function. ATP synthase catalyzes the final coupling step of oxidative phosphorylation to supply energy in the form of ATP. Alterations at this step will crucially impact mitochondrial respiration and hence cardiac performance. It is well established that cardiac contractility is strongly dependent on the mitochondria, and that myocardial ATP depletion is a key feature of heart failure. ATP synthase dysfunction can cause and exacerbate human diseases, such as cardiomyopathy and heart failure. While ATP synthase has been extensively studied, essential questions related to how the regulation of ATP synthase determines energy metabolism in the heart linger and therapies targeting this important mechanism remain scarce. This review will visit the main findings, identify unsolved issues and provide insights into potential future perspectives related to the regulation of ATP synthase and cardiac pathophysiology.

  17. Dynein ATPase pathway: ATP analogs and regulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Three biochemical aspects of 22S dynein from Tetrahymena cilia have been investigated: its ATP binding polypeptides and the manner in which they bind ATP, its AMPPNP-induced dissociation from microtubules, and its phosphorylation. We have attempted to identify the polypeptides of dynein that bind ATP, i.e., the active site polypeptides, with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-N{sub 3}ATP. The 8-N{sub 3}ATP has been shown to bind to dyneins active sites and in a manner similar to that of ATP. Upon irradiation, (2-{sup 3}H)8-N{sub 3}ATP covalently labels the three heavy chains, i.e., heads, which is detected by autoradiography of SDS PAG's. Thus, the three heads are considered to be the three active sites of dynein. AMPPNP is a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog which we have assayed for the ability to induce dynein dissociation from microtubules.

  18. ATP overflow in skeletal muscle 1A arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Kluess, Heidi A; Stone, Audrey J; Evanson, Kirk W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sources of ATP in the 1A arteriole, and to investigate age-related changes in ATP overflow. Arterioles (1A) from the red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle were isolated, cannulated and pressurized in a microvessel chamber with field stimulation electrodes. ATP overflow was determined using probes specific for ATP and null probes that were constructed similar to the ATP probes, but did not contain the enzyme coating. ATP concentrations were determined using a normal curve (0.78 to 25 μmol l−1 ATP). ATP overflow occurred in two phases. Phase one began in the first 20 s following stimulation and phase two started 35 s after field stimulation. Tetrodotoxin, a potent neurotoxin that blocks action potential generation in nerves, abolished both phases of ATP overflow. α1-Receptor blockade resulted in a small decrease in ATP overflow in phase two, but endothelial removal resulted in an increase in ATP overflow. ATP overflow was lowest in 6-month-old rats and highest in 12- and 2-month-old rats (P < 0.05). ATP overflow measured via biosensors was of neural origin with a small contribution from the vascular smooth muscle. The endothelium seems to play an important role in attenuating ATP overflow in 1A arterioles. PMID:20566660

  19. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  20. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  1. The involvement of P2Y12 receptors, NADPH oxidase, and lipid rafts in the action of extracellular ATP on synaptic transmission at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Giniatullin, A; Petrov, A; Giniatullin, R

    2015-01-29

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the main co-transmitter accompanying the release of acetylcholine from motor nerve terminals. Previously, we revealed the direct inhibitory action of extracellular ATP on transmitter release via redox-dependent mechanism. However, the receptor mechanism of ATP action and ATP-induced sources of reactive oxygen sources (ROS) remained not fully understood. In the current study, using microelectrode recordings of synaptic currents from the frog neuromuscular junction, we analyzed the receptor subtype involved in synaptic action of ATP, receptor coupling to NADPH oxidase and potential location of ATP receptors within the lipid rafts. Using subtype-specific antagonists, we found that the P2Y13 blocker 2-[(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)azo]-5-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. In contrast, the P2Y12 antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate abolished the inhibitory action of ATP, suggesting the key role of P2Y12 receptors in ATP action. As the action of ATP is redox-dependent, we also tested potential involvement of the NADPH oxidase, known as a common inducer of ROS. The depressant action of extracellular ATP was significantly reduced by diphenyleneiodonium chloride and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride, two structurally different inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, indicating that this enzyme indeed mediates the action of ATP. Since the location and activity of various receptors are often associated with lipid rafts, we next tested whether ATP-driven inhibition depends on lipid rafts. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced and largely delayed the action of ATP. Taken together, these data revealed key steps in the purinergic control of synaptic transmission via P2Y12 receptors associated with lipid rafts, and identified NADPH oxidase as the main source of ATP-induced inhibitory ROS at the neuromuscular

  2. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  3. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  4. Mechanochemical coupling of the motion of molecular motors to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Astumian, R D; Bier, M

    1996-01-01

    The typical biochemical paradigm for coupling between hydrolysis of ATP and the performance of chemical or mechanical work involves a well-defined sequence of events (a kinetic mechanism) with a fixed stoichiometry between the number of ATP molecules hydrolyzed and the turnover of the output reaction. Recent experiments show, however, that such a deterministic picture of coupling may not be adequate to explain observed behavior of molecular motor proteins in the presence of applied forces. Here we present a general model in which the binding of ATP and release of ADP serve to modulate the binding energy of a motor protein as it travels along a biopolymer backbone. The mechanism is loosely coupled--the average number of ATPs hydrolyzed to cause a single step from one binding site to the next depends strongly on the magnitude of an applied force and on the effective viscous drag force. The statistical mechanical perspective described here offers insight into how local anisotrophy along the "track" for a molecular motor, combined with an energy-releasing chemical reaction to provide a source of nonequilibrium fluctuations, can lead to macroscopic motion. Images Scheme 1 FIGURE 1 PMID:8789082

  5. Sequential Action of MalE and Maltose Allows Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Translocation in the MalFGK2 Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Cytrynbaum, Eric; Duong, Franck

    2015-10-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have evolved an ATP-dependent alternating-access mechanism to transport substrates across membranes. Despite important progress, especially in their structural analysis, it is still unknown how the substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis, the hallmark of ABC transporters. In this study, we measure the ATP turnover cycle of MalFGK2 in steady and pre-steady state conditions. We show that (i) the basal ATPase activity of MalFGK2 is very low because the cleavage of ATP is rate-limiting, (ii) the binding of open-state MalE to the transporter induces ATP cleavage but leaves release of Pi limiting, and (iii) the additional presence of maltose stimulates release of Pi, and therefore increases the overall ATP turnover cycle. We conclude that open-state MalE stabilizes MalFGK2 in the outward-facing conformation until maltose triggers return to the inward-facing state for substrate and Pi release. This concerted action explains why ATPase activity of MalFGK2 depends on maltose, and why MalE is essential for transport. PMID:26338707

  6. Sequential Action of MalE and Maltose Allows Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Translocation in the MalFGK2 Transporter.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Cytrynbaum, Eric; Duong, Franck

    2015-10-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have evolved an ATP-dependent alternating-access mechanism to transport substrates across membranes. Despite important progress, especially in their structural analysis, it is still unknown how the substrate stimulates ATP hydrolysis, the hallmark of ABC transporters. In this study, we measure the ATP turnover cycle of MalFGK2 in steady and pre-steady state conditions. We show that (i) the basal ATPase activity of MalFGK2 is very low because the cleavage of ATP is rate-limiting, (ii) the binding of open-state MalE to the transporter induces ATP cleavage but leaves release of Pi limiting, and (iii) the additional presence of maltose stimulates release of Pi, and therefore increases the overall ATP turnover cycle. We conclude that open-state MalE stabilizes MalFGK2 in the outward-facing conformation until maltose triggers return to the inward-facing state for substrate and Pi release. This concerted action explains why ATPase activity of MalFGK2 depends on maltose, and why MalE is essential for transport.

  7. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  8. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  9. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  10. Intensification of ciliary motility by extracellular ATP.

    PubMed

    Ovadyahu, D; Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1988-01-01

    Ciliary metachronism and motility were examined optically in tissue cultures from frog palate epithelium as a function of extracellular ATP concentration in the range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M. The main findings were: a) upon addition of ATP the metachronal wavelength increased by a factor of up to 2. b) the velocity of the metachronal wave increased by a factor of up to 5. c) the frequency of ciliary beating increased by a factor of up to 2-3, the increase being temperature insensitive in the range of 15 degrees C-25 degrees C. d) the area under the 1-second FFT spectrum decreased by a factor of up to 2.5. e) the energy of the metachronal wave is increased by a factor of up to 9.5. f) all the spectrum parameters are subject to influence by ATP, as also by ADP and AMP. However, there are pronounced differences in the various responses to them. Based on these findings, physical aspects of the rate increase of particle transport caused by addition of extracellular ATP are explained. A plausible overall chemical mechanism causing pronounced changes in ciliary motility is discussed.

  11. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  12. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring.

  13. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50–100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca2+ acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca2+ gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca2+ signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca2+ signalling relies on cell specific Ca2+ signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca2+ signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca2+ signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377728

  14. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  15. ATP and microfilaments in cellular oxidant injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, D. B.; Armstrong, B. C.; Burger, J. M.; Beals, T. F.; Hyslop, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidant injury produces dramatic changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell shape. ATP synthetic pathways are major targets of oxidant injury resulting in rapid depletion of cellular ATP following oxidant exposure. The relation of ATP depletion to the changes in microfilament organization seen following H2O2 exposure were examined in the P388D1 cell line. Three hours of glucose depletion alone resulted in a decline in cellular ATP levels to less than 10% of controls, which was comparable to ATP levels in cells 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2 in the presence of glucose. Adherent cells stained with rhodamine phalloidin, a probe specific for polymerized (F) actin, revealed a progressive shortening of microfilaments into globular aggregates within cells depleted of glucose over 3 hours, a pattern similar to earlier observations of H2O2-injured cells after 1 hour. The changes in cellular ATP associated with glucose depletion or H2O2 exposure were then correlated with G actin content measured by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. No real differences in G actin content as a percentage of total actin were seen in P388D1 cells following 3 hours of glucose depletion or 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2. But 2 to 3 hours after exposure to H2O2 there was a progressive decrease in G actin as a percentage of total actin within the cells. Transmission electron microscopy of cells depleted of glucose for 3 h or 1 hour after exposure to H2O2 revealed the presence of side-to-side aggregates or bundles of microfilaments within the cells. These observations suggest that declining levels of ATP either from metabolic inhibition or H2O2 injury are correlated with the fragmentation and shortening of microfilaments into aggregates. No net change in monomeric or polymeric actin was necessary for this to occur. However, at later time points after H2O2 exposure some actin assembly did occur. Images p[484]-a p481-a p482-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3414780

  16. Group I mGluRs Evoke K-ATP Current by Intracellular Ca2+ Mobilization in Rat Subthalamus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ke-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    We reported previously that Ca2+ influx through N-methly-d-aspartate-gated channels evokes ATP-sensitive K+ (K-ATP) currents in rat subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons. By using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in brain slices, we investigated the ability of (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), a group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist, to evoke K-ATP currents. DHPG (20 µM) evoked outward current at −70 mV and was associated with a positive slope conductance of 2.7 nS. The sulfonylurea agent tolbutamide (100 µM) converted the positive slope to negative slope conductance, indicating mediation by K-ATP channels (ATP-sensitive K+ channels). Currents evoked by DHPG were significantly reduced by a combination of mGluR1 and mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators. DHPG-evoked outward current was blocked by cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin and mimicked by caffeine, suggesting mediation by release of intracellular Ca2+. DHPG outward current was also blocked by ryanodine and 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, suggesting mediation by ryanodine- and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate-sensitive Ca2+ release. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and inhibitors of protein kinase G activity also suppressed DHPG-induced outward current. Voltage recordings showed that tolbutamide prolonged depolarizing plateau potentials and increased the spontaneous firing rate of STN neurons recorded in the presence of DHPG. These results show that group I mGluR stimulation generates K-ATP current by a nitric oxide- and protein kinase G-dependent process that is mediated by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Because burst firing is linked to symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, we suggest that K-ATP channels might provide a physiologically important inhibitory influence on STN neuronal activity. PMID:23335392

  17. ATP-Responsive and Near-Infrared-Emissive Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery and Real-Time Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chenggen; Chen, Yulei; Zhu, Sha; Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Peijian; Tang, Xin; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Lu, Yue; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive and imaging-guided drug delivery systems hold vast promise for enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. Here we report an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-responsive and near-infrared (NIR)-emissive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier for the controlled release of anticancer drugs and real-time imaging. We demonstrate that the conjugated polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with phenylboronic acid tags on surface as binding sites for ATP could be converted to the water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes in an ATP-rich environment, which promotes the disassembly of the drug carrier and subsequent release of the cargo. In vivo studies validate that this formulation exhibits promising capability for inhibition of tumor growth. We also evaluate the metabolism process by monitoring the fluorescence signal of the conjugated polymer through the in vivo NIR imaging. PMID:27217838

  18. ATP-Responsive and Near-Infrared-Emissive Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery and Real-Time Imaging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chenggen; Chen, Yulei; Zhu, Sha; Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Peijian; Tang, Xin; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Lu, Yue; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive and imaging-guided drug delivery systems hold vast promise for enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. Here we report an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-responsive and near-infrared (NIR)-emissive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier for the controlled release of anticancer drugs and real-time imaging. We demonstrate that the conjugated polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with phenylboronic acid tags on surface as binding sites for ATP could be converted to the water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes in an ATP-rich environment, which promotes the disassembly of the drug carrier and subsequent release of the cargo. In vivo studies validate that this formulation exhibits promising capability for inhibition of tumor growth. We also evaluate the metabolism process by monitoring the fluorescence signal of the conjugated polymer through the in vivo NIR imaging. PMID:27217838

  19. Mitochondrial ATP synthasome: Expression and structural interaction of its components.

    PubMed

    Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Mikulová, Tereza; Vrbacký, Marek; Kovářová, Nikola; Kovalčíková, Jana; Pecina, Petr; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-08-28

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase, ADP/ATP translocase (ANT), and inorganic phosphate carrier (PiC) are supposed to form a supercomplex called ATP synthasome. Our protein and transcript analysis of rat tissues indicates that the expression of ANT and PiC is transcriptionally controlled in accordance with the biogenesis of ATP synthase. In contrast, the content of ANT and PiC is increased in ATP synthase deficient patients' fibroblasts, likely due to a post-transcriptional adaptive mechanism. A structural analysis of rat heart mitochondria by immunoprecipitation, blue native/SDS electrophoresis, immunodetection and MS analysis revealed the presence of ATP synthasome. However, the majority of PiC and especially ANT did not associate with ATP synthase, suggesting that most of PiC, ANT and ATP synthase exist as separate entities.

  20. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena. PMID:27154705

  1. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena.

  2. An atpE-specific promoter within the coding region of the atpB gene in tobacco chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S; Wakasugi, T; Deno, H; Sugiura, M

    1994-09-01

    The atpB and atpE genes encode beta and epsilon subunits, respectively, of chloroplast ATP synthase and are co-transcribed in the plant species so far studied. In tobacco, an atpB gene-specific probe hybridizes to 2.7- and 2.3-kb transcripts. In addition to these, a probe from the atpE coding region hybridizes also to a 1.0-kb transcript. The 5' end of the atpE-specific transcript has been mapped 430/431 nt upstream of the atpE translation initiation site, within the coding region of the atpB gene. In-vitro capping revealed that this transcript results from a primary transcriptional event and is also characterized by -10 and -35 canonical sequences in the 5' region. It has been found to share a common 3' end with the bi-cistronic transcripts that has been mapped within the coding region of the divergently transcribed trnM gene, approximately 236 nt downstream from the atpE termination codon. Interestingly, this transcript accumulates only in leaves and not in proplastid-containing cultured (BY-2) cells, indicating that, unless it is preferentially degraded in BY-2 cells, its expression might be transcriptionally controlled.

  3. Yeast mitochondria import ATP through the calcium-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier Sal1p, and are ATP consumers during aerobic growth in glucose.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Froschauer, Elisabeth Maria; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Del Arco, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    Sal1p, a novel Ca2+-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, is essential in yeast lacking all adenine nucleotide translocases. By targeting luciferase to the mitochondrial matrix to monitor mitochondrial ATP levels, we show in isolated mitochondria that both ATP-Mg and free ADP are taken up by Sal1p with a K(m) of 0.20 +/- 0.03 mM and 0.28 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. Nucleotide transport along Sal1p is strictly Ca2+ dependent. Ca2+ increases the V(max) with a S(0.5) of 15 muM, and no changes in the K(m) for ATP-Mg. Glucose sensing in yeast generates Ca2+ transients involving Ca2+ influx from the external medium. We find that carbon-deprived cells respond to glucose with an immediate increase in mitochondrial ATP levels which is not observed in the presence of EGTA or in Sal1p-deficient cells. Moreover, we now report that during normal aerobic growth on glucose, yeast mitochondria import ATP from the cytosol and hydrolyse it through H+-ATP synthase. We identify two pathways for ATP uptake in mitochondria, the ADP/ATP carriers and Sal1p. Thus, during exponential growth on glucose, mitochondria are ATP consumers, as those from cells growing in anaerobic conditions or deprived of mitochondrial DNA which depend on cytosolic ATP and mitochondrial ATPase working in reverse to generate a mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, the results show that growth on glucose requires ATP hydrolysis in mitochondria and recruits Sal1p as a Ca2+-dependent mechanism to import ATP-Mg from the cytosol. Whether this mechanism is used under similar settings in higher eukaryotes is an open question.

  4. Internal regulation of ATP turnover, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Brand, M D

    1999-12-01

    Previously [Ainscow, E.K. & Brand, M.D. (1999) Eur. J. Biochem. 263, 671-685], top-down control analysis was used to describe the control pattern of energy metabolism in rat hepatocytes. The system was divided into nine reaction blocks (glycogen breakdown, glucose release, glycolysis, lactate production, NADH oxidation, pyruvate oxidation, mitochondrial proton leak, mitochondrial phosphorylation and ATP consumption) linked by five intermediates (intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate and ATP levels, cytoplasmic NADH/NAD ratio and mitochondrial membrane potential). The kinetic responses (elasticities) of reaction blocks to intermediates were determined and used to calculate control coefficients. In the present paper, these elasticities and control coefficients are used to quantify the internal regulatory pathways within the cell. Flux control coefficients were partitioned to give partial flux control coefficients. These describe how strongly one block of reactions controls the flux through another via its effects on the concentration of a particular intermediate. Most flux control coefficients were the sum of positive and negative partial effects acting through different intermediates; these partial effects could be large compared to the final control strength. An important result was the breakdown of the way ATP consumption controlled respiration: changes in ATP level were more important than changes in mitochondrial membrane potential in stimulating oxygen consumption when ATP consumption increased. The partial internal response coefficients to changes in each intermediate were also calculated; they describe how steady state concentrations of intermediates are maintained. Increases in mitochondrial membrane potential were opposed mostly by decreased supply, whereas increases in glucose-6-phosphate, NADH/NAD and pyruvate were opposed mostly by increased consumption. Increases in ATP were opposed significantly by both decreased supply and increased consumption.

  5. Sodium pump-mediated ATP:ADP exchange. The sided effects of sodium and potassium ions

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Resealed human red cell ghosts containing caged ATP (Kaplan et al., 1978) and [3H]ADP were irradiated at 340 nm. The photochemical release of free ATP initiated a rapid transphosphorylation reaction (ATP:ADP exchange), a component of which is inhibited by ouabain. The reaction rate was measured by following the rate of appearance of [3H]ATP. The sodium pump-mediated ATP:ADP exchange reaction showed high-affinity stimulation by Mg ions (less than 10 microM) and was inhibited at higher levels. At optimal [Mg], extracellular Na (Nao) had a biphasic effect. Nao progressively inhibited the reaction rate between 0 and 10 mM and stimulated at higher levels. Intracellular Na (Nai) activated the reaction; the rate was maximal when Nai was 1 mM and remained unaltered up to 115 mM Nai at constant Nao. Extracellular K ions (Ko) inhibited the reaction; at high Nao, half-maximal inhibition was observed with 0.9 mM Ko. Lio inhibited the exchange rate with a lower affinity than Ko; half-maximal inhibition was produced by approximately 50 mM Lio. Intracellular K ions were without dramatic effect on the reaction rate in the concentration range where Ko inhibited completely. The relationship between these observations and previous studies on porous preparations is discussed, as well as the extent to which these observations support the hypothesis that the sodium pump-mediated ATP:ADP exchange reaction accompanies the Na:Na exchange transport mode of the sodium pump. PMID:6294224

  6. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peters, Theodore W; Miller, Aaron W; Tourette, Cendrine; Agren, Hannah; Hubbard, Alan; Hughes, Robert E

    2015-11-19

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes.

  7. Physiological levels of ATP Negatively Regulate Proteasome Function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongbiao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Shujue; Liu, Ningning; Lian, Wen; McDowell, Emily; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Canguo; Guo, Haiping; Zhang, Change; Yang, Changshan; Wen, Guangmei; Dong, Xiaoxian; Lu, Li; Ma, Ningfang; Dong, Weihua; Dou, Q. Ping; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is ATP-dependent and the optimal ATP concentration to activate proteasome function in vitro is ~100 μM. Intracellular ATP levels are generally in the low millimolar range but ATP at a level within this range was shown to inhibit proteasome peptidase activities in vitro. Here we report new evidence that supports a hypothesis that intracellular ATP at the physiological levels bidirectionally regulates 26S proteasome proteolytic function in the cell. First, we confirmed that ATP exerted bidirectional regulation on the 26S proteasome in vitro, with the optimal ATP concentration (between 50–100 μM) stimulating proteasome chymotrypsin-like activities. Second, we found that manipulating intracellular ATP levels also led to bidirectional changes in the levels of proteasome-specific protein substrates in cultured cells. Finally, measures to increase intracellular ATP enhanced, while decreasing intracellular ATP attenuated, the ability of proteasome inhibition to induce cell death. These data strongly suggest that endogenous ATP within the physiological concentration range can exert a negative impact on proteasome activities, allowing the cell to rapidly up-regulate proteasome activity upon ATP reduction under stress conditions. PMID:20805844

  8. Purinergic modulation of preBötzinger complex inspiratory rhythm in rodents: the interaction between ATP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, J D; Rajani, V; Hahn, L B; Funk, G D

    2011-09-15

    ATP signalling in the CNS is mediated by a three-part system comprising the actions of ATP (and ADP) at P2 receptors (P2Rs), adenosine (ADO) at P1 receptors (P1Rs), and ectonucleotidases that degrade ATP into ADO. ATP excites preBötzinger complex (preBötC) inspiratory rhythm-generating networks where its release attenuates the hypoxic depression of breathing. Its metabolite, ADO, inhibits breathing through unknown mechanisms that may involve the preBötC. Our objective is to understand the dynamics of this signalling system and its influence on preBötC networks. We show that the preBötC of mouse and rat is sensitive to P2Y(1) purinoceptor (P2Y(1)R) activation, responding with a >2-fold increase in frequency. Remarkably, the mouse preBötC is insensitive to ATP. Only after block of A(1) ADORs is the ATP-evoked, P2Y(1)R-mediated frequency increase observed. This demonstrates that ATP is rapidly degraded to ADO, which activates inhibitory A(1)Rs, counteracting the P2Y(1)R-mediated excitation. ADO sensitivity of mouse preBötC was confirmed by a frequency decrease that was absent in rat. Differential ectonucleotidase activities are likely to contribute to the negligible ATP sensitivity of mouse preBötC. Real-time PCR analysis of ectonucleotidase isoforms in preBötC punches revealed TNAP (degrades ATP to ADO) or ENTPDase2 (favours production of excitatory ADP) as the primary constituent in mouse and rat, respectively. These data further establish the sensitivity of this vital network to P2Y(1)R-mediated excitation, emphasizing that individual components of the three-part signalling system dramatically alter network responses to ATP. Data also suggest therapeutic potential may derive from methods that alter the ATP-ADO balance to favour the excitatory actions of ATP.

  9. Space shuttle (ATP configuration) abort staging investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampy, J. M.; Blackwell, K. L.; Allen, E. C., Jr.; Fossler, I.

    1973-01-01

    A wind tunnel test conducted in a 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel to determine the force and moment characteristics of the ATP Orbiter and modified ATP External Tank/SRB combination during abort staging conditions is discussed. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded for the orbiter and ET/SRB combination. Pitch polars were obtained for an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees and orbiter incidence angles (orbiter relative to the ET/SRB combination) of 0 and 2 degrees. A limited amount of yaw data were obtained at 0 degree angle of attack and beta range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees. In addition, orbiter pitch control effectiveness was determined at several grid points. These force and moment data were obtained for Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2 and 2.0.

  10. Regional vascular responses to ATP and ATP analogues in the rabbit kidney in vivo: roles for adenosine receptors and prostanoids

    PubMed Central

    Eppel, G A; Ventura, S; Evans, R G

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Our knowledge of the effects of P2-receptor activation on renal vascular tone comes mostly from in vitro models. We aimed to characterise the pharmacology of ATP in the renal circulation in vivo. Experimental approach: In pentobarbitone anaesthetized rabbits, we examined total renal and medullary vascular responses to ATP (0.2 and 0.8 mg kg-1), β,γ-methylene ATP (β,γ-mATP, 7 and 170 μg kg-1), α,β-mATP (0.2 and 2 μg kg-1) and adenosine (2 and 6 μg kg-1) using transit-time ultrasound and laser Doppler flowmetry, respectively. We also determined whether adenosine receptors, NO or prostanoids contribute to the actions of the purinoceptor agonists. Key results: Renal arterial boluses of ATP, β,γ-mATP, and adenosine produced biphasic changes; ischaemia followed by hyperaemia, in total renal and medullary blood flow. α,β-mATP induced only ischaemia. The adenosine receptor antagonist 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline reduced the responses to adenosine and the hyperaemic responses to ATP and β,γ-mATP only. NO synthase inhibition (Nω-nitro-L-arginine) did not significantly alter responses to the P2 receptor agonists. Subsequent cyclooxygenase inhibition (ibuprofen) reduced the ATP- and β,γ-mATP-induced increases in renal blood flow. All other responses remained unchanged. Conclusions and implications: In the rabbit kidney in vivo, α,β-mATP sensitive receptors mediate vasoconstriction. β,γ-mATP and ATP induce vasodilation at least partly through adenosine receptors. ATP induced renal vasodilatation is independent of NO and partly dependent on prostanoids in the bulk of the kidney, but not in the vasculature controlling medullary blood flow. PMID:16981003

  11. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam’s principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA. PMID:26823015

  12. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  13. Electrical Stimuli Are Anti-Apoptotic in Skeletal Muscle via Extracellular ATP. Alteration of This Signal in Mdx Mice Is a Likely Cause of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ and stimulates mitochondrial ATP synthesis in pancreatic MIN6 beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Takashi; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Holz, George G; Jouaville, Laurence S; Thomas, Andrew P; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion whose mechanisms of action are only partly understood. In the present paper, we show that at low (3 mM) glucose concentrations, GLP-1 increases the free intramitochondrial concentrations of both Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](m)), and ATP ([ATP](m)) in clonal MIN6 beta-cells. Suggesting that cAMP-mediated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores is responsible for these effects, increases in [ATP](m) that were induced by GLP-1 were completely blocked by the Rp isomer of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS), or by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, inhibition of Ins(1,4,5) P (3) (IP(3)) receptors with xestospongin C, or application of ryanodine, partially inhibited GLP-1-induced [ATP](m) increases, and the simultaneous blockade of both IP(3) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) completely eliminated the rise in [ATP](m). GLP-1 appeared to prompt Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release through IP(3) receptors via a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation event, since ryanodine-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were abrogated with the PKA inhibitor, H89. In contrast, the effects of GLP-1 on RyR-mediated [ATP](m) increases were apparently mediated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor cAMP-GEFII, since xestospongin C-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were blocked by a dominant-negative form of cAMP-GEFII (G114E,G422D). Taken together, these results demonstrate that GLP-1 potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release in part via the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), and the stimulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. PMID:12410638

  15. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  16. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  17. ATP synthase: a tentative structural model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Junge, W

    1997-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate at the expense of proton- or sodium-motive force across the respective coupling membrane in Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Cation flow through the intrinsic membrane portion of this enzyme (Fo, subunits ab2c9-12) and substrate turnover in the headpiece (F1, subunits alpha3beta3 gammadeltaepsilon) are mechanically coupled by the rotation of subunit gamma in the center of the catalytic hexagon of subunits (alphabeta)3 in F1. ATP synthase is the smallest rotatory engine in nature. With respect to the headpiece alone, it probably operates with three steps. Partial structures of six out of its at least eight different subunits have been published and a 3-dimensional structure is available for the assembly (alphabeta)3gamma. In this article, we review the available structural data and build a tentative topological model of the holoenzyme. The rotor portion is proposed to consist of a wheel of at least nine copies of subunits c, epsilon and a portion of gamma as a spoke, and another portion of gamma as a crankshaft. The stator is made up from a, the transmembrane portion of b2, delta and the catalytic hexagon of (alphabeta)3. As an educated guess, the model may be of heuristic value for ongoing studies on this fascinating electrochemical-to-mechanical-to-chemical transducer. PMID:9323021

  18. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  19. Effect of continuous ATP injection on human hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Komukai, Kimiaki; Hashimoto, Koichi; Shibata, Takahiro; Iwano, Keiji; Muto, Makoto; Mogi, Junichi; Imai, Kamon; Horie, Toshinobu; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2002-10-01

    Continuous ATP injection is used clinically for Tl imaging or coronary flow measurement and because the effect on human hemodynamics is unknown, the present study investigated it in 14 patients undergoing heart catheter examination. Continuous ATP injection induced chest symptoms in 13 of the patients and second-degree atrioventricular block in one, but these complications disappeared immediately after the end of ATP infusion. Continuous ATP injection decreased aortic pressure, but increased pulmonary artery pressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. ATP increased heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output, the latter the result of an increase in preload, a decrease in afterload, and the increase in heart rate. PMID:12381087

  20. Semiquantification of ATP in live cells using nonspecific desorption of DNA from graphene oxide as the internal reference.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaohong; Chen, Tao; Xiong, Xiangling; Mao, Ye; Zhu, Guizhi; Yasun, Emir; Li, Chunmei; Zhu, Zhi; Tan, Weihong

    2012-10-16

    In this aritcle, we have developed an interesting imaging method for intracellular ATP molecules with semiquantitation. While there has been a lot of work in understanding intracellular events, very few can come close to quantitation or semiquantitation in living cells. In this work, we made an effective use of nanomaterials, graphene oxides, both as a quencher and a carrier for intracellular delivery. In addition, this graphene oxide also serves as the carrier for reference probes for fluorescent imaging. An ATP aptamer molecular beacon (AAMB) is adsorbed on graphene oxide (GO) to form a double quenching platform. The AAMB/GO spontaneously enters cells, and then AAMB is released and opened by intracellular ATP. The resulting fluorescence recovery is used to perform ATP live-cell imaging with greatly improved background and signaling. Moreover, a control ssDNA, which is released nonspecifically from GO by nontarget cellular proteins, can serve as an internal reference for ATP semiquantification inside living cells using the intensity ratio of the AAMB and control. This approach can serve as a way for intracellular delivery and quantitative analysis.

  1. ATP synthases from archaea: the beauty of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Gerhard; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Mayer, Florian; Müller, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Archaea live under different environmental conditions, such as high salinity, extreme pHs and cold or hot temperatures. How energy is conserved under such harsh environmental conditions is a major question in cellular bioenergetics of archaea. The key enzymes in energy conservation are the archaeal A1AO ATP synthases, a class of ATP synthases distinct from the F1FO ATP synthase ATP synthase found in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and the V1VO ATPases of eukaryotes. A1AO ATP synthases have distinct structural features such as a collar-like structure, an extended central stalk, and two peripheral stalks possibly stabilizing the A1AO ATP synthase during rotation in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at high temperatures as well as to provide the storage of transient elastic energy during ion-pumping and ATP synthesis/-hydrolysis. High resolution structures of individual subunits and subcomplexes have been obtained in recent years that shed new light on the function and mechanism of this unique class of ATP synthases. An outstanding feature of archaeal A1AO ATP synthases is their diversity in size of rotor subunits and the coupling ion used for ATP synthesis with H(+), Na(+) or even H(+) and Na(+) using enzymes. The evolution of the H(+) binding site to a Na(+) binding site and its implications for the energy metabolism and physiology of the cell are discussed.

  2. The azetidine derivative, KHG26792 protects against ATP-induced activation of NFAT and MAPK pathways through P2X7 receptor in microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Cho, Chang Hun; Kim, Jiae; Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Choi, Soo Young; Yang, Seung-Ju; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2015-12-01

    Azetidine derivatives are of interest for drug development because they may be useful therapeutic agents. However, their mechanisms of action remain to be completely elucidated. Here, we have investigated the effects of 3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy)methyl)azetidine hydrochloride (KHG26792) on ATP-induced activation of NFAT and MAPK through P2X7 receptor in the BV-2 mouse microglial cell line. KHG26792 decreased ATP-induced TNF-α release from BV-2 microglia by suppressing, at least partly, P2X7 receptor stimulation. KHG26792 also inhibited the ATP-induced increase in IL-6, PGE2, NO, ROS, CXCL2, and CCL3. ATP induced NFAT activation through P2X7 receptor, with KHG26792 reducing the ATP-induced NFAT activation. KHG26792 inhibited an ATP-induced increase in iNOS protein and ERK phosphorylation. KHG26792 prevented an ATP-induced increase in MMP-9 activity through the P2X7 receptor as a result of degradation of TIMP-1 by cathepsin B. Our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of KHG26792 in the inhibition of TNF-α produced via P2X7 receptor-mediated activation of NFAT and MAPK pathways in ATP-treated BV-2 cells. This study highlights the potential use of KHG26792 as a therapeutic agent for the many diseases of the CNS related to activated microglia.

  3. Role of ATP and related purines in inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Knight, Gillian E; Wildman, Scott SP; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: As adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is one of the inhibitory mediators of the bladder outflow region, this study investigates the possible release of ATP or related purines in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and the purinoceptor(s) involved in nerve-mediated relaxations of the pig urinary bladder neck. Experimental approach: Urothelium-denuded and intact phenylephrine-precontracted strips were mounted in organ baths containing physiological saline solution at 37°C and gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 for isometric force recordings. Key results: EFS, in the presence of atropine, guanethidine and NG-nitro-L-arginine, and exogenous purines, produced frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations respectively. Adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine were more potent than ATP in producing relaxation, while uridine 5′-triphosphate, uridine 5′-diphosphate and α,β-methylene ATP were less effective. The non-selective P2 antagonist suramin, and the P2Y1 and P1 receptor blockers 2′-deoxy-N6-methyladenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate tetrasodium and 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline, respectively, inhibited the responses to EFS and ATP. The P1 agonist's potency was: 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)>4-2[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene propanoic acid hydrochloride>2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine>-2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamide = adenosine. 4-(-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl) phenol, an A2A antagonist, reduced the relaxations to EFS, adenosine and NECA. In urothelium-intact samples, relaxations to EFS and purines were smaller than in urothelium-denuded preparations. Neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels blockade failed to modify ATP relaxations. At basal tension, EFS- and ATP-induced contractions were resistant to desensitization or blockade of P2X1 and P2X3 receptors

  4. When Too Much ATP Is Bad for Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-08-14

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the energy currency of living cells. Even though ATP powers virtually all energy-dependent activities, most cellular ATP is utilized in protein synthesis via tRNA aminoacylation and guanosine triphosphate regeneration. Magnesium (Mg(2+)), the most common divalent cation in living cells, plays crucial roles in protein synthesis by maintaining the structure of ribosomes, participating in the biochemistry of translation initiation and functioning as a counterion for ATP. A non-physiological increase in ATP levels hinders growth in cells experiencing Mg(2+) limitation because ATP is the most abundant nucleotide triphosphate in the cell, and Mg(2+) is also required for the stabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane and as a cofactor for essential enzymes. We propose that organisms cope with Mg(2+) limitation by decreasing ATP levels and ribosome production, thereby reallocating Mg(2+) to indispensable cellular processes.

  5. Mechanism of ATP-driven PCNA clamp loading by S. cerevisiae RFC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siying; Levin, Mikhail K.; Sakato, Miho; Zhou, Yayan; Hingorani, Manju M.

    2009-01-01

    Circular clamps tether polymerases to DNA, serving as essential processivity factors in genome replication, and function in other critical cellular processes as well. Clamp loaders catalyze clamp assembly onto DNA, and the question of how these proteins construct a topological link between a clamp and DNA remains open, especially the mechanism by which ATP is utilized for the task. Here we describe pre-steady state analysis of ATP hydrolysis, PCNA clamp opening and DNA binding by S. cerevisiae RFC, and present the first kinetic model of a eukaryotic clamp loading reaction validated by global data analysis. ATP binding to multiple RFC subunits initiates a slow conformational change in the clamp loader, enabling it to bind and open PCNA, and bind DNA as well. PCNA opening locks RFC into an active state, and the resulting RFC•ATP•PCNA(open) intermediate is ready for entry of DNA into the clamp. DNA binding commits RFC to ATP hydrolysis, which is followed by PCNA closure and PCNA•DNA release. This model enables quantitative understanding of the multi-step mechanism of a eukaryotic clamp loader, and furthermore facilitates comparative analysis of loaders from diverse organisms. PMID:19285992

  6. Single turnovers of fluorescent ATP bound to bipolar myosin filament during actin filaments sliding

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Takahiro; Kobatake, Takahiro; Okubo, Hiroyuki; Chaen, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide turnover rates of bipolar myosin thick filament along which actin filament slides were measured by the displacement of prebound fluorescent ATP analog 2′(3′)-O-[N-[2-[(Cy3)]amindo]ethyl] carbamoyl]-adenosine 5′ triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP) upon flash photolysis of caged ATP. The fluorescence of the thick filament where actin filament slides decayed with two exponential processes. The slower rate constant was the same as that without actin filament. Along bipolar myosin thick filament, actin filaments slide at a fast speed towards the central bare zone (forward), but more slowly away from the bare zone (backward). The displacement rate constant of fluorescent ATP from the myosin filament where actin filament moved forward was 5.0 s−1, whereas the rate constant where the actin filament slid backward was 1.7 s−1. These findings suggest that the slow ADP release rate is responsible for the slow backward sliding movement. PMID:27493536

  7. The protein targeting factor Get3 functions as ATP-independent chaperone under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Voth, Wilhelm; Schick, Markus; Gates, Stephanie; Li, Sheng; Vilardi, Fabio; Gostimskaya, Irina; Southworth, Daniel R; Schwappach, Blanche; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    Exposure of cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes a rapid and significant drop in intracellular ATP levels. This energy depletion negatively affects ATP-dependent chaperone systems, making ROS-mediated protein unfolding and aggregation a potentially very challenging problem. Here we show that Get3, a protein involved in ATP-dependent targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins under nonstress conditions, turns into an effective ATP-independent chaperone when oxidized. Activation of Get3's chaperone function, which is a fully reversible process, involves disulfide bond formation, metal release, and its conversion into distinct, higher oligomeric structures. Mutational studies demonstrate that the chaperone activity of Get3 is functionally distinct from and likely mutually exclusive with its targeting function, and responsible for the oxidative stress-sensitive phenotype that has long been noted for yeast cells lacking functional Get3. These results provide convincing evidence that Get3 functions as a redox-regulated chaperone, effectively protecting eukaryotic cells against oxidative protein damage.

  8. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the catalysis of shikimate kinase and adenylate kinase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    that kinase enzymes achieve the observed 2,500-fold variation in KM through a combination of the various conserved “push” and “pull” mechanisms associated with the release of C8-H, the proton transfer cascades unique to the class of kinase in question and the resultant/concomitant creation of a pentavalent species from the γ-phosphate group of ATP. Also demonstrated is the interplay between the role of the C8-H of ATP and the ATP concentration in the observed enzyme activity. The lability of the C8-H mediated by active site residues co-ordinated to the purine ring of ATP therefore plays a significant role in explaining the broad KM range associated with kinase steady state enzyme activities. PMID:22876783

  9. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients.

  10. From ATP to PTP and back. A dual function for the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Paolo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Fogolari, Federico; Lippe, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a fundamental role in heart physiology, but are also key effectors of dysfunction and death. This dual role assumes a new meaning following recent advances on the nature and regulation of the permeability transition pore, an inner membrane channel whose opening requires matrix Ca2+ and is modulated by many effectors including reactive oxygen species, matrix cyclophilin D, Pi and matrix pH. The recent demonstration that the F-ATP synthase can reversibly undergo a Ca2+-dependent transition to form a channel that mediates the permeability transition opens new perspectives to the field. These findings demand a reassessment of the modifications of F-ATP synthase that take place in the heart under pathological conditions and of their potential role in determining the transition of F-ATP synthase from and energy-conserving into an energy-dissipating device. PMID:25999424

  11. FasL-triggered death of Jurkat cells requires caspase 8-induced, ATP-dependent cross-talk between Fas and the purinergic receptor P2X(7).

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Juan C; Henríquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-02-01

    Fas ligation via the ligand FasL activates the caspase-8/caspase-3-dependent extrinsic death pathway. In so-called type II cells, an additional mechanism involving tBid-mediated caspase-9 activation is required to efficiently trigger cell death. Other pathways linking FasL-Fas interaction to activation of the intrinsic cell death pathway remain unknown. However, ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic P2X(7) receptors (P2X(7)Rs) favors cell death in some cells. Here, we evaluated the possibility that ATP release downstream of caspase-8 via pannexin1 hemichannels (Panx1 HCs) and subsequent activation of P2X(7)Rs participate in FasL-stimulated cell death. Indeed, upon FasL stimulation, ATP was released from Jurkat cells in a time- and caspase-8-dependent manner. Fas and Panx1 HCs colocalized and inhibition of the latter, but not connexin hemichannels, reduced FasL-induced ATP release. Extracellular apyrase, which hydrolyzes ATP, reduced FasL-induced death. Also, oxidized-ATP or Brilliant Blue G, two P2X(7)R blockers, reduced FasL-induced caspase-9 activation and cell death. These results represent the first evidence indicating that the two death receptors, Fas and P2X(7)R connect functionally via caspase-8 and Panx1 HC-mediated ATP release to promote caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent cell death in lymphoid cells. Thus, a hitherto unsuspected route was uncovered connecting the extrinsic to the intrinsic pathway to amplify death signals emanating from the Fas receptor in type II cells.

  12. FasL-triggered death of Jurkat cells requires caspase 8-induced, ATP-dependent cross-talk between Fas and the purinergic receptor P2X(7).

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Juan C; Henríquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-02-01

    Fas ligation via the ligand FasL activates the caspase-8/caspase-3-dependent extrinsic death pathway. In so-called type II cells, an additional mechanism involving tBid-mediated caspase-9 activation is required to efficiently trigger cell death. Other pathways linking FasL-Fas interaction to activation of the intrinsic cell death pathway remain unknown. However, ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic P2X(7) receptors (P2X(7)Rs) favors cell death in some cells. Here, we evaluated the possibility that ATP release downstream of caspase-8 via pannexin1 hemichannels (Panx1 HCs) and subsequent activation of P2X(7)Rs participate in FasL-stimulated cell death. Indeed, upon FasL stimulation, ATP was released from Jurkat cells in a time- and caspase-8-dependent manner. Fas and Panx1 HCs colocalized and inhibition of the latter, but not connexin hemichannels, reduced FasL-induced ATP release. Extracellular apyrase, which hydrolyzes ATP, reduced FasL-induced death. Also, oxidized-ATP or Brilliant Blue G, two P2X(7)R blockers, reduced FasL-induced caspase-9 activation and cell death. These results represent the first evidence indicating that the two death receptors, Fas and P2X(7)R connect functionally via caspase-8 and Panx1 HC-mediated ATP release to promote caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent cell death in lymphoid cells. Thus, a hitherto unsuspected route was uncovered connecting the extrinsic to the intrinsic pathway to amplify death signals emanating from the Fas receptor in type II cells. PMID:22806078

  13. Clusterin and COMMD1 Independently Regulate Degradation of the Mammalian Copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B*

    PubMed Central

    Materia, Stephanie; Cater, Michael A.; Klomp, Leo W. J.; Mercer, Julian F. B.; La Fontaine, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are copper-transporting P1B-type ATPases (Cu-ATPases) that are critical for regulating intracellular copper homeostasis. Mutations in the genes encoding ATP7A and ATP7B lead to copper deficiency and copper toxicity disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Clusterin and COMMD1 were previously identified as interacting partners of these Cu-ATPases. In this study, we confirmed that clusterin and COMMD1 interact to down-regulate both ATP7A and ATP7B. Overexpression and knockdown of clusterin/COMMD1 decreased and increased, respectively, endogenous levels of ATP7A and ATP7B, consistent with a role in facilitating Cu-ATPase degradation. We demonstrate that whereas the clusterin/ATP7B interaction was enhanced by oxidative stress or mutation of ATP7B, the COMMD1/ATP7B interaction did not change under oxidative stress conditions, and only increased with ATP7B mutations that led to its misfolding. Clusterin and COMMD1 facilitated the degradation of ATP7B containing the same Wilson disease-causing C-terminal mutations via different degradation pathways, clusterin via the lysosomal pathway and COMMD1 via the proteasomal pathway. Furthermore, endogenous ATP7B existed in a complex with clusterin and COMMD1, but these interactions were neither competitive nor cooperative and occurred independently of each other. Together these data indicate that clusterin and COMMD1 represent alternative and independent systems regulating Cu-ATPase quality control, and consequently contributing to the maintenance of copper homeostasis. PMID:22130675

  14. Similarities between UDP-Glucose and Adenine Nucleotide Release in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Esther, Charles R.; Sesma, Juliana I.; Dohlman, Henrik G.; Ault, Addison D.; Clas, Marién L.; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular UDP-glucose is a natural purinergic receptor agonist, but its mechanisms of cellular release remain unclear. We studied these mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a simple model organism that releases ATP, another purinergic agonist. Similar to ATP, UDP-glucose was released by S. cerevisiae at a rate that was linear over time. However, unlike ATP release, UDP-glucose release was not dependent on glucose stimulation. This discrepancy was resolved by demonstrating the apparent glucose stimulation of ATP release reflected glucose-dependent changes in the intracellular pattern of adenine nucleotides, with AMP release dominating in the absence of glucose. Indeed, total adenine nucleotide release, like UDP-glucose release, did not vary with glucose concentration over the short term. The genetic basis of UDP-glucose release was explored through analysis of deletion mutants, aided by development of a novel bioassay for UDP-glucose based on signaling through heterologously expressed human P2Y14 receptors. Using this assay, an elevated rate of UDP-glucose release was demonstrated in mutants lacking the putative Golgi nucleotide sugar transporter YMD8. An increased rate of UDP-glucose release in ymd8Δ was reduced by deletion of the YEA4 UDP-N-acetylglucosamine or the HUT1 UDP-galactose transporters, and overexpression of YEA4 or HUT1 increased the rate of UDP-glucose release. These findings suggest an exocytotic release mechanism similar to that of ATP, a conclusion supported by decreased rates of ATP, AMP, and UDP-glucose release in response to the secretory inhibitor Brefeldin A. These studies demonstrate the involvement of the secretory pathway in nucleotide and nucleotide sugar efflux in yeast and offer a powerful model system for further investigation. PMID:18693752

  15. Central presynaptic terminals are enriched in ATP but the majority lack mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Vrushali; Willis, Jeffery; Walker, Sidney K; Clark, Helen R; Liu, Xinran; Fox, Michael A; Srivastava, Sarika; Mukherjee, Konark

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic neurotransmission is known to be an energy demanding process. At the presynapse, ATP is required for loading neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles, for priming synaptic vesicles before release, and as a substrate for various kinases and ATPases. Although it is assumed that presynaptic sites usually harbor local mitochondria, which may serve as energy powerhouse to generate ATP as well as a presynaptic calcium depot, a clear role of presynaptic mitochondria in biochemical functioning of the presynapse is not well-defined. Besides a few synaptic subtypes like the mossy fibers and the Calyx of Held, most central presynaptic sites are either en passant or tiny axonal terminals that have little space to accommodate a large mitochondrion. Here, we have used imaging studies to demonstrate that mitochondrial antigens poorly co-localize with the synaptic vesicle clusters and active zone marker in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and the cerebellum. Confocal imaging analysis on neuronal cultures revealed that most neuronal mitochondria are either somatic or distributed in the proximal part of major dendrites. A large number of synapses in culture are devoid of any mitochondria. Electron micrographs from neuronal cultures further confirm our finding that the majority of presynapses may not harbor resident mitochondria. We corroborated our ultrastructural findings using serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) and found that more than 60% of the presynaptic terminals lacked discernible mitochondria in the wild-type mice hippocampus. Biochemical fractionation of crude synaptosomes into mitochondria and pure synaptosomes also revealed a sparse presence of mitochondrial antigen at the presynaptic boutons. Despite a low abundance of mitochondria, the synaptosomal membranes were found to be highly enriched in ATP suggesting that the presynapse may possess alternative mechanism/s for concentrating ATP for its function. The potential mechanisms including

  16. Butyl benzyl phthalate suppresses the ATP-induced cell proliferation in human osteosarcoma HOS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P.-S.; Chen, C.-Y.

    2010-05-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), an endocrine disruptor present in the environment, exerts its genomic effects via intracellular steroid receptors and elicits non-genomic effects by interfering with membrane ion-channel receptors. We previously found that BBP blocks the calcium signaling coupled with P2X receptors in PC12 cells (Liu and Chen, 2006). Osteoblast P2X receptors were recently reported to play a role in cell proliferation and bone remodeling. In this present study, the effects of BBP on ATP-induced responses were investigated in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. These receptors mRNA had been detected, named P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y5, P2Y9, and P2Y11, in human osteosarcoma HOS cells by RT-PCR. The enhancement of cell proliferation and the decrease of cytoviability had both been shown to be coupled to stimulation via different concentrations of ATP. BBP suppressed the ATP-induced calcium influx (mainly coupled with P2X) and cell proliferation but not the ATP-induced intracellular calcium release (mainly coupled with P2Y) and cytotoxicity in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. Suramin, a common P2 receptor's antagonist, blocked the ATP-induced calcium signaling, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity. We suggest that P2X is mainly responsible for cell proliferation, and P2Y might be partially responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. BBP suppressed the calcium signaling coupled with P2X, suppressing cell proliferation. Since the importance of P2X receptors during bone metastasis has recently become apparent, the possible toxic risk of environmental BBP during bone remodeling is a public problem of concern.

  17. Protection of hypoxia-induced ATP decrease in endothelial cells by ginkgo biloba extract and bilobalide.

    PubMed

    Janssens, D; Michiels, C; Delaive, E; Eliaers, F; Drieu, K; Remacle, J

    1995-09-28

    Due to their localization at the interface between blood and tissue, endothelial cells are the first target of any change occurring within the blood, and alterations of their functions can seriously impair organs. During hypoxia, which mimics in vivo ischemia, a cascade of events occurs in the endothelial cells, starting with a decrease in ATP content and leading to their activation and release of inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 and one of its constituents, bilobalide, were shown to inhibit the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP content in endothelial cells in vitro. Under these conditions, glycolysis was activated, as evidenced by increased glucose transport, as well as increased lactate production. Bilobalide was found to increase glucose transport under normoxic but not hypoxic conditions. In addition, EGb and bilobalide prevented the increase in total lactate production observed after 60 min of hypoxia. However, after 120 min of hypoxia, the total lactate production was similar under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and both compounds increased this production. These results indicate that glycolysis slowed down between the 60th and 120th minute of hypoxia, while EGb and bilobalide delayed the onset of glycolysis activation. In another experimental model, both compounds were shown to increase the respiratory control ratio of mitochondria isolated from liver of rats treated orally. Since ischemia is known to uncouple mitochondria, the protection of ATP content and the delay in glycolysis activation observed during hypoxia in the presence of EGb 761 or bilobalide is best explained by a protection of mitochondrial respiratory activity, at least during the first 60 min of hypoxia incubation. Both products retain the ability to form ATP, thereby reducing the cell's need to induce glycolysis, probably by preserving ATP regeneration by mitochondria as long as oxygen is available.

  18. Fluorescent ATP analog mant-ATP reports dynein activity in the isolated Chlamydomonas axoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilova, Maria; Howard, Jonathon

    Eukaryotic flagella are long rod-like extensions of cells, which play a fundamental role in single cell movement, as well as in fluid transport. Flagella contain a highly evolutionary conserved mechanical structure called the axoneme. The motion of the flagellum is generated by dynein motor proteins located all along the length of the axoneme. How the force production of motors is controlled spatially and temporally is still an open question. Therefore, monitoring dynein activity in the axonemal structure is expected to provide novel insights in regulation of the beat. We use high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy to monitor the binding and hydrolysis kinetics of the fluorescently labeled ATP analogue mant-ATP (2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate), which is known to support dynein activity. By studying the kinetics of mant-ATP fluorescence, we identified distinct mant-ATP binding sites in the axoneme. The application of this method to axonemes with reduced amounts of dynein, showed evidence that one of the sites is associated with binding to dynein. In the future, we would like to use this method to find the spatial distribution of dynein activity in the axoneme.

  19. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop.

  20. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca2+ signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  1. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  2. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  3. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  4. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H.W.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-01-01

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1. PMID:26543158

  5. Atomic structure of the apoptosome: mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mengying; Li, Yini; Hu, Qi; Bai, Xiao-Chen; Huang, Weiyun; Yan, Chuangye; Scheres, Sjors H W; Shi, Yigong

    2015-11-15

    The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) controls the onset of many known forms of intrinsic apoptosis in mammals. Apaf-1 exists in normal cells as an autoinhibited monomer. Upon binding to cytochrome c and dATP, Apaf-1 oligomerizes into a heptameric complex known as the apoptosome, which recruits and activates cell-killing caspases. Here we present an atomic structure of an intact mammalian apoptosome at 3.8 Å resolution, determined by single-particle, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Structural analysis, together with structure-guided biochemical characterization, uncovered how cytochrome c releases the autoinhibition of Apaf-1 through specific interactions with the WD40 repeats. Structural comparison with autoinhibited Apaf-1 revealed how dATP binding triggers a set of conformational changes that results in the formation of the apoptosome. Together, these results constitute the molecular mechanism of cytochrome c- and dATP-mediated activation of Apaf-1.

  6. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  7. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-01

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released. Abbreviations: ACh, acetylcholine AFM, atomic force microscopy

  8. P2Y2 receptor activation opens pannexin-1 channels in rat carotid body type II cells: potential role in amplifying the neurotransmitter ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Piskuric, Nikol A; Vollmer, Cathy; Nurse, Colin A

    2012-09-01

    Signal processing in the carotid body (CB) is initiated at receptor glomus (or type I) cells which depolarize and release the excitatory neurotransmitter ATP during chemoexcitation by hypoxia and acid hypercapnia. Glomus cell clusters (GCs) occur in intimate association with glia-like type II cells which express purinergic P2Y2 receptors (P2Y2Rs) but their function is unclear. Here we immunolocalize the gap junction-like protein channel pannexin-1 (Panx-1) in type II cells and show Panx-1 mRNA expression in the rat CB. As expected, type II cell activation within or near isolated GCs by P2Y2R agonists, ATP and UTP (100 μm), induced a rise in intracellular [Ca(2+)]. Moreover in perforated-patch whole cell recordings from type II cells, these agonists caused a prolonged depolarization and a concentration-dependent, delayed opening of non-selective ion channels that was prevented by Panx-1 blockers, carbenoxolone (5 μm) and 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS; 10 μm). Because Panx-1 channels serve as conduits for ATP release, we hypothesized that paracrine, type II cell P2Y2R activation leads to ATP-induced ATP release. In proof-of-principle experiments we used co-cultured chemoafferent petrosal neurones (PNs), which express P2X2/3 purinoceptors, as sensitive biosensors of ATP released from type II cells. In several cases, UTP activation of type II cells within or near GCs led to depolarization or increased firing in nearby PNs, and the effect was reversibly abolished by the selective P2X2/3 receptor blocker, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS; 10 μm). We propose that CB type II cells may function as ATP amplifiers during chemotransduction via paracrine activation of P2Y2Rs and Panx-1 channels.

  9. Diversity and regulation of ATP sulfurylase in photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Prioretti, Laura; Gontero, Brigitte; Hell, Ruediger; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the sulfate assimilation pathway, the activation of sulfate prior to its reduction. ATPS has been studied in only a few model organisms and even in these cases to a much smaller extent than the sulfate reduction and cysteine synthesis enzymes. This is possibly because the latter were considered of greater regulatory importance for sulfate assimilation. Recent evidences (reported in this paper) challenge this view and suggest that ATPS may have a crucial regulatory role in sulfate assimilation, at least in algae. In the ensuing text, we summarize the current knowledge on ATPS, with special attention to the processes that control its activity and gene(s) expression in algae. Special attention is given to algae ATPS proteins. The focus on algae is the consequence of the fact that a comprehensive investigation of ATPS revealed that the algal enzymes, especially those that are most likely involved in the pathway of sulfate reduction to cysteine, possess features that are not present in other organisms. Remarkably, algal ATPS proteins show a great diversity of isoforms and a high content of cysteine residues, whose positions are often conserved. According to the occurrence of cysteine residues, the ATPS of eukaryotic algae is closer to that of marine cyanobacteria of the genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus and is more distant from that of freshwater cyanobacteria. These characteristics might have evolved in parallel with the radiation of algae in the oceans and the increase of sulfate concentration in seawater. PMID:25414712

  10. A hierarchy of ATP-consuming processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Buttgereit, F; Brand, M D

    1995-01-01

    The rates of different ATP-consuming reactions were measured in concanavalin A-stimulated thymocytes, a model system in which more than 80% of the ATP consumption can be accounted for. There was a clear hierarchy of the responses of different energy-consuming reactions to changes in energy supply: pathways of macromolecule biosynthesis (protein synthesis and RNA/DNA synthesis) were most sensitive to energy supply, followed by sodium cycling and then calcium cycling across the plasma membrane. Mitochondrial proton leak was the least sensitive to energy supply. Control analysis was used to quantify the relative control over ATP production exerted by the individual groups of ATP-consuming reactions. Control was widely shared; no block of reactions had more than one-third of the control. A fuller control analysis showed that there appeared to be a hierarchy of control over the flux through ATP: protein synthesis > RNA/DNA synthesis and substrate oxidation > Na+ cycling and Ca2+ cycling > other ATP consumers and mitochondrial proton leak. Control analysis also indicated that there was significant control over the rates of individual ATP consumers by energy supply. Each ATP consumer had strong control over its own rate but very little control over the rates of the other ATP consumers. Images Figure 3 PMID:7492307

  11. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  12. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  13. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio.

    PubMed

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside the cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We, therefore, developed a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here, we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy.

  14. The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter MCU is essential for glucose-induced ATP increases in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Andrei I; Semplici, Francesca; Ravier, Magalie A; Bellomo, Elisa A; Pullen, Timothy J; Gilon, Patrick; Sekler, Israel; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2012-01-01

    Glucose induces insulin release from pancreatic β-cells by stimulating ATP synthesis, membrane depolarisation and Ca(2+) influx. As well as activating ATP-consuming processes, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases may also potentiate mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Until recently, the ability to study the role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion has been hindered by the absence of suitable approaches either to suppress Ca(2+) uptake into these organelles, or to examine the impact on β-cell excitability. Here, we have combined patch-clamp electrophysiology with simultaneous real-time imaging of compartmentalised changes in Ca(2+) and ATP/ADP ratio in single primary mouse β-cells, using recombinant targeted (Pericam or Perceval, respectively) as well as entrapped intracellular (Fura-Red), probes. Through shRNA-mediated silencing we show that the recently-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, MCU, is required for depolarisation-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases, and for a sustained increase in cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio. By contrast, silencing of the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger NCLX affected the kinetics of glucose-induced changes in, but not steady state values of, cytosolic ATP/ADP. Exposure to gluco-lipotoxic conditions delayed both mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio increases without affecting the expression of either gene. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation, mediated by MCU and modulated by NCLX, is thus required for normal glucose sensing by pancreatic β-cells, and becomes defective in conditions mimicking the diabetic milieu.

  15. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding.

  16. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This ‘DNA sliding’ is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. PMID:26538601

  17. Interaction of beef-heart mitochondrial F1-ATPase with immobilized ATP in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Beharry, S; Bragg, P D

    1992-10-01

    Dimethylsulfoxide [Me2SO, 30% (v/v)] promotes the formation of ATP from ADP and phosphate catalyzed by soluble mitochondrial F1-ATPase. The effects of this solvent on the interaction of beef-heart mitochondrial F1 with the immobilized ATP of Agarose-hexane-ATP were studied. In the presence of Me2SO, F1 bound less readily to the immobilized ATP, but once bound was more difficult to elute with exogenous ATP. This suggests that not only was the binding affinity for adenine nucleotide at the first binding site affected but that adenine nucleotide binding affinity at the second and/or third sites, which interact cooperatively with the first site to release bound nucleotide, was also affected. A reduction in the binding of [3H]ADP to these sites was shown. A change in the conformation of F1 in 30% (v/v) Me2SO was demonstrated by crosslinking and by the increased resistance of the enzyme to cold denaturation.

  18. Activated Müller Cells Involved in ATP-Induced Upregulation of P2X7 Receptor Expression and Retinal Ganglion Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Xie, Yuting; Xue, Bo; Guan, Huaijin

    2016-01-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, plays an important role in glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptotic death, in which activated retinal Müller glial cells may be involved by releasing ATP. In the present study, we investigated whether and how activated Müller cells may induce changes in P2X7R expression in RGCs by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques. Intravitreal injection of DHPG, a group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR I) agonist, induced upregulation of GFAP expression, suggestive of Müller cell activation (gliosis), as we previously reported. Accompanying Müller cell activation, P2X7R protein expression was upregulated, especially in the cells of ganglion cell layer (GCL), which was reversed by coinjection of brilliant blue G (BBG), a P2X7R blocker. In addition, intravitreal injection of ATP also induced upregulation of P2X7R protein expression. Similar results were observed in cultured retinal neurons by ATP treatment. Moreover, both DHPG and ATP intravitreal injection induced a reduction in the number of fluorogold retrogradely labeled RGCs, and the DHPG effect was partially rescued by coinjection of BBG. All these results suggest that activated Müller cells may release ATP and, in turn, induce upregulation of P2X7R expression in the cells of GCL, thus contributing to RGC death. PMID:27738636

  19. Target-induced structure switching of hairpin aptamers for label-free and sensitive fluorescent detection of ATP via exonuclease-catalyzed target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunying; Xu, Jin; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we described the development of a new label-free, simple and sensitive fluorescent ATP sensing platform based on exonuclease III (Exo III)-catalyzed target recycling (ECTR) amplification and SYBR Green I indicator. The hairpin aptamer probes underwent conformational structure switching and re-configuration in the presence of ATP, which led to catalytic cleavage of the re-configured aptamers by Exo III to release ATP and to initiate the ECTR process. Such ECTR process resulted in the digestion of a significant number of the hairpin aptamer probes, leading to much less intercalation of SYBR Green I to the hairpin stems and drastic suppression of the fluorescence emission for sensitive ATP detection down to the low nanomolar level. Due to the highly specific affinity bindings between aptamers and ATP, the developed method exhibited excellent selectivity toward ATP against other analogous molecules. Besides, our ATP sensing approach used un-modified aptamer probes and could be performed in a "mix-and-detect" fashion in homogenous solutions. All these distinct advantages of the developed method thus made it hold great potential for the development of simple and robust sensing strategies for the detection of other small molecules.

  20. Electrochemiluminescent biosensor of ATP using tetrahedron structured DNA and a functional oligonucleotide for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation and target identification.

    PubMed

    Bu, Nan-Nan; Gao, Ai; He, Xi-Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2013-05-15

    Restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure are the main limitations in single-stranded DNA aptamer-based electrochemical sensors. Chemical labeling of the aptamer with a probe at the end of aptamer is inefficient and time-consuming. In this work, tetrahedron-structured DNA (ts-DNA) and a functionalized oligonucleotide (FO) were used to develop an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) aptasensor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a model target. The ts-DNA was formed with three thiolated oligonucleotides and one oligonucleotide containing anti-ATP aptamer. The FO contained a complementary strand to the anti-ATP aptamer and an intermolecular duplex for Ru(phen)3(2+) intercalation. After the ts-DNA was immobilized on the electrode surface through gold-thiol interactions, hybridization between the anti-ATP aptamer and its complementary strand introduced the intercalated Ru(phen)3(2+) to the electrode. ECL emission from Ru(phen)3(2+) was observed with tripropylamine as a co-reactant. Once ATP reacted with its aptamer, the aptamer-complimentary strand duplex dissociated and the intermolecular duplex containing Ru(phen)3(2+) was released. The difference in emission before and after reaction with ATP was used to quantify ATP with a detection limit of 0.2nM. The ts-DNA increased the sensitivity compared to conventional methods, and the intercalation strategy avoided a complex chemical labeling procedure.

  1. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  2. ATP synthesis in Halobacterium saccharovorum: evidence that synthesis may be catalysed by an F0F1-ATP synthase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.

    1992-01-01

    Halobacterium saccharovorum synthesized ATP in response to a pH shift from 8 to 6.2. Synthesis was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chloro-phenylhydrazone, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, and azide. Nitrate, an inhibitor of the membrane-bound ATPase previously isolated from this organism, did not inhibit ATP synthesis. N-Ethymaleimide, which also inhibited this ATPase, stimulated the production of ATP. These observations suggested that H. saccharovorum synthesized and hydrolysed ATP using different enzymes and that the vacuolar-like ATPase activity previously described in H. saccharovorum was an ATPase whose function is yet to be identified.

  3. Effects of altering the ATP/ADP ratio on pump-mediated Na/K and Na/Na exchanges in resealed human red blood cell ghosts

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Resealed human red blood cell ghosts were prepared to contain a range of ADP concentrations at fixed ATP concentrations and vice versa. ATP/ADP ratios ranging from approximately 0.2 to 50 were set and maintained (for up to 45 min) in this system. ATP and ADP concentrations were controlled by the addition of either a phosphoarginine- or phosphocreatine-based regenerating system. Ouabain- sensitive unidirectional Na efflux was determined in the presence and absence of 15 mM external K as a function of the nucleotide composition. Na/K exchange was found to increase to saturation with ATP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 250 microM), whereas Na/Na exchange (measured in K-free solutions) was a saturating function of ADP (K 1/2 approximately equal to 350 microM). The elevation of ATP from approximately 100 to 1,800 microM did not appreciably affect Na/Na exchange. In the presence of external Na and a saturating concentration of external K, increasing the ADP concentration at constant ATP was found to decrease ouabain-sensitive Na/K exchange. The decreased Na/K exchange that still remained when the ADP/ATP ratio was high was stimulated by removal of external Na. Assuming that under normal substrate conditions the reaction cycle of the Na/K pump is rate- limited by the conformational change associated with the release of occluded K [E2 X (K) X ATP----E1 X ATP + K], increasing ADP inhibits the rate of these transformations by competition with ATP for the E2(K) form. A less likely alternative is that inhibition is due to competition with ATP at the high-affinity site (E1). The acceleration of the Na/K pump that occurs upon removing external Na at high levels of ADP evidently results from a shift in the forward direction of the transformation of the intermediates involved with the release of occluded Na from E1P X (Na). Thus, the nucleotide composition and the Na gradient can modulate the rate at which the Na/K pump operates. PMID:3950576

  4. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-04-19

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells.In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin.In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin.ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype.Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly.We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  5. ATP7B expression confers multidrug resistance through drug sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Moinuddin, F M; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Komatsu, Masaharu; Mitsuo, Ryoichi; Minami, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Kawahara, Kohich; Hirano, Hirofumi; Arita, Kazunori; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that ATP7B is involved in cisplatin resistance and ATP7A confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. In this study, we show that ATP7B expressing cells also are resistant to doxorubicin, SN-38, etoposide, and paclitaxel as well as cisplatin. In ATP7B expressing cells, doxorubicin relocated from the nuclei to the late-endosome at 4 hours after doxorubicin exposure. EGFP-ATP7B mainly colocalized with doxorubicin. ATP7B has six metal binding sites (MBSs) in the N-terminal cytoplasmic region. To investigate the role of the MBSs of ATP7B in doxorubicin resistance, we used three mutant ATP7B (Cu0, Cu6 and M6C/S) expressing cells. Cu0 has no MBSs, Cu6 has only the sixth MBS and M6C/S carries CXXC to SXXS mutation in the sixth MBS. Cu6 expressing cells were less resistance to the anticancer agents than wild type ATP7B expressing cells, and had doxorubicin sequestration in the late-endosome. Cu0- and M6C/S-expressing cells were sensitive to doxorubicin. In these cells, doxorubicin did not relocalize to the late-endosome. EGFP-M6C/S mainly localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) even in the presence of copper. Thus the cysteine residues in the sixth MBS of ATP7B are essential for MDR phenotype. Finally, we found that ammonium chloride and tamoxifen suppressed late endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin, thereby attenuating drug resistance. These results suggest that the sequestration depends on the acidity of the vesicles partly. We here demonstrate that ATP7B confers MDR by facilitating nuclear drug efflux and late endosomal drug sequestration. PMID:26988911

  6. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P R; Michelsen, O

    1992-12-01

    The membrane-bound H(+)-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth rate and growth yield were decreased less than expected for a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis alone as a source of ATP. Moreover, the respiration rate of a atp deletion strain was increased by 40% compared with the wild-type strain. This result is surprising, since the atp deletion strain is not able to utilize the resulting proton motive force for ATP synthesis. Indeed, the ratio of ATP concentration to ADP concentration was decreased from 19 in the wild type to 7 in the atp mutant, and the membrane potential of the atp deletion strain was increased by 20%, confirming that the respiration rate was not controlled by the magnitude of the opposing membrane potential. The level of type b cytochromes in the mutant cells was 80% higher than the level in the wild-type cells, suggesting that the increased respiration was caused by an increase in the expression of the respiratory genes. The atp deletion strain produced twice as much by-product (acetate) and exhibited increased flow through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. These three changes all lead to an increase in substrate level phosphorylation; the first two changes also lead to increased production of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis.

  7. Sympathetic co-transmission: the coordinated action of ATP and noradrenaline and their modulation by neuropeptide Y in human vascular neuroeffector junctions.

    PubMed

    Pablo Huidobro-Toro, J; Verónica Donoso, M

    2004-10-01

    The historical role of noradrenaline as the predominant sympathetic neurotransmitter in vascular neuroeffector junctions has matured to include ATP and the modulator action of neuropeptide Y (NPY). Numerous studies with isolated blood vessels rings demonstrate the presence of key enzymes responsible for the synthesis of ATP, noradrenaline and NPY, their co-storage, and their electrically evoked release from sympathetic perivascular nerve terminals. Functional assays coincide to demonstrate the integral role of these neurochemicals in sympathetic reflexes. In addition, the detection of the diverse receptor populations for ATP, noradrenaline and NPY in blood vessels, either in the smooth muscle, endothelial cells or nerve endings, further contribute to the notion that sympathetic vascular reflexes encompass the orchestrated action of the noradrenaline and ATP, and their modulation by NPY. The future clinical opportunities of sympathetic co-transmission in the control of human cardiovascular diseases will be highlighted.

  8. Regulation of quantal transmitter secretion by ATP and protein kinases at developing neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Fu, W M; Chen, Y H; Lee, K F; Liou, J C

    1997-04-01

    The effects of endogenously released ATP on the maturation of developing neuromuscular synapses were investigated in Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures. The potentiating action of ATP (1 mM) on spontaneous acetylcholine release was inhibited by P2-purinoceptor antagonists suramin (0.3 mM) and reactive blue 2 (RB-2, 3 microM) in day 1 cultures. Bath application of suramin (10 microM) or RB-2 in day 1 cultures and prolonged treatment for 2 days dramatically decreased the amplitude of both spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs) and evoked synaptic currents (ESCs) in the same cultures on day 3. Chronic treatment with 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (4 microM) or 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitroquinoxaline (CNQX, 10 microM), P1-purinoceptor and glutamate receptor antagonists respectively, did not exert such an inhibitory effect. Chronic treatment with suramin or RB-2 for 2 days had no significant effect on the amplitude of either iontophoretic acetylcholine-induced whole-cell currents or single acetylcholine channel measurements in 3-day-old cultured myocytes. In addition, prolonged treatment for 2 days with various kinase inhibitors such as H-8 (10 microM), KN-62 (5 microM) and H-7 (10 microM) also decreased the amplitudes of both spontaneous and evoked synaptic currents in natural synapses, but not those of iontophoretic acetylcholine-induced currents. Furthermore, suramin and these protein kinase inhibitors also decreased the amplitude of spontaneous synaptic currents in manipulated synapses of 'vacated' nerve terminals. The results suggest that endogenously released ATP, acting in concert with various protein kinases, is involved in the maintenance and/or development of the quantum size of synaptic vesicles at embryonic neuromuscular synapses. PMID:9153574

  9. Purinergic Signaling in Early Inflammatory Events of the Foreign Body Response: Modulating Extracellular ATP as an Enabling Technology for Engineered Implants and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fann, Stephen A.; Yost, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signaling is a ubiquitous and vital aspect of mammalian biology in which purines—mainly adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—are released from cells through loss of membrane integrity (cell death), exocytosis, or transport/diffusion across membrane channels, and exert paracrine or autocrine signaling effects through three subclasses of well-characterized receptors: the P1 adenosine receptors, the P2X ionotropic nucleotide receptors, and the P2Y metabotropic receptors. ATP and its metabolites are released by damaged and stressed cells in injured tissues. The early events of wound healing, hemostasis, and inflammation are highly regulated by these signals through activation of purinergic receptors on platelets and neutrophils. Recent data have demonstrated that ATP signaling is of particular importance to targeting leukocytes to sites of injury. This is particularly relevant to the subject of implanted medical devices, engineered tissues, and grafts as all these technologies elicit a wound healing response with varying degrees of encapsulation, rejection, extrusion, or destruction of the tissue or device. Here, we review the biology of purinergic signaling and focus on ATP release and response mechanisms that pertain to the early inflammatory phase of wound healing. Finally, therapeutic options are explored, including a new class of peptidomimetic drugs based on the ATP-conductive channel connexin43. PMID:24279914

  10. Synphilin-1 binds ATP and regulates intracellular energy status.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianxia; Liu, Jingnan; Smith, Wanli W

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that synphilin-1, a cytoplasmic protein, is involved in energy homeostasis. Overexpression of synphilin-1 in neurons results in hyperphagia and obesity in animal models. However, the mechanism by which synphilin-1 alters energy homeostasis is unknown. Here, we used cell models and biochemical approaches to investigate the cellular functions of synphilin-1 that may affect energy balance. Synphilin-1 was pulled down by ATP-agarose beads, and the addition of ATP and ADP reduced this binding, indicating that synphilin-1 bound ADP and ATP. Synphilin-1 also bound GMP, GDP, and GTP but with a lower affinity than it bound ATP. In contrast, synphilin-1 did not bind with CTP. Overexpression of synphilin-1 in HEK293T cells significantly increased cellular ATP levels. Genetic alteration to abolish predicted ATP binding motifs of synphilin-1 or knockdown of synphilin-1 by siRNA reduced cellular ATP levels. Together, these data demonstrate that synphilin-1 binds and regulates the cellular energy molecule, ATP. These findings provide a molecular basis for understanding the actions of synphilin-1 in energy homeostasis.

  11. The ATP synthase: the understood, the uncertain and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Walker, John E

    2013-02-01

    The ATP synthases are multiprotein complexes found in the energy-transducing membranes of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria. They employ a transmembrane protonmotive force, Δp, as a source of energy to drive a mechanical rotary mechanism that leads to the chemical synthesis of ATP from ADP and Pi. Their overall architecture, organization and mechanistic principles are mostly well established, but other features are less well understood. For example, ATP synthases from bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts differ in the mechanisms of regulation of their activity, and the molecular bases of these different mechanisms and their physiological roles are only just beginning to emerge. Another crucial feature lacking a molecular description is how rotation driven by Δp is generated, and how rotation transmits energy into the catalytic sites of the enzyme to produce the stepping action during rotation. One surprising and incompletely explained deduction based on the symmetries of c-rings in the rotor of the enzyme is that the amount of energy required by the ATP synthase to make an ATP molecule does not have a universal value. ATP synthases from multicellular organisms require the least energy, whereas the energy required to make an ATP molecule in unicellular organisms and chloroplasts is higher, and a range of values has been calculated. Finally, evidence is growing for other roles of ATP synthases in the inner membranes of mitochondria. Here the enzymes form supermolecular complexes, possibly with specific lipids, and these complexes probably contribute to, or even determine, the formation of the cristae.

  12. Metabolic properties of low ATP erythrocytes of the monotremes.

    PubMed

    Kim, H D; Zeidler, R B; Sallis, J; Nicol, S; Isaacks, R E

    1984-02-13

    The erythrocytes of the monotremes, having a trace amount of ATP, can metabolize glucose to lactate at a rate comparable to human and other mammalian erythrocytes. The echidna energy metabolism is unique in that adenosine can stimulate glycolytic carbon flow, resulting in a nearly 20-fold net synthesis of ATP.

  13. Subunit Movements in Single Membrane-bound H+-ATP Synthases from Chloroplasts during ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bienert, Roland; Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Diez, Manuel; Gräber, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Subunit movements within the H+-ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF0F1) are investigated during ATP synthesis. The γ-subunit (γCys-322) is covalently labeled with a fluorescence donor (ATTO532). A fluorescence acceptor (adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imino)triphosphate (AMPPNP)-ATTO665) is noncovalently bound to a noncatalytic site at one α-subunit. The labeled CF0F1 is integrated into liposomes, and a transmembrane pH difference is generated by an acid base transition. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer is measured in freely diffusing proteoliposomes with a confocal two-channel microscope. The fluorescence time traces reveal a repetitive three-step rotation of the γ-subunit relative to the α-subunit during ATP synthesis. Some traces show splitting into sublevels with fluctuations between the sublevels. During catalysis the central stalk interacts, with equal probability, with each αβ-pair. Without catalysis the central stalk interacts with only one specific αβ-pair, and no stepping between FRET levels is observed. Two inactive states of the enzyme are identified: one in the presence of AMPPNP and one in the presence of ADP. PMID:19864418

  14. Subunit movements in single membrane-bound H+-ATP synthases from chloroplasts during ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Roland; Rombach-Riegraf, Verena; Diez, Manuel; Gräber, Peter

    2009-12-25

    Subunit movements within the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts (CF(0)F(1)) are investigated during ATP synthesis. The gamma-subunit (gammaCys-322) is covalently labeled with a fluorescence donor (ATTO532). A fluorescence acceptor (adenosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imino)triphosphate (AMPPNP)-ATTO665) is noncovalently bound to a noncatalytic site at one alpha-subunit. The labeled CF(0)F(1) is integrated into liposomes, and a transmembrane pH difference is generated by an acid base transition. Single-pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer is measured in freely diffusing proteoliposomes with a confocal two-channel microscope. The fluorescence time traces reveal a repetitive three-step rotation of the gamma-subunit relative to the alpha-subunit during ATP synthesis. Some traces show splitting into sublevels with fluctuations between the sublevels. During catalysis the central stalk interacts, with equal probability, with each alphabeta-pair. Without catalysis the central stalk interacts with only one specific alphabeta-pair, and no stepping between FRET levels is observed. Two inactive states of the enzyme are identified: one in the presence of AMPPNP and one in the presence of ADP.

  15. Amperometric ATP biosensor based on polymer entrapped enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kueng, Angelika; Kranz, Christine; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2004-05-15

    A dual enzyme electrode for the detection of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) at physiologically relevant pH levels was developed by co-immobilization of the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOD) and hexokinase (HEX) using pH-shift induced deposition of enzyme containing polymer films. Application of a simple electrochemical procedure for the co-immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces exhibits a major improvement of sensitivity, response time, reproducibility, and ease of fabrication of ATP biosensors. Competition between glucose oxidase and hexokinase for the substrate glucose involving ATP as a co-substrate allows the determination of ATP concentrations. Notable control on the immobilization process enables fabrication of micro biosensors with a diameter of 25 microm. The presented concept provides the technological basis for a new generation of fast responding, sensitive, and robust biosensors for the detection of ATP at physiological pH values with a detection limit of 10 nmol l(-1). PMID:15046763

  16. Emerging enzymes for ATP regeneration in biocatalytic processes.

    PubMed

    Andexer, Jennifer N; Richter, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate-dependent enzyme catalysed reactions are widespread in nature. Consequently, the enzymes involved have an intrinsic potential for use in syntheses of high value products. Although regeneration systems for ATP starting from adenosine-5'-diphosphate are available, certain limitations exist for both in vitro and in vivo applications requiring ATP regeneration from adenosine-5'-monophosphate, or adenosine. Following a short overview of the chemical and thermodynamic background, this Minireview focuses on emerging enzymes and methodologies for ATP regeneration. A large range of as yet unexploited reactions will be accessible with new, powerful, multistep ATP regeneration systems that use cheap phosphate donors and provide high longevity, compatibility, and robustness under process conditions. Their potential might go far beyond the direct use of ATP in enzymatic reactions; enzyme discovery, and engineering, as well as immobilisation strategies, will help to realise such systems.

  17. Visualization of the mechanochemical coupling in myosin V using deac-aminoATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaoto, Takeshi; Webb, Martin; Forgacs, Eva; White, Howard; Sellers, Jim

    2010-03-01

    MyosinV is a twoheaded motor, which moves processively along an actin with ADP-release as the rate limiting step. The kinetic cycles of the two heads are gated by the internal strain each places on the other Mechanical studies suggest that there is tight coupling (i.e., one ATP is hydrolyzed per power stroke). We investigated the coordination between the ATPase mechanism of the two heads-myosin Va and directly visualized the binding and dissociation of nucleotide molecules, while simultaneously observing the stepping motion of the myosin V as it moved along an actin filament. To do this, we used an fluorescent labeled ATP analog, deac-aminoATP, which shows a 20fold increase in fluorescent intensity when bound to the active site of myosinV I directly demonstrate tight coupling between myosin V movement and the binding and dissociation of nucleotide by simultaneously imaging with near nanometre precision. Supported by K99/R00 NIH grant.

  18. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naser A.; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO42-), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO42--activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S2-) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  19. ATP-sulfurylase, sulfur-compounds, and plant stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Gill, Ritu; Kaushik, Manjeri; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal; Tuteja, Narendra; Gill, Sarvajeet S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur (S) stands fourth in the list of major plant nutrients after N, P, and K. Sulfate (SO4 (2-)), a form of soil-S taken up by plant roots is metabolically inert. As the first committed step of S-assimilation, ATP-sulfurylase (ATP-S) catalyzes SO4 (2-)-activation and yields activated high-energy compound adenosine-5(')-phosphosulfate that is reduced to sulfide (S(2-)) and incorporated into cysteine (Cys). In turn, Cys acts as a precursor or donor of reduced S for a range of S-compounds such as methionine (Met), glutathione (GSH), homo-GSH (h-GSH), and phytochelatins (PCs). Among S-compounds, GSH, h-GSH, and PCs are known for their involvement in plant tolerance to varied abiotic stresses, Cys is a major component of GSH, h-GSH, and PCs; whereas, several key stress-metabolites such as ethylene, are controlled by Met through its first metabolite S-adenosylmethionine. With the major aim of briefly highlighting S-compound-mediated role of ATP-S in plant stress tolerance, this paper: (a) overviews ATP-S structure/chemistry and occurrence, (b) appraises recent literature available on ATP-S roles and regulations, and underlying mechanisms in plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance, (c) summarizes ATP-S-intrinsic regulation by major S-compounds, and (d) highlights major open-questions in the present context. Future research in the current direction can be devised based on the discussion outcomes. PMID:25904923

  20. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  1. The conformational transition pathway of ATP binding cassette transporter MsbA revealed by atomistic simulations.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jing-Wei; Fan, Kang-Nian; Wang, Wen-Ning

    2010-01-29

    ATP binding cassette transporters are integral membrane proteins that use the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) to translocate a wide variety of substrates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes. MsbA from Gram-negative bacteria is a lipid and multidrug resistance ATP binding cassette exporter that can undergo large scale conformational changes between the outward-facing and the inward-facing conformations revealed by crystal structures in different states. Here, we use targeted molecular dynamics simulation methods to explore the atomic details of the conformational transition from the outward-facing to the inward-facing states of MsbA. The molecular dynamics trajectories revealed a clear spatiotemporal order of the conformational movements. The disruption of the nucleotide binding sites at the NBD dimer interface is the very first event that initiates the following conformational changes, verifying the assumption that the conformational conversion is triggered by ATP hydrolysis. The conserved x-loops of the NBDs were identified to participate in the interaction network that stabilizes the cytoplasmic tetrahelix bundle of the TMDs and play an important role in mediating the cross-talk between the NBD and TMD. The movement of the NBD dimer is transmitted through x-loops to break the tetrahelix bundle, inducing the packing rearrangements of the transmembrane helices at the cytoplasmic side and the periplasmic side sequentially. The packing rearrangement within each periplasmic wing of TMD that results in exposure of the substrate binding sites occurred at the end stage of the trajectory, preventing the wrong timing of the binding site accessibility.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of IL-6 in bile duct epithelia by extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Sheung, Nina; Soliman, Elwy M.; Spirli, Carlo; Dranoff, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine IL-6 is essential for cell survival after liver injury. Bile duct epithelia (BDE) markedly upregulate IL-6 release after liver injury, but the mechanisms regulating this have not been defined. Purinergic signals induce multiple potent downstream effects in BDE, so the goals of this study were to determine whether extracellular ATP regulates BDE IL-6 transcription and to identify the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. Effects of extracellular nucleotides on IL-6 transcription in primary rat bile duct epithelia were assessed. The relative effects of cAMP and cytosolic calcium were determined by use of agonists and antagonists. The role of the cAMP response element (CRE) was determined by site-directed mutagenesis. We found that ATP potently upregulated IL-6 mRNA, and that the pharmacological profile for IL-6 upregulation was most consistent with the newly identified P2Y11 receptor. This occurred in a cAMP-dependent and calcium-dependent fashion. The effect of cAMP and calcium agonists on IL-6 promoter activity was synergistic, and mutation of the IL-6 CRE blocked upregulation by ATP. Taken together, these data show that extracellular ATP acts through a mechanism involving a rat P2Y receptor functionally related to the P2Y11 receptor, cAMP, and calcium signals and that the IL-6 promoter CRE to upregulate transcription of IL-6 in BDE. Since IL-6 has such critical importance in the liver, it is likely that this pathway is of great relevance to the understanding of hepatic response to injury. PMID:19136380

  3. GLUCOSE-INDUCED INTESTINAL VASODILATION VIA ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS REQUIRES NITRIC OXIDE BUT NOT K+ATP CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Paul J.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Both nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine A1 receptor activation mediate microvascular vasodilation during intestinal glucose absorption. Our overall hypothesis is that ATP utilization during glucose absorption would increase adenosine metabolite release, which acts on adenosine A1 receptors to alter endothelial production of NO and/or activate ATP-dependent potassium channels (K+ATP) to dilate intestinal microvessels. METHODS Intravital videomicroscopy of the rat jejunum was used to record the vascular responses of inflow (termed 1A) arterioles and proximal (p3A) and distal (d3A) premucosal arterioles during exposure to isotonic glucose or mannitol solutions alone or in the presence of the selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), or a K+ATP channel inhibitor (glibenclamide). RESULTS As expected, glucose exposure caused rapid dilation of both p3A and d3A arterioles, while mannitol exposure had no effect on microvascular diameters. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade completely prevented glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles. NOS inhibition significantly blunted the glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles, but had little effect in the mannitol group. Simultaneous application of both the NOS inhibitor and the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist gave the same reduction in glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist alone. Blockade of K+ATP channels with glibenclamide did not attenuate glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that glucose-induced vasodilation of premucosal jejunal arterioles is mediated through adenosine A1 receptors, and NO at least partially mediates the adenosine A1 receptor-induced vasodilation. In addition, K+ATP channels are not involved in premucosal arteriolar vasodilation during intestinal glucose exposure. PMID

  4. Roles of ATP and NADPH in formation of the Fe-S cluster of spinach ferredoxin. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Fujita, Yuichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigated whether ATP and NADPH in the chloroplast system of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) are involved in the supply of ({sup 35}S)sulfide or iron, or in Fe-S cluster formation itself. ({sup 35}S)Sulfide was liberated from ({sup 35}S)cysteine in an NADPH-dependent manner, whereas ATP was not necessary for this process. This desulfhydration of ({sup 35}S)cysteine occurred before the formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster, and the amount of radioactivity in ({sup 35}S)sulfide was greater than that in {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd by a factor of more than 20. Addition of nonradioactive sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) inhibited competitively formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster along with the addition of nonradioactive cysteine, indicating that some of the inorganic sulfide released from cysteine is incorporated into the Fe-S cluster of Fd. ATP hydrolysis was not involved in the production of inorganic sulfide or in the supply of iron for assembly into the Fe-S cluster. However, ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation was observed even in the presence of sufficient amounts of ({sup 35}S)sulfide and iron. These results suggest a novel type of ATP-dependent in vivo Fe-S cluster formation that is distinct from in vitro chemical reconstitution. The implications of these results for the possible mechanisms of ATP-dependent Fe-S cluster formation are discussed.

  5. Dimers of mitochondrial ATP synthase form the permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Valentina; von Stockum, Sophia; Antoniel, Manuela; Fabbro, Astrid; Fogolari, Federico; Forte, Michael; Glick, Gary D.; Petronilli, Valeria; Zoratti, Mario; Szabó, Ildikó; Lippe, Giovanna; Bernardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Here we define the molecular nature of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), a key effector of cell death. The PTP is regulated by matrix cyclophilin D (CyPD), which also binds the lateral stalk of the FOF1 ATP synthase. We show that CyPD binds the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein subunit of the enzyme at the same site as the ATP synthase inhibitor benzodiazepine 423 (Bz-423), that Bz-423 sensitizes the PTP to Ca2+ like CyPD itself, and that decreasing oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein expression by RNAi increases the sensitivity of the PTP to Ca2+. Purified dimers of the ATP synthase, which did not contain voltage-dependent anion channel or adenine nucleotide translocator, were reconstituted into lipid bilayers. In the presence of Ca2+, addition of Bz-423 triggered opening of a channel with currents that were typical of the mitochondrial megachannel, which is the PTP electrophysiological equivalent. Channel openings were inhibited by the ATP synthase inhibitor AMP-PNP (γ-imino ATP, a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog) and Mg2+/ADP. These results indicate that the PTP forms from dimers of the ATP synthase. PMID:23530243

  6. The origin of cytosolic ATP in photosynthetic cells.

    PubMed

    Gardeström, Per; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    In photosynthetically active cells, both chloroplasts and mitochondria have the capacity to produce ATP via photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, respectively. Thus, theoretically, both organelles could provide ATP for the cytosol, but the extent, to which they actually do this, and how the process is regulated, both remain unclear. Most of the evidence discussed comes from experiments with rapid fractionation of isolated protoplasts subjected to different treatments in combination with application of specific inhibitors. The results obtained indicate that, under conditions where ATP demand for photosynthetic CO2 fixation is sufficiently high, the mitochondria supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. In contrast, under stress conditions where CO2 fixation is severely limited, ATP will build up in chloroplasts and it can then be exported to the cytosol, by metabolite shuttle mechanisms. Thus, depending on the conditions, either mitochondria or chloroplasts can supply the bulk of ATP for the cytosol. This supply of ATP is discussed in relation to the idea that mitochondrial functions may be tuned to provide an optimal environment for the chloroplast. By balancing cellular redox states, mitochondria can contribute to an optimal photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27087668

  7. Breast Feeding Increases Vasoconstriction Induced by Electrical Field Stimulation in Rat Mesenteric Artery. Role of Neuronal Nitric Oxide and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Granado, Miriam; Balfagón, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate in rat mesenteric artery whether breast feeding (BF) affects the vasomotor response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS), participation by different innervations in the EFS-induced response and the mechanism/s underlying these possible modifications. Methods Experiments were performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats (3 months old), divided into three groups: Control (in oestrous phase), mothers after 21 days of BF, and mothers that had recovered their oestral cycle (After BF, in oestrous phase). Vasomotor response to EFS, noradrenaline (NA) and nitric oxide (NO) donor DEA-NO were studied. Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) and phosphorylated nNOS (P-nNOS) protein expression were analysed and NO, superoxide anion (O2.–), NA and ATP releases were also determined. Results EFS-induced contraction was higher in the BF group, and was recovered after BF. 1 µmol/L phentolamine decreased the response to EFS similarly in control and BF rats. NA vasoconstriction and release were similar in both experimental groups. ATP release was higher in segments from BF rats. 0.1 mmol/L L-NAME increased the response to EFS in both control and BF rats, but more so in control animals. BF decreased NO release and did not modify O2.– production. Vasodilator response to DEA-NO was similar in both groups, while nNOS and P-nNOS expressions were decreased in segments from BF animals. Conclusion Breast feeding increases EFS-induced contraction in mesenteric arteries, mainly through the decrease of neuronal NO release mediated by decreased nNOS and P-nNOS expression. Sympathetic function is increased through the increased ATP release in BF rats. PMID:23342008

  8. [Magnetic Magnesium Isotope Accelerates ATP Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Myosin].

    PubMed

    Koltover, V K; Labyntseva, R D; Karandashev, V K; Kosterin, S O

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of experimental studies on the influence of different magnesium isotopes, the magnetic 25Mg and nonmagnetic 24Mg and 26Mg on ATP activity of the isolated myosin subfragment-1. The reaction rate in the presence of magetic 25Mg isotope turned out to be 2.0-2.5 times higher than that using nonmagnetic 24Mg and 2 Mg isotopes. No magnetic isotope effect was observed in the absence of the enzyme as in spontaneous ATP hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Hence, a significant catalytic effect of the magnetic 25Mg isotope (nuclear spin catalysis) was observed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP.

  9. An ATP synthase harboring an atypical γ-subunit is involved in ATP synthesis in tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Pateraki, Irini; Renato, Marta; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín; Boronat, Albert

    2013-04-01

    Chromoplasts are non-photosynthetic plastids specialized in the synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids. During fruit ripening, chloroplasts differentiate into photosynthetically inactive chromoplasts in a process characterized by the degradation of the thylakoid membranes, and by the active synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids. This transition renders chromoplasts unable to photochemically synthesize ATP, and therefore these organelles need to obtain the ATP required for anabolic processes through alternative sources. It is widely accepted that the ATP used for biosynthetic processes in non-photosynthetic plastids is imported from the cytosol or is obtained through glycolysis. In this work, however, we show that isolated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit chromoplasts are able to synthesize ATP de novo through a respiratory pathway using NADPH as an electron donor. We also report the involvement of a plastidial ATP synthase harboring an atypical γ-subunit induced during ripening, which lacks the regulatory dithiol domain present in plant and algae chloroplast γ-subunits. Silencing of this atypical γ-subunit during fruit ripening impairs the capacity of isolated chromoplast to synthesize ATP de novo. We propose that the replacement of the γ-subunit present in tomato leaf and green fruit chloroplasts by the atypical γ-subunit lacking the dithiol domain during fruit ripening reflects evolutionary changes, which allow the operation of chromoplast ATP synthase under the particular physiological conditions found in this organelle.

  10. Apyrase Suppression Raises Extracellular ATP Levels and Induces Gene Expression and Cell Wall Changes Characteristic of Stress Responses1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Min Hui; Wu, Jian; Yao, Jianchao; Gallardo, Ignacio F.; Dugger, Jason W.; Webb, Lauren J.; Huang, James; Salmi, Mari L.; Song, Jawon; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells release ATP into their extracellular matrix as they grow, and extracellular ATP (eATP) can modulate the rate of cell growth in diverse tissues. Two closely related apyrases (APYs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), APY1 and APY2, function, in part, to control the concentration of eATP. The expression of APY1/APY2 can be inhibited by RNA interference, and this suppression leads to an increase in the concentration of eATP in the extracellular medium and severely reduces growth. To clarify how the suppression of APY1 and APY2 is linked to growth inhibition, the gene expression changes that occur in seedlings when apyrase expression is suppressed were assayed by microarray and quantitative real-time-PCR analyses. The most significant gene expression changes induced by APY suppression were in genes involved in biotic stress responses, which include those genes regulating wall composition and extensibility. These expression changes predicted specific chemical changes in the walls of mutant seedlings, and two of these changes, wall lignification and decreased methyl ester bonds, were verified by direct analyses. Taken together, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that APY1, APY2, and eATP play important roles in the signaling steps that link biotic stresses to plant defense responses and growth changes. PMID:24550243

  11. Protection of mice from endotoxic death by 2-methylthio-ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, R A; Denlinger, L C; Leventhal, P S; Daugherty, S K; van de Loo, J W; Tanke, T; Firestein, G S; Bertics, P J

    1994-01-01

    The lethal effects of endotoxin, a bacterial product shed into the blood during bacteremia, are thought to be due to macrophage release of mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1. Although much is known about the pathophysiology of endotoxemia, relatively little is known about the cellular signaling mechanisms that are involved. The data in this study suggest that extracellular adenine nucleotides can influence the development of endotoxin shock. An adenine nucleotide analog, 2-methylthio-ATP, inhibited the endotoxin-stimulated release of toxic mediators (i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 1), and it protected mice from endotoxin-induced death. These studies suggest a fundamental and unusual role for adenine nucleotides on endotoxin action, and they provide a potentially new therapeutic approach for the control of the pathophysiology of Gram-negative septicemia. Images PMID:8016108

  12. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-limiting ADP release

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S.A. Kuznetsov and V.I. Gelfand is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin. The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that P/sub i/ release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (K/sub i/ < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by (/sup 14/C)ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  13. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  14. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na/sup +/ or K/sup +/ (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer.

  15. Retrotranslocation of MHC class I heavy chain from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol is dependent on ATP supply to the ER lumen.

    PubMed

    Albring, Jörn; Koopmann, Jens-Oliver; Hämmerling, Günter J; Momburg, Frank

    2004-01-01

    MHC class I heavy chains (HC) that fail to acquire a mature conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a result of defective folding or assembly with beta2-microglobulin, or lack of appropriate peptide cargo are retrotranslocated through the Sec61 channel to the cytosol for degradation by proteasomes. The mechanisms involved in ER retrotranslocation of HC are as yet incompletely understood. Using a microsomal system, we characterized the molecular requirements for the release of HC into the soluble fraction. Extraction of ubiquitinated HC was facilitated by cytosol, or by addition of proteins that stabilized the membrane association of the cytoplasmic ATPase p97. Functional proteasomes were not needed for HC mobilization. ATP supply to the ER lumen was found to be an essential factor since an inhibitor of the ATP importing pump in the ER membrane blocked HC release. Also non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs delivered to the ER lumen facilitated HC export suggesting that ATP binding by ER chaperones rather than ATP hydrolysis is involved. PMID:14644099

  16. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas Joseph (Inventor); Yang, Robert Alexander (Inventor); Brown, Christopher William (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a pyrotechnic actuated release mechanism which is mechanically two fault tolerant for effecting release. It is particularly well suited for releasably connecting structures to be used in the space environment or in other aerospace applications. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body, each attachable to either one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the body are fastenable by a toggle supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end, which is received in a central opening in the fastener body and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein, the toggle is restrained by three retractable latching pins. Each pin is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge. While retraction of all three pins releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt is mounted on the fastener plate as a support for the socket mounting of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for pre-loading the toggle.

  17. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  18. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, Erin L.; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J.; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B.; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H.; Mikati, Mohamad A.; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na+/K+-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  19. Distinct neurological disorders with ATP1A3 mutations.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, Erin L; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brashear, Allison; Clapcote, Steven J; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Goldstein, David B; Jóhannesson, Sigurður H; Mikati, Mohamad A; Neville, Brian; Nicole, Sophie; Ozelius, Laurie J; Poulsen, Hanne; Schyns, Tsveta; Sweadner, Kathleen J; van den Maagdenberg, Arn; Vilsen, Bente

    2014-05-01

    Genetic research has shown that mutations that modify the protein-coding sequence of ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cause both rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism and alternating hemiplegia of childhood. These discoveries link two clinically distinct neurological diseases to the same gene, however, ATP1A3 mutations are, with one exception, disease-specific. Although the exact mechanism of how these mutations lead to disease is still unknown, much knowledge has been gained about functional consequences of ATP1A3 mutations using a range of in-vitro and animal model systems, and the role of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases in the brain. Researchers and clinicians are attempting to further characterise neurological manifestations associated with mutations in ATP1A3, and to build on the existing molecular knowledge to understand how specific mutations can lead to different diseases. PMID:24739246

  20. Properties of ATP-gated ion channels assembled from P2X2 subunits in mouse cochlear Reissner's membrane epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morton-Jones, Rachel T; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M; Thorne, Peter R; Cockayne, Debra A; Ryan, Allen F; Housley, Gary D

    2015-12-01

    In the cochlea, Reissner's membrane separates the scala media endolymphatic compartment that sustains the positive endocochlear potential and ion composition necessary for sound transduction, from the scala vestibuli perilymphatic compartment. It is known that with sustained elevated sound levels, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released into the endolymph and ATP-gated ion channels on the epithelial cells lining the endolymphatic compartment shunt the electrochemical driving force, contributing to protective purinergic hearing adaptation. This study characterises the properties of epithelial cell P2X(2)-type ATP-activated membrane conductance in the mouse Reissner's membrane, which forms a substantial fraction of the scale media surface. The cells were found to express two isoforms (a and b) of the P2X(2) subunit arising from alternative splicing of the messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript that could contribute to the trimeric subunit assembly. The ATP-activated conductance demonstrated both immediate and delayed desensitisation consistent with incorporation of the combination of P2X(2) subunit isoforms. Activation by the ATP analogue 2meSATP had equipotency to ATP, whereas α,β-meATP and adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) were ineffective. Positive allosteric modulation of the P2X(2) channels by protons was profound. This native conductance was blocked by the P2X(2)-selective blocker pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and the conductance was absent in these cells isolated from mice null for the P2rX2 gene encoding the P2X(2) receptor subunit. The activation and desensitisation properties of the Reissner's membrane epithelial cell ATP-gated P2X(2) channels likely contribute to the sensitivity and kinetics of purinergic control of the electrochemical driving force for sound transduction invoked by noise exposure.

  1. Sodium-coupled ATP synthesis in the bacterium Vitreoscilla.

    PubMed

    Efiok, B J; Webster, D A

    1992-01-01

    The bacterium Vitreoscilla generates an electrical potential gradient due to sodium ion (delta psi Na+) across its membrane via respiratory-driven primary Na+ pump(s). The role of the delta psi Na+ as a driving force for ATP synthesis was, therefore, investigated. In respiring starved cells pulsed with 100 mM external Na+ [( Na+]o) there was a 167% net increase in cellular ATP concentration over basal levels compared with 0, 56, 78, and 78% for no addition, choline, Li+, and K+ controls, respectively. Doubling the [Na+]o to 200 mM boosted the net increase to 244% but a similar doubling of the choline caused only an increase to 78%. When the initial condition was intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i) = [Na+]o = 100 mM, there was a 94% net increase in cellular ATP compared with only 18 and 11% for Li+ and K+ controls, respectively, indicating that Nai+ may be the only cation tested that the cells extruded to generate the electrochemical gradient required to drive ATP synthesis. The Na(+)-dependent ATP synthesis was inhibited completely by monensin (12 microM), but only transiently by the protonophore 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (100 microM), further evidence that the Na+ gradient and not a H+ gradient was driving the ATP synthesis. ATP synthesis in response to an artificially imposed H+ gradient (delta pH approximately 3) in the absence of an added cation, or in the presence of Li+, K+, or choline, yielded similar delta ATP/delta pH ratios of 0.98-1.22. In the presence of Na+, however, this ratio dropped to 0.23, indicating that Na+ inhibited H(+)-coupling to ATP synthesis and possibly that H+ and Na+ coupling to ATP synthesis share a common catalyst. The above evidence adds to previous findings that under normal growth conditions Na+ is probably the main coupling cation for ATP synthesis in Vitreoscilla. PMID:1309288

  2. Highly Divergent Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Complexes in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Balabaskaran Nina, Praveen; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kane, Lesley A.; van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2010-01-01

    The F-type ATP synthase complex is a rotary nano-motor driven by proton motive force to synthesize ATP. Its F1 sector catalyzes ATP synthesis, whereas the Fo sector conducts the protons and provides a stator for the rotary action of the complex. Components of both F1 and Fo sectors are highly conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Therefore, it was a surprise that genes encoding the a and b subunits as well as other components of the Fo sector were undetectable in the sequenced genomes of a variety of apicomplexan parasites. While the parasitic existence of these organisms could explain the apparent incomplete nature of ATP synthase in Apicomplexa, genes for these essential components were absent even in Tetrahymena thermophila, a free-living ciliate belonging to a sister clade of Apicomplexa, which demonstrates robust oxidative phosphorylation. This observation raises the possibility that the entire clade of Alveolata may have invented novel means to operate ATP synthase complexes. To assess this remarkable possibility, we have carried out an investigation of the ATP synthase from T. thermophila. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed the ATP synthase to be present as a large complex. Structural study based on single particle electron microscopy analysis suggested the complex to be a dimer with several unique structures including an unusually large domain on the intermembrane side of the ATP synthase and novel domains flanking the c subunit rings. The two monomers were in a parallel configuration rather than the angled configuration previously observed in other organisms. Proteomic analyses of well-resolved ATP synthase complexes from 2-D BN/BN-PAGE identified orthologs of seven canonical ATP synthase subunits, and at least 13 novel proteins that constitute subunits apparently limited to the ciliate lineage. A mitochondrially encoded protein, Ymf66, with predicted eight transmembrane domains could be a substitute for the subunit a

  3. Manganese suppresses ATP-dependent intercellular calcium waves in astrocyte networks through alteration of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tjalkens, Ronald B; Zoran, Mark J; Mohl, Brianne; Barhoumi, Roula

    2006-10-01

    The neurotoxicity of manganese [Mn] is due in part to glutamate excitotoxicity. Release of ATP by astrocytes is a critical modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is regulated by calcium (Ca(2+)) waves that propagate through astrocytic networks in response to synaptic activity. It was postulated that Mn alters ATP-dependent intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in astrocytes, thereby suppressing Ca(2+) wave activity. Confluent primary cultures of cortical astrocytes were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fluo-4 and examined by fluorescence microscopy for Ca(2+) wave activity following micropipet mechanical stimulation of a single cell. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy following addition of ATP using the mitochondrial-specific Ca(2+) dye rhod-2-AM. Imaging studies revealed that pretreatment of astrocytes with 1-10 microM Mn significantly reduced the rate, area, and amplitude of mechanically induced Ca(2+) waves. This attenuation was not a result of inhibited mitochondrial calcium uptake because robust calcium waves were still observed following pretreatment of astrocytes with Ru360, an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, either in coupling or uncoupling conditions. However, determination of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) levels in cells using the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin indicated that Mn reduced the available pool of releasable ER Ca(2+) at concentrations as low as 1 muM. Examination of ATP-stimulated changes in mitochondrial Ca(2+) indicated that, in cells pretreated with Mn, mitochondria retained high levels of Ca(2+). It is concluded that exposure of astrocytes to low concentrations of Mn(2+) results in sequestration of Ca(2+) within the mitochondria that reduces the available pool of releasable Ca(2+) within the ER, thereby inhibiting calcium wave activity. PMID:16934782

  4. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier

    PubMed Central

    Harborne, Steven P.D.; Ruprecht, Jonathan J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  5. Calcium-induced conformational changes in the regulatory domain of the human mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier.

    PubMed

    Harborne, Steven P D; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-10-01

    The mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier imports adenine nucleotides from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix and exports phosphate. The carrier is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium, altering the size of the adenine nucleotide pool in the mitochondrial matrix in response to energetic demands. The protein consists of three domains; (i) the N-terminal regulatory domain, which is formed of two pairs of fused calcium-binding EF-hands, (ii) the C-terminal mitochondrial carrier domain, which is involved in transport, and (iii) a linker region with an amphipathic α-helix of unknown function. The mechanism by which calcium binding to the regulatory domain modulates substrate transport in the carrier domain has not been resolved. Here, we present two new crystal structures of the regulatory domain of the human isoform 1. Careful analysis by SEC confirmed that although the regulatory domain crystallised as dimers, full-length ATP-Mg/Pi carrier is monomeric. Therefore, the ATP-Mg/Pi carrier must have a different mechanism of calcium regulation than the architecturally related aspartate/glutamate carrier, which is dimeric. The structure showed that an amphipathic α-helix is bound to the regulatory domain in a hydrophobic cleft of EF-hand 3/4. Detailed bioinformatics analyses of different EF-hand states indicate that upon release of calcium, EF-hands close, meaning that the regulatory domain would release the amphipathic α-helix. We propose a mechanism for ATP-Mg/Pi carriers in which the amphipathic α-helix becomes mobile upon release of calcium and could block the transport of substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:26164100

  6. Sleep and brain energy levels: ATP changes during sleep.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Markus; McCarley, Robert W; Kim, Tae; Kalinchuk, Anna V; Basheer, Radhika

    2010-06-30

    Sleep is one of the most pervasive biological phenomena, but one whose function remains elusive. Although many theories of function, indirect evidence, and even common sense suggest sleep is needed for an increase in brain energy, brain energy levels have not been directly measured with modern technology. We here report that ATP levels, the energy currency of brain cells, show a surge in the initial hours of spontaneous sleep in wake-active but not in sleep-active brain regions of rat. The surge is dependent on sleep but not time of day, since preventing sleep by gentle handling of rats for 3 or 6 h also prevents the surge in ATP. A significant positive correlation was observed between the surge in ATP and EEG non-rapid eye movement delta activity (0.5-4.5 Hz) during spontaneous sleep. Inducing sleep and delta activity by adenosine infusion into basal forebrain during the normally active dark period also increases ATP. Together, these observations suggest that the surge in ATP occurs when the neuronal activity is reduced, as occurs during sleep. The levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (P-AMPK), well known for its role in cellular energy sensing and regulation, and ATP show reciprocal changes. P-AMPK levels are lower during the sleep-induced ATP surge than during wake or sleep deprivation. Together, these results suggest that sleep-induced surge in ATP and the decrease in P-AMPK levels set the stage for increased anabolic processes during sleep and provide insight into the molecular events leading to the restorative biosynthetic processes occurring during sleep.

  7. Chemoproteomic characterization of protein kinase inhibitors using immobilized ATP.

    PubMed

    Duncan, James S; Haystead, Timothy A J; Litchfield, David W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors have emerged as indispensable tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of specific signal transduction pathways and as promising candidates for molecular-targeted therapy. However, because many protein kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of specific protein kinases, the large number of protein kinases that are encoded within eukaryotic genomes and the existence of many other cellular proteins that bind ATP result in the prospect of off-target effects for many of these compounds. Many of the potential off-target effects remain unrecognized because protein kinase inhibitors are often developed and tested primarily on the basis of in vitro assays using purified components. To overcome this limitation, we describe a systematic approach to characterize ATP-competitive protein kinase inhibitors employing ATP-sepharose to capture the purine-binding proteome from cell extracts. Protein kinase inhibitors can be used in competition experiments to prevent binding of specific cellular proteins to ATP-sepharose or to elute bound proteins from ATP-sepharose. Collectively, these strategies can enable validation of interactions between a specific protein kinase and an inhibitor in complex mixtures and can yield the identification of inhibitor targets.

  8. Extracellular ATP induces hyperpolarization and motility stimulation of ciliary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tarasiuk, A; Bar-Shimon, M; Gheber, L; Korngreen, A; Grossman, Y; Priel, Z

    1995-01-01

    Cellular membrane potential and ciliary motility were examined in tissues cultures prepared from frog palate and esophagus epithelia. Addition of micromolar concentrations of extracellular ATP caused membrane hyperpolarization and enhanced the beat frequency. These two effects of ATP were 1) dose dependent, reaching a maximum at 10 microM ATP; 2) dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ or Mg2+; 3) insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels; 4) abolished after depleting the intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin; 5) attenuated by quinidine (1 mM), Cs+ (5-20 mM), and replacement of extracellular Na+ by K+; 6) insensitive to charybdotoxin (5-20 nM), TEA (1-20 microM), and apamin (0.1-1 microM); 7) independent of initial membrane potential; and 8) unaffected by amiloride. In addition, extracellular ATP induced an appreciable rise in intracellular Ca2+. Addition of thapsigargin caused an initial enhancement of the ciliary beat frequency and membrane hyperpolarization. These results strongly suggest the involvement of calcium-dependent potassium channels in the response to ATP. The results show that moderate hyperpolarization is closely associated with a sustained enhancement of ciliary beating by extracellular ATP. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:7756536

  9. Follow the ATP: tumor energy production: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Oronsky, Neil; Fanger, Gary R; Parker, Christopher W; Caroen, Scott Z; Lybeck, Michelle; Scicinski, Jan J

    2014-01-01

    As early as the 1920s, the eminent physician and chemist, Otto Warburg, nominated for a second Nobel Prize for his work on fermentation, observed that the core metabolic signature of cancer cells is a high glycolytic flux. Warburg averred that the prime mover of cancer is defective mitochondrial respiration, which drives a switch to an alternative energy source, aerobic glycolysis in lieu of Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS), in an attempt to maintain cellular viability and support critical macromolecular needs. The cell, deprived of mitochondrial ATP production, must reprogram its metabolism as a secondary survival mechanism to maintain sufficient ATP and NADH levels for macromolecule production, membrane integrity and DNA synthesis as well as maintenance of membrane ionic gradients. A time-tested method to identify and disrupt criminal activity is to "follow the money" since the illicit proceeds from crime are required to underwrite it. By analogy, strategies to target cancer involve following and disrupting the flow of ATP and NADH, the energetic and redox "currencies" of the cell, respectively, since the tumor requires high levels of ATP and NADH, not only for metastasis and proliferation, but also, on a more basic level, for survival. Accordingly, four broad ATP reduction strategies to impact and potentially derail cancer energy production are highlighted herein: 1) small molecule energy-restriction mimetic agents (ERMAs) that target various aspects of energy metabolism, 2) reduction of energy 'subsidization' with autophagy inhibitors, 3) acceleration of ATP turnover to increase energy inefficiency, and 4) dietary energy restriction to limit the energy supply.

  10. Catalytic Mechanism of the Maltose Transporter Hydrolyzing ATP.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenting; Liao, Jie-Lou

    2016-01-12

    We use quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations to study ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the maltose transporter. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family that consists of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The ABC proteins catalyze ATP hydrolysis to perform a variety of biological functions. Despite extensive research efforts, the precise molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the ABC enzymes remains elusive. In this work, the reaction pathway for ATP hydrolysis in the maltose transporter is evaluated using a QM/MM implementation of the nudged elastic band method without presuming reaction coordinates. The potential of mean force along the reaction pathway is obtained with an activation free energy of 19.2 kcal/mol in agreement with experiments. The results demonstrate that the reaction proceeds via a dissociative-like pathway with a trigonal bipyramidal transition state in which the cleavage of the γ-phosphate P-O bond occurs and the O-H bond of the lytic water molecule is not yet broken. Our calculations clearly show that the Walker B glutamate as well as the switch histidine stabilizes the transition state via electrostatic interactions rather than serving as a catalytic base. The results are consistent with biochemical and structural experiments, providing novel insight into the molecular mechanism of ATP hydrolysis in the ABC proteins. PMID:26666844

  11. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  12. A mechano-chemiosmotic model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis in energy-transforming membranes: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Eldar A; Kasumov, Ruslan E; Kasumova, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    -helix of γ-subunit that acts as a lift; then, in the formation of phosphoryl group; and lastly, in the release of ATP molecules from the active center of the enzyme and the loading of ADP. We are aware that our model is not an accepted model for ATP synthesis, but it is presented here for further examination and test.

  13. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) mitochondrial ATP synthase ATP5G1.

    PubMed

    Hou, W-R; Hou, Y-L; Ding, X; Wang, T

    2012-09-03

    The ATP5G1 gene is one of the three genes that encode mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c of the proton channel. We cloned the cDNA and determined the genomic sequence of the ATP5G1 gene from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cloned cDNA fragment contains an open reading frame of 411 bp encoding 136 amino acids; the length of the genomic sequence is of 1838 bp, containing three exons and two introns. Alignment analysis revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced protein sequence are highly conserved compared to Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos taurus, and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of the giant panda ATP5G1 to those of these species are 93.92, 92.21, 92.46, 93.67, and 92.46%, respectively, and the homologies for amino acid sequences are 90.44, 95.59, 93.38, 94.12, and 91.91%, respectively. Topology prediction showed that there is one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, five N-myristoylation sites, and one ATP synthase c subunit signature in the ATP5G1 protein of the giant panda. The cDNA of ATP5G1 was transfected into Escherichia coli, and the ATP5G1 fused with the N-terminally GST-tagged protein gave rise to accumulation of an expected 40-kDa polypeptide, which had the characteristics of the predicted protein.

  14. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) mitochondrial ATP synthase ATP5G1.

    PubMed

    Hou, W-R; Hou, Y-L; Ding, X; Wang, T

    2012-01-01

    The ATP5G1 gene is one of the three genes that encode mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit c of the proton channel. We cloned the cDNA and determined the genomic sequence of the ATP5G1 gene from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cloned cDNA fragment contains an open reading frame of 411 bp encoding 136 amino acids; the length of the genomic sequence is of 1838 bp, containing three exons and two introns. Alignment analysis revealed that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced protein sequence are highly conserved compared to Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bos taurus, and Sus scrofa. The homologies for nucleotide sequences of the giant panda ATP5G1 to those of these species are 93.92, 92.21, 92.46, 93.67, and 92.46%, respectively, and the homologies for amino acid sequences are 90.44, 95.59, 93.38, 94.12, and 91.91%, respectively. Topology prediction showed that there is one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one casein kinase II phosphorylation site, five N-myristoylation sites, and one ATP synthase c subunit signature in the ATP5G1 protein of the giant panda. The cDNA of ATP5G1 was transfected into Escherichia coli, and the ATP5G1 fused with the N-terminally GST-tagged protein gave rise to accumulation of an expected 40-kDa polypeptide, which had the characteristics of the predicted protein. PMID:23007995

  15. ATP hydrolysis is critically required for function of CaV1.3 channels in cochlear inner hair cells via fueling Ca2+ clearance.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Simon; Krinner, Stefanie; Wong, Aaron B; Moser, Tobias; Pangršič, Tina

    2014-05-14

    Sound encoding is mediated by Ca(2+) influx-evoked release of glutamate at the ribbon synapse of inner hair cells. Here we studied the role of ATP in this process focusing on Ca(2+) current through CaV1.3 channels and Ca(2+) homeostasis in mouse inner hair cells. Patch-clamp recordings and Ca(2+) imaging demonstrate that hydrolyzable ATP is essential to maintain synaptic Ca(2+) influx in inner hair cells via fueling Ca(2+)-ATPases to avoid an increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and subsequent Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation of CaV1.3 channels.

  16. Inosine preserves ATP during ischemia and enhances recovery during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Devous, M D; Lewandowski, E D

    1987-11-01

    The effects of exogenous inosine (IN) on high-energy phosphate metabolism and function in isolated, working rabbit hearts were monitored with 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Dynamic measurements of ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) were made along with concomitant functional recordings during normal perfusion, global ischemia (IS), and reperfusion (RE). We found that 0.1 mM IN enhanced the rate of pressure development (dP/dt) within the left ventricle by 10 +/- 5% (n = 7). Although IN levels in treated hearts were elevated during normal perfusion, no effect was observed on ATP or PCr levels. However during IS, pretreatment with IN minimized ATP loss for the first 20 min relative to untreated controls (UNT, P less than 0.05). Both IN and UNT hearts that were ischemic for only 13.5 min regained function during a 60-min RE period. However, at the end of IS, IN hearts (n = 8) displayed 88 +/- 10% of the pre-IS ATP levels, whereas UNT hearts (n = 7) retained only 60 +/- 10%. With RE, ATP in IN hearts remained elevated over that of UNT hearts for the entire 60 min. IN treatment also increased the rate of recovery of dP/dt and maintained improved function over 60 min of RE. No correlation was found between post-IS ATP levels and dP/dt values during RE in either IN or UNT hearts. These data indicate that IN was protective against ATP loss during IS and improved functional recovery on RE.

  17. Protease La from Escherichia coli Hydrolyzes ATP and Proteins in a Linked Fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, Lloyd; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1982-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli results from an ATP requirement for the function of protease La, the product of the lon gene. This novel serine protease contains an ATPase activity that is essential for proteolysis. ATP and protein hydrolysis show the same Km for ATP (30-40 μ M) and are affected similarly by various inhibitors, activators, and ATP analogs. Vanadate inhibited ATP cleavage and caused a proportionate reduction in casein hydrolysis, and inhibitors of serine proteases reduced ATP cleavage. Thus, ATP and protein hydrolysis appear to be linked stoichiometrically. Furthermore, ATP hydrolysis is stimulated two- to threefold by polypeptides that are substrates for the protease (casein, glucagon) but not by nonhydrolyzed polypeptides (insulin, RNase). Unlike hemoglobin or native albumin, globin and denatured albumin stimulated ATP hydrolysis and were substrates for proteolysis. It is suggested that the stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by potential substrates triggers activation of the proteolytic function.

  18. A Multisite-Binding Switchable Fluorescent Probe for Monitoring Mitochondrial ATP Level Fluctuation in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yuan, Lin; Zeng, Xian; Peng, Juanjuan; Ni, Yong; Er, Jun Cheng; Xu, Wang; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Su, Dongdong; Kim, Beomsue; Chang, Young-Tae

    2016-01-26

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), commonly produced in mitochondria, is required by almost all the living organisms; thus fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial ATP levels fluctuation are essential and highly desired. Herein, we report a multisite-binding switchable fluorescent probe, ATP-Red 1, which selectively and rapidly responds to intracellular concentrations of ATP. Live-cell imaging indicated that ATP-Red 1 mainly localized to mitochondria with good biocompatibility and membrane penetration. In particular, with the help of ATP-Red 1, we successfully observed not only the decreased mitochondrial ATP levels in the presence of KCN and starvation state, but also the increased mitochondrial ATP levels in the early stage of cell apoptosis. These results indicate that ATP-Red 1 is a useful tool for investigating ATP-relevant biological processes.

  19. A1Ao-ATP synthase of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium couples sodium ions for ATP synthesis under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Ferguson, Scott A; Dey, Debjit; Schröder, Katja; Aung, Htin Lin; Carbone, Vincenzo; Attwood, Graeme T; Ronimus, Ron S; Meier, Thomas; Janssen, Peter H; Cook, Gregory M

    2011-11-18

    An unresolved question in the bioenergetics of methanogenic archaea is how the generation of proton-motive and sodium-motive forces during methane production is used to synthesize ATP by the membrane-bound A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase, with both proton- and sodium-coupled enzymes being reported in methanogens. To address this question, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase (MbbrA(1)A(o)) of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, a predominant methanogen in the rumen. Growth of M. ruminantium M1 was inhibited by protonophores and sodium ionophores, demonstrating that both ion gradients were essential for growth. To study the role of these ions in ATP synthesis, the ahaHIKECFABD operon encoding the MbbrA(1)A(o) was expressed in Escherichia coli strain DK8 (Δatp) and purified yielding a 9-subunit protein with an SDS-stable c oligomer. Analysis of the c subunit amino acid sequence revealed that it consisted of four transmembrane helices, and each hairpin displayed a complete Na(+)-binding signature made up of identical amino acid residues. The purified MbbrA(1)A(o) was stimulated by sodium ions, and Na(+) provided pH-dependent protection against inhibition by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide but not tributyltin chloride. ATP synthesis in inverted membrane vesicles lacking sodium ions was driven by a membrane potential that was sensitive to cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not to monensin. ATP synthesis could not be driven by a chemical gradient of sodium ions unless a membrane potential was imposed. ATP synthesis under these conditions was sensitive to monensin but not cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. These data suggest that the M. ruminantium M1 A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase exhibits all the properties of a sodium-coupled enzyme, but it is also able to use protons to drive ATP synthesis under conditions that favor proton coupling, such as low pH and low levels of sodium ions.

  20. Fumaric acid esters prevent the NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated and ATP-triggered pyroptosis of differentiated THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Miglio, Gianluca; Veglia, Eleonora; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) exert therapeutic effects in patients with psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, however their mode of action remains elusive. Pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory form of programmed cell death, mediated by the activation of inflammasomes. To understand the pharmacological basis of the therapeutic effects of FAEs, the anti-pyroptotic activity of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) and its hydrolysis metabolite monomethyl fumarate (MMF) was studied in a model of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated pyroptosis of human macrophages. Phorbol myristate acetate-differentiated THP-1 cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (5 μg/ml; 4h), then pulsed with ATP (5mM; 1h). MMF, DMF, or parthenolide (positive control) were added 1h before the ATP pulse. The pyroptotic cell death was evaluated by morphological examination and quantified by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The ATP-triggered death of THP-1 cells (60.4 ± 4.0%) was significantly (P<0.01) prevented by DMF, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (pIC50 and maximal effect were 6.6 and 67.6 ± 1.2%, respectively). MMF was less efficacious than DMF. These effects were accompanied by a decreased intracellular activation of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β release from ATP-treated cells, thus suggesting that FAEs antagonise the effects of ATP by preventing the activation of the pyroptotic molecular cascade leading to cell death. These results indicate that FAEs are endowed with anti-pyroptotic activity, which may contribute to their therapeutic effects. PMID:26096886

  1. ATP Mediates Neuroprotective and Neuroproliferative Effects in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium following Exposure to Satratoxin G In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Sangsiri, Sutheera; Belock, Bethany; Iqbal, Tania R.; Pestka, James J.; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal aspiration of satratoxin G (SG), a mycotoxin produced by the black mold Stachybotrys chartarum, selectively induces apoptosis in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis 24 h post-SG exposure in vitro as measured by increased activated caspases in the OP6 olfactory placodal cell line and increased propidium iodide staining in primary OE cell cultures. Intranasal aspiration of SG increased TUNEL (Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling) staining in the neuronal layer of the OE and significantly increased the latency to find a buried food pellet, confirming that SG selectively induces neuronal apoptosis and demonstrating that SG impairs the sense of smell. Next, we investigated whether ATP can prevent SG-induced OE toxicity. ATP did not decrease apoptosis under physiological conditions but significantly reduced SG-induced OSN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, purinergic receptor inhibition significantly increased apoptosis in OE primary cell culture and in vivo. These data indicate that ATP is neuroprotective against SG-induced OE toxicity. The number of cells that incorporated 5′-bromodeoxyuridine, a measure of proliferation, was significantly increased 3 and 6 days post-SG aspiration. Treatment with purinergic receptor antagonists significantly reduced SG-induced cell proliferation, whereas post-treatment with ATP significantly potentiated SG-induced cell proliferation. These data indicate that ATP is released and promotes cell proliferation via activation of purinergic receptors in SG-induced OE injury. Thus, the purinergic system is a therapeutic target to alleviate or restore the loss of OSNs. PMID:21865290

  2. ATP mediates neuroprotective and neuroproliferative effects in mouse olfactory epithelium following exposure to satratoxin G in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cuihong; Sangsiri, Sutheera; Belock, Bethany; Iqbal, Tania R; Pestka, James J; Hegg, Colleen C

    2011-11-01

    Intranasal aspiration of satratoxin G (SG), a mycotoxin produced by the black mold Stachybotrys chartarum, selectively induces apoptosis in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis 24 h post-SG exposure in vitro as measured by increased activated caspases in the OP6 olfactory placodal cell line and increased propidium iodide staining in primary OE cell cultures. Intranasal aspiration of SG increased TUNEL (Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling) staining in the neuronal layer of the OE and significantly increased the latency to find a buried food pellet, confirming that SG selectively induces neuronal apoptosis and demonstrating that SG impairs the sense of smell. Next, we investigated whether ATP can prevent SG-induced OE toxicity. ATP did not decrease apoptosis under physiological conditions but significantly reduced SG-induced OSN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, purinergic receptor inhibition significantly increased apoptosis in OE primary cell culture and in vivo. These data indicate that ATP is neuroprotective against SG-induced OE toxicity. The number of cells that incorporated 5'-bromodeoxyuridine, a measure of proliferation, was significantly increased 3 and 6 days post-SG aspiration. Treatment with purinergic receptor antagonists significantly reduced SG-induced cell proliferation, whereas post-treatment with ATP significantly potentiated SG-induced cell proliferation. These data indicate that ATP is released and promotes cell proliferation via activation of purinergic receptors in SG-induced OE injury. Thus, the purinergic system is a therapeutic target to alleviate or restore the loss of OSNs.

  3. P2X7 Receptors Trigger ATP Exocytosis and Modify Secretory Vesicle Dynamics in Neuroblastoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Bustillo, Diego; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Sánchez-Nogueiro, Jesús; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina; Binz, Thomas; Gutiérrez, Luis Miguel; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Artalejo, Antonio R.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that purinergic ionotropic P2X7 receptors negatively regulate neurite formation in Neuro-2a (N2a) mouse neuroblastoma cells through a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-related mechanism. In the present study we used this cell line to investigate a parallel though faster P2X7 receptor-mediated signaling pathway, namely Ca2+-regulated exocytosis. Selective activation of P2X7 receptors evoked exocytosis as assayed by high resolution membrane capacitance measurements. Using dual-wavelength total internal reflection microscopy, we have observed both the increase in near-membrane Ca2+ concentration and the exocytosis of fluorescently labeled vesicles in response to P2X7 receptor stimulation. Moreover, activation of P2X7 receptors also affects vesicle motion in the vertical and horizontal directions, thus, involving this receptor type in the control of early steps (docking and priming) of the secretory pathway. Immunocytochemical and RT-PCR experiments evidenced that N2a cells express the three neuronal SNAREs as well as vesicular nucleotide and monoamine (VMAT-1 and VMAT-2) transporters. Biochemical measurements indicated that ionomycin induced a significant release of ATP from N2a cells. Finally, P2X7 receptor stimulation and ionomycin increased the incidence of small transient inward currents, reminiscent of postsynaptic quantal events observed at synapses. Small transient inward currents were dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and were abolished by Brilliant Blue G, suggesting they were mediated by P2X7 receptors. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of a positive feedback mechanism mediated by P2X7 receptor-stimulated exocytotic release of ATP that would act on P2X7 receptors on the same or neighbor cells to further stimulate its own release and negatively control N2a cell differentiation. PMID:21292765

  4. Cardiac Metabolism in Heart Failure - Implications beyond ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Doenst, Torsten; Nguyen, T. Dung; Abel, E. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The heart has a high rate of ATP production and turnover which is required to maintain its continuous mechanical work. Perturbations in ATP generating processes may therefore affect contractile function directly. Characterizing cardiac metabolism in heart failure revealed several metabolic alterations termed metabolic remodeling, ranging from changes in substrate utilization to mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in ATP deficiency and impaired contractility. However, ATP depletion is not the only relevant consequence of metabolic remodeling during heart failure. By providing cellular building blocks and signaling molecules, metabolic pathways control essential processes such as cell growth and regeneration. Thus, alterations in cardiac metabolism may also affect the progression to heart failure by mechanisms beyond ATP supply. Our aim is therefore to highlight that metabolic remodeling in heart failure not only results in impaired cardiac energetics, but also induces other processes implicated in the development of heart failure such as structural remodeling and oxidative stress. Accordingly, modulating cardiac metabolism in heart failure may have significant therapeutic relevance that goes beyond the energetic aspect. PMID:23989714

  5. ATP synthases: cellular nanomotors characterized by LILBID mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Jan; Sokolova, Lucie; Preiss, Laura; Hicks, David B.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Morgner, Nina; Wittig, Ilka; Schägger, Hermann; Meier, Thomas; Brutschy, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes is still a methodological challenge due to hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the species and the fact that all subunits are bound non-covalently together. The present study with the novel laser induced liquid bead ion desorption mass spectrometry (LILBID-MS) reports on the determination of the subunit composition of the F1Fo-ATP synthase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, that of both bovine heart and, for the first time, of human heart mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthases. Under selected buffer conditions the mass of the intact F1Fo-ATP synthase of B. pseudofirmus OF4 could be measured, allowing the analysis of complex subunit stoichiometry. The agreement with theoretical masses derived from sequence databases is very good. A comparison of the ATP synthase subunit composition of 5 different ATPases reveals differences in the complexity of eukaryotic and bacterial ATP synthases. However, whereas the overall construction of eukaryotic enzymes is more complex than the bacterial ones, functionally important subunits are conserved among all ATPases. PMID:20820587

  6. Rotation and structure of FoF1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Daichi; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase is one of the most ubiquitous enzymes; it is found widely in the biological world, including the plasma membrane of bacteria, inner membrane of mitochondria and thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. However, this enzyme has a unique mechanism of action: it is composed of two mechanical rotary motors, each driven by ATP hydrolysis or proton flux down the membrane potential of protons. The two molecular motors interconvert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis and proton electrochemical potential via the mechanical rotation of the rotary shaft. This unique energy transmission mechanism is not found in other biological systems. Although there are other similar man-made systems like hydroelectric generators, F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase operates on the nanometre scale and works with extremely high efficiency. Therefore, this enzyme has attracted significant attention in a wide variety of fields from bioenergetics and biophysics to chemistry, physics and nanoscience. This review summarizes the latest findings about the two motors of F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase as well as a brief historical background.

  7. ATP synthase: from single molecule to human bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    KAGAWA, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    ATP synthase (FoF1) consists of an ATP-driven motor (F1) and a H+-driven motor (Fo), which rotate in opposite directions. FoF1 reconstituted into a lipid membrane is capable of ATP synthesis driven by H+ flux. As the basic structures of F1 (α3β3γδε) and Fo (ab2c10) are ubiquitous, stable thermophilic FoF1 (TFoF1) has been used to elucidate molecular mechanisms, while human F1Fo (HF1Fo) has been used to study biomedical significance. Among F1s, only thermophilic F1 (TF1) can be analyzed simultaneously by reconstitution, crystallography, mutagenesis and nanotechnology for torque-driven ATP synthesis using elastic coupling mechanisms. In contrast to the single operon of TFoF1, HFoF1 is encoded by both nuclear DNA with introns and mitochondrial DNA. The regulatory mechanism, tissue specificity and physiopathology of HFoF1 were elucidated by proteomics, RNA interference, cytoplasts and transgenic mice. The ATP synthesized daily by HFoF1 is in the order of tens of kilograms, and is primarily controlled by the brain in response to fluctuations in activity. PMID:20689227

  8. Differential modulation by extracellular ATP of carotid chemosensory responses.

    PubMed

    Spergel, D; Lahiri, S

    1993-06-01

    The possibility that the carotid body has ATP surface receptors that mediate O2 chemoreception was tested. To distinguish between the event(s) initiating chemoreception and those at the neurotransmitter level, we also tested the chemosensory response to nicotine before and after ATP administration. Carotid bodies from cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium were perfused and superfused in vitro with modified Tyrode solution (PCO2 < 1 Torr, pH 7.4, 36 degrees C) equilibrated at PO2 > 400 or approximately 150 Torr while chemosensory discharge was recorded extracellularly. ATP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate stimulated discharge with similar dose dependence, whereas adenosine had little effect. ATP infusion for > or = 2 min evoked an initial stimulation of discharge followed by a decline to baseline (desensitization). Desensitization did not affect the response to hypoxia (perfusate flow interruption) but inhibited the response to nicotine (4-nmol pulse). Therefore, 1) the carotid body has surface ATP receptors that may mediate the chemosensory response to nicotine but not to hypoxia and 2) nicotinic receptors are not required for carotid body O2 chemoreception. PMID:8366007

  9. A common fold for peptide synthetases cleaving ATP to ADP: glutathione synthetase and D-alanine:d-alanine ligase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, C; Moews, P C; Shi, Y; Walsh, C T; Knox, J R

    1995-01-01

    Examination of x-ray crystallographic structures shows the tertiary structure of D-alanine:D-alanine ligase (EC 6.3.2.4). a bacterial cell wall synthesizing enzyme, is similar to that of glutathione synthetase (EC 6.32.3) despite low sequence homology. Both Escherichia coli enzymes, which convert ATP to ADP during ligation to produce peptide products, are made of three domains, each folded around a 4-to 6-stranded beta-sheet core. Sandwiched between the beta-sheets of the C-terminal and central domains of each enzyme is a nonclassical ATP-binding site that contains a common set of spatially equivalent amino acids. In each enzyme, two loops are proposed to exhibit a required flexibility that allows entry of ATP and substrates, provides protection of the acylphosphate intermediate and tetrahedral adduct from hydrolysis during catalysis, and then permits release of products. PMID:7862655

  10. ATP13A2 (PARK9) polymorphisms influence the neurotoxic effects of manganese

    PubMed Central

    Rentschler, Gerda; Covolo, Loredana; Haddad, Amelia Ahmadi; Lucchini, Roberto G; Zoni, Silvia; Broberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A higher prevalence of individuals affected by Parkinsonism was found in Valcamonica, Italy. This may be related to ferro-alloy smelters in the area, releasing manganese (Mn) in the air, soil and water for about a century. There exists individual susceptibility for Mn neurotoxicity. Aim To analyse how polymorphism in genes regulating Mn metabolism and toxicity can modify neurophysiological effects of Mn exposure. Materials and Methods Elderly (N=255) and adolescents (N=311) from Northern Italy were examined for neuromotor and olfactory functions. Exposure to Mn was assessed in blood and urine by atomic absorption spectroscopy and in soil by a portable instrument based on X-Ray fluorescence technology. Polymorphisms in the Parkinson-related gene ATPase type 13A2 (ATP13A2, also called PARK9: rs3738815, rs2076602, rs4920608, rs2871776, rs2076600), and in the secretory pathway Ca2+/ Mn2+ ATPase isoform 1 gene (SPCA1: rs218498, rs3773814, rs2669858) were analysed by TaqMan probes. Results For both adolescents and elderly, negative correlations between Mn in soil and motor coordination (Rs=−0.20, p<0.001, Rs=−0.13, p=0.05 respectively) were demonstrated. Also among adolescents, negative correlations were seen between Mn in soil with odor identification (Rs=−0.17, p<0.01). No associations were seen for Mn in blood or urine. ATP13A2 polymorphisms rs4920608 and rs2871776 significantly modified the effects of Mn exposure on impaired motor coordination in elderly (p for interaction= 0.029, p= 0.041 respectively), also after adjustments for age and gender. The rs2871776 altered a binding site for transcription factor Insulinoma-associated 1. Conclusions ATP13A2 variation may be a risk marker for neurotoxic effects of Mn in humans. PMID:22285144

  11. Role of divalent metal cations in ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase: Magnesium provides a bridge for ATP to fuel unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Frick, David N.; Banik, Sukalyani; Rypma, Ryan S.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of magnesium ions in coupling ATP hydrolysis to the nucleic acid unwinding catalyzed by the NS3 protein encoded by the hepatitis C virus. Analyses of steady-state ATP hydrolysis rates at various RNA and magnesium concentrations were used to determine values for the 15 dissociation constants describing the formation of a productive enzyme-metal-ATP-RNA complex and the 4 rate constants describing hydrolysis of ATP by the possible enzyme-ATP complexes. These values coupled with direct binding studies, specificity studies and analyses of site-directed mutants reveal only one ATP binding site on HCV helicase centered on the catalytic base Glu291. An adjacent residue, Asp290, binds a magnesium ion that forms a bridge to ATP, reorienting the nucleotide in the active site. RNA stimulates hydrolysis while decreasing the affinity of the enzyme for ATP, magnesium, and MgATP. The binding scheme described here explains the unusual regulation of the enzyme by ATP that has been reported previously. Binding of either free magnesium or free ATP to HCV helicase competes with MgATP, the true fuel for helicase movements, and leads to slower hydrolysis and nucleic acid unwinding. PMID:17084859

  12. ATP as a mediator of erythrocyte-dependent regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery in humans

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    In healthy human beings, blood flow to dynamically contracting skeletal muscle is regulated primarily to match oxygen (O2) delivery closely with utilisation. This occurs across a wide range of exercise intensities, as well as when exercise is combined with conditions that modify blood O2 content. The red blood cells (RBCs), the primary O2 carriers in the blood, contribute to the regulation of the local processes matching O2 supply and demand. This is made possible by the ability of RBCs to release the vasoactive substance adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in response to reductions in erythrocyte and plasma O2, as well as to other adjuvant metabolic and mechanical stimuli. The regulatory role of RBCs in human beings is supported by the observations that, i) exercising skeletal muscle blood flow responds primarily to changes in the amount of O2 bound to the erythrocyte haemoglobin molecules, rather than the amount of O2 in plasma, and ii) exercising muscle blood flow can almost double (from 260 to 460 ml min−1 100 g−1) with alterations in blood O2 content, such that O2 delivery and are kept constant. Besides falling blood O2 content, RBCs release ATP when exposed to increased temperature, reduced pH, hypercapnia, elevated shear stress and augmented mechanical deformation, i.e. conditions that exist in the microcirculation of active skeletal muscle. ATP is an attractive mediator signal for skeletal muscle blood flow regulation, not only because it can act as a potent vasodilator, but also because of its sympatholytic properties in the human limb circulations. These properties are essential to counteract the vasoconstrictor effects of concurrent increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and circulating vasoconstrictor substances during exercise. Comparison of the relative vasoactive potencies and sympatholytic properties of ATP, other nucleotides, and adenosine in human limbs, suggests that intravascular ATP exerts its vasodilator and sympatholytic effects directly

  13. Mechanism of the αβ conformational change in F1-ATPase after ATP hydrolysis: free-energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuko; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    One of the motive forces for F1-ATPase rotation is the conformational change of the catalytically active β subunit due to closing and opening motions caused by ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. The closing motion is accomplished in two steps: the hydrogen-bond network around ATP changes and then the entire structure changes via B-helix sliding, as shown in our previous study. Here, we investigated the opening motion induced by ATP hydrolysis using all-atom free-energy simulations, combining the nudged elastic band method and umbrella sampling molecular-dynamics simulations. Because hydrolysis requires residues in the α subunit, the simulations were performed with the αβ dimer. The results indicate that the large-scale opening motion is also achieved by the B-helix sliding (in the reverse direction). However, the sliding mechanism is different from that of ATP binding because sliding is triggered by separation of the hydrolysis products ADP and Pi. We also addressed several important issues: 1), the timing of the product Pi release; 2), the unresolved half-closed β structure; and 3), the ADP release mechanism. These issues are fundamental for motor function; thus, the rotational mechanism of the entire F1-ATPase is also elucidated through this αβ study. During the conformational change, conserved residues among the ATPase proteins play important roles, suggesting that the obtained mechanism may be shared with other ATPase proteins. When combined with our previous studies, these results provide a comprehensive view of the β-subunit conformational change that drives the ATPase.

  14. Mechanism of the αβ Conformational Change in F1-ATPase after ATP Hydrolysis: Free-Energy Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuko; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    One of the motive forces for F1-ATPase rotation is the conformational change of the catalytically active β subunit due to closing and opening motions caused by ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. The closing motion is accomplished in two steps: the hydrogen-bond network around ATP changes and then the entire structure changes via B-helix sliding, as shown in our previous study. Here, we investigated the opening motion induced by ATP hydrolysis using all-atom free-energy simulations, combining the nudged elastic band method and umbrella sampling molecular-dynamics simulations. Because hydrolysis requires residues in the α subunit, the simulations were performed with the αβ dimer. The results indicate that the large-scale opening motion is also achieved by the B-helix sliding (in the reverse direction). However, the sliding mechanism is different from that of ATP binding because sliding is triggered by separation of the hydrolysis products ADP and Pi. We also addressed several important issues: 1), the timing of the product Pi release; 2), the unresolved half-closed β structure; and 3), the ADP release mechanism. These issues are fundamental for motor function; thus, the rotational mechanism of the entire F1-ATPase is also elucidated through this αβ study. During the conformational change, conserved residues among the ATPase proteins play important roles, suggesting that the obtained mechanism may be shared with other ATPase proteins. When combined with our previous studies, these results provide a comprehensive view of the β-subunit conformational change that drives the ATPase. PMID:25564855

  15. Phosphate release coupled to rotary motion of F1-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Kei-ichi; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    F1-ATPase, the catalytic domain of ATP synthase, synthesizes most of the ATP in living organisms. Running in reverse powered by ATP hydrolysis, this hexameric ring-shaped molecular motor formed by three αβ-dimers creates torque on its central γ-subunit. This reverse operation enables detailed explorations of the mechanochemical coupling mechanisms in experiment and simulation. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to construct a first atomistic conformation of the intermediate state following the 40° substep of rotary motion, and to study the timing and molecular mechanism of inorganic phosphate (Pi) release coupled to the rotation. In response to torque-driven rotation of the γ-subunit in the hydrolysis direction, the nucleotide-free αβE interface forming the “empty” E site loosens and singly charged Pi readily escapes to the P loop. By contrast, the interface stays closed with doubly charged Pi. The γ-rotation tightens the ATP-bound αβTP interface, as required for hydrolysis. The calculated rate for the outward release of doubly charged Pi from the αβE interface 120° after ATP hydrolysis closely matches the ∼1-ms functional timescale. Conversely, Pi release from the ADP-bound αβDP interface postulated in earlier models would occur through a kinetically infeasible inward-directed pathway. Our simulations help reconcile conflicting interpretations of single-molecule experiments and crystallographic studies by clarifying the timing of Pi exit, its pathway and kinetics, associated changes in Pi protonation, and changes of the F1-ATPase structure in the 40° substep. Important elements of the molecular mechanism of Pi release emerging from our simulations appear to be conserved in myosin despite the different functional motions. PMID:24062450

  16. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC.

  17. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  18. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  19. Infusion of ATP increases leg oxygen delivery but not oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Christensen, Peter M; Mortensen, Stefan P; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined whether an increase in leg blood flow and oxygen delivery at the onset of intense exercise would speed the rate of rise in leg oxygen uptake. Nine healthy men (25 ± 1 years old, mean ± SEM) performed one-leg knee-extensor exercise (62 ± 3 W, 86 ± 3% of incremental test peak power) for 4 min during a control setting (CON) and with infusion of ATP into the femoral artery in order to increase blood flow before and during exercise. In the presence of ATP, femoral arterial blood flow and O2 delivery were higher (P < 0.001) at the onset of exercise and throughout exercise (femoral arterial blood flow after 10 s, 5.1 ± 0.5 versus 2.7 ± 0.3 l min(-1); after 45 s, 6.0 ± 0.5 versus 4.1 ± 0.4 l min(-1); after 90 s, 6.6 ± 0.6 versus 4.5 ± 0.4 l min(-1); and after 240 s, 7.0 ± 0.6 versus 5.1 ± 0.3 l min(-1) in ATP and CON conditions, respectively). Leg oxygen uptake was not different in ATP and CON conditions during the first 20 s of exercise but was lower (P < 0.05) in the ATP compared with CON conditions after 30 s and until the end of exercise (30 s, 436 ± 42 versus 549 ± 45 ml min(-1); and 240 s, 705 ± 31 versus 814 ± 59 ml min(-1) in ATP and CON, respectively). Lactate release was lower after 60, 120 and 180 s of exercise with ATP infusion. These results suggest that O2 delivery is not limiting the rise in skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise. PMID:25085840

  20. Pyrophosphate-Dependent ATP Formation from Acetyl Coenzyme A in Syntrophus aciditrophicus , a New Twist on ATP Formation

    DOE PAGES

    James, Kimberly L.; Ríos-Hernández, Luis A.; Wofford, Neil Q.; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Nguyen, Hong H.; Yang, Yanan; Xie, Yongming; Erde, Jonathan; et al

    2016-08-16

    Syntrophus aciditrophicusis a model syntrophic bacterium that degrades key intermediates in anaerobic decomposition, such as benzoate, cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, and certain fatty acids, to acetate when grown with hydrogen-/formate-consuming microorganisms. ATP formation coupled to acetate production is the main source for energy conservation byS. aciditrophicus. However, the absence of homologs for phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase in the genome ofS. aciditrophicusleaves it unclear as to how ATP is formed, as most fermentative bacteria rely on these two enzymes to synthesize ATP from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and phosphate. Here, we combine transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and enzymatic approaches to show thatS. aciditrophicususes AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs1)more » for ATP synthesis from acetyl-CoA.acs1mRNA and Acs1 were abundant in transcriptomes and proteomes, respectively, ofS. aciditrophicusgrown in pure culture and coculture. Cell extracts ofS. aciditrophicushad low or undetectable acetate kinase and phosphate acetyltransferase activities but had high acetyl-CoA synthetase activity under all growth conditions tested. Both Acs1 purified fromS. aciditrophicusand recombinantly produced Acs1 catalyzed ATP and acetate formation from acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate. High pyrophosphate levels and a high AMP-to-ATP ratio (5.9 ± 1.4) inS. aciditrophicuscells support the operation of Acs1 in the acetate-forming direction. Thus,S. aciditrophicushas a unique approach to conserve energy involving pyrophosphate, AMP, acetyl-CoA, and an AMP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase. We find bacteria use two enzymes, phosphate acetyltransferase and acetate kinase, to make ATP from acetyl-CoA, while acetate-forming archaea use a single enzyme, an ADP-forming, acetyl-CoA synthetase, to synthesize ATP and acetate from acetyl-CoA.Syntrophus aciditrophicusapparently relies on a different approach to conserve energy during acetyl-CoA metabolism, as

  1. A Protonmotive Force Drives ATP Synthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Peter C.; Kashket, E. R.; Wilson, T. Hastings

    1974-01-01

    When cells of Streptococcus lactis or Escherichia coli were suspended in a potassium-free medium, a membrane potential (negative inside) could be artificially generated by the addition of the potassium ionophore, valinomycin. In response to this inward directed protonmotive force, ATP synthesis catalyzed by the membrane-bound ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) was observed. The formation of ATP was not found in S. lactis that had been treated with the ATPase inhibitor, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, nor was it observed in a mutant of E. coli lacking the ATPase. Inhibition of ATP synthesis in S. lactis was also observed when the membrane potential was reduced by the presence of external potassium, or when cells were first incubated with the proton conductor, carbonylcyanidefluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. These results are in agreement with predictions made by the chemiosmotic hypothesis of Mitchell. PMID:4279406

  2. ATP level and caffeine efficiency on cytokinesis inhibition in plants.

    PubMed

    López-Sáez, J F; Mingo, R; González-Fernández, A

    1982-06-01

    Plant cytokinesis appears to be a topographically organized process of exocytosis. Golgi vesicles which contain cell wall precursors are translocated during telophase, by interzonal microtubules, to the equatorial region of the mitotic apparatus where they fuse with each other giving rise to the new cell wall. Caffeine inhibits cytokinesis by hindering Golgi vesicle coalescence. The present results demonstrate that treatments which increase the cellular ATP level (adenosine, cycloheximide and anisomycin) counteract caffein-induced cytokinesis inhibition in meristem cells of onion root tips (Allium cepa L.), while treatments which decrease ATP level potentiate this caffeine effect (dinitrophenol, fluoroacetate, low oxygen tensions, etc.). We postulate that caffeine, in competition with the cellular ATP level, blocks cell plate formation by inhibiting a certain ATPase activity required for membrane fusion of Golgi vesicles.

  3. Rotary catalysis of FoF1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rikiya

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of ATP, the key reaction of biological energy metabolism, is accomplished by the rotary motor protein; FoF1-ATP synthase (FoF1). In vivo, FoF1, located on the cell membrane, carries out ATP synthesis by using the proton motive force. This heterologous energy conversion is supposed to be mediated by the mechanical rotation of FoF1; however, it still remained unclear. Recently, we developed the novel experimental setup to reproduce the proton motive force in vitro and succeeded in directly observing the proton-driven rotation of FoF1. In this review, we describe the interesting working principles determined so far for FoF1 and then introduce results from our recent study.

  4. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional alpha-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for alpha(1)- or alpha(2)-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (alpha(2)-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct alpha(1)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (DeltaFVC = -11 +/- 3% versus -39 +/- 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-3 +/- 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to alpha(2)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (-13 +/- 4% versus -40 +/- 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-4 +/- 4%). In Prototol 2 (n = 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce alpha(1)-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (-38 +/- 3%) and ATP (-33 +/- 2%) were not significantly different from rest (-40 +/- 3%; P> 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (-22 +/- 6%) and high dose ATP (-8 +/- 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became

  5. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional α-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for α1- or α2-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (α1-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (α2-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct α1-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (ΔFVC =−11 ± 3%versus−39 ± 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−3 ± 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to α2-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (−13 ± 4%versus−40 ± 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−4 ± 4%). In Prototol 2 (n= 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce α1-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (−38 ± 3%) and ATP (−33 ± 2%) were not significantly different from rest (−40 ± 3%; P < 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (−22 ± 6%) and high dose ATP (−8 ± 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became progressively greater (moderate =−48

  6. The alpha-subunit of Leishmania F1 ATP synthase hydrolyzes ATP in presence of tRNA.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Srikanta; Adhya, Samit

    2006-07-14

    Import of tRNAs into the mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania requires the tRNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP leading to the generation of membrane potential through the pumping of protons. Subunit RIC1 of the inner membrane RNA import complex is a bi-functional protein that is identical to the alpha-subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase and specifically binds to a subset (Type I) of importable tRNAs. We show that recombinant, purified RIC1 is a Type I tRNA-dependent ATP hydrolase. The activity was insensitive to oligomycin, sensitive to mutations within the import signal of the tRNA, and required the cooperative interaction between the ATP-binding and C-terminal domains of RIC1. The ATPase activity of the intact complex was inhibited by anti-RIC1 antibody, while knockdown of RIC1 in Leishmania tropica resulted in deficiency of the tRNA-dependent ATPase activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, RIC1 knockdown extracts failed to generate a membrane potential across reconstituted proteoliposomes, as shown by a rhodamine 123 uptake assay, but activity was restored by adding back purified RIC1. These observations identify RIC1 as a novel form of the F1 ATP synthase alpha-subunit that acts as the major energy transducer for tRNA import. PMID:16735512

  7. Comparing the catalytic strategy of ATP hydrolysis in biomolecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    ATP-driven biomolecular motors utilize the chemical energy obtained from the ATP hydrolysis to perform vital tasks in living cells. Understanding the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis reaction has substantially progressed lately thanks to combined quantum/classical molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. Here, we present a comparative summary of the most recent QM/MM results for myosin, kinesin and F1-ATPase motors. These completely different motors achieve the acceleration of ATP hydrolysis through a very similar catalytic mechanism. ATP hydrolysis has high activation energy because it involves the breaking of two strong bonds, namely the Pγ-Oβγ bond of ATP and the H-O bond of lytic water. The key to the four-fold decrease in the activation barrier by the three enzymes is that the breaking of the Pγ-Oβγ bond precedes the deprotonation of the lytic water molecule, generating a metaphosphate hydrate complex. The resulting singly charged trigonal planar PγO3(-) metaphosphate is a better electrophilic target for attack by an OaH(-) hydroxyl group. The formation of this OaH(-) is promoted by a strong polarization of the lytic water: in all three proteins, this water is forming a hydrogen-bond with a backbone carbonyl group and interacts with the carboxylate group of glutamate (either directly or via an intercalated water molecule). This favors the shedding of one proton by the attacking water. The abstracted proton is transferred to the γ-phosphate via various proton wires, resulting in a H2PγO4(-)/ADP(3-) product state. This catalytic strategy is so effective that most other nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes adopt a similar approach, as suggested by their very similar triphosphate binding sites. PMID:27296627

  8. Pivotal role of ATP in macrophages fast tracking wound repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Girish J; Sarojini, Harshini; Chien, Sufan

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wounds occurring during aging or diabetes pose a significant burden to patients. The classical four-phase wound healing process has a 3-6 day lag before granulation starts to appear and it requires an intermediate step of activation of resident fibroblasts during the remodeling phase for production of collagen. This brief communication discusses published articles that demonstrate how the entire wound healing process can be fast tracked by intracellular ATP delivery, which triggers a novel pathway where alternatively activated macrophages play absolutely critical and central roles. This novel pathway involves an increase in proinflammatory cytokines (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6) and a chemokine (MCP-1) release. This is followed by activation of purinergic receptor (a family of plasma membrane receptors found in almost all mammalian cells), production of platelets and platelet microparticles, and activation of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes. The end result is a massive influx and in situ proliferation of macrophages, increases in vascular endothelial growth factors that promote neovascularization, and most prominently, the direct production of collagen. PMID:26053302

  9. Astrocytes increase ATP exocytosis mediated calcium signaling in response to microgroove structures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay V; Raymond, Michael; Pace, Fabiano; Certo, Anthony; Zuidema, Jonathan M; McKay, Christopher A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Lu, X Lucas; Wan, Leo Q

    2015-01-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form glial scars, which inhibit axonal regeneration, leading to long-term functional deficits. Engineered nanoscale scaffolds guide cell growth and enhance regeneration within models of spinal cord injury. However, the effects of micro-/nanosize scaffolds on astrocyte function are not well characterized. In this study, a high throughput (HTP) microscale platform was developed to study astrocyte cell behavior on micropatterned surfaces containing 1 μm spacing grooves with a depth of 250 or 500 nm. Significant changes in cell and nuclear elongation and alignment on patterned surfaces were observed, compared to on flat surfaces. The cytoskeleton components (particularly actin filaments and focal adhesions) and nucleus-centrosome axis were aligned along the grooved direction as well. More interestingly, astrocytes on micropatterned surfaces showed enhanced mitochondrial activity with lysosomes localized at the lamellipodia of the cells, accompanied by enhanced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and calcium activities. These data indicate that the lysosome-mediated ATP exocytosis and calcium signaling may play an important role in astrocytic responses to substrate topology. These new findings have furthered our understanding of the biomechanical regulation of astrocyte cell-substrate interactions, and may benefit the optimization of scaffold design for CNS healing. PMID:25597401

  10. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive.

    PubMed

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-12-01

    After being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22 degrees C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes.

  11. Students' reasoning about "high-energy bonds" and ATP: A vision of interdisciplinary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Gouvea, Julia; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-06-01

    As interdisciplinary courses are developed, instructors and researchers have to grapple with questions of how students should make connections across disciplines. We explore the issue of interdisciplinary reconciliation (IDR): how students reconcile seemingly contradictory ideas from different disciplines. While IDR has elements in common with other frameworks for the reconciliation of ideas across contexts, it differs in that each disciplinary idea is considered canonically correct within its own discipline. The setting for the research is an introductory physics course for biology majors that seeks to build greater interdisciplinary coherence and therefore includes biologically relevant topics such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and chemical bond energy. In our case-study data, students grapple with the apparent contradiction between the energy released when the phosphate bond in ATP is broken and the idea that an energy input is required to break a bond. We see students justifying context-dependent modeling choices, showing nuance in articulating how system choices may be related to disciplinary problems of interest. This represents a desired end point of IDR, in which students can build coherent connections between concepts from different disciplines while understanding each concept in its own disciplinary context. Our case study also illustrates elements of the instructional environment that play roles in the process of IDR.

  12. Leishmania donovani: intracellular ATP level regulates apoptosis-like death in luteolin induced dyskinetoplastid cells.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nilkantha; Das, Benu Brata; Ganguly, Agneyo; Banerjee, Bijoylaxhmi; Sen, Tanusree; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2006-11-01

    Leishmaniasis presents a spectrum of diseases ranging from benign cutaneous lesions to the often-fatal visceralizing form. Luteolin, a dietary flavone induces apoptosis-like death in both promastigote and amastigote forms of Leishmania, the causative agent of the diseases. Here, we have elucidated the mechanism of action of luteolin by analyzing the mitochondrial and cytosolic changes associated with apoptosis-like death of leishmanial cells. In Leishmania donovani, treatment with luteolin induces the loss of both maxicircles and minicircles which resulted in the formation of dyskinetoplastid cells. The loss of mitochondrial DNA causes reduction in the activities of complex I, II, III, and IV of electron transport chain. However, the mitochondrial ATPase activity of complex V remains almost unaltered during treatment with luteolin but the sensitivity to oligomycin is lost. The inactivation of ETC complex is associated with decrease in mitochondrial as well as glycolytic ATP production, which is responsible for depolarization of Deltapsi(m) and alteration in mitochondrial structure. This event is followed by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in mt-DNA depleted leishmanial cells and causes an activation of caspase like proteases. Collectively our results provide the first insight into the mechanistic pathway of apoptosis-like death where inhibition of glycolytic ATP production is an essential event responsible for depolarization of Deltapsi(m) in mt-DNA depleted cells to propagate apoptosis-like death in leishmanial cells. PMID:16707127

  13. Expanding role of ATP as a versatile messenger at carotid and aortic body chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Piskuric, Nikol A; Nurse, Colin A

    2013-01-15

    In mammals, peripheral arterial chemoreceptors monitor blood chemicals (e.g. O(2), CO(2), H(+), glucose) and maintain homeostasis via initiation of respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. Whereas chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies (CBs), located bilaterally at the carotid bifurcation, control primarily respiratory functions, those in the more diffusely distributed aortic bodies (ABs) are thought to regulate mainly cardiovascular functions. Functionally, CBs sense partial pressure of O(2) ( ), whereas ABs are considered sensors of O(2) content. How these organs, with essentially a similar complement of chemoreceptor cells, differentially process these two different types of signals remains enigmatic. Here, we review evidence that implicates ATP as a central mediator during information processing in the CB. Recent data allow an integrative view concerning its interactions at purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors within the chemosensory complex that contains elements of a 'quadripartite synapse'. We also discuss recent studies on the cellular physiology of ABs located near the aortic arch, as well as immunohistochemical evidence suggesting the presence of pathways for P2X receptor signalling. Finally, we present a hypothetical 'quadripartite model' to explain how ATP, released from red blood cells during hypoxia, could contribute to the ability of ABs to sense O(2) content.

  14. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-02-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus.

  15. The intranuclear mobility of messenger RNA binding proteins is ATP dependent and temperature sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Calapez, Alexandre; Pereira, Henrique M.; Calado, Angelo; Braga, José; Rino, José; Carvalho, Célia; Tavanez, João Paulo; Wahle, Elmar; Rosa, Agostinho C.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2002-01-01

    fAter being released from transcription sites, messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) must reach the nuclear pore complexes in order to be translocated to the cytoplasm. Whether the intranuclear movement of mRNPs results largely from Brownian motion or involves molecular motors remains unknown. Here we have used quantitative photobleaching techniques to monitor the intranuclear mobility of protein components of mRNPs tagged with GFP. The results show that the diffusion coefficients of the poly(A)-binding protein II (PABP2) and the export factor TAP are significantly reduced when these proteins are bound to mRNP complexes, as compared with nonbound proteins. The data further show that the mobility of wild-type PABP2 and TAP, but not of a point mutant variant of PABP2 that fails to bind to RNA, is significantly reduced when cells are ATP depleted or incubated at 22°C. Energy depletion has only minor effects on the intranuclear mobility of a 2,000-kD dextran (which corresponds approximately in size to 40S mRNP particles), suggesting that the reduced mobility of PABP2 and TAP is not caused by a general alteration of the nuclear environment. Taken together, the data suggest that the mobility of mRNPs in the living cell nucleus involves a combination of passive diffusion and ATP-dependent processes. PMID:12473688

  16. ATP Induces IL-1β Secretion in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-Infected Human Macrophages by a Mechanism Not Related to the NLRP3/ASC/Caspase-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    García, Killen; Escobar, Gisselle; Mendoza, Pablo; Beltran, Caroll; Perez, Claudio; Vernal, Rolando; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Ngo) has developed multiple immune evasion mechanisms involving the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent findings have reported that Ngo reduces the IL-1β secretion of infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Here, we investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in production and release of IL-1β in Ngo-infected MDM. We found that the exposure of Ngo-infected MDM to ATP increases IL-1β levels about ten times compared with unexposed Ngo-infected MDM (P < 0.01). However, we did not observe any changes in inflammasome transcriptional activation of speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (CARD) (ASC, P > 0.05) and caspase-1 (CASP1, P > 0.05). In addition, ATP was not able to modify caspase-1 activity in Ngo-infected MDM but was able to increase pyroptosis (P > 0.01). Notably ATP treatment defined an increase of positive staining for IL-1β with a distinctive intracellular pattern of distribution. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces IL-1β secretion by a mechanism not related to the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis and likely is acting at the level of vesicle trafficking or pore formation. PMID:27803513

  17. Simulation research on ATP system of airborne laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongyi; Huang, Hailong

    2015-02-01

    The compound axis tracking control circuits model of the ATP system was established and simulation was run on the tracking control performance of the ATP system. It was found through simulation that with the fixed coarse tracking error, the dynamic lag error in the coarse tracking servo system could be suppressed to 120μrad and with the fixed fine tracking error, the dynamic lag error in the fine tracking servo system could be restrained to 2.73μrad, and the vibration residual could be controlled within 1.5μrad.

  18. Respiratory ATP synthesis: the new generation of mycobacterial drug targets?

    PubMed

    Bald, Dirk; Koul, Anil

    2010-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, poses a global health challenge due to the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Recently, bacterial energy metabolism has come into focus as a promising new target pathway for the development of antimycobacterial drugs. This review summarizes our current knowledge on mycobacterial respiratory energy conversion, in particular, during the physiologically dormant state that is associated with latent or persistent tuberculosis infections. Targeting components of respiratory ATP production, such as type-2 NADH dehydrogenase or ATP synthase, is illustrated as an emerging strategy in the development of novel drugs.

  19. Identification of an erythroid ATP-dependent aminophospholipid transporter.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-05-01

    The asymmetric distribution of amino-containing phospholipids in plasma membranes is essential for the function and survival of mammalian cells. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is restricted to the inner leaflet of plasma membranes by an ATP-dependent transport process. Exposure of PS on the surface of cells serves as a binding site for haemostatic factors, triggers cell-cell interaction and recognition by macrophages and phospholipases. Exposure of PS on the red cell surface plays a significant role in sickle cell pathology. We report the identification of two different isoforms of the aminophospholipid translocase, Atp8a1, or flippase, in the murine red blood cell membrane.

  20. Kinetic analysis of PCNA clamp binding and release in the clamp loading reaction catalyzed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication factor C

    PubMed Central

    Marzahn, Melissa R.; Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Meyer, Jennifer A.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases require a sliding clamp to achieve processive DNA synthesis. The toroidal clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders, members of the AAA+ family of ATPases. These enzymes utilize the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to perform a variety of cellular functions. In this study, a clamp loader-clamp binding assay was developed to measure the rates of ATP-dependent clamp binding and ATP-hydrolysis-dependent clamp release for the S. cerevisiae clamp loader (RFC) and clamp (PCNA). Pre-steady-state kinetics of PCNA binding showed that although ATP binding to RFC increases affinity for PCNA, ATP binding rates and ATP-dependent conformational changes in RFC are fast relative to PCNA binding rates. Interestingly, RFC binds PCNA faster than the Escherichia coli γ complex clamp loader binds the β-clamp. In the process of loading clamps on DNA, RFC maintains contact with PCNA while PCNA closes, as the observed rate of PCNA closing is faster than the rate of PCNA release, precluding the possibility of an open clamp dissociating from DNA. Rates of clamp closing and